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Sample records for suppress stimulated brillouin

  1. Suppression of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Optical Fibers Using a Linearly Chirped Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    output,” Proc. SPIE 7914, 79140B, 79140B-8 (2011). 9. C. G. Carlson, R. B. Ross, J. M. Schafer, J. B. Spring, and B. G. Ward, “Full vectorial analysis...Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is a major factor limiting the output power of a fiber laser. In a lossless, passive fiber, SBS occurs when the product

  2. Stimulated Brillouin processes in crystals and glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, G.W.; Hickman, A.P.

    1992-02-01

    The basic physics and material properties needed to describe and predict the Brillouin gain for a variety of materials have been investigated. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has identified transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) as an important limiting mechanism in high power laser fusion systems. At sufficiently high laser intensities, SBS drives acoustic vibrations that can damage optical components. SRI has performed measurements and developed the corresponding theory for stimulated Brillouin gain spectroscopy in anisotropic crystals. Absolute Brillouin steady-state gain coefficients, linewidths, and frequency shifts have been determined at 532 nm for a number of optical materials of interest to LLNL. This knowledge can be used to select optical materials and devise suppression schemes that will allow much higher laser fluences to be used in laser fusion

  3. Stimulated Brillouin scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, D.C.; Berger, R.L.; Busch, G.; Kinzer, C.M.; Mayer, F.J.; Powers, L.V.; Tanner, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes two experiments in which SBS would be expected to play an important role. In the first experiment, we find a clear signature of the Brillouin backscatter of a short (100 psec) pulse from a long (approx. 50 μm) gradient length gas target plasma. The second experiment used much longer (approx. 1 nsec) pulses on spherical glass shell targets. These experiments were done with both narrow ( 30A) bandwidth laser light. Using one-dimensional, spherically symmetric fluid simulations, we have attempted to model many of the laser-plasma interaction processes which combine to determine the amount of absorbed energy in the long-pulse experiments. These simulations indicate that modest laser bandwidths are successful in reducing the level of SBS at the irradiances ( 15 W/cm 2 ) used in these experiments

  4. Transient effects on stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, G.W.; Dyer, M.J.; Hickman, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of theory and experiment for transient stimulated Brillouin scattering for a pump pulse with Gaussian temporal profile. A new approach for measuring Brillouin linewidths is demonstrated, and an unexplained asymmetry is observed

  5. Brillouin suppression in a fiber optical parametric amplifier by combining temperature distribution and phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Carsten Vandel

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an increased gain in optical parametric amplier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering by applying a temperature distribution along the fiber resulting in a reduction of the required phase modulation.......We demonstrate an increased gain in optical parametric amplier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering by applying a temperature distribution along the fiber resulting in a reduction of the required phase modulation....

  6. High-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering spectroscopy at 780 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Remer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a high-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS spectroscopy system that is able to acquire stimulated Brillouin gain point-spectra in water samples and Intralipid tissue phantoms over 2 GHz within 10 ms and 100 ms, respectively, showing a 10-100 fold increase in acquisition rates over current frequency-domain SBS spectrometers. This improvement was accomplished by integrating an ultra-narrowband hot rubidium-85 vapor notch filter in a simplified frequency-domain SBS spectrometer comprising nearly counter-propagating continuous-wave pump-probe light at 780 nm and conventional single-modulation lock-in detection. The optical notch filter significantly suppressed stray pump light, enabling detection of stimulated Brillouin gain spectra with substantially improved acquisition times at adequate signal-to-noise ratios (∼25 dB in water samples and ∼15 dB in tissue phantoms. These results represent an important step towards the use of SBS spectroscopy for high-speed measurements of Brillouin gain resonances in scattering and non-scattering samples.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) Suppression and Long Delivery Fibers at the Multikilowatt Level with Chirped Seed Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    the Multikilowatt Level with Chirped Seed Lasers by Jeffrey O White, Mark Harfouche, John Edgecumbe, Naresh Satyan, George Rakuljic, and Amnon...Suppression and Long Delivery Fibers at the Multikilowatt Level with Chirped Seed Lasers by Jeffrey O White Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Fibers at the Multikilowatt Level with Chirped Seed Lasers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  8. Stimulated Brillouin Cavity Optomechanics in Liquid Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; De Natale, P.; Yannai, M.; Carmon, T.; Gagliardi, G.

    2018-02-01

    Liquid droplets are ubiquitous in nature wherein surface tension shapes them into perfect spheres with atomic-scale smooth surfaces. Here, we use stable droplets that cohost equatorial acoustical and optical resonances phase matched to enable the exchange of energy and momentum between sound and light. Relying on free-space laser excitation of multiple whispering-gallery modes, we harness a triple-resonant forward Brillouin scattering to stimulate optomechanical surface waves. Nonlinear amplification of droplet vibrations in the 60-70 MHz range is realized with spectral narrowing beyond the limit of material loss, thereby activating the droplet as hypersound-laser emitter.

  9. Temporal evolution of stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    A qualitative understanding of the time dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) provides estimates of the amount of temporal growth that occurs in current inertial confinement fusion and short laser pulse interaction experiments when the growth is limited by the length of the experiment or by motion of the ''hot spots'' of the laser intensity pattern induced by beam smoothing. In the weak coupling limit, the instantaneous growth rate depends upon the plasma initial conditions early in time, is proportional to t -1/2 later in time, and asymptotically approaches the absolute growth rate (in the absence of damping). When the instability is strongly coupled, the growth rate depends upon the plasma initial conditions early in time but is proportional to t -1/3 later in time. When the growth rate drops to a value comparable to that of the ion acoustic frequency, the instability becomes effectively weakly coupled. The effects of damping are also discussed

  10. Electron Gyro-Harmonic Effects on Ionospheric Stimulated Brillouin Scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-21

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and resonant phenomena are well known in the context of laser fusion, fiber optics ... fiber optics , and piezoelectric semiconductor plasmas, as well as in various biological applications. Due to recent advances, active space experiments... fiber optics , and piezoelectric semiconductor plasmas, as well as in various biological applications. Due to recent advances, active space

  11. Suppression of Brillouin scattering in fibre-optical parametric amplifier by applying temperature control and phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Carsten Vandel

    2009-01-01

    An increased gain in a fibre-optical parametric amplifier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering is demonstrated by applying a temperature distribution along the fibre for a fixed phase modulation of the pump. The temperature distribution slightly impacts the gain spectrum....

  12. SBS [stimulated Brillouin scattering] pulse distortion in multimode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Hawkins, R.J.; Laumann, C.W.; Hatch, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed sever temporal-pulse-shape distortion due to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in multimode optical fibers used to diagnose 351 m laser pulses on the Nova laser system. Our measurements can be fit by a basic model of SBS and provide a clear indication of the intensity and temporal regimes where significant SBS-induced temporal-pulse-shape distortion can be avoided. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Stimulated Brillouin scattering materials, experimental design and applications: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenxu; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Zhaohong; Xu, Pengbai; Gao, Qilin; Williams, Robert J.; Kitzler, Ondrej; Mildren, Richard P.; Wang, Yulei; Lu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), as one type of third-order nonlinear optics effect, is extensively exploited and rapidly developed in the field of lasers and optoelectronics. A large number of theoretical and experimental studies on SBS have been carried out in the past decades. Especially, the exploration of new SBS materials and new types of SBS modulation methods have been engaged simultaneously, as the properties of different materials have great influence on the SBS performance such as generation threshold, Brillouin amplification efficiency, frequency shift, breakdown threshold, etc. This article provides a comprehensive review of the characteristics of different types of SBS materials, SBS applications, experimental design methods, as well as the parameter optimization method, which is expected to provide reference and guidance to SBS related experiments.

  14. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic Alfven waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.R.; Sharma, R.C.; Sharma, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic Alfven waves in a plasma is investigated by employing fluid model approach. The low frequency nonlinearity of ion acoustic wave arises through the ponderomotive force on ions and high frequency nonlinearity arises through the equation of continuity. For a typical isothermal plasma (Tsub(e)/Tsub(i)approx.=10), Alfven wave frequency ω 0 approx.=10 6 rad. sec -1 , the threshold for this instability in a uniform plasma is approx.= milliwatt cm -2 . Above the threshold, the growth rate for forward and back scatterings are approx.=10 -3 rad.sec -1 and approx.=10 -4 rad.sec. -1 , respectively. (author)

  15. Strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin amplification in pump-ionizing plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H.; Wu, Z. H.; Zuo, Y. L.; Zhou, K. N.; Wang, X. D.; Li, Q.; Zhu, H. Y.; Su, J. Q.

    2018-02-01

    Laser amplification based on strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering in plasma is investigated. The pump and seed are at the same wavelength of 800 nm and the same duration of 3.5 ps, but with a different intensity. The plasma is produced by the front part of the pump via tunnel ionization from hydrogen. The hydrogen is fully ionized to eliminate small-scale density fluctuations in the plasma, so the transmission level of the seed is enhanced to 22%, and a relative amplification factor of 6 is obtained.

  16. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in dispersion-decreasing fiber with ultrahigh-speed femtosecond soliton pulse compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Toshihiko; Ono, Shinpei; Hagiuda, Ken-ichi; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2005-02-15

    We report that stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a dispersion-decreasing fiber (DDF) is particularly disadvantageous with ultrahigh-speed femtosecond soliton compression that exceeds 40 GHz. It is important to note that the increase in the longitudinal mode power of a soliton is proportional to the square of the repetition rate. The SBS threshold is determined by the dispersion-decreasing rate of the DDF, rather than its fiber loss. We suppressed the SBS by applying 30-MHz frequency modulation to a mode-locked fiber laser and successfully obtained a stable 40-GHz, 100-fs pulse train.

  17. Stimulated brillouin scattering of electromagnetic waves in a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M.; Sen, A.

    1991-08-01

    The stimulated Brilluoin scattering of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous, unmagnetized and collisionless dusty plasma has been investigated theoretically. The Vlasov equation has been solved perturbatively to find the nonlinear response of the plasma particles. The presence of the dust particles introduces a background inhomogeneous electric field which significantly influences the dispersive properties of the plasma. At the ion acoustic branch we find the usual scattering slightly modified by the charged dust grains. However, at the frequency lower than the ion acoustic branch we find a new mode of the plasma arising from the oscillations of the ions in the static structure of the dust distribution. This low frequency branch causes enhanced stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic waves in a dusty plasma. (author). 15 refs

  18. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in long-scale-length laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirokikh, A.; Seka, W.; Simon, A.; Craxton, R.S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1998-01-01

    Brillouin scattering from a preformed, inhomogeneous, expanding plasma has been investigated. Backscattered light near the incident laser wavelength (λ=1054 nm) from CH planar targets has been spectrally and temporally resolved. By varying the time delay of the interaction beam, the scattering was studied for different plasma conditions. The backscattered light is predominantly blue-shifted and appears before the peak of the laser pulse. The experimental time-integrated reflectivity of backscattered light is in the range of 1%endash 10% and decreases with the plasma density. The time-resolved spectra and total reflectivity were calculated using a theory of convective stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a flowing inhomogeneous plasma combined with a statistical hot spot model for the interaction beam. The plasma parameters for these calculations were provided by simulations using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code. The calculated SBS spectra are similar to the experimental observations. The time-integrated reflectivities agree well with the experimental results for the higher peak density interactions, but are below the observations by orders of magnitude for the lowest peak density cases. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. Multi-wavelength Praseodymium fiber laser using stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Aidit, S. N.; Tiu, Z. C.

    2018-02-01

    A multi-wavelength Brillouin Praseodymium fiber laser (MWBPFL) operating at 1300 nm region is demonstrated based on the hybrid scheme by utilizing Brillouin gain medium and Praseodymium-doped fluoride fiber as linear gain medium. A 15 μm air gap is incorporated into the cavity to allow the switching of Brillouin frequency spacing from double to single spacing. Under the Brillouin pump of 8 dBm and the 1020 nm pump power of 567.2 mW, 36 Stokes lines with a wavelength spacing of 0.16 nm and 24 Stokes lines with a wavelength spacing of 0.08 nm are achieved. The wavelength tunability of 8 nm is realized for both MWBPFLs by shifting the Brillouin pump wavelength. The MWBPFLs exhibit an excellent stability in the number of generated Stokes and power level over one-hour period.

  20. Bandwidth-tunable narrowband rectangular optical filter based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Yi, Lilin; Jaouën, Yves; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-09-22

    We propose a rectangular optical filter based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fiber with bandwidth tuning from 50 MHz to 4 GHz at less than 15-MHz resolution. The rectangular shape of the filter is precisely achieved utilizing digital feedback control of the comb-like pump spectral lines. The passband ripple is suppressed to ~1 dB by mitigating the nonlinearity influences of the comb-like pump lines generated in electrical and optical components and fibers. Moreover a fiber with a single Brillouin peak is employed to further reduce the in-band ripple and the out-of-band SBS gain at the same time. Finally, we analyze the noise performance of the filter at different bandwidth cases and demonstrate the system performance of the proposed filter with 2.1-GHz bandwidth and 19-dB gain by amplifying a 2-GHz orthogonal frequency-division-multiplexing (OFDM) signal with quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) and 16-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (16-QAM) on each subscriber.

  1. 40-gHz, 100-fs stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-free pulse generation by combining a mode-locked laser diode and a dispersion-decreasing fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiuda, Ken-ichi; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka; Arahira, Shin; Ogawa, Yoh

    2005-03-15

    A 40-GHz, 100-fs pulse train was successfully generated by soliton compression of a mode-locked laser diode (MLLD) pulse with a dispersion-decreasing fiber. The MLLD had a longitudinal mode linewidth as broad as 60 MHz, which made it possible to suppress stimulated Brillouin scattering and achieve stable, ultrahigh-speed pulse compression without applying external frequency modulation.

  2. High-resolution stimulated Brillouin gain spectroscopy in glasses and crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, G.W.; Jusinski, L.E.; Hickman, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    Theory and measurements are presented for stimulated Brillouin gain spectroscopy in anisotropic media. The coupling between arbitrary pump and Stokes waves and the corresponding acoustic wave is formulated in terms of the elastic displacement vector and the photoelastic tensor. A propagation equation that fully includes transient effects is obtained for the Stokes wave. In the limit of small-signal gains this propagation equation can be solved analytically, yielding expressions that relate experimentally accessible quantities to material properties. Absolute Brillouin steady-state gain coefficients, linewidths, and frequency shifts are thereby determined in a number of optical materials at 532 nm. The Brillouin gain coefficient for fused silica is measured by three techniques, providing the reference for absolute gain measurements. Quantitative agreement is found between theory and experiment for transient effects on stimulated Brillouin scattering

  3. Stimulated Brillouin scattering during electron gyro-harmonic heating at EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations of secondary radiation, stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE, produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based, high-power, high-frequency (HF radio waves are considered. The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility is capable of generating narrowband SEE in the form of stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter (SIBS in the SEE spectrum. Such narrowband SEE spectral lines have not been reported using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT heater facility before. This work reports the first EISCAT results of narrowband SEE spectra and compares them to SEE previously observed at HAARP during electron gyro-harmonic heating. An analysis of experimental SEE data shows observations of emission lines within 100 Hz of the pump frequency, interpreted as SBS, during the 2012 July EISCAT campaign. Experimental results indicate that SBS strengthens as the pump frequency approaches the third electron gyro-harmonic. Also, for different heater antenna beam angles, the CUTLASS radar backscatter induced by HF radio pumping is suppressed near electron gyro-harmonics, whereas electron temperature enhancement weakens as measured by EISCAT/UHF radar. The main features of these new narrowband EISCAT observations are generally consistent with previous SBS measurements at HAARP.

  4. Effects of hydrodynamics on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in multiple plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahia, V.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Borisenko, N. G.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Orekhov, A.; Rienecker, T.; Rosmej, O.; Labaune, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment carried out on LULI2000 facility is presented. It was designed to investigate how two successive plasmas interact through hydrodynamic coupling and electromagnetic radiations. Contributions of both effects have been successfully identified and the effects of hydrodynamic coupling on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering has been observed. (authors)

  5. Theoretical analysis and experiment performance of slow-light based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hongyan; Zhong Kun; Zhang Ru; Lang Peilin

    2011-01-01

    Slow light technology will play a key role in future all-optical communication. The slow-light technology based on stimulated Brillouin scattering has become a research highlight because of its additional advantages, such as compatibility of the devices with existing telecommunication systems, room-temperature operation, and tunable at arbitrary wavelengths. According to the propagation of a cw pulse through a Brillouin fiber amplifier, whose frequency is near the Stokes resonance, via three-wave coupling equations, both pump depletion and fiber losses taken into consideration, the principle of how slow-light effect based on stimulated Brillouin scattering produced and the mathematical expression of time delay are strictly deduced. A delay of 8 ns is obtained when the input Stokes pulse is 200ns and the SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering) gain G is ∼18 in our designed experiment of SBS slow-light system. Then the extent of transformation from pump waves to Stokes waves is measured using MATLAB numerical simulation according to the experiment dates, based on the relation between output pump light power and input pump light power and also the relation between output Stokes light power and input pump light power. And the relation between the input light power and propagation distance is discussed as well. Finally the relation between slow light pulse delay and SBS gain is also obtained.

  6. An ultrawide tunable range single passband microwave photonic filter based on stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongchuan; Guo, Jing; Wu, Kui; Qu, Pengfei; Qi, Huajuan; Liu, Caixia; Ruan, Shengping; Chen, Weiyou; Dong, Wei

    2013-02-11

    A single passband microwave photonic filter with ultrawide tunable range based on stimulated Brillouin scattering is theoretically analyzed. Combining the gain and loss spectrums, tuning range with 44GHz is obtained without crosstalk by introducing two pumps. Adding more pumps, Tuning range multiplying with the multiplication factor equaling to the total quantity of pump can be achieved, which has potential application in microwave and millimeter wave wireless communication systems.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of an electromagnetic wave in weakly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The importance of the laser–plasma interaction becomes an active field of research in the laser-fusion experiments, charged particle acceleration experiments, X-ray generation, propagation of EM waves in ionosphere etc. and the stimulated Bril- louin scattering (SBS) plays an important role in laser–plasma interaction as it.

  8. Nonlinear Fluid Simulation Study of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings in Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chuang; Hao, Liang; Yan, Rui; Li, Jun; Liu, Wenda

    2017-10-01

    We developed a new nonlinear fluid laser-plasma-instability code FLAME using a multi-fluid plasma model combined with full electromagnetic wave equations. The completed one-dimensional (1D) version of FLAME was used to study laser-plasma instabilities in shock ignition. The simulations results showed that absolute Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) modes growing near the quarter-critical surface were saturated by Langmuir-wave Decay Instabilities (LDI) and pump depletion. The ion-acoustic waves from LDI acted as seeds of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS), which displayed a bursting pattern and caused strong pump depletion. Re-scattering of SRS was also observed in a high temperature case. These results largely agreed with corresponding Particle-in-Cell simulations. Work funded by DOE (DE-SC0012316), NSF (PHY-1314734), NSFC (11642020, 11621202), and Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A505).

  9. Beyond the random phase approximation: Stimulated Brillouin backscatter for finite laser coherence times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a linear theory of backward stimulated Brillouin scatter (BSBS) of a spatially and temporally random laser beam relevant for laser fusion. Our analysis reveals a new collective regime of BSBS (CBSBS). Its intensity threshold is controlled by diffraction, once cT c exceeds a laser speckle length, with T c the laser coherence time. The BSBS spatial gain rate is approximately the sum of that due to CBSBS, and a part which is independent of diffraction and varies linearly with T c . The CBSBS spatial gain rate may be reduced significantly by the temporal bandwidth of KrF-based laser systems compared to the bandwidth currently available to temporally smoothed glass-based laser systems

  10. Stimulated Brillouin scattering continuous wave phase conjugation in step-index fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven M; Spring, Justin B; Russell, Timothy H

    2008-07-21

    Continuous wave (CW) stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation in step-index optical fibers was studied experimentally and modeled as a function of fiber length. A phase conjugate fidelity over 80% was measured from SBS in a 40 m fiber using a pinhole technique. Fidelity decreases with fiber length, and a fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.06 was found to generate good phase conjugation fidelity over longer lengths than a fiber with 0.13 NA. Modeling and experiment support previous work showing the maximum interaction length which yields a high fidelity phase conjugate beam is inversely proportional to the fiber NA(2), but find that fidelity remains high over much longer fiber lengths than previous models calculated. Conditions for SBS beam cleanup in step-index fibers are discussed.

  11. Dynamics of ponderomotive self-focusing and periodic bursts of stimulated Brillouin backscattering in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Tarakanov, S.V.; Zykov, A.I.

    1993-01-01

    The space--time evolution of ponderomotive self-focusing of electromagnetic beams in a plasma is investigated. The quasineutral, hydrodynamic plasma response to the ponderomotive force is considered. The set of coupled quasioptic and acoustic equations is solved both analytically and numerically for slab and cylindrical beams. It is shown that the transient process of self-focusing has the form of a nonlinear wave propagating along the beam axis from boundary into the interior of a plasma with velocity considerably higher than the ion-sound velocity. Mutual dynamics of self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) is computed. It is shown that self-focusing results in the high intensity periodical bursts of SBBS. However, the time average level of scattered radiation is quite low

  12. Geophysical Remote Sensing Using the HF Pumped Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (SBS) Emission Lines Produced by HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    An ordinary or extraordinary mode electromagnetic wave can decay into a low frequency electrostatic wave and a scattered electromagnetic wave by a process called stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS). The low frequency wave can be either an ion acoustic wave (IA) or an electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) wave. The first detection ion acoustic waves by this process during ionospheric modification with high power radio waves was reported by Norin et al. (2009) using the HAARP transmitter in Alaska. The first detection of the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is reported here using HAARP during the March 2009 campaign. Subsequent experiments have provided additional verification of the SBS process and quantitative interpretation of the scattered wave frequency offsets to yield measurements of the electron temperatures in the heated ionosphere by Bernhardt et al. (2009). Using the SBS technique to generate ion acoustic waves, electron temperatures between 3000 and 4000 K were measured over the HAARP facility. The matching conditions for decay of the high frequency pump wave show that in addition to the production of an ion-acoustic wave, an electrostatic ion cyclotron wave can produced by the generalized SBS processes only if the pump waves makes a large angle with the magnetic field. When the EIC mode is produced, it is seen as a narrow of stimulated electromagnetic emissions at the ion cyclotron frequency. Occasionally, multiple lines are seen and analyzed to yield the relative abundance of oxygen, and molecular ions in the lower ionosphere. This ion mass spectrometer interpretation of the SBS data is new to the field of ionosphere remote sensing. In addition, based on the matching condition theory, the first profiles of the scattered wave amplitude are produced using the stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) matching conditions. These profiles are consistent with maximum ionospheric interactions at the upper-hybrid resonance height and at a region just below the plasma

  13. Large On-Chip Amplification in Silicon via Forward Stimulated Brillouin Scattering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittlaus, Eric [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Shin, Heedeuk [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Rakich, Peter [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Strong Brillouin coupling has only recently been realized in silicon using a new class of op- tomechanical waveguides that yield both optical and phononic con nement. Despite these major advances, appreciable Brillouin ampli cation has yet to be observed in silicon. Using new membrane- suspended silicon waveguide we report large Brillouin ampli cation for the rst time, reaching levels greater than 5 dB for modest pump powers, and demonstrate a record low (5 mW) threshold for net ampli cation. This work represents a crucial advance necessary to realize high-performance Brillouin lasers and ampli ers in silicon.

  14. Anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering of stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade in high-intensity laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q. S.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; Xiao, C. Z.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, H. C.; Cao, L. H.; He, X. T.

    2017-07-01

    Anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering in stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) cascades have been researched using the Vlasov-Maxwell simulation. In high-intensity laser-plasma interactions, stimulated anti-Stokes Brillouin scattering (SABS) will occur after second stage SBS rescattering. The mechanism of SABS has been put forward to explain this phenomenon. In the early phase of SBS evolution, only first stage SBS appears and total SBS reflectivity comes from first stage SBS. However, when high-stage SBS and SABS occur, SBS reflectivity will display burst behavior and the total reflectivity comes from the SBS cascade and SABS superimposition. The SABS will compete with the SBS rescattering to determine the total SBS reflectivity. Thus, SBS rescattering including SABS is an important saturation mechanism of SBS and should be taken into account in high-intensity laser-plasma interaction.

  15. Analytical study of nonlinear phase shift through stimulated Brillouin scattering in single mode fiber with the pump power recycling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Asadi, H A; Mahdi, M A; Bakar, A A A; Adikan, F R Mahamd

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of nonlinear phase shift through stimulated Brillouin scattering in single mode optical fiber. Analytical expressions describing the nonlinear phase shift for the pump and Stokes waves in the pump power recycling technique have been derived. The dependence of the nonlinear phase shift on the optical fiber length, the reflectivity of the optical mirror and the frequency detuning coefficient have been analyzed for different input pump power values. We found that with the recycling pump technique, the nonlinear phase shift due to stimulated Brillouin scattering reduced to less than 0.1 rad for 5 km optical fiber length and 0.65 reflectivity of the optical mirror, respectively, at an input pump power equal to 30 mW

  16. Multifunctional microwave photonic signal processor based on dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhan; Wang, Ling; Yang, Cheng Wu; Li, Ming; Zhu, Ning Hua; Li, Wei

    2017-09-01

    We report a multifunctional microwave photonic signal processor based on dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and stimulated Brillouin scattering. The signal processor acts as a microwave photonic filter (MPF) and microwave photonic phase shifter (MPS) simultaneously. The MPF and MPS can be tuned separately. Experimental results demonstrate that the central frequency of the bandpass MPF is tunable from 3 to 18 GHz while the MPS in the passband of the MPF is continuously adjustable over 360 deg.

  17. Angular characteristics of the stimulated-Brillouin-scattering spectrum from a laser plasma with strong acoustic-wave damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikia, P.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of stimulated Brillouin scattering from an inhomogeneous moving laser plasma is analyzed. The damping of acoustic waves and scattered electromagnetic waves is taken into account. Spectra are derived for various scattering angles and for various radii of the laser beam. For all observation angles the center of the spectral line is at an unshifted frequency. As the observation angle increases, the width of the red wing in the spectrum increases. The intensity of the scattered light is very anisotropic

  18. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of the beat wave of two lasers in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Sharma, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering of two collinear lasers in a plasma is investigated. Lasers exert a longitudinal ponderomotive force on electrons, imparting them oscillatory axial velocity at the beat frequency. This velocity acts as a driver for parametric excitation of an ion acoustic wave (ω,k-vector) and a noncollinear sideband electromagnetic wave (ω ' ,k-vector ' ). The driver velocity v-vector 0- couples to the sideband wave to exert a ponderomotive force at (ω,k-vector) on the electrons, driving the ion acoustic wave. The density perturbation of ion acoustic wave beats with v-vector 0- to produce a nonlinear current at (ω ' ,k-vector ' ), driving the sideband. In the case of finite spot size Gaussian laser beams, the beat wave has a Gaussian profile and excites an ion acoustic wave (ω,k-vector) and a backscattered TM mode (ω ' ,k-vector z ' ). The growth rate scales as the product of amplitudes of the lasers and maximizes at optimum values of scattering angles. The parametric instability of difference frequency driver is stronger than the sum frequency driver.

  19. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in highly birefringent multimode tapered chalcogenide photonic crystal fiber for distributed optical sensors (Retraction Notice)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, Amira; Cherif, Rim; Zghal, Mourad

    2016-09-01

    This paper, originally published on September 15, 2016, was retracted from the SPIE Digital Library on October 5, 2016, due to a high degree of similarity between specific portions of the text of the paper to the following publications: J. Tchahame, J. Beugnot, A. Kudlinski, and T. Sylvestre, "Multimode Brillouin spectrum in a long tapered birefringent photonic crystal fiber," Opt. Lett. 40, 4281-4284 (2015). doi: 10.1364/OL.40.004281 W. W. Ke, X. J. Wang and X. Tang, "Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Model in Multi-Mode Fiber Lasers," in IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 305-314, Sept.-Oct. 2014. doi: 10.1109/JSTQE.2014.2303256.

  20. Dimensionality reduction and dynamical filtering: Stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setra, Rafael G; Arroyo-Almanza, Diana A; Ni, Zetian; Murphy, Thomas E; Roy, Rajarshi

    2015-08-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is a noise-driven nonlinear interaction between acoustical and optical waves. In optical fibers, SBS can be observed at relatively low optical powers and can severely limit signal transmission. Although SBS is initiated by high dimensional noise, it also exhibits many of the hallmarks of a complex nonlinear dynamical system. We report here a comprehensive experimental and numerical study of the fluctuations in the reflected Stokes wave produced by SBS in optical fibers. Using time series analysis, we demonstrate a reduction of dimensionality and dynamical filtering of the Stokes wave. We begin with a careful comparison of the measured average transmitted and reflected intensities from below the SBS threshold to saturation of the transmitted power. Initially the power spectra and correlation functions of the time series of the reflected wave fluctuations at the SBS threshold and above are measured and simulated. Much greater dynamical insight is provided when we study the scaling behavior of the intensity fluctuations using Hurst exponents and detrended fluctuation analysis for time scales extending over six orders of magnitude. At the highest input powers, we notice the emergence of three distinct dynamical scaling regimes: persistent, Brownian, and antipersistent. Next, we explore the Hilbert phase fluctuations of the intensity time series and amplitude-phase coupling. Finally, time-delay embedding techniques reveal a gradual reduction in dimensionality of the spatiotemporal dynamics as the laser input is increased toward saturation of the transmitted power. Through all of these techniques, we find a transition from noisier to smoother dynamics with increasing input power. We find excellent agreement between our experimental measurements and simulations.

  1. Dimensionality reduction and dynamical filtering: Stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setra, Rafael G.; Arroyo-Almanza, Diana A.; Ni, Zetian; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2015-08-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is a noise-driven nonlinear interaction between acoustical and optical waves. In optical fibers, SBS can be observed at relatively low optical powers and can severely limit signal transmission. Although SBS is initiated by high dimensional noise, it also exhibits many of the hallmarks of a complex nonlinear dynamical system. We report here a comprehensive experimental and numerical study of the fluctuations in the reflected Stokes wave produced by SBS in optical fibers. Using time series analysis, we demonstrate a reduction of dimensionality and dynamical filtering of the Stokes wave. We begin with a careful comparison of the measured average transmitted and reflected intensities from below the SBS threshold to saturation of the transmitted power. Initially the power spectra and correlation functions of the time series of the reflected wave fluctuations at the SBS threshold and above are measured and simulated. Much greater dynamical insight is provided when we study the scaling behavior of the intensity fluctuations using Hurst exponents and detrended fluctuation analysis for time scales extending over six orders of magnitude. At the highest input powers, we notice the emergence of three distinct dynamical scaling regimes: persistent, Brownian, and antipersistent. Next, we explore the Hilbert phase fluctuations of the intensity time series and amplitude-phase coupling. Finally, time-delay embedding techniques reveal a gradual reduction in dimensionality of the spatiotemporal dynamics as the laser input is increased toward saturation of the transmitted power. Through all of these techniques, we find a transition from noisier to smoother dynamics with increasing input power. We find excellent agreement between our experimental measurements and simulations.

  2. Anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering of stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade in high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qingsong; Zheng, Chunyang; Liu, Zhanjun; Xiao, Chengzhuo; Wang, Qing; Cao, Lihua; He, Xiantu

    2017-10-01

    The anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering in stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) cascade have been researched by the Vlasov-Maxwell simulation. In the high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction, the stimulated anti-Stokes Brillouin scattering (SABS) will occur after the second stage SBS rescattering. The mechanism of SABS has been put forward to explain this phenomenon. In the early time of SBS evolution, only the first stage SBS appears, and the total SBS reflectivity comes from the first stage SBS. However, when the high-stage SBS and SABS occur, the SBS reflectivity will appear a burst behavior, and the total reflectivity comes from the SBS cascade and SABS superimposition. The SABS will compete with the SBS rescattering to determine the total SBS reflectivity. Thus, the SBS rescattering including the SABS is an important saturation mechanism of SBS, and should be taken into account in the high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction. This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375032, 11575035, 11475030 and 11435011), National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834101) and Science Challenge Project, No. TZ2016005.

  3. Coherent Forward Stimulated-Brillouin Scattering of a Spatially Incoherent Laser Beam in a Plasma and Its Effect on Beam Spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grech, M.; Riazuelo, G.; Pesme, D.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model for forward stimulated-Brillouin scattering is developed for a spatially incoherent, monochromatic, laser beam propagating in a plasma. The threshold above which the laser beam spatial incoherence cannot prevent the coherent growth of forward stimulated-Brillouin scattering is computed. It is found to be well below the threshold for self-focusing. Three-dimensional simulations confirm its existence and reveal the onset of beam spray above it. From these results, we propose a new figure of merit for the control of propagation through a plasma of a spatially incoherent laser beam

  4. Distributed Strain Measurement along a Concrete Beam via Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Bernini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural strain measurement of tension and compression in a 4 m long concrete beam was demonstrated with a distributed fiber-optic sensor portable system based on Brillouin scattering. Strain measurements provided by the fiber-optic sensor permitted to detect the formation of a crack in the beam resulting from the external applied load. The sensor system is valuable for structural monitoring applications, enabling the long-term performance and health of structures to be efficiently monitored.

  5. OPTICAL DATA PROCESSING: Realization of associative memory with the aid of a nonlinear selective stimulated-Brillouin-scattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyev, A. Z.; Pasmanik, G. A.

    1993-05-01

    An associative memory using only optical elements has been realized experimentally. The key element of the arrangement is a stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) selector consisting of a short SBS medium at the focus of a lens. The qualitative advantage of the selector over an SBS mirror is demonstrated experimentally. The response time of the arrangement is ~ 10-8 s and is determined by the duration of the SBS. Estimates show that the SBS selector is capable in practice of distinguishing a signal against background noise when the initial distortion level of the object beam is 10-3. Reliable operation of the SBS selector has been demonstrated for radiative and energy loads reaching 2 GW/cm2 and 2 J, respectively.

  6. Optical Generation of 80 GHz Downstream Data in Radio over Fiber System Based on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husaini M.M.H

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we proposed Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS in an optical generation of millimeter waves (mm-waves for radio over fiber (RoF system with the transmission of 2.5 Gbps data rate. SBS method is achieved by imposing continuous wave (CW laser in a single mode optical fiber (SMF via Mach-Zehnder Modulator (MZM with Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA and two pump lasers. Mm-waves signal of 80 GHz was generated from a 40 GHz radio frequency (RF synthesizer. Simulation result and the analysis comparison of effective light power are investigated with different SMF loop length from 20 km until 120 km. The performance of SBS system is analysed and the generated of millimeter waves signal can be transmit with length up to 120 km based on eye pattern and Bit Error Rate (BER curve.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering phase-locking using a transient acoustic standing wave excited through an optical interference field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrej Slezak; Milan Kalal; Hon Jin Kong

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Analytical description of an experimentally verified scheme leading to a phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), used in a laser beam combination systems, is presented. The essential condition for the phase-locking effect for SBS is the fixation of the starting position and time of the acoustic Brillouin wave. It is shown that the starting position fixation of this acoustic wave may have its origin in a transient acoustic standing wave initiated by an arising optical interference field produced by the back-seeding concave mirror. This interference field leads to a stationary density modulation of the medium. However, the way to the formation of this density modulation leads via the acoustic standing wave. An appropriate solution, in the form of the standing wave, was obtained from solving the acoustic wave-equation using the electrostriction as a driving force. As a consequence of the damping term included in this equation the acoustic standing wave becomes gradually attenuated and contrary to the undamped solution published earlier, thus constitutes a truly transient phenomenon. Using a mathematical formalism similar to that which is used for the SBS description in the case of a random phase, the coupled equations describing the phase-locked SBS were derived. Contrary to the case without the back-seeding mirror, where the wave chosen from the thermal noise background subsequently plays the role of a trigger of the stimulated process, in this case it is replaced by the transient standing wave produced as a consequence of the presence of an optical interference field arisen in the focal region of the back-seeding concave mirror.

  8. Phasing of Stokes radiation under shock excitation of stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, A A; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-30

    Interaction of counterpropagating waves in Brillouin-active media has been analysed by numerical computation. The dynamics of the development of acoustic waves is described using a secondorder equation. It is shown that in the case of counterpropagating waves with sufficiently steep leading pulse edges ({tau}{sub f} {<=} 3T{sub 2}, where T{sub 2} is the acoustic phonon lifetime), SBS begins from the level of acoustic waves induced by shock excitation in the bulk of the active medium rather than from the spontaneous noise level. This mechanism determines the phase of the output Stokes wave, which is generated in the backward direction to the wave with the highest input intensity, irrespective of the ratio of counterpropagating-wave frequencies.

  9. Monitoring the distributed impact wave on a concrete slab due to the traffic based on polarization dependence on stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Xiaoyi; Zhang Chunshu; Li Wenhai; Eisa, M; El-Gamal, S; Benmokrane, B

    2008-01-01

    For the first time to our knowledge, distributed impact waves due to the highway traffic on concrete slabs reinforced with FRP bars are monitored in real time using stimulated Brillouin scattering. The impact wave is caused by the traffic passing on the highway pavement at high speed (>100 km h −1 ), which induced pressure on the concrete slabs, and in turn created a local birefringence change, leading to variation of the local state of polarization change (SOP). The pump and probe waves of the stimulated Brillouin scattering 'see' the SOP change and react with a decrease of the Brillouin gain or loss signal, when the pump and probe waves have the same input polarization state. The frequency difference between the pump and probe waves are locked at the static-strain-related Brillouin frequency. Optical fiber was embedded throughout the concrete pavement continuously reinforced with FRP bars in Highway 40 East, Montréal, Quebec to detect impact waves caused by cars and trucks passing on these pavements at a sampling rate of 10 kHz. A spatial resolution of 2 m was used over a sensing length of 300 m

  10. Laser and Plasma Parameters for Laser Pulse Amplification by Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the Strong Coupling Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangolf, Thomas; Blecher, Marius; Bolanos, Simon; Lancia, Livia; Marques, Jean-Raphael; Cerchez, Mirela; Prasad, Rajendra; Aurand, Bastian; Loiseau, Pascal; Fuchs, Julien; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    In the ongoing quest for novel techniques to obtain ever higher laser powers, plasma amplification has drawn much attention, benefiting from the fact that a plasma can sustain much higher energy densities than a solid state amplifier. As a plasma process, Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the strong coupling regime (sc-SBS) can be used to transfer energy from one laser pulse (pump) to another (seed), by a nonlinear ion oscillation forced by the pump laser. Here, we report on experimental results on amplification by sc-SBS using the ARCTURUS Ti:Sapphire multi-beam laser system at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany. Counter-propagating in a supersonic Hydrogen gas jet target, an ultrashort seed pulse with a pulse duration between 30 and 160 fs and an energy between 1 and 12 mJ was amplified by a high-energy pump pulse (1.7 ps, 700 mJ). For some of the measurements, the gas was pre-ionized with a separate laser pulse (780 fs, 460 mJ). Preliminary analysis shows that the amplification was larger for the longer seed pulses, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  11. Pump spectral linewidth influence on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-termination behavior of SRS in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guang S.; Kuzmin, Andrey; Prasad, Paras N. [The Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The threshold, temporal behavior, and conversion efficiency of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SBS) in three liquids (benzene, hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide) and two crystals (calcite and barium nitrate) have been investigated under three largely different spectral linewidth conditions. Pumped with 532-nm and nanosecond duration laser pulses of ≤ 0.01 cm{sup -1} linewidth, only SBS can be generated in all tested liquids with a high nonlinear reflectivity. However when the pump spectral linewidth is ∝0.07 cm{sup -1} or ∝0.8 cm{sup -1}, both SBS and SRS can be observed in benzene while only SRS can be generated in dimethyl sulfoxide; in all these cases SRS is the dominant contribution to the stimulated scattering but the efficiency values are drastically decreased due to the self-termination behavior of SRS in liquids, which arises from the thermal self-defocusing of both pump beam and SRS beam owing to Stokes-shift related opto-heating effect. In contrast, for SRS process in the two crystals, the thermal self-defocusing influence is negligible benefitting from their much greater thermal conductivity, and a higher conversion efficiency of SRS generation can be retained under all three pump conditions. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. High-input dynamic range and selectivity stimulated Brillouin scattering-based microwave photonic filter utilizing a dual-stage scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhong, Yibo; Ke, Changjian; Liu, Deming

    2017-09-01

    A high-input dynamic range and selectivity stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS)-based microwave photonic filter (MPF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By utilizing a pump-splitting dual-stage scheme to mitigate the gain saturation, an input dynamic range of >40  dB and a selectivity of >49  dB are achieved simultaneously for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The bandwidth is reconfigurable from 50 MHz to 200 MHz by tailoring the Brillouin pump precisely. During the bandwidth turning, the passband ripple is maintained <1.3  dB, and the 20-dB shape factor is 1.2 for the 200-MHz case. The superior performance makes the proposed SBS-MPF one of the best candidates for microwave photonics applications.

  13. An experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in laser-produced plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Keith Stanley [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-02-11

    Despite the apparent simplicity of controlled fusion, there are many phenomena which have prevented its achievement. One phenomenon is laser-plasma instabilities. An investigation of one such instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), is reported here. SBS is a parametric process whereby an electromagnetic wave (the parent wave) decays into another electromagnetic wave and an ion acoustic wave (the daughter waves). SBS impedes controlled fusion since it can scatter much or all of the incident laser light, resulting in poor drive symmetry and inefficient laser-plasma coupling. It is widely believed that SBS becomes convectively unstable--that is, it grows as it traverses the plasma. Though it has yet to be definitively tested, convective theory is often invoked to explain experimental observations, even when one or more of the theory`s assumptions are violated. In contrast, the experiments reported here not only obeyed the assumptions of the theory, but were also conducted in plasmas with peak densities well below quarter-critical density. This prevented other competing or coexisting phenomena from occurring, thereby providing clearly interpretable results. These are the first SBS experiments that were designed to be both a clear test of linear convective theory and pertinent to controlled fusion research. A crucial part of this series of experiments was the development of a new instrument, the Multiple Angle Time Resolving Spectrometer (MATRS). MATRS has the unique capability of both spectrally and temporally resolving absolute levels of scattered light at many angles simultaneously, and is the first of its kind used in laser-plasma experiments. A detailed comparison of the theoretical predictions and the experimental observations is made.

  14. Modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering near the critical-density surface in the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximov, A.V.; Myatt, J.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The nonlinear propagation of laser beams, smoothed by spatial and temporal bandwidth, near the critical density surface of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been modeled. The interplay between filamentation and forward and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is described in the presence of light reflected from the critical density surface and high absorption of light near the critical density. The spectrum of backscattered light develops a red shift due to SBS, which can be seeded by the reflection of light from the critical surface. The intensity of backscattered light decreases moderately as the bandwidth of smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is increased

  15. Central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of the January 2012 to June 2013 publications on central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite covers amphetamines (including metamfetamine, paramethoxyamfetamine and paramethoxymetamfetamine), fenfluramine and benfluorex, atomoxetine, methylphenidate, modafinil and armodafinil...

  16. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Tokamak Core Plasma Diagnostics Based on the Synergy of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A novel plasma diagnostic method is proposed based on the synergy of stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. A nonlinear plasma mode is excited in a 4-wave coupling,footnotetextV. Alexander STEFAN, Nonlinear Electromagnetic Radiation Plasma Interactions, (S-U-Press, 2008). leading to the appearance of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the plasma edgefootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, Abstract: D1.00018 : ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions; Bulletin of the American Physical Society APS April Meeting 2011 Volume 56, Number 4. with the parameters directly dependent on the plasma parameters in the core of tokamak. Accordingly, plasma diagnostic in the core region, (ion temperature), can be performed by the diagnostics of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the edge plasma.

  17. Testosterone Suppression of CRH-stimulated Cortisol in Men

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinow, David R.; Roca, Catherine A.; Schmidt, Peter J.; Danaceau, Merry A.; Putnam, Karen; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Nieman, Lynnette

    2005-01-01

    Despite observations of age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, the role of androgens in the regulation of HPA axis activity in men has not been examined. We assessed this role by performing CRH stimulation tests in ten men (ages 18–45) during gonadal suppression with leuprolide acetate and during testosterone addition to leuprolide. CRH-stimulated cortisol levels as well as peak cortisol and greatest cortisol excursion were significantly lower ...

  18. Testosterone suppression of CRH-stimulated cortisol in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinow, David R; Roca, Catherine A; Schmidt, Peter J; Danaceau, Merry A; Putnam, Karen; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Nieman, Lynnette

    2005-10-01

    Despite observations of age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, the role of androgens in the regulation of HPA axis activity in men has not been examined. We assessed this role by performing CRH stimulation tests in 10 men (ages 18-45 years) during gonadal suppression with leuprolide acetate and during testosterone addition to leuprolide. CRH-stimulated cortisol levels as well as peak cortisol and greatest cortisol excursion were significantly lower (pcortisol area under the curve was lower at a trend level (pcortisol : ACTH ratio, a measure of adrenal sensitivity, was lower during testosterone replacement (pcortisol. These data demonstrate that testosterone regulates CRH-stimulated HPA axis activity in men, with the divergent effects on ACTH and cortisol suggesting a peripheral (adrenal) locus for the suppressive effects on cortisol. Our results further demonstrate that the enhanced stimulated HPA axis activity previously described in young men compared with young women cannot be ascribed to an activational upregulation of the axis by testosterone.

  19. Observation of narrowband intrinsic spectra of Brillouin dynamic gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang Yong; Yoon, Hyuk Jin

    2010-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the reflection spectrum of a Brillouin dynamic grating in a polarization-maintaining fiber can be much narrower than the intrinsic linewidth of the stimulated Brillouin scattering, matching well with the theory of a fiber Bragg grating in terms of the linewidth and the reflectivity. A 3 dB bandwidth as narrow as 10.5 MHz is observed with the Brillouin dynamic grating generated in a 9 m uniform fiber.

  20. Suppressive Subtraction Hybridization on Stimulated Primary Horse Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matiašovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To study genes potentially involved in genetic resistance to infectious diseases in the horse, suppressive subtraction hybridization was used to identify genes expressed in primary horse macrophages after their stimulation with E. coli. Overnight culture of blood monocyte-derived macrophage cells was stimulated with E. coli K12 in ratio 40 E. coli cells to one macrophage cell. After 4 hours of incubation, non-phagocyted bacteria were washed away. Following next 20 hour incubation in MEM alpha containing 5 μg of gentamycin in 1 ml of media, mRNA was isolated and used in Clontech PCR-Select cDNA Subtraction Kit. Expression of several known horse genes, as well as some new ESTs (expressed sequence tags showing sequence similarity with immunity-related genes from other species was identified.

  1. Conjugation and transformation of the wave front by stimulated Brillouin scattering of vortex Laguerre - Gaussian laser modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopalkin, A V; Bogachev, V A; Dolgopolov, Yu V; Kochemasov, G G; Kulikov, S M; Maslov, N V; Starikov, F A; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Feoktistov, V V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Malyutin, A A

    2011-01-01

    We study experimentally stimulated Brilluoin scattering (SBS) of vortex laser beams, namely, the LG 1 1 and LG 0 1 Laguerre -Gaussian modes. The wave front transformation is experimentally demonstrated in the case of SBS of the LG 1 1 laser mode, directly focused into the SBS cell, when the fundamental Gaussian mode LG 0 0 rather than the conjugate mode is selected from the Stokes beam. It is shown that optical vortices become phase conjugate by destroying the laser mode structure in the SBS cell. Phase conjugation (PC) of the LG 0 1 and LG 1 1 modes is obtained in the SBS mirror using a regular aberrator (microlens raster) in the system of laser beam focusing into the SBS cell.

  2. Brillouin Instability in Fiber Lasers Doped By Power | Bouras ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Brillouin back scattering is theoretically analysed by two-coupled modes laser model. We consider the Fabry-Perot fiber laser cavity. The rich and complex dynamic behaviours are observed. In particular the quasi periodic dynamic is identified and studied. Keywords: Stimulated Brillouin Scattering; high power ...

  3. TRH Stimulation Tests Compared with T3 Suppression Tests in Patients With Marginal Hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Jae; Koh, Chang Soon

    1980-01-01

    TRH stimulation tests and T 3 suppression tests were done in 13 patients with clinically suspected mild or early hyperthyroidism who were all conventional thyroid function tests gave results within the accepted normal range. The results were as follows 1) 6 patients with normal T 3 suppression test revealed normal TRH stimulation test and could be easily diagnosed as euthyroidism 2) 7 patients with abnormal T 3 suppression test exhibited no TSH response to TRH stimulation test and could be easily diagnosed as hyperthyroidism. The TRH stimulation test is a single, sensitive and reliable test of thyroid function and can well replace T 3 suppression test in the diagnosis of marginal hyperthyroidism

  4. Dynamic stimulated Brillouin scattering analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djupsöbacka, A.; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    We present a new simple analysis - including the effect of spontaneous emission - of the (dynamic) influence of SBS on the detected receiver eye diagram. It applies in principle for general types of modulation formats such as the digital formats of ASK, FSK, and PSK. The analysis is formulated fo...

  5. Brillouin, Prof. Leon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Honorary. Brillouin, Prof. Leon. Date of birth: 7 August 1889. Date of death: 4 October 1969 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  6. Burst-suppression is reactive to photic stimulation in comatose children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, Dragos A.; Moldovan, Mihai; Sharma, Roy

    2016-01-01

    -suppression in children with acquired brain injury. Methods: Intensive care unit electroencephalographic monitoring recordings containing burst-suppression were obtained from 5 comatose children with acquired brain injury of various etiologies. Intermittent photic stimulation was performed at 1 Hz for 1 min to assess...

  7. Pulsed radiofrequency stimulation suppresses palmar hyperhidrosis in an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Huang, Tzu-Rung; Kao, Ming-Chien; Chiu, Hung-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2017-11-01

    Palmar hyperhidrosis (PH) exhibits excessive and unpredictable sweating. The most effective treatment for permanent cure is the ablation of thoracic sympathetic ganglia innervating hands. However, sympathectomy of T2 sympathetic ganglion by clipping or cauterization causes irreversible nerve damage, and results in a compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH). We herein used the pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation to reversibly block sympathetic ganglion to treat PH and avoid CH. A bipolar electrode was implanted into the right T2 sympathetic trunk by endoscopic surgery and PRF was delivered through the electrode. The humidity (%) of right palm was measured to indicate sweating level. Six out of 13 rats (46.2%) that received a 5-min PRF stimulation on the T2 sympathetic trunk showed a decrease in the right palm humidity during the surgery. PRF stimulation significantly reduced humidity from 69.17% ± 0.72% obtained from baseline condition to 66.93% ± 0.69%. The humidity reduction was also observed at 10 min after the PRF stimulation. We further evaluated the effect of PRF stimulation 1 week after surgery and found that the PRF stimuli reduced right hand humidity in 5 out of 8 rats (62.5%). PRF stimulation significantly reduced humidity from 66.11% ± 0.81% obtained from sham operation control to 63.62% ± 0.82%. The percentage of right hand humidity obtained 10 min after PRF stimulation was also reduced to 63.38% ± 0.80%. Anesthetics have no effect on humidity. These results indicate that PRF stimulation of T2 sympathetic trunk reduces palm sweating in rats.

  8. Brillouin scattering at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimsditch, M.; Polian, A.

    1988-02-01

    Technical advances which have made Brillouin scattering a useful tool in high pressure diamond anvil cell (DAC) studies, viz. multipassing and tandem operation of Fabry-Perot interferometers, are reviewed. Experimental aspects, such as allowed scattering geometries, are outlined and the data analysis required to transform Brillouin spectra into sound velocities and elastic constants is presented. Experimental results on H 2 , N 2 , Ar, and He are presented, and the close relationship between the Brillouin scattering results and equations of state is highlighted

  9. Brillouin Spectroscopy Data Base for Biological Threats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubel, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    .... Brillouin scattering from DNA, ovalbumen, the Bacillus spores globigii and thuringiensis were measured to determine the feasibility of biological material discrimination using Brillouin scattering...

  10. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  11. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduces psychophysically measured surround suppression in the human visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Spiegel

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe, non-invasive technique for transiently modulating the balance of excitation and inhibition within the human brain. It has been reported that anodal tDCS can reduce both GABA mediated inhibition and GABA concentration within the human motor cortex. As GABA mediated inhibition is thought to be a key modulator of plasticity within the adult brain, these findings have broad implications for the future use of tDCS. It is important, therefore, to establish whether tDCS can exert similar effects within non-motor brain areas. The aim of this study was to assess whether anodal tDCS could reduce inhibitory interactions within the human visual cortex. Psychophysical measures of surround suppression were used as an index of inhibition within V1. Overlay suppression, which is thought to originate within the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, was also measured as a control. Anodal stimulation of the occipital poles significantly reduced psychophysical surround suppression, but had no effect on overlay suppression. This effect was specific to anodal stimulation as cathodal stimulation had no effect on either measure. These psychophysical results provide the first evidence for tDCS-induced reductions of intracortical inhibition within the human visual cortex.

  12. Mechanisms of Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation in Pain Suppression: A Computational Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Alexander R; Min, Xiaoyi; Hogan, Quinn H; Kramer, Jeffery M

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation for chronic pain remain unclear. The objective of this work was to explore the neurophysiological effects of DRG stimulation using computational modeling. Electrical fields produced during DRG stimulation were calculated with finite element models, and were coupled to a validated biophysical model of a C-type primary sensory neuron. Intrinsic neuronal activity was introduced as a 4 Hz afferent signal or somatic ectopic firing. The transmembrane potential was measured along the neuron to determine the effect of stimulation on intrinsic activity across stimulation parameters, cell location/orientation, and membrane properties. The model was validated by showing close correspondence in action potential (AP) characteristics and firing patterns when compared to experimental measurements. Subsequently, the model output demonstrated that T-junction filtering was amplified with DRG stimulation, thereby blocking afferent signaling, with cathodic stimulation at amplitudes of 2.8-5.5 × stimulation threshold and frequencies above 2 Hz. This amplified filtering was dependent on the presence of calcium and calcium-dependent small-conductance potassium channels, which produced a hyperpolarization offset in the soma, stem, and T-junction with repeated somatic APs during stimulation. Additionally, DRG stimulation suppressed somatic ectopic activity by hyperpolarizing the soma with cathodic or anodic stimulation at amplitudes of 3-11 × threshold and frequencies above 2 Hz. These effects were dependent on the stem axon being relatively close to and oriented toward a stimulating contact. These results align with the working hypotheses on the mechanisms of DRG stimulation, and indicate the importance of stimulation amplitude, polarity, and cell location/orientation on neuronal responses. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Potentiation of fentanyl suppression of the jaw-opening reflex by transcranial electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alantar, A; Azerad, J; Limoge, A; Robert, C; Rokyta, R; Pollin, B

    1997-07-18

    Stinus et al. [L. Stinus, M. Auriacombe, J. Tignol, A. Limoge, M. Le Moal, Transcranial electrical stimulation with high frequency intermittent current (Limoge's) potentiates opiate-induced analgesia: blind studies, Pain, 42 (1990) 351-363.] observed that transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) with high-frequency intermittent current potentiated opiate-induced analgesia using the tail-flick test. In unanesthetized, chronic preparations, electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz) of the lower incisor pulp of rats elicits a short-(6 ms) and a long-latency (12-18 ms) jaw-opening reflex (JOR) without any evidence of aversive behavior [J. Azerad, F. Fuentes, I. Lendais, A. Limoge, B. Pollin, Methods for selective tooth pulp stimulation in acute and chronic preparations in rats, J. Physiol., 406 (1988) 3P.]. Fentanyl increases thresholds of both reflexes and transiently suppresses the long-latency JOR. We then decided to look at the influence of TCES on both drug-induced mean of maximal threshold variation (MMTV) and duration of JOR suppression period. These parameters have been investigated in 43 Wistar rats with or without TCES administered for 3 h before the drug injection and throughout the testing period. TCES alone has no effect. In contrast, it significantly increases the duration of the reflex suppression period (149 +/- 5% vs. control, P < 0.001) while fentanyl-increased reflex thresholds remain unchanged. The fentanyl-induced JOR suppression period returns to the control values 2 days later. When a second 3-h TCES session is delivered 2 or 4 days after the first TCES session, a similar increase of this suppression period is observed. Moreover, 2 days after a second TCES session, an increase of the duration of the fentanyl-induced JOR suppression period is systematically observed. In contrast, a 6-h TCES session never induces such effects. These results confirm a potentiating effect of TCES on opioid action and demonstrate the value of repeated TCES sessions.

  14. Self-pulsation threshold of Raman amplified Brillouin fiber cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    An implicit equation for the oscillation threshold of stimulated Brillouin scattering from Raman amplified signals in fibers with external feedback is derived under the assumption of no depletion. This is compared to numerical investigations of Raman amplification schemes showing good agreement...

  15. A hybrid stimulation strategy for suppression of spiral waves in cardiac tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Binbin; Jacquir, Sabir; Laurent, Gabriel; Bilbault, Jean-Marie; Binczak, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Simulation of a cardiac tissue by a modified 2D FitzHugh-Nagumo model. → Stimulation of monophasic impulsions from a grid of electrodes to the cardiac tissue. → Propose a method by modifying the tissue's sodium channels and electrical stimulation. → The method leading to suppress spiral waves without generating new ones. → Optimal parameters of a successful suppression of spiral waves are investigated. - Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia whose mechanisms are thought to be mainly due to the self perpetuation of spiral waves (SW). To date, available treatment strategies (antiarrhythmic drugs, radiofrequency ablation of the substrate, electrical cardioversion) to restore and to maintain a normal sinus rhythm have limitations and are associated with AF recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess a way of suppressing SW by applying multifocal electrical stimulations in a simulated cardiac tissue using a 2D FitzHugh-Nagumo model specially convenient for AF investigations. We identified stimulation parameters for successful termination of SW. However, SW reinduction, following the electrical stimuli, leads us to develop a hybrid strategy based on sodium channel modification for the simulated tissue.

  16. A hybrid stimulation strategy for suppression of spiral waves in cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Binbin, E-mail: xubinbin@hotmail.fr [LE2I, CNRS UMR 5158, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Jacquir, Sabir, E-mail: sjacquir@u-bourgogne.fr [LE2I, CNRS UMR 5158, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Laurent, Gabriel; Bilbault, Jean-Marie [LE2I, CNRS UMR 5158, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Binczak, Stephane, E-mail: stbinc@u-bourgogne.fr [LE2I, CNRS UMR 5158, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Simulation of a cardiac tissue by a modified 2D FitzHugh-Nagumo model. > Stimulation of monophasic impulsions from a grid of electrodes to the cardiac tissue. > Propose a method by modifying the tissue's sodium channels and electrical stimulation. > The method leading to suppress spiral waves without generating new ones. > Optimal parameters of a successful suppression of spiral waves are investigated. - Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia whose mechanisms are thought to be mainly due to the self perpetuation of spiral waves (SW). To date, available treatment strategies (antiarrhythmic drugs, radiofrequency ablation of the substrate, electrical cardioversion) to restore and to maintain a normal sinus rhythm have limitations and are associated with AF recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess a way of suppressing SW by applying multifocal electrical stimulations in a simulated cardiac tissue using a 2D FitzHugh-Nagumo model specially convenient for AF investigations. We identified stimulation parameters for successful termination of SW. However, SW reinduction, following the electrical stimuli, leads us to develop a hybrid strategy based on sodium channel modification for the simulated tissue.

  17. Electrical stimulation of the primate lateral habenula suppresses saccadic eye movement through a learning mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The lateral habenula (LHb is a brain structure which represents negative motivational value. Neurons in the LHb are excited by unpleasant events such as reward omission and aversive stimuli, and transmit these signals to midbrain dopamine neurons which are involved in learning and motivation. However, it remains unclear whether these phasic changes in LHb neuronal activity actually influence animal behavior. To answer this question, we artificially activated the LHb by electrical stimulation while monkeys were performing a visually guided saccade task. In one block of trials, saccades to one fixed direction (e.g., right direction were followed by electrical stimulation of the LHb while saccades to the other direction (e.g., left direction were not. The direction-stimulation contingency was reversed in the next block. We found that the post-saccadic stimulation of the LHb increased the latencies of saccades in subsequent trials. Notably, the increase of the latency occurred gradually as the saccade was repeatedly followed by the stimulation, suggesting that the effect of the post-saccadic stimulation was accumulated across trials. LHb stimulation starting before saccades, on the other hand, had no effect on saccade latency. Together with previous studies showing LHb activation by reward omission and aversive stimuli, the present stimulation experiment suggests that LHb activity contributes to learning to suppress actions which lead to unpleasant events.

  18. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  19. Polarity Specific Suppression Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Joos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external auditory stimulus and affects 10–15% of the Western population. Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the left auditory cortex on tinnitus loudness, but the effect of this presumed excitatory stimulation contradicts with the underlying pathophysiological model of tinnitus. Therefore, we included 175 patients with chronic tinnitus to study polarity specific effects of a single tDCS session over the auditory cortex (39 anodal, 136 cathodal. To assess the effect of treatment, we used the numeric rating scale for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant main effect for tinnitus loudness and annoyance, but for tinnitus annoyance anodal stimulation has a significantly more pronounced effect than cathodal stimulation. We hypothesize that the suppressive effect of tDCS on tinnitus loudness may be attributed to a disrupting effect of ongoing neural hyperactivity, independent of the inhibitory or excitatory effects and that the reduction of annoyance may be induced by influencing adjacent or functionally connected brain areas involved in the tinnitus related distress network. Further research is required to explain why only anodal stimulation has a suppressive effect on tinnitus annoyance.

  20. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-10-24

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics.

  1. Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Won; Kwon, Yuri; Lee, Sang-Ki; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Kwon, Do-Young; Lee, Chan-Nyeong; Park, Kun-Woo; Manto, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, "arms stretched forward", was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90% during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.

  2. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution.

  3. Curcumin suppresses growth of mesothelioma cells in vitro and in vivo, in part, by stimulating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Rishi, Arun K; Wu, Wenjuan; Polin, Lisa; Sharma, Sunita; Levi, Edi; Albelda, Steven; Pass, Harvey I; Wali, Anil

    2011-11-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, asbestos-related malignancy of the thoracic pleura. Although, platinum-based agents are the first line of therapy, there is an urgent need for second-line therapies to treat the drug-resistant MPM. Cell cycle as well as apoptosis pathways are frequently altered in MPM and thus remain attractive targets for intervention strategies. Curcumin, the major component in the spice turmeric, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics has been under investigation for a number of cancers. In this study, we investigated the biological and molecular responses of MPM cells to curcumin treatments and the mechanisms involved. Flow-cytometric analyses coupled with western immunoblotting and gene-array analyses were conducted to determine mechanisms of curcumin-dependent growth suppression of human (H2373, H2452, H2461, and H226) and murine (AB12) MPM cells. Curcumin inhibited MPM cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner while pretreatment of MPM cells with curcumin enhanced cisplatin efficacy. Curcumin activated the stress-activated p38 kinase, caspases 9 and 3, caused elevated levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax, stimulated PARP cleavage, and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin treatments stimulated expression of novel transducers of cell growth suppression such as CARP-1, XAF1, and SULF1 proteins. Oral administration of curcumin inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo in part by stimulating apoptosis. Thus, curcumin targets cell cycle and promotes apoptosis to suppress MPM growth in vitro and in vivo. Our studies provide a proof-of-principle rationale for further in-depth analysis of MPM growth suppression mechanisms and their future exploitation in effective management of resistant MPM.

  4. Epidural motor cortex stimulation suppresses somatosensory evoked potentials in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Lee, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Chen-Wei; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Kuo, Chung-Chih

    2012-06-29

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is a promising clinical procedure to help alleviate chronic pain. Animal models demonstrated that MCS is effective in lessening nocifensive behaviors. The present study explored the effects of MCS on cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded at the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) of the rat. SEPs were evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the contralateral forepaws. Effects of different intensities, frequencies, and durations of MCS were tested. MCS at ≥2V suppressed SEPs of the ipsilateral SI. Suppression lasted 120 min at an intensity of 5 V. The optimal frequency was 50 Hz, and the duration was 30s. In contrast, MCS did not affect SEPs recorded on the contralateral SI. Cortical stimulation out of the motor cortex did not induce a decrease in the ipsilateral SEPs. We also investigated involvement of the endogenous opioid system in this inhibition of SEPs induced by MCS. The opioid antagonist, naloxone (0.5 mg/kg), was administered 30 min before MCS. Application of naloxone completely prevented the inhibitory effect of MCS on ipsilateral SEPs. These results demonstrate that MCS blocked the transmission of somatosensory information to the primary somatosensory cortex, and this interference was mediated by the endogenous opioid system. This inhibitory effect on sensory transmission induced by MCS may reflect its antinociceptive effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lutein Enhances Bone Mass by Stimulating Bone Formation and Suppressing Bone Resorption in Growing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Watanabe, Kenta; Matsumoto, Chiho; Grundler, Florian M W; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a member of the xanthophyll family of carotenoids, which are known to prevent hypoxia-induced cell damage in the eye by removing free radicals. However, its role in other tissues is controversial, and the effects of lutein on bone tissues are unknown. To identify a possible role of lutein in bone tissues, we examined the effects of lutein on bone formation and bone resorption and on femoral bone mass in mice. Lutein enhanced the formation of mineralized bone nodules in cultures of osteoblasts. On the other hand, lutein clearly suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced bone resorption as measured by pit formation in organ culture of mouse calvaria. In co-cultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts, lutein suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced osteoclast formation. In cultures of bone marrow macrophages, lutein suppressed soluble RANKL, the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) ligand, induced osteoclast formation. When five-week-old male mice were orally administered lutein for 4 weeks, the femoral bone mass was clearly enhanced in cortical bone, as measured by bone mineral density in dual X-ray absorptiometry and micro computed tomography (µCT) analyses. The present study indicates that lutein enhances bone mass in growing mice by suppressing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Lutein may be a natural agent that promotes bone turnover and may be beneficial for bone health in humans.

  6. Role of the red nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the raphe magnus nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study, we found that electrical and chemical stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR). It has been reported that the RN receives bilaterally projection fibers from the raphe magnus nucleus (RMg), and that stimulation of the RMg inhibits the tooth pulp-evoked nociceptive JOR. These facts imply that RMg-induced inhibition of the JOR could be mediated via the RN. The present study first examines whether stimulation of the RMg suppresses the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RMg significantly suppressed the JOR. A further study then examined whether electrically induced lesions of the RN or microinjection of muscimol into the RN affects RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. Electrically induced lesions of the bilateral RN and microinjection of muscimol into the bilateral RN both reduced the RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. These results suggest that RMg-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the RN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Artificial sweeteners stimulate adipogenesis and suppress lipolysis independently of sweet taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Becky R; Parlee, Sebastian D; Learman, Brian S; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L; Cawthorn, William P; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Evans, Charles R; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2013-11-08

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3.

  8. Artificial Sweeteners Stimulate Adipogenesis and Suppress Lipolysis Independently of Sweet Taste Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Becky R.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Learman, Brian S.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L.; Cawthorn, William P.; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Evans, Charles R.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  9. Induction of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha: suppression of centrally stimulated gastric motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, G E; Tovar, C A; Rogers, R C

    1999-01-01

    Gastric stasis is frequently seen in conjunction with critical infectious illness, chronic inflammatory disorders, radiation sickness, and carcinogenesis. These conditions are associated with elevated circulating levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The present studies examined the relationship between endogenously produced TNF-alpha and the central neural mechanisms that augment gastric motility. Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was employed to induce TNF-alpha production in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats. Sixty minutes after intravenous LPS injection, gastric motility could not be stimulated by a potent centrally acting gastrokinetic stimulant, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). This failure to elicit gastric motility via central mechanisms coincided with high circulating levels of TNF-alpha. However, intravenous injections of bethanecol, a peripherally acting cholinergic agonist with direct gastrokinetic effects, were still able to elicit normal increases in gastric motility in the presence of TNF-alpha and LPS. Therefore, the inability to stimulate gastric motility via central TRH could not be attributed to the direct inhibitory effects of either LPS or TNF-alpha on the stomach. If the production of endogenous TNF-alpha was suppressed via the use of urethan as the anesthetic agent, then intravenous injections of LPS were no longer effective in suppressing gastric motility. Thus these effects on gastric motility are not directly attributable to LPS nor are they due to direct effects on the gastric smooth muscle. Our previous study demonstrated that microinjection of femtomole quantities of TNF-alpha in the brain stem dorsal vagal complex (DVC) can modulate gastric motility. This central TNF-alpha effect on gastric motility was dose dependent and required an intact vagal efferent pathway. The results from these two studies suggest that systemically produced TNF-alpha may gain access to the DVC to modulate gastric function.

  10. Tinnitus Suppression by Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation in Single Sided Deafness – A Prospective Clinical Trial: Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Remo A. G. J.; George, Erwin L. J.; Janssen, Miranda; Griessner, Andreas; Zierhofer, Clemens; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Earlier studies show that a Cochlear Implant (CI), capable of providing intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, appears to suppress tinnitus at least for minutes. The current main objective is to compare the long-term suppressive effects of looped (i.e. repeated) electrical stimulation (without environmental sound perception) with the standard stimulation pattern of a CI (with environmental sound perception). This could open new possibilities for the development of a “Tinnitus Implant” (TI), an intracochlear pulse generator for the suppression of tinnitus. Materials and Methods Ten patients with single sided deafness suffering from unilateral tinnitus in the deaf ear are fitted with a CI (MED-EL Corporation, Innsbruck, Austria). Stimulation patterns are optimized for each individual patient, after which they are compared using a randomized crossover design, with a follow-up of six months, followed by a 3 month period using the modality of patient’s choice. Results Results show that tinnitus can be suppressed with intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, even long term. No significant difference in tinnitus suppression was found between the standard clinical CI and the TI. Conclusion It can be concluded that coding of environmental sounds is no requirement for tinnitus suppression with intracochlear electrical stimulation. It is therefore plausible that tinnitus suppression by CI is not solely caused by an attention shift from the tinnitus to environmental sounds. Both the standard clinical CI and the experimental TI are potential treatment options for tinnitus. These findings offer perspectives for a successful clinical application of the TI, possibly even in patients with significant residual hearing. Trial Registration TrialRegister.nl NTR3374 PMID:27111333

  11. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  12. Extreme temperature sensing using brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Fellay, Alexandre

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in silica-based optical fibers may be considered from two different and complementary standpoints. For a physicist, this interaction of light and pressure wave in a material, or equivalently in quantum theory terms between photons and phonons, gives some glimpses of the atomic structure of the solid and of its vibration modes. For an applied engineer, the same phenomenon may be put to good use as a sensing mechanism for distributed measurements, thanks to the dependence of the scattered light on external parameters such as the temperature, the pressure or the strain applied to the fiber. As far as temperature measurements are concerned, Brillouin-based distributed sensors have progressively gained wide recognition as efficient systems, even if their rather high cost still restricts the number of their applications. Yet they are generally used in a relatively narrow temperature range around the usual ambient temperature; in this domain, the frequency of the scattered light incre...

  13. Magnetic and electric stimulation to elicit the masseteric exteroceptive suppression period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komiyama, Osamu; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    : In contrast to electrical stimulation, both ES1 and ES2 appeared and saturated with painless magnetic stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE: The present results indicate that both ES1 and ES2 have a non-nociceptive origin. Painless magnetic stimuli will be an advantage in ES reflex examinations for various orofacial pain......OBJECTIVES: The present study compared the perception of electric and magnetic stimuli for reflex appearance threshold (RT) and reflex saturation threshold (RS) of the exteroceptive suppression reflex (ES) in the masseter muscle. METHODS: Twelve healthy males and 12 females (age: 24.2+/-3.2 years......) participated. The surface EMG was recorded from the left masseter muscle. The stimulus intensities were set as multiple values of the sensory threshold (ST), and were applied to the skin above the left mental nerve. Subjects reported the perceived intensity of the stimulus on a numeric rating scale (NRS) at RT...

  14. Nitroxyl (HNO stimulates soluble guanylyl cyclase to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and superoxide generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Q Lin

    Full Text Available New therapeutic targets for cardiac hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for heart failure and death, are essential. HNO is a novel redox sibling of NO• attracting considerable attention for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders, eliciting cGMP-dependent vasodilatation yet cGMP-independent positive inotropy. The impact of HNO on cardiac hypertrophy (which is negatively regulated by cGMP however has not been investigated.Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with angiotensin II (Ang II in the presence and absence of the HNO donor Angeli's salt (sodium trioxodinitrate or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP (all 1 µmol/L. Hypertrophic responses and its triggers, as well as cGMP signaling, were determined.We now demonstrate that Angeli's salt inhibits Ang II-induced hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes, including increases in cardiomyocyte size, de novo protein synthesis and β-myosin heavy chain expression. Angeli's salt also suppresses Ang II induction of key triggers of the cardiomyocyte hypertrophic response, including NADPH oxidase (on both Nox2 expression and superoxide generation, as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK. The antihypertrophic, superoxide-suppressing and cGMP-elevating effects of Angeli's salt were mimicked by BNP. We also demonstrate that the effects of Angeli's salt are specifically mediated by HNO (with no role for NO• or nitrite, with subsequent activation of cardiomyocyte soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and cGMP signaling (on both cGMP-dependent protein kinase, cGK-I and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, VASP.Our results demonstrate that HNO prevents cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and that cGMP-dependent NADPH oxidase suppression contributes to these antihypertrophic actions. HNO donors may thus represent innovative pharmacotherapy for cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. Recombinant Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein suppresses toll-like receptor stimulation in response to multiple bacterial ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Benítez, Marcos J; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb; Aguayo, Vasti; Espino, Ana M

    2017-07-14

    Recently, we reported that a native Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein (FABP) termed Fh12 is a powerful anti-inflammatory protein capable of suppressing the LPS-induced expression of inflammatory markers in vivo and in vitro. Because the purification of a protein in native form is, in many situations not cost-beneficial and unsuitable for industrial grade scale-up, this study accomplished the task of optimizing the expression and purification of a recombinant form of FABP (Fh15). Additionally, we ascertained whether this molecule could exhibit a similar suppressive effect on TLR-stimulation and inflammatory cytokine expression from macrophages than those previously demonstrated for the native molecule. Results demonstrated that Fh15 suppresses the expression of IL-1β and TNFα in murine macrophages and THP1 Blue CD14 cells. Additionally, Fh15 suppress the LPS-induced TLR4 stimulation. This effect was not impaired by a thermal denaturing process or blocked by the presence of anti-Fh12 antibodies. Fh15 also suppressed the stimulation of various TLRs in response to whole bacteria extracts, suggesting that Fh15 could have a broad spectrum of action. These results support the possibility of using Fh15 as an excellent alternative for an anti-inflammatory drug in preclinical studies in the near future.

  16. Suppression of motor cortical excitability in anesthetized rats by low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Muller

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a widely-used method for modulating cortical excitability in humans, by mechanisms thought to involve use-dependent synaptic plasticity. For example, when low frequency rTMS (LF rTMS is applied over the motor cortex, in humans, it predictably leads to a suppression of the motor evoked potential (MEP, presumably reflecting long-term depression (LTD -like mechanisms. Yet how closely such rTMS effects actually match LTD is unknown. We therefore sought to (1 reproduce cortico-spinal depression by LF rTMS in rats, (2 establish a reliable animal model for rTMS effects that may enable mechanistic studies, and (3 test whether LTD-like properties are evident in the rat LF rTMS setup. Lateralized MEPs were obtained from anesthetized Long-Evans rats. To test frequency-dependence of LF rTMS, rats underwent rTMS at one of three frequencies, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 Hz. We next tested the dependence of rTMS effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR, by application of two NMDAR antagonists. We find that 1 Hz rTMS preferentially depresses unilateral MEP in rats, and that this LTD-like effect is blocked by NMDAR antagonists. These are the first electrophysiological data showing depression of cortical excitability following LF rTMS in rats, and the first to demonstrate dependence of this form of cortical plasticity on the NMDAR. We also note that our report is the first to show that the capacity for LTD-type cortical suppression by rTMS is present under barbiturate anesthesia, suggesting that future neuromodulatory rTMS applications under anesthesia may be considered.

  17. Cell type-specific suppression of mechanosensitive genes by audible sound stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Takahashi, Daiji; Takeyasu, Kunio; Yoshimura, Shige H

    2018-01-01

    Audible sound is a ubiquitous environmental factor in nature that transmits oscillatory compressional pressure through the substances. To investigate the property of the sound as a mechanical stimulus for cells, an experimental system was set up using 94.0 dB sound which transmits approximately 10 mPa pressure to the cultured cells. Based on research on mechanotransduction and ultrasound effects on cells, gene responses to the audible sound stimulation were analyzed by varying several sound parameters: frequency, wave form, composition, and exposure time. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed a distinct suppressive effect for several mechanosensitive and ultrasound-sensitive genes that were triggered by sounds. The effect was clearly observed in a wave form- and pressure level-specific manner, rather than the frequency, and persisted for several hours. At least two mechanisms are likely to be involved in this sound response: transcriptional control and RNA degradation. ST2 stromal cells and C2C12 myoblasts exhibited a robust response, whereas NIH3T3 cells were partially and NB2a neuroblastoma cells were completely insensitive, suggesting a cell type-specific response to sound. These findings reveal a cell-level systematic response to audible sound and uncover novel relationships between life and sound.

  18. High-Frequency Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus Suppresses Excessive Self-Grooming in Autism-Like Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew D; Berges, Victoria A; Chung, Sunho J; Fridman, Gene Y; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately one quarter of individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display self-injurious behavior (SIB) ranging from head banging to self-directed biting and punching. Sometimes, these behaviors are extreme and unresponsive to pharmacological and behavioral therapies. We have found electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can produce life-changing results, with more than 90% suppression of SIB frequency. However, these patients typically require frequent maintenance ECT (mECT), as often as every 5 days, to sustain the improvement gained during the acute course. Long-term consequences of such frequent mECT started as early as childhood in some cases are unknown. Accordingly, there is a need for alternative forms of chronic stimulation for these patients. To explore the feasibility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for intractable SIB seen in some patients with an ASD, we utilized two genetically distinct mouse models demonstrating excessive self-grooming, namely the Viaat-Mecp2(-/y) and Shank3B(-/-) lines, and administered high-frequency stimulation (HFS) via implanted electrodes at the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS). We found that STN-HFS significantly suppressed excessive self-grooming in both genetic lines. Suppression occurs both acutely when stimulation is switched on, and persists for several days after HFS is stopped. This effect was not explained by a change in locomotor activity, which was unaffected by STN-HFS. Likewise, social interaction deficits were not corrected by STN-HFS. Our data show STN-HFS suppresses excessive self-grooming in two autism-like mouse models, raising the possibility DBS might be used to treat intractable SIB associated with ASDs. Further studies are required to explore the circuitry engaged by STN-HFS, as well as other potential stimulation sites. Such studies might also yield clues about pathways, which could be modulated by non-invasive stimulatory techniques.

  19. KrF laser amplifier with phase-conjugate Brillouin retroreflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, M C

    1982-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of phase-conjugate stimulated Brillouin scattering mirrors to produce high-quality, short-pulse KrF laser beams from angular multiplexed and regenerative amplifiers. The mirror was also shown to isolate systems optically from amplifier spontaneous emission. Automatic alignment of targets using this mirror as a retroreflector was also demonstrated.

  20. Non-local effect in Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer based on Raman amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xinhong; Rao Yunjiang; Wang Zinan; Zhang Weili; Ran Zengling; Deng Kun; Yang Zixin

    2012-01-01

    Compared with conventional Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer (BOTDA), the BOTDA based on Raman amplification allows longer sensing range, higher signal-to-noise ratio and higher measurement accuracy. However, the non-local effect induced by pump depletion significantly restricts the probe optical power injected to sensing fiber, thereby limiting the further extension for sensing distance. In this paper, the coupled equations including the interaction of probe light, Brillouin and Raman pumps are applied to the study on the non-local characteristics of BOTDA based on Raman amplification. The results show that, the system error induced by non-local effect worsens with increased powers of probe wave and Raman pump. The frequency-division-multiplexing (cascading the fibers with various Brillouin frequency shifts) and time-division-multiplexing (modulating both of the Brillouin pump and probe lights) technologies are efficient approaches to suppress the non-local effect, through shortening the effective interaction range between Brillouin pump and probe lights. (authors)

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases GFR and suppresses proximal reabsorption in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Scott C; Kashkouli, Ali; Singh, Prabhleen

    2013-01-15

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from the gut in response to fat or carbohydrate and contributes to negative feedback control of blood glucose by stimulating insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon, and slowing gastric emptying. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are also expressed in the proximal tubule, and possibly elsewhere in the kidney. Presently, we examined the effect of a GLP-1R agonist on single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (GFR; SNGFR), proximal reabsorption (Jprox), tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) responses, and urine flow rate in hydropenic male Wistar and Wistar-Froemter rats. Micropuncture and whole-kidney data were obtained before and during infusion of the GLP-1 agonist exenatide (1 nmol/h iv). SNGFR and Jprox were measured by late proximal collection at both extremes of TGF activation, which was achieved by perfusing Henle's loop at 0 or 50 nl/min. Primary changes in Jprox were revealed by analysis of covariance for Jprox with SNGFR as a covariate. Effects on TGF activation were determined in a separate set of experiments by comparing early distal and late proximal collections. Exenatide increased SNGFR by 33-50%, suppressed proximal tubular reabsorption by 20-40%, doubled early distal flow rate, and increased urine flow rate sixfold without altering the efficiency of glomerulotubular balance, TGF responsiveness, or the tonic influence of TGF. This implies that exenatide is both a proximal diuretic and a renal vasodilator. Since the natural agonist for the GLP-1R is regulated by intake of fat and carbohydrate, but not by salt or fluid, the control of salt excretion by the GLP-1R system departs from the usual negative-feedback paradigm for regulating salt balance.

  2. FIBER OPTICS, HOLOGRAPHY, AND OPTICAL DATA PROCESSING: Phase-conjugation suppression of the phase noise during propagation of giant laser pulses in an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belous, A. I.; Grigoruk, V. I.; Pasechnyĭ, V. A.; Strizhevskiĭ, V. L.; Chernyshov, V. A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the suppression of phase noise during propagation of giant ruby laser pulses in short (up to 0.1 m) multimode fiber waveguides. A segment of a fiber waveguide, in which stimulated Brillouin scattering took place, acted as a mirror performing phase conjugation. The dependences of the parameters of the corrected signal on the lengths of both waveguide segments were determined.

  3. Down-Regulation by Resveratrol of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Stimulated Osteoprotegerin Synthesis through Suppression of Akt in Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Otsuka, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Nakakami, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    It is firmly established that resveratrol, a natural food compound abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, has beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells and whether resveratrol affects the OPG synthesis. FGF-2 stimulated both the OPG release and the expression of OPG mRNA. Resveratrol significantly suppressed the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, reduced the FGF-2-induced OPG release and the OPG mRNA expression. PD98059, an inhibitor of upstream kinase activating p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, had little effect on the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release. On the other hand, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), and Akt inhibitor suppressed the OPG release induced by FGF-2. Resveratrol failed to affect the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK. The phosphorylation of Akt induced by FGF-2 was significantly suppressed by resveratrol or SRT1720. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol down-regulates FGF-2-stimulated OPG synthesis through the suppression of the Akt pathway in osteoblasts and that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol is mediated at least in part by SIRT1 activation. PMID:25290095

  4. Is suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) associated with subclinical depression in the Danish General Suburban Population Study?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, Jan; Ellervik, Christina; Bech, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The first phase of the Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) including 8214 individuals was an attempt to evaluate the association between subclinical hypothyroidism without or with elevated peroxidase antibodies and depression. No such association was found. In the second...... phase, including 14,787 individuals, we have focused on suppressed TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and depression. AIMS: To evaluate to what extent suppressed TSH is associated with subclinical depression. METHODS: The total scores of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) were used to evaluate...... subclinical depression, both by its total score and by an algorithm of the subthreshold depressed by presence of at least three of the 10 ICD-10 depression symptoms. Serum levels of TSH were used to classify the individuals into suppressed (TSH

  5. Model-based stimulation optimization for chronic pain suppression using percutaneous and surgical leads in spinal cord stimulation (SCS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankarasubramanian, V.

    2013-01-01

    The primary indication of SCS is chronic pain, in particular neuropathic pain. It is a highly debilitating condition, and in particular, is estimated to affect about one-fifth of the population in Europe (18% in the Netherlands). SCS, which uses electrical stimulation, is a valuable treatment for

  6. Lutein, a carotenoid, suppresses osteoclastic bone resorption and stimulates bone formation in cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Grundler, Florian M W; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2017-02-01

    Lutein, a member of the xanthophyll family of carotenoids, suppressed IL-1-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. The survival of mature osteoclasts was also suppressed by lutein in cultures. When lutein was added to the cultures of osteoblasts, lutein enhanced the formation of mineralized bone nodules by elevating BMP2 expression and inhibiting sclerostin expression. Lutein may be beneficial for bone health.

  7. A comparison of continuous thalamic stimulation and thalamotomy for suppression of severe tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, P. R.; Bosch, D. A.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Bonsel, G. J.; van Someren, E. J.; de Bie, R. M.; Merkus, M. P.; Speelman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deep-brain stimulation through an electrode implanted in the thalamus was developed as an alternative to thalamotomy for the treatment of drug-resistant tremor. Stimulation is thought to be as effective as thalamotomy but to have fewer complications. We examined the effects of these two

  8. Suppression of pokeweed mitogen-stimulated immunoglobulin production in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Engleman, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI, 200 rad). The authors previously reported long-lasting clinical improvement in this group associated with a persistent decrease in circulating Leu-3 (helper subset) T cells and marked impairment of in vitro lymphocyte function. In the present experiments, they studied the mechanisms underlying the decrease in pokeweed mitogen stimulated immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion observed after TLI. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBL) from TLI-treated patients produced 10-fold less Ig (both IgM and IgG) in response to pokeweed mitogen than before radiotherapy. This decrease in Ig production was associated with the presence of suppressor cells in co-culture studies. By using responder cells obtained from normal individuals (allogeneic system), PBL from eight of 12 patients after TLI suppressed Ig synthesis by more than 50%. In contrast, PBL from the same patients before TLI failed to suppress Ig synthesis. PBL with suppressive activity contained suppressor T cells, and the latter cells bore the Leu-2 surface antigen. In 50% of the patients studied suppressor cells were also found in the non-T fraction and were adherent to plastic. Interestingly, the Leu-2 + cells from TLI-treated patients were no more potent on a cell per cell basis than purified Leu-2 + cells obtained before TLI. Additional experiments suggested that the suppression mediated by T cells after TLI is related to the increased ratio of Leu-2 to Leu-3 cells observed after radiotherapy

  9. Endothelin‐1 suppresses insulin‐stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake via GPCR kinase 2 in skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Akimasa; Harada, Takuya; Higa, Tsunaki; Karki, Sarita; Terada, Koji; Higashi, Tsunehito; Mai, Yosuke; Nepal, Prabha; Mazaki, Yuichi; Miwa, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelin‐1 (ET‐1) reduces insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, inducing insulin resistance. Here, we have determined the molecular mechanisms underlying negative regulation by ET‐1 of insulin signalling. Experimental Approach We used the rat L6 skeletal muscle cells fully differentiated into myotubes. Changes in the phosphorylation of Akt was assessed by Western blotting. Effects of ET‐1 on insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake was assessed with [3H]‐2‐deoxy‐d‐glucose ([3H]2‐DG). The C‐terminus region of GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2‐ct), a dominant negative GRK2, was overexpressed in L6 cells using adenovirus‐mediated gene transfer. GRK2 expression was suppressed by transfection of the corresponding short‐interfering RNA (siRNA). Key Results In L6 myotubes, insulin elicited sustained Akt phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473, which was suppressed by ET‐1. The inhibitory effects of ET‐1 were prevented by treatment with a selective ETA receptor antagonist and a Gq protein inhibitor, overexpression of GRK2‐ct and knockdown of GRK2. Insulin increased [3H]2‐DG uptake rate in a concentration‐dependent manner. ET‐1 noncompetitively antagonized insulin‐stimulated [3H]2‐DG uptake. Blockade of ETA receptors, overexpression of GRK2‐ct and knockdown of GRK2 prevented the ET‐1‐induced suppression of insulin‐stimulated [3H]2‐DG uptake. In L6 myotubes overexpressing FLAG‐tagged GRK2, ET‐1 facilitated the interaction of endogenous Akt with FLAG‐GRK2. Conclusions and Implications Activation of ETA receptors with ET‐1 suppressed insulin‐induced Akt phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 and [3H]2‐DG uptake in a GRK2‐dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells. These findings suggest that ETA receptors and GRK2 are potential targets for overcoming insulin resistance. PMID:26660861

  10. Widely tunable multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with triple Brillouin-shift wavelength spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Al-Sheriyani, A.; Younis, M. A. A.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a widely tunable multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MBEFL) having a wavelength spacing of 0.25 nm (triple Brillouin-shift wavelength spacing). The proposed laser structure overcomes the need for Brillouin pump wavelength to be closed to the self-lasing cavity modes region. The laser exhibits a wide tuning range of 40 nm (from 1530 nm to 1570 nm) at Brillouin pump and 980 nm pump powers of 25 mW and 350 mW, respectively. Four stable output channels are produced within this wavelength range with all the channels having a peak output power greater than 1.58 mW. The laser has the potential to be used as a multiwavelength laser source for dense wavelength division multiplexing communication.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of early visual cortex suppresses conscious representations in a dichotomous manner without gradually decreasing their precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Mika; Harjuniemi, Inari; Railo, Henry; Salminen-Vaparanta, Niina; Revonsuo, Antti

    2017-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of early visual cortex can suppresses visual perception at early stages of processing. The suppression can be measured both with objective forced-choice tasks and with subjective ratings of visual awareness, but there is lack of objective evidence on how and whether the TMS influences the quality of representations. Does TMS decrease the precision of representations in graded manner, or does it lead to dichotomous, "all-or-nothing" suppression. We resolved this question by using a continuous measure of the perceptual error: the observers had to perceive the orientation of a target (Landort-C) and to adjust the orientation of a probe to match that of the target. Mixture modeling was applied to estimate the probability of guess trials and the standard deviation of the non-guess trials. TMS delivered 60-150 ms after stimulus-onset influenced only the guessing rate, whereas the standard deviation (i.e., precision) was not affected. This suggests that TMS suppressed representations dichotomously without affecting their precision. The guessing probability correlated with subjective visibility ratings, suggesting that it measured visual awareness. In a control experiment, manipulation of the stimulus contrast affected the standard deviation of the errors, indicating that contrast has a gradual influence on the precision of representations. The findings suggest that TMS of early visual cortex suppresses perception in dichotomous manner by decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the noise level, whereas reduction of the signal level (i.e., contrast) decreases the precision of representations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiwavelength ytterbium-Brillouin random Rayleigh feedback fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Wang, Zinan; Fan, Mengqiu; Li, Jiaqi; Meng, Qingyang; Xu, Dangpeng; Rao, Yunjiang

    2018-03-01

    In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate the multiwavelength ytterbium-Brillouin random fiber laser for the first time, in the half-open cavity formed by a fiber loop mirror and randomly distributed Rayleigh mirrors. With a cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fiber and a long TrueWave fiber, the narrow linewidth Brillouin pump can generate multiple Brillouin Stokes lines with hybrid ytterbium-Brillouin gain. Up to six stable channels with a spacing of about 0.06 nm are obtained. This work extends the operation wavelength of the multiwavelength Brillouin random fiber laser to the 1 µm band, and has potential in various applications.

  13. The intact strontium ranelate complex stimulates osteoblastogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis by antagonizing NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Weitzmann, M Neale

    2012-01-01

    Strontium ranelate, a pharmaceutical agent shown in clinical trials to be effective in managing osteoporosis and reducing fracture risk in postmenopausal women, is relatively unique in its ability to both blunt bone resorption and stimulate bone formation. However, its mechanisms of action are largely unknown. As the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation antagonists both stimulate osteoblastic bone formation and repress osteoclastic bone resorption, we hypothesized that strontium ranelate may achieve its anabolic and anti-catabolic activities by modulating NF-κB activation in bone cells. In this study, osteoclast and osteoblast precursors were treated with intact strontium ranelate or its individual components sodium ranelate and/or strontium chloride, and its effect on in vitro osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and on NF-κB activation quantified. Although the activity of strontium ranelate has been attributed to the release of strontium ions, low dose intact strontium ranelate complex, but not sodium ranelate and/or strontium chloride, potently antagonized NF-κB activation in osteoclasts and osteoblasts in vitro, and promoted osteoblast differentiation while suppressing osteoclast formation. Taken together, our data suggest a novel centralized mechanism by which strontium ranelate promotes osteoblast activity and suppresses osteoclastogenesis, based on suppression of NF-κB signal transduction. We further demonstrate that the biological actions of strontium ranelate may be related to low dose of the intact molecule rather than dissociation and release of strontium ions, as previously thought. These data may facilitate the development of additional novel pharmacological agents for the amelioration of osteoporosis, based on NF-κB blockade.

  14. The effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on suppression of habitual counting during random number generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, M; Profice, P; Brown, R G; Ridding, M C; Dirnberger, G; Rothwell, J C

    1998-08-01

    Random number generation is an attention-demanding task that engages working memory and executive processes. Random number generation requires holding information 'on line', suppression of habitual counting, internally driven response generation and monitoring of responses. Evidence from PET studies suggests that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is involved in the generation of random responses. We examined the effects of short trains of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left or right DLPFC or medial frontal cortex on random number generation in healthy normal participants. As in previous evidence, in control trials without stimulation participants performed poorly on the random number generation task, showing repetition avoidance and a tendency to count. Brief disruption of processing with TMS over the left DLPFC changed the balance of the individuals' counting bias, increasing the most habitual counting in ones and reducing the lower probability response of counting in twos. This differential effect of TMS over the left DLPFC on the balance of the subject's counting bias was not obtained with TMS over the right DLPFC or the medial frontal cortex. The results suggest that, with disruption of the left DLPFC with TMS, habitual counting in ones that has previously been suppressed is released from inhibition. From these findings a network modulation model of random number generation is proposed, whereby suppression of habitual responses is achieved through the modulatory influence of the left DLPFC over a number-associative network in the superior temporal cortex. To allow emergence of appropriate random responses, the left DLPFC inhibits the superior temporal cortex to prevent spreading activation and habitual counting in ones.

  15. Repetition suppression in transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potentials is modulated by cortical inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, E; Pääkkönen, A; Julkunen, P

    2015-12-03

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to modulate cortical phenomena. The modulation effect is dependent on the applied stimulation frequency. Repetition suppression (RS) has been demonstrated in the motor system using TMS with short suprathreshold 1-Hz stimulation trains repeated at long inter-train intervals. RS has been reported to occur in the resting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) with respect to the first pulse in a train of stimuli. Although this RS in the motor system has been described in previous studies, the neuronal origin of the phenomenon is still poorly understood. The present study evaluated RS in three TMS-induced motor responses; resting and active MEPs as well as corticospinal silent periods (SPs) in order to clarify the mechanism behind TMS-induced RS. We studied 10 healthy right-handed subjects using trains of four stimuli with stimulation intensities of 120% of the resting motor threshold (rMT) and 120% of the silent period threshold for an SP duration of 30 ms (SPT30). Inter-trial interval was 20s, with a 1-s inter-stimulus interval within the trains. We confirmed that RS appears in resting MEPs (p 0.792). SPs, on the contrary, lengthened (p < 0.001) indicating modulation of cortical inhibition. The effects of the two stimulation intensities exhibited a similar trend; however, the SPT30 evoked a more profound inhibitory effect compared to that achieved by rMT. Moreover, the resting MEP amplitudes and SP durations correlated (rho ⩽ -0.674, p < 0.001) and the pre-TMS EMG level did not differ between stimuli in resting MEPs (F = 0.0, p ⩾ 0.999). These results imply that the attenuation of response size seen in resting MEPs might originate from increasing activity of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons which relay the characteristics of SPs. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer.

  17. Does Prolonged Therapy with a Long-Acting Stimulant Suppress Growth in Children with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Lerner, Marc; Cooper, Kimberly M.; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether prolonged therapy with a long-acting stimulant affects growth in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: One hundred seventy-eight children ages 6 to 13 years received OROS methylphenidate (OROS MPH, CONCERTA) for at least 21 months. Height and weight were measured monthly during the…

  18. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  19. Tibialis anterior stretch reflex in early stance is suppressed by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuur, Abraham T; Christensen, Mark Schram; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A rapid plantar flexion perturbation in the early stance phase of walking elicits a large stretch reflex in tibialis anterior (TA). In this study we use repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to test if this response is mediated through a transcortical pathway. TA stretch...... reflexes were elicited in the early stance phase of the step cycle during treadmill walking. 20 minutes of 1 Hz rTMS at 115% resting motor threshold (MTr) significantly decreased (p

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases GFR and suppresses proximal reabsorption in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Scott C.; Kashkouli, Ali; Singh, Prabhleen

    2012-01-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from the gut in response to fat or carbohydrate and contributes to negative feedback control of blood glucose by stimulating insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon, and slowing gastric emptying. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are also expressed in the proximal tubule, and possibly elsewhere in the kidney. Presently, we examined the effect of a GLP-1R agonist on single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (GFR; SNGFR), proximal reabsorpt...

  1. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Amyloid β Production in the Human Lens Epithelial Cell Stimulated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Kotani, Sachiyo; Mano, Yu; Ueno, Akina; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kitaba, Toshio; Takata, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stresses induce the production of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain, lens, and retina, leading to age-related diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid on the Aβ levels in H2O2-stimulated human lens epithelial (HLE) SRA 01/04 cells. Three types of Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and Aβ1-43) were measured by ELISA, and the levels of mRNA for the expressed proteins related to Aβ production (APP, BACE1, and PS proteins) and degradation (ADAM10, NEP, and ECE1 proteins) were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. H2O2 stimulation augmented gene expression of the proteins related to Aβ production, resulting in the production of three types of Aβ peptides. Treatment with 0.1 μM ferulic acid attenuated the augmentations of gene expression and production of the proteins related to the secretion of three types of Aβ peptides in the H2O2-stimulated HLE cells. These results provided evidence of antioxidative functions of ferulic acid for lens epithelial cells. PMID:28409157

  2. Neutron Brillouin scattering in dense fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkerk, P. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands); FINGO Collaboration

    1997-04-01

    Thermal neutron scattering is a typical microscopic probe for investigating dynamics and structure in condensed matter. In contrast, light (Brillouin) scattering with its three orders of magnitude larger wavelength is a typical macroscopic probe. In a series of experiments using the improved small-angle facility of IN5 a significant step forward is made towards reducing the gap between the two. For the first time the transition from the conventional single line in the neutron spectrum scattered by a fluid to the Rayleigh-Brillouin triplet known from light-scattering experiments is clearly and unambiguously observed in the raw neutron data without applying any corrections. Results of these experiments are presented. (author).

  3. Limitation of brillouin scatter in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.; Valeo, E.J.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    A simple model is proposed for the limitation of Brillouin backscatter often observed experimentally. This limitation is a natural consequence of the limited mass and heat capacity of the underdense plasma. In this model a reflection front moves through the underdense plasma supersonically. For plasmas prepared by a prepulse, the reflectivity could then be time-dependent in agreement with some recent experimental measurements. (U.S.)

  4. [Tremor Suppression on Multi-DoF Wrist Joint Based on Functional Electrical Stimulation: A Simulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dingguo; Liu, Jianrong

    2015-04-01

    An automatic control system was designed to suppress pathological tremor on wrist joint with two degrees of freedom (DoF) using functional electrical stimulation (FES). The tremor occurring in the wrist flexion-extension and adduction-abduction was expected to be suppressed. A musculoskeletal model of wrist joint was developed to serve as the control plant, which covered four main muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris). A second-order mechanical impedance model was used to describe the wrist skeletal dynamics. The core work was to design the controller and a hybrid control strategy was proposed, which combined inverse model based on feed forward control and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control. Performance of the system was tested under different input conditions (step signal, sinusoidal signal, and real data of a patient)., The results indicated that the proposed hybrid controller could attenuate over 94% of the tremor amplitude on multi-DoF wrist joint.

  5. Estrogen stimulates osteoprotegerin expression via the suppression of miR-145 expression in MG-63 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Zeng, Xiantie; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is implicated in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, and other metabolic bone diseases caused by estrogen deficiency. Previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may stimulate OPG expression in osteoblast cells at the transcriptional level; however, whether estrogen can regulate OPG expression at a post-transcriptional level remains elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miRNA) in estrogen‑mediated OPG production in human osteoblast‑like MG‑63 cells. The results from ELISA, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) confirmed that estrogen may upregulate OPG expression. Mechanistic studies indicated that estrogen increased the activity of a luciferase reporter harboring the OPG 3'‑untranslated region (3'‑UTR). Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that there is a potential targeting site in the OPG 3'‑UTR for miRNA (miR)‑145, which is associated with osteoblast differentiation. The results of an RT‑qPCR suggested that estrogen suppressed miR‑145 expression. In addition, dual‑luciferase assay, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis indicated that miR‑145 directly targets and negatively regulates OPG expression. Furthermore, transfection of cells with miR‑145 mimics was able to partially inhibit the induction of OPG expression by estrogen, thus confirming the role of miR‑145 in estrogen‑mediated OPG induction. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that estrogen may post-transcriptionally regulate OPG expression through suppression of miR-145 expression.

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates repetition suppression to unfamiliar faces: an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe Lafontaine

    Full Text Available Repeated visual processing of an unfamiliar face suppresses neural activity in face-specific areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. This "repetition suppression" (RS is a primitive mechanism involved in learning of unfamiliar faces, which can be detected through amplitude reduction of the N170 event-related potential (ERP. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC exerts top-down influence on early visual processing. However, its contribution to N170 RS and learning of unfamiliar faces remains unclear. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS transiently increases or decreases cortical excitability, as a function of polarity. We hypothesized that DLPFC excitability modulation by tDCS would cause polarity-dependent modulations of N170 RS during encoding of unfamiliar faces. tDCS-induced N170 RS enhancement would improve long-term recognition reaction time (RT and/or accuracy rates, whereas N170 RS impairment would compromise recognition ability. Participants underwent three tDCS conditions in random order at ∼72 hour intervals: right anodal/left cathodal, right cathodal/left anodal and sham. Immediately following tDCS conditions, an EEG was recorded during encoding of unfamiliar faces for assessment of P100 and N170 visual ERPs. The P3a component was analyzed to detect prefrontal function modulation. Recognition tasks were administered ∼72 hours following encoding. Results indicate the right anodal/left cathodal condition facilitated N170 RS and induced larger P3a amplitudes, leading to faster recognition RT. Conversely, the right cathodal/left anodal condition caused N170 amplitude and RTs to increase, and a delay in P3a latency. These data demonstrate that DLPFC excitability modulation can influence early visual encoding of unfamiliar faces, highlighting the importance of DLPFC in basic learning mechanisms.

  7. NF-κB inhibitor dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin suppresses osteoclastogenesis and expression of NFATc1 in mouse arthritis without affecting expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin or macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Machiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Komano, Yukiko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of NF-κB is known to be effective in reducing both inflammation and bone destruction in animal models of arthritis. Our previous study demonstrated that a small cell-permeable NF-κB inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), suppresses expression of proinflammatory cytokines and ameliorates mouse arthritis. It remained unclear, however, whether DHMEQ directly affects osteoclast precursor cells to suppress their differentiation to mature osteoclasts in vivo. The effect of DHMEQ on human osteoclastogenesis also remained elusive. In the present study, we therefore examined the effect of DHMEQ on osteoclastogenesis using a mouse collagen-induced arthritis model, and using culture systems of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and of osteoclast precursor cells from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. DHMEQ significantly suppressed formation of osteoclasts in arthritic joints, and also suppressed expression of NFATc1 along the inner surfaces of bone lacunae and the eroded bone surface, while serum levels of soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were not affected by the treatment. DHMEQ also did not suppress spontaneous expression of RANKL nor of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in culture of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results suggest that DHMEQ suppresses osteoclastogenesis in vivo, through downregulation of NFATc1 expression, without significantly affecting expression of upstream molecules of the RANKL/receptor activator of NF-κB/osteoprotegerin cascade, at least in our experimental condition. Furthermore, in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, differentiation and activation of human osteoclasts were also suppressed by DHMEQ, suggesting the possibility of future application of NF-κB inhibitors to rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID

  8. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron

  9. A 2-center Comparative Study on Tonic Versus Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation: Amount of Responders and Amount of Pain Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, D.M.D.; Lenders, M.W.P.M.; de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; Dijkstra-Scholten, C.R.N.; Wolters, R.R.N.; Vancamp, T.P.T.; Van Looy, P.R.N.; Van Havenbergh, T.M.D.; Vanneste, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal cord stimulation is a safe and effective procedure applied for medically intractable neuropathic pain and failed back surgery syndrome. Recently, a novel stimulation paradigm was developed, called burst stimulation consisting of intermittent packets of closely spaced

  10. Protection against type 1 diabetes upon Coxsackievirus B4 infection and iNKT-cell stimulation: role of suppressive macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazarian, Liana; Diana, Julien; Beaudoin, Lucie; Larsson, Pär G; Puri, Raj K; van Rooijen, Nico; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Lehuen, Agnès

    2013-11-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells belong to the innate immune system and exercise a dual role as potent regulators of autoimmunity and participate in responses against different pathogens. They have been shown to prevent type 1 diabetes development and to promote antiviral responses. Many studies in the implication of environmental factors on the etiology of type 1 diabetes have suggested a link between enteroviral infections and the development of this disease. This study of the pancreatropic enterovirus Coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4) shows that although infection accelerated type 1 diabetes development in a subset of proinsulin 2-deficient NOD mice, the activation of iNKT cells by a specific agonist, α-galactosylceramide, at the time of infection inhibited the disease. Diabetes development was associated with the infiltration of pancreatic islets by inflammatory macrophages, producing high levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and activation of anti-islet T cells. On the contrary, macrophages infiltrating the islets after CVB4 infection and iNKT-cell stimulation expressed a number of suppressive enzymes, among which indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was sufficient to inhibit anti-islet T-cell response and to prevent diabetes. This study highlights the critical interaction between virus and the immune system in the acceleration or prevention of type 1 diabetes.

  11. Involvement of stimulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the suppressive effect of tropisetron on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaka, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Daiki; Kiyoi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Suemaru, Katsuya; Araki, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) involves chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Several agents are used to treat UC, but adverse side effects are remaining problems. We examined the effect of tropisetron as a new type of drug for UC using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced model of colitis in mice. We developed a DSS-induced model of colitis and calculated the Disease Activity Index and colon length. We measured myeloperoxidase activity and determined the protein level and mRNA level of cytokines in the colon. DSS-induced colitis was ameliorated by administration of tropisetron and PNU282987. Pre-administration of methyllycaconitine diminished the suppressive effect of tropisetron upon DSS-induced colitis. These findings suggested that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs) were related to the suppressive effect of tropisetron on DSS-induced colitis. Additionally, stimulation of α7 nAChRs decreased the colon level of interleukin-6 and interferon-γ upon DSS administration. Furthermore, stimulation of α7 nAChRs decreased macrophage infiltration, with expression of α7 nAChR increased by DSS administration. These results suggest that the underlying mechanism of this suppressive effect on DSS-induced colitis is via stimulation of α7 nAChRs and involves suppression of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Tropisetron could be a new type of therapeutic agent for UC. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Probing microscopic mechanical properties of hard tissues with Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical properties of hard tissues play an important role in understanding underlying biological structures, as well as assessing the quality of artificial bone replacement materials. In this study, we employed Brillouin spectroscopy as a non-invasive approach to probe the microscopic elasticity of hard tissues, such as bones. Brillouin spectra were collected using a background free virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. As a reference, Raman spectra were also acquired for each imaging point. Experimental results reveal a positive correlation between the local concentration of the mineral content and the corresponding tissue stiffness, assessed through a Brillouin shift.

  13. Comparing stimulation requirements and final outcome between early follicular and mid luteal pituitary suppression in the long gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Abdulmagid; Harira, Mervat; Elshazly, Sherine; Nouh, Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    To compare stimulation requirements and ICSI outcome when agonist treatment is started in the early follicular phase or in mid luteal phase of the cycle. 181 infertile patients were randomly assigned to: group A (N=66) and group B (N=115). GnRH-a (Triptorelin) subcutaneous daily injections started on day 20-22 of the previous cycle till pituitary suppression is achieved where gonadotropins stimulation commenced. In group A, agonist treatment was started on the first or second days of the cycle, in group B it was started on day 20-22 of the cycle. The agonist treatment was continued till the day of (hCG) administration. The stimulation requirements were similar in the two groups. The days of t agonist treatment required to reach pituitary suppression were higher in group A: 12.5±6.4 than in group B, 11±4.5. Days of stimulation (10.4±1.7 and 10.3±1.6) and number of gonadotropin vials (40.1±8.7and 39.3±9.5) did not differ between both groups. The mean number of oocytes retrieved, mean number of embryos produced (11.7±7.4 and 13.3±9.3) (5.9±4.2and 6±5.2) were similar in both groups. The rates of fertilization and cleavage were similar in the two groups. Pregnancy rates were similar in both groups. The clinical pregnancy rates per cycle was 31.8% and 33%, while pregnancy rates per embryo transfer was 36.2 % and 36.5% in groups A and B respectively. Starting pituitary suppression with GnRH agonist in the early follicular phase or mid luteal phase were comparable regarding stimulation requirements and final outcomes.

  14. Thomson-scattering study of the subharmonic decay of ion-acoustic waves driven by the Brillouin instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandulet, H.C.; Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Depierreux, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) has been used to investigate the two-ion decay instability of ion acoustic waves generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an underdense CH plasma. Two complementary TS diagnostics, spectrally and spatially resolved, demonstrate the occurrence of the subharmonic decay of the primary ion acoustic wave into two secondary waves. The study of the laser intensity dependence shows that the secondary ion acoustic waves are correlated with the SBS reflectivity saturation, at a level of a few percent

  15. Atorvastatin Protects Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From TGF-β1-Stimulated Calcification by Inducing Autophagy via Suppression of the β-Catenin Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial calcification is a major event in the progression of atherosclerosis. It is reported that statins exhibit various protective effects against vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC inflammation and proliferation in cardiovascular remodeling. Although statins counteract atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanisms of statins on the calcium release from VSMCs have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Calcium content of VSMCs was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of proteins involved in cellular transdifferentiation was analyzed by western blot. Cell autophagy was measured by fluorescence microscopic analysis for acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The autophagic inhibitors (3-MA, chloroquine, NH4Cl and bafilomycin A1 and β-catenin inhibitor JW74 were used to assess the effects of atorvastatin on autophagy and the involvement of β-catenin on cell calcification respectively. Furthermore, cell transfection was performed to overexpress β-catenin. Results: In VSMCs, atorvastatin significantly suppressed transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-stimulated calcification, accompanied by the induction of autophagy. Downregulation of autophagy with autophagic inhibitors significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on cell calcification. Moreover, the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on calcification and autophagy was reversed by β-catenin overexpression. Conversely, JW74 supplement enhanced this effect. Conclusion: These data demonstrated that atorvastatin protect VSMC from TGF-β1-stimulated calcification by inducing autophagy through suppression of the β-catenin pathway, identifying autophagy induction might be a therapeutic strategy for use in vascular calcification.

  16. Experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a brillouin cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yingchun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhongxuan; Tang, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang

    2017-06-01

    It has been an important research subject to find new nonlinear optical phenomena. In this paper, we report the experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a super long single-mode standard fiber with external optical feedback provided by the fiber end. The end facet reflection provides an analogous Fabry-Perot stimulated Brillouin resonator cavity. By increasing the pump power to exceed stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold, we observed light structures exhibiting extremely rich temporal-pulse characteristics that had never been reported in literature before, including supercontinuum background generation, the localization of periodic optical structure formation, fission, and compression. These optical structures are of period-doubling distribution and have different recurrence rates. What is more interesting is that we have observed sets of low frequency bipolar cycle-pulse trains that is often seen in the electrical field and hardly seen in pure optical system. Real-time specification of dynamical temporal regimes of laser operation may bring new insight into rich underlying nonlinear physics of practical fiber cavity systems. Therefore, some new nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed.

  17. Relationship between size and surface modification of silica particles and enhancement and suppression of inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide- or peptidoglycan-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Eiichiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Hirai, Toshiro; Handa, Takayuki; Nagano, Kazuya; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Although nanomaterials are used in an increasing number of commodities, the relationships between their immunotoxicity and physicochemical properties such as size or surface characteristics are not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that pretreatment with amorphous silica particles (SPs) of various sizes (diameters of 10–1000 nm), with or without amine surface modification, significantly decreased interleukin 6 production by RAW264.7 macrophages following lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan stimulation. Furthermore, nanosized, but not microsized, SPs significantly enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. This altered cytokine response was distinct from the inflammatory responses induced by treatment with the SPs alone. Additionally, the uptake of SPs into macrophages by phagocytosis was found to be crucial for the suppression of macrophage immune response to occur, irrespective of particle size or surface modification. Together, these results suggest that SPs may not only increase susceptibility to microbial infection, but that they may also be potentially effective immunosuppressants.

  18. Relationship between size and surface modification of silica particles and enhancement and suppression of inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide- or peptidoglycan-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Eiichiro, E-mail: uemura-e@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: y-yoshioka@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirai, Toshiro, E-mail: toshiro.hirai@pitt.edu; Handa, Takayuki, E-mail: handa-t@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nagano, Kazuya, E-mail: knagano@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Higashisaka, Kazuma, E-mail: higashisaka@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Although nanomaterials are used in an increasing number of commodities, the relationships between their immunotoxicity and physicochemical properties such as size or surface characteristics are not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that pretreatment with amorphous silica particles (SPs) of various sizes (diameters of 10–1000 nm), with or without amine surface modification, significantly decreased interleukin 6 production by RAW264.7 macrophages following lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan stimulation. Furthermore, nanosized, but not microsized, SPs significantly enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. This altered cytokine response was distinct from the inflammatory responses induced by treatment with the SPs alone. Additionally, the uptake of SPs into macrophages by phagocytosis was found to be crucial for the suppression of macrophage immune response to occur, irrespective of particle size or surface modification. Together, these results suggest that SPs may not only increase susceptibility to microbial infection, but that they may also be potentially effective immunosuppressants.

  19. Resveratrol reduces prostaglandin E1-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts: suppression of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohiro; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Kainuma, Shingo; Nakakami, Akira; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol mainly existing in red grapes and berries, possesses beneficial effects on human being. We have previously reported that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) but not p44/p42 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the PGE1-effect on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis and the effect of resveratrol on the synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. PGE1 induced the expression levels of OPG mRNA and stimulated the OPG release. Resveratrol significantly reduced the PGE1-induced OPG release and the mRNA expression. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, suppressed the release of OPG. The protein levels of SIRT1 were not up-regulated by resveratrol with or without PGE1. Both SB203580 and SP600125, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor and a specific SAPK/JNK inhibitor, respectively, but not PD98059, a specific MEK inhibitor, reduced the PGE1-stimulated OPG release. Resveratrol or SRT1720 failed to affect the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. On the contrary, PGE1-induced phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK was significantly attenuated by both resveratrol and SRT1720. Our results strongly suggest that resveratrol inhibits PGE1-stimulated OPG synthesis via suppressing SAPK/JNK but not p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiba, Taro; Katsukawa, Masahiro; Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes

  1. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiba, Taro, E-mail: thoriba@mail.kikkoman.co.jp [Research and Development Division, Kikkoman Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Katsukawa, Masahiro [Research and Development Division, Kikkoman Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes.

  2. Suppressive effect of formononetin on platelet-derived growth factor-BB-stimulated proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Suixin; Cai, Ying; Xie, Kangling; Zhang, Wenliang; Dong, Lei; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Fan; Dun, Yaoshan; Li, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has been implicated in intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis and restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention. Formononetin, a phytoestrogen extracted from the root of Astragalus membranaceus , has been widely used in Chinese tradition medicine due to its protective effects against certain symptoms of cancer, hypertension, inflammation, hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. However, the effect of formononetin on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs, as well as the underlying molecular mechanism, remains largely unclear. In the present study, treatment with formononetin significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Investigation into the underlying molecular mechanism revealed that the administration of formononetin suppressed PDGF-BB-stimulated switch of VSMCs to a proliferative phenotype. Furthermore, treatment with formononetin inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced upregulation of cell cycle-related proteins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP2) and MMP9. In addition, the that administration of formononetin inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT induced by PDGF-BB in VSMCs. The present results suggest that formononetin has a suppressive effect on PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs proliferation and migration, which may occur partly via the inhibition of AKT signaling pathway. Therefore, formononetin may be useful for the treatment of intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  3. High-pressure Brillouin scattering in a simple molecular system

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, H

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in high-pressure in situ Brillouin spectroscopy of a simple molecular system are reviewed by demonstrating experimental and analytical methods for the study of acoustic velocities in any direction, adiabatic elastic constants, and elastic anisotropy. Detailed applications to solid argon (Ar) are presented, at pressures up to 70 GPa in a diamond anvil cell, using recently developed approaches that combine the method of in situ Brillouin spectroscopy, for a single crystal of Ar up to 4 GPa, and the envelope method applied to both longitudinal acoustic and transverse acoustic modes, for recrystallized Ar between 4 and 70 GPa.

  4. Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis in composite material beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Yonatan; London, Yosef; Preter, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    with optical fiber sensors. In this work, we report high-resolution distributed Brillouin sensing over standard fibers that are embedded in composite structures. A phase-coded, Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis (B-OCDA) protocol was employed, with spatial resolution of 2 cm and sensitivity of 1 °K......) estimating the stiffness and Young’s modulus of a composite beam; and (c) distributed strain measurements across the surfaces of a model wing of an unmanned aerial vehicle. The measurements are supported by the predictions of structural analysis calculations. The results illustrate the potential added values...

  5. Expression levels of novel cytokine IL-32 in periodontitis and its role in the suppression of IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Ouhara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:IL-32 was recently found to be elevated in the tissue of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by polymicrobial infections that result in soft tissue destruction and alveolar bone loss. Although IL-32 is also thought to be associated with periodontal disease, its expression and possible role in periodontal tissue remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the expression patterns of IL-32 in healthy and periodontally diseased gingival tissue. The expression of IL-32 in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF as well as effects of autocrine IL-32 on IL-8 production from HGF were also examined.Methods:Periodontal tissue was collected from both healthy volunteers and periodontitis patients, and immunofluorescent staining was performed in order to determine the production of IL-32. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, mRNA expression and protein production of IL-32 in HGF, stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, were also investigated.Results:Contrary to our expectation, the production of IL-32 in the periodontitis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy volunteers. According to immunofluorescent microscopy, positive staining for IL-32 was detected in prickle and basal cell layers in the epithelium as well as fibroblastic cells in connective tissue. Addition of fixed Pg in vitro was found to suppress the otherwise constitutive expression of IL-32 mRNA and protein in HGF. However, recombinant IL-32 in vitro inhibited the expression of IL-8 mRNA by HGF stimulated with Pg. Interestingly, anti-IL-32 neutralizing antibody upregulated the IL-8 mRNA expression in non-stimulated HGF, indicating that constitutive expression of IL-32 in HGF suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression in the absence of bacterial stimulation.Conclusion:These results indicate that IL-32 is constitutively produced by HGF which can be suppressed by Pg and may play a role in the downregulation

  6. Stimulation of Central A1 Adenosine Receptors Suppresses Seizure and Neuropathology in a Soman Nerve Agent Seizure Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    bilateral micro -injection of CPA into the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) could also suppress excitotoxic activity. The results from these studies...chow and filtered tap water were freely available whenever the animals were in home cages. Surgery Using aseptic surgical techniques, animals were...into the rat’s skull were connected to recording leads via a connecting plug that attached to the rat’s head with dental cement. At the time of

  7. Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes vectors overcome suppressive plasma factors during HIV infection to stimulate myeloid dendritic cells to promote adaptive immunity and reactivation of latent virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Spadaccia, Meredith R; Norton, Thomas; Demmler, Morgan; Gopal, Ramya; O'Brien, Meagan; Landau, Nathaniel; Dubensky, Thomas W; Lauer, Peter; Brockstedt, Dirk G; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by myeloid dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction, which blunts the responsiveness to vaccine adjuvants. We previously showed that nonviral factors in HIV-seropositive plasma are partially responsible for mediating this immune suppression. In this study we investigated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) vectors, which naturally infect and potently activate DCs from seronegative donors, as a means to overcome DC dysfunction associated with HIV infection. Monocyte-derived DCs were cocultured with plasma from HIV-infected donors (HIV-moDCs) to induce a dysregulated state and infected with an attenuated, nonreplicative vaccine strain of Lm expressing full length clade B consensus gag (KBMA Lm-gag). Lm infection stimulated cytokine secretion [interleukin (IL)-12p70, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6] and Th-1 skewing of allogeneic naive CD4 T cells by HIV-moDCs, in contrast to the suppressive effects observed by HIV plasma on moDCs on toll-like receptor ligand stimulation. Upon coculture of "killed" but metabolically active (KBMA) Lm-gag-infected moDCs from HIV-infected donors with autologous cells, expansion of polyfunctional, gag-specific CD8(+) T cells was observed. Reactivation of latent proviruses by moDCs following Lm infection was also observed in models of HIV latency in a TNF-α-dependent manner. These findings reveal the unique ability of Lm vectors to contend with dysregulation of HIV-moDCs, while simultaneously possessing the capacity to activate latent virus. Concurrent stimulation of innate and adaptive immunity and disruption of latency may be an approach to reduce the pool of latently infected cells during HIV infection. Further study of Lm vectors as part of therapeutic vaccination and eradication strategies may advance this evolving field.

  8. Generation of high-power few-cycle lasers via Brillouin-based plasma amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; Hong, W.; Deng, Z. G.; Teng, J.; He, S. K.; Zhou, W. M.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2017-11-01

    Strong coupling stimulated Brillouin backscattering (sc-SBS) in plasma is potentially an efficient method of amplifying laser pulses to reach exawatt powers. Here, we report on a new regime of brillouin-based plasma amplification, producing an amplified pulse with a duration of 5 fs and unfocused intensity of 6 × 1017 W/cm2. The results are obtained from 2D particle-in-cell simulations, using two circularly polarized pump and seed pulse with Gaussian transverse profile, both at an intensity of 2.74 × 1016 W/cm2, counter-propagating in a 0.3nc plasma. The significant compression of amplified seed is achieved as a result of sc-SBS amplification as well as additional compression by the interplay between self-phase modulation and negative group delay dispersion. We show that the amplified seed retains high beam qualities since the filamentation can be prevented due to the fast compression. This scheme may pave the way for few-cycle laser pulses to reach exawatt or even zetawatt regime.

  9. Unsaturated fatty acids suppress interleukin-2 production and transferrin receptor expression by concanavalin A-stimulated rat Iymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Calder, Philip C.; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The proliferation of T-lymphocytes is dependent upon their ability to synthesize and secrete the cytokine, interleukin-2, and to express cell surface receptors for interleukin-2 and transferrin. We have previously reported that certain fatty acids inhibit mitogen-stimulated T-lymphocyte proliferation. We now report that unsaturated fatty acids decrease the concentration of interleukin-2 in the culture medium of such cells by up to 45%. This suggests that unsaturated fatty acids inhibit lympho...

  10. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiba, Taro; Katsukawa, Masahiro; Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-07

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brillouin Distributed Fiber Sensors: An Overview and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Galindez-Jamioy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A review focused on real world applications of Brillouin distributed fiber sensors is presented in this paper. After a brief overview of the theoretical principles, some works to face the two main technical challenges (large dynamic range and higher spatial resolution are commented. Then an overview of some real and on-field applications is done.

  12. Hypothalamic and Striatal Insulin Action Suppresses Endogenous Glucose Production and May Stimulate Glucose Uptake During Hyperinsulinemia in Lean but Not in Overweight Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Kullmann, Stephanie; Gancheva, Sofiya; Roden, Michael; Peter, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Intranasal spray application facilitates insulin delivery to the human brain. Although brain insulin modulates peripheral metabolism, the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Twenty-one men underwent two hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with d-[6,6- 2 H 2 ]glucose infusion to measure endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance. On two separate days, participants received intranasal insulin or placebo. Insulin spillover into circulation after intranasal insulin application was mimicked by an intravenous insulin bolus on placebo day. On a different day, brain insulin sensitivity was assessed by functional MRI. Glucose infusion rates (GIRs) had to be increased more after nasal insulin than after placebo to maintain euglycemia in lean but not in overweight people. The increase in GIRs was associated with regional brain insulin action in hypothalamus and striatum. Suppression of endogenous glucose production by circulating insulin was more pronounced after administration of nasal insulin than after placebo. Furthermore, glucose uptake into tissue tended to be higher after nasal insulin application. No such effects were detected in overweight participants. By increasing insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, brain insulin may improve glucose metabolism during systemic hyperinsulinemia. Obese people appear to lack these mechanisms. Therefore, brain insulin resistance in obesity may have unfavorable consequences for whole-body glucose homeostasis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. The effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on the gonadal steroid hormones of patients with thyroid carcinoma after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ying; Liang, Nan; Hong, Yang; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Sun, Hui

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on the gonadal hormones and related symptoms in patients after surgery. From 2008 to 2011, totally 238 patients were recruited, who underwent thyroid surgery and subsequent TSH suppression treatment in Department of thyroid Surgery, China-Japan Union hospital, Jilin University. Then their postoperative follow-up data (3-8 years) were collected, including operational method, pathological diagnosis, whether processed radioiodine therapy and the period/dose of TSH suppression treatment. In addition, the menstrual cycle, menstruation quantity, whether accompanied with dysmenorrheal and menstrual disorder or not, date of last menstrual period, ages of menopause and so on were also collected. (I) Neither the level nor the duration of TSH treatment had any function on estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) in male patients; (II) in the subgroup of patients with TSH treatment for 3-5 years, patients who took high dose of TSH (TSH ≥0.5 U/L) obtained the lower T level compared with the group of medium dose (1.08±0.34 vs. 1.36±0.46 nmol/L, P=0.001); (III) in the medium dose (0.1 IU/L ≤ TSH hormone (FSH) did not show any change in terms of the dose and the duration of TSH treatment; (V) the menstrual volume, dysmenorrhea condition, menstrual cycle and menopause related indicators did not show any difference in terms of doses and duration of TSH treatment (P=0.701, 0.412 and 0.507 respectively). The long term of TSH repressive therapy after surgery did not affect T and E2 level in male patients. As for female patients, the impact was mainly reflected in the T and E2 levels especially in female sexual maturity but not FSH level. In addition, TSH treatment did not play any role on menstruation or menopause.

  14. Alpha-mangostin suppresses IL-6 and IL-8 expression in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiemwattana, Ichaya; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 expression in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). HGFs were challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and then treated with various concentrations of alpha-mangostin. The cytotoxicity was determined using MTS assay and cytokine expressions were evaluated by Real-time PCR and ELISA. The results showed that 5 μg/ml P. gingivalis LPS and alpha-mangostin at 1 µg/ml or less did not affect the viability of HGFs. Alpha-mangostin reduced IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA and protein in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated HGFs. These findings suggested that alpha-mangostin might be used as an adjunct to the periodontal therapy.

  15. Lutein suppresses inflammatory responses through Nrf2 activation and NF-κB inactivation in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV-2 microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wanqiang; Li, Yuelian; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Yawen; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Xuebo

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the effects of lutein on neuroinflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated BV-2 microglia were investigated. The production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and nitric oxide was measured in culture medium using enzyme immunoassay and Griess reagent, respectively. The expression of proteins was determined using Western blot. Pretreatment with lutein (50 μM) prior to LPS (1 μg/mL, 12 h) stimulation resulted in a significant inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and nitric oxide production (p lutein suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Akt kinase (p lutein markedly quenched reactive oxygen species and promoted antioxidant protein expression including heme oxygenase-1 and quinone oxidoreductase by enhancing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mediated NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation (p lutein attenuates neuroinflammation in LPS-activated BV-2 microglia partly through inhibiting p38-, JNK-, and Akt-stimulated NF-κB activation and promoting ERK-induced Nrf2 activation, suggesting that lutein has great potential as a nutritional preventive strategy in inflammation-related neurodegenerative disorders. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of inter-train interval on the induction of repetition suppression of motor-evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Pitkänen

    Full Text Available Repetition suppression (RS is evident as a weakened response to repeated stimuli after the initial response. RS has been demonstrated in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Here, we investigated the effect of inter-train interval (ITI on the induction of RS of MEPs with the attempt to optimize the investigative protocols. Trains of TMS pulses, targeted to the primary motor cortex by neuronavigation, were applied at a stimulation intensity of 120% of the resting motor threshold. The stimulus trains included either four or twenty pulses with an inter-stimulus interval (ISI of 1 s. The ITI was here defined as the interval between the last pulse in a train and the first pulse in the next train; the ITIs used here were 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, and 17 s. RS was observed with all ITIs except with the ITI of 1 s, in which the ITI was equal to ISI. RS was more pronounced with longer ITIs. Shorter ITIs may not allow sufficient time for a return to baseline. RS may reflect a startle-like response to the first pulse of a train followed by habituation. Longer ITIs may allow more recovery time and in turn demonstrate greater RS. Our results indicate that RS can be studied with confidence at relatively short ITIs of 6 s and above.

  17. Effect of inter-train interval on the induction of repetition suppression of motor-evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Minna; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Julkunen, Petro

    2017-01-01

    Repetition suppression (RS) is evident as a weakened response to repeated stimuli after the initial response. RS has been demonstrated in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here, we investigated the effect of inter-train interval (ITI) on the induction of RS of MEPs with the attempt to optimize the investigative protocols. Trains of TMS pulses, targeted to the primary motor cortex by neuronavigation, were applied at a stimulation intensity of 120% of the resting motor threshold. The stimulus trains included either four or twenty pulses with an inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 1 s. The ITI was here defined as the interval between the last pulse in a train and the first pulse in the next train; the ITIs used here were 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, and 17 s. RS was observed with all ITIs except with the ITI of 1 s, in which the ITI was equal to ISI. RS was more pronounced with longer ITIs. Shorter ITIs may not allow sufficient time for a return to baseline. RS may reflect a startle-like response to the first pulse of a train followed by habituation. Longer ITIs may allow more recovery time and in turn demonstrate greater RS. Our results indicate that RS can be studied with confidence at relatively short ITIs of 6 s and above.

  18. 6-Gingerol inhibits ROS and iNOS through the suppression of PKC-{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tzung-Yan, E-mail: joyamen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ko-Chen [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hen-Hong [Graduate Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-24

    Inflammation is involved in numerous diseases, including chronic inflammatory diseases and the development of cancer. Many plants possess a variety of biological activities, including antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol is very limited. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as a model of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol, which contains phenolic structure. We found that 6-gingerol exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect. 6-Gingerol could decrease inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-{alpha} expression through suppression of I-{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, NF-{kappa}B nuclear activation and PKC-{alpha} translocation, which in turn inhibits Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that 6-gingerol acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by blocking NF-{kappa}B and PKC signaling, and may be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of cancer or inflammatory diseases.

  19. 6-Gingerol inhibits ROS and iNOS through the suppression of PKC-α and NF-κB pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tzung-Yan; Lee, Ko-Chen; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in numerous diseases, including chronic inflammatory diseases and the development of cancer. Many plants possess a variety of biological activities, including antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol is very limited. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as a model of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol, which contains phenolic structure. We found that 6-gingerol exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect. 6-Gingerol could decrease inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α expression through suppression of I-κBα phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear activation and PKC-α translocation, which in turn inhibits Ca 2+ mobilization and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that 6-gingerol acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by blocking NF-κB and PKC signaling, and may be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of cancer or inflammatory diseases.

  20. Ursolic acid inhibits leucine-stimulated mTORC1 signaling by suppressing mTOR localization to lysosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ou

    Full Text Available Ursolic acid (UA, a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in medicinal herbs and fruits, has been reported to possess a wide range of beneficial properties including anti-hyperglycemia, anti-obesity, and anti-cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of UA remain largely unknown. Here we show that UA inhibits leucine-induced activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway in C2C12 myotubes. The UA-mediated inhibition of mTORC1 is independent of Akt, tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2 (TSC1/2, and Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb, suggesting that UA negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling by targeting at a site downstream of these mTOR regulators. UA treatment had no effect on the interaction between mTOR and its activator Raptor or inhibitor Deptor, but suppressed the binding of RagB to Raptor and inhibited leucine-induced mTOR lysosomal localization. Taken together, our study identifies UA as a direct negative regulator of the mTORC1 signaling pathway and suggests a novel mechanism by which UA exerts its beneficial function.

  1. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  2. Osteogenic Stimulation of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using a Fungal Metabolite That Suppresses the Polycomb Group Protein EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Dudakovic, Amel; Manzar, Bushra; Sen, Buer; Dietz, Allan B; Cool, Simon M; Rubin, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2018-02-01

    Strategies for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration apply adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that can be sourced from bone marrow- and lipo-aspirates. Adipose tissue-derived MSCs are more easily harvested in the large quantities required for skeletal tissue-engineering approaches, but are generally considered to be less osteogenic than bone marrow MSCs. Therefore, we tested a new molecular strategy to improve their osteogenic lineage-differentiation potential using the fungal metabolite cytochalasin D (CytoD). We show that CytoD, which may function by redistributing the intracellular location of β-actin (ACTB), is a potent osteogenic stimulant as reflected by significant increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and osteoblast-related gene expression (e.g., RUNX2, ALPL, SPARC, and TGFB3). RNA sequencing analyses of MSCs revealed that acute CytoD treatment (24 hours) stimulates a broad program of osteogenic biomarkers and epigenetic regulators. CytoD decreases mRNA and protein levels of the Polycomb chromatin regulator Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2), which controls heterochromatin formation by mediating trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). Reduced EZH2 expression decreases cellular H3K27me3 marks indicating a global reduction in heterochromatin. We conclude that CytoD is an effective osteogenic stimulant that mechanistically functions by blocking both cytoplasmic actin polymerization and gene-suppressive epigenetic mechanisms required for the acquisition of the osteogenic phenotype in adipose tissue-derived MSCs. This finding supports the use of CytoD in advancing the osteogenic potential of MSCs in skeletal regenerative strategies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:197-209. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  3. Osteogenic Stimulation of Human Adipose‐Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using a Fungal Metabolite That Suppresses the Polycomb Group Protein EZH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Manzar, Bushra; Sen, Buer; Dietz, Allan B.; Cool, Simon M.; Rubin, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Strategies for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration apply adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that can be sourced from bone marrow‐ and lipo‐aspirates. Adipose tissue‐derived MSCs are more easily harvested in the large quantities required for skeletal tissue‐engineering approaches, but are generally considered to be less osteogenic than bone marrow MSCs. Therefore, we tested a new molecular strategy to improve their osteogenic lineage‐differentiation potential using the fungal metabolite cytochalasin D (CytoD). We show that CytoD, which may function by redistributing the intracellular location of β‐actin (ACTB), is a potent osteogenic stimulant as reflected by significant increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and osteoblast‐related gene expression (e.g., RUNX2, ALPL, SPARC, and TGFB3). RNA sequencing analyses of MSCs revealed that acute CytoD treatment (24 hours) stimulates a broad program of osteogenic biomarkers and epigenetic regulators. CytoD decreases mRNA and protein levels of the Polycomb chromatin regulator Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2), which controls heterochromatin formation by mediating trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). Reduced EZH2 expression decreases cellular H3K27me3 marks indicating a global reduction in heterochromatin. We conclude that CytoD is an effective osteogenic stimulant that mechanistically functions by blocking both cytoplasmic actin polymerization and gene‐suppressive epigenetic mechanisms required for the acquisition of the osteogenic phenotype in adipose tissue‐derived MSCs. This finding supports the use of CytoD in advancing the osteogenic potential of MSCs in skeletal regenerative strategies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:197–209 PMID:29280310

  4. Glucose-stimulated insulin response in pregnant sheep following acute suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriskandarajah Nadarajah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations in non-pregnant animals have been reported to decrease pancreatic responsiveness. As ovine gestation advances, maternal insulin concentrations fall and NEFA concentrations increase. Experiments were designed to examine if the pregnancy-associated rise in NEFA concentration is associated with a reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose in vivo. We investigated the possible relationship of NEFA concentrations in regulating maternal insulin concentrations during ovine pregnancy at three physiological states, non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL, 105 and 135 days gestational age (dGA, term 147+/- 3 days. Methods The plasma concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH and ovine placental lactogen (oPL were determined by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Insulin responsiveness to glucose was measured using bolus injection and hyperglycaemic clamp techniques in 15 non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes and in nine pregnant ewes at 105 dGA and near term at 135 dGA. Plasma samples were also collected for hormone determination. In addition to bolus injection glucose and insulin Area Under Curve calculations, the Mean Plasma Glucose Increment, Glucose Infusion Rate and Mean Plasma Insulin Increment and Area Under Curve were determined for the hyperglycaemic clamp procedures. Statistical analysis of data was conducted with Students t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA. Results Maternal growth hormone, placental lactogen and NEFA concentrations increased, while basal glucose and insulin concentrations declined with advancing gestation. At 135 dGA following bolus glucose injections, peak insulin concentrations and insulin area under curve (AUC profiles were significantly reduced in pregnant ewes compared with NPNL control ewes (p Conclusions Results suggest that despite an acute suppression of circulating NEFA concentrations during pregnancy, the associated steroids and hormones

  5. Improved diffusion-weighting efficiency of pulsed gradient stimulated echo MR measurements with background gradient cross-term suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Accurate diffusion measurements with pulsed gradient NMR are hampered by cross-terms of the diffusion-weighting and background gradients. For experiments based on a stimulated echo pulse sequence, that is preferred for samples with a T2 short compared to the diffusion time, a diffusion-weighting scheme has been presented that avoids these cross-terms in each of the en- and decoding periods separately. However, this approach suffers from a reduced diffusion-weighting efficiency because the two gradients applied in each of the periods have effectively opposite polarities leading to a partial cancellation. An extension of this scheme is presented that involves an additional gradient pulse in each period and delivers an improved diffusion-weighting efficiency without sacrificing the cross-term compensation. Analytical expressions for the gradient pulse lengths and amplitudes are given for arbitrary timing parameters. MR measurements with artificial (switched) background gradients were performed to test the cross-term compensation capability of the proposed extension. The results show that considerably higher q and b values can be achieved with the extension without changing the timing parameters. The MR measurements yielded identical diffusion coefficients without, with the same, and with different background gradients in the en- and decoding periods demonstrating the cross-term compensation of the presented approach.

  6. BRILLOUIN INSTABILITY IN FIBER LASERS DOPED BY POWER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    afin de décrire l'évolution temporelle du milieu amplificateur. On ne tient pas compte des ordres supérieurs des composantes Stokes. Le gain de la diffusion Brillouin n'est plus considéré comme instantané [1]. Les ondes sont décrites en termes d'amplitudes des champs optiques et acoustique et des conditions aux limites.

  7. Kinetics of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2 synthesis and suppression of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awara, W; Hillier, K; Jones, D

    1986-12-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of thromboxane A2 and prostaglandin E2 on peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes stimulated with PHA in vitro, and the relationship of this to the time-course of their synthesis in culture, were investigated using prostaglandin E2, a thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor (UK37248), a thromboxane A2 mimic (U46619) and a thromboxane A2 receptor blocker (EP045). The inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on PHA-induced human peripheral blood mononuclear leucocyte proliferation diminishes if the addition of PGE2 is delayed. If added 4 hr after a maximum concentration of PHA (5 micrograms/ml), the effect of PGE2 was reduced by 60%. If a submaximal concentration of PHA (1 microgram/ml) was used, the effect of PGE2 was not reduced if added 4 hr later but fell by about 60% after 16 hr. UK37248 moderately inhibited PHA-induced activation while substantially inhibiting thromboxane A2 synthesis and simultaneously enhancing PGE2 synthesis. The enhanced accumulation of PGE2 occurs while sensitivity to PGE2 is dropping. U46619, exogenously applied as a thromboxane A2 mimic, inhibited PHA-induced activation at concentrations that did not significantly alter PGE2 synthesis. EP045, which may modulate the effects of endogenous thromboxane A2 by blocking receptors, did not alter PHA-induced activation. We conclude that thromboxane A2 may have a role in inhibiting PHA-induced activation on the basis of the effect of U46619. However, this study highlights difficulties in utilizing prostaglandin and thromboxane receptor and synthesis inhibitors to examine their endogenous role in the modulation of mitogen-induced activation in vitro. If sensitivity to the purported endogenous substance is limited to the early stages of culture and if only low levels are synthesized at this early stage, then blocking drugs would have little effect.

  8. Linear approximation of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binietoglou, Ioannis; Giampouras, Paris; Belegante, Livio

    2016-09-20

    Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering is the basis of many remote sensing techniques, including high spectral resolution lidar measurements of aerosols and wind. Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra can be accurately estimated using physics-based models like the so-called Tenti's S6 and Pan's S7 models. Unfortunately, these are computationally expensive and can be the bottleneck for real-time lidar processing and iterative parameter estimation problems. This short article describes a very efficient linear approximation of the Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Using PCA, the outputs of the above models can be approximated with very high accuracy using a single matrix multiplication. The described method can be applied to the output of any detailed scattering model, thus it can be used for a wide range of problems, e.g., for scattering from different gases (Air, N2, O2,…) and for different ranges of temperature and pressure. The precision of the approximation can be adapted to the requirements of the studied problem, and can easily exceed the actual accuracy of the reference models.

  9. Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation–induced Stimulation of Distant Tumor Growth Is Suppressed by c-Met Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Moussa, Marwan; Wang, Yuanguo; Rozenblum, Nir; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2016-01-01

    VEGF levels. Compared with RF ablation alone, RF ablation combined with adjuvant PHA-665752 or semaxanib reduced distant tumor growth, proliferation, and microvascular density. For c-Met–negative tumors, hepatic RF ablation did not increase distant tumor growth, proliferation, or microvascular density compared with sham treatment. Conclusion RF ablation of normal liver can stimulate distant subcutaneous tumor growth mediated by HGF/c-Met pathway and VEGF activation. This effect was not observed in c-Met–negative tumors and can be blocked with adjuvant c-Met and VEGF inhibitors. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26418615

  10. Weight Changes in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma during Postoperative Long-Term Follow-up under Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Young Sohn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere are limited data about whether patients who receive initial treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC gain or lose weight during long-term follow-up under thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH suppression. This study was aimed to evaluate whether DTC patients under TSH suppression experience long-term weight gain after initial treatment. We also examined the impact of the radioactive iodine ablation therapy (RAIT preparation method on changes of weight, comparing thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW and recombinant human TSH (rhTSH.MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed 700 DTC patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by either RAIT and levothyroxine (T4 replacement or T4 replacement alone. The control group included 350 age-matched patients with benign thyroid nodules followed during same period. Anthropometric data were measured at baseline, 1 to 2 years, and 3 to 4 years after thyroidectomy. Comparisons were made between weight and body mass index (BMI at baseline and follow-up.ResultsSignificant gains in weight and BMI were observed 3 to 4 years after initial treatment for female DTC but not in male patients. These gains among female DTC patients were also significant compared to age-matched control. Women in the THW group gained a significant amount of weight and BMI compared to baseline, while there was no increase in weight or BMI in the rhTSH group. There were no changes in weight and BMI in men according to RAIT preparation methods.ConclusionFemale DTC patients showed significant gains in weight and BMI during long-term follow-up after initial treatment. These changes were seen only in patients who underwent THW for RAIT.

  11. c-Ski inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via suppressing Smad3 signaling but stimulating p38 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Yuan-Guo; Yang, Kang; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays key roles in the progression of intimal hyperplasia, but the molecular mechanisms that trigger VSMC proliferation after vascular injury remain unclear. c-Ski, a co-repressor of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling, was detected to express in VSMC of rat artery. During the course of arterial VSMC proliferation induced by balloon injury in rat, the endogenous protein expressions of c-Ski decreased markedly in a time-dependent manner. In vivo c-Ski gene delivery was found to significantly suppress balloon injury-induced VSMC proliferation and neointima formation. Further investigation in A10 rat aortic smooth muscle cells demonstrated that overexpression of c-Ski gene inhibited TGF-β1 (1 ng/ml)-induced A10 cell proliferation while knockdown of c-Ski by RNAi enhanced the stimulatory effect of TGF-β1 on A10 cell growth. Western blot for signaling detection showed that suppression of Smad3 phosphorylation while stimulating p38 signaling associated with upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27 was responsible for the inhibitory effect of c-Ski on TGF-β1-induced VSMC proliferation. These data suggest that the decrease of endogenous c-Ski expression is implicated in the progression of VSMC proliferation after arterial injury and c-Ski administration represents a promising role for treating intimal hyperplasia via inhibiting the proliferation of VSMC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brillouin Scattering Spectrum Analysis Based on Auto-Regressive Spectral Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengyun; Li, Wei; Liu, Zhangyun; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2018-03-01

    Auto-regressive (AR) spectral estimation technology is proposed to analyze the Brillouin scattering spectrum in Brillouin optical time-domain refelectometry. It shows that AR based method can reliably estimate the Brillouin frequency shift with an accuracy much better than fast Fourier transform (FFT) based methods provided the data length is not too short. It enables about 3 times improvement over FFT at a moderate spatial resolution.

  13. Mitigating the effects of the gain-dependence of the Brillouin line-shape on dynamic BOTDA sensing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Avi; Davidi, Roy; Hadar, Raanan; Tur, Moshe

    2017-09-18

    It has been recently shown that in stimulated Brillouin amplification (pulsed pump & CW probe) the line-shape of the normalized logarithmic Brillouin Gain Spectrum (BGS) broadens with increasing gain. Most pronounced for short pump pulses, a linewidth increase of ~3 MHz (~1.5 MHz) per dB of additional gain was observed for a pump pulse width of 15 ns (30 ns), respectively. This gain-dependency of the shape of the BGS compromises the accuracy of the otherwise attractive, highly dynamic and distributed slope-assisted BOTDA techniques, where measurand-induced gain variations of a single probe, are converted to strain/temperature values through a calibration factor that depends on the line-shape of the BGS. A previously developed technique with built-in compensation for Brillouin gain variations, namely: the Ratio Double Slope-Assisted BOTDA (RDSA-BOTDA) method, where both slopes of the BGS are interrogated, fails to meet this new challenge of the gain-induced shape dependence of the BGS, resulting, for instance, in significant measurement errors of ~5% per dB of gain change for a 15 ns pump pulse. Here, we propose and demonstrate an extension of the RDSA-BOTDA method, which now offers immunity also to Brillouin gain-dependent line-shape variations. Requiring a prior characterization of the gain-induced line-shape dependency of the fiber and pump-pulse-width in use, this mitigation technique takes advantage of the fact that the sum of the measured logarithmic gains at judiciously chosen two fixed frequency points of the BGS can be used to determine the local peak gain, via a pre-established calibration curve. Based on the deduced correct peak gain, its associated BGS shape can now be used in the application of the previously introduced RDSA-BOTDA technique to obtain error-free results, independent of the gain dependence of the line-shape. The proposed technique has been successfully put to test in an experiment, involving a RDSA-BOTDA measurement of a fiber segment

  14. Robust, Brillouin Active Embedded Fiber-Is-The-Sensor System in Smart Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung

    1996-01-01

    Extensive review of our proposed sensing scheme, based mainly on the forward Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering (GAWBS) with backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (sBs) as an auxiliary scheme for system fault tolerance has been completed during this project period. This preliminary study is conducted for a number of reasons. The most significant reasons lie in the essential capability of the system to measure temperature and pressure. These two measurands have been proposed to be sensed by sBs in our proposal. Temperature and pressure/strain are important measurands in structural monitoring, so that the effectiveness of sensing by sBs needs to be further examined. It has been pointed out initially that sBs shift will be dependent on temperature and pressure/strain simultaneously. The shift versus temperature or strain is linear. Now, the question is how can these two measurands be separated when sBs is used to sense an environment, in which both temperature and strain are changing simultaneously. Typical sBs shift plotted versus strain and varying temperature is shown in Fig. 1. As is clear, a fiber initially stressed will relax with rising temperature. This is verified by a displacement to the right with rising temperature of the sBs shift vs strain curves in the figure. A way to circumvent this ambiguity is by employing two fibers, one pre-stressed and the other is a free fiber. The latter will measure temperature and subtracting data in the latter fiber from those of the former will give us net strain readings. This is a laborious approach, since it involves the use of two identical fibers, and this is hard to accomplish, especially when many sensors are needed. Additional multiplexing of the data stream for data subtraction becomes a necessity.

  15. Optimizing signal collection efficiency of the VIPA-based Brillouin spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokai Meng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging tool for microscopic optical imaging as it allows for noninvasive and direct assessment of the viscoelastic properties of materials. Recent advances of background-free confocal Brillouin spectrometer allows investigators to acquire the Brillouin spectra for turbid samples as well as transparent ones. However, due to strong signal loss induced by the imperfect optical setup, the Brillouin photons are usually immersed in background noise. In this report, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated multiple approaches to enhance the signal collection efficiency. A signal enhancement by > 4 times can be observed, enabling observation of ultra-weak signals.

  16. Two-color Brillouin ring laser gyro with gyro-compassing capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M; Quast, T

    1994-09-15

    We investigated the gyro-compassing capability of a Brillouin ring laser gyro set up in a two-color operation. Two counterpropagating pump lasers initiated two Brillouin ring lasers on different resonances of a fiber-optic ring resonator cavity, which excluded the mutual intracavity interaction between both counterpropagating Brillouin lasers. Additionally minimizing the external feedback channels of the individual Brillouin lasers allowed for high-resolution measurements, e.g., the horizontal component of the Earth's rotation rate (10.0 degrees /h at Uberlingen, Germany, which corresponded to a beat frequency of 6.85 Hz).

  17. Andrographolide Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokines Secretion in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells through Suppression of NF-κB/MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide, the main active component extracted from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Wall. ex Nees, exerts anti-inflammatory effects; however, the principal molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Andrographolide in modifying lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells. An in vitro model of inflammation was induced by LPS in mouse RAW264.7 cells in the presence of Andrographolide. The concentration and expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, respectively. The nuclear level of NF-κB was measured by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. The expression levels of NF-κB, p38, ERK, and JNK were determined by western blot. Andrographolide dose-dependently inhibited the release and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The nuclear level of p65 protein was decreased in Andrographolide treatment group. Western blot analysis showed that Andrographolide suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation and the phosphorylation of IkBa, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. These results suggest that Andrographolide exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Andrographolide Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokines Secretion in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells through Suppression of NF-κB/MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; He, Shengnan; Tang, Jishun; Ding, Nana; Chu, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lianping; Ding, Xuedong; Liang, Ting; Feng, Shibin; Rahman, Sajid Ur; Wang, Xichun; Wu, Jinjie

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide, the main active component extracted from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees, exerts anti-inflammatory effects; however, the principal molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Andrographolide in modifying lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells. An in vitro model of inflammation was induced by LPS in mouse RAW264.7 cells in the presence of Andrographolide. The concentration and expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively. The nuclear level of NF- κ B was measured by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The expression levels of NF- κ B, p38, ERK, and JNK were determined by western blot. Andrographolide dose-dependently inhibited the release and mRNA expression of TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The nuclear level of p65 protein was decreased in Andrographolide treatment group. Western blot analysis showed that Andrographolide suppressed LPS-induced NF- κ B activation and the phosphorylation of IkBa, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. These results suggest that Andrographolide exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of NF- κ B/MAPK signaling pathway and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Optimization of the Brillouin operator on the KNL architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    Experiences with optimizing the matrix-times-vector application of the Brillouin operator on the Intel KNL processor are reported. Without adjustments to the memory layout, performance figures of 360 Gflop/s in single and 270 Gflop/s in double precision are observed. This is with Nc = 3 colors, Nv = 12 right-hand-sides, Nthr = 256 threads, on lattices of size 323 × 64, using exclusively OMP pragmas. Interestingly, the same routine performs quite well on Intel Core i7 architectures, too. Some observations on the much harderWilson fermion matrix-times-vector optimization problem are added.

  20. Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum in special relativistic hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Perciante, A. L.; Garcia-Colin, L. S.; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum for a relativistic simple fluid according to three different versions available for a relativistic approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics. An outcome of these calculations is that Eckart's version predicts that such spectrum does not exist. This provides an argument to question its validity. The remaining two results, which differ one from another, do provide a finite form for such spectrum. This raises the rather intriguing question as to which of the two theories is a better candidate to be taken as a possible version of relativistic nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The answer will clearly require deeper examination of this problem.

  1. High-resolution, on-chip RF photonic signal processor using Brillouin gain shaping and RF interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Amol; Liu, Yang; Morrison, Blair; Vu, Khu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Ma, Pan; Madden, Stephen; Marpaung, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2017-07-19

    Integrated microwave photonics has strongly emerged as a next-generation technology to address limitations of conventional RF electronics for wireless communications. High-resolution RF signal processing still remains a challenge due to limitations in technology that offer sub-GHz spectral resolution, in particular at high carrier frequencies. In this paper, we present an on-chip high-resolution RF signal processor, capable of providing high-suppression spectral filtering, large phase shifts and ns-scale time delays. This was achieved through tailoring of the Brillouin gain profiles using Stokes and anti-Stokes resonances combined with RF interferometry on a low-loss photonic chip with strong opto-acoustic interactions. Using an optical power of <40 mW, reconfigurable filters with a bandwidth of ~20 MHz and an extinction ratio in excess of 30 dB are synthesized. Through the concept of vector addition of RF signals we demonstrate, almost an order of magnitude amplification in the phase and delay compared to devices purely based upon the slow-light effect of Brillouin scattering. This concept allows for versatile and power-efficient manipulation of the amplitude and phase of RF signals on a photonic chip for applications in wireless communications including software defined radios and beam forming.

  2. Suppression of the auxin response pathway enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi while phosphite-mediated resistance stimulates the auxin signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytophthora cinnamomi is a devastating pathogen worldwide and phosphite (Phi), an analogue of phosphate (Pi) is highly effective in the control of this pathogen. Phi also interferes with Pi starvation responses (PSR), of which auxin signalling is an integral component. In the current study, the involvement of Pi and the auxin signalling pathways in host and Phi-mediated resistance to P. cinnamomi was investigated by screening the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Col-0 and several mutants defective in PSR and the auxin response pathway for their susceptibility to this pathogen. The response to Phi treatment was also studied by monitoring its effect on Pi- and the auxin response pathways. Results Here we demonstrate that phr1-1 (phosphate starvation response 1), a mutant defective in response to Pi starvation was highly susceptible to P. cinnamomi compared to the parental background Col-0. Furthermore, the analysis of the Arabidopsis tir1-1 (transport inhibitor response 1) mutant, deficient in the auxin-stimulated SCF (Skp1 − Cullin − F-Box) ubiquitination pathway was also highly susceptible to P. cinnamomi and the susceptibility of the mutants rpn10 and pbe1 further supported a role for the 26S proteasome in resistance to P. cinnamomi. The role of auxin was also supported by a significant (P < 0.001) increase in susceptibility of blue lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) to P. cinnamomi following treatment with the inhibitor of auxin transport, TIBA (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid). Given the apparent involvement of auxin and PSR signalling in the resistance to P. cinnamomi, the possible involvement of these pathways in Phi mediated resistance was also investigated. Phi (especially at high concentrations) attenuates the response of some Pi starvation inducible genes such as AT4, AtACP5 and AtPT2 in Pi starved plants. However, Phi enhanced the transcript levels of PHR1 and the auxin responsive genes (AUX1, AXR1and AXR2), suppressed the primary root

  3. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Woan Sean; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB) in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL). Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator's production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26609199

  4. Lipolysis stimulating peptides of potato protein hydrolysate effectively suppresses high-fat-diet-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fibrosis in aging rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Dee Chiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most common outcomes of obesity and is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides, increased tissue apoptosis, and fibrosis. NAFLD is more common among elderly than in younger age groups, and it causes serious hepatic complications. Objective: In this study, alcalase treatment derived potato protein hydrolysate (APPH with lipolysis-stimulating property has been evaluated for its efficiency to provide hepato-protection in a high-fat-diet (HFD-fed aging rats. Design: Twenty-four-month-old SD rats were randomly divided into six groups (n=8: aged rats fed with standard chow, HFD-induced aged obese rats, HFD with low-dose (15 mg/kg/day APPH treatment, HFD with moderate (45 mg/kg/day APPH treatment, HFD with high (75 mg/kg/day APPH treatment, and HFD with probucol. Results: APPH was found to reduce the NAFLD-related effects in rat livers induced by HFD and all of the HFD-fed rats exhibited heavier body weight than those with control chow diet. However, the HFD-induced hepatic fat accumulation was effectively attenuated in rats administered with low (15 mg/kg/day, moderate (45 mg/kg/day, and high (75 mg/kg/day doses of APPH. APPH oral administration also suppressed the hepatic apoptosis- and fibrosis-related proteins induced by HFD. Conclusions: Our results thus indicate that APPH potentially attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation and anti-apoptosis and fibrosis effects in HFD-induced rats. APPH may have therapeutic potential in the amelioration of NAFLD liver damage.

  5. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woan Sean Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Nitric oxide (NO production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL. Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator’s production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway.

  6. Activated factor X signaling via protease-activated receptor 2 suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-stimulated myeloid cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Eimear M

    2013-07-19

    Vitamin K-dependent proteases generated in response to vascular injury and infection enable fibrin clot formation, but also trigger distinct immuno-regulatory signaling pathways on myeloid cells. Factor Xa, a protease crucial for blood coagulation, also induces protease-activated receptor-dependent cell signaling. Factor Xa can bind both monocytes and macrophages, but whether factor Xa-dependent signaling stimulates or suppresses myeloid cell cytokine production in response to Toll-like receptor activation is not known. In this study, exposure to factor Xa significantly impaired pro-inflammatory cytokine production from lipopolysaccharide-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, THP-1 monocytic cells and murine macrophages. Furthermore, factor Xa inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B activation in THP-1 reporter cells, requiring phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase activity for its anti-inflammatory effect. Active-site blockade, γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain truncation and a peptide mimic of the factor Xa inter-epidermal growth factor-like region prevented factor Xa inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-α release. In addition, factor Xa anti-inflammatory activity was markedly attenuated by the presence of an antagonist of protease-activated receptor 2, but not protease-activated receptor 1. The key role of protease-activated receptor 2 in eliciting factor Xa-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling on macrophages was further underscored by the inability of factor Xa to mediate inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release from murine bone marrow-derived protease-activated receptor 2-deficient macrophages. We also show for the first time that, in addition to protease-activated receptor 2, factor Xa requires a receptor-associated protein-sensitive low-density lipoprotein receptor to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production. Collectively, this study supports a novel function for factor Xa as an endogenous, receptor

  7. Spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectral analysis based on Wiener filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingcheng; Wu, Tao; Yang, Chuanyin; Yu, Huan; He, Xingdao

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectrometer is developed to measure the gaseous spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (SRBS) profiles over the pressure range 1 to 6 atm for a wavelength of 532nm at the constant room temperature of 296K and 900 scattering angle. The measured Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra are deconvolved using Wiener filtering to remove the effect of the Airy transmission function of the Fabry-Pérot scanning interferometer and get high resolution Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra. The root-mean-square error is less than 2% and χ 2 is less than 15 over the pressure range 1 to 6 atm. The comparison between theoretical spectra (Tenti S6 model) and deconvolved Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra is made. Some factors that effected the deconvolution of accuracy are analyzed and discussed.

  8. In vitro effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M.; Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE 2 suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE 2 synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release

  9. Brillouin-zone database on the Bilbao Crystallographic Server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroyo, Mois I; Orobengoa, Danel; de la Flor, Gemma; Tasci, Emre S; Perez-Mato, J Manuel; Wondratschek, Hans

    2014-03-01

    The Brillouin-zone database of the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (http://www.cryst.ehu.es) offers k-vector tables and figures which form the background of a classification of the irreducible representations of all 230 space groups. The symmetry properties of the wavevectors are described by the so-called reciprocal-space groups and this classification scheme is compared with the classification of Cracknell et al. [Kronecker Product Tables, Vol. 1, General Introduction and Tables of Irreducible Representations of Space Groups (1979). New York: IFI/Plenum]. The compilation provides a solution to the problems of uniqueness and completeness of space-group representations by specifying the independent parameter ranges of general and special k vectors. Guides to the k-vector tables and figures explain the content and arrangement of the data. Recent improvements and modifications of the Brillouin-zone database, including new tables and figures for the trigonal, hexagonal and monoclinic space groups, are discussed in detail and illustrated by several examples.

  10. Single-frequency pulsed Brillouin-thulium fiber laser at 2 µm with nonlinear polarization rotation and active phase modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Lv, Haibin; Zhou, Pu; Wu, Weijun; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Liu, Zejin

    2014-10-01

    We present a single-frequency (SF) pulsed fiber laser at 2 µm based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in a thulium-doped fiber laser. The effective feedback of the fiber laser is quite weak to induce pulse operation. Nonlinear polarization rotation and active phase modulation are employed to compress the pulse width and stabilize the pulse train. This SF pulsed Brillouin-thulium fiber laser (BTFL) can generate a stable pulse train with a repetition rate of ˜310 kHz and a pulse width of ˜200 ns. The repetition rate of the pulse train can be adjusted by controlling the cavity length, and the pulse width can be tuned between 200 and 500 ns. The central wavelength locates at 1971.58 nm with an optical signal-to-noise ratio of more than 40 dB, and the linewidth is about 6 MHz. This is the first demonstration of the SF pulsed BTFL as far as we know.

  11. Mechanical characterisation of hydrogels using Brillouin microscopy, ultrasound and unconfined compression tests (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Jung; Kabakova, Irina V.; Song, ChengZe; Paterson, Carl; Overby, Darryl R.; Török, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical characterisation of biomaterials provides the basis for investigating disease-related changes in the biomechanical properties of living tissues and cells. Brillouin microscopy offers a non-invasive and label-free method to measure material properties. Briefly, Brillouin scattering involves energy exchange between photons and acoustic phonons, resulting in an optical frequency shift of the scattered light. This shift is proportional to the speed of sound in the material, and consequently to the longitudinal elastic modulus (M). However, it is unclear how Brillouin measurements, which characterize the mechanical response at GHz frequencies, relate to mechanical properties measured at much lower frequencies ( 1 Hz) relevant to physiological conditions. Furthermore, as most biomaterials are hydrated, it remains unclear how the relative incompressibility of water influences the acoustic wave speed so as to affect Brillouin measurements of hydrated biomaterials. In this study, we aim to establish the relationship between Brillouin frequency shift, acoustic wave speed and quasi-static elastic modulus of hydrogels of varying stiffness. Hydrogels are homogeneous and isotropic materials that mimic the poroelastic nature of biological tissues. Each measurement probes the mechanics of hydrogels in a significantly different frequency range: GHz for Brillouin imaging, MHz for ultrasound and Hz for unconfined compression tests. The acoustic wave speed falls into range from 1490 to 1533 m/s in both MHz (ultrasound) and GHz (Brillouin) frequency ranges. The quasi-static modulus correlates positively with Brillouin frequency shift, increasing from 6 to 54 kPa. All the results indicate the measurements obtained by Brillouin microscopy are capable of representing the material properties of hydrogels in quasi-static condition.

  12. Quantum Rabi model in the Brillouin zone with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Simone; Rico, Enrique; Sabin, Carlos; Ockenfels, Till; Koch, Johannes; Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the interaction between a two-level quantum system and a single bosonic mode. We propose a method to perform a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model, introducing an implementation of the two-level system provided by the occupation of Bloch bands in the first Brillouin zone by ultracold atoms in tailored optical lattices. The effective qubit interacts with a quantum harmonic oscillator implemented in an optical dipole trap. Our realistic proposal allows one to experimentally investigate the quantum Rabi model for extreme parameter regimes, which are not achievable with natural light-matter interactions. When the simulated wave function exceeds the validity region of the simulation, we identify a generalized version of the quantum Rabi model in a periodic phase space.

  13. High-pressure Brillouin study on methane hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, S; Suwa, I; Kume, T; Shimizu, H

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic velocities and adiabatic elastic constants of structure I of methane hydrate (MH) have been determined as a function of pressure up to 0.6 GPa at 23 deg. C by the high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy developed for a single molecular crystal. The pressure dependence of the acoustic velocities of MH is very similar to that of ice-Ih except for the longitudinal acoustic (LA) velocity. The value of the LA velocity along the (100) direction of MH at 0.02 GPa is 3.63 km s sup - sup 1 which is about 7% lower than the average of the LA velocities in the ice-Ih phase at -35.5 deg. C and atmospheric pressure.

  14. Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy for tissue engineering application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilbekova, Dana; Yakupov, Talgat; Ogay, Vyacheslav; Umbayev, Bauyrzhan; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Utegulov, Zhandos N.

    2018-02-01

    Biomechanical properties of mammalian bones, such as strength, toughness and plasticity, are essential for understanding how microscopic scale mechanical features can link to macroscale bones' strength and fracture resistance. We employ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) micro-spectroscopy for local assessment of elastic properties of bones under compression and the efficacy of the tissue engineering approach based on heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) hydrogels, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and osteogenic stem cells in the regeneration of the bone tissues. BLS is noninvasive and label-free imaging modality for probing mechanical properties of hard tissues that can give information on structure-function properties of normal and pathological tissues. Results showed that HCF gels containing combination of all factors had the best effect with complete defect regeneration at week 9 and that the bones with fully consolidated fractures have higher values of elastic moduli compared to the bones with defects.

  15. Time gated phase-correlation distributed Brillouin fibre sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Andrey; Soto, Marcelo A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-05-01

    A random access distributed Brillouin fibre sensor is presented, based on phase modulation using a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) together with time gating. The standard phase-correlation technique is known to show a noise level increasing linearly with the number of measured points due to weak gratings generated randomly along the whole sensing fibre. Here we show how intensity modulated pump and time gated detection significantly improve the signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) of the system with no impact on the spatial resolution. A measurement with 1.1 cm spatial resolution over 3.3 km is demonstrated, representing 300'000 equivalent points. The limitations of the proposed technique are discussed through the paper.

  16. The Nkx6.1 homeodomain transcription factor suppresses glucagon expression and regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islet beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Jensen, Per Bo; Harper, David Alexander Taylor

    2005-01-01

    , respectively. In class 1 cells, overexpressed Nkx6.1 suppressed glucagon expression but did not affect the levels of several other prominent beta cell transcription factors. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 in class 3 cells resulted in a doubling of glucagon mRNA, with no effect on Pdx1...... levels, whereas suppression of Pdx1 in class 3 cells caused a 12-fold increase in glucagon transcript levels, demonstrating independent effects of Nkx6.1 and Pdx1 on glucagon expression in beta cell lines. RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 expression in class 3 cells also caused a decrease in GSIS from...... 13.9- to 3.7-fold, whereas suppression of Pdx1 reduced absolute amounts of insulin secretion without affecting fold response. Finally, RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 mRNA in primary rat islets was accompanied by a significant decrease in GSIS relative to control cells. In sum, our studies have...

  17. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (United States)); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. (Centro de Estudios Farmacologicos y de Principios Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  18. Bi-Directional Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analyzer System for Long Range Distributed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jie; Jin, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao

    2016-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme of bi-directional Brillouin time domain analyzer (BD-BOTDA) to extend the sensing range. By deploying two pump-probe pairs at two different wavelengths, the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) distribution over each half of the whole fiber can be obtained with the simultaneous detection of Brillouin signals in both channels. Compared to the conventional unidirectional BOTDA system of the same sensing range, the proposed BD-BOTDA scheme enables distributed sensing with a performance level comparable to the conventional one with half of the sensing range and a spatial resolution of 2 m, while maintaining the Brillouin signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the BFS uncertainty. Based on this technique, we have achieved distributed temperature sensing with a measurement range of 81.9 km fiber at a spatial resolution of 2 m and BFS uncertainty of ~0.44 MHz without introducing any complicated components or schemes.

  19. Simulation of simultaneously obtaining ocean temperature and salinity using dual-wavelength Brillouin lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yin; Ma, Yong; Li, Hao; Huang, Jun; Fang, Yu; Liang, Kun; Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A method for simultaneously obtaining the ocean temperature and salinity based on dual-wavelength Brillouin lidar is proposed in this letter. On the basis of the relationships between the temperature and salinity and the Brillouin shifts, a retrieval model for retrieving the temperature and salinity is established. By using the retrieval model, the ocean temperature and salinity can be simultaneously obtained through the Brillouin shifts. Simulation based on dual-wavelength Brillouin lidar is also carried out for verification of the accuracy of the retrieval model. Results show that the errors of the retrieval model for temperature and salinity are ±0.27 °C and ±0.33‰. (letter)

  20. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Wide-range temperature dependences of Brillouin scattering properties in polymer optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Hayashi, Neisei; Shinohara, Yuri; Tahara, Masaki; Hosoda, Hideki; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the temperature dependences of the Brillouin scattering properties in a perfluorinated graded-index (PFGI-) polymer optical fiber (POF) in a wide temperature range from -160 to 125 °C. The temperature dependences of the Brillouin frequency shift, linewidth, and Stokes power are almost linear at lower temperature down to -160 °C while they show nonlinear dependences at higher temperature. These behaviors appear to originate from the partial glass transition of the polymer material.

  2. Brillouin scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of sound velocity and acoustic absorption in simple alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. R.; Coakley, R. W.

    2011-07-01

    A scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to measure Brillouin spectra of methanol, isopropanol and a 95% ethanol-water mixture for temperatures ranging between 285 K and 320 K. The Brillouin frequency shifts and linewidths were used to calculate the velocities and absorption coefficients of hypersonic acoustic waves in these liquids. The temperature dependence of sound speed and acoustic attenuation was determined. For all three materials, both sound velocity and absorption coefficient decreased with temperature.

  3. On stimulated scattering of laser light in inertial fusion energy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Lj [National Inst. for Fusion Science, The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Ishiguro, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Theory and Computer Simulation Center, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sato, T. [JAMSTEC, Earth Simulator Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron-plasma, we have found, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability, is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron acoustic wave ({omega} < {omega}{sub p}). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in our simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments. (author)

  4. Ganoderma lucidum ethanol extract inhibits the inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-κB and toll-like receptor pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jun; Han, Min Seok; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gi Young; Lee, Jai-Heon; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a traditional Oriental medicine that has been widely used as a tonic to promote longevity and health in Korea and other Asian countries. Although a great deal of work has been carried out on the therapeutic potential of this mushroom, the pharmacological mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory actions remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of G. lucidum ethanol extract (EGL) on the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV2 microglia. We also investigated the effects of EGL on the LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were detected in BV2 microglia following LPS stimulation. We identifed that EGL significantly inhibits the excessive production of NO, PGE(2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in a concentration-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. In addition, EGL suppressed NF-κB translocation and transcriptional activity by blocking IκB degradation and inhibiting TLR4 and MyD88 expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of EGL on LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in BV2 microglia are associated with the suppression of the NF-κB and TLR signaling pathways. Therefore, EGL may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by inhibiting inflammatory mediator responses in activated microglia.

  5. The Nkx6.1 homeodomain transcription factor suppresses glucagon expression and regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islet beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Jensen, Per Bo; Harper, David Alexander Taylor

    2005-01-01

    -unresponsive/glucagon-negative; and class 3, glucose-responsive/glucagon-negative. The transcription factor Nkx2.2 was expressed with relative abundance of 3.3, 1.0, and 1.0 in class 1, class 2, and class 3 cells, respectively, whereas Nkx6.1 expression had the opposite trend: 1.0, 2.6, and 6.4 in class 1, class 2, and class 3 cells......, respectively. In class 1 cells, overexpressed Nkx6.1 suppressed glucagon expression but did not affect the levels of several other prominent beta cell transcription factors. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 in class 3 cells resulted in a doubling of glucagon mRNA, with no effect on Pdx1...... levels, whereas suppression of Pdx1 in class 3 cells caused a 12-fold increase in glucagon transcript levels, demonstrating independent effects of Nkx6.1 and Pdx1 on glucagon expression in beta cell lines. RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 expression in class 3 cells also caused a decrease in GSIS from...

  6. The effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on the cognitive function of elderly patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Soyeon; Seo, Jiyeong; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Kim, Ki Woong; Jang, Hak Chul

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have evidenced the association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, the effect of long-term TSH suppressive therapy on the cognitive function in elderly patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the effect of long-term TSH suppression on the cognitive function of elderly patients with DTC. A cross-sectional case-control study including 50 DTC patients aged 65 years or older (mean age 70.9 ± 5.0 y) who have received a TSH-suppressive therapy for at least 5 years and 90 control subjects matched for age, sex, education period, and depressive mood was conducted. Major Outcome Measure: Comprehensive cognitive domains were compared between the patient and control groups. The association between serum thyroid hormone concentration and cognitive function was investigated. The patient group had higher serum free T4 levels and suppressed TSH levels compared with the control group. Age, sex, education period, the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale scores, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale scores were not different between the 2 groups. All assessed neuropsychiatric tests were comparable in both groups. In the patient group, those with higher serum free T4 levels performed better on Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Test A. The association between serum free T4 and Trail Making Test A was maintained after adjusting for age, education period, the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. In the control group, serum free T4 and TSH levels were not associated with any of the assessed cognitive domains. Our results demonstrated the safety of long-term TSH suppression on the cognitive function in elderly DTC patients. Furthermore, the positive correlations between serum free T4 levels and some cognitive domains suggest the potential beneficial effects of exogenous levothyroxine on the

  7. The Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, the French National Neutron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba-Simionesco, C.; Visticot, J.P.; Menelle, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratoire Léon Brillouin is a French research infrastructure supported jointly by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); it constructs and operates spectrometers around Orphée, a 14 MW reactor operated by the CEA since 1980. The three missions of this national large scale facility are to perform research in its own scientific programs, to promote the use of diffraction and neutron spectroscopy, to welcome and assist experimentalists, subsequently ensuring training and education, and providing access for industrial partners. As a service institute the LLB makes its facilities and expertise available to visiting scientists from France and foreign countries. Every year, about 500 researchers from France (70%) and other countries (30%) visit the LLB and perform their experiments on the 20 operational spectrometers. About 450 experiments selected by a scientific review committee are performed annually. These activities are enduring and complementary to international centers, such as the Institute Laue-Langevin or the future European Spallation Source in Sweden, and cooperation programs with other national centers. As a national facility, its management of beam time is quite flexible, allowing more tests, thoughts and discussions between beginners and experts, the exploration of new areas or experiment preparation, and access to industrial partners. The exceptional situation of the LLB in the southwest of Paris, in the scientific centre of Saclay, nearby faculties, engineering schools and other large scale facilities, such the synchrotron Soleil, promotes external contacts and discussions, and stimulates new collaborations. New objectives in research are at the centre of the instrumental development program CAP2015. The goal of this program is the modernization or construction of nearly half of the laboratory's instruments by 2015, accounting for the needs of the

  8. Dietary L-Lysine Suppresses Autophagic Proteolysis and Stimulates Akt/mTOR Signaling in the Skeletal Muscle of Rats Fed a Low-Protein Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-09-23

    Amino acids, especially L-leucine, regulate protein turnover in skeletal muscle and have attracted attention as a means of increasing muscle mass in people suffering from malnutrition, aging (sarcopenia), or a bedridden state. We previously showed that oral administration of L-lysine (Lys) by gavage suppressed proteolysis in skeletal muscles of fasted rats. However, the intake of Lys in the absence of other dietary components is unlikely in a non-experimental setting, and other dietary components may interfere with the suppressive effect of Lys on proteolysis. We supplemented Lys to a 10% casein diet and investigated the effect of Lys on proteolysis and autophagy, a major proteolytic system, in the skeletal muscle of rats. The rate of proteolysis was evaluated from 3-methylhisitidine (MeHis) released from isolated muscles, in plasma, and excreted in urine. Supplementing lysine with the 10% casein diet decreased the rate of proteolysis induced by intake of a low-protein diet. The upregulated autophagy activity [light chain 3 (LC3)-II/total LC3] caused by a low-protein diet was reduced, and the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway was activated by Lys. Importantly, continuous feeding of a Lys-rich 10% casein diet for 15 days increased the masses of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Taken together, supplementation of Lys to a low-protein diet suppresses autophagic proteolysis through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and continuous feeding of a Lys-rich diet may increase skeletal muscle mass.

  9. Unexpected Improvement of Hand Motor Function with a Left Temporoparietal Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Regime Suppressing Auditory Hallucinations in a Brainstem Chronic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We here report paradoxical hand function recovery in a 61-year-old male tetra-paretic chronic patient following a stroke of the brainstem (with highly degraded right and abolished left-hand finger flexion/extension disabling him to manipulate objects who experienced insidious auditory hallucinations (AHs 4 years after such event. Symptomatic treatment for AHs was provided with periodical double sessions of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS (daily 1 Hz, 2 × 1,200 pulses interleaved by 1 h interval delivered to the left temporoparietal junction across two periods of 5 and 3 weeks, respectively. At the end of each stimulation period, AHs disappeared completely. Most surprisingly and totally unexpectedly, the patient experienced beneficial improvements of long-lasting impairments in his right-hand function. Detailed examination of onset and offset of rTMS stimulation regimes strongly suggests a temporal relation with the remission and re-appearance of AHs and also with a fragile but clinically meaningful improvements of right (but not left hand function contingent to the accrual of stimulation sessions. On the basis of post-recovery magnetic resonance imaging structural and functional evidence, mechanistic hypotheses that could subtend such unexpected motor recovery are critically discussed.

  10. Multipolar intrafascicular stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, Jan H.; Meier, J.H.; Rutten, Wim

    1992-01-01

    The suppressing effect of two intrafascicular anodes on the neural recruitment elicited by one intrafascicular cathode has been studied. Recruitment curves are calculated with a nerve stimulation model and are compared to experimental curves for the peroneal nerve of rat.

  11. Influence of core diameter and length of polymer optical fiber on Brillouin scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Ishigure, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Brillouin scattering in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers (PFGI-POFs) is potentially useful in developing high-accuracy distributed temperature sensors with reduced strain sensitivity. In this study, we investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, the influence of the fiber core diameter and length on the Brillouin gain spectra (BGS) in PFGI-POFs. First, we show that smaller core diameter drastically enhances the Stokes power using PFGI-POFs with 62.5-μm and 120-μm core diameters, and discuss the Brillouin threshold power. Then, we demonstrate that the PFGI-POF length has little influence on the BGS when the length is longer than 50 m. We also predict that, at 1.55-μm wavelength, it is difficult to reduce the Brillouin threshold power of PFGI-POFs below that of long silica single-mode fibers even if their core diameter is sufficiently reduced to satisfy the single-mode condition. Finally, making use of the enhanced Stokes signal, we confirm the Brillouin linewidth narrowing effect.

  12. Brillouin scattering, piezobirefringence, and dispersion of photoelastic coefficients of CdS and ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkowicz, R.; Skettrup, Torben

    1975-01-01

    We have measured the dispersion of the Brillouin scattering from acoustoelectrical domains in CdS and ZnO. These spectra are compared with the birefringence spectra obtained by applying uniaxial stress. The resonant cancellation of the Brillouin scattering occurs at the spectral position of the i......We have measured the dispersion of the Brillouin scattering from acoustoelectrical domains in CdS and ZnO. These spectra are compared with the birefringence spectra obtained by applying uniaxial stress. The resonant cancellation of the Brillouin scattering occurs at the spectral position...... of the isotropic point of the stress-induced birefringence. From these spectra it is concluded that the Brillouin scattering in CdS and ZnO is determined by elasto-optic effects alone. The spectra of some of the photoelastic coefficients have been determined. A model dielectric constant is derived where both....... It is found that the exchange interaction between the excitons may change the values of the photoelastic coefficients in ZnO about 10%....

  13. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Peng [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Sun, Guifan [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Andersen, Melvin E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  14. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs 3+ decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. → iAs 3+ attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. → iAs 3+ activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. → iAs 3+ impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. → iAs 3+ decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 μM) inorganic arsenite (iAs 3+ ) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs 3+ exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs 3+ exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4 expression may also be involved in arsenic-induced insulin resistance in

  15. Controlling Stimulated Brillouin/Raman Scattering in High Power Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    fiber amplifier archetype . 26 Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. The fiber was coiled on a 65 cm diameter aluminum spool with...compare to bulk silica [7] and the gB for the Yb- and P2O5-doped silica was 4.3x reduced [12] compared to literature values. A 2x reduction can be...glass interface. Other efficiency metrics for free-space fiber amplifiers that are found in the literature include efficiency with respect to the

  16. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  17. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sarabalis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W−1m−1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  18. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W-1m-1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  19. Brillouin-scattering measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in liquid CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, R. W.; Detenbeck, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin spectra were recorded for light scattered at small angles from liquid CS2. The use of a single-mode He-Ne laser, locked in frequency to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, permitted measurements of line widths of the order of 10 MHz for frequencies in the range 300-1000 MHz. These measurements extend previous Brillouin line-width measurements at higher frequencies into the region where relaxation effects are dominant and connect the optical measurements with lower-frequency acoustical data.

  20. Suppression of the increasing level of acetylcholine-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ in guinea pig airway smooth muscle cells by mabuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xirui; Zhao, Chao; Dai, Cailing; Ren, Yanxin; An, Nan; Wen, Huimin; Pan, L I; Cheng, Maosheng; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to establish an effective method for the in vitro culture of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, and also investigate the suppressive effect of mabuterol hydrochloride (Mab) on the increased level of intracellular Ca 2+ in ASM cells induced with acetylcholine (Ach). Two different methods, i.e. with or without collagenase to pretreat tracheal tissues, were applied to the manufacture of ASM cells. Cell viability was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthinazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence were used for the identification of ASM cells. Different concentration levels (10 -3 , 10 -4 , 10 -5 , 10 -6 and 10 -7 mmol/l) of Mab were administered 5 min before Ach (10 -4 M) treatment, respectively. The Ca 2+ fluorescent probe, Fura-2/AM or Fluo-3/AM were applied to the inspection of Ca 2+ fluorescent intensity with Varioskan Flash, immunocytometry systems and an inverted system microscope, respectively. The results showed that the fresh method, in which isolated tracheal tissues were previously treated with collagenase for 20 min, was more advantageous for the preparation of guinea pig ASM cells compared to when the enzyme was not used. The time for the ASM cells to initially migrate out of the 'tissue blocks' and the culture having to be generated due to the thick cell density was significantly less. On identification with immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescent staining, >95% of the cells were ASM cells. Mab (10 -3 -10 -7 mmol/l) significantly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ induced by Ach in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory rates of intracellular Ca 2+ by different concentrations of Mab, from low to high, were 14.93, 24.73, 40.06, 48.54 and 57.13%, respectively, when Varioskan Flash was used for determination. In conclusion, this novel method has a shorter harvesting period for ASM cells. Mab can suppress the increasing level of intracellular Ca 2

  1. Determination of the elastic constants of portlandite by Brillouin spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, S.

    2008-10-01

    The single crystal elastic constants Cij and the shear and adiabatic bulk modulus of a natural portlandite (Ca(OH)2) crystal were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The elastic constants, expressed in GPa, are: C11 = 102.0(± 2.0), C12 = 32.1(± 1.0), C13 = 8.4(± 0.4), C14 = 4.5(± 0.2), C33 = 33.6(± 0.7), C44 = 12.0(± 0.3), C66 = (C11-C12)/2 = 35.0(± 1.1), where the numbers in parentheses are 1σ standard deviations. The Reuss bounds of the adiabatic bulk and shear moduli are K0S = 26.0(± 0.3) GPa and G0 = 17.5(± 0.4) GPa, respectively, while the Voigt bounds of these moduli are K0S = 37.3(± 0.4) GPa and G0 = 24.4(± 0.3) GPa. The Reuss and Voigt bounds for the aggregate Young\\'s modulus are 42.8(± 1.0) GPa and 60.0(± 0.8) GPa respectively, while the aggregate Poisson\\'s ratio is equal to 0.23(± 0.01). Portlandite exhibits both large compressional elastic anisotropy with C11/C33 = 3.03(± 0.09) equivalent to that of the isostructural hydroxide brucite (Mg(OH)2), and large shear anisotropy with C66/C44 = 2.92(± 0.12) which is 11% larger than brucite. The comparison between the bulk modulus of portlandite and that of lime (CaO) confirms a systematic linear relationship between the bulk moduli of brucite-type simple hydroxides and the corresponding NaCl-type oxides. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estradiol-Dependent Stimulation and Suppression of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuron Firing Activity by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumsatitpong, Chayarndorn; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2018-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are the final central regulators of reproduction, integrating various inputs that modulate fertility. Stress typically inhibits reproduction but can be stimulatory; stress effects can also be modulated by steroid milieu. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) released during the stress response may suppress reproduction independent of downstream glucocorticoids. We hypothesized CRH suppresses fertility by decreasing GnRH neuron firing activity. To test this, mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and either implanted with an estradiol capsule (OVX+E) or not treated further to examine the influence of estradiol on GnRH neuron response to CRH. Targeted extracellular recordings were used to record firing activity from green fluorescent protein-identified GnRH neurons in brain slices before and during CRH treatment; recordings were done in the afternoon when estradiol has a positive feedback effect to increase GnRH neuron firing. In OVX mice, CRH did not affect the firing rate of GnRH neurons. In contrast, CRH exhibited dose-dependent stimulatory (30 nM) or inhibitory (100 nM) effects on GnRH neuron firing activity in OVX+E mice; both effects were reversible. The dose-dependent effects of CRH appear to result from activation of different receptor populations; a CRH receptor type-1 agonist increased firing activity in GnRH neurons, whereas a CRH receptor type-2 agonist decreased firing activity. CRH and specific agonists also differentially regulated short-term burst frequency and burst properties, including burst duration, spikes/burst, and/or intraburst interval. These results indicate that CRH alters GnRH neuron activity and that estradiol is required for CRH to exert both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on GnRH neurons. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  3. Cinnamomum cassia Suppresses Caspase-9 through Stimulation of AKT1 in MCF-7 Cells but Not in MDA-MB-231 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianpour Rad, Sima; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri; Lee, Guan Serm; Looi, Chung Yeng; Wong, Won Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is a popular culinary spice used for flavoring and in traditional medicine. C. cassia extract (CE) induces apoptosis in many cell lines. In the present study, particular differences in the mechanism of the anti-proliferative property of C. cassia on two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, were elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings The hexane extract of C. cassia demonstrated high anti-proliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells (IC50, 34±3.52 and 32.42 ±0.37 μg/ml, respectively). Oxidative stress due to disruption of antioxidant enzyme (SOD, GPx and CAT) activity is suggested as the probable cause for apoptosis initiation. Though the main apoptosis pathway in both cell lines was found to be through caspase-8 activation, caspase-9 was also activated in MDA-MB-231 cells but suppressed in MCF-7 cells. Gene expression studies revealed that AKT1, the caspase-9 suppressor, was up-regulated in MCF-7 cells while down-regulated in MDA-MB-231 cells. Although, AKT1 protein expression in both cell lines was down-regulated, a steady increase in MCF-7 cells was observed after a sharp decrease of suppression of AKT1. Trans-cinnamaldehyde and coumarin were isolated and identified and found to be mainly responsible for the observed anti-proliferative activity of CE (Cinnamomum cassia). Conclusion Activation of caspase-8 is reported for the first time to be involved as the main apoptosis pathway in breast cancer cell lines upon treatment with C. cassia. The double effects of C. cassia on AKT1 gene expression in MCF-7 cells is reported for the first time in this study. PMID:26700476

  4. Valeriana officinalis root extract suppresses physical stress by electric shock and psychological stress by nociceptive stimulation-evoked responses by decreasing the ratio of monoamine neurotransmitters to their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Young; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kwak, Youn-Gil; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2014-12-11

    In this study, we investigate the effects of valerian root extracts (VE) on physical and psychological stress responses by utilizing a communication box. Eight-week-old ICR mice received oral administration of VE (100 mg/kg/0.5 ml) or equal volume of distilled water in every day for 3 weeks prior to being subjected to physical or psychological stress for 3 days, which are induced by communication box developed for physical electric shock and psychological stress by nociceptive stimulation-evoked responses. The stress condition was assessed by forced swimming test and serum corticosterone levels. In addition, norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites such as 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol sulfate (MHPG-SO4) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in the hippocampus and amygdala at 1 h after final stress condition, respectively. Immobility time and corticosterone levels were significantly increased in both the physical and psychological stress groups compared to the control group. The administration of VE significantly reduced these parameters in both the physical and psychological stress groups. In addition, compared to the control group, physical and psychological stress groups showed significantly increased levels of MHPG-SO4 and 5-HIAA in the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. The administration of VE significantly suppressed the increase of MHPG-SO4 and 5-HIAA in the two stress groups. These results suggest that VE can suppress physical and psychological stress responses by modulating the changes in 5-HT and NE turnover in the hippocampus and amygdala.

  5. Dienogest, a selective progestin, reduces plasma estradiol level through induction of apoptosis of granulosa cells in the ovarian dominant follicle without follicle-stimulating hormone suppression in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, S; Shimizu, Y; Nagaoka, T; Tokado, H; Imada, K; Mizuguchi, K

    2008-07-01

    Dienogest is a selective progestin that has been shown to arrest ovarian follicular development in women, without affecting gonadotropin secretion. As luteal progesterone or exogeneous progestins are known to suppress ovarian folliculogenesis via the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion, this action of dienogest on ovaries seems to be unique. To examine the underlying mechanism of the antifolliculogenic effect of dienogest, female cynomolgus monkeys were treated with a single oral dose of 0.1 mg/kg dienogest on day 7 of the menstrual cycle. Plasma FSH, estradiol (E2), and progesterone levels were measured up to 15 days after dosing. In an additional experiment, ovaries were excised 24 h after dosing for histological examinations. As a result, plasma E2 level declined within 24 h after dosing, while dienogest did not decreased FSH level prior to E2 decline. After decline of E2 level, the low level of E2 was sustained for more than 11 days. It is considered that a single oral dose of dienogest induced atresia of the dominant follicle. In the histological examination, two out of three animals showed decline in E2 level. The ovarian dominant follicles from these animals showed apoptotic changes in granulosa cells with scattered aromatase expression within 24 h after dosing. These results indicate that the induction of atresia of the ovarian dominant follicle by direct action would be a possible mechanism of dienogest to inhibit plasma E2 level.

  6. Berberine Activates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor but Suppresses CYP1A1 Induction through miR-21-3p Stimulation in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Lo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Berberine and the methylenedioxy ring-opening derivatives palmatine and jatrorrhizine are active ingredients in immunomodulatory plants, such as goldenseal. This study aimed to illustrate the effects of protoberberines on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR activation and cytochrome P450 (CYP 1 in the estrogen receptor (ERα(+ MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Among protoberberines at non-cytotoxic concentrations (≤10 μM, berberine had the most potent and statistically significant effects on AhR activation and CYP1A1/1A2/1B1 mRNA induction. The 24-h exposure to 10 μM berberine did not change CYP1A1 mRNA stability, protein level and function. Berberine significantly increased micro RNA (miR-21-3p by 36% and the transfection of an inhibitor of miR-21-3p restored the induction of CYP1A1 protein with a 50% increase. These findings demonstrate that the ring opening of the methylenedioxyl moiety in berberine decreased AhR activation in MCF-7 cells. While CYP1A1 mRNA was elevated, berberine-induced miR-21-3p suppressed the increase of functional CYP1A1 protein expression.

  7. Residual strain sensor using Al-packaged optical fiber and Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo-Hun; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2015-03-09

    We propose a distributed residual strain sensor that uses an Al-packaged optical fiber for the first time. The residual strain which causes Brillouin frequency shifts in the optical fiber was measured using Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis with 2 cm spatial resolution. We quantified the Brillouin frequency shifts in the Al-packaged optical fiber by the tensile stress and compared them for a varying number of Al layers in the optical fiber. The Brillouin frequency shift of an optical fiber with one Al layer had a slope of 0.038 MHz/με with respect to tensile stress, which corresponds to 78% of that for an optical fiber without Al layers. After removal of the stress, 87% of the strain remained as residual strain. When different tensile stresses were randomly applied, the strain caused by the highest stress was the only one detected as residual strain. The residual strain was repeatedly measured for a time span of nine months for the purpose of reliability testing, and there was no change in the strain except for a 4% reduction, which is within the error tolerance of the experiment. A composite material plate equipped with our proposed Al-packaged optical fiber sensor was hammered for impact experiment and the residual strain in the plate was successfully detected. We suggest that the Al-packaged optical fiber can be adapted as a distributed strain sensor for smart structures, including aerospace structures.

  8. Observation of depolarized guided acoustic-wave Brillouin scattering in partially uncoated optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Neisei; Set, Sze Yun; Yamashita, Shinji

    2018-02-01

    We observed the depolarized guided acoustic-wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS) spectrum in a highly nonlinear fiber with a partially side-stripped polymer coat. The linewidth of the GAWBS spectral line at 941 MHz was measured to be 6.4 MHz, which was 0.9 times that of a coated fiber.

  9. Temperature retrieval from Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles measured in air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witschas, B.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the performance of two different algorithms for retrieving temperature from Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) line shapes, RB scattering measurements have been performed in air at a wavelength of 403 nm, for a temperature range from 257 K to 330 K, and atmospherically relevant

  10. Spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering of ultraviolet light in nitrogen, dry and moist air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witschas, B.; Vieitez, M.O.; van Duijn, E.-J.; Reitebuch, O.; Van de Water, W.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric lidar techniques for the measurement of wind, temperature, and optical properties of aerosols rely on the exact knowledge of the spectral line shape of the scattered laser light on molecules. We report on spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering measurements in the ultraviolet at a

  11. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles of air at different temperatures and pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Z.; Witschas, B.; van der Water, W.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering profiles for air have been recorded for the temperature range from 255 to 340 K and the pressure range from 640 to 3300 mbar, covering the conditions relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for planned atmospheric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) missions. The

  12. Distributed Brillouin fiber optic strain monitoring applications in advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Filippo; Cargnelutti, Mario; Di Tommaso, Angelo; Toffanin, Massimo

    2003-08-01

    Composite materials based on glass, carbon and aramid fibers have many advantages such as fast application, lightweight and corrosion resistance, and are widely diffused for manufacturing of tanks, pipings and for restoration, upgrade and seismic retrofit of structures and historical heritage. As several questions regarding long term durability of composite strengthenings remains still unsolved, monitoring of strain and temperature is strongly recommended, respectively to assess proper load transfer and no glass phase transition of the polymeric matrix. In this research work strain and temperature distributed sensing trough Brillouin scattering in single-mode optical fibers was used in different tests in order to understand the influence of different fiber coatings and embedding techniques. Pressure tests were performed on a GFRP piping with inhomogeneous strengthening layout and Brillouin strain data were compared with conventional strain gages. A smart CFRP material has been also developed and evaluated in a seismic retrofit application on an historical building dated 1500 that was seriously damaged in the earthquake of 1997. The developed embedding technique has been demonstrated successful to obtain fiber-optic smart composites with low optical losses, and the data comparison between Brillouin and resistive strain gauges confirms Brillouin technique is very effective for composite monitoring.

  13. Decreasing Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3C (EIF3C) Suppresses Proliferation and Stimulates Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cell Lines Through Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weipeng; Li, Xichuan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen; Jia, Yongsheng; Yuan, Shunzong; Huang, Yong; Shi, Yehui; Tong, Zhongsheng

    2017-08-30

    BACKGROUND Translation initiation is the rate limiting step of protein synthesis and is highly regulated. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3C (EIF3C), an oncogene overexpressed in several human cancers, plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cell proliferation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of EIF3C in breast cancer tissues from 42 patients. We investigated whether EIF3C silencing decreases breast cancer cell proliferation as assessed by colony formation assay, and whether EIF3C gene knockdown induces apoptosis as assessed by flow cytometry analysis. We utilized the stress and apoptosis signaling antibody array kit, while p-ERK1/2, p-Akt, p-Smad2, p-p38 MAPK, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-7 were explored between EIF3C-siRNA and controls. Furthermore, the effects of EIF3C gene knockdown in mTOR pathway were analyzed by western blotting for different cell lines. RESULTS In EIF3C-positive tumors, 32 out of 42 showed significantly higher frequencies of high grade group by immunoreactivity (p=0.0016). BrdU incorporation after four days of cell plating was significantly suppressed in MDA-MB-231 cells by EIF3C knockdown compared with controls, with average changes of 7.8-fold (pcells by EIF3C knockdown compared with controls (pCell apoptosis was significantly increased in the EIF3C-siRNA group when compared with the cells that were transfected with scrambled siRNA (3.51±0.0842 versus 13.24±0.2307, p<0.01). The mTOR signaling pathway was involved in decreasing EIF3C translational efficiency. CONCLUSIONS Unveiling the mechanisms of EIF3 action in tumorigenesis may help identify attractive targets for cancer therapy.

  14. pF3D Simulations of Large Outer-Beam Brillouin Scattering from NIF Rugby Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steven; Strozzi, David; Chapman, Thomas; Amendt, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We assess the cause of large outer-beam stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a NIF shot with a rugby-shaped hohlraum, which has less wall surface loss and thus higher x-ray drive than a cylindrical hohlraum of the same radius. This shot differed from a prior rugby shot with low SBS in three ways: outer beam pointing, split-pointing of the four beams within each outer-beam quadruplet, and a small amount of neon added to the hohlraum helium fill gas. We use pF3D, a massively-parallel, paraxial-envelope laser plasma interaction code, with plasma profiles from the radiation-hydrodynamics code Lasnex. We determine which change between the two shots increased the SBS by adding them one at a time to the simulations. We compare the simulations to experimental data for total SBS power, its spatial distribution at the lens, and the SBS spectrum. For each shot, we use profiles from Lasnex simulations with and without a model for mix at the hohlraum wall-gas interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-674893.

  15. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  16. Localization of the interband transitions in the bulk of the Brillouin zone of III–V compound crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, V. V., E-mail: sobolev@uni.udm.ru; Perevoshchikov, D. A. [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    The localization of the transitions in the bulk of the Brillouin zone that form the main structures in the spectra of the imaginary part of the permittivity in the range up to ~7 eV for III–V semiconductors (AlSb, GaSb, InSb, and InAs) is determined using electron density functional theory. It is established that intense transitions occur not only in the vicinity of the high-symmetry axes of the Brillouin zone, but also in some specific large volumes of the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone.

  17. Protocatechuic Acid, a Phenolic from Sansevieria roxburghiana Leaves, Suppresses Diabetic Cardiomyopathy via Stimulating Glucose Metabolism, Ameliorating Oxidative Stress, and Inhibiting Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloy Bhattacharjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Persistent hyperglycemia, impairment of redox status and establishment of inflammatory pathophysiology integrally play important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC. Present study examined the therapeutic potential of protocatechuic acid isolated from the Sansevieria roxburghiana rhizomes against DC employing rodent model of type 2 diabetes (T2D. T2D was induced by high fat diet + a low-single dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, i.p.. T2D rats exhibited significantly (p < 0.01 high fasting blood glucose level. Alteration in serum lipid profile (p < 0.01 and increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (p < 0.01 and creatine kinase (p < 0.01 in the sera of T2D rats revealed the occurrence of hyperlipidemia and diabetic pathophysiology. A significantly (p < 0.01 high levels of serum C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory mediators revealed the establishment of inflammatory occurrence in T2D rats. Besides, significantly high levels of troponins in the sera revealed the establishment of cardiac dysfunctions in T2D rats. However, protocatechuic acid (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. treatment could significantly reverse the changes in serum biochemical parameters related to cardiac dysfunctions. Molecular mechanism studies demonstrated impairment of signaling cascade, IRS1/PI3K/Akt/AMPK/p 38/GLUT4, in glucose metabolism in the skeletal muscle of T2D rats. Significant (p < 0.01 activation of polyol pathway, enhanced production of AGEs, oxidative stress and up-regulation of inflammatory signaling cascades (PKC/NF-κB/PARP were observed in the myocardial tissue of T2D rats. However, protocatechuic acid (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. treatment could significantly (p < 0.05–0.01 stimulate glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle, regulated glycemic and lipid status, reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the myocardial physiology in T2D rats near to normalcy. Histological assessments were also in agreement with the above findings

  18. The critical role of cognitive-based trait differences in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) suppression of food craving and eating in frank obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Mary Katherine; Sylvester, Maria D; Osborn, Lauren; Helms, Joel; Turan, Bulent; Burgess, Emilee E; Boggiano, Mary M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity remains a major public health concern and novel treatments are needed. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation technique shown to reduce food craving and consumption, especially when targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) with a right anode/left cathode electrode montage. Despite the implications to treat frank (non-bingeeating) obesity, no study has tested the right anode/left cathode montage in this population. Additionally, most tDCS appetite studies have not controlled for differences in traits under DLPFC control that may influence how well one responds to tDCS. Hence, N = 18 (10F/8M) adults with frank obesity completed the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire-Restraint and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and received 20 min of 2 mA active tDCS and control tDCS session. Craving and eating was assessed at both sessions with a food photo "wanting" test and in-lab measures of total, preferred, and less-preferred kilocalories consumed of three highly palatable snack foods. While main effects of tDCS vs. control were not found, significant differences emerged when trait scores were controlled. tDCS reduced food craving in females with lower attention-type impulsiveness (p = 0.047), reduced preferred-food consumption in males with lower intent to restrict calories (p = 0.024), and reduced total food consumption in males with higher non-planning-type impulsiveness (p = 0.009) compared to control tDCS. This is the first study to find significant reductions in food craving and consumption in a sample with frank obesity using the most popular tDCS montage in appetite studies. The results also highlight the cognitive-based heterogeneity of individuals with obesity and the importance of considering these differences when evaluating the efficacy of DLPFC-targeted tDCS in future studies aimed at treating obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. N(6)-(2-Hydroxyethyl)adenosine in the Medicinal Mushroom Cordyceps cicadae Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Pro-inflammatory Responses by Suppressing TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng-Ying; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lee, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-Wei; Kuo, Chia-Feng

    2015-10-23

    Natural products play an important role in promoting health with relation to the prevention of chronic inflammation. N(6)-(2-Hydroxyethyl)adenosine (HEA), a physiologically active compound in the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps cicadae, has been identified as a Ca(2+) antagonist and shown to control circulation and possess sedative activity in pharmacological tests. The fruiting body of C. cicadae has been widely applied in Chinese medicine. However, neither the anti-inflammatory activities of HEA nor the fruiting bodies of C. cicadae have been carefully examined. In this study, we first cultured the fruiting bodies of C. cicadae and then investigated the anti-inflammatory activities of water and methanol extracts of wild and artificially cultured C. cicadae fruiting bodies. Next, we determined the amount of three bioactive compounds, adenosine, cordycepin, and HEA, in the extracts and evaluated their synergistic anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, the possible mechanism involved in anti-inflammatory action of HEA isolated from C. cicadae was investigated. The results indicate that cordycepin is more potent than adenosine and HEA in suppressing the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by RAW 264.7 macrophages; however, no synergistic effect was observed with these three compounds. HEA attenuated the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by suppressing the toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. This result will support the use of HEA as an anti-inflammatory agent and C. cicadae fruiting bodies as an anti-inflammatory mushroom.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of cordycepin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages through Toll-like receptor 4-mediated suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi YH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yung Hyun Choi,1,2 Gi-Young Kim,3 Hye Hyeon Lee4 1Department of Biochemistry, Dongeui University College of Korean Medicine, Busan, 2Anti-Aging Research Center and Blue-Bio Industry RIC, Dongeui University, Busan, 3Laboratory of Immunobiology, Department of Marine Life Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju, 4Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: Cordycepin is the main functional component of the Cordyceps species, which has been widely used in traditional Oriental medicine. This compound possesses many pharmacological properties, such as an ability to enhance immune function, as well as antioxidant, antiaging, and anticancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of cordycepin using a murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell model. Our data demonstrated that cordycepin suppressed production of proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 by inhibiting inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression. Cordycepin also inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta, through downregulation of respective mRNA expression. In addition, pretreatment with cordycepin significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activating protein kinases and attenuated nuclear translocation of NF-κB by LPS, which was associated with abrogation of inhibitor kappa B-alpha degradation. Furthermore, cordycepin potently inhibited the binding of LPS to macrophages and LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the inhibitory effects of cordycepin on LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages are associated with suppression of mitogen-activating protein kinases and activation of NF-κB by inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. Keywords

  1. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  2. On the stimulated Raman sidescattering in inhomogeneous plasmas: revisit of linear theory and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C. Z.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yin, Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; Zhao, Y.; He, X. T.

    2018-02-01

    Stimulated Raman sidescattering (SRSS) in inhomogeneous plasma is comprehensively revisited on both theoretical and numerical aspects due to the increasing concern of its detriments to inertial confinement fusion. Firstly, two linear mechanisms of finite beam width and collisional effects that could suppress SRSS are investigated theoretically. Thresholds for the eigenmode and wave packet in a finite-width beam are derived as a supplement to the theory proposed by Mostrom and Kaufman (1979 Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 644). Collisional absorption of SRSS is efficient at high-density plasma and high-Z material, otherwise, it allows emission of sidescattering. Secondly, we have performed the first three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in the context of SRSS to investigate its linear and nonlinear effects. Simulation results are qualitatively agreed with the linear theory. SRSS with the maximum growth gain is excited at various densities, grows to an amplitude that is comparable with the pump laser, and evolutes to lower densities with a large angle of emergence. Competitions between SRSS and other parametric instabilities such as stimulated Raman backscattering, two-plasmon decay, and stimulated Brillouin scattering are discussed. These interaction processes are determined by gains, occurrence sites, scattering geometries of each instability, and will affect subsequent evolutions. Nonlinear effects of self-focusing and azimuthal magnetic field generation are observed to be accompanied with SRSS. In addition, it is found that SRSS is insensitive to ion motion, collision (low-Z material), and electron temperature.

  3. Pilot study on rugged fiber optic brillouin sensors for large-strain measurements to ensure the safety of transportation structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Brillouin-scattering Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (BOTDR) is a viable technology for simultaneous, distributed : strain and temperature measurements for miles-long transportation structures. It is a promising tool to ensure the smooth : operatio...

  4. Research on distributed strain separation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing system combining an electric power optical fiber cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuqing; Chen, Xi; Li, Jihui; Tong, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin-based optical fiber sensing system has been taken more and more attentions in power transmission line in recent years. However, there exists a temperature cross sensitivity problem in sensing system. Hence, researching on strain separation technology of fiber brillouin sensing system is an urgent requirement in its practical area. In this paper, a real-time online distributed strain separation calculation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing combining an electric power optical fiber cable is proposed. The technology is mainly composed of the Brillouin temperature-strain distributed measurement system and the Raman temperature distributed measurement system. In this technology, the electric power optical fiber cable is a special optical phase conductor (OPPC); the Brillouin sensing system uses the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) method. The optical unit of the OPPC includes single-mode and multimode fibers which can be used as sensing channel for Brillouin sensing system and Raman sensing system respectively. In the system networking aspect, the data processor of fiber Brillouin sensing system works as the host processor and the data processor of fiber Raman sensing system works as the auxiliary processor. And the auxiliary processor transfers the data to the host processor via the Ethernet interface. In the experiment, the BOTDA monitoring system and the Raman monitoring system work on the same optical unit of the OPPC simultaneously; In the data processing aspect, the auxiliary processor of Raman transfers the temperature data to the host processor of Brillouin via the Ethernet interface, and then the host processor of Brillouin uses the temperature data combining itself strain-temperature data to achieve the high sampling rate and high-precision strain separation via data decoupling calculation. The data decoupling calculation is achieved through the interpolation, filtering, feature point alignment, and the singular point prediction

  5. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering to determine one-dimensional temperature and number density profiles of a gas flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; John, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra for heated nitrogen gas were measured by imaging the output of a Fabry-Perot interferometer onto a CCD array. The spectra were compared with the theoretical 6-moment model of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering convolved with the Fabry-Perot instrument function. Estimates of the temperature and a dimensionless parameter proportional to the number density of the gas as functions of position in the laser beam were calculated by least-squares deviation fits between theory and experiment.

  6. Tesofensine, a novel triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor, induces appetite suppression by indirect stimulation of alpha1 adrenoceptor and dopamine D1 receptor pathways in the diet-induced obese rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    in the DIO rat. Tesofensine (0.5-3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) induced a dose-dependent and marked decline in food intake with an ED(50) of 1.3 mg/kg. The hypophagic response of tesofensine (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.) was almost completely reversed by co-administration of prazosin (1.0 mg/kg, alpha(1) adrenoceptor antagonist......) and partially antagonized by co-administration of SCH23390 (0.03 mg/kg, DA D(1) receptor antagonist). In contrast, tesofensine-induced hypophagia was not affected by RX821002 (0.3 mg/kg, alpha(2) adrenoceptor antagonist), haloperidol (0.03 mg/kg, D(2) receptor antagonist), NGB2904 (0.1 mg/kg, D(3) receptor...... antagonist), or ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist). Hence, the mechanism underlying the suppression of feeding by tesofensine in the obese rat is dependent on the drug's ability to indirectly stimulate alpha(1) adrenoceptor and DA D(1) receptor function....

  7. Electrically tunable Brillouin fiber laser based on a metal-coated single-mode optical fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Popov

    Full Text Available We explore tunability of the Brillouin fiber laser employing Joule heating. For this purpose, 10-m-length of a metal-coated single-mode optical cavity fiber has been directly included into an electrical circuit, like a conductor wire. With the current up to ∼3.5 A the laser tuning is demonstrated over a spectrum range of ∼400 MHz. The observed laser line broadening up to ∼2 MHz is explained by frequency drift and mode-hoping in the laser caused by thermal noise. Keywords: Brillouin fiber laser, Metal-coated optical fiber, Laser tuning, Fiber sensors

  8. Evaluating biomechanical properties of murine embryos using Brillouin microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Raksha; Zhang, Jitao; Wu, Chen; Rippy, Justin; Singh, Manmohan; Larin, Kirill V.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Embryogenesis is regulated by numerous changes in mechanical properties of the cellular microenvironment. Thus, studying embryonic mechanophysiology can provide a more thorough perspective of embryonic development, potentially improving early detection of congenital abnormalities as well as evaluating and developing therapeutic interventions. A number of methods and techniques have been used to study cellular biomechanical properties during embryogenesis. While some of these techniques are invasive or involve the use of external agents, others are compromised in terms of spatial and temporal resolutions. We propose the use of Brillouin microscopy in combination with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure stiffness as well as structural changes in a developing embryo. While Brillouin microscopy assesses the changes in stiffness among different organs of the embryo, OCT provides the necessary structural guidance.

  9. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in NH4Cl under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikita, Tomoyuki; Kitabatake, Makoto; Ikeda, Takuro

    1981-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in NH 4 Cl has been studied under hydrostatic pressure. Brillouin shifts of the longitudinal phonons propagating along the and directions and of the transverse phonons propagating along the direction are measured as a function of temperature at four fixed pressures up to 2.3 kbar. All components increase almost linearly with decreasing temperature in the disordered phase and show incremental increases similar to the temperature dependence of the long range order parameter in the ordered phase. It was found that the longitudinal modes exhibit large despersion effect even at high pressures. On the other hand, the transverse mode appears to give no dispersion effect. The intensity of the Rayleigh component in the VV polarization condition increases as the temperature approaches the transition point, while that in the VH polarization does not show such anomalous increase. (author)

  10. Temperature dependence of Brillouin frequency shift in polymers controlled by plasticization effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Du, Qiming; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    The temperature-dependence coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers is known to change drastically, because of the glass transition, at a certain critical temperature (Tc), above which the BFS becomes more sensitive to temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Tc value can be adjusted by varying the dopant concentration, which is originally used to form the graded-index profile in the core region. Furthermore, we show that the temperature sensitivity of the BFS is enhanced in the presence of dopant probably because the temperature sensitivity of Young's modulus is increased. The results indicate a big potential of the temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering with an extremely high sensitivity in a specific desired temperature range.

  11. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  12. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in SF6 in the kinetic regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yuanqing; Yu, Yin; Liang, Kun; Marques, Wilson; van de Water, Willem; Ubachs, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin spectral profiles are measured with a laser-based scatterometry setup for a 90° scattering angle at a high signal-to-noise ratio (r.m.s. noise below 0.15% w.r.t. peak intensity) in sulfur-hexafluoride gas for pressures in the range 0.2–5 bar and for a wavelength of λ=403.0 nm. The

  13. Viscoelasticity of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse brain studied by Brillouin microspectroscopy and correlative Raman analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mattana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidopathy is one of the most prominent hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma. The plaques consist of abnormal deposits mainly composed of an aggregation-prone protein fragment, β-amyloid 1-40/1-42, into the extracellular matrix. Brillouin microspectroscopy is an all-optical contactless technique that is based on the interaction between visible light and longitudinal acoustic waves or phonons, giving access to the viscoelasticity of a sample on a subcellular scale. Here, we describe the first application of micromechanical mapping based on Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to probe the stiffness of individual amyloid plaques in the hippocampal part of the brain of a β-amyloid overexpressing transgenic mouse. Correlative analysis based on Brillouin and Raman microspectroscopy showed that amyloid plaques have a complex structure with a rigid core of β-pleated sheet conformation (β-amyloid protein surrounded by a softer ring-shaped region richer in lipids and other protein conformations. These preliminary results give a new insight into the plaque biophysics and biomechanics, and a valuable contrast mechanism for the study and diagnosis of amyloidopathy.

  14. Brillouin spectroscopy reveals changes in muscular viscoelasticity in Drosophila POMT mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Baker, Ryan; Panin, Vladislav M.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-03-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of muscle diseases that induce weakness in skeletal muscle and cause progressive muscle degeneration. The muscular mechanical properties (i.e., viscoelasticity), however, have not been thoroughly examined before and after MD. On the other hand, Brillouin spectroscopy (BS) provides a non-invasive approach to probing the local sound speed within a small volume. Moreover, recent advances in background-free Brillouin spectroscopy enable investigators to imaging not only transparent samples, but also turbid ones. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of muscles while employing Drosophila model of dystroglycanopathies, human congenital muscular dystrophies resulting from abnormal glycosylation of alphadystroglycan. Specifically, we analyzed larval abdominal muscles of Drosophila with mutations in protein Omannosyltransferase (POMT) genes. As a comparison, we have also examined muscular tissues dissected from wildtype Drosophila. The Brillouin spectra were obtained by a background free VIPA (virtually imaged phased array) spectrometer described in the previous report. As a reference, the Raman spectra were also acquired for each test. Our current results indicated that POMT defects cause changes in muscle elasticity, which suggests that muscular dystrophy conditions may be also associated with abnormalities in muscle elastic properties.

  15. Viscoelasticity of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse brain studied by Brillouin microspectroscopy and correlative Raman analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Tamagnini, Francesco; Fioretto, Daniele; Palombo, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidopathy is one of the most prominent hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma. The plaques consist of abnormal deposits mainly composed of an aggregation-prone protein fragment, β-amyloid 1-40/1-42, into the extracellular matrix. Brillouin microspectroscopy is an all-optical contactless technique that is based on the interaction between visible light and longitudinal acoustic waves or phonons, giving access to the viscoelasticity of a sample on a subcellular scale. Here, we describe the first application of micromechanical mapping based on Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to probe the stiffness of individual amyloid plaques in the hippocampal part of the brain of a β-amyloid overexpressing transgenic mouse. Correlative analysis based on Brillouin and Raman microspectroscopy showed that amyloid plaques have a complex structure with a rigid core of β-pleated sheet conformation (β-amyloid) protein surrounded by a softer ring-shaped region richer in lipids and other protein conformations. These preliminary results give a new insight into the plaque biophysics and biomechanics, and a valuable contrast mechanism for the study and diagnosis of amyloidopathy. PMID:29151920

  16. Cleome rutidosperma and Euphorbia thymifolia Suppress Inflammatory Response via Upregulation of Phase II Enzymes and Modulation of NF-κB and JNK Activation in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiou-Yu Ding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleome rutidosperma DC. and Euphorbia thymifolia L. are herbal medicines used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to treat various illnesses. Reports document that they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms involved in their anti-inflammatory actions have not yet been elucidated. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities and underlying mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Cleome rutidosperma (CR and Euphorbia thymifolia (ET were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated microglial cell line BV2. The morphology changes and production of pro-inflammatory mediators were assayed. Gene expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, interleukin (IL-1β, and CC chemokine ligand (CCL-2, as well as phase II enzymes such as heme oxygenase (HO-1, the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM and NAD(PH quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1, were further investigated using reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-Q-PCR and Western blotting. The effects of CR and ET on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs and nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling pathways were examined using Western blotting and specific inhibitors. CR and ET suppressed BV2 activation, down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression and inhibited nitric oxide (NO overproduction without affecting cell viability. They reduced LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor (TNF and IL-6 production, attenuated IL-1β and CCL2 expression, but upregulated HO-1, GCLM and NQO1 expression. They also inhibited p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and modulated Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK activation in BV2 cells. SP600125, the JNK inhibitor, significantly augmented the anti-IL-6 activity of ET. NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, enhanced the anti-IL-6 effects of both CR and ET. Znpp, a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, attenuated the anti-NO effects of CR and ET. Our results show that CR and ET exhibit anti

  17. Ethyl acetate extract from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer and its main constituents inhibit α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced melanogenesis by suppressing oxidative stress in B16 mouse melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Xu, Xiao-Hao; Wang, Ke; Yang, Xin-Zhao; Bi, Ying-Fei; Yan, Yao; Liu, Jian-Zeng; Chen, Xue-Nan; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Guo, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Da-Qing; Sun, Li-Wei

    2017-08-17

    Hyperpigmentation disease involves darkening of the skin color due to melanin overproduction. Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine and has a long history of use as a skin lightener to inhibit melanin formation in China, Korea and some other Asian countries. However, the constituents and the molecular mechanisms by which they affect melanogenesis are not fully clear. The purpose of this study was to identify the active ingredient in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer extract that inhibits mushroom tyrosinase activity and to investigate the antioxidative capacity and molecular mechanisms of the effective extract on melanogenesis in B16 mouse melanoma cells. Aqueous extracts of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer were successively fractionated with an equal volume of chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butyl alcohol to determine the effects by examining the activity of mushroom tyrosinase. The effective fraction was analyzed using HPLC and LC-MS. The antioxidative capacity and the inhibitory effects on melanin content, cell intracellular tyrosinase activity, and melanogenesis protein levels were determined in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-treated B16 mouse melanoma cells. The ethyl acetate extract from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (PG-2) had the highest inhibiting effect on mushroom tyrosinase, mainly contained phenolic acids, including protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid, salicylic acid, and caffeic acid, and exhibited apparent antioxidant activity in vitro. PG-2 and its main constituents significantly decreased melanin content, suppressed cellular tyrosinase activity, and reduced expression of tyrosinase protein to inhibit B16 cells melanogenesis induced by α-MSH, and no cytotoxic effects were observed. They also inhibited cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) level in α-MSH-treated B16 cells effectively. And those activities of its main constituents

  18. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 μM ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 μM of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-α and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 μM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-α and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through suppression of TLR4-mediated

  19. Suppression of Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Neuroinflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases [4]. It was well documented that activated microglia releases proinflammatory mediators and free radicals which may participate progressive neurodegeneration. Therefore early attenuation of activated microglia and the neuroinflammatory processes can attenuate the severity of.

  20. Anti-neuroinflammatory effects of grossamide from hemp seed via suppression of TLR-4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qian; Yan, Xiaoli; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Ji, Mei; Yuan, Huiqing; Lou, Hongxiang; Fan, Peihong

    2017-04-01

    Grossamide, a representative lignanamide in hemp seed, has been reported to possess potential anti-inflammatory effects. However, the potential anti-neuroinflammatory effects and underlying mechanisms of action of grossamide are still unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of grossamide against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in BV2 microglia cells. BV2 microglia cells were pre-treated with various concentrations of grossamide before being stimulated with LPS to induce inflammation. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined using the enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels were measured by real-time PCR. The translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and contribution of TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation on inflammatory effects were evaluated by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. This study demonstrated that grossamide significantly inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and decreased the level of LPS-mediated IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. In addition, it significantly reduced the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB subunit p65 in a concentration-dependent manner and suppressed translocation of NF-κB p65 into the nucleus. Furthermore, grossamide markedly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). Taken together, these data suggest that grossamide could be a potential therapeutic candidate for inhibiting neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Andrographolide acts as an anti-inflammatory agent in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages by inhibiting STAT3-mediated suppression of the NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ko-Chen; Chang, Hen-Hong; Chung, Ying-Hui; Lee, Tzung-Yan

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation is involved in numerous diseases, such as chronic inflammatory disease and cancer. Many plant products exhibit useful biological activities, including antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory actions. However, our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of andrographolide is limited. We use lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as a model of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of andrographolide, which contains polyphenolic structures. We found that andrographolide exhibited a potent anti-inflammatory effect. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of andrographolide on the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) as well as their respective downstream products, NO and PGE2, in RAW264.7 cells treated with LPS. Treatment with andrographolide also reduced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activation protein-1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activity. Western blot analysis showed that andrographolide significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and the protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ). We also found that andrographolide suppressed LPS-induced suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 and 3 (SOCS1 and 3) mRNA expression, which, in turn, inhibited apoptosis signalling and mitochondria membrane potential activation. Our results demonstrate that andrographolide downregulates inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 gene expression by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 by interfering with the expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 signalling. Therefore, andrographolide exerts a potent anti-inflammatory effect and could potentially be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of cancer or inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A fully computerized multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer for Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohidar, H.; Berland, T.; Boger, F.; Joessang, T.; Feder, J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a Multipass Fabry-Perot interforometer assembly for use in Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering experiments is reported. The optical alignment and the scattered signal data acquisition have been completely computerized. Digital scanning and alignment strategies of the Fabry-Perot resonator have been incorporated, which makes this instrument quite unique in this respect. The high contrast (∼10 10 ) and finesse (∼50) offered by this instrument makes it possible to detect Brillouin peaks from samples that have a small Brillouin scattering cross-section. As part of this system a compatible and precision sample chamber has been constructed, which has been designed to operate in the pressure and temperature ranges of 1-1000B and 20-150 o C, respectively. The cell has been constructed to be small and compact, but it still has a large heat capacity (∼250J/K) which ensures easy and stable temperature control of the liquid sample volume which has a size of 40 mm 3 . The achievable temperature stability is +-1mK and +-2mK for operating temperatures below and above 100 o C, respectively. The pressure stability is in the range of +-0.05B of the set pressure for pressures below 100B and it is +-0.05% for higher pressures up to 1000B. Both pressure and temperature are remotely monitored and controlled by a ND/100 computer. Special care has been taken in designing the optics of the pressure cell to ensure that both the primary and secondary reflections from the entrance window, as well as the main beam, go out of the scattering region in order to achieve higher signal-to-noise ratio in actual experiments

  3. Effect of acoustic waveguide properties on the Brillouin gain spectrum in multi-mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wei-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Xuan

    2015-02-01

    With a recent developed mode-coupling model, the Brillouin gain spectra (BGS) of multi-mode fibers (MMF) are investigated and compared with the corresponding experiment. It is found that the calculation results are coincident well with the experiment data. Furthermore, the BGS are found to be very sensitive to the index fluctuation. Such phenomenon is demonstrated by introducing a small index hump or dip in the center of the fiber core. And it can be explained by that the index fluctuation may influence the acoustic mode greatly.

  4. Deformation of Brillouin gain spectrum shape caused by strain varying linearly with respect to time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Ayako; Tateda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The shape of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) that is produced in an optical fiber undergoing strain varying linearly with respect to time, which is a typical example of temporally non-uniform strain, is theoretically derived through an analysis similar to that by which the BGS under spatially non-uniform strain would be derived. The BGS shape that is theoretically derived agrees well with the shape experimentally observed. The characteristics of the BGS deformation and strain measurement error under the temporally linear strain are discussed based on their similarity to the BGS shape derived under spatially linear strain.

  5. Observation of acoustically induced modulation instability in a Brillouin photonic crystal fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Birgit; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2013-05-01

    We report the experimental observation of self-induced modulation instability (MI) in a Brillouin fiber laser made with a solid-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with strong anomalous dispersion. We identify this MI as the result of parametric amplification of optical sidebands generated by guided acoustic modes within the core of the PCF. It is further shown that MI leads to passive harmonic mode locking and to the generation of a picosecond pulse train at a repetition rate of 1.15 GHz which matches the acoustic frequency of the fundamental acoustic mode of the PCF.

  6. Temperature and molecular-weight dependences of acoustic behaviors of polystyrene studied using Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Soo Han; Lee, Byoung Wan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Hyeonju; Park, Jaehoon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2017-04-01

    The acoustic properties of three polystyrene polymers with different molecular weights were investigated as a function of temperature by using Brillouin light scattering. The longitudinal sound velocity showed a change in the slope, which depended on the molecular weight, at the glass transition temperature. The absorption coefficient exhibited a maximum above the glass transition temperature, and the maximum temperature became higher as the molecular weight was increased. Comparison with previous acoustic studies on polystyrene indicate that a substantial frequency dispersion caused by strong coupling between the longitudinal acoustic waves and the segmental motions exists in the high-temperature range.

  7. Observation of spin-wave dispersion in Nd-Fe-B magnets using neutron Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Inami, N.; Saito, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Kawana, D.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Manabe, A.; Kato, A.; Kaneko, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The low-energy spin-wave dispersion in polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets was observed using neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS). Low-energy spin-wave excitations for the lowest acoustic spin-wave mode were clearly observed. From the spin-wave dispersion, we were able to determine the spin-wave stiffness constant D sw (100.0 ± 4.9 meV.Å 2 ) and the exchange stiffness constant A (6.6 ± 0.3 pJ/m)

  8. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Brillouin scattering study of surface acoustic waves in crystalline GaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, J.; Kiefte, H.; Clouter, M. J.

    1992-10-01

    Surface acoustic modes in GaP crystals have been observed and identified using the technique of high-contrast Brillouin spectroscopy. Surface acoustic wave velocities were determined for (100) GaP in different directions of wave propagation. The values of the velocities are: 3250 m/s in the [010] direction and 3467 m/s in the [011] direction on the (100) GaP surface. These results are discussed and compared with theoretical calculations and with similar measurements in GaAs and Si.

  10. Elastic properties of aspirin in its crystalline and glassy phases studied by micro-Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic waves propagating along the direction perpendicular to the (1 0 0) cleavage plane of aspirin crystal were investigated using micro-Brillouin spectroscopy from which C11, C55 and C66 were obtained. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic waves could be explained by normal anharmonic lattice models, while the transverse acoustic waves showed an abnormal increase in the hypersonic attenuation at low temperatures indicating their coupling to local remnant dynamics. The sound velocity as well as the attenuation of the longitudinal acoustic waves of glassy aspirin showed a substantial change at ˜235 K confirming a transition from glassy to supercooled liquid state in vitreous aspirin.

  11. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Acoustic Anomalies and Fast Relaxation Dynamics of Amorphous Progesterone as Revealed by Brillouin Light Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The amorphous state of pharmaceuticals has attracted much attention due to its high bioavailability and other advantages. The stability of the amorphous state in relation with the local molecular mobility is important from both fundamental and practical points of view. The acoustic properties of amorphous progesterone, one of the representative steroid hormones, were investigated by using a Brillouin inelastic light scattering technique. The Brillouin spectrum of the longitudinal acoustic mode exhibited distinct changes at the glass transition and the cold-crystallization temperatures. The acoustic dispersions of the longitudinal sound velocity and the acoustic absorption coefficient were attributed to the fast and possibly the secondary relaxation processes in the glassy and supercooled liquid states, while the structural relaxation process was considered as the dominant origin for the significant acoustic damping observed even in the liquid phase. The persisting acoustic dispersion in the liquid state was attributed to the single-molecule nature of the progesterone which does not exhibit hydrogen bonds in the condensed states.

  13. Single-crystal elasticity of diaspore, AlOOH, to 12 GPa by Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fuming; Majzlan, Juraj; Speziale, Sergio; He, Duanwei; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2008-11-01

    The high-pressure elasticity of diaspore (AlOOH) has been determined by Brillouin spectroscopy to 12 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Experiments were carried out using a 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture as pressure medium, and ruby as pressure standard. Acoustic velocities were measured in three roughly orthogonal planes at ambient and eight elevated pressures. The nine individual elastic stiffness constants of the orthorhombic crystal were obtained by fitting the velocity data to Christoffel's equation. Aggregate elastic moduli and pressure derivatives were calculated from the Cijs by fits to Eulerian finite strain equations, yielding: K=152(1) GPa, G0 = 117.2(5) GPa, (/∂P)T=3.7(1),   (=1.5(1) for the Voigt-Reuss-Hill average. All individual Cijs increase with pressure but C23 and C55 exhibit anomalously low pressure derivatives. From calculated linear compressibilities, the a-axis is the most compressible. The b-axis becomes the least compressible axis at high pressures. Over the examined pressure range, the azimuthal P-wave anisotropy decreased from 22% to 16%, while the azimuthal S-wave anisotropy increased from 15% to 21%. Both volume and axial compression curves calculated using our Brillouin results are in good agreement with the results from static compression studies. High-pressure sound velocities in diaspore exceed those of other hydrous minerals as well as many anhydrous phases relevant to Earth's upper mantle.

  14. The role of cell body density in ruminant retina mechanics assessed by atomic force and Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Isabell P.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Franze, Kristian

    2017-12-01

    Cells in the central nervous system (CNS) respond to the stiffness of their environment. CNS tissue is mechanically highly heterogeneous, thus providing motile cells with region-specific mechanical signals. While CNS mechanics has been measured with a variety of techniques, reported values of tissue stiffness vary greatly, and the morphological structures underlying spatial changes in tissue stiffness remain poorly understood. We here exploited two complementary techniques, contact-based atomic force microscopy and contact-free Brillouin microscopy, to determine the mechanical properties of ruminant retinae, which are built up by different tissue layers. As in all vertebrate retinae, layers of high cell body densities (‘nuclear layers’) alternate with layers of low cell body densities (‘plexiform layers’). Different tissue layers varied significantly in their mechanical properties, with the photoreceptor layer being the stiffest region of the retina, and the inner plexiform layer belonging to the softest regions. As both techniques yielded similar results, our measurements allowed us to calibrate the Brillouin microscopy measurements and convert the Brillouin shift into a quantitative assessment of elastic tissue stiffness with optical resolution. Similar as in the mouse spinal cord and the developing Xenopus brain, we found a strong correlation between nuclear densities and tissue stiffness. Hence, the cellular composition of retinae appears to strongly contribute to local tissue stiffness, and Brillouin microscopy shows a great potential for the application in vivo to measure the mechanical properties of transparent tissues.

  15. The broad Brillouin doublet and CP of KTaO3, second sound vs. Two-phonon difference scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhi, E.; Tagantsev, A.K.; Hehlen, B.; Courtens, E.; Boatner, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Low-T Brillouin spectra of the incipient ferroelectric KTaO 3 exhibit a broad central peak (CP) (1), and some additional broad Brillouin doublet (BD) (2), that can both relate to phonon-density fluctuations (3). Starting from extensive new high resolution neutron scattering measurements in pure crystals, low lying phonon sheets were modelled in the central part of Brillouin zone. Such a parameterisation was then used in order to analyse those up-mentioned unusual features in teens of two-phonon mechanisms (4). Numerical evaluations show that transverse acoustic (TA) phonons whose normal damping is faster than the BD frequency (Γ DB > ω DB ) may produce hydrodynamic second sound (propagation of heat). Moreover, two-phonon difference scattering from low damping thermal TA phonons ((Γ DB DB ) can contribute to the spectra with either a sharp or a broader BD, depending on the phonon group velocity and phonon-sheet anisotropy. The position of the doublet is consistent with both mechanisms, but comparing the computed anisotropies with experimental Brillouin and neutron scattering data, one favours the second process. (author)

  16. The Measurement of Tropospheric Temperature Profiles using Rayleigh-Brillouin Scattering : Results from Laboratory and Atmospheric Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witschas, Benjamin; Reitebuch, Oliver; Lemmerz, Christian; Kableka, Pau Gomez; Kondratyev, Sergey; Gu, Z.; Ubachs, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we suggest a new method for measuring tropospheric temperature profiles using Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering. We report on laboratory RB scattering measurements in air, demonstrating that temperature can be retrieved from RB spectra with an absolute accuracy of better than 2 K.

  17. Optimization of interaction conditions for efficient short laser pulse amplification by stimulated Brillouin scattering in the strongly coupled regime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiaramello, M.; Riconda, C.; Amiranoff, F.; Fuchs, J.; Grech, M.; Lancia, L.; Marquès, J.-R.; Vinci, T.; Weber, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2016), s. 1-11, č. článku 072103. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasmas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2016

  18. Dynamics of a self-Q-switched fiber laser with a Rayleigh-stimulated Brillouin scattering ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadi, Andrei A.; Mégret, Patrice; Blondel, Michel

    2004-05-01

    Backward light scattering can cause passive Q switching in fiber lasers. We propose a self-consistent description of the laser dynamics. Our model quantitatively reproduces the temporal structure of pulsation and is also attractive for analysis of laser stability and statistics. The validity of the model is directly verified in an experiment.

  19. Investigation of Laser Beam Combining and Clean-Up via Seeded Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Multimode Optical Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    .... Beam combining in multimode fibers via SBS is being considered as a method of combining low power laser beams into a single beam having higher power and superior spatial coherence for applications...

  20. Signatures of the self-similar regime of strongly coupled stimulated brillouin scattering for efficient short laser pulse amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lancia, L.; Giribono, A.; Vassura, L.; Chiaramello, M.; Riconda, C.; Weber, Stefan A.; Castan, A.; Chatelain, A.; Frank, A.; Gangolf, T.; Quinn, M.N.; Fuchs, J.; Marqués, J.-R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 7 (2016), 1-5, č. článku 075001. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : light-pulses * compression * plasmas * Raman Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 8.462, year: 2016

  1. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  2. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons

  3. Elastic constants and dimensions of imprinted polymeric nanolines determined from Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W L; Kim, S A; Geiss, R; Flannery, C M; Soles, C L; Wang, C; Stafford, C M; Wu, W-L; Torres, J M; Vogt, B D; Heyliger, P R

    2010-01-01

    Elastic constants and cross-sectional dimensions of imprinted nanolines of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on silicon substrates are determined nondestructively from finite-element inversion analysis of dispersion curves of hypersonic acoustic modes of these nanolines measured with Brillouin light scattering. The results for the cross-sectional dimensions, under the simplifying assumption of vertical sides and a semicircular top, are found to be consistent with dimensions determined from critical-dimension small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The elastic constants C 11 and C 44 are found to be, respectively, 11.6% and 3.1% lower than their corresponding values for bulk PMMA. This result is consistent with the dimensional dependence of the quasi-static Young's modulus determined from buckling measurements on PMMA films with lower molecular weights. This study provides the first evidence of size-dependent effects on hypersonic elastic properties of polymers.

  4. Acoustic and relaxation behaviors of polydimethylsiloxane studied by using brillouin and dielectric spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Park, Jaehoon; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the acoustic properties and the dielectric relaxation times of polydimethylsiloxane were investigated by using high-resolution Brillouin and broadband dielectric spectroscopies. The longitudinal sound velocity showed a large increase upon approaching the glass transition temperature while the acoustic absorption coefficient exhibited a maximum at ~263 K. Comparison of these results with previous ultrasonic data revealed a substantial frequency dispersion of the acoustic properties of this silicone-based elastomer. The relaxation times derived from the acoustic absorption peaks were consistent with the temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation time of the structural a process, indicating a strong coupling between the acoustic waves and the segmental motions of the main chains.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Rayleigh Brillouin Spectrum Linewidth in Air and Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yuanqing; Niu, Qunjie; Peng, Li; Zhou, Bo

    2017-06-26

    The relation between spontaneous Rayleigh Brillouin (SRB) spectrum linewidth, gas temperature, and pressure are analyzed at the temperature range from 220 to 340 K and the pressure range from 0.1 to 1 bar, covering the stratosphere and troposphere relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for atmospheric Lidar missions. Based on the analysis, a model retrieving gas temperature from directly measured linewidth is established and the accuracy limitations are estimated. Furthermore, some experimental data of air and nitrogen are used to verify the accuracy of the model. As the results show, the retrieved temperature shows good agreement with the reference temperature, and the absolute difference is less than 3 K, which indicates that this method provides a fruitful tool in satellite retrieval to extract the gaseous properties of atmospheres on-line by directly measuring the SRB spectrum linewidth.

  6. Neutron Brillouin scattering experiments with pulsed neutrons on high resolution chopper spectrometer HRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S; Yokoo, T; Endoh, Y; Kawana, D; Kaneko, Y; Tokura, Y; Fujita, M; Yoshida, K; Saito, K; Inami, N; Takeichi, Y; Ono, K

    2014-01-01

    We improved the High Resolution Chopper Spectrometer (HRC), which is installed at MLF in J-PARC, in order to perform neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS) experiments, and successfully demonstrated a feasibility of this method. Gapless spin-wave excitations were observed in La 0.8 Sr 0.2 MnO 3 , which were in good agreement with previous results using single crystals, on the other hand, a large energy gap in the ferromagnetic spin waves was found in SrRuO 3 . Spin-wave peaks in a permanent magnet Nd 2 Fe 14 B were on the dispersion curve determined previously using a single crystal. Excitations, so-called fast sound, in liquid D 2 O were in a good agreement with previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments and the dispersion curve were extended to the lower Q region.

  7. Tunable and reconfigurable multi-tap microwave photonic filter based on dynamic Brillouin gratings in fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, J; Primerov, N; Chin, S; Antman, Y; Zadok, A; Sales, S; Thévenaz, L

    2012-03-12

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate new architectures to realize multi-tap microwave photonic filters, based on the generation of a single or multiple dynamic Brillouin gratings in polarization maintaining fibers. The spectral range and selectivity of the proposed periodic filters is extensively tunable, simply by reconfiguring the positions and the number of dynamic gratings along the fiber respectively. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of three different configurations comprising a microwave photonic filter implementation: a simple notch-type Mach-Zehnder approach with a single movable dynamic grating, a multi-tap performance based on multiple dynamic gratings and finally a stationary grating configuration based on the phase modulation of two counter-propagating optical waves by a common pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS).

  8. Brillouin scattering: its application to the study of damage and amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimsditch, M.; Bhadra, R.; Gray, K.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Okamoto, P.; Pearson, J.; Rehn, L.

    1988-02-01

    A brief review of Brillouin scattering is made emphasizing its advantages and disadvantages over conventional ultrasonic techniques. One of its advantages is that the elastic properties of very thin films (∼ 1μ) can be investigated. The authors have used this technique to study changes in shear elastic constants of materials irradiated with high energy ions. These particles only penetrate ∼ 1μ into the material but produce very high defect concentrations which, in certain cases, can lead to amorphization. In Nb 3 Ir and Zr 3 Al very large changes are observed before the onset of amorphization, while in Si the changes occur concomitantly with amorphization. The significance of the hardening observed in Zr 3 Al when it becomes amorphous will be discussed

  9. Methyl (E)-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acryloyl)tryptophanate can suppress MCP-1 expression by inhibiting p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB in LPS-stimulated differentiated THP-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB play significant roles in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic factor-1 (MCP-1). Therefore, potent inhibitors to suppress p38 kinase and NF-kB activities have been explored as anti-inflammatory agents. In this study, a nov...

  10. S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in the ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Nur Elina; Ahmad Hambali, N. A. M.; Sohaimi, M. Syazwan; M. Shahimin, M.; A. Wahid, M. H.; Yusof, N. Roshidah; Malek, A. Zakiah

    2015-08-01

    This paper is focusing on simulation and analyzed of S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser performance utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity by using Optisystem software. Raman amplifieraverage power model is employed for signal amplification. This laser system is operates in S-band wavelength region due to vast demanding on transmitting the information. Multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on hybrid Brillouin-Raman gain configuration supported by Rayleigh scattering effect have attracted significant research interest due to its ability to produced multi-wavelength signals from a single light source. In multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber, single mode fiber is utilized as the nonlinear gain medium. From output results, 90 % output coupling ratio has ability to provide the maximum average output power of 43 dBm at Brillouin pump power of 20 dBm and Raman pump power of 14 dBm. Furthermore, multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier is capable of generated 7 Brillouin Stokes signals at 1480 nm, 1510 nm and 1530 nm.

  11. A Brillouin scattering study of the effect of chemical passivation on the elastic properties of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. J.; Kuok, M. H.; Ng, S. C.; Boukherroub, R.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2002-07-01

    Brillouin scattering has been performed to probe acoustic waves in porous silicon films that have been chemically modified with either 1-decene, decyl aldehyde, undecylenic acid, or ethyl undecylenate. The shift in the frequencies of acoustic modes in the passivated porous silicon samples, relative to those in freshly prepared porous silicon, is different for different chemical modifiers. The magnitude of the frequency shift is qualitatively correlated with the change, caused by the passivation, in the average densities and elastic constants of the samples.

  12. Influence of Stimuled Raman Scattering on Transmitted Optical Signal in WDM System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Ružbarský

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper is focused on simulations behavior of signals in high-speed networks. Huge amount of transmitted information and increase in transmission speed create unwanted events in optical fiber. The main influences comprise effects such as: stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering. This paper is focused only on Raman scattering. For transmitting a signal through optical fiber one needs to select an appropriate wavelength. This is one of goals the experiment in this article. Signals were transmitted accordance with Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM and spacing among channels 100GHz.

  13. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  14. Brillouin distributed temperature sensing system for monitoring of submarine export cables of off-shore wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Benjamin; Rath, Alexander; Kolm, Frederick; Schröder, Andreas; Buntebarth, Christian; Dreß, Albrecht; Hill, Wieland

    2016-05-01

    For high-voltage cables, the maximum temperature of the insulation must never be exceeded at any location and at any load condition. The local temperatures depend not only on the cable design and load history, but also on the local thermal environment of the cable. Therefore, distributed temperature monitoring of high-voltage cables is essential to ensure the integrity of the cable at high load. Especially, the load of the export cables of wind farms varies strongly in dependence on weather conditions. In this field study, we demonstrate the measurement performance of a new, robust Brillouin distributed temperature sensing system (Brillouin-DTS). The system is based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering and does not require a fibre loop. This is essential for long submarine high-voltage cables, where normally no loop can be formed in the seabed. It is completely passively cooled and does not contain any moving or wearing parts. The instrument is dedicated for use in industrial and other rough environments. With a measuring time below 10 min, the temperature resolution is better than 1 °C for distances up to 50 km. In the field study, the submarine export cable of an off-shore wind farm has been monitored. The temperature profile of the export cable shows several hot spots, mostly located at cable joints, and also several cold spots.

  15. Transmission properties in a photonic crystal with a Dirac-like point located at the Brillouin zone center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, H.; Zhou, Y.; Zhao, L.; Wei, G.

    2017-11-01

    Light transmission properties of a two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-like point located at the Brillouin zone center are studied. The results show that at the Dirac-like point, the transmittance remains constant rather than inversely varying with the PC's thickness, that is, this transmission does not follow the pseudo-diffusive phenomenon. Moreover, since the PC with a Dirac point at the Brillouin zone center can mimic zero index material (ZIM), transmittance of a real homogeneous ZIM layer is also theoretically investigated. Invariant transmittance is obtained again and the constant transmittance at the Dirac-like point is confirmed. Physical mechanisms of the pseudo-diffusive transmission as well as the constant transmission are both analyzed. It is found that the Dirac point is a critical state between band gaps and transmission bands, where the wave vector takes a complex number. It is the imaginary part of the wave vector which causes the decrease of the transmittance. While at the Dirac-like point at the center of the Brillouin zone, an additional flat band makes the Dirac point frequency fall into a transmission band where the wave vector is a real number, therefore the transmittance does not display any decrease tendency.

  16. High temperature surface Brillouin scattering study of mechanical properties of boron-doped epitaxial polysilicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Mathe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A study of the mechanical properties of a boron-doped epitaxial polysilicon layer deposited on a Si (100 substrate specimen has been carried out by surface Brillouin scattering at high temperatures. This type of specimen is widely used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. By accumulating spectra with the Rayleigh mode and the Lamb continuum the isotropic elastic constants C44 and C11 were obtained, from which the values of the bulk, shear and Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio for the layer were determined over a range of temperatures from 20 °C to 110 °C. By contrast, an examination of the literature on polycrystalline silicon shows that other methods each provide a limited range of the above properties and thus additional experiments and techniques were needed. The SBS method is applicable to other polycrystalline materials such as silicon carbide, silicon nitride, silicon germanium and amorphous diamond that have also been used for MEMS applications.

  17. Hemispherical Brillouin zone imaging of a diamond-type biological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The brilliant structural body colours of many animals are created by three-dimensional biological photonic crystals that act as wavelength-specific reflectors. Here, we report a study on the vividly coloured scales of the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis. Electron microscopy identified the chitin and air assemblies inside the scales as domains of a single-network diamond (Fd3m) photonic crystal. We visualized the topology of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ) by imaging scatterometry, and we reconstructed the complete photonic band structure diagram (PBSD) of the chitinous photonic crystal from reflectance spectra. Comparison with calculated PBSDs indeed showed a perfect overlap. The unique method of non-invasive hemispherical imaging of the FBZ provides key insights for the investigation of photonic crystals in the visible wavelength range. The characterized extremely large biophotonic nanostructures of E. imperialis are structurally optimized for high reflectance and may thus be well suited for use as a template for producing novel photonic devices, e.g. through biomimicry or direct infiltration from dielectric material. PMID:22188768

  18. Rayleigh-Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy of nitrous oxide (N2O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, K.; van de Water, W.; Marques, W.; Ubachs, W.

    2018-02-01

    High signal-to-noise and high-resolution light scattering spectra are measured for nitrous oxide (N2O) gas at an incident wavelength of 403.00 nm, at 90° scattering, at room temperature and at gas pressures in the range 0.5 - 4 bar. The resulting Rayleigh-Brillouin light scattering spectra are compared to a number of models describing in an approximate manner the collisional dynamics and energy transfer in this gaseous medium of this polyatomic molecular species. The Tenti-S6 model, based on macroscopic gas transport coefficients, reproduces the scattering profiles in the entire pressure range at less than 2% deviation at a similar level as does the alternative kinetic Grad's 6-moment model, which is based on the internal collisional relaxation as a decisive parameter. A hydrodynamic model fails to reproduce experimental spectra for the low pressures of 0.5-1 bar, but yields very good agreement ( viscosity of ηb ∼(6 ± 2) ×10-5 Pa · s. A 'rough-sphere' model, previously shown to be effective to describe light scattering in SF6 gas, is not found to be suitable, likely in view of the non-sphericity and asymmetry of the N-N-O structured linear polyatomic molecule.

  19. Direct ion heating in overdense plasmas through the Brillouin instability driven by relativistic whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takayoshi; Hata, Masayasu; Iwata, Natsumi; Mima, Kunioki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Strong magnetic fields over kilo-Tesla have been available in the laboratory by the use of ultra-intense lasers. It would be interesting to apply those strong fields to other laser experiments such as the inertial confinement fusion and laboratory astrophysics. The characteristics of laser-plasma interactions could be modified significantly by the presence of such strong magnetic fields. We investigate electromagnetic wave propagation in overdense plasmas along the magnetic field for a right-hand circularly polarized wave by PIC simulations. Since the whistler mode has no cutoff density, it can penetrate into overdense plasmas and interact directly with charged particles there. When the external field strength is near a critical value defined by that the cyclotron frequency is equal to the laser one, it is reported that electrons are accelerated efficiently by the cyclotron resonance. However, if the field strength is far beyond the critical value, the cyclotron resonance is inefficient, while the ions gain a large amount of energy directly from the laser light owning to the Brillouin scattering. As the result, only ions are heated up selectively. We will discuss about the application of this ion heating in dense plasmas. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15K21767.

  20. Brillouin Light Scattering from Magnetic Excitations in Superparamagnetic and Ferromagnetic Co-Al-O Granular Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Akira; Maeda, Toshiteru; Kawamura, Satoshi; Nakamura, Shintaro; Nojima, Tsutomu; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Shigehiro

    2018-04-01

    A systematic study of Brillouin light scattering (BLS) from superparamagnetic (SPM) and ferromagnetic (FM) Co-Al-O granular films was performed under magnetic fields of up to 4.6 kOe in the standard backscattering geometry at room temperature. The SPM and FM boundary, defined as the Co composition at which the exchange field vanishes, was found to be located at xC(Co) = 59.3 ± 1.3 at. %. From FM films we observed a pair of bulk spin-wave peaks on both the positive- and negative-frequency sides and a surface localized Damon-Eshbach peak only on the positive-frequency side under the present scattering conditions. From SPM films, a pair of broader but propagative excitation peaks with asymmetric intensity were observed on both frequency sides in a spectrum. We performed a numerical analysis of the BLS spectrum by employing the theory developed by Camley and Mills (CM) while retaining dipole and exchange couplings for FM films and only dipole coupling for SPM films. The CM theory successfully reproduced the observed spectrum for both SPM and FM films. The SPM spectrum exhibits a singlet-doublet peak structure similarly to an FM SW spectrum. The SPM peak stems from the dipole-coupled larger-amplitude precession motion of the granule magnetic moment around the external-field-induced magnetization.

  1. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in SF6 in the kinetic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanqing; Yu, Yin; Liang, Kun; Marques, Wilson; van de Water, Willem; Ubachs, Wim

    2017-02-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin spectral profiles are measured with a laser-based scatterometry setup for a 90° scattering angle at a high signal-to-noise ratio (r.m.s. noise below 0.15% w.r.t. peak intensity) in sulfur-hexafluoride gas for pressures in the range 0.2-5 bar and for a wavelength of λ = 403.0 nm. The high quality data are compared to a number of light scattering models in order to address the effects of rotational and vibrational relaxation. While the vibrational relaxation rate is so slow that vibration degrees of freedom remain frozen, rotations relax on time scales comparable to those of the density fluctuations. Therefore, the heat capacity, the thermal conductivity and the bulk viscosity are all frequency-dependent transport coefficients. This is relevant for the Tenti model that depends on the values chosen for these transport coefficients. This is not the case for the other two models considered: a kinetic model based on rough-sphere interactions, and a model based on fluctuating hydrodynamics. The deviations with the experiment are similar between the three different models, except for the hydrodynamic model at pressures p≲ 2bar . As all models are in line with the ideal gas law, we hypothesize the presence of real gas effects in the measured spectra.

  2. N-Caffeoyltryptamine, a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Phenolic Amide, Suppressed MCP-1 Expression in LPS-stimulated THP-1 Cells and Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae B

    2017-05-27

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a well-known chemokine critically involved in the pathophysiological progression of several inflammatory diseases including arthrosclerosis. N -caffeoyltryptamine is a phenolic amide with strong anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, in this paper, the potential effect of N -caffeoyltryptamine on MCP-1 expression was investigated as a potential p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. At the concentration of 20 μM, N -caffeoyltryptamine significantly inhibited p38 MAP kinase α, β, γ and δ by 15-50% ( p cells with N -caffeoyltryptamine (10, 20 and 40 μM) led to significant suppression of MCP-1 production by 10-45% ( p cells. Additionally, N -caffeoyltryptamine was also able to significantly downregulate MCP-1 mRNA expression in the THP-1 cells ( p fat diet (HF), or a high-fat diet supplemented with N -caffeoyltryptamine (2 mg per day) (HFS). After 16 weeks, blood samples were collected from the rats in each group, and MCP-1 levels were determined in plasma with other atherogenic markers (C-reactive protein and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin)). As expected, the average MCP-1 levels of the HF group were found to be higher than those of the C group ( p < 0.05). However, the MCP-1 levels of the HFS group were significantly lower than those of the HF group ( p < 0.05), suggesting that N -caffeoyltryptamine could decrease MCP-1 expression in vivo. Related to other atherogenic markers such as C-reactive protein and sE-selectin, there was no significant difference in their levels between the HF and HFS groups. These data suggest that N -caffeoyltryptamine may specifically suppress MCP-1 expression in vitro and in vivo, possibly by inhibiting p38 MAP kinase.

  3. The chloroform fraction of Solanum nigrum suppresses nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages through inhibition of p38, JNK and ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee; Jeong, Ha-Deok; Choi, Ho-Young

    2011-01-01

    Solanum nigrum L., commonly known as black nightshade, is used worldwide for the treatment of skin and mucosal ulcers, liver cirrhosis and edema. We aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory active fraction of S. nigrum by serial extractions. S. nigrum was first extracted with methanol, then fractionated with chloroform and water. The effects of S. nigrum fractions, diosgenin and α-solanine on LPS/interferon-gamma-induced nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS), or LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6, in mouse peritoneal macrophages were determined. Western blotting analysis was used to detect LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38, JNK and ERK1/2. The chloroform fraction of S. nigrum was cytotoxic in a time and concentration dependent manner; however, the methanol and water fractions were not. The chloroform fraction reduced NO through inhibition of iNOS synthesis and inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 at the level of protein secretion; the methanol and water fractions showed a weak or no effect. The chloroform fraction also suppressed p38, JNK and ERK1/2. Diosgenin and α-solanine were cytotoxic at a high concentration. In particular, diosgenin was able to inhibit TNF-α and IL-6, but both compounds did not affect LPS-induced iNOS expression. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory compounds of S. nigrum exist preferentially in the nonpolar fraction, ruling out the possibility that diosgenin and α-solanine are the likely candidates. The inhibition of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 by the chloroform fraction may be partly due to the suppression of p38, JNK and ERK1/2. Further study is required to identify the active compounds of S. nigrum.

  4. Detection of sinkhole formation via Brillouin Optical-Fiber Time-Domain Reflectrometry (BOTDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, R.; Klar, A.

    2009-04-01

    Sinkholes have been considered a major natural hazard in the Dead Sea region since their apparition more than 15 year ago. Although these sinkholes develop slowly over several months, they collapse very suddenly without any warning signs, which makes them especially dangerous to both people and infrastructures. The most commonly accepted mechanism for sinkholes formation in the Dead Sea area is dissolving of salt in subsurface layers. As a result of salt dissolution, the load that was carried originally by the salt layers is transferred to the other soil layers. When this load exceeds the layers' holding capacity, collapse occurs. Throughout this load-transfer process, small mechanical deformations must develop in the soil and the present study investigates the use of Brillouin Optical-Fiber Time-Domain Reflectrometry (BOTDR) for detecting these changes. BOTDR uses the Brillouin-scattering of the light along the optic fiber to estimate the temperature or strain profile in the fiber in a distributed manner. Following temperature compensation, such a system allows for nearly-continuous distributed monitoring of strains over distances of tens of kilometers with a spatial resolution of about 1 meter. In the present study, an analytical solution of the strains that develop in the soil due to sinkhole development was used to simulate the BOTDR signals that would be produced by an optic fiber buried one meter below the soil surface. These simulated "ideal" signals were corrupted artificially to account for the actual spatial resolution of the signal analyzer and random measurement errors. In addition, BOTDR signals due to above-surface disturbances (400kg loading and rain) that were obtained experimentally, were superimposed to the simulated signals. Three thousands BOTDR signals were generated with sinkhole radii and depths ranging from 1.5 to 4.0m and from 10 to 30m, respectively. These signals were subjected to wavelet decomposition and the most informative wavelet

  5. A Brillouin smart FRP material and a strain data post processing software for structural health monitoring through laboratory testing and field application on a highway bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Filippo; Matta, Fabio; Galati, Nestore; Nanni, Antonio

    2005-05-01

    Strain and temperature sensing obtained through frequency shift evaluation of Brillouin scattered light is a technology that seems extremely promising for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). Due to the intrinsic distributed sensing capability, Brillouin can measure the deformation of any individual segment of huge lengths of inexpensive single-mode fiber. In addition, Brillouin retains other typical advantages of Fiber Optic Sensors (FOS), such as harsh environment durability and interference rejection. Despite these advantages, the diffusion of Brillouin for SHM is constrained by different factors, such as the high equipment cost, the commercial unavailability of specific SHM oriented fiber products and even some prejudices on the required sensitivity performances. In the present work, a complete SHM pilot application was developed, installed and successfully operated during a diagnostic load test on the High Performance Steel (HPS) bridge A6358 located at the Lake of the Ozarks (Miller County, MO, USA). Four out of five girders were extensively instrumented with a "smart" Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) tape having embedded fibers for strain sensing and thermal compensation. Data collected during a diagnostic load test were elaborated through a specific post-processing software, and the strain profiles retrieved were compared to traditional strain gauges and theoretical results based on the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for structural assessment purposes. The excellent results obtained confirm the effectiveness of Brillouin SHM systems for the monitoring of real applications.

  6. Micro-focused Brillouin light scattering: imaging spin waves at the nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSebastian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spin waves constitute an important part of research in the field of magnetization dynamics. Spin waves are the elementary excitations of the spin system in a magnetically ordered material state and magnons are their quasi particles. In the following article, we will discuss the optical method of Brillouin light scattering (BLS spectroscopy which is a now a well established tool for the characterization of spin waves. BLS is the inelastic scattering of light from spin waves and confers several benefits: the ability to map the spin wave intensity distribution with spatial resolution and high sensitivity as well as the potential to simultaneously measure the frequency and the wave vector and, therefore, the dispersion properties.For several decades, the field of spin waves gained huge interest by the scientific community due to its relevance regarding fundamental issues of spindynamics in the field of solid states physics. The ongoing research in recent years has put emphasis on the high potential of spin waves regarding information technology. In the emerging field of textit{magnonics}, several concepts for a spin-wave based logic have been proposed and realized. Opposed to charge-based schemes in conventional electronics and spintronics, magnons are charge-free currents of angular momentum, and, therefore, less subject to scattering processes that lead to heating and dissipation. This fact is highlighted by the possibility to utilize spin waves as information carriers in electrically insulating materials. These developments have propelled the quest for ways and mechanisms to guide and manipulate spin-wave transport. In particular, a lot of effort is put into the miniaturization of spin-wave waveguides and the excitation of spin waves in structures with sub-micrometer dimensions.For the further development of potential spin-wave-based devices, the ability to directly observe spin-wave propagation with spatial resolution is crucial. As an optical

  7. Application of Coupled-Wave Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin Approximation to Ground Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Prokopovich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with bistatic subsurface probing of a horizontally layered dielectric half-space by means of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves. In particular, the main objective of this work is to present a new method for the solution of the two-dimensional back-scattering problem arising when a pulsed electromagnetic signal impinges on a non-uniform dielectric half-space; this scenario is of interest for ground penetrating radar (GPR applications. For the analytical description of the signal generated by the interaction of the emitted pulse with the environment, we developed and implemented a novel time-domain version of the coupled-wave Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. We compared our solution with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD results, achieving a very good agreement. We then applied the proposed technique to two case studies: in particular, our method was employed for the post-processing of experimental radargrams collected on Lake Chebarkul, in Russia, and for the simulation of GPR probing of the Moon surface, to detect smooth gradients of the dielectric permittivity in lunar regolith. The main conclusions resulting from our study are that our semi-analytical method is accurate, radically accelerates calculations compared to simpler mathematical formulations with a mostly numerical nature (such as the FDTD technique, and can be effectively used to aid the interpretation of GPR data. The method is capable to correctly predict the protracted return signals originated by smooth transition layers of the subsurface dielectric medium. The accuracy and numerical efficiency of our computational approach make promising its further development.

  8. Does Brillouin light scattering probe the primary glass transition process at temperatures well above glass transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, P; Gomopoulos, N; Le Grand, A; Hadjichristidis, N; Floudas, G; Ediger, M D; Fytas, G

    2010-02-21

    The primary alpha-relaxation time (tau(alpha)) for molecular and polymeric glass formers probed by dielectric spectroscopy and two light scattering techniques (depolarized light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy) relates to the decay of the torsional autocorrelation function computed by molecular dynamics simulation. It is well known that Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy (BLS) operating in gigahertz frequencies probes a fast (10-100 ps) relaxation of the longitudinal modulus M*. The characteristic relaxation time, irrespective of the fitting procedure, is faster than the alpha-relaxation which obeys the non-Arrhenius Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. Albeit, this has been noticed, it remains a puzzling finding in glass forming systems. The available knowledge is based only on temperature dependent BLS experiments performed, however, at a single wave vector (frequency). Using a new BLS spectrometer, we studied the phonon dispersion at gigahertz frequencies in molecular [o-terphenyl (OTP)] and polymeric [polyisoprene (PI) and polypropylene (PP)] glass formers. We found that the hypersonic dispersion does relate to the glass transition dynamics but the disparity between the BLS-relaxation times and tau(alpha) is system dependent. In PI and PP, the former is more than one order of magnitude faster than tau(alpha), whereas the two relaxation times become comparable in the case of OTP. The difference between the two relaxation times appears to relate to the "breadth" of the relaxation time distribution function. In OTP the alpha-relaxation process assumes a virtually single exponential decay at high temperatures well above the glass transition temperature, in clear contrast with the case of the amorphous bulk polymers.

  9. Growth hormone administration stimulates energy expenditure and extrathyroidal conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine in a dose-dependent manner and suppresses circadian thyrotrophin levels: studies in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Møller, Jens

    1994-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: The impact of exogenous GH on thyroid function remains controversial although most data add support to a stimulation of peripheral T4 to T3 conversion. For further elucidation we evaluated iodothyronine and circadian TSH levels in GH-deficient patients as part of a GH dose......-response study. PATIENTS: Eight GH-deficient adults, who received stable T4 substitution due to central hypothyroidism; two patients, who were euthyroid without T4 supplementation were studied separately. DESIGN: All patients were initially studied after at least 4 weeks without GH followed by 3 consecutive 4......-week periods in fixed order during which they received daily doses of 1, 2 and 4 IU of GH/m2 body surface area. The patients were hospitalized for 24 hours at the end of each period. MEASUREMENTS: Circulating total and free concentrations of T4 and T3, total rT3 and TSH were measured once at the end...

  10. Attention modulates sensory suppression during back movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hulle, Lore; Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2013-06-01

    Tactile perception is often impaired during movement. The present study investigated whether such sensory suppression also occurs during back movements, and whether this would be modulated by attention. In two tactile detection experiments, participants simultaneously engaged in a movement task, in which they executed a back-bending movement, and a perceptual task, consisting of the detection of subtle tactile stimuli administered to their upper or lower back. The focus of participants' attention was manipulated by raising the probability that one of the back locations would be stimulated. The results revealed that tactile detection was suppressed during the execution of the back movements. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 revealed that when the stimulus was always presented to the attended location, tactile suppression was substantially reduced, suggesting that sensory suppression can be modulated by top-down attentional processes. The potential of this paradigm for studying tactile information processing in clinical populations is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Micaela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer and chemotherapy are both associated with immune system suppression. We initiated a clinical trial in patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer to determine if administration of GM-CSF in this setting was immunostimulatory. Methods Between June, 2003 and January, 2007, 20 patients were enrolled in a clinical trial (NCT00257322 in which they received 500 ug GM-CSF daily for 4 days starting 24 hours after each chemotherapy cycle. There were no toxicities or adverse events reported. Blood was obtained before chemotherapy/GM-CSF administration and 24 hours following the final dose of GM-CSF and evaluated for circulating dendritic cells and adaptive immune cellular subsets by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC expression of γ-interferon and T-bet transcription factor (Tbx21 by quantitative real-time PCR was performed as a measure of Th1 adaptive cellular immunity. Pre- and post-treatment (i.e., chemotherapy and GM-CSF samples were evaluable for 16 patients, ranging from 1 to 5 cycles (median 3 cycles, 6 biologic sample time points. Dendritic cells were defined as lineage (- and MHC class II high (+. Results 73% of patients had significant increases in circulating dendritic cells of ~3x for the overall group (5.8% to 13.6%, p = 0.02 and ~5x excluding non-responders (3.2% to 14.5%, p Tbx21 levels declined by 75% following each chemotherapy cycle despite administration of GM-CSF (p = 0.02. PBMC γ-interferon expression, however was unchanged. Conclusions This clinical trial confirms the suppressive effects of chemotherapy on Th1 cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer but demonstrates that mid-cycle administration of GM-CSF can significantly increase the proportion of circulating dendritic cells. As the role of dendritic cells in anti-tumor immunity becomes better defined, GM-CSF administration may provide a non-toxic intervention to augment this arm

  12. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  13. Influence of KF substitution on the ferroelectric phase transition of lead titanate single crystals studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonhyeop Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The elastic properties of KF-substituted perovskite lead titanate (PbTiO3 were investigated by dielectric measurements and Brillouin light scattering. The ferroelectric phase transition occurred at substantially lower temperature due to KF substitution, which was attributed to the modification of the covalency in Pb–O and Ti–O bonds. The longitudinal acoustic (LA mode of KF-substituted PbTiO3 showed a frequency softening in the paraelectric phase, which was accompanied by increasing acoustic damping. This indicated that polarization fluctuations responsible for the acoustic anomalies were enhanced by KF substitution.

  14. Quantum-Chemical Calculation and Visualization of the Vibrational Modes of Graphene in Different Points of the Brillouin Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedieva, Tetiana; Gubanov, Victor; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Pidhirnyi, Denys

    2015-12-01

    Different notations of graphene irreducible representations and optical modes could be found in the literature. The goals of this paper are to identify the correspondence between available notations, to calculate the optical modes of graphene in different points of the Brillouin zone, and to compare them with experimental data obtained by Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. The mechanism of the resonance enhancement of vibration modes of the molecules adsorbed on graphene in CARS experiments is proposed. The possibility of appearance of the discrete breathing modes is discussed.

  15. Highly sensitive distributed birefringence measurements based on a two-pulse interrogation of a dynamic Brillouin grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Denisov, Andrey; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Thévenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    A method for distributed birefringence measurements is proposed based on the interference pattern generated by the interrogation of a dynamic Brillouin grating (DBG) using two short consecutive optical pulses. Compared to existing DBG interrogation techniques, the method here offers an improved sensitivity to birefringence changes thanks to the interferometric effect generated by the reflections of the two pulses. Experimental results demonstrate the possibility to obtain the longitudinal birefringence profile of a 20 m-long Panda fibre with an accuracy of 10-8 using 16 averages and 30 cm spatial resolution. The method enables sub-metric and highly-accurate distributed temperature and strain sensing.

  16. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin solution of cut-off frequency for horizontal shear (SH) waves in various inhomogeneous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoshan; Shi, Junping; Jin, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method is employed to study the cut-off frequencies of the horizontal shear waves in a freestanding functionally graded piezoelectric-piezomagnetic material film with the electrically and magnetically open boundary conditions. An analytical solution, which could be used in analyzing the problems of various functionally graded materials, is proven to have high precision by analytical analysis and a numerical example. The results reveal that the set of cut-off frequencies is a series of approximate arithmetic progressions. A theoretical foundation based on the relationship between the cut-off frequencies and the materials' gradient property is established for nondestructive evaluation.

  17. Simulation of nanowire tunneling transistors: From the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation to full-band phonon-assisted tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-04-01

    Nanowire band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) are simulated using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and an atomistic, full-band quantum transport solver including direct and phonon-assisted tunneling (PAT). It is found that the WKB approximation properly works if one single imaginary path connecting the valence band (VB) and the conduction band (CB) dominates the tunneling process as in direct band gap semiconductors. However, PAT is essential in Si and Ge nanowire TFETs where multiple, tightly-coupled, imaginary paths exist between the VB and the CB.

  18. Separated-pair independent particle model and the generalized Brillouin theorem: ab initio calculations on the dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Kenneth Randall [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1976-01-01

    A method is developed to optimize the separated-pair independent particle (SPIP) wave function; it is a special case of the separated-pair theory obtained by using two-term natural expansions of the geminals. The orbitals are optimized by a theory based on the generalized Brillouin theorem and iterative configuration interaction (CI) calculations in the space of the SPIP function and its single excitations. The geminal expansion coefficients are optimized by serial 2 x 2 CI calculations. Formulas are derived for the matrix elements. An algorithm to implement the method is presented, and the work needed to evaluate the molecular integrals is discussed.

  19. Martensitic phase transition in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni shape memory alloys studied by Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczykowski, B; Mielcarek, S; Mroz, B; Breczewski, T; No, M L; San-Juan, J

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of the martensitic phase transition on hypersonic thermally excited surface acoustic waves propagating in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni (wt%) shape memory alloy. Non-destructive and non-contact testing using Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy permitted determination of the elastic constants of austenite versus temperature. Experimental results obtained for martensite were interpreted using the proposed model of the cubic to orthorhombic martensitic phase transition based on the Landau model of a first-order phase transition. Additionally we adopted the approximation of the domain structure of martensite by a polycrystalline sample using the Voigt–Reuss–Hill procedure of averaging the elastic constants. (paper)

  20. Nonlinear optical absorption and stimulated Mie scattering in metallic nanoparticle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang S; Law, Wing-Cheung; Baev, Alexander; Liu, Sha; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-01-14

    The nonlinear optical properties of four metallic (Au-, Au/Ag-, Ag-, and Pt-) nanoparticle suspensions in toluene have been studied in both femtosecond and nanosecond regimes. Nonlinear transmission measurements in the femtosecond laser regime revealed two-photon absorption (2PA) induced nonlinear attenuation, while in the nanosecond laser regime a stronger nonlinear attenuation is due to both 2PA and 2PA-induced excited-state absorption. In the nanosecond regime, at input pump laser intensities above a certain threshold value, a new type of stimulated (Mie) scattering has been observed. Being essentially different from all other well known molecular (Raman, Brillouin) stimulated scattering effects, the newly observed stimulated Mie scattering from the metallic nanoparticles exhibits the features of no frequency shift and low pump threshold requirement. A physical model of induced Bragg grating initiated by the backward Mie scattering from metallic nanoparticles is proposed to explain the gain mechanism of the observed stimulated scattering effect.

  1. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone is contained in nerve terminals innervating thyrotropin-releasing hormone-synthesizing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and prevents fasting-induced suppression of prothyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, C; Légrádi, G; Mihály, E; Huang, Q H; Tatro, J B; Rand, W M; Emerson, C H; Lechan, R M

    2000-02-15

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus has an essential role in mediating the homeostatic responses of the thyroid axis to fasting by altering the sensitivity of prothyrotropin-releasing hormone (pro-TRH) gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to feedback regulation by thyroid hormone. Because agouti-related protein (AGRP), a leptin-regulated, arcuate nucleus-derived peptide with alpha-MSH antagonist activity, is contained in axon terminals that terminate on TRH neurons in the PVN, we raised the possibility that alpha-MSH may also participate in the mechanism by which leptin influences pro-TRH gene expression. By double-labeling immunocytochemistry, alpha-MSH-IR axon varicosities were juxtaposed to approximately 70% of pro-TRH neurons in the anterior and periventricular parvocellular subdivisions of the PVN and to 34% of pro-TRH neurons in the medial parvocellular subdivision, establishing synaptic contacts both on the cell soma and dendrites. All pro-TRH neurons receiving contacts by alpha-MSH-containing fibers also were innervated by axons containing AGRP. The intracerebroventricular infusion of 300 ng of alpha-MSH every 6 hr for 3 d prevented fasting-induced suppression of pro-TRH in the PVN but had no effect on AGRP mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. alpha-MSH also increased circulating levels of free thyroxine (T4) 2.5-fold over the levels in fasted controls, but free T4 did not reach the levels in fed controls. These data suggest that alpha-MSH has an important role in the activation of pro-TRH gene expression in hypophysiotropic neurons via either a mono- and/or multisynaptic pathway to the PVN, but factors in addition to alpha-MSH also contribute to the mechanism by which leptin administration restores thyroid hormone levels to normal in fasted animals.

  2. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Burzynska-Pedziwiatr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP. Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05 and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05. Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D-glucose (PGG, the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Wan Shim

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation.

  4. Temperature extraction in Brillouin optical time-domain analysis sensors using principal component analysis based pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Khan, Faisal Nadeem; Alarashi, Waled Hussein; Guo, Nan; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2017-07-10

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the use of principal component analysis (PCA) based pattern recognition to extract temperature distribution from the measured Brillouin gain spectra (BGSs) along the fiber under test (FUT) obtained by Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) system. The proposed scheme employs a reference database consisting of relevant ideal BGSs with known temperature attributes. PCA is then applied to the BGSs in the reference database as well as to the measured BGSs so as to reduce their size by extracting their most significant features. Now, for each feature vector of the measured BGS, we determine its best match in the reference database comprised of numerous reduced-size feature vectors of the ideal BGSs. The known temperature attribute corresponding to the best-matched BGS in the reference database is then taken as the extracted temperature of the measured BGS. We analyzed the performance of PCA-based pattern recognition algorithm in detail and compared it with that of curve fitting method. The experimental results validate that the proposed technique can provide better accuracy, faster processing speed and larger noise tolerance for the measured BGSs. Therefore, the proposed PCA-based pattern recognition algorithm can be considered as an attractive method for extracting temperature distributions along the fiber in BOTDA sensors.

  5. The effect of signal to noise ratio on accuracy of temperature measurements for Brillouin lidar in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Niu, Qunjie; Wu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiaqi; Peng, Li; Zhou, Bo

    2017-09-01

    A lidar system with Fabry-Pérot etalon and an intensified charge coupled device can be used to obtain the scattering spectrum of the ocean and retrieve oceanic temperature profiles. However, the spectrum would be polluted by noise and result in a measurement error. To analyze the effect of signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the accuracy of measurements for Brillouin lidar in water, the theory model and characteristics of SNR are researched. The noise spectrums with different SNR are repetitiously measured based on simulation and experiment. The results show that accuracy is related to SNR, and considering the balance of time consumption and quality, the average of five measurements is adapted for real remote sensing under the pulse laser conditions of wavelength 532 nm, pulse energy 650 mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz, pulse width 8 ns and linewidth 0.003 cm-1 (90 MHz). Measuring with the Brillouin linewidth has a better accuracy at a lower temperature (15 °C), based on the classical retrieval model we adopt. The experimental results show that the temperature error is 0.71 °C and 0.06 °C based on shift and linewidth respectively when the image SNR is at the range of 3.2 dB-3.9 dB.

  6. Old and New Gut Hormone, Gastrin and Acid Suppressive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruma, Ken; Kamada, Tomoari; Manabe, Noriaki; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Shiotani, Akiko

    2018-03-27

    Gastrin acts physiologically as a gut hormone to stimulate acid secretion after meal and as a cell-growth factor of oxyntic mucosa. Increase in serum gastrin level happens under various conditions including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, antral G cell hyperplasia, autoimmune gastritis, atrophic gastritis, renal failure, vagotomy, Helicobacter pylori infection and acid suppressive therapy. As acid suppressive therapy causes hypergastrinemia, the association between acid suppressive therapy and gastric neuroendocrine cell tumor (NET) has been discussed during the past 30 years. In this review article, the definition of hypergastrinemia and the related disorders including acid suppressive therapy and gastric NET are discussed. © 2018 Japanese Gastroenterological Association Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  8. Implementation of the multireference Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee's coupled cluster methods with non-iterative triple excitations utilizing reference-level parallelism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Brabec, Jiří; Apra, E.; van Dam, H. J. J.; Pittner, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 9 (2012), 094112 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : multireference methods * molecular applications * Brillouin-Wogner Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.164, year: 2012

  9. Elastic Constants of Brucite (Mg(OH)2) and Diaspore (AlO(OH)) to 12 GPa by Brillouin Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Speziale, S.; Majzlan, J.; Duffy, T. S.

    2005-12-01

    Hydroxides such as brucite, Mg(OH)2, and diaspore, AlO(OH), serve as analogs for the more complex hydrogen-bearing minerals found in subduction zones. The single-crystal elastic constants of these two minerals were determined by Brillouin scattering up to 12 GPa in a diamond anvil cell. A 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water and 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture were used as pressure media and ruby as pressure calibrant. Two platelets of brucite and three platelets of diaspore were measured at room pressure and over nine elevated pressures. Brillouin spectra were recorded in 37 directions with a 5-degree step for each plane. All individual elastic stiffness constants were retrieved by fitting the velocity data to the Christoffel's equation. The individual elastic constants, aggregate bulk and shear moduli, were then fitted to the finite Eulerian stain equations to obtain their pressure derivatives. For brucite, aggregate moduli and their pressure derivatives are KT0=35.9(9) GPa, GO=31.3(2) GPa, (∂ Kt/∂ P)T0=8.9(3), (∂ G/∂ P)O=4.33(4) for the Reuss bound. Diaspore aggregate moduli and their pressure derivatives are KT0=147.0(7) GPa, GO=114.8(5) GPa, (∂ Ks/∂ P)T0=4.1(1), (∂ G/∂ P)O=1.6(1). For diaspore, both individual and aggregate elastic moduli define nearly linear modulus pressure trend within the measured pressure range. For Brucite, there are clear deviations from linear modulus - pressure trends. In comparison with diaspore, brucite exhibits strong anisotropy. The ratio of the linear compressibility of brucite along the c and a axes decreased from 4.7 to 1.3 over the examined pressure range. The shear anisotropy (C66/C44) decreased from 2.6 at ambient condition to 1.3 with increase of pressure to 12 GPa. Compression curves constructed from our Brillouin data for both brucite and diaspore are in good agreement with previous x-ray diffraction data.

  10. Serotonin-1A receptor stimulation mediates effects of a metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonist, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495), and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, ketamine, in the novelty-suppressed feeding test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Iijima, Michihiko; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-06-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor stimulation has been proposed to be a common neural mechanism of metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, ketamine, exerting antidepressant effects in animal models. AMPA receptor stimulation has also been shown to mediate an increase in the extracellular level of serotonin (5-HT) in the medial prefrontal cortex by an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist in rats. However, involvement of the serotonergic system in the actions of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists and ketamine is not well understood. We investigated involvement of the serotonergic system in the effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495), and ketamine in a novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) test in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of LY341495 or ketamine at 30 min prior to the test significantly shortened latency to feed, which was attenuated by an AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr-obenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX). The effects of LY341495 and ketamine were no longer observed in mice pretreated with a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). Moreover, the effects of LY341495 and ketamine were blocked by a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, N-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-(2-pyridynyl) cyclohexane-carboxamide (WAY100635), but not by a 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin. Likewise, an AMPA receptor potentiator, 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-7-yl-(1-piperidyl)methanone (CX546), shortened latency to feed in the NSF test, which was prevented by depletion of 5-HT and blockade of 5-HT1A receptor. These results suggest that AMPA receptor-dependent 5-HT release and subsequent 5-HT1A receptor stimulation may be involved in the actions of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist and ketamine in the NSF test.

  11. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Size-dependent magnetization dynamics in individual Ni80Fe20 disk using micro-focused Brillouin Light Scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shimon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A direct and systematic investigation of the magnetization dynamics in individual circular Ni80Fe20 disk of diameter (D in the range from 300 nm to 1 μm measured using micro-focused Brillouin Light Scattering (μ-BLS spectroscopy is presented. At high field, when the disks are in a single domain state, the resonance frequency of the uniform center mode is observed to reduce with reducing disk’s diameter. For D = 300 nm, additional edge and end-domains resonant modes are observed due to size effects. At low field, when the disks are in a vortex state, a systematic increase of resonant frequency of magnetostatic modes in a vortex state with the square root of the disks’ aspect ratio (thickness divided by radius is observed. Such dependence diminishes for disks with larger aspect ratio due to an increasing exchange energy contribution. Micromagnetic simulations are in excellent agreement with the experiments.

  13. Method to map one-dimensional electronic wave function by using multiple Brillouin zone angle resolved photoemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wook Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES is a powerful tool to investigate electronic structures in solids and has been widely used in studying various materials. The electronic structure information by ARPES is obtained in the momentum space. However, in the case of one-dimensional system, we here show that we extract the real space information from ARPES data taken over multiple Brillouin zones (BZs. Intensities in the multiple BZs are proportional to the photoemission matrix element which contains information on the coefficient of the Bloch wave function. It is shown that the Bloch wave function coefficients can be extracted from ARPES data, which allows us to construct the real space wave function. As a test, we use ARPES data from proto-typical one-dimensional system SrCuO2 and construct the real space wave function.

  14. Transition from hydrodynamic to fast sound in a He-Ne mixture a neutron Brillouin scattering experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bafile, U; Barocchi, F; Sampoli, M

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a fast-sound mode in the microscopic dynamics of the rare-gas mixture He-Ne, predicted by theoretical studies and molecular-dynamics simulations, was demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering experiment. In order to study the transition between the fast and the normal acoustic modes in the hydrodynamic regime, k values lower by about one order of magnitude than in the usual experiments have to be probed. We describe here the results of the first neutron Brillouin scattering experiment performed with this purpose on the same system already investigated at larger k. The results of both experiments, together with those of a new molecular-dynamics simulation, provide a complete and consistent description, still missing so far, of the onset of fast-sound propagation in a binary mixture. (orig.)

  15. Water dynamics in a lithium chloride aqueous solution probed by Brillouin neutron and x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontov, E; De Francesco, A; Formisano, F; Laloni, A; Sani, L; Leu, B M; Said, A H; Kolesnikov, A I

    2012-02-15

    We studied the collective excitations in an aqueous solution of lithium chloride over the temperature range of 270-205 K using neutron and x-ray Brillouin scattering. Both neutron and x-ray experiments revealed the presence of low- and high-frequency excitations, similar to the low- and high-frequency excitations in pure water. These two excitations were detectable through the entire temperature range of the experiment, at all probed values of the scattering momentum transfer (0.2 Å(-1) temperature range was investigated using elastic intensity neutron and x-ray scans. Clear evidence of the crossover in the dynamics of the water molecules in the solution was observed in the single-particle relaxational dynamics on the µeV (nanosecond) time scale, but not in the collective dynamics on the meV (picosecond) time scale.

  16. Surround suppression maps in the cat primary visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Vanni, Matthieu P.; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In the primary visual cortex and higher-order areas, it is well known that the stimulation of areas surrounding the classical receptive field of a neuron can inhibit its responses. In the primate area middle temporal (MT), this surround suppression was shown to be spatially organized into high and low suppression modules. However, such an organization has not been demonstrated yet in the primary visual cortex. Here, we used optical imaging of intrinsic signals to spatially evaluate surround s...

  17. Stimulating at the right time: phase-specific deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Pedrosa, David; Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alek; Cheeran, Binith; Aziz, Tipu; Green, Alexander; Fitzgerald, James; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Friston, Karl J; Denison, Timothy; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    SEE MOLL AND ENGEL DOI101093/AWW308 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Brain regions dynamically engage and disengage with one another to execute everyday actions from movement to decision making. Pathologies such as Parkinson's disease and tremor emerge when brain regions controlling movement cannot readily decouple, compromising motor function. Here, we propose a novel stimulation strategy that selectively regulates neural synchrony through phase-specific stimulation. We demonstrate for the first time the therapeutic potential of such a stimulation strategy for the treatment of patients with pathological tremor. Symptom suppression is achieved by delivering stimulation to the ventrolateral thalamus, timed according to the patient's tremor rhythm. Sustained locking of deep brain stimulation to a particular phase of tremor afforded clinically significant tremor relief (up to 87% tremor suppression) in selected patients with essential tremor despite delivering less than half the energy of conventional high frequency stimulation. Phase-specific stimulation efficacy depended on the resonant characteristics of the underlying tremor network. Selective regulation of neural synchrony through phase-locked stimulation has the potential to both increase the efficiency of therapy and to minimize stimulation-induced side effects. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  18. Anti-inflammatory action of 2-carbomethoxy-2,3-epoxy-3-prenyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (CMEP-NQ) suppresses both the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways of TLR4 signaling in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju Woo, Hyun; Jun, Do Youn; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hae Sun; Woo, Mi Hee; Park, Sook Jahr; Kim, Sang Chan; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-06-09

    The roots of Rubia cordifolia L. have been widely used as a traditional herbal medicine in Northeast Asia for treating inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of 2-carbomethoxy-2,3-epoxy-3- prenyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (CMEP-NQ), purified from the roots of R. cordifolia L. as the major anti-inflammatory component, in LPS-treated RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells. Anti-inflammatory activity of CMEP-NQ was investigated in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells by measuring the levels of NO, PGE 2 , and cytokines (IL1β, IL-6, TNF-α) in the culture supernatants and the TLR4-mediated intracellular events including association of MyD88 with IRAK1, activation of IRAK1, TAK1, MAPKs, NF-κB/AP-1, and IRF3, and generation of ROS. Pretreatment of RAW264.7 cells with CMEP-NQ reduced LPS-induced production of NO and PGE 2 by suppressing iNOS and COX-2 gene expression. CMEP-NQ also reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by down-regulating mRNA levels. Under these conditions, TLR4-mediated MyD88-dependent events were inhibited by CMEP-NQ, including the association of MyD88 with IRAK1, phosphorylation of IRAK1, TAK1, and MAPKs (ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK), and activation of NF-κB and AP-1. As TRIF-dependent events of TLR4 signaling, phosphorylation of IRF3 and induction of iNOS protein expression were also inhibited by CMEP-NQ. However, the binding of FITC-conjugated LPS to cell surface TLR4 was not affected by CMEP-NQ. Following LPS stimulation, intracellular ROS production was first detected by DCFH-DA staining at 1h; then it continuously increased until 16h. Although CMEP-NQ failed to exhibit DPPH radical- or ABTS radical-scavenging activity in vitro, LPS-induced ROS production in RAW264.7 cells was more efficiently blocked by CMEP-NQ than by NAC. These results demonstrate that the suppressive effect of CMEP-NQ on LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells was mainly exerted via its inhibition of TLR4-mediated proximal events, such as MyD88

  19. Biomarkers and Stimulation Algorithms for Adaptive Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Hoang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to describe in what ways feedback or adaptive stimulation may be delivered and adjusted based on relevant biomarkers. Specific treatment mechanisms underlying therapeutic brain stimulation remain unclear, in spite of the demonstrated efficacy in a number of nervous system diseases. Brain stimulation appears to exert widespread influence over specific neural networks that are relevant to specific disease entities. In awake patients, activation or suppression of these neural networks can be assessed by either symptom alleviation (i.e., tremor, rigidity, seizures or physiological criteria, which may be predictive of expected symptomatic treatment. Secondary verification of network activation through specific biomarkers that are linked to symptomatic disease improvement may be useful for several reasons. For example, these biomarkers could aid optimal intraoperative localization, possibly improve efficacy or efficiency (i.e., reduced power needs, and provide long-term adaptive automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters. Possible biomarkers for use in portable or implanted devices span from ongoing physiological brain activity, evoked local field potentials (LFPs, and intermittent pathological activity, to wearable devices, biochemical, blood flow, optical, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes, temperature changes, or optogenetic signals. First, however, potential biomarkers must be correlated directly with symptom or disease treatment and network activation. Although numerous biomarkers are under consideration for a variety of stimulation indications the feasibility of these approaches has yet to be fully determined. Particularly, there are critical questions whether the use of adaptive systems can improve efficacy over continuous stimulation, facilitate adjustment of stimulation interventions and improve our understanding of the role of abnormal network function in disease mechanisms.

  20. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  1. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  2. Suppression in the occurrence of stuttering due to current stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    能登谷, 晶子

    1999-01-01

    われわれのこれまでの研究から、末梢における吃音症状発生の主体は、声帯レベルでの機能異常によるものの可能性が強いことが推測されている。本研究は、吃音発生時の声門レベルの異常に焦点をて、低周波干渉電流が吃音発生の抑制に関与するかを検討することを目的としている。低周波干渉電流刺激療法が、理学療法の分野では末梢神経の伝導抑制作用を示し、その作用を利用して消炎・鎮痛療法があることは広く認められている。また、低周波による神経刺激実験で50Hz以上の電流が鎮痙的作用があることも知られている。3例の成人吃音患者を対象としたが、発話時のBlockと、身体の随伴症状が最も著しかった1例を対象に、上肢に電極を装着して電流刺激をした場合と、咽頭に電極を装着して電流刺激をした場合と、電流を流さない状態とで、文章音読時の吃音症状出現頻度について検討した。電流刺激装置は日本メデックス社の低周波刺激装置を用いた。咽頭への電流刺激方法は、星状神経節ブロック施行時の要領で行い、50-60Hz、5-10mAの電流を流した。また、distraction効果についても検討した。その結果、咽頭への電流刺激が吃音症状軽減に有...

  3. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  4. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and 3 H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by α-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S 2 episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. 3 H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system

  5. Adaptive deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudel, M; Brown, P

    2016-01-01

    Although Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), there are still limitations in terms of effectivity, side-effects and battery consumption. One of the reasons for this may be that not only pathological but also physiological neural activity can be suppressed whilst stimulating. For this reason, adaptive DBS (aDBS), where stimulation is applied according to the level of pathological activity, might be advantageous. Initial studies of aDBS demonstrate effectiveness in PD, but there are still many questions to be answered before aDBS can be applied clinically. Here we discuss the feedback signals and stimulation algorithms involved in adaptive stimulation in PD and sketch a potential road-map towards clinical application. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of 2-mm-long strained section in silica fiber using slope-assisted Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2018-02-01

    Slope-assisted Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry is a single-end-access distributed Brillouin sensing technique with high spatial resolution and high-speed operation. We have recently discovered its unique feature, that is, strained or heated sections even shorter than nominal resolution can be detected, but its detailed characterization has not been carried out. Here, after experimentally characterizing this “beyond-nominal-resolution” effect, we show its usefulness by demonstrating the detection of a 2-mm-long strained section along a silica fiber. We also demonstrate the detection of a 5-mm-long heated section along a polymer optical fiber. The lengths of these detected sections are smaller than those of the other demonstrations reported so far.

  7. Development of in situ Brillouin spectroscopy at high pressure and high temperature with synchrotron radiation and infrared laser heating system: Application to the Earth's deep interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Motohiko; Asahara, Yuki; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Hirose, Kei

    2009-05-01

    Seismic wave velocity profiles in the Earth provide one of the strongest constraints on structure, mineralogy and elastic properties of the Earth's deep interior. Accurate sound velocity data of deep Earth materials under relevant high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, therefore, are essential for interpretation of seismic data. Such information can be directly obtained from Brillouin scattering measurement. Here we describe an in situ Brillouin scattering system for measurements at high pressure and high temperature using a laser heated diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation for sample characterization. The system has been used with single-crystal and polycrystalline materials, and with glass and fluid phase. It provided high quality sound velocity and elastic data with X-ray diffraction data at high pressure and/or high temperature. Those combined techniques can potentially offer the essential information for resolving many remaining issues in mineral physics.

  8. High resolution Brillouin scattering studies of β-Gd2(MoO4)3; the bulk and surface phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarek, S; Trzaskowska, A; Mroz, B; Andrews, T

    2005-01-01

    We present here results of Brillouin scattering from bulk and surface phonons propagating in a well known ferroelectric-ferroelastic crystal β-Gd 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 , in the temperature range covering the phase transition. Temperature dependences of the velocity of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves, propagating in a few planes of this crystal, have been calculated. The surface phonon velocities determined experimentally have been found to show a different character of temperature dependences, especially in the phase transition range

  9. Continuous Transition between Brillouin-Wigner and Rayleigh-Schrödinger Perturbation Theory, Generalized Bloch Equation, and Hilbert Space Multireference Coupled Cluster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pittner, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 24 (2003), s. 10876-10889 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D23.001; GA ČR GA203/99/D009; GA AV ČR IAA4040108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : continuous transition * Brillouin-Wigner * Rayleigh-Schrödinger Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.950, year: 2003

  10. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Surround Suppression Maps in the Cat Primary Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu P Vanni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the primary visual cortex and higher-order areas, it is well known that the stimulation of areas surrounding the classical receptive field of a neuron can inhibit its responses. In the primate area MT, this surround suppression was shown to be spatially organized into high and low suppression modules. However, such an organization hasn’t been demonstrated yet in the primary visual cortex. Here, we used optical imaging of intrinsic signals to spatially evaluate surround suppression in the cat visual cortex. The magnitude of the response was measured in areas 17 and 18 for stimuli with different diameters, presented at different eccentricities. Delimited regions of the cortex were revealed by circumscribed stimulations of the visual field (cortical response field. Increasing the stimulus diameter increased the spread of cortical activation. In the cortical response field, the optimal stimulation diameter and the level of suppression were evaluated. Most pixels (3/4 exhibited surround suppression profiles. The optimal diameter, corresponding to a population of receptive fields, was smaller in area 17 (22 deg. than in area 18 (36 deg. in accordance with electrophysiological data. No difference in the suppression strength was observed between both areas (A17: 25%, A18: 21%. Further analysis of our data revealed the presence of surround modulation maps, organized in low and high suppression domains. We also developed a statistical method to confirm the existence of this cortical map and its neuronal origin. The organization for center/surround suppression observed here at the level of the primary visual cortex is similar to those found in higher order areas in primates (e.g. area MT and could represent a strategy to optimize figure ground discrimination.

  12. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  13. Elastic Characterization of Transparent and Opaque Films, Multilayers and Acoustic Resonators by Surface Brillouin Scattering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Carlotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a renewed interest in the development of experimental methods to achieve the elastic characterization of thin films, multilayers and acoustic resonators operating in the GHz range of frequencies. The potentialities of surface Brillouin light scattering (surf-BLS for this aim are reviewed in this paper, addressing the various situations that may occur for the different types of structures. In particular, the experimental methodology and the amount of information that can be obtained depending on the transparency or opacity of the film material, as well as on the ratio between the film thickness and the light wavelength, are discussed. A generalization to the case of multilayered samples is also provided, together with an outlook on the capability of the recently developed micro-focused scanning version of the surf-BLS technique, which opens new opportunities for the imaging of the spatial profile of the acoustic field in acoustic resonators and in artificially patterned metamaterials, such as phononic crystals.

  14. Discrete modes of a ferromagnetic stripe dipolarly coupled to a ferromagnetic film: a Brillouin light scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubbiotti, G; Tacchi, S; Carlotti, G; Ono, T; Roussigne, Y; Tiberkevich, V S; Slavin, A N

    2007-01-01

    Spin wave excitations in a magnetic structure consisting of a series of long permalloy stripes of a rectangular cross section magnetized along the stripe length and situated above a continuous permalloy film are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Stripes and continuous film are coupled by dipole-dipole interaction across 10 nm thick Cu spacers. Experimental measurements made using the Brillouin light scattering technique (with the light wavevector oriented along the stripe width) provide evidence for one dispersive spin wave mode associated with the continuous film and several discrete non-dispersive modes resonating within the finite width of the stripes. To interpret the experimental spectra, an analytic theory based on the spin wave formalism for finite-width magnetic stripes has been developed, achieving a good qualitative and partly quantitative description of the experimentally observed spin wave spectrum of the system. In particular, it is explained why the presence of a continuous magnetic film near the magnetic stripe leads to a substantial decrease of the frequencies of the discrete dipolar spin wave modes localized within the stripes. A more quantitative description of the measured frequencies and of the spatial profiles of the spin wave eigenmodes has been obtained by numerical calculations performed using a finite element method

  15. Localized spin-wave modes in a triangular magnetic element studied by micro-focused Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.; Kwon, J.-H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Grünberg, P. [Grünberg Center for Magnetic Nanomaterials, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, B.K., E-mail: chobk@gist.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Direct evidence of localized mode in a triangular nano-magnet using μ-BLS. • Localized regions are identified by the internal field distribution. • The spatially resolved measurement was performed to obtain 2-D intensity map. • Spin modes in same positions can be distinguish comparing with simulated spectrum. • Localized modes were identified by comparing with the simulated spatial profiles. - Abstract: Localized spin-wave modes, which were thermally excited at a specific position in a triangular magnetic element, were investigated using micro-focused Brillouin light scattering in two saturated states, the buckle and Y-states, with an applied magnetic field of 0.24 T parallel and perpendicular to the basal edge, respectively. The measured frequency spectrum at a specific beam spot position, rather than an integrated spectrum, was analyzed by comparing it with the simulation data at a precisely selected position within the beam spot area. The analyzed results were used to plot a two-dimensional intensity map and simulation spatial profile to verify the validity of the analysis. From the analysis process, two localized spin-wave modes in a triangular magnetic element were successfully identified near the apex region in the buckle state and near the basal edge region in the Y-state.

  16. A self-consistent trapping model of driven electron plasma waves and limits on stimulated Raman scatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Harvey A.; Russell, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A Vlasov equation based model is used to determine various regimes of electron plasma wave response to a source appropriate to stimulated scatter in a laser hot spot. It incorporates trapped particle effects such as the standard nonlinear frequency shift, extended beyond the weak regime, and a reduction of damping a la Zakharov and Karpman [V. E. Zakharov and V. I. Karpman, JETP 16, 351 (1963)]. The results are consistent with those of Holloway and Dorning [J. P. Holloway and J. J. Dorning, Phys. Rev. A 44, 3856 (1991)] for small amplitude Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. This leads to the prediction that as long as kλ D ≥0.53 for a background Maxwellian distribution function, e.g., a 5 keV plasma with n e /n c ≤0.075, anomalously large backward stimulated Raman scatter can be excluded. A similar analysis leads to density limits on stimulated Brillouin scatter

  17. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Selective SWS suppression does not affect the time course of core body temperature in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    1992-01-01

    In eight healthy middle-aged men, sleep and core body temperature were recorded under baseline conditions, during all-night SWS suppression by acoustic stimulation, and during undisturbed recovery sleep. SWS suppression resulted in a marked reduction of sleep stages 3 and 4 but did not affect the

  19. J/Ψ suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capony, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkaninan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Mac Cormick, M.; Macciotta, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Sartori, S.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Temnikov, P.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.; Vale, C.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for J/Ψ production in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 GeV per nucleon is measured at the CERN SPS by the NA50 experiment. The final results from the 1995 run are presented here together with preliminary ones from the high-statistics 1996 run. An anomalous J/Ψ suppression is observed in Pb-Pb collisions as compared to extrapolations of the previous results obtained by the NA38 experiment with proton and lighter ion beams. The results of the two runs are in good agreement. The results from the 1996 run allow the study of the onset of the anomalous suppression within the same set of data, showing evidence of a sharp change of behaviour around a value of neutral transverse energy, as measured by our electromagnetic calorimeter, of about 50 GeV

  20. Stimulants for the control of hedonic appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Sally Poulton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behaviour. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognised to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone, are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilisation of this effective and inexpensive class of drug.

  1. A cortical locus for anisotropic overlay suppression of stimuli presented at fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bruce C; Richard, Bruno; Andres, Kristin; Johnson, Aaron P; Thompson, Benjamin; Essock, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Human contrast sensitivity for narrowband Gabor targets is suppressed when superimposed on narrowband masks of the same spatial frequency and orientation (referred to as overlay suppression), with suppression being broadly tuned to orientation and spatial frequency. Numerous behavioral and neurophysiological experiments have suggested that overlay suppression originates from the initial lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) inputs to V1, which is consistent with the broad tuning typically reported for overlay suppression. However, recent reports have shown narrowly tuned anisotropic overlay suppression when narrowband targets are masked by broadband noise. Consequently, researchers have argued for an additional form of overlay suppression that involves cortical contrast gain control processes. The current study sought to further explore this notion behaviorally using narrowband and broadband masks, along with a computational neural simulation of the hypothesized underlying gain control processes in cortex. Additionally, we employed transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in order to test whether cortical processes are involved in driving narrowly tuned anisotropic suppression. The behavioral results yielded anisotropic overlay suppression for both broadband and narrowband masks and could be replicated with our computational neural simulation of anisotropic gain control. Further, the anisotropic form of overlay suppression could be directly modulated by tDCS, which would not be expected if the suppression was primarily subcortical in origin. Altogether, the results of the current study provide further evidence in support of an additional overlay suppression process that originates in cortex and show that this form of suppression is also observable with narrowband masks.

  2. Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction sign in Ir/Co2FeAl systems investigated by Brillouin light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmeguenai, M.; Gabor, M. S.; Roussigné, Y.; Petrisor, T.; Mos, R. B.; Stashkevich, A.; Chérif, S. M.; Tiusan, C.

    2018-02-01

    C o2FeAl (CFA) ultrathin films, of various thicknesses (0.9 nm ≤tCFA≤1.8 nm ), have been grown by sputtering on Si substrates, using Ir as a buffer layer. The magnetic properties of these structures have been studied by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), miscrostrip ferromagnetic resonance (MS-FMR), and Brillouin light scattering (BLS) in the Damon-Eshbach geometry. VSM characterizations show that films are mostly in-plane magnetized and the saturating field perpendicular to the film plane increases with decreasing CFA thickness suggesting the existence of a perpendicular interface anisotropy. The presence of a magnetic dead layer of 0.44 nm has been detected by VSM. The MS-FMR with the magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the film plane has been used to determine the gyromagnetic factor. The BLS measurements reveal a pronounced nonreciprocal spin wave propagation, due to the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) induced by the Ir interface with CFA, which increases with decreasing CFA thickness. The DMI sign has been found to be the same (negative) as that of Pt/Co, in contrast to the ab initio calculation on Ir/Co, where it is found to be positive. The thickness dependence of the effective DMI constant shows the existence of two regimes similarly to that of the perpendicular anisotropy constant. The surface DMI constant Ds was estimated to be -0.37 pJ /m for the thickest samples, where a linear thickness dependence of the effective DMI constant has been observed.

  3. Advances of a Brillouin Scattering Lidar System for the Detection of Temperature Profiles in the Ocean: Laboratory Measurements and Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, T.; Rupp, D.; Friman, S.; Trees, C.; Fournier, G.

    2016-02-01

    Recently we have demonstrated the feasibility of remotely measuring temperature profiles in water under a laboratory environment employing our real-time Brillouin Scattering LIDAR (BSL) system. The working principle is based on the frequency and time resolved detection of the backscattered spontaneous Brillouin signal of a short light pulse fired into the ocean. The light source consists of a frequency-doubled fiber-amplified External Cavity Diode Laser (ECDL) providing high-energy, Fourier transform-limited laser pulses in the green spectral range. The Brillouin shift is detected with high accuracy (low uncertainty) by employing an edge filter based on an Excited State Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (ESFADOF). Time-resolution allows for the depth resolution and the frequency resolved shift is proportional to the speed of sound. Thus, the temperature profile can be extracted from the measurements. In our laboratory setup we were able to resolve water temperatures with a mean accuracy of up to 0.07 oC and a spatial resolution of 1 m depending on the amount of averaging. In order to prepare the system for a first field test under realistic conditions on the coast of the Mediterranean at CMRE in La Spezia, almost all of the components have been upgraded. This first test is planned for November 2015. We will present the above mentioned measurements, details about the upgrades and report on our experiences during this maritime field test.Ultimately, the plan is to operate the system from a mobile platform, e.g., a helicopter or vessel, in order to precisely determine the temperature of the surface mixed layer of the ocean with high spatial resolution.

  4. Glechoma hederacea Suppresses RANKL-mediated Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J K; Erkhembaatar, M; Gu, D R; Lee, S H; Lee, C H; Shin, D M; Lee, Y R; Kim, M S

    2014-07-01

    Glechoma hederacea (GH), commonly known as ground-ivy or gill-over-the-ground, has been extensively used in folk remedies for relieving symptoms of inflammatory disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of GH are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GH constituents inhibit osteoclastogenesis by abrogating receptor activator of nuclear κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced free cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) oscillations. To evaluate the effect of GH on osteoclastogenesis, we assessed the formation of multi-nucleated cells (MNCs), enzymatic activity of tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP), expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), and [Ca(2+)]i alterations in response to treatment with GH ethanol extract (GHE) in primarily cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Treatment of RANKL-stimulated or non-stimulated BMMs with GHE markedly suppressed MNC formation, TRAP activity, and NFATc1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, GHE treatment induced a large transient elevation in [Ca(2+)]i while suppressing RANKL-induced [Ca(2+)]i oscillations, which are essential for NFATc1 activation. GHE-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)]i was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP), inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs), but was independent of store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Notably, after transient [Ca(2+)] elevation, treatment with GHE desensitized the VGCCs, resulting in an abrogation of RANKL-induced [Ca(2+)]i oscillations and MNC formation. These findings demonstrate that treatment of BMMs with GHE suppresses RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis by activating and then desensitizing DHP-sensitive VGCCs, suggesting potential applications of GH in the treatment of bone disorders, such as periodontitis, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  5. A single-longitudinal-mode Brillouin fiber laser passively stabilized at the pump resonance frequency with a dynamic population inversion grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirin, V V; López-Mercado, C A; Kinet, D; Mégret, P; Fotiadi, A A; Zolotovskiy, I O

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a single-longitudinal-mode Brillouin ring fiber laser passively stabilized at the resonance frequency with a 1.7 m section that is an unpumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber. The two coupled all-fiber Fabry–Perot interferometers that comprise the cavity, in combination with the dynamical population inversion gratings self-induced in the active fiber, provide adaptive pump-mode selection and Stokes wave generation at the same time. The laser is shown to emit a single-frequency Stokes wave with a linewidth narrower than 100 Hz. (letter)

  6. Brillouin scattering, DSC, dielectric and X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions in antiferroelectric PbHfO{sub 3}:Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mączka, Mirosław, E-mail: m.maczka@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wrocław 2 (Poland); Kim, Tae Hyun [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Gągor, Anna [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wrocław 2 (Poland); Jankowska-Sumara, Irena [Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, 30-084 Kraków (Poland); Majchrowski, Andrzej [Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology, 2 Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warszawa (Poland); Kojima, Seiji [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Phase transition mechanisms were studied in antiferroelectric PbHf{sub 0.975}Sn{sub 0.025}O{sub 3.} • Acoustic phonons showed anomalies at 472 and 426 K due to phase transitions. • Brillouin data showed evidence for presence of polar clusters in paraelectric phase. • An order-disorder mechanism of the PE to AFE2 transition was proved. - Abstract: Specific heat, dielectric, powder X-ray diffraction and Brillouin scattering studies of phase transitions in antiferroelectric PbHf{sub 0.975}Sn{sub 0.025}O{sub 3} crystal were performed. The specific heat data revealed clear anomalies at T{sub 1} = 473.5 and T{sub 2} = 426.3 K on cooling, which could be attributed to onset of first order phase transitions from the paraelectric (PE) phase to an intermediate antiferroelectric phase (AFE2) and the AFE2 phase to another antiferroelectric phase (AFE1), respectively. The estimated entropy changes at T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} pointed to mainly an order-disorder and displacive character of these transitions, respectively. X-ray diffraction data showed a complex superstructure of the intermediate phase with a = 11.895(6) Å, b = 11.936(4) Å, c = 8.223(3) Å at 453 K. Brillouin studies revealed pronounced softening of longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode in the PE phase associated with its broadening. The broadening and softening exhibited maximum values at T{sub 1}. Additional acoustic anomalies, that is, abrupt frequency shifts for LA and transverse acoustic (TA) modes were also observed at T{sub 2}. Brillouin scattering data also showed presence of a broad central peak (CP) that exhibited highest intensity at T{sub 1}. The observed temperature dependences of acoustic modes and CP indicate order-disorder character of the FE to AFE2 phase transition and importance of polar precursor clusters in the PE phase. The obtained data also suggest that the intermediate antiferroelectric phases in Sn{sup 4+} doped PbHfO{sub 3} and PbZrO{sub 3} may have very similar structures

  7. How to suppress obsessive thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Diepstraten, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Thought suppression (i.e. consciously trying to avoid certain thoughts from entering consciousness) has been argued to be an inadequate strategy in case of unwanted intrusions. That is, thought suppression seems to result in more rather than less intrusions. Although this experimental finding has been explained in terms of failing attempts to distract oneself from the target thought, the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI; a scale that measures chronic thought suppression tendencies) does not address the means by which respondents try to suppress unwanted thoughts. To examine which strategies of mental control people use to suppress unwanted thoughts, obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (N=47) completed the WBSI, the Thought Control Questionnaire, and two measures of psychopathology. Results suggest that the crucial mechanism in thought suppression may not be distraction, but self-punishment.

  8. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  9. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  10. PGSTE-WATERGATE: An STE-based PGSE NMR sequence with excellent solvent suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Anil Kumar, P. G.; Torres, Allan M.; Price, William S.

    2008-03-01

    A new stimulated-echo based pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR diffusion sequence incorporating WATERGATE solvent suppression, PGSTE-WATERGATE, is presented. The sequence provides superb solvent suppression without any phase distortions. The sequence is simple to set up and particularly suited to measuring diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution such as is commonly required in pharmaceutical and combinatorial applications. The utility of the sequence is demonstrated on samples containing lysozyme and sucrose. Importantly, the high degree of phase-distortion suppression allows more complicated selective π pulses to be used to enhance the selectivity of solvent suppression.

  11. On the Suppression Band and Bandgap of Planar Electromagnetic Bandgap Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharak Mohajer-Iravani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic bandgap structures are considered a viable solution for the problem of switching noise in printed circuit boards and packages. Less attention, however, has been given to whether or not the introduction of EBGs affects the EMI potential of the circuit to couple unwanted energy to neighboring layers or interconnects. In this paper, we show that the bandgap of EBG structures, as generated using the Brillouin diagram, does not necessarily correspond to the suppression bandwidth typically generated using S-parameters. We show that the reactive near fields radiating from openings within the EBG layers can be substantial and are present in the entire frequency band including propagating and nonpropagating mode regions. These fields decay fast with distance; however, they can couple significant energy to adjacent layers and to signal lines. The findings are validated using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation. Based on this work, design guidelines for EBG structures can be drawn to insure not only suppression of switching noise but also minimization of EMI and insuring signal integrity.

  12. Brillouin zone spin filtering mechanism of enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance and correlation effects in a Co(0001 )/h -BN/Co(0001 ) magnetic tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleev, Sergey V.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Mryasov, Oleg N.

    2015-12-01

    The Brillouin zone spin filtering mechanism of enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is described for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and studied for an example of the MTJ with hcp Co electrodes and hexagonal BN (h -BN) spacer. Our calculations based on the local density approximation of density-functional theory (LDA-DFT) for Co(0001 )/h -BN/Co(0001 ) MTJ predict high TMR in this device due to Brillouin zone filtering mechanism. Owning to the specific complex band structure of the h -BN the spin-dependent tunneling conductance of the system is ultrasensitive to small variations of the Fermi energy position inside the BN band gap. Doping of the BN and, consequentially, changing the Fermi energy position could lead to variation of the TMR by several orders of magnitude. We show also that taking into account correlation effects on beyond DFT level is required to accurately describe position of the Fermi level and thus transport properties of the system. Our study suggests that new MTJ based on hcp Co-Pt or Co-Pd disordered alloy electrodes and p -doped hexagonal BN spacer is a promising candidate for the spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory.

  13. Real-Time Distributed Strain Monitoring of a Railway Bridge during Train Passage by Using a Distributed Optical Fiber Sensor Based on Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Jin Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the monitoring of distributed strain of rail and girder of a railway bridge occurring during train passage over the bridge’s entire section on a real-time basis by applying a developed distributed optical fiber sensor based on Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis (BOCDA. The distributed optical fiber sensor system and an algorithm to control as well as to analyze Brillouin gain spectrum signals were also developed. A single-mode optical fiber was attached in the longitudinal direction on the rail and the lower flange of the girder to be used as a sensing fiber of the BOCDA system. Changes in the girder’s strain at the center point of the bridge during the passage of a commercial train were measured at 9 Hz, and the accuracy of this measurement was validated by comparing the measured data with the data from strain gauge. In addition, the distributed strain of a girder and the rail with a length of 40.26 m was measured in real time with a spatial resolution of 31.1 cm. Based on the results of the rail’s strain distribution, the study could identify the location where excessive strain occurred due to an influence of unsupported sleepers on girder of the bridge.

  14. A Brillouin scattering study of La0.77Ca0.23MnO3 across the metal-insulator transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seikh, Md Motin; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Sudheendra, L; Sood, A K; Rao, C N R

    2004-01-01

    Temperature-dependent Brillouin scattering studies have been carried out on La 0.77 Ca 0.23 MnO 3 across the paramagnetic insulator-ferromagnetic metal (I-M) transition (T C ∼ 230 K). The spectra show modes corresponding to a surface Rayleigh wave (SRW) and a high velocity pseudo-surface wave (HVPSAW) along with bulk acoustic waves (B1 and B2). The Brillouin shifts associated with the SRW and HVPSAW increase, whereas the B1 and B2 frequencies decrease, below T C . The temperature dependence of the SRW and HVPSAW modes is related to the increase in the elastic constant C 11 across the I-M transition. The decrease in frequency across the I-M transition of the bulk modes is understood to be due to enhanced self-energy corrections as a result of increased magnon-phonon interaction across the I-M transition. Correspondingly, these modes show a large increase in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) as the temperature decreases. We also observe a central peak whose width is maximum at T C

  15. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  16. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003377.htm Growth hormone stimulation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the ...

  17. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  18. Suppression of sympathetic detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C., Jr.; Gunger, M. E.; Craig, B. G.; Parsons, G. H.

    1984-08-01

    There are two basic approaches to suppression of sympathetic detonation. Minimizing the shock sensitivity of the explosive to long duration pressure will obviously reduce interround separation distances. However, given that the explosive sensitivity is fixed, then much can be gained through the use of simple barriers placed between the rounds. Researchers devised calculational methods for predicting shock transmission; experimental methods have been developed to characterize explosive shock sensitivity and observe the response of acceptors to barriers. It was shown that both EAK and tritonal can be initiated to detonation with relatively low pressure shocks of long durations. It was also shown that to be an effective barrier between the donor and acceptor, the material must attenuate shock and defect fragments. Future actions will concentrate on refining the design of barriers to minimize weight, volume, and cost.

  19. The use of appetite suppressants among health sciences undergraduate students in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, Carlos; Lazzaretti, Rubia

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of appetite suppressant use among health sciences students in Southern Brazil. Undergraduate students (n=300) from seven health science undergraduate courses of the Universidade de Caxias do Sul completed a questionnaire about the use of substances to suppress appetite. A significant percentage (15%; n=45) of research participants used appetite suppressants at least once in their lives. The most commonly used substances were sympathomimetic stimulant drugs (5%), including amfepramone (3.3%) and fenproporex (1.7%). The lifetime use of appetite suppressants was more prevalent among Nursing (26.7%) and Nutrition (24.4%%) students. There was no reported use of appetite suppressants among medical students. The use of appetite suppressants was significantly more prevalent among women. The majority of those who used these substances did so under medical recommendation. Most of users took appetite suppressants for more than 3 months. Lifetime use of appetite suppressants was substantial, being sympathomimetic stimulant drugs the most commonly used agents. Students enrolled in Nursing and Nutrition courses presented a significantly higher prevalence of lifetime use of appetite suppressants.

  20. Saturation of Backward Stimulated Scattering of a Laser Beam in the Kinetic Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Rose, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) are examined in the kinetic regime using particle-in-cell simulations. Wave front bowing of electron-plasma waves (ion-acoustic waves) from trapped particle nonlinear frequency shift is observed in the SRS (SBS) regime for the first time. Self-focusing from trapped particle modulational instability (TPMI) is shown to occur in 2D and 3D SRS simulations. The key physics of SRS saturation is identified as a combination of wave front bowing, TPMI, and self-focusing: Bowing marks the beginning of SRS saturation and self-focusing terminates SRS. Ion-acoustic wave bowing also contributes to SBS saturation. Velocity diffusion by transverse modes and rapid loss of hot electrons in regions of small transverse extent formed from self-focusing dissipate wave energy and increase Landau damping, despite trapping that reduces Landau damping initially

  1. Bioelectrical activity of limb muscles during cold shivering of stimulation of the vestibular apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of caloric and electric stimulation of the vestibular receptors on the EMG activity of limb muslces in anesthetized cats during cold induced shivering involved flexor muscles alone. Both types of stimulation suppressed bioelectrical activity more effectively in the ipsilateral muscles. The suppression of shivering activity seems to be due to the increased inhibitory effect of descending labyrinth pathways on the function of flexor motoneurons.

  2. TMS suppression of right pars triangularis, but not pars opercularis, improves naming in aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Theoret, Hugo; Kobayashi, Masahito; Fregni, Felipe; Nicholas, Marjorie; Tormos, Jose M.; Steven, Megan S.; Baker, Errol H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to discover if an optimum 1 cm2 area in the non-damaged right hemisphere (RH) was present, which could temporarily improve naming in chronic, nonfluent aphasia patients when suppressed with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Ten minutes of slow, 1 Hz rTMS was applied to suppress different RH ROIs in eight aphasia cases. Picture naming and response time (RT) were examined before, and immediately after rTMS. In aphasia patients, suppression of right pars triangularis (PTr) led to significant increase in pictures named, and significant decrease in RT. Suppression of right pars opercularis (POp), however, led to significant increase in RT, but no change in number of pictures named. Eight normals named all pictures correctly; similar to aphasia patients, RT significantly decreased following rTMS to suppress right PTr, versus right POp. Differential effects following suppression of right PTr versus right POp suggest different functional roles for these regions. PMID:21864891

  3. WaterControl: self-diffusion based solvent signal suppression enhanced by selective inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Torres, Allan M; Price, William S

    2017-05-01

    Selective inversion/excitation based solvent signal suppression techniques are widely used in various NMR experiments because of their high efficiency and general applicability. However, these techniques generate a 'null'/suppression region containing (non-quantitatively) degraded solvent and desired resonances because of their reliance on the rejection of the coherence transfer pathway corresponding to all the resonances within the suppression region. To address this issue, the WaterControl technique was developed by inserting a (pulsed gradient - selective inversion pulse - pulsed gradient) unit into each 'transverse' period of a standard stimulated echo pulse sequence so that the coherence transfer pathways corresponding to both the suppression and non-suppression regions can be selected in one transient. The new sequence affords a diffusion based and quantifiable solvent signal suppression with no or minimal loss of features of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  5. Modulation of Hippocampal Activity by Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Freely Moving Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, L.E.; Wadman, W.J.; van Mierlo, P.; Delbeke, J.; Grimonprez, A.; Van Nieuwenhuyse, B.; Portelli, J.; Boon, P; Vonck, K.; Raedt, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) has seizure-suppressing effects but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying VNS-induced seizure suppression at a neurophysiological level, the present study examined effects of VNS on hippocampal

  6. Irreducible Brillouin conditions and contracted Schrödinger equations for n-electron systems. IV. Perturbative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzelnigg, Werner; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2004-04-01

    The k-particle irreducible Brillouin conditions IBCk and the k-particle irreducible contracted Schrödinger equations ICSEk for a closed-shell state are analyzed in terms of a Møller-Plesset-type perturbation expansion. The zeroth order is Hartree-Fock. From the IBC2(1), i.e., from the two-particle IBC to first order in the perturbation parameter μ, one gets the leading correction λ2(1) to the two-particle cumulant λ2 correctly. However, in order to construct the second-order energy E2, one also needs the second-order diagonal correction γD(2) to the one-particle density matrix γ. This can be obtained: (i) from the idempotency of the n-particle density matrix, i.e., essentially from the requirement of n-representability; (ii) from the ICSE1(2); or (iii) by means of perturbation theory via a unitary transformation in Fock space. Method (ii) is very unsatisfactory, because one must first solve the ICSE3(2) to get λ3(2), which is needed in the ICSE2(2) to get λ2(2), which, in turn, is needed in the ICSE1(2) to get γ(2). Generally the (k+1)-particle approximation is needed to obtain Ek correctly. One gains something, if one replaces the standard hierarchy, in which one solves the ICSEk, ignoring λk+1 and λk+2, by a renormalized hierarchy, in which only λk+2 is ignored, and λk+1 is expressed in terms of the λp of lower particle rank via the partial trace relation for λk+2. Then the k-particle approximation is needed to obtain Ek correctly. This is still poorer than coupled-cluster theory, where the k-particle approximation yields Ek+1. We also study the possibility to use some simple necessary n-representability conditions, based on the non-negativity of γ(2) and two related matrices, in order to get estimates for γD(2) in terms of λ2(1). In general these estimates are rather weak, but they can become close to the best possible bounds in special situations characterized by a very sparse structure of λ2 in terms of a localized representation. The

  7. Wirelessly powered stimulator and recorder for neuronal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sudip; Sharma, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is widely adopted in neuro-engineering to partially alleviate diseased functions in the brain, retina and cochlea. We present a 32-channel wirelessly powered constant current stimulator and low power recording amplifier for FES based applications. The biphasic stimulator utilizes innovative techniques for matched positive/ negative currents and thus improves charge balance. Electrode discharging scheme is added for stimulation artifact suppression. An improved low power amplifier is incorporated for evoked response measurements. Electrical performance is characterized using simulated electrode-electrolyte impedance. Closed-loop stimulation and recording experiments have been performed. Stimulation current magnitudes of 2 μA-200 μA and up to 400 Hz rate have been realized. Theory and limitation of discharging scheme is explored while suppressing artifacts down to 3 ms. Alternate anodic-first and cathodic-first stimulation pulses are adopted for enhanced charge balancing. The low power amplifier exhibits gain of 1200 and bandwidth 350 Hz-1.02 KHz. A multiplexer/ demultiplexer is used to share the front-end among 32 electrodes. The inductively coupled wireless energy harvester works at 125 KHz-135 KHz that can remotely deliver 1.4 mW at 1cm distance to an equivalent of 10K load. The system can accommodate multielectrodes with impedance up to 100 K Ω. The entire hybrid analog-digital system consumes 360 μW quiescent power. Miniaturization makes it suitable for in-vivo applications.

  8. Brillouin spectroscopy study of the radiation resistance of ferroelectric copolymer filled with Al2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabah, Sawsen; Vincent, Brice; Chaabi, Abdelhafid; Rouxel, Didier; Girard, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid nanocomposite materials based on oxide nanoparticles incorporated in polymer matrix have been extensively studied in the last two decades. The purpose of the investigation was to study the ability of these materials to withstand radiation environments such as those encountered in nuclear power plants. Two nanocomposite polymers have been developed and characterized. They are based on a P(VDF-TrFE) matrix filled with either ZnO nanoparticles or Al2O3 nanoparticles. All nanocomposites were irradiated with two different types of particles (neutron and X-rays). For such materials, Brillouin spectroscopy can provide information on both elastic and elasto-optic variation with the radiation dose. This research points out that this technique also provides a good diagnostic of chemical and structural modifications induced by radiations.

  9. Surface Brillouin scattering measurement of the elastic constants of single crystal InAs{sub 0.91}Sb{sub 0.09}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotane, L M; Comins, J D; Every, A G [Materials Physics Research Institute, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Botha, J R, E-mail: Lesias.Kotane@wits.ac.z [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2011-01-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering of light has been used to measure the angular dependence of the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), pseudo surface acoustic wave (PSAW) and longitudinal lateral wave (LLW) speeds in a (100)-oriented single crystal of the ternary semiconductor alloy InAs{sub 0.91}Sb{sub 0.09}. The wave speed measurements have been used to determine the room temperature values of the elastic constants C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44} of the alloy. A simple and robust fitting procedure has been implemented for recovering the elastic constants, in which the merit function is constructed from explicit secular functions that determine the surface and lateral wave speeds in the [001] and [011] crystallographic directions. In the fitting, relatively larger weighting factors have been assigned to the SAW and PSAW data because of the greater precision with which the surface modes can be measured as compared with the lateral wave.

  10. Surface Brillouin scattering measurement of the elastic constants of single crystal InAs0.91Sb0.09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotane, L M; Comins, J D; Every, A G; Botha, J R

    2011-01-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering of light has been used to measure the angular dependence of the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), pseudo surface acoustic wave (PSAW) and longitudinal lateral wave (LLW) speeds in a (100)-oriented single crystal of the ternary semiconductor alloy InAs 0.91 Sb 0.09 . The wave speed measurements have been used to determine the room temperature values of the elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 of the alloy. A simple and robust fitting procedure has been implemented for recovering the elastic constants, in which the merit function is constructed from explicit secular functions that determine the surface and lateral wave speeds in the [001] and [011] crystallographic directions. In the fitting, relatively larger weighting factors have been assigned to the SAW and PSAW data because of the greater precision with which the surface modes can be measured as compared with the lateral wave.

  11. Implementation of the multireference Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee’s coupled cluster methods with non-iterative triple excitations utilizing reference-level parallelism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Brabec, Jiri; Apra, Edoardo; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Pittner, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-09-07

    In this paper we discuss the performance of the non-iterative State-Specific Mul- tireference Coupled Cluster (SS-MRCC) methods accounting for the effect of triply excited cluster amplitudes. The corrections to the Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee MRCC models based on the manifold of singly and doubly excited cluster amplitudes (BW-MRCCSD and Mk-MRCCSD, respectively) are tested and compared with the exact full configuration interaction results (FCI) for small systems (H2O, N2, and Be3). For larger systems (naphthyne isomers and -carotene), the non-iterative BW-MRCCSD(T) and Mk-MRCCSD(T) methods are compared against the results obtained with the single reference coupled cluster methods. We also report on the parallel performance of the non-iterative implementations based on the use of pro- cessor groups.

  12. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unusual features of long-range density fluctuations in glass-forming organic liquids: A Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Brillouin light scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkowski, A.; Fischer, E. W.; Steffen, W.; Glaser, H.; Baumann, M.; Ruths, T.; Meier, G.

    2001-01-01

    A new feature of glass-forming liquids, i.e., long-range density fluctuations of the order of 100 nm, has been extensively characterized by means of static light scattering, photon correlation spectroscopy and Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy in orthoterphenyl (OTP) and 1,1-di(4 # prime#-methoxy-5 # prime#methyl-phenyl)-cyclohexane (BMMPC). These long-range density fluctuations result in the following unusual features observed in a light scattering experiment, which are not described by the existing theories: (i) strong q-dependent isotropic excess Rayleigh intensity, (ii) additional slow component in the polarized photon correlation function, and (iii) high Landau-Placzek ratio. These unusual features are equilibrium properties of the glass-forming liquids and depend only on temperature, provided that the sample has been equilibrated long enough. The temperature-dependent equilibration times were measured for BMMPC and are about 11 orders of magnitude longer than the α process. It was found that the glass-forming liquid OTP may occur in two states: with and without long-range density fluctuations ('clusters'). We have characterized the two states by static and dynamic light scattering in the temperature range from T g to T g +200 K. The relaxation times of the α process as well as the parameters of the Brillouin line are identical in both OTP with and without clusters. The α process (density fluctuations) in OTP was characterized by measuring either the polarized (VV) or depolarized (VH) correlation function, which are practically identical and q-independent. This feature, which is commonly observed in glass-forming liquids, is not fully explained by the existing theories

  14. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  15. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  16. Improved attractants for enhancing tsetse fly suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    that previously were difficult to monitor. - The combination of some plant volatiles with new and standard host odours constitute attractant odour blends for several tsetse species for which previously no odour attractants were known. - The novel hydrocarbons identified and characterized from several tsetse species specifically influence (stimulate or inhibit) the sexual behaviour of tsetse males and offer useful tools in rearing/control operations. An incorporation of specific operational research with identified host and habitat odour blends for Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, G. palpalis gambiensis and G. swynnertoni should be considered as part of ongoing tsetse intervention projects that are supported by IAEA-TC and other partners. Thus the findings under this CRP can be refined for large scale field application and eventually benefit integrated tsetse intervention campaigns through availability of improved standard tools for fly population monitoring, for tsetse suppression operations and for the establishment of (temporary) barrier systems

  17. Thyroid suppression test with dextrothyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Fridman, J.; Ribeiro, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    The classic thyroid suppression test with triiodothyronine (l-T 3 ) has been shown to be efficient as an auxiliary method in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases, but should not be performed on elderly patients or on those with heart disease or a tendency to tachycardia. Since these subjects seem able to support a short period of dextro-thyronine (d-T 4 ) feeding, we compared the effect of d-T 4 and l-T 3 on the 24 hours thyroid uptake in euthyroid and hyperthyroid subjects. After basal radio-iodine uptake determination, 99 patients without hyperthyroidism and 27 with Graves' disease were randomly divided in 2 groups; one received 100μg of l-T 3 per day and the other 4 mg of d-T 4 per day, both groups being treated for a period of 10 days. At the end of this suppression period the 24 hours radio-iodine uptake was measured again and the percentual suppression index (S.I.) calculated. Since the comparison of the two groups showed no difference between the suppressive effect of l-T 3 and d-T 4 in euthyroid subjects, while dextro-thyronine, as levo-triiodothyronine, did not suppress the 24 hours uptake of hyperthyroid patients, l-T 3 or d-T 4 can be used interchangeably to test thyroid suppressibility. In the euthyroid subjects the normal range for the post-suppression uptake was 0-17.1% and for the suppression index 54,7.100% [pt

  18. In vivo Treg suppression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Creg J; Collison, Lauren W; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R; Rehg, Jerold E; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of T(regs) upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model including resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  19. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  20. Optically stimulated luminesence dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiujiang; Zhu Lei; Zhu Lei; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Chen Zhaoyang; Fan Yanwei; Ba Weizhen; Cong Xiuyun; Tang Xinqiang; Guo Qi; Lu Wu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the principle and makeup of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter is described, and a measurement for radiation is carried, some actual problem is discussed. The dosimeter has high sensitive and can be reseted in-flight by stimulated light. (authors)

  1. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  2. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Noble, Steven A; Munro, Bridget; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H-) reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation ( CONTROL + STIM ), sprints with sensory stimulation ( SPRINT + STIM ) and sprints without stimulation ( SPRINT ). Seven participants also performed a fourth session ( CONTROL ), which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM , participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM , participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output, compared

  3. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. P. Pearcey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H- reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation (CONTROL + STIM, sprints with sensory stimulation (SPRINT + STIM and sprints without stimulation (SPRINT. Seven participants also performed a fourth session (CONTROL, which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM, participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM, participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output

  4. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormos, J M; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone, A

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) permits stimulation of the cerebral cortex in humans without requiring open access to the brain and is one of the newest tools available in neuroscience. There are two main types of application: single-pulse TMS and repetitive TMS. The magnetic stimulator is composed of a series of capacitors that store the voltage necessary to generate a stimulus of the sufficient intensity of generate an electric field in the stimulation coil. The safety of TMS is supported by the considerable experience derived from studies involving electrical stimulation of the cortex in animals and humans, and also specific studies on the safety of TMS in humans. In this article we review historical and technical aspects of TMS, describe its adverse effects and how to avoid them, summarize the applications of TMS in the investigation of different cerebral functions, and discuss the possibility of using TMS for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Kinetic inflation of stimulated Raman backscatter in regimes of high linear Landau damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, H.X.; Du Bois, D.F.; Bezzerides, B.

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic simulations and analysis show that backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in regimes of large linear Landau damping of the primary Langmuir wave, attains levels greatly exceeding the predictions of models based on fixed damping. These regimes are encountered in plasma conditions expected for target designs to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl, Inertial Confinement Fusion (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998)]. Trapped electrons in the Langmuir wave have the dual effect of reducing its damping, thereby enhancing the BSRS response, and saturating this response by phase detuning, a consequence of the trapping-induced, time-dependent, frequency shift. BSRS, then, occurs as a train of sub-picosecond pulses, arising from the competition between phase detuning and parametric regeneration. A simple three wave parametric model, including the effect of the nonlinear frequency shift and residual nonlinear damping, reproduces these essential features. A similar scenario applies to backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (BSBS). BSRS activity many orders of magnitude above noise level is found for intense laser speckles even when the primary Langmuir wave number times the Debye length is as high as 0.55. The simulation model consistently accounts for the competition of other instabilities, including BSBS, forward stimulated Raman scattering, and the Langmuir decay instability with cavitation

  6. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  7. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-01-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering with pump and Stokes beams is manifest in both the Raman loss of the pump beam and the Raman gain of the Stokes beam, and it has been used in various label-free bioimaging applications. Here, a three-beam stimulated Raman scattering that involves pump, Stokes, and depletion beams is considered, where two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are deliberately made to compete with each other. It is shown that the three-beam Raman scattering process can be described by coupled differential equations for the increased numbers of Stokes and depletion beam photons. From approximate solutions of the coupled differential equations and numerical calculation results, it is shown that a highly efficient suppression of the Stokes Raman gain is possible by using an intense depletion beam whose frequency difference from that of the pump beam is identical to another acceptor Raman mode frequency. I anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

  8. Role of frequency chirp and energy flow directionality in the strong coupling regime of brillouin-based plasma amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiaramello, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Riconda, C.; Weber, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 23 (2016), s. 1-5, č. článku 235003. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : stimulated scattering * Raman amplification * pulse generation * light-pulses Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 8.462, year: 2016

  9. Stimulant-induced trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalian, Gareen; Citrome, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    A prior report described the presentation of cocaine-induced trichotillomania, which resolved with the cessation of cocaine use. Here the authors describe the case of stimulant-induced trichotillomania that resolved with the discontinuation of stimulants and initiation of olanzapine. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported adult case of stimulant-induced trichotillomania. The case is of a patient with a previous diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder whose symptoms of trichotillomania coincide with abuse of amphetamine and with the resolution of symptoms in the absence of amphetamine use. Given the increase in exposure of prescription amphetamines among adults, further study into the association between stimulants and adverse events such as trichotillomania is needed.

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  11. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  12. Resonance suppression from color reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, R.; Chinellato, D. D.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Takahashi, J.; Torrieri, G.; Markert, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present studies that show how multi-parton interaction and color reconnection affect the hadro-chemistry in proton-proton (pp) collisions with special focus on the production of resonances using the pythia8 event generator. We find that color reconnection suppresses the relative production of meson resonances such as ρ0 and K* , providing an alternative explanation for the K*/K decrease observed in proton-proton collisions as a function of multiplicity by the ALICE collaboration. Detailed studies of the underlying mechanism causing meson resonance suppression indicate that color reconnection leads to shorter, less energetic strings whose fragmentation is less likely to produce more massive hadrons for a given quark content, therefore reducing ratios such as K*/K and ρ0/π in high-multiplicity pp collisions. In addition, we have also studied the effects of allowing string junctions to form and found that these may also contribute to resonance suppression.

  13. Teaching to suppress Polglish processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dziubalska-Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Balas, Anna; Schwartz, Geoffrey; Rojczyk, Arkadiusz; Wrembel, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Advanced second language (henceforth L2) learners in a formal setting can suppress many first language (henceforth L1) processes in L2 pronunciation when provided with sufficient exposure to L2 and meta competence (see Sect. 4 for a definition of this term). This paper shows how imitation in L2 teaching can be enhanced on the basis of current phonetic research and how complex allophonic processes such as nasal vocalization and glottal stop insertion can be suppressed using “repair”—a method o...

  14. Cooperative Immune Suppression by Escherichia coli and Shigella Effector Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maarten F; Alto, Neal M

    2018-04-01

    The enteric attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and the invasive pathogens enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and Shigella encode type III secretion systems (T3SS) used to inject effector proteins into human host cells during infection. Among these are a group of effectors required for NF-κB-mediated host immune evasion. Recent studies have identified several effector proteins from A/E pathogens and EIEC/ Shigella that are involved in suppression of NF-κB and have uncovered their cellular and molecular functions. A novel mechanism among these effectors from both groups of pathogens is to coordinate effector function during infection. This cooperativity among effector proteins explains how bacterial pathogens are able to effectively suppress innate immune defense mechanisms in response to diverse classes of immune receptor signaling complexes (RSCs) stimulated during infection. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  16. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  17. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung: Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Nonlinear gain suppression in semiconductor lasers due to carrier heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatzen, M.; Uskov, A.; Moerk, J.; Olesen, H.; Tromborg, B.; Jauho, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    We present a simple model for carrier heating in semiconductor lasers, from which the temperature dynamics of the electron and hole distributions can be calculated. Analytical expressions for two new contributions to the nonlinear gain coefficient ε are derived, which reflect carrier heating due to stimulated emission and free carrier absorption. In typical cases, carrier heating and spectral holeburning are found to give comparable contributions to nonlinear gain suppression. The results are in good agreement with recent measurements on InGaAsP laser diodes. (orig.)

  19. Simultaneous convection compensation and solvent suppression in biomolecular NMR diffusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2009-11-01

    Thermal convection and high intensity solvent resonances can significantly hamper diffusion estimates in pulsed gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion experiments on biomolecule samples. To overcome these two problems, a new double functional NMR diffusion sequence, double echo PGSTE-WATERGATE, is presented. The new sequence provides excellent convection compensation and solvent suppression (with a suppression factor in excess of at least 10(5) in a single scan) in biomolecular NMR diffusion experiments. Due to its stimulated echo nature, the new sequence is much less susceptible to spin-spin relaxation than Hahn spin-echo based sequences. Furthermore, the new sequence is not susceptible to spin diffusion due to the application of bipolar pulsed gradients. The new sequence is also much easier to set up compared to previously developed stimulated echo based convection compensation and solvent suppression sequence. The utility of the new sequence is demonstrated on an aqueous lysozyme sample.

  20. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4 + T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4 + T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  1. Micro-focused Brillouin light scattering study of the magnetization dynamics driven by Spin Hall effect in a transversely magnetized NiFe nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madami, M., E-mail: marco.madami@fisica.unipg.it; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM), Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Moriyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Siracusano, G.; Finocchio, G. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); Carpentieri, M. [Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Politecnico of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We employed micro-focused Brillouin light scattering to study the amplification of the thermal spin wave eigenmodes by means of a pure spin current, generated by the spin-Hall effect, in a transversely magnetized Pt(4 nm)/NiFe(4 nm)/SiO{sub 2}(5 nm) layered nanowire with lateral dimensions 500 × 2750 nm{sup 2}. The frequency and the cross section of both the center (fundamental) and the edge spin wave modes have been measured as a function of the intensity of the injected dc electric current. The frequency of both modes exhibits a clear redshift while their cross section is greatly enhanced on increasing the intensity of the injected dc. A threshold-like behavior is observed for a value of the injected dc of 2.8 mA. Interestingly, an additional mode, localized in the central part of the nanowire, appears at higher frequency on increasing the intensity of the injected dc above the threshold value. Micromagnetic simulations were used to quantitatively reproduce the experimental results and to investigate the complex non-linear dynamics induced by the spin-Hall effect, including the modification of the spatial profile of the spin wave modes and the appearance of the extra mode above the threshold.

  2. Development of low-temperature and high-pressure Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and its application to the solid I form of hydrogen sulphide

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, S; Sasaki, S; Kume, T; Shimizu, H

    2002-01-01

    A new experimental system has been developed for low-temperature and high-pressure Brillouin scattering measurements. The new system allows us to investigate the elastic properties of samples in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) down to liquid N sub 2 temperature (approx 80 K). In contrast to the case in our conventional technique, the optics in the system can be rotated for measuring the direction dependence of acoustic velocities of the samples in the DAC fixed in the cryostat. The new experimental technique was applied to the solid I form of hydrogen sulphide (H sub 2 S). As a result, three ratios of elastic constants to density were successfully determined at P = 3.70 GPa, T = 240 K: C sub 1 sub 1 /rho = 16.4, C sub 1 sub 2 /rho = 12.4, C sub 4 sub 4 /rho = 7.57 x 10 sup 6 m sup 2 s sup - sup 2. These values are almost the same as those obtained at room temperature.

  3. Dependence of Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction on Layer Thicknesses in Ta /Co -Fe -B /TaOx Heterostructures from Brillouin Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Avinash Kumar; Choudhury, Samiran; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan

    2018-01-01

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI) has recently drawn extensive research interest due to its fundamental role in stabilizing chiral spin textures in ultrathin ferromagnets, which are suitable candidates for future magnetic-memory devices. Here, we explore the ferromagnetic and heavy-metal layer-thickness dependence of IDMI in technologically important Ta /Co20Fe60B20/TaOx heterostructures by measuring nonreciprocity in spin-wave frequency using the Brillouin light-scattering technique. The observed value of the IDMI constant agrees with that obtained from a separate measurement of in-plane angular dependence of frequency nonreciprocity, which is also in good agreement with the theory predicted by Cortes-Ortuno and Landeros. Linear scaling behavior of IDMI with the inverse of Co-Fe-B thicknesses suggests that IDMI originates primarily from the interface in these heterostructures, whereas we observe a weak dependence of Ta thickness on the strength of IDMI. Importantly, the observed value of the IDMI constant is reasonably large by a factor of 3 compared to annealed Ta /Co -Fe -B /MgO heterostructures. We propose that the observation of large IDMI is likely due to the absence of boron diffusion towards the Ta /Co -Fe -B interface as the heterostructures are as deposited. Our detailed investigation opens up a route to designing thin-film heterostructures with the tailored IDMI constant for controlling Skyrmion-based magnetic-memory devices.

  4. Highly efficient and two-photon excited stimulated Rayleigh-Bragg scattering in organic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guang S., E-mail: gshe@buffalo.edu; Prasad, Paras N. [The Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States); Kannan, Ramamurthi; Tan, Loon-Seng [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RX, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7750 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The properties of backward stimulated Rayleigh-Bragg scattering (SRBS) in three highly two-photon active AF-chromophores solutions in tetrahydrofuran (THF) have been investigated using 816-nm and 8-ns pump laser beam. The nonlinear reflectivity R, spectral structure, temporal behavior, and phase-conjugation capability of the backward SRBS output have been measured, respectively. Under the same experimental condition, the pump threshold for SRBS in three solution samples can be significantly (∼one order of magnitude) lower than that for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in the pure solvent (THF). With the optimized concentration value and at a moderate pump energy (∼1.5 mJ) level, the measured nonlinear reflectivity was R ≥ 35% for the 2 cm-long solution sample, while for the SBS from a pure solvent sample of the same length was R ≈ 4.7%. The peculiar features of very low pump threshold, no spectral shift, tolerant pump spectral linewidth requirement (≤1 cm{sup −1}), and phase-conjugation capability are favorable for those nonlinear photonics applications, such as highly efficiency phase-conjugation reflectors for high-brightness laser oscillator/amplifier systems, special imaging through turbid medium, self-adaptive remote optical sensing, as well as for optical rangefinder and lidar systems.

  5. New York Canyon Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  6. Serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels in patients with suppressed pituitary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasavada, P.; Chen, I.; Maxon, H.; Barnes, E.; Sperling, M.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of borderline hyperthyroidism is difficult. A sensitive radioimmunoassay capable of detecting subnormal levels of serum TSH may be of value in confirming this diagnosis because of the suppressed pituitary function in this disease state. This sensitive assay may also be useful in monitoring the suppression of pituitary function in thyroid cancer patients receiving thyroid hormone therapy. A sensitive radioimmunoassay capable of detecting serum TSH levels as low as 0.25 μU/m1 with coefficients of variation less than 17.2% was used to measure serum TSH levels in 80 healthy subjects, 44 hyperthyroid patients, and 25 athyrotic thyroid cancer patients on daily suppressive doses of thyroxine. All healthy subjects had detectable TSH levels with a mean value of 1.17 and two standard deviation ranges of 0.41 - 2.70 μU/m1 (lognormal distribution). Although the mean +-1 SEM value of 0.63 +- 0.003 μUm1 for hyperthyroid patients and 0.76 +- 0.08 μU/ml for thyroid cancer patients were significantly lower than that of healthy subjects (t-test, p<0.05), subnormal levels of serum TSH were found in only 28.6% (12/42) and 24% (6/25) of hyperthyroid and thyroid cancer patients, respectively. TSH stimulation tests performed in 6 of the cancer patients all gave suppressed responses. Because of considerable overlap, serum TSH levels alone cannot distinguish hyperthyroidsm from euthyroidism. However, a sensitive TSH radioimmunoassay such as the one described here may be of value in evaluating the extent of pituitary suppression in thyroid cancer therapy

  7. Strangeness Suppression and Color Deconfinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satz, Helmut

    2018-02-01

    The relative multiplicities for hadron production in different high energy collisions are in general well described by an ideal gas of all hadronic resonances, except that under certain conditions, strange particle rates are systematically reduced. We show that the suppression factor γs, accounting for reduced strange particle rates in pp, pA and AA collisions at different collision energies, becomes a universal function when expressed in terms of the initial entropy density s0 or the initial temperature T of the produced thermal medium. It is found that γs increases from about 0.5 to 1.0 in a narrow temperature range around the quark-hadron transition temperature Tc ≃ 160 MeV. Strangeness suppression thus disappears with the onset of color deconfinement; subsequently, full equilibrium resonance gas behavior is attained.

  8. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  9. Suppressing Quantum Fluctuations in Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Vikman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We study vacuum quantum fluctuations of simple Nambu-Goldstone bosons - derivatively coupled single scalar-field theories possessing shift-symmetry in field space. We argue that quantum fluctuations of the interacting field can be drastically suppressed with respect to the free-field case. Moreover, the power-spectrum of these fluctuations can soften to become red for sufficiently small scales. In quasiclassical approximation, we demonstrate that this suppression can only occur for those theories that admit such classical static backgrounds around which small perturbations propagate faster than light. Thus a quasiclassical softening of quantum fluctuations is only possible for theories which classicalize instead of having a usual Lorentz invariant and local Wilsonian UV- completion. We illustrate our analysis by estimating the quantum fluctuations for the DBI-like theories.

  10. Orexin-A suppresses the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone via beta-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irahara, M; Tamura, T; Matuzaki, T; Saito, S; Yasui, T; Yamano, S; Kamada, M; Aono, T

    2001-02-16

    Orexins, the novel hypothalamic neuropeptides that stimulate feeding behavior, have been shown to suppress the pulsatile secretion of LH in ovariectomized rats. However, the mechanism of this action is still not clear. We examined the effect of naloxone, a specific opioid antagonist, on the suppression of the pulsatile secretion of LH by orexins to determine whether beta-endorphin is involved in this suppressive effect. We administered orexins intracerebroventricularly and injected naloxone intravenously in ovariectomized rats, and we measured the serum LH concentration to analyze the pulsatile secretion. Administration of orexin-A significantly reduced the mean LH concentration and the pulse frequency, but coadministration of naloxone significantly restored the mean LH concentration and the pulse frequency. Administration of orexin-B also significantly reduced the mean LH concentration and the pulse frequency, and coadministration of naloxone did not restore them. These results indicate that orexin-A, but not orexin-B, suppresses GnRH secretion via beta-endorphin.

  11. stimulated BV2 Microglial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-26

    Mar 26, 2012 ... (PGE2) as well as their regulatory genes such as inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-. 2), in LPS-stimulated ... mediated NF-κB activity. Keywords: Myelophycus caespitosus, Nitric oxide, Prostaglandin E2, Nuclear factor-κB. ..... induced by hypoxia and endotoxin. J Immunol. 2000 ...

  12. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic recordings reveal tactile stimuli can suppress spontaneous activity of neurons in somatosensory cortex of awake and anesthetized primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Reed, Jamie L; Franca, Joao G; Jain, Neeraj; Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-04-01

    In somatosensory cortex, tactile stimulation within the neuronal receptive field (RF) typically evokes a transient excitatory response with or without postexcitatory inhibition. Here, we describe neuronal responses in which stimulation on the hand is followed by suppression of the ongoing discharge. With the use of 16-channel microelectrode arrays implanted in the hand representation of primary somatosensory cortex of New World monkeys and prosimian galagos, we recorded neuronal responses from single units and neuron clusters. In 66% of our sample, neuron activity tended to display suppression of firing when regions of skin outside of the excitatory RF were stimulated. In a small proportion of neurons, single-site indentations suppressed firing without initial increases in response to any of the tested sites on the hand. Latencies of suppressive responses to skin indentation (usually 12-34 ms) were similar to excitatory response latencies. The duration of inhibition varied across neurons. Although most observations were from anesthetized animals, we also found similar neuron response properties in one awake galago. Notably, suppression of ongoing neuronal activity did not require conditioning stimuli or multi-site stimulation. The suppressive effects were generally seen following single-site skin indentations outside of the neuron's minimal RF and typically on different digits and palm pads, which have not often been studied in this context. Overall, the characteristics of widespread suppressive or inhibitory response properties with and without initial facilitative or excitatory responses add to the growing evidence that neurons in primary somatosensory cortex provide essential processing for integrating sensory stimulation from across the hand. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Taxifolin suppresses rat and human testicular androgen biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Tian, Erpo; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaoheng; Zhu, Qiqi; Wang, Yiyan; Zhong, Ying; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2018-03-01

    Taxifolin is a flavonoid. It has been used as a chemopreventive agent and supplement. It may have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by suppressing androgen production in Leydig cells. The objective of the present study was to study the effects of taxifolin on androgen production of rat Leydig cells isolated from immature testis and some rat and human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat Leydig cells were incubated with 100μM taxifolin without (basal) or with 10ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and steroid enzyme substrates (20μM): 22R-hydroxychloesterol, pregnenolone, progesterone, and androstenedione. The medium concentrations of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL) and testosterone were measured. Taxifolin significantly suppressed basal, LH-stimulated, 8BR-stimulated, pregnenolone-mediated, and progesterone-mediated androgen production by Leydig cells. Further study demonstrated that taxifolin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase with IC 50 values of 14.55±0.013 and 16.75±0.011μM, respectively. Taxifolin also inhibited these two enzyme activities in human testis with IC 50 value of about 100μM. Taxifolin was a competitive inhibitor for these two enzymes when steroid substrates were used. In conclusion, taxifolin may have benefits for the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. In the suppression of regge cut contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, S.P.

    1975-07-01

    It is shown that contributions of reggeon-pomeron cuts are suppressed in amplitudes with opposite natural to the reggeon. This suppression grows logarithmically with energy. The suppression in the πP cut is, however, found to be weak. Consequence on conspiracy is discussed

  16. Secretoneurin suppresses cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Li; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Yuan, Guo-Lin; Zhao, Yi-Lin; Yu, Chao

    2018-03-05

    The neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN) plays protective roles in myocardial ischemia. In the present study, the effect of SN in cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. We observed that, in isoproterenol (ISO) treatment induced cardiac or cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, a marked increase in the expression of endogenous SN in mouse plasma, myocardium and primary-cultured cardiomyocytes occurs. In hypertrophic mice, the heart size, heart weight/body weight (HW/BW) ratio, cardiomyocyte size, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) expression were significantly higher than those in controls but were effectively suppressed by SN gene therapy. Similarly, the protective effects of SN were also observed in cultured cardiomyocytes following ISO treatment. SN significantly increased the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in parallel with the decrease in reactive oxygen species levels in cardiomyocytes. We observed that SN evoked the activation of all of the AMPK, P38/MAPK and ERK/MAPK pathways in cardiomyocytes, but pretreatment with only AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and ERK1/2/MAPK inhibitor (PD98059) counteracted the protective effects of SN against cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the suppressive effects of SN on oxidant stress in cardiomyocytes. These results indicated that endogenous SN is induced in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, and may play a protective role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that exogenous SN supplementation protects the cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO treatment through the activation of AMPK and ERK/MAPK pathways, thus upregulating antioxidants and suppressing oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acoustically segmented photonic crystal fiber for single-frequency high-power laser applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Craig; Dajani, Iyad

    2011-07-15

    The Brillouin gain characteristics of a Yb-doped polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber possessing a segmented acoustic profile are investigated using a pump-probe technique. The concentrations of fluorine, aluminum, and germanium in two regions of the core were selected, such that the corresponding Brillouin shifts were sufficiently separated to allow for the introduction of a temperature profile along the fiber for further stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression. By using a cutback technique to measure loss, we estimated the Brillouin gain coefficient to be 1.2×10(-11) m/W. Despite differences in the concentration levels of dopants between the two segments, there was no evidence of a development of an optical interface. When this fiber was utilized in a counterpumped amplifier configuration, close to 500 W of near-diffraction-limited single-frequency output was obtained. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Targeting Immune Regulatory Networks to Counteract Immune Suppression in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Camisaschi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The onset of cancer is unavoidably accompanied by suppression of antitumor immunity. This occurs through mechanisms ranging from the progressive accumulation of regulatory immune cells associated with chronic immune stimulation and inflammation, to the expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Some of them are being successfully exploited as therapeutic targets, with impressive clinical results achieved in patients, as in the case of immune checkpoint inhibitors. To limit immune attack, tumor cells exploit specific pathways to render the tumor microenvironment hostile for antitumor effector cells. Local acidification might, in fact, anergize activated T cells and facilitate the accumulation of immune suppressive cells. Moreover, the release of extracellular vesicles by tumor cells can condition distant immune sites contributing to the onset of systemic immune suppression. Understanding which mechanisms may be prevalent in specific cancers or disease stages, and identifying possible strategies to counterbalance would majorly contribute to improving clinical efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we intend to highlight these mechanisms, how they could be targeted and the tools that might be available in the near future to achieve this goal.

  19. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  20. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  1. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains...

  2. Grating stimulated echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubetsky, B.; Berman, P.R.; Sleator, T.

    1992-01-01

    A theory of a grating simulated echo (GTE) is developed. The GSE involves the sequential excitation of atoms by two counterpropagating traveling waves, a standing wave, and a third traveling wave. It is shown that the echo signal is very sensitive to small changes in atomic velocity, much more sensitive than the normal stimulated echo. Use of the GSE as a collisional probe or accelerometer is discussed

  3. Methanol suppression of trichloroethylene degradation by M. trichosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Eng, W.

    1990-01-01

    Biodegradation by methylotrophs has been considered a potential method for in situ remediation, but delivery of sufficient methane could be a problem. Since methanol could be delivered more readily into soil, the authors examined TCE degradation under methane (0.89 M), methanol (1.187 mM), and combined methane (0.89 mM) methanol (1.187 mM) stimulated treatments using M. trichosporium and mixed cultures JS and DT. Degradation of TCE was determined by the summation of radiolabeled CO 2 , water-soluble intermediates, and biomass transformed from 14 C TCE. M. trichosporium degraded 0.36 ± 2.08% (mean ± std dev) of the initial TCe (0.3 mg/l) with methanol stimulation, compared to 9.07 ± 1.04% with methane stimulation. JS and DT cultures degraded 4.34 ± 0.11% on methanol compared to 24.3 ± 1.38% and 34.3 ± 3.0% on methane, respectively. If methanol was added to methane-stimualted cultures, TCE degradation was reduced to 1.08 ± 1.74% for M. trichosporium, and 5.08 ± 0.56% for JS culture. Methanol retarded the rates of methane and oxygen utilization as well. However, methanol-stimulated cultures grew to a greater extent than methane-stimulated cultures with 14 mg/l TCE. Previous workers have shown that methanol suppresses methane monooxygenase, and they suggest this may explain the reduced amount of TCE degraded

  4. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  5. CD137 signaling suppresses the suppressive function of treg cells of peripheral blood from breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tian; Jiang Linhua; ZZhang Chi; Sun Xuewei; Ju Songguang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the biological effect of CD137 and its molecular mechanism on CD4 + CD25 + Treg cells. Methods: Anti-CD137 mAb was added to stimulate the T cells that isolated from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients and activated by PHA. T cell proliferation was determined by cell counting or by 3 H-TdR incorporation assessing at the 3rd. The phenotype of cells was determined by FACS, and Foxp3 analysis was performed after fixation and intracellular staining. Cytokine in the supernatant was quantified with ELISA. Results: CD137 expressed on CD4 + CD25 + Treg cells. Triggering CD137 signaling of CD4 + CD25 + Treg cells by anti-CD137 mAb could promote the proliferation of T cells form PBMCs of breast cancer patients and decrease the ratio of Foxp3 + Treg population and reduce Foxp3 expression of Treg cells, as well as the production of TGF-β1 and IL-10, and suppress the ability of Treg cells to inhibit proliferation of CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Conclusion: CD137 signaling could suppress the suppressive function of Treg cells, and CD137 might be a potential molecular target for the immunological interference. (authors)

  6. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, A.; Alekseichuk, I.; Bikson, M.

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...

  7. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1965-01-01

    In this paper some physiological and clinical aspects of paired stimulation are discussed. I) The augmenting effect of paired stimulation on rnyocardial contractility is due to potentiation (increase in speed of restitution) and fusion of two contractions. 2) While using paired stimulation the

  8. Novel Stimulation Paradigms with Temporally-Varying Parameters to Reduce Synchronous Activity at the Onset of High Frequency Stimulation in Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyan Cai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has shown wide applications for treating various disorders in the central nervous system by using high frequency stimulation (HFS sequences of electrical pulses. However, upon the onset of HFS sequences, the narrow pulses could induce synchronous firing of action potentials among large populations of neurons and cause a transient phase of “onset response” that is different from the subsequent steady state. To investigate the transient onset phase, the antidromically-evoked population spikes (APS were used as an electrophysiological marker to evaluate the synchronous neuronal reactions to axonal HFS in the hippocampal CA1 region of anesthetized rats. New stimulation paradigms with time-varying intensity and frequency were developed to suppress the “onset responses”. Results show that HFS paradigms with ramp-up intensity at the onset phase could suppress large APS potentials. In addition, an intensity ramp with a slower ramp-up rate or with a higher pulse frequency had greater suppression on APS amplitudes. Therefore, to reach a desired pulse intensity rapidly, a stimulation paradigm combining elevated frequency and ramp-up intensity was used to shorten the transition phase of initial HFS without evoking large APS potentials. The results of the study provide important clues for certain transient side effects of DBS and for development of new adaptive stimulation paradigms.

  9. Nuclear reactor scram suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Hisamitsu.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention suppresses reactor scram due to increase of neutrons caused by pressure elevation in the reactor even when a portion of main steam pipes is closed by some or other causes such as closure of a main steam isolation valve in a BWR type power plant. That is, when a flow channel is closed, such as upon closure of a main steam isolation valve, a flow rate signal sent from each of main steam flow rate detection means is inputted to a selective circuit of a pressure control device, from which a normal value is obtained. A deviation value for each of the main steam flow rate values is determined from the value described above and a flow rate average value obtained in an averaging circuit. Abnormality in the main steam pipelines is judged if a level for each of the deviation values is greater than a predetermined value. Further, the insertion of selective control rods and trip and run back instructions for recycling pumps are controlled by output signals of the deviation value detection circuit, to decrease the reactor power and prevent elevation in the reactor. As a result, reactor scram due to increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed. (I.S.)

  10. The Neurobiological Impact of Ghrelin Suppression after Oesophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor F. Murphy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, discovered in 1999, is a 28-amino-acid hormone, best recognized as a stimulator of growth hormone secretion, but with pleiotropic functions in the area of energy homeostasis, such as appetite stimulation and energy expenditure regulation. As the intrinsic ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R, ghrelin appears to have a broad array of effects, but its primary role is still an area of debate. Produced mainly from oxyntic glands in the stomach, but with a multitude of extra-metabolic roles, ghrelin is implicated in complex neurobiological processes. Comprehensive studies within the areas of obesity and metabolic surgery have clarified the mechanism of these operations. As a stimulator of growth hormone (GH, and an apparent inducer of positive energy balance, other areas of interest include its impact on carcinogenesis and tumour proliferation and its role in the cancer cachexia syndrome. This has led several authors to study the hormone in the cancer setting. Ghrelin levels are acutely reduced following an oesophagectomy, a primary treatment modality for oesophageal cancer. We sought to investigate the nature of this postoperative ghrelin suppression, and its neurobiological implications.

  11. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependant manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE 2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE 2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE 2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin

  12. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  13. Suppression of immune surveillance in melanoma [Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma by reversal of immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eiselein, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we develop the hypothesis that a significant fraction of patients with advanced melanoma can be successfully treated with immunotherapy. Reversal of antigen-specific immune suppression to melanoma polypeptide antigens is an essential, first step. We postulate the key regulation of CTL responses resides within the CD4+ T-lymphocytes and macrophage/dendritic cells. There is a pluri-potential cell within this regulatory arm that functions either as a Th1 cell or as a suppressor T-cell, Ths, depending on how antigen is presented. We have shown that poliovirus 1 Sabin will lyse human melanoma cells in tissue culture, and a special "vaccine" prepared from this lysis actively stimulates Ths cell function. The Ths arm of the regulatory system can be down-regulated with cyclophosphamide given 24 hours after the vaccine. The capacity to generate a CTL response is retained. The summary conclusion is that a phase 1 clinical trial in advanced melanoma using the special viral-tumor-lysate followed by cyclophosphamide, plus expanded autologous dendritic cells sensitized with the polypeptide epitopes captained in the viral-lysate will produce beneficial results.

  14. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  15. Safety system for pressure suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.E.; Ludwig, G.J.; Tulsa, O.

    1975-01-01

    The rupture disk with rated breaking points is constrained by two supporting elements and has a convex-concave shape. For pressure suppression, it is reversable inversely to its bulging. Its surface has notches which are the rated breaking points and respond to higher pressures. The centre of the rupture disk contains an area of relatively smaller thickness that will burst at lower pressure and thus makes it applicable for lower pressures. For the response of the rupture disk centre, a thrust ring with a central opening may also be used. Its edge is formed into a convex-concave section supported on the edge of the rupture disk on the exit side. The free centre of the rupture disk is then the area of relative weakness. (RW/AK) [de

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Bogard, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The use of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) for radiation dosimetry has become increasingly popular in recent years. The OSL method is based on luminescence emitted from semiconductor materials stimulated with specific wavelengths of light, after being exposed to ionizing radiation. The OSL intensity is a function of the radiation dose absorbed by the material. This work complements previous studies by the authors of the thermoluminescence (TL) response by SiO 2 commercial optical fiber exposed to ionizing radiation and provides preliminary results describing some of the material's OSL properties. Linear OSL response to beta radiation dose, along with a consistent shape of the photon emission curve with time, were observed using a green/blue OSL excitation laser. The reproducibility of OSL response after repeated irradiations and the change in intensity with time were also examined. The search and characterization of materials that exhibit this OSL response, in parallel with the continued development of OSL methodology and instrumentation, is an important scientific and commercial issue. (Author)

  17. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Osaka Hospital, 4-2-78 Fukushima, Fukushima Ward, Osaka City, Osaka 553-0003 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  18. A distributed current stimulator ASIC for high density neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong Hoan Park; Chaebin Kim; Seung-Hee Ahn; Tae Mok Gwon; Joonsoo Jeong; Sang Beom Jun; Sung June Kim

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel distributed neural stimulator scheme. Instead of a single stimulator ASIC in the package, multiple ASICs are embedded at each electrode site for stimulation with a high density electrode array. This distributed architecture enables the simplification of wiring between electrodes and stimulator ASIC that otherwise could become too complex as the number of electrode increases. The individual ASIC chip is designed to have a shared data bus that independently controls multiple stimulating channels. Therefore, the number of metal lines is determined by the distributed ASICs, not by the channel number. The function of current steering is also implemented within each ASIC in order to increase the effective number of channels via pseudo channel stimulation. Therefore, the chip area can be used more efficiently. The designed chip was fabricated with area of 0.3 mm2 using 0.18 μm BCDMOS process, and the bench-top test was also conducted to validate chip performance.

  19. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait......-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified...

  20. CO2 mediated interaction in yeast stimulates budding and growth on minimal media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V Volodyaev

    Full Text Available Here we show that carbon dioxide (CO2 stimulates budding and shortens the lag-period of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures, grown on specific weak media. CO2 can be both exogenous and secreted by another growing yeast culture. We also show that this effect can be observed only in the lag-period, and demonstrate minimal doses and duration of culture exposition to CO2. Opposite to the effects of CO2 sensitivity, previously shown for pathogens, where increased concentration of CO2 suppressed mitosis and stimulated cell differentiation and invasion, here it stimulates budding and culture growth.

  1. Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 promotes osteogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-ming; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Hua; Wei-Mao Wang; Chen, Ju-yu; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Jin-fang; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2014-03-10

    As a super-antigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) stimulates the release of massive inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) which are documented to implicate osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, SEC2 was found to significantly improve the osteoblast differentiation by up-regulating BMP2 and Runx2/Cbfa1 expression. Interferon (IFN)-inducible gene IFI16, a co-activator of Runx2/Cbfa1, was also activated by SEC2 in the osteoblast differentiation. In addition, exogenous introduction of SEC2 stimulated OPG expression and suppressed RANKL, suggesting suppression of osteoclastogenesis in hMSCs. Therefore, our results displayed that SEC2 plays an important role in the commitment of MSC to the osteoblast and it might be a potential new therapeutic candidate for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Novel In Vitro System for Comparative Analyses of Bone Cells and Bacteria under Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Josef Dauben

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation is a promising approach to enhance bone regeneration while having potential to inhibit bacterial growth. To investigate effects of alternating electric field stimulation on both human osteoblasts and bacteria, a novel in vitro system was designed. Electric field distribution was simulated numerically and proved by experimental validation. Cells were stimulated on Ti6Al4V electrodes and in short distance to electrodes. Bacterial growth was enumerated in supernatant and on the electrode surface and biofilm formation was quantified. Electrical stimulation modulated gene expression of osteoblastic differentiation markers in a voltage-dependent manner, resulting in significantly enhanced osteocalcin mRNA synthesis rate on electrodes after stimulation with 1.4VRMS. While collagen type I synthesis increased when stimulated with 0.2VRMS, it decreased after stimulation with 1.4VRMS. Only slight and infrequent influence on bacterial growth was observed following stimulations with 0.2VRMS and 1.4VRMS after 48 and 72 h, respectively. In summary this novel test system is applicable for extended in vitro studies concerning definition of appropriate stimulation parameters for bone cell growth and differentiation, bacterial growth suppression, and investigation of general effects of electrical stimulation.

  3. Effect of the human follicle-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-binding inhibitor (FSHBI), purified by our laboratory from human ovarian follicular fluid, has been shown to suppress ovulation and induce follicular atresia/apoptosis in mice as well as impair fertility in marmosets, the new world monkeys. The octapeptide, a peptide corresponding to ...

  4. Taste matters-effects of bypassing oral stimulation on hormone and appetite responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetter, M.S.; Mars, M.; Viergever, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between oral and gastric signals is an important part of food intake regulation. Previous studies suggest that bypassing oral stimulation diminishes the suppression of hunger and increases gastric emptying rate. However, the role of appetite hormones, like cholecystokinin-8 and

  5. Acute urodynamic effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with MS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjorback, M.V.; Rey, F. van; Pal, F. van der; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.; Petersen, T.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve could suppress detrusor contractions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. METHODS: Two successive slow-fill cystometries (16 ml/min) were

  6. PROLONGED ELECTRO-RETINAL RESPONSE SUPPRESSION (PERRS) IN PATIENTS WITH STATIONARY SUBNORMAL VISUAL-ACUITY AND PHOTOPHOBIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOIJMAN, AC; HOUTMAN, A; DAMHOF, A; VANENGELEN, JPM

    1991-01-01

    Neural adaptation to light stimulation in the dark-adapted retina can be demonstrated by double-flash electroretinography. The first flash is a conditioning flash, the second flash is the test flash. Interstimulus intervals are in the range of 0.2 to 30 seconds. Suppression of the response to the

  7. Distributed stimulation increases force elicited with functional electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmire, Alie J.; Lockwood, Danielle R.; Doane, Cynthia J.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. The maximum muscle forces that can be evoked using functional electrical stimulation (FES) are relatively modest. The reason for this weakness is not fully understood but could be partly related to the widespread distribution of motor nerve branches within muscle. As such, a single stimulating electrode (as is conventionally used) may be incapable of activating the entire array of motor axons supplying a muscle. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether stimulating a muscle with more than one source of current could boost force above that achievable with a single source. Approach. We compared the maximum isometric forces that could be evoked in the anterior deltoid of anesthetized monkeys using one or two intramuscular electrodes. We also evaluated whether temporally interleaved stimulation between two electrodes might reduce fatigue during prolonged activity compared to synchronized stimulation through two electrodes. Main results. We found that dual electrode stimulation consistently produced greater force (~50% greater on average) than maximal stimulation with single electrodes. No differences, however, were found in the fatigue responses using interleaved versus synchronized stimulation. Significance. It seems reasonable to consider using multi-electrode stimulation to augment the force-generating capacity of muscles and thereby increase the utility of FES systems.

  8. Brain stimulation for intractable epilepsy: Anterior thalamus and responsive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhor Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite medications, resective surgery, and vagal nerve stimulation, some patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. In these patients, other approaches are urgently needed. The biological basis of stimulation of anterior thalamic nucleus and epileptogenic focus is presented. Results from two large randomized controlled trials Stimulation of Anterior Nucleus of Thalamus for Epilepsy (SANTE and Neuropace pivotal trial are discussed. Neuromodulation provides effective treatment for a select group of refractory epilepsy patients. Future investigations into the mechanism underlying ′response′ to brain stimulation are desired.

  9. Study of a non-ideal liquid mixture in the hydrodynamic regime. Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra, sound propagation and damping in the CH3CN-CCl4 system at the azeotropic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassi, Paola; D'Elia, Valerio; Cataliotti, Rosario Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour in the GHz frequency region has been analzsed for the non-ideal CH 3 CN-CCl 4 liquid mixture around the azeotropic composition. Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra have been measured as a function of temperature and composition, at fixed value of transferred wave vector in the 90 deg. scattering geometry, and also at different scattering angles to study dispersion with frequency of the spectral observables. These measurements have been complemented by those of refractive index, density and viscosity at the same temperatures and mole fraction values. Very interesting behaviour of the classic Brillouin spectral observables, such as the hypersonic propagation speeds and the acoustic absorption coefficients, has been revealed near the azeotropic composition of the mixture at the investigated temperatures, namely 15 deg. C, 25 deg. C, 40 deg. C and 60 deg. C. These effects have been interpreted at the light of the Mountain and Deutch theory of binary solutions and the forecast behaviour of the intermolecular forces around the azeotropic point composition of these very different molecular liquids

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  11. Suppression of two-photon resonantly enhanced nonlinear processes in extended media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.; Moore, M.A.; Payne, M.G.; Wunderlich, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    On the basis of combined experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear processes associated with two-photon excitations near 3d and 4d states in Na, we show how resonantly enhanced stimulated hyper-Raman emission, parametric four-wave mixing processes and total resonant two-photon absorption can become severely suppressed through the actions of internally generated fields on the total atomic response in extended media. 7 refs., 3 figs

  12. Engagement sensitive visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance.

  13. Reflectivity of stimulated back scattering in a homogeneous-slab medium in the case of negligible pump-wave damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, G.S.; Cho, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    As to the backscatter instability which is one of nonlinear three-wave resonant interactions, the reflectivity(r) in the case of homogeneous-slab medium is calculated, assuming all the three wavepackets negligible damping caused by medium. The expression has turned out such that r = tanh 2 KAsub(p)L, where K, Asub(p), and L are the constant coupling coefficient, the constant pump-wave amplitude, and the thickness of the medium engaged in the interaction each. When this result is interpreted in terms of the stimulated Brillouin back-scattering in a so-called underdense plasma in controlled fusion, we find the reflectivity twice as large as that by others in the limit of large pump-wave damping, and unfitting to former experiments in the independence on the incident laser-light intensity. We see the incompatibility rise chiefly from neglecting the damping of pump-wave in the plasma. In contrast to the former results by others in the limit of large pump-wave damping, our result might be regarded as that for cases of negligible pump-wave damping, in general stimulated back-scattering phenomena. (author)

  14. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  15. Motor stimulation with interferential currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Domenico, G G; Strauss, G R

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of motor nerves to produce muscle contraction in normally innervated muscles is a long established part of orthodox physiotherapy. Recently however, a revival of interest in the area has occurred, particularly in the U.S.A. Recent research has indicated that such stimulation can improve muscle strength, reduce muscle spasm and modulate spasticity, in addition to the more usual re-educative role of electrical stimulation. The concept of functional electrical stimulation (F.E.S.) seems destined to become an integral part of many programmes for the neurologically handicapped patient. This paper describes the technique of motor stimulation using interferential currents. The stimulating parameters and electrode placement are considered, along with a detailed explanation of the pre-modulated system of electrode arrangement. Copyright © 1985 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  16. 8-OH-DPAT suppresses vomiting in the cat elicited by motion, cisplatin or xylazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1989-01-01

    Vomiting was suppressed in cats pretreated with 8-OH-DPAT and then challenged with an emetic stimulus; motion, xylazine or cisplatin. The antiemetic effect is likely due to stimulation of postsynaptic serotonin-1A receptors. The most parsimonious explanation is that it acts at a convergent structure, presumably at or near the vomiting center. If so, 8-OH-DPAT may block emesis elicited by virtually any other stimulus. A supplementary experiment revealed that lorazepam suppressed motion sickness at a dose that produced ataxia, but did not suppress xylazine-induced emesis. These results do not support the possibility that the antiemetic effects of 8-OH-DPAT were the result of anxiolytic activity.

  17. Spironolactone induces apoptosis in human mononuclear cells. Association between apoptosis and cytokine suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Martin; Sønder, S U; Nersting, J

    2006-01-01

    Spironolactone (SPIR) has been described to suppress accumulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here, the suppression of TNF-alpha in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mononuclear cell cultures was confirmed. However, SPIR was also found to induce apoptosis, prompting the investigations...... of a possible association between the two effects: The apoptosis-inducing and the cytokine-suppressive effects of SPIR correlated with regard to the effective concentration range. Also, pre-incubation experiments demonstrated a temporal separation of the two effects of ... preceding apoptosis. An association between the two effects was also seen when testing several SPIR analogues. Contrary to TNF-alpha, the levels of IL-1beta increased in SPIR-treated cultures. However, the amount of IL-1beta in the supernatants depended upon the order of SPIR and LPS addition, as IL-1beta...

  18. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies

  19. Prestorage and bedside leucofiltration of whole blood modulates storage-time-dependent suppression of in vitro TNFalpha release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Hammer, J H; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    . Nine units of whole blood were leucofiltered prestorage and stored for 35 d. 27 units, 3 x 9, were stored and leucofiltered at the bedside after 7, 21 and 35 d. Supernatants were collected from all units during storage and added to a whole blood assay of E. coli-LPS-stimulated TNFalpha release....... The effects of storage were assessed and compared with supernatants collected immediately after donation as reference. TNFalpha release was storage time dependently suppressed to: 81%, 74% and 57% by supernatants from non-filtered blood stored for 7, 21 and 35 d, respectively. Prestorage leucofiltration...... almost eliminated this effect, but we still observed a storage-time-dependent suppression by bedside-leucofiltered blood to 88%, 78% and 65%, respectively. Prestorage leucofiltration appeared to reduce storage-time-dependent suppression of in vitro stimulated TNFalpha release induced by plasma from whole...

  20. Contribution of muscarinic M1 receptors to the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Shawnna G; Chapman, C Andrew

    2013-10-25

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to play roles in sensory and mnemonic function, and the cholinergic suppression of the strength of synaptic inputs is likely to have important impacts on these processes. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the medial entorhinal cortex evoked by stimulation of the piriform cortex are suppressed during theta EEG activity in behaving animals, and cholinergic receptor activation suppresses synaptic responses both in vivo, and in layer II entorhinal neurons in vitro. Here, we have used in vitro field potential recordings to investigate the transmitter receptors that mediate the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer I inputs to layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs with an EC50 of 5.3μM, and enhanced paired-pulse ratio. The M2/M4 preferring receptor blocker methoctramine, or the M4 receptor blocker PD102807, did not prevent the cholinergic suppression. However, the M1/M4 receptor blocker pirenzepine and the M1 receptor blocker VU0255035 reduced the suppression, suggesting that the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex is dependent in large part on activation of M1 receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus

  2. Immunosenescence, suppression and tumour progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, G; Koch, S; Griesemann, H; Rehbein, A; Hähnel, K; Gouttefangeas, C

    2006-08-01

    There are good arguments for suggesting that two seminal papers published 50 years ago can be taken as the beginning of modern tumour immunology. These papers by R. Baldwin, "Immunity to transplanted tumour: the effect of tumour extracts on the growth of homologous tumours in rats" and "Immunity to methylcholanthrene-induced tumours in inbred rats following atrophy and regression of the implanted tumours" (Br J Cancer 9:646-51 and 652-657, 1955) showed that once tumours are established, they and their products can be recognised by the adaptive immune system and rejected. However, the tumour normally co-evolves with immunity, like a parasite, rather than being suddenly introduced as in these, and many other, experimental models. Dynamics of this co-evolution are illustrated by findings that inflammation enhances tumorigenicity, yet is important to enable T cells to respond properly to tumour antigen and exert anti-tumour effects. The important thing is to maintain the balance between effective anti-tumour immunity and tumour escape and/or stimulatory mechanisms. Tumours almost always co-exist with immune defence systems over extended periods and interact chronically with T cells. The effect of this is potentially similar to other situations of chronic antigenic stress, particularly lifelong persistent virus infection, most strikingly, CMV infection. The questions briefly explored in this symposium paper are what happens when T lymphocyte clones are chronically stimulated by antigen which is not or cannot be eliminated? What are the similarities and differences between chronic antigenic stimulation by tumour antigen versus CMV antigen? What can we learn in one system which may illuminate the other?

  3. Pressure pain thresholds increase after preconditioning 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Tonya M; Witney, Alice G

    2014-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (ppain thresholds (ppain. This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia.

  4. Photoperiodic suppression of drug reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, B A; Stark, G; Sergeeva, A; Jansen, H T

    2011-03-10

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12 h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  5. DBS artifact suppression using a time-frequency domain filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Guzmán, Alina; Heute, Ulrich; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a useful tool for brain research. However, during Deep-Brain Stimulation (DBS), there are large artifacts that obscure the physiological EEG signals. In this paper, we aim at suppressing the DBS artifacts by means of a time-frequency-domain filter. As a pre-processing step, Empirical-Mode Decomposition (EMD) is applied to detrend the raw data. The detrended signals are then filtered iteratively until, by visual inspection, the quality is good enough for interpretation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by an application to a clinical DBS-EEG data set in resting state and in finger-tapping condition. Moreover, a comparison with a Low-Pass filter (LPF) is provided, by visual inspection and by a quantitative measure.

  6. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  7. Parenteral nutrition suppresses the bactericidal response of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Jiro; Pierre, Joseph F; Heneghan, Aaron F; Tsao, Francis H C; Sano, Yoshifumi; Jonker, Mark A; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) increases infectious risk in critically ill patients compared with enteral feeding. Previously, we demonstrated that PN feeding suppresses the concentration of the Paneth cell antimicrobial protein secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in the gut lumen. sPLA2 and other Paneth cell proteins are released in response to bacterial components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and they modulate the intestinal microbiome. Because the Paneth cell protein sPLA2 was suppressed with PN feeding, we hypothesized PN would diminish the responsiveness of the small bowel to LPS through reduced secretions and as a result exhibit less bactericidal activity. The distal ileum was harvested from Institute of Cancer Research mice, washed, and randomized for incubation with LPS (0, 1, or 10 μg/mL). Culture supernatant was collected and sPLA2 activity was measured. Bactericidal activity of the ileum segment secretions was assessed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with and without an sPLA2 inhibitor at 2 concentrations, 100 nmol/L and 1 μmol/L. Institute of Cancer Research mice were randomized to chow or PN for 5 days. Tissue was collected for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ileal segments were incubated with LPS (0 or 10 μg/mL). sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity were measured in secretions from ileal segments. Ileal segments responded to 10 μg/mL LPS with significantly greater sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity. The bactericidal activity of secretions from LPS stimulated tissue was suppressed 50% and 70%, respectively, with the addition of the sPLA2-inhibitor. Chow displayed greater sPLA2 in the Paneth cell granules and secreted higher levels of sPLA2 than PN before and after LPS. Accordingly, media collected from chow was more bactericidal than PN. IHC confirmed a reduction in Paneth cell granules after PN. This work demonstrates that ileal segments secrete bactericidal secretions after LPS exposure and the inhibition of the Paneth cell antimicrobial

  8. Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 accessory proteins that suppress beta interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Kenji; Gotoh, Bin

    2007-07-01

    The paramyxovirus P gene encodes accessory proteins antagonistic to interferon (IFN). Viral proteins responsible for the IFN antagonism, however, are distinct among paramyxoviruses. Here we determine bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV3) IFN antagonists that suppress IFN-beta production, and investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Of bPIV3 P gene products, C and V proteins were found to suppress double-stranded RNA-stimulated IFN-beta production. The V protein of bPIV3 and Sendai virus in the same genus Respirovirus significantly inhibits double-stranded RNA-stimulated IFN-beta production and the IFN-beta promoter activation enhanced by overexpression of MDA5 but not RIG-I, and yet does not suppress IFN-beta production induced by TRIF, TBK1, and IKKi. The V protein of both viruses specifically binds to MDA5 but not RIG-I. These results suggest that the V protein targets MDA5 for blockage of the IFN-beta gene activation signal. On the other hand, both bPIV3 and Sendai virus C proteins modestly inhibited IFN-beta production irrespective of a species of the signaling molecules used as an inducer. Interestingly, reporter gene expression driven by various promoters was also suppressed by the C proteins irrespective of the promoter species. These results demonstrate that the target of the respirovirus C protein is undoubtedly different from that of the V protein.

  9. Menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasi, I; Spitzer, R F; Allen, L M; Ornstein, M P

    2009-06-01

    The approach to menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities has evolved considerably over the years due to changing philosophies and evolving treatment options. We review the medical management options available for menstrual suppression with a focus on the needs and treatment of adolescents with developmental disabilities.

  10. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    and clinical options are available for the suppression of fertility in adult cats and the decision as to which should be chosen - independent of the legal registration of any state - depends on different facts: (i) feral or privately owned animal? (ii) temporary or permanent suppression of fertility wanted...

  11. Simulation analysis of a wildfire suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abílio Pereira Pacheco; João Claro; Tiago. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Rekindles and false alarms are unusually high in the Portuguese wildfire management system, representing a high burden on suppression resources in particular, and fire management resources in general. In 20,049 occurrences that the suppression system handled in the summer of 2010, 12.5% were false alarms and 15.0% were rekindles. We present a discreteevent simulation...

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists suppress water intake independent of effects on food intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Naomi J.; Kanoski, Scott E.; Hayes, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced by and released from the small intestine following ingestion of nutrients. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists applied peripherally or centrally decrease food intake and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These effects make the GLP-1 system an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In addition to these more frequently studied effects of GLP-1R stimulation, previous reports indicate that GLP-1R agonists suppress water intake. The present experiments were designed to provide greater temporal resolution and site specificity for the effect of GLP-1 and the long-acting GLP-1R agonists, exendin-4 and liraglutide, on unstimulated water intake when food was and was not available. All three GLP-1R ligands suppressed water intake after peripheral intraperitoneal administration, both in the presence of and the absence of food; however, the magnitude and time frame of water intake suppression varied by drug. GLP-1 had an immediate, but transient, hypodipsic effect when administered peripherally, whereas the water intake suppression by IP exendin-4 and liraglutide was much more persistent. Additionally, intracerebroventricular administration of GLP-1R agonists suppressed water intake when food was absent, but the suppression of intake showed modest differences depending on whether the drug was administered to the lateral or fourth ventricle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GLP-1 receptor agonists affecting unstimulated, overnight intake in the absence of food, the first test for antidipsogenic effects of hindbrain application of GLP-1 receptor agonists, and the first test of a central effect (forebrain or hindbrain) of liraglutide on water intake. Overall, these results show that GLP-1R agonists have a hypodipsic effect that is independent of GLP-1R-mediated effects on food intake, and this occurs, in part, through central nervous system GLP-1R activation

  13. Chrysin attenuates atopic dermatitis by suppressing inflammation of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choi, Young-Ae; Jin, Meiling; Choi, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Hun; Park, Pil-Hoon; Choi, Hyukjae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-12-01

    We previously reported the inhibitory effect of chrysin, a natural flavonoid plentifully contained in propolis, vegetables and fruits, on the mast cell-mediated allergic reaction. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chrysin on atopic dermatitis (AD) and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We used an AD model in BALB/c mice by the repeated local exposure of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DNCB/DFE caused AD-like skin lesions. Oral administration of chrysin diminished AD symptoms such as ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. Chrysin decreased infiltration of mast cells, and reduced serum histamine level. Chrysin also suppressed AD by inhibiting the inflammatory responses of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in mouse lymph node and ear. Interestingly, chrysin significantly inhibited the production of cytokines, Th2 chemokines, CCL17 and CCL22 by the down-regulation of p38 MAPK, NF-κB, and STAT1 in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α/interferon (IFN)-γ-stimulated human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Chrysin also inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-stimulated IL-33 expression in HaCaT cells and mouse primary keratinocytes. Taken together, the results indicate that chrysin suppressed AD symptoms, suggesting that chrysin might be a candidate for the treatment of AD and skin allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients are commonly infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Aspergilli are also frequently isolated. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different Aspergillus. Methods: A suspension of 106 fungal spores/ml was streaked onto WATM......, here among 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS). An unidentified green pseudomonas compound was also observed. Interestingly the P. aeruginosa mutant rpoN was unable to suppress A. fumigatus, but suppressed A. flavus, A. oryzae and A. niger. However several other P. aeruginosa mutants suppressed A....... fumigatus including flif, pilA, lasR, PVDA, PQSC and rhlA mutants indicating that phenazines may be involved in the suppressed growth of A. fumigatus. All pseudomonas mutants suppressed A. oryzae, A. niger and A. flavus. Conclusions: An increase in phenazine production by P. aeruginosa may contribute...

  15. Emotion suppression, not reappraisal, predicts psychotherapy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Anne; Boecker, Maren; Pawelzik, Markus; Gauggel, Siegfried; Forkmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify whether trait emotion regulation strategies predict successful or unsuccessful psychotherapy outcomes in cognitive behaviour therapy. Three emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal, suppression, and externalizing behaviour) were assessed in 358 in- and outpatients. Patients were then grouped by therapy outcome. Emotion regulation strategies and confounding variables were entered as predictors in multinomial logistic regression analyses. Emotion suppression, but not reappraisal, was found to predict therapy outcomes for in- and outpatients, with patients high in suppression experiencing worse outcomes. Externalizing behaviour was only relevant in inpatient treatment. High suppression might be detrimental to psychotherapy outcome and should be assessed early on. Further research should investigate the influence of suppression on the mechanisms that facilitate change in psychotherapy.

  16. Does suppression of oscillatory synchronisation mediate some of the therapeutic effects of DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Alexandre; Cagnan, Hayriye; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence for exaggerated oscillatory neuronal synchronisation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, oscillations at around 20 Hz, in the so-called beta frequency band, relate to the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia and rigidity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can significantly improve these motor impairments. Recent evidence has demonstrated reduction of beta oscillations concurrent with alleviation of PD motor symptoms, raising the possibility that suppression of aberrant activity may mediate the effects of DBS. Here we review the evidence supporting suppression of pathological oscillations during stimulation and discuss how this might underlie the efficacy of DBS. We also consider how beta activity may provide a feedback signal suitable for next generation closed-loop and intelligent stimulators.

  17. Identification of derlin-1 as a novel growth factor-responsive endothelial antigen by suppression subtractive hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Yuliang; Jiang Yangfu; Zhong Xing; Zhou Zhuan; Liu Haiyan; Hu Hai; Lou Jinning; Yang Zhihua

    2006-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important regulatory role in embryonic development, reproductive functions, tumor growth and progression. In the present study, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was employed to identify differentially expressed genes between non-stimulated endothelial cells and activated endothelial cells. Following mRNA isolation of non-stimulated and hepatocellular carcinoma homogenate-stimulated cells, cDNAs of both populations were prepared and subtracted by suppressive PCR. Sequencing of the enriched cDNAs identified a couple of genes differentially expressed, including derlin-1. Derlin-1 was significantly up-regulated by tumor homogenates, VEGF, and endothelial growth supplements in a dose-dependent manner. Knock-down of derlin-1 triggered endothelial cell apoptosis, inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, and blocked the formation of a network of tubular-like structures. Our data reveal that derlin-1 is a novel growth factor-responsive endothelial antigen that promotes endothelial cell survival and growth

  18. Does suppression of oscillatory synchronisation mediate some of the therapeutic effects of DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eEusebio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence for exaggerated oscillatory neuronal synchronisation in patients with Parkinson’s disease. In particular, oscillations at around 20 Hz, in the so-called beta frequency band, relate to the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia and rigidity. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can significantly improve these motor impairments. Recent evidence has demonstrated reduction of beta oscillations concurrent with alleviation of PD motor symptoms, raising the possibility that suppression of aberrant activity may mediate the effects of DBS. Here we review the evidence supporting suppression of pathological oscillations during stimulation and discuss how this might underlie the efficacy of DBS. We also consider how beta activity may provide a feedback signal suitable for next generation closed loop and intelligent stimulators.

  19. The Limits of Linked Suppression for Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro eIto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously found that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (T regs can adoptively transfer tolerance after its induction with co-stimulatory blockade in a mouse model of murine cardiac allograft transplantation. In these experiments, we tested an hypothesis with three components: 1 the T regs that transfer tolerance have the capacity for linked suppression, 2 the determinants that stimulate the T regs are expressed by the indirect pathway, and 3 the donor peptides contributing to these indirect determinants are derived from donor MHC antigens. Methods: 1st heart transplants were performed from the indicated donor strain to B10.D2 recipients along with co-stimulatory blockade treatment (250μg i.p. injection of MR1 on day 0 and 250μg i.p. injection of CTLA-4 Ig on day 2. At least 8 weeks later a 2nd heart transplant was performed to a new B10.D2 recipient that had been irradiated with 450 cGy. This recipient was given 40 x 106 naïve B10.D2 spleen cells plus 40 x 106 B10.D2 spleen cells from the first (tolerant recipient. We performed 3 different types of heart transplants with using various donor.Results: 1. T regs suppress the graft rejection in an antigen-specific manner. 2. T regs generated in the face of MHC disparities suppress the rejection of grafts expressing third party MHC along with tolerant MHC. Conclusion:The limits of linkage appear to be quantitative and not universally determined by either the indirect pathway or by peptides of donor MHC antigens.

  20. Endogenous ACh suppresses LTD induction and nicotine relieves the suppression via different nicotinic ACh receptor subtypes in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-08-28

    Studying the normal role of nicotinic cholinergic systems in hippocampal synaptic plasticity is critical for understanding how cholinergic loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and tobacco use affect cognitive function. However, it is largely unknown how nicotinic cholinergic systems regulate the induction of long-term depression (LTD). Extracellular field potential recordings were performed in hippocampal slices prepared from wild-type, α2, α7, and β2 knockout (KO) mice. Effects of nicotine and nicotinic antagonists on LTD induction in wild-type, α2, α7, and β2 KO mice were compared. Activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) occurs during LTD-inducing stimulation to suppress LTD induction at CA3-CA1 synapses. Nicotine relieves this suppression, causing larger LTD. This nicotine effect was mediated by the activation of non-α7 nAChR subtypes, which were not activated by ACh released during LTD-inducing stimulation, and requires the presence of endogenous ACh-induced α7 nAChR activation. Furthermore, the effect of nicotine was prevented in the presence of mecamylamine, but not dihydro-β-erythroidine, and was still observed in both α2 KO and β2 KO mice. This is the first report to evaluate the involvement of different nAChR subtypes in LTD induction. Findings indicate the involvement of unique non-α7 nAChR subtypes, which have not been considered in the nicotinic modulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation, in the control of LTD induction. The implication of our results is that the loss of cholinergic projections to the hippocampus, which reduces ACh release as seen in AD patients, and nicotine from tobacco smoking can differentially affect LTD induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.