WorldWideScience

Sample records for supported ny raman

  1. From single-site tantalum complexes to nanoparticles of TaxNy and TaOxNy supported on silica: elucidation of synthesis chemistry by dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mohandas, Janet Chakkamadathil; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Callens, Emmanuel; Samantaray, Manoja; Gajan, David; Gurinov, Andrei; Ma, Tao; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Hoffman, Adam S.; Gates, Bruce C.; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Air-stable catalysts consisting of tantalum nitride nanoparticles represented as a mixture of TaxNy and TaOxNy with diameters in the range of 0.5 to 3 nm supported on highly dehydroxylated silica were synthesized from TaMe5 (Me = methyl) and dimeric

  2. From single-site tantalum complexes to nanoparticles of TaxNy and TaOxNy supported on silica: elucidation of synthesis chemistry by dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mohandas, Janet Chakkamadathil

    2017-06-08

    Air-stable catalysts consisting of tantalum nitride nanoparticles represented as a mixture of TaxNy and TaOxNy with diameters in the range of 0.5 to 3 nm supported on highly dehydroxylated silica were synthesized from TaMe5 (Me = methyl) and dimeric Ta-2(OMe)(10) with guidance by the principles of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). Characterization of the supported precursors and the supported nanoparticles formed from them was carried out by IR, NMR, UV-Vis, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies complemented with XRD and high-resolution TEM, with dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy being especially helpful by providing enhanced intensities of the signals of H-1, C-13, Si-29, and N-15 at their natural abundances. The characterization data provide details of the synthesis chemistry, including evidence of (a) O-2 insertion into Ta-CH3 species on the support and (b) a binuclear to mononuclear transformation of species formed from Ta-2(OMe)(10) on the support. A catalytic test reaction, cyclooctene epoxidation, was used to probe the supported nanoparticles, with 30% H2O2 serving as the oxidant. The catalysts gave selectivities up to 98% for the epoxide at conversions as high as 99% with a 3.4 wt% loading of Ta present as TaxNy/TaOxNy.

  3. Raman study of supported molybdenum disulfide single layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrer, William; Manciu, Felicia; Afanasiev, Pavel; Berhault, Gilles; Chianelli, Russell

    2008-10-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for clean transportation fuels, highly dispersed single layer transition metal sulfides such as MoS2-based catalysts play an important role in catalytic processes for upgrading and removing sulfur from heavy petroleum feed. In its crystalline bulk form, MoS2 is chemically rather inactive due to a strong tendency to form highly stacked layers, but, when dispersed as single-layer nanoclusters on a support, the MoS2 becomes catalytically active in the hydrogenolysis of sulphur and nitrogen from organic compounds (hydrotreating catalysis). In the present studies alumina-supported MoS2 samples were analyzed by confocal Raman spectroscopy. Evidence of peaks at 152 cm-1, 234 cm-1, and 336 cm-1, normally not seen in the Raman spectrum of the standard bulk crystal, confirms the formation of single layers of MoS2. Furthermore, the presence of the 383 cm-1 Raman line suggests the trigonal prismatic coordination of the formed MoS2 single layers. Depending on the sample preparation method, a restacking of MoS2 layers is also observed, mainly for ex-thiomolybdate samples sulfided at 550 C.

  4. An intraoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors using Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bing; Wen, Zhining; Li, Yi; Li, Longjiang; Xue, Lili

    2014-01-01

    The preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors is difficult, but is important for their surgical management. In order to explore an intraoperative diagnostic method, Raman spectroscopy is applied to detect the normal parotid gland and tumors, including pleomorphic adenoma, Warthin’s tumor and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. In the 600–1800 cm −1 region of the Raman shift, there are numerous spectral differences between the parotid gland and tumors. Compared with Raman spectra of the normal parotid gland, the Raman spectra of parotid tumors show an increase of the peaks assigned to nucleic acids and proteins, but a decrease of the peaks related to lipids. Spectral differences also exist between the spectra of parotid tumors. Based on these differences, a remarkable classification and diagnosis of the parotid gland and tumors are carried out by support vector machine (SVM), with high accuracy (96.7∼100%), sensitivity (93.3∼100%) and specificity (96.7∼100%). Raman spectroscopy combined with SVM has a great potential to aid the intraoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors and could provide an accurate and rapid diagnostic approach. (paper)

  5. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  6. Resonance Raman spectra of phthalocyanine monolayers on different supports. A normal mode analysis of zinc phthalocyanine by means of the MNDO method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palys, Barbara J.; van den Ham, Dirk M.W.; van den Ham, D.M.W.; Briels, Willem J.; Feil, D.; Feil, Dirk

    1995-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of monolayers of transition metal phthalocyanines reveal specific interaction with the support. To elucidate its mechanism, Raman spectra of zinc phthalocyanine monolayers were studied. The analysis was based largely on the results of MNDO calculations. Calculated wavenumbers

  7. Controlled Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles using Solid-support for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyejin; Chae, Jinjoo; Jeong, Hong; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoonsik

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated small clusters of gold nanoparticles by using solid-supported aggregation of gold nanoparticles. The fabricated Au nanoclusters consisting mainly of dimers showed homogeneous characteristics in cluster size and SERS intensity. The SERS enhancement of 4-ABT molecules in an effective area within 2-nm gap appeared to be approximately 10. Detachment process by ultrasonication was successively carried out in order to use the nanoclusters as SERS probes. The possibility of these clusters as SERS probe was proved in terms of signal and cluster size. Single molecule-level sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was known approximately fifteen years ago. Ever since there have been many different applications benefiting from the ultra-high sensitivity such as single molecule detection, chemical sensing and bio-molecular probes. Especially, SERS has drawn much attention in bio-multiplexing probes owing to its unique optical characteristics claiming extremely narrow bandwidth, high sensitivity of light signals, and non-bleaching feature

  8. Controlled Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles using Solid-support for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hyejin; Chae, Jinjoo; Jeong, Hong [Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoonsik [Interdisciplinary Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We fabricated small clusters of gold nanoparticles by using solid-supported aggregation of gold nanoparticles. The fabricated Au nanoclusters consisting mainly of dimers showed homogeneous characteristics in cluster size and SERS intensity. The SERS enhancement of 4-ABT molecules in an effective area within 2-nm gap appeared to be approximately 10. Detachment process by ultrasonication was successively carried out in order to use the nanoclusters as SERS probes. The possibility of these clusters as SERS probe was proved in terms of signal and cluster size. Single molecule-level sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was known approximately fifteen years ago. Ever since there have been many different applications benefiting from the ultra-high sensitivity such as single molecule detection, chemical sensing and bio-molecular probes. Especially, SERS has drawn much attention in bio-multiplexing probes owing to its unique optical characteristics claiming extremely narrow bandwidth, high sensitivity of light signals, and non-bleaching feature.

  9. Ny rapport advarer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jex, Catherine; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Colgan, William

    2017-01-01

    Ifølge forskerne bag en ny mellemstatslig rapport vil den globale opvarmning få endnu flere og meget drastiske konsekvenser for det arktiske klima end hidtil antaget. Men klimaaftalen fra Paris kan afværge nogle af de største forandringer efter år 2050. Hvis den bliver implementeret øjeblikkeligt...

  10. Quantum-mechanical DFT calculation supported Raman spectroscopic study of some amino acids in bovine insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tah, Bidisha; Pal, Prabir; Roy, Sourav; Dutta, Debodyuti; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Ghosh, Manash; Talapatra, G B

    2014-08-14

    In this article Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations by Density Functional Theory (DFT) have been performed of all amino acids present in bovine insulin. Simulated Raman spectra of those amino acids are compared with their experimental spectra and the major bands are assigned. The results are in good agreement with experiment. We have also verified the DFT results with Quantum mechanical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) results for some amino acids. QM/MM results are very similar with the DFT results. Although the theoretical calculation of individual amino acids are feasible, but the calculated Raman spectrum of whole protein molecule is difficult or even quite impossible task, since it relies on lengthy and costly quantum-chemical computation. However, we have tried to simulate the Raman spectrum of whole protein by adding the proportionate contribution of the Raman spectra of each amino acid present in this protein. In DFT calculations, only the contributions of disulphide bonds between cysteines are included but the contribution of the peptide and hydrogen bonds have not been considered. We have recorded the Raman spectra of bovine insulin using micro-Raman set up. The experimental spectrum is found to be very similar with the resultant simulated Raman spectrum with some exceptions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential of cancer screening with serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and a support vector machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S X; Zhang, Y J; Zeng, Q Y; Li, L F; Guo, Z Y; Liu, Z M; Xiong, H L; Liu, S H

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the most common disease to threaten human health. The ability to screen individuals with malignant tumours with only a blood sample would be greatly advantageous to early diagnosis and intervention. This study explores the possibility of discriminating between cancer patients and normal subjects with serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and a support vector machine (SVM) through a peripheral blood sample. A total of 130 blood samples were obtained from patients with liver cancer, colonic cancer, esophageal cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, gastric cancer, as well as 113 blood samples from normal volunteers. Several diagnostic models were built with the serum SERS spectra using SVM and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. The results show that a diagnostic accuracy of 85.5% is acquired with a PCA algorithm, while a diagnostic accuracy of 95.8% is obtained using radial basis function (RBF), PCA–SVM methods. The results prove that a RBF kernel PCA–SVM technique is superior to PCA and conventional SVM (C-SVM) algorithms in classification serum SERS spectra. The study demonstrates that serum SERS, in combination with SVM techniques, has great potential for screening cancerous patients with any solid malignant tumour through a peripheral blood sample. (letters)

  12. Ultraviolet Raman Spectral Signatures in Support of Lisa (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J; Finfrock, Charles C; Christesen, Steve; Chyba, Tom; Higdon, Scott

    2003-01-01

    ... (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents). This engineering, testing and evaluation effort uses a novel mini-Raman lidar technique for on-the-move, short-range, non-contact detection and identification of chemical agents on the battlefield...

  13. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups,

  14. Efficient design of gain-flattened multi-pump Raman fiber amplifiers using least squares support vector regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojie; Yin, Cunyi; Jiang, Hao

    2018-02-01

    An efficient method to design the broadband gain-flattened Raman fiber amplifier with multiple pumps is proposed based on least squares support vector regression (LS-SVR). A multi-input multi-output LS-SVR model is introduced to replace the complicated solving process of the nonlinear coupled Raman amplification equation. The proposed approach contains two stages: offline training stage and online optimization stage. During the offline stage, the LS-SVR model is trained. Owing to the good generalization capability of LS-SVR, the net gain spectrum can be directly and accurately obtained when inputting any combination of the pump wavelength and power to the well-trained model. During the online stage, we incorporate the LS-SVR model into the particle swarm optimization algorithm to find the optimal pump configuration. The design results demonstrate that the proposed method greatly shortens the computation time and enhances the efficiency of the pump parameter optimization for Raman fiber amplifier design.

  15. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formatted to take advantage of the changes in publishing methods in the past thirty ..... This work would not have been possible without the support and en- couragement of ..... in which Raman made his decision, have a deeper significance than .... Light in Water and the Colour of the Sea within a month of his return to India ...

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of gold nanoparticles supported on copper foil with graphene as a nanometer gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Quan; Zhu, Xupeng; Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Huigao

    2016-01-01

    Gaps with single-nanometer dimensions (<10 nm) between metallic nanostructures enable giant local field enhancements for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monolayer graphene is an ideal candidate to obtain a sub-nanometer gap between plasmonic nanostructures. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to achieve a sub-nanometer gap by dewetting a gold film supported on monolayer graphene grown on copper foil. The Cu foil can serve as a low-loss plasmonically active metallic film that supports the imaginary charge oscillations, while the graphene can not only create a stable sub-nanometer gap for massive plasmonic field enhancements but also serve as a chemical enhancer. We obtained higher SERS enhancements in this graphene-gapped configuration compared to those in Au nanoparticles on Cu film or on graphene–SiO 2 –Si. Also, the Raman signals measured maintained their fine features and intensities over a long time period, indicating the stability of this Au–graphene–Cu hybrid configuration as an SERS substrate. (paper)

  17. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo . The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque ™ ) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque ™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µ m for Omnipaque ™ and 40 µ m for glycerol ( p   ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque ™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque ™ . However, Omnipaque ™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure. (paper)

  18. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  19. Raman Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Investigations of Pt Electrocatalyst Supported on Carbon Prepared through Plasma Pyrolysis of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Santos Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical and electrochemical characterisations of Pt-based electrocatalysts supported on carbon (Vulcan carbon, C1, and carbon produced by plasma pyrolysis of natural gas, C2 toward ethanol electrooxidation were investigated. The Pt20/C180 and Pt20/C280 electrocatalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors at 350°C. The electrochemical and physicochemical characterisations of the electrocatalysts were performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, Raman scattering, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry tests. The XRD results show that the Pt-based electrocatalysts present platinum metallic which is face-centered cubic structure. The results indicate that the Pt20/C180 electrocatalyst has a smaller particle size (10.1–6.9 nm compared with the Pt20/C280 electrocatalyst; however, the Pt20/C280 particle sizes are similar (12.8–10.4 nm and almost independent of the reflection planes, which suggests that the Pt crystallites grow with a radial shape. Raman results reveal that both Vulcan carbon and plasma carbon are graphite-like materials consisting mostly of sp2 carbon. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry data obtained in this study indicate that the deposition of Pt on plasma carbon increases its electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation reaction.

  20. A combined in situ XAS-XRPD-Raman study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a carbon supported Co catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Dehghan, Roya; Johnsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst, supported on a carbon nanofibers/carbon felt composite (Co/CNF/CF) was studied in situ at realistic conditions. The catalyst was monitored by Xray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (HR-XRPD) and Raman...... spectroscopy, while changes in the gas phase were observed by mass spectrometry (MS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to characterise the catalyst. The catalyst has a bimodal particle size distribution and exhibits a high deactivation rate. During the in situ study the catalyst appears...... to reduce further at the induction period of FTS, while crystallite growth is been detected in the same period. At steady state FTS the amount of metallic Co is constant. A change in the volumetric flow towards higher conversions did not affect the degree of reduction or the crystallite size of the catalyst...

  1. Inspiration fra NY-times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    2015-01-01

    NY-times har en ugentlig klumme med gode råd. For nogle uger siden var ugens inspiration henvendt til lærere/undervisere og drejede sig om, hvordan man skaber taletid til alle uden at have favoritter og overse de mere stille elever.......NY-times har en ugentlig klumme med gode råd. For nogle uger siden var ugens inspiration henvendt til lærere/undervisere og drejede sig om, hvordan man skaber taletid til alle uden at have favoritter og overse de mere stille elever....

  2. [Study on the Recognition of Liquor Age of Gujing Based on Raman Spectra and Support Vector Regression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-xiang; Wang, Hai-yan; Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zheng-yong; Liu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    It is an important and difficult research point to recognize the age of Chinese liquor rapidly and exactly in the field of liquor analyzing, which is also of great significance to the healthy development of the liquor industry and protection of the legitimate rights and interests of consumers. Spectroscopy together with the pattern recognition technology is a preferred method of achieving rapid identification of wine quality, in which the Raman Spectroscopy is promising because of its little affection of water and little or free of sample pretreatment. So, in this paper, Raman spectra and support vector regression (SVR) are used to recognize different ages and different storing time of the liquor of the same age. The innovation of this paper is mainly reflected in the following three aspects. First, the application of Raman in the area of liquor analysis is rarely reported till now. Second, the concentration of studying the recognition of wine age, while most studies focus on studying specific components of liquor and studies together with the pattern recognition method focus more on the identification of brands or different types of base wine. The third one is the application of regression analysis framework, which cannot be only used to identify different years of liquor, but also can be used to analyze different storing time, which has theoretical and practical significance to the research and quality control of liquor. Three kinds of experiments are conducted in this paper. Firstly, SVR is used to recognize different ages of 5, 8, 16 and 26 years of the Gujing Liquor; secondly, SVR is also used to classify the storing time of the 8-years liquor; thirdly, certain group of train data is deleted form the train set and put into the test set to simulate the actual situation of liquor age recognition. Results show that the SVR model has good train and predict performance in these experiments, and it has better performance than other non-liner regression method such

  3. montauk_ny.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  4. Udlejers godkendelse af ny erhvervslejer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    I artiklen er taget udgangspunkt i den »klassiske« afståelsessituation, hvor en lejer vil afhænde den i de lejede lokaler drevne virksomhed, og lejeren har afståelsesret til en af udlejer godkendt lejer, uden at kravene til den ny lejer er specificeret. På baggrund af Vestre Landsrets dom af 9/2 ...

  5. Ny industrialisering - et bedre produktmarked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2001-01-01

    for byggeriet med titlerne: 1. Bygherren som forandringsagent. 2. Tæt samarbejde i byggedelen. 3. Ny industrialisering. 4. Byg med kommunikation og innovation. Dette debathæfte er nummer tre i rækken og omhandler byggeriets industridel og mulighederne for at fremme en succesfuld industriel produktion....

  6. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies

  7. Plavíny

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2017), s. 20-21 ISSN 0139-7761 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : floating heart * cultivation * water plants Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  8. Nitrogen-doped graphene network supported copper nanoparticles encapsulated with graphene shells for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Chunnian

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrated nitrogen-doped graphene network supported few-layered graphene shell encapsulated Cu nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu@G-NGNs) as a sensing platform, which were constructed by a simple and scalable in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique with the assistance of a self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) NaCl template. Compared with pure Cu NPs and graphene decorated Cu NPs, the graphene shells can strengthen the plasmonic coupling between graphene and Cu, thereby contributing to an obvious improvement in the local electromagnetic field that was validated by finite element numerical simulations, while the 3D nitrogen-doped graphene walls with a large surface area facilitated molecule adsorption and the doped nitrogen atoms embedded in the graphene lattice can reduce the surface energy of the system. With these merits, a good surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) activity of the 3D Cu@G-NGN painting film on glass was demonstrated using rhodamine 6G and crystal violet as model analytes, exhibiting a satisfactory sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. As far as we know, this is the first report on the in situ synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene/copper nanocomposites and this facile and low-cost Cu-based strategy tends to be a good supplement to Ag and Au based substrates for SERS applications.In this study, we demonstrated nitrogen-doped graphene network supported few-layered graphene shell encapsulated Cu nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu@G-NGNs) as a sensing platform, which were constructed by a simple and scalable in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique with the assistance of a self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) NaCl template. Compared with pure Cu NPs and graphene decorated Cu NPs, the graphene shells can strengthen the plasmonic coupling between graphene and Cu, thereby contributing to an obvious improvement in the local electromagnetic field that was validated by finite element numerical simulations, while the 3D nitrogen

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of self-assembled thiol monolayers and supported lipid membranes on thin anodic porous alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin anodic porous alumina (tAPA was fabricated from a 500 nm thick aluminum (Al layer coated on silicon wafers, through single-step anodization performed in a Teflon electrochemical cell in 0.4 M aqueous phosphoric acid at 110 V. Post-fabrication etching in the same acid allowed obtaining tAPA surfaces with ≈160 nm pore diameter and ≈80 nm corresponding wall thickness to be prepared. The tAPA surfaces were made SERS-active by coating with a thin (≈25 nm gold (Au layer. The as obtained tAPA–Au substrates were incubated first with different thiols, namely mercaptobenzoic acid (MbA and aminothiol (AT, and then with phospholipid vesicles of different composition to form a supported lipid bilayer (SLB. At each step, the SERS substrate functionality was assessed, demonstrating acceptable enhancement (≥100×. The chemisorption of thiols during the first step and the formation of SLB from the vesicles during the second step, were independently monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D technique. The SLB membranes represent a simplified model system of the living cells membranes, which makes the successful observation of SERS on these films promising in view of the use of tAPA–Au substrates as a platform for the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS biosensors on living cells. In the future, these tAPA–Au-SLB substrates will be investigated also for drug delivery of bioactive agents from the APA pores.

  10. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  11. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  12. Long reach and enhanced power budget DWDM radio-over-fibre link supported by Raman amplification and coherent detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Fernandez, Amaya

    2009-01-01

    We report on a scalable and enhanced power budget radio-over-fibre system for hybrid-wireless access networks operating at 12.5 GHz DWDM spacing for 5 GHz RF carriers over a 60 km fibre link with Raman amplification....

  13. Combined operando Raman/UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy as a tool to study supported metal oxide catalysts at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinnemans, Stanislaus Josephus

    2006-01-01

    A novel set-up has been developed in which two complementary spectroscopic techniques, namely operando Raman and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, are combined. With this set-up it is possible to characterize catalytic materials under reaction conditions (high temperature, normal pressure) and in this way on

  14. Urban metabolism in Syracuse, NY – introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Urban Ecosystems contains a series of papers related to assessing urban metabolism in Syracuse, NY. These papers were developed under the Urban Long-Term Research Area Exploratory Awards Program funded by the National Science Foundation. Objectives of this two-year project (2009–2011) in Syracuse, NY were to investigate: a)...

  15. [Application of support vector machine-recursive feature elimination algorithm in Raman spectroscopy for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haipeng; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Zhiru; Fan, Zhimin; Zheng, Chao; Han, Bing

    2014-08-01

    To explore the value of application of support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) method in Raman spectroscopy for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast diseases. Fresh breast tissue samples of 168 patients (all female; ages 22-75) were obtained by routine surgical resection from May 2011 to May 2012 at the Department of Breast Surgery, the First Hospital of Jilin University. Among them, there were 51 normal tissues, 66 benign and 51 malignant breast lesions. All the specimens were assessed by Raman spectroscopy, and the SVM-RFE algorithm was used to process the data and build the mathematical model. Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals were used as discriminating criteria to evaluate this data-processing method. 1 800 Raman spectra were acquired from the fresh samples of human breast tissues. Based on spectral profiles, the presence of 1 078, 1 267, 1 301, 1 437, 1 653, and 1 743 cm(-1) peaks were identified in the normal tissues; and 1 281, 1 341, 1 381, 1 417, 1 465, 1 530, and 1 637 cm(-1) peaks were found in the benign and malignant tissues. The main characteristic peaks differentiating benign and malignant lesions were 1 340 and 1 480 cm(-1). The accuracy of SVM-RFE in discriminating normal and malignant lesions was 100.0%, while that in the assessment of benign lesions was 93.0%. There are distinct differences among the Raman spectra of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues, and SVM-RFE method can be used to build differentiation model of breast lesions.

  16. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  17. Subfemtosecond pulse generation by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering with modulated Raman excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wu Jian; Zeng Heping

    2003-01-01

    Subfemtosecond (sub-fs) pulses can be generated by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering in a Raman medium with modulated Raman excitations, driven by two sufficiently intense laser beams, one of which is amplitude modulated. The nonadiabatic Raman interaction establishes a strong modulated Raman coherence, which supports compression of the generated broadband Raman sidebands to a train of sub-fs pulses regardless of whether the carrier frequencies of the driving lasers are tuned above, below or on two-photon Raman resonance. (letter to the editor)

  18. Classifying low-grade and high-grade bladder cancer using label-free serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjiao; Lai, Xiaoping; Zeng, Qiuyao; Li, Linfang; Lin, Lin; Li, Shaoxin; Liu, Zhiming; Su, Chengkang; Qi, Minni; Guo, Zhouyi

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to classify low-grade and high-grade bladder cancer (BC) patients using serum surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms. Serum SERS spectra are acquired from 88 serum samples with silver nanoparticles as the SERS-active substrate. Diagnostic accuracies of 96.4% and 95.4% are obtained when differentiating the serum SERS spectra of all BC patients versus normal subjects and low-grade versus high-grade BC patients, respectively, with optimal SVM classifier models. This study demonstrates that the serum SERS technique combined with SVM has great potential to noninvasively detect and classify high-grade and low-grade BC patients.

  19. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  20. 2008 FEMA Lidar: South Oneida County (NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — For Oneida County, NY, there were two types of elevation datasets. The first type is LiDAR and the second one is Auto-correlation DEM. Auto-correlation DEM data was...

  1. 49 CFR 372.235 - New York, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New York, NY. 372.235 Section 372.235... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.235 New York, NY. The zone adjacent to, and commercially a part of, New York, NY, within which transportation by motor vehicle, in interstate or foreign...

  2. Ground-based lidar measurements from Ny-Ålesund during ASTAR 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herber

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR in March and April 2007, measurements obtained at the AWIPEV Arctic Research Base in Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen at 78.9° N, 11.9° E (operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research – AWI and the Institut polaire français Paul-Emile Victor – IPEV, supported the airborne campaign. This included lidar data from the Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL and the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL, located in the atmospheric observatory as well as photometer data and the daily launched radiosonde. The MPL features nearly continuous measurements; the KARL was switched on whenever weather conditions allowed observations (145 h in 61 days. From 1 March to 30 April, 71 meteorological balloon soundings were performed and compared with the concurrent MPL measurements; photometer measurements are available from 18 March. For the KARL data, a statistical overview of particle detection based on their optical properties backscatter ratio and volume depolarization can be given. The altitudes of the occurrence of the named features (subvisible and visible ice and water as well as mixed-phase clouds, aerosol layers as well as their dependence on different air mass origins are analyzed. Although the spring 2007 was characterized by rather clean conditions, diverse case studies of cloud and aerosol occurrence during March and April 2007 are presented in more detail, including temporal development and main optical properties as depolarization, backscatter and extinction coefficients. Links between air mass origins and optical properties can be presumed but need further evidence.

  3. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  4. Study on spectral parameters and the support vector machine in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of serum for the detection of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Yao, Jun; Wang, Deli; Li, Siqi; Song, Youtao; Ding, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been recognized as an effective tool for the analysis of tissue samples and biofluids. In this work, a total of 27 spectral parameters were chosen and compared using SERS. Four parameters with the highest prediction ability were selected for further support vector machine (SVM) analysis. As a comparison, principal component analysis (PCA) was used on the same dataset for feature extraction. SVM was used with the above two data reduction methods separately to differentiate colon cancer and the control groups. Serum taken from 52 colon cancer patients and 60 healthy volunteers were collected and tested by SERS. The accuracy for Parameter-SVM was 95.0%, the sensitivity was 96.2%, and the specificity was 95.5%, which was much higher than the results using only one parameter, while for PCA-SVM, the results are 93.3%, 92.3%, and 92.9%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SERS analysis method can be used to identify serum differences between colon cancer patients and normal people. (letter)

  5. 76 FR 77175 - New York Fun Factory Fireworks Display, Western Long Island Sound; Mamaroneck, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ...-AA00 New York Fun Factory Fireworks Display, Western Long Island Sound; Mamaroneck, NY AGENCY: Coast... in support of the New York Fun Factory Fireworks display. This action is necessary to provide for the... the Coast Guard to define regulatory safety zones. On May 10, 2012 New York Fun Factory Events is...

  6. 78 FR 36242 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: New York State Museum, Albany, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., Rensselaer County, NY, by Reverend O.C. Auringer of Troy, NY. Museum records indicate that the cultural items..., and Saratoga Counties, NY, by Mr. Dwinel F. Thompson of Troy, NY. Museum records indicate that the... collections. From the former Laureate Grounds in Troy, Rensselaer County, NY, the 90 unassociated funerary...

  7. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice canceling temporary... Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. The owner of the bridge, Nassau... published a temporary deviation entitled ``Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY...

  8. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...

  9. Ny vaccine mod ledbetændelse er ikke effektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elisabeth Okholm; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll

    2013-01-01

    En ny mulighed for at vaccinere mod mykoplasma-ledbetændelse er undersøgt hos en slagtesvineproducent. Vaccinen kunne desværre ikke forebygge halthed eff ektivt.......En ny mulighed for at vaccinere mod mykoplasma-ledbetændelse er undersøgt hos en slagtesvineproducent. Vaccinen kunne desværre ikke forebygge halthed eff ektivt....

  10. 77 FR 22530 - Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... navigable waters of the Hudson River in the vicinity of Rhinecliff, NY for a fireworks display. This... fireworks displays. This rule is intended to restrict all vessels from a portion of the Hudson River before...

  11. Sjøforsvaret i ny drakt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestvik, Marit; Bjerck, Mari

    Denne rapporten formidler resultater fra undersøkelser som er gjort på to av Sjøforsvarets fartøy i 2010 og 2011, som omfatter utprøving av ny niformsmodell for utendørs bruk. Undersøkelsene er en del av forskningsprosjektet Uni-Form: Arbeidsbekledning for kvinner i mannsdominerte yrker. I...... prosjektet utvikles arbeidsklær for Sjøforsvarets personell som har bedre funksjonalitet og komfort enn eksisterende uniformer. En målsetning er å bedre trivselen for personellet gjennom å utvikle forbedrete uniformbekledning. At uniformsbekledningen er tilfredsstillende i funksjonalitet, passform og...... tilpasset snitt for kvinner. Dette gjelder også Forsvarets uniformer....

  12. Introductory Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    2012-01-01

    Praise for Introductory Raman Spectroscopy Highlights basic theory, which is treated in an introductory fashion Presents state-of-the-art instrumentation Discusses new applications of Raman spectroscopy in industry and research.

  13. 75 FR 13131 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Sale of Plum Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... the anticipated sale of Plum Island, New York and an ancillary support facility at Orient Point, New...) for the Sale of Plum Island, NY AGENCY: Office of Real Property Utilization & Disposal; General...: Plum Island is an 840-acre island located approximately 1.5 miles off the northeast tip of Orient Point...

  14. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the New York, NY EnviroAtlas community. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based...

  15. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  16. Facile preparation of water dispersible polypyrrole nanotube-supported silver nanoparticles for hydrogen peroxide reduction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yingjing; Qiu Lihua; Pan Congtao; Wang Cancan; Shang Songmin; Yan Feng

    2012-01-01

    Water dispersible polypyrrole nanotube/silver nanoparticle hybrids (PPyNT-COOAgNP) were synthesized via a cation-exchange method. The approach involves the surface functionalization of PPyNTs with carboxylic acid groups (-COOH), and cation-exchange with silver ions (Ag + ) and followed by the reduction of metal ions. The morphology and optical properties of the produced PPyNT-COOAgNP nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The as-prepared PPyNT-COOAgNP nanohybrids exhibited well-defined response to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, and as extremely suitable substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with a high enhancement factor of 6.0 × 10 7 , and enabling the detection of 10 −12 M Rhodamine 6G solution.

  17. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  18. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  19. NY-ESO-1 Based Immunotherapy of Cancer: Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remy Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 or New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 1 is a well-known cancer-testis antigen (CTAs with re-expression in numerous cancer types. Its ability to elicit spontaneous humoral and cellular immune responses, together with its restricted expression pattern, have rendered it a good candidate target for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we provide background information on NY-ESO-1 expression and function in normal and cancerous tissues. Furthermore, NY-ESO-1-specific immune responses have been observed in various cancer types; however, their utility as biomarkers are not well determined. Finally, we describe the immune-based therapeutic options targeting NY-ESO-1 that are currently in clinical trial. We will highlight the recent advancements made in NY-ESO-1 cancer vaccines, adoptive T cell therapy, and combinatorial treatment with checkpoint inhibitors and will discuss the current trends for future NY-ESO-1 based immunotherapy. Cancer treatment has been revolutionized over the last few decades with immunotherapy emerging at the forefront. Immune-based interventions have shown promising results, providing a new treatment avenue for durable clinical responses in various cancer types. The majority of successful immunotherapy studies have been reported in liquid cancers, whereas these approaches have met many challenges in solid cancers. Effective immunotherapy in solid cancers is hampered by the complex, dynamic tumor microenvironment that modulates the extent and phenotype of the antitumor immune response. Furthermore, many solid tumor-associated antigens are not private but can be found in normal somatic tissues, resulting in minor to detrimental off-target toxicities. Therefore, there is an ongoing effort to identify tumor-specific antigens to target using various immune-based modalities. CTAs are considered good candidate targets for immunotherapy as they are characterized by a restricted expression in normal somatic tissues

  20. Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the purchase of a Renishaw InVia Raman microscope to support and enhance the research in...laser. The system includes an accessory for polarization (for 785 nm) and an optical cable that allows external Raman measurements. The manufacturer...UU 18-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials The views

  1. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  2. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  3. Factors Influencing Divergent Patterns of Phosphorus Availability in NY and PA Biogeochemical `Hotspots'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.; Hofmeister, K.; Regan, J. M.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Walter, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the soil phosphorus (P) cycle leads to subsequent water quality issues in agricultural dominated watersheds. In the humid Northeastern United States (NE US), variably saturated areas can generate surface runoff that transports P and stimulates biogeochemical processes; these hydrologically dynamic locations are often called biogeochemical `hotspots'. Many studies have evaluated nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesized seasonally wet parts of the landscape (i.e., hotspots) have smaller biologically available P pools because runoff events frequently carry away nutrients like P. To test this hypothesis, we generated soil wetness index (SWI) maps from soil (SURRGO) and elevation (LiDAR rescaled to 3 m) data and used these maps to direct seasonal soil sampling near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania (PA) and Ithaca, New York (NY). We collected 5cm deep soil samples in PA (bimonthly) and NY (monthly) along soil moisture gradients for a range of land cover types (forest, fallow, and cropped) from May through October. We measured soil moisture in the field and percent organic matter (OM), pH, and three increasingly strong soil P extractions (dilute-salt-extractable P, oxalate-extractable P, and total-extractable P) in the laboratory. Our results indicated a negative relationship between dilute-salt-extractable P concentrations and SWI in PA and no relationship between these same variables in NY. We also found positive relationships between each of the three P extractions in PA but only a positive relationship between oxalate-extractable P and total-extractable P in NY. Our findings in PA support our hypothesis; namely, less biologically available P (i.e. dilute-salt-extractable P) is found in wetter areas of the landscape. However, divergent P availability patterns in NY point to further complexities and confounding variables in our understanding in soil P processes. Further studies will look

  4. NILU`s Atmospheric Research at Ny-Aalesund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beine, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    At Ny-Aalesund, Spitsbergen, NILU is involved in many scientific projects that focus on global and regional atmospheric chemistry such as stratospheric ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect (from gases and aerosols), tropospheric ozone (in-situ production and depletion in the boundary layer), or the transport of pollutants from mid-latitudes (Arctic haze). This report presents a brief historical overview of NILU`s research activities at Ny-Aalesund since 1973. It also discusses the scientific results of the first years of operation of the Zeppelin station since 1989, and presents ongoing projects. 128 refs., 20 figs., 1 table

  5. 33 CFR 110.87 - Henderson Harbor, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Henderson Harbor, N.Y. 110.87... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.87 Henderson Harbor, N.Y. (a) Area A. The area in the... latitude 43°51′08.8″ N, longitude 76°12′08.9″ W, thence to latitude 43°51′09.0″ N, longitude 76°12′19.0″ W...

  6. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  7. In situ Raman spectroscopy studies of bulk and surface metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk V-P-O and model supported vanadia catalysts were investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy during n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride in order to determine the fundamental molecular structure-reactivity/selectivity insights that can be obtained from such experiments. The in situ Raman

  8. Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Andre

    2014-03-31

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

  9. 77 FR 37316 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from... regulations governing the operation of the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel, at Nassau...: The Long Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 4.7, at Nassau, New York, has a vertical...

  10. 78 FR 26508 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from... regulation governing the operation of the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New.... on July 12, 2013. Reynolds Creek has commercial and recreational vessel traffic. No objections were...

  11. 78 FR 66265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York...

  12. 78 FR 37456 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from... regulation governing the operation of the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New... July 1, 2013. Reynolds Creek has commercial and recreational vessel traffic. No objections were...

  13. 78 FR 34893 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds... Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York, has a vertical clearance in the closed position of 25...

  14. 78 FR 56610 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York...

  15. Kapitalismens dna i ny oversættelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schanz, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Adam Smiths klassiske storværk om kapitalismen ’Nationernes velstand’ havde stor indflydelse på socialfilosofien, på Hegel, på Marx og liberaløkonomerne. Ny oversættelse yder omsider værket fuld respekt på dansk. Anmeldelse af: Adam Smith: Nationernes velstand. 441+ 519 sider. 699,95 kr...

  16. Evaluering af ny kokkeuddannelse for hørehandicappede

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Henrik Møller

    2010-01-01

    Center for Ungdomsforskning har netop afsluttet en evaluering af en ny uddannelse indenfor madproduktion, rettet imod personer med et hørehandicap. Hensigten med uddannelsen er, at kunne tilbyde døve, døvblinde og hørehæmmede personer et uddannelsestilbud indenfor fremstilling af mad. Konkret han...

  17. Ejendomsordbogen fransk/dansk: ny integreret e-ordbog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick; Hansen, Liselotte Kruse

    2012-01-01

    fusionere med en praktisk guide. Til dette formål har vi udviklet konceptet til en ny type hybridordbog, der kan tilfredsstille de intenderede brugeres informationsbehov i kommunikative, kognitive og praktiske situationer. Udviklingen er sket i samarbejde med den førende udbyder af online ordbøger i Danmark...

  18. Quantitative analysis of sugar composition in honey using 532-nm excitation Raman and Raman optical activity spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šugar, Jan; Bouř, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2016), s. 1298-1303 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09072S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : honey * sugar mixtures * spectral decompositions * Raman spectroscopy * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  19. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Hudson River, NY in the vicinity of Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim... Beacon Swim is an annual recurring event that has a permanent safety zone found at 33 CFR 165.160. The...

  20. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY... temporary special local regulation on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during... powerboat racing regatta. The event will be held on the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY and will feature...

  1. 33 CFR 207.60 - Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level. 207.60 Section 207.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., N.Y.; pool level. (a) Whenever the elevation of the pool created by the Federal dam at Troy, N.Y...

  2. 33 CFR 110.8 - Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.8 Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt. (a) Ticonderoga, N.Y. An area shoreward of a line bearing 312° from Ticonderoga Light to the southeast corner of the...

  3. Holographic Raman lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have constructed a Raman lidar system that incorporates a holographic optical element. By resolving just 3 nitrogen lines in the Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) spectrum, temperature fits as good as 1% at altitudes of 20km can be made in 30 minutes. Due to the narrowband selectivity of the HOE, the lidar provides measurements over a continuous 24hr period. By adding a 4th channel to capture the Rayleigh backscattered light, temperature profiles can be extended to 80km

  4. Oxygen vibrations in the series Bi2Sr2Ca{_{n-1}}Cu{n}O{_{4+2 n+y}}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulques, E.; Dupouy, P.; Lefrant, S.

    1991-06-01

    We present a discussion of the oxygen vibrations in the Bi{2}Sr{2}Ca{n-1}Cu{n}O{4+2 n+y} high T_c superconductors with the aim of interpreting Raman spectra in the case of the non-symmorphic Amaa structure. Group theory shows that the oxygen atoms belonging to the central CuO{2} plane generate a Raman activity for the n=1,3 phases. Consequently, we propose a novel assignment for the lines of weak intensity at 297, 316 and 333 cm^{-1}. It is shown that the two components of the 460 cm^{-1} band may be consistent with the Amma structure. Spectra recorded in crossed polarization exhibit weak lines which could be assigned to B {1g} modes expected for the three phases. Nous présentons une discussion sur les vibrations des atomes d'oxygène dans la série des supraconducteurs Bi{2}Sr{2}Ca{n-1}Cu{n}O{4+2 n+y} dans le but d'interpréter les spectres Raman. L'analyse des modes normaux de vibration de la structure Amaa pour les phases n=1 ou 3 montre que les atomes d'oxygène du plan CuO{2} contenant les centres d'inversion donnent lieu à une activité Raman. En conséquence, nous proposons une nouvelle attribution pour les raies de faible intensité à 297, 316 et 333 cm^{-1}. Nous montrons que le dédoublement de la bande à 460 cm^{-1} pourrait être dû à la structure Amaa. Les spectres enregistrés en polarization croisée montrent de faibles bandes qui peuvent être attribuées aux modes B {1g} attendus pour les trois phases.

  5. Geothermal energy and district heating in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Julianne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the possibilities for using shallow geothermal energy for heating purposes in Ny-Ålesund. The current energy supply in Ny-Ålesund is a diesel generator, which does not comply with the Norwegian government and Ny-Ålesund Science Managers Committee’s common goal to maintain the natural environment in Ny-Ålesund. Ny-Ålesund has a potential for replacing the heat from the current diesel based energy source with geothermal energy. Geothermal energy is considered to have low im...

  6. Holographic Raman Tweezers Controlled by Hand Gestures and Voice Commands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Antalík, M.; Kesa, P.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2B (2013), s. 331-336 ISSN 2160-8881 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Holographic Optical Tweezers * Raman Tweezers * Natural User Interface * Leap Motion * Gesture Camera Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  7. Ny forskning: Derfor virker ros ikke mod stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Ny forskning peger på, at stressede medarbejdere overhører din ros og anerkendelse, hvis de føler skam. Skam over ikke at kunne slå til på arbejdet. Vil du hjælpe en stresset medarbejder, skal du forebygge, at de føler sig skamfulde. Læs her anbefalinger til, hvordan du bedst hjælper din stressed...

  8. Den fjerde vej: Trumps sejr skaber ny samfundsorden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin Møller Boje; Andersen, Torben K.; Kragh, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Bag Donald Trumps uempatiske retorik gemmer sig omridset af et politisk projekt, man kan kalde den fjerde vej. USA’s kommende præsident blander højre- og venstreorienterede mærkesager til et nyt nationalsocialt politisk koncept. Spørgsmålet er, om Trumps fjerde vej er et seriøst bud på en ny...

  9. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.; Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    weak Raman signal, which facilitates identification in chemi- cal and biological systems. Recently, single-molecule Raman scattering has enhanced the detection sensitivity limit of ... was working on the molecular diffraction of light, which ulti-.

  12. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  13. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.I.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  14. Raman spectra of graphene ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, R; Furukawa, M; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M S

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag and armchair edges are calculated within non-resonant Raman theory. Depending on the edge structure and polarization direction of the incident and scattered photon beam relative to the edge direction, a symmetry selection rule for the phonon type appears. These Raman selection rules will be useful for the identification of the edge structure of graphene nanoribbons.

  15. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  16. Vaccination with NY-ESO-1 overlapping peptides mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and montanide ISA-51 in patients with cancers expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hisashi; Isobe, Midori; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Mizote, Yu; Eikawa, Shingo; Sato, Eiichi; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Udono, Heiichiro; Seto, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph; Oka, Mikio; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of an NY-ESO-1 cancer vaccine using 4 synthetic overlapping long peptides (OLP; peptides #1, 79-108; #2, 100-129; #3, 121-150; and #4, 142-173) that include a highly immunogenic region of the NY-ESO-1 molecule. Nine patients were immunized with 0.25 mg each of three 30-mer and a 32-mer long NY-ESO-1 OLP mixed with 0.2 KE Picibanil OK-432 and 1.25 mL Montanide ISA-51. The primary endpoints of this study were safety and NY-ESO-1 immune responses. Five to 18 injections of the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine were well tolerated. Vaccine-related adverse events observed were fever and injection site reaction (grade 1 and 2). Two patients showed stable disease after vaccination. An NY-ESO-1-specific humoral immune response was observed in all patients and an antibody against peptide #3 (121-150) was detected firstly and strongly after vaccination. NY-ESO-1 CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses were elicited in these patients and their epitopes were identified. Using a multifunctional cytokine assay, the number of single or double cytokine-producing cells was increased in NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after vaccination. Multiple cytokine-producing cells were observed in PD-1 (-) and PD-1 (+) CD4 T cells. In conclusion, our study indicated that the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51 was well tolerated and elicited NY-ESO-1-specific humoral and CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in immunized patients.

  17. Designing of Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Al-Awad, F.; Alsous, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we describe the design of the Raman laser pumped by Frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser (λ=532 nm) to generate new laser wavelengths by shifting the frequency of the Nd-YAG laser to Stokes region (λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm, λ 3 =1579.5 nm) and Antistokes region (λ ' 1 =435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm, λ ' 3=319.8 nm). Laser resonator has been designed to increase the laser gain. It consists of two mirrors, the back mirror transmits the pump laser beam (λ=532 nm) through the Raman tube and reflects all other generated Raman laser lines. Four special front mirrors were made to be used for the four laser lines λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm and λ ' 1 = 435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm. The output energy for the lines υ 1 s, υ 2 s, υ 1 as,υ 2 as was measured. The output energy of the Raman laser was characterized for different H 2 pressure inside the tube. (Author)

  18. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  20. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  1. Doping of C-70 fullerene peapods with lithium vapor: Raman spectroscopic and Raman spectroelectrochemical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Valeš, Václav; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 48 (2014), 485706 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fullerene peapods * Raman spectroelectrochemistry * Li doping Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2014

  2. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Isotopically Engineered Graphene Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015

  3. Increased NY-ESO-1 Expression and Reduced Infiltrating CD3+ T Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Giavina-Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79, rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10 and not in benign nevi (0/20. Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P=0.007 and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P<0.02. NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P=0.017. When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P=0.010 or as isolated cells (P=0.002 than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

  4. Raman study of ? crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, M. A.; Oliveira, M. A. S.; Bourson, P.; Crettez, J. M.

    1997-09-01

    In this work we present a polarized Raman study of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img7 single crystals for several values of the concentration 0953-8984/9/37/020/img8 made using different scattering geometries. The Raman spectra, composed of broad bands, have been fitted in accordance with a symmetry analysis which allowed us to assign the vibrational modes, and determine their frequencies and damping constants. The results are compatible with an average hexagonal symmetry for the solid solutions with x in the range 0953-8984/9/37/020/img9. In each of the spectra we found two bands at about 590 and 0953-8984/9/37/020/img10, probably associated with the existence of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img11 structures in the solid solutions.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  6. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  7. Enhanced Raman scattering on functionalized graphene substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Václav; Kovaříček, Petr; Fridrichová, Michaela; Ji, X.; Ling, X.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 025087. ISSN 2053-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * molecules * graphene * graphene enhanced Raman scattering * functionalized graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.937, year: 2016

  8. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, K.; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, F.; Holá, Miroslava; Mahelová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2014), s. 23924-23935 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * Candida parapsilosis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  9. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Long Island Sound, Jamaica Bay, and Lower Bay of NY/NJ Harbor, NY, 1994-2002 (NODC Accession 0089467)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are a collection of benthic habitat data from studies conducted in the coastal Long Island Sound, NY region in GIS shapefile (.shp, .dbf, .shx, and .prj...

  10. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  11. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  12. Spectroscopy and Raman imaging of inhomogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is aimed at developing methodologies in Raman spectroscopy and imaging. After reviewing the statistical instruments which allow treating giant amount of data (multivariate analysis and classification), the study is applied to two families of well-known materials which are used as models for testing the limits of the implemented developments. The first family is a series of carbon materials pyrolyzed at various temperatures and exhibiting inhomogeneities at a nm scale which is suitable for Raman-X-ray diffraction combination. Another results concern the polishing effect on carbon structure. Since it is found to induce Raman artifacts leading to the overestimation of the local structural disorder, a method based on the use of the G band width is therefore proposed in order to evaluate the crystallite size in both unpolished and polished nano-graphites. The second class of materials presents inhomogeneities at higher (micrometric) scales by the example of uranium dioxide ceramics. Being well adapted in terms of spatial scale, Raman imaging is thus used for probing their surfaces. Data processing is implemented via an approach combining the multivariate (principal component) analysis and the classical fitting procedure with Lorentzian profiles. The interpretation of results is supported via electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis which enables us to distinguish the orientation effects of ceramic grains from other underlying contributions. The last ones are mainly localized at the grain boundaries, that is testified by the appearance of a specific Raman mode. Their origin seems to be caused by stoichiometric oxygen variations or impurities, as well as strain inhomogeneities. The perspectives of this work include both the implementation of other mathematical methods and in-depth analysis of UO 2 structure damaged by irradiation (anisotropic effects, role of grain boundaries). (author) [fr

  13. NY-BR-1 Antigen Expression and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients: Clinicopathological and Prognostic Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghazy, Amany A; Ghoneim, Hossam E; Zoheir, Malak; Ahmed, Ahmed S; Sorour, Sally S; Abouelella, Amira M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the world. In Egypt, it ranks the first among female malignancies with incidence of 37.7%. Over the last decades, the integration of prognostic and predictive markers in treatment decisions has led to more individualized and optimized therapy. NY-BR-1 antigen has been shown to be frequently expressed in breast cancers. The study aimed to assess the tissue expression of NY-BR-1 antigen and serum IgG antibody to this antigen in Egyptian breast cancer females. The study was conducted on 60 females (10 healthy, 10 having benign breast lesions, 40 with malignant breast cancer). NY-BR-1 Ag expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG was assessed by ELISA. Results revealed a significant difference in NY-BR-1 Ag expression between benign and malignant breast cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between NY-BR-1 antigen expression and estrogen receptor's status (P = 0.019), stage of the disease (P = 0.008), menopausal status (P = 0.008), lymph node involvement (P = 0.022) and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG (P = 0.032) among the studied individuals. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in anti-NY-BR-1 IgG O.D. results among malignant breast cancer group. It is correlated with tumor type (P < 0.001) and progesterone receptor status (P = 0.038). In conclusion, our work may represent a step towards identification of a new prognostic marker specific for breast cancer.

  14. 76 FR 34865 - Safety Zone; Rochester Harbor Festival, Genesee River, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Rochester Harbor Festival, Genesee River, Rochester, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Genesee River, Rochester, NY for the Rochester Harbor Festival fireworks. This zone is intended to...

  15. 76 FR 20532 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Niagara River, Niagara Falls, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Niagara River, Niagara Falls, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Niagara River... Marina and a portion of the Niagara River, Niagara Falls, NY during the Boom Days Fireworks on April 16...

  16. 78 FR 24677 - Safety Zone; XA The Experimental Agency Fireworks, Pier 34, East River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Final Rule This rule establishes a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the East River, in... Fireworks, Pier 34, East River, NY. (a) Regulated Area. The following area is a temporary safety zone: all... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; XA The Experimental Agency Fireworks, Pier 34, East River, NY AGENCY: Coast...

  17. 76 FR 51885 - Safety Zone; Thunder on Niagara, Niagara River, North Tonawanda, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... River, North Tonawanda, NY. This temporary safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Niagara River during the Thunder on Niagara powerboat races. This temporary safety zone is...-AA00 Safety Zone; Thunder on Niagara, Niagara River, North Tonawanda, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...

  18. 75 FR 52021 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Port Clarence, Nome County... the human remains was made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in...

  19. 75 FR 33327 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the... College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of...

  20. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from... College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Quassarte...

  1. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from.... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry...

  2. 77 FR 39406 - Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION..., NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Port Bay during the Tom Graves... necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks. This zone...

  3. 75 FR 13454 - Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast... navigable waters of Huntington Bay, New York due to the annual Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships. The..., ``Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY'' (Docket number USCG...

  4. 75 FR 38710 - Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast... Regulation on the navigable waters of Huntington Bay, New York due to the annual Fran Schnarr Open Water... ``Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY'' in the Federal...

  5. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) [Reserved] (c) No vessel shall moor or...

  6. 33 CFR 207.50 - Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.50 Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation. (a...) [Reserved] (n) Trespass on U.S. property. Trespass on U.S. property, or willful injury to the banks, masonry...

  7. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use...

  8. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds. Southward of a line 312 feet south of and parallel to the south side...

  9. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an area...

  10. The efficiency of micro-Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of complicated mixtures in modern paints: Munch's and Kupka's paintings under study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košařová, V.; Hradil, David; Hradilová, J.; Čermáková, Zdeňka; Němec, I.; Schreiner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 156, MAR (2016), s. 36-46 ISSN 1386-1425 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Micro-Raman spectroscopy * Portable Raman spectrometry * Modern paints Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2016

  11. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  12. Imaging with extrinsic Raman labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N M; Duindam, J J; Puppels, G J; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1996-01-01

    In two separate examples we demonstrate the use of extrinsic Raman scattering probes for imaging of biological samples. First, the distribution of cholesterol in a rat eye Lens is determined with the use of the Raman scattered light from filipin, a molecule which binds specifically to cholesterol.

  13. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  14. Miniature Raman spectrometer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvallet, Joseph; Auz, Bryan; Rodriguez, John; Olmstead, Ty

    2018-02-01

    The development of techniques to rapidly identify samples ranging from, molecule and particle imaging to detection of high explosive materials, has surged in recent years. Due to this growing want, Raman spectroscopy gives a molecular fingerprint, with no sample preparation, and can be done remotely. These systems can be small, compact, lightweight, and with a user interface that allows for easy use and sample identification. Ocean Optics Inc. has developed several systems that would meet all these end user requirements. This talk will describe the development of different Ocean Optics Inc miniature Raman spectrometers. The spectrometer on a phone (SOAP) system was designed using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components, in a rapid product development cycle. The footprint of the system measures 40x40x14 mm (LxWxH) and was coupled directly to the cell phone detector camera optics. However, it gets roughly only 40 cm-1 resolution. The Accuman system is the largest (290x220X100 mm) of the three, but uses our QEPro spectrometer and get 7-11 cm-1 resolution. Finally, the HRS-30 measuring 165x85x40 mm is a combination of the other two systems. This system uses a modified EMBED spectrometer and gets 7-12 cm-1 resolution. Each of these units uses a peak matching algorithm that then correlates the results to the pre-loaded and customizable spectral libraries.

  15. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry Street...

  16. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  17. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  18. Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A; Cuellar, Maryann; Uerpmann, Carsten; Lenain, Bruno; Lewis, Ian R

    2017-01-01

    Adoption of Quality by Design (QbD) principles, regulatory support of QbD, process analytical technology (PAT), and continuous manufacturing are major factors effecting new approaches to pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing. In this review, we highlight new technology developments, data analysis models, and applications of Raman spectroscopy, which have expanded the scope of Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology. Emerging technologies such as transmission and enhanced reflection Raman, and new approaches to using available technologies, expand the scope of Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical manufacturing, and now Raman spectroscopy is successfully integrated into real-time release testing, continuous manufacturing, and statistical process control. Since the last major review of Raman as a pharmaceutical PAT in 2010, many new Raman applications in bioprocessing have emerged. Exciting reports of in situ Raman spectroscopy in bioprocesses complement a growing scientific field of biological and biomedical Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy has made a positive impact as a process analytical and control tool for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing, with demonstrated scientific and financial benefits throughout a product's lifecycle.

  19. In Situ Raman Study of Liquid Water at High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Alexandr V; Rashchenko, Sergey V; Goryainov, Sergey V; Likhacheva, Anna Yu; Korsakov, Andrey V

    2018-06-01

    A pressure shift of Raman band of liquid water (H 2 O) may be an important tool for measuring residual pressures in mineral inclusions, in situ barometry in high-pressure cells, and as an indicator of pressure-induced structural transitions in H 2 O. However, there was no consensus as to how the broad and asymmetric water Raman band should be quantitatively described, which has led to fundamental inconsistencies between reported data. In order to overcome this issue, we measured Raman spectra of H 2 O in situ up to 1.2 GPa using a diamond anvil cell, and use them to test different approaches proposed for the description of the water Raman band. We found that the most physically meaningful description of water Raman band is the decomposition into a linear background and three Gaussian components, associated with differently H-bonded H 2 O molecules. Two of these components demonstrate a pronounced anomaly in pressure shift near 0.4 GPa, supporting ideas of structural transition in H 2 O at this pressure. The most convenient approach for pressure calibration is the use of "a linear background + one Gaussian" decomposition (the pressure can be measured using the formula P (GPa) = -0.0317(3)·Δν G (cm -1 ), where Δν G represents the difference between the position of water Raman band, fitted as a single Gaussian, in measured spectrum and spectrum at ambient pressure).

  20. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  1. Raman probe. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Raman probe is deployed in high-level waste tanks with the cone penetrometer (CPT). These technologies are engineered and optimized to work together. All of the hardware is radiation hardened, designed for and tested in the high-radiation, highly caustic chemical environment of US Department of Energy's (DOE's) waste storage tanks. When deployed in tanks, the system is useful for rapidly assessing the species and concentrations of organic-bearing tank wastes. The CPT was originally developed for geological and groundwater applications, with sensors that measure physical parameters such as soil moisture, temperature, and pH. When deployed, it is hydraulically forced directly into the ground rather than using boring techniques utilized by rotary drilling systems. There is a separate Innovative Technology Summary Report for the CPT, so this report will focus on the changes made specifically to support the Raman probe. The most significant changes involve adapting the Raman probe for in-tank and subsurface field use and developing meaningful real-time data analysis. Testing of the complete LLNL system was conducted in a hot cell in the 222-S Laboratory at the Hanford site in summer 1997. Both instruments were tested in situ on solvent-contaminated soils (TCE and PCE) at the Savannah River Site in February and June 1998. This report describes the technology, its performance, its uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  2. Field Raman Spectrograph for Environmental Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvia, J.M.; Haas, J.W.; Spencer, K.M.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.; Forney, R.W.; Johnston, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread contamination found across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex has received considerable attention from the government and public alike. A massive site characterization and cleanup effort has been underway for several years and is expected to continue for several decades more. The scope of the cleanup effort ranges from soil excavation and treatment to complete dismantling and decontamination of whole buildings. To its credit, DOE has supported research and development of new technologies to speed up and reduce the cost of this effort. One area in particular has been the development of portable instrumentation that can be used to perform analytical measurements in the field. This approach provides timely data to decision makers and eliminates the expense, delays, and uncertainties of sample preservation, transport, storage, and laboratory analysis. In this program, we have developed and demonstrated in the field a transportable, high performance Raman spectrograph that can be used to detect and identify contaminants in a variety of scenarios. With no moving parts, the spectrograph is rugged and can perform many Raman measurements in situ with flexible fiber optic sampling probes. The instrument operates under computer control and a software package has been developed to collect and process spectral data. A collection of Raman spectra for 200 contaminants of DOE importance has been compiled in a searchable format to assist in the identification of unknown contaminants in the field

  3. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  4. Molecular selectivity of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxi; Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Song, Yi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Jin; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2015-05-13

    experimentally supported by the change of the UV-visible absorption spectra of molecules when in contact with graphene and these conclusions are theoretically corroborated by first-principles calculations. These research findings are important for gaining fundamental insights into the graphene-molecule interaction and the chemical mechanism in Raman enhancement, as well as for advancing the role of such understanding both in guiding chemical and molecule detection applications and in medical and biological technology developments.

  5. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  6. Frequency shifts in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinth, W.; Kaiser, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonresonant contributions to the nonlinear susceptibility chisup(()3) produce a frequency chirp during stimulated Raman scattering. In the case of transient stimulated Raman scattering, the spectrum of the generated Stokes pulse is found at higher frequencies than expected from spontaneous Raman data. The frequency difference can be calculated from the theory of stimulated Raman scattering. (orig.)

  7. Following lipids in the food chain: determination of the iodine value using Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Zemánek, Pavel; Bernatová, Silvie; Pilát, Zdeněk; Telle, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2012), s. 18-21 ISSN 0966-0941 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman micro-spectroscopy * Raman laser excitation * lipids Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  8. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  9. Ny styring af lærernes autonomi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet ”Ny styring af lærernes autonom?” i bogen Folkeskolen - efter reformen fokuserer på, hvordan en realisering af den vedtagne skolereform og forventningen om en kommende brug af nye forenklede Fælles Mål ud fra en målstyringstænkning ændrer lærernes autonomi til at udøve dømmekraft i...... klasseværelset. Dermed er kapitlets tese, at man ikke – i hvert fald ikke kun – kan tale om et tab af autonomi, men en ændret opfattelse og indhold heraf. Opgaven er derfor at indkredse, hvordan danske læreres autonomi til at udøve professionel dømmekraft forandrer sig, hvis man realiserer idéen om en...... læringsmålstyret undervisning, konkret i form af forenklede Fælles Mål. Og netop spørgsmålet om lærerens autonomi til at udøve professionel dømmekraft bliver i sammenhæng med styring heraf et centralt emne og problematik at afklare. Ikke kun i dansk sammenhæng, men også internationalt....

  10. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Connecticut and Long Island, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  11. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The New York, NY EnviroAtlas Meter-scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data were generated by the University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Laboratory (SAL) under the...

  12. 77 FR 60901 - Safety Zone; Battle of Queenston Heights Bicentennial, Niagara River, Lewiston, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., Docket Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of... Lower Niagara River near the Silo Restaurant, Lewiston, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has...

  13. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... in the visible range can be performed. The simultaneous delivery of the excitation light and collection of the Raman signal from the sample are achieved by means of a doubleclad fiber, whose core and inner cladding act as \\independent" transmission channels. A double-clad fiber coupler allows for the recovery...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work...

  15. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A 3/4... following coordinates: latitude 41°06′12″ N., longitude 72°00′05″ W., latitude 41°07′40″ N., longitude 72°01...

  16. 33 CFR 110.85 - Niagara River, Youngstown, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Niagara River, Youngstown, N.Y... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.85 Niagara River, Youngstown, N.Y. (a) Area 1... of the Niagara River at latitude 43°14′33″ N, longitude 79°03′7.5″ W; thence westerly to a point at...

  17. 33 CFR 162.15 - Manhasset Bay, N.Y.; seaplane restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manhasset Bay, N.Y.; seaplane... Bay, N.Y.; seaplane restricted area. (a) The restricted area. An area in Manhasset Bay between the... line bearing 166°50′ true from latitude 40°50′17.337 N, longitude 73°43′03.877 W, which point is on the...

  18. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  19. Heating by the Raman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p/ 2 , where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets

  20. Rapid identification of staphylococci by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rebrošová, K.; Šiler, Martin; Samek, Ota; Růžička, F.; Bernatová, Silvie; Holá, V.; Ježek, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel; Sokolová, J.; Petráš, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 14846. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : coagulase-negative staphylococci * Raman spectroscopy * rapid identification Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Atmospheric Research in Ny-Aalesund. Proceedings from the Third NySMAC meeting. NILU, Kjeller, Norway, 9.-11. April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floeisand, Inga; Gernandt, Hartwig; Larsen, Elisabeth Stoltz; Stordal, Frode; Wada, Makoto

    1997-07-01

    Leading abstract. The Ny-Aalesund Seminar Series was conceived by NySMAC (Ny-Aalesund Science Managers Committee) as a means of bringing together research scientists involved in programmes running at Ny-Aalesund or having an interest in that area. The first Seminar was held in Potsdam in Germany in May 1995, and included talks which covered all current research disciplines; physical, atmospheric, earth and biological sciences. The Second Seminar was devoted to biological science and particularly to ecology. It was held in Cambridge in UK in February 1996. The subject of this Third Seminar, held in Kjeller in Norway in April 1997, is atmospheric research in Ny-Aalesund. Since the early 1980s a wide range of projects have been carried out on Svalbard and particularly at Ny-Aalesund. Prominent in this research have been several international research programmes with emphasis on topics of e.g. Arctic (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, AMAP), European (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, EMEP) or global (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, IGBP; World Climate Research Programme, WCRP) scales. Atmospheric observations have been carried out in Ny-Aalesund in Svalbard for several years. From the early 1980s, the long range transport of sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosols leading to Arctic Haze, has been studied. As a consequence, EMEP included Ny-Aalesund in their network. In the following years the transport of ozone and chemical precursors were observed, and recently the naturally occurring phenomenon of rapid surface ozone loss has been given particular attention. From the late 1980s observations of the stratospheric ozone layer and related chemical species were undertaken, and the efforts have increased considerably since. Ny-Aalesund is now one of the primary Arctic sites of the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change) network. Important efforts have been undertaken to participate in the European campaigns as the European

  2. Far infrared and Raman response in tetragonal PZT ceramic films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buixaderas, Elena; Kadlec, Christelle; Vaněk, Přemysl; Drnovšek, S.; Uršič, H.; Malič, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2015), s. 219-224 ISSN 0366-3175 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25639S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dielectric response * phonons * FIR spectroscopy * time-domain THz spectroscopy * Raman spectroscopy * effective medium * PZT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.280, year: 2015

  3. Different level of fluorescence in Raman spectra of montmorillonites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ritz, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kupková, J.; Plevová, Eva; Bartoňová, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, May 2016 (2016), s. 7-15 ISSN 0924-2031 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * fluorescence * montmorillonite Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2016

  4. Lanthanum trilactate: Vibrational spectroscopic study - infrared/Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, M.; Novák, Vít; Bartůněk, V.; Člupek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, Nov (2016), s. 123-128 ISSN 0924-2031 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lanthanum trilactate * tris(2-hydroxypropanoato-O1,O2) * lanthanum tris[2-(hydroxy-kappa O)propanoato-kappa O] * Raman spectra * infrared spectra * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2016

  5. Raman microspectroscopy of algal lipid bodies: beta-carotene quantification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pilát, Zdeněk; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šerý, Mojmír; Samek, Ota; Zemánek, Pavel; Nedbal, Ladislav; Trtílek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2012), s. 541-546 ISSN 0921-8971 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/433; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * Microalgae * Trachydiscus minutus * Biotechnology * Carotenoids Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.326, year: 2012

  6. Raman hyperspectral imaging and analysis of fat spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, van G.; Velzen, van E.J.J.; Heussen, P.C.M.; Sovago, M.; Malssen, van K.F.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of fat spreads is of fundamental importance to their sensorial properties such as texture, mouthfeel and spreadability. Fat spreads are water in oil emulsions,with a continuous phase supported by a fat crystal network. Confocal Raman microscopy offers the possibility for the

  7. Reversibility of Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering with Fluorinated Graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Václav; Melníková Komínková, Zuzana; Verhagen, Timotheus; Vejpravová, Jana; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 1700177. ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001821 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : fluorination * graphene * graphene-enhanced Raman * Raman spectroscopy * scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  8. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...

  9. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT-molecular orbi......Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  10. Optimally shaped narrowband picosecond pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David P; Valley, David; Ellis, Scott R; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-09-09

    A comparison between a Fabry-Pérot etalon filter and a conventional grating filter for producing the picosecond (ps) Raman pump pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is presented. It is shown that for pulses of equal energy the etalon filter produces Raman signals twice as large as that of the grating filter while suppressing the electronically resonant background signal. The time asymmetric profile of the etalon-generated pulse is shown to be responsible for both of these observations. A theoretical discussion is presented which quantitatively supports this hypothesis. It is concluded that etalons are the ideal method for the generation of narrowband ps pulses for FSRS because of the optical simplicity, efficiency, improved FSRS intensity and reduced backgrounds.

  11. Determining Gender by Raman Spectroscopy of a Bloodstain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2017-02-07

    The development of novel methods for forensic science is a constantly growing area of modern analytical chemistry. Raman spectroscopy is one of a few analytical techniques capable of nondestructive and nearly instantaneous analysis of a wide variety of forensic evidence, including body fluid stains, at the scene of a crime. In this proof-of-concept study, Raman microspectroscopy was utilized for gender identification based on dry bloodstains. Raman spectra were acquired in mapping mode from multiple spots on a bloodstain to account for intrinsic sample heterogeneity. The obtained Raman spectroscopic data showed highly similar spectroscopic features for female and male blood samples. Nevertheless, support vector machines (SVM) and artificial neuron network (ANN) statistical methods applied to the spectroscopic data allowed for differentiating between male and female bloodstains with high confidence. More specifically, the statistical approach based on a genetic algorithm (GA) coupled with an ANN classification showed approximately 98% gender differentiation accuracy for individual bloodstains. These results demonstrate the great potential of the developed method for forensic applications, although more work is needed for method validation. When this method is fully developed, a portable Raman instrument could be used for the infield identification of traces of body fluids and to obtain phenotypic information about the donor, including gender and race, as well as for the analysis of a variety of other types of forensic evidence.

  12. Exploring Raman spectroscopy for the evaluation of glaucomatous retinal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.; Harper, Matthew M.; Hamouche, Nicolas; Kecova, Helga; Lazic, Tatjana; Yu, Chenxu

    2011-10-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells and subsequent loss of visual function. Early detection of glaucoma is critical for the prevention of permanent structural damage and irreversible vision loss. Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides rapid biochemical characterization of tissues in a nondestructive and noninvasive fashion. In this study, we explored the potential of using Raman spectroscopy for detection of glaucomatous changes in vitro. Raman spectroscopic imaging was conducted on retinal tissues of dogs with hereditary glaucoma and healthy control dogs. The Raman spectra were subjected to multivariate discriminant analysis with a support vector machine algorithm, and a classification model was developed to differentiate disease tissues versus healthy tissues. Spectroscopic analysis of 105 retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from glaucomatous dogs and 267 RGCs from healthy dogs revealed spectroscopic markers that differentiated glaucomatous specimens from healthy controls. Furthermore, the multivariate discriminant model differentiated healthy samples and glaucomatous samples with good accuracy [healthy 89.5% and glaucomatous 97.6% for the same breed (Basset Hounds); and healthy 85.0% and glaucomatous 85.5% for different breeds (Beagles versus Basset Hounds)]. Raman spectroscopic screening can be used for in vitro detection of glaucomatous changes in retinal tissue with a high specificity.

  13. Toward improving fine needle aspiration cytology by applying Raman microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Putsche, Melanie; Bocklitz, Thomas; Clement, Joachim; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Medical diagnosis of biopsies performed by fine needle aspiration has to be very reliable. Therefore, pathologists/cytologists need additional biochemical information on single cancer cells for an accurate diagnosis. Accordingly, we applied three different classification models for discriminating various features of six breast cancer cell lines by analyzing Raman microspectroscopic data. The statistical evaluations are implemented by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVM). For the first model, a total of 61,580 Raman spectra from 110 single cells are discriminated at the cell-line level with an accuracy of 99.52% using an SVM. The LDA classification based on Raman data achieved an accuracy of 94.04% by discriminating cell lines by their origin (solid tumor versus pleural effusion). In the third model, Raman cell spectra are classified by their cancer subtypes. LDA results show an accuracy of 97.45% and specificities of 97.78%, 99.11%, and 98.97% for the subtypes basal-like, HER2+/ER-, and luminal, respectively. These subtypes are confirmed by gene expression patterns, which are important prognostic features in diagnosis. This work shows the applicability of Raman spectroscopy and statistical data handling in analyzing cancer-relevant biochemical information for advanced medical diagnosis on the single-cell level.

  14. Vertical variability of aerosol single-scattering albedo and equivalent black carbon concentration based on in-situ and remote sensing techniques during the iAREA campaigns in Ny-Ålesund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Chilinski, M. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a methodology for obtaining vertical profiles of aerosol single scattering properties based on a combination of different measurement techniques. The presented data were obtained under the iAREA (Impact of absorbing aerosols on radiative forcing in the European Arctic) campaigns conducted in Ny-Ålesund (Spitsbergen) during the spring seasons of 2015-2017. The retrieval uses in-situ observations of black carbon concentration and absorption coefficient measured by a micro-aethalometer AE-51 mounted onboard a tethered balloon, as well as remote sensing data obtained from sun photometer and lidar measurements. From a combination of the balloon-borne in-situ and the lidar data, we derived profiles of single scattering albedo (SSA) as well as absorption, extinction, and aerosol number concentration. Results have been obtained in an altitude range from about 400 m up to 1600 m a.s.l. and for cases with increased aerosol load during the Arctic haze seasons of 2015 and 2016. The main results consist of the observation of increasing values of equivalent black carbon (EBC) and absorption coefficient with altitude, and the opposite trend for aerosol concentration for particles larger than 0.3 μm. SSA was retrieved with the use of lidar Raman and Klett algorithms for both 532 and 880 nm wavelengths. In most profiles, SSA shows relatively high temporal and altitude variability. Vertical variability of SSA computed from both methods is consistent; however, some discrepancy is related to Raman retrieval uncertainty and absorption coefficient estimation from AE-51. Typically, very low EBC concentration in Ny-Ålesund leads to large error in the absorbing coefficient. However, SSA uncertainty for both Raman and Klett algorithms seems to be reasonable, e.g. SSA of 0.98 and 0.95 relate to an error of ±0.01 and ± 0.025, respectively.

  15. Raman spectra, electrochemical redox potentials and intramolucular reorganization due to ionization and excitation of benzodifuranone chromophore

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luňák, S. Jr.; Frumarová, Božena; Mikysek, T.; Vyňuchal, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 570, 10 May (2013), s. 50-55 ISSN 0009-2614 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : benzodifuranone * DFT calculations * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.991, year: 2013

  16. Covalent Reactions on Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Graphene Studied by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovaříček, Petr; Bastl, Zdeněk; Valeš, Václav; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 15 (2016), s. 5404-5408 ISSN 1521-3765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * nanomaterials * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  17. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  18. Raman chemical imaging technology for food and agricultural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents Raman chemical imaging technology for inspecting food and agricultural products. The paper puts emphasis on introducing and demonstrating Raman imaging techniques for practical uses in food analysis. The main topics include Raman scattering principles, Raman spectroscopy measurem...

  19. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, N.S.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Parrish, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 μg g -1 , with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 μg g -1 ; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 ± 40 μg g -1 . A plot of 236 U/ 238 U against 235 U/ 238 U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 ± 0.06) x 10 -3235 U/ 238 U, (3.2 ± 0.1) x 10 -5236 U/ 238 U, and (7.1 ± 0.3) x 10 -6234 U/ 238 U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g -1 DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  20. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, N.S., E-mail: nsl3@alumni.leicester.ac.uk [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.R. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-20

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 {mu}g g{sup -1}; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 {+-} 40 {mu}g g{sup -1}. A plot of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U against {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -3235}U/{sup 238}U, (3.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -5236}U/{sup 238}U, and (7.1 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6234}U/{sup 238}U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g{sup -1} DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  1. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly.

  2. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. 10 Gb/s bidirectional single fibre long reach PON link with distributed Raman amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Kjær, Rasmus; Jeppesen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    We report operation of a single fibre bidirectional 80 km long reach PON link with symmetric up- and-downstream data rate of 10 Gb/s supported by distributed Raman fibre amplification only.......We report operation of a single fibre bidirectional 80 km long reach PON link with symmetric up- and-downstream data rate of 10 Gb/s supported by distributed Raman fibre amplification only....

  4. Strategy for monitoring T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in patients with any HLA class I allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjatic, Sacha; Nagata, Yasuhiro; Jäger, Elke; Stockert, Elisabeth; Shankara, Srinivas; Roberts, Bruce L.; Mazzara, Gail P.; Lee, Sang Yull; Dunbar, P. Rod; Dupont, Bo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Ritter, Gerd; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Knuth, Alexander; Old, Lloyd J.

    2000-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 elicits frequent antibody responses in cancer patients, accompanied by strong CD8+ T cell responses against HLA-A2-restricted epitopes. To broaden the range of cancer patients who can be assessed for immunity to NY-ESO-1, a general method was devised to detect T cell reactivity independent of prior characterization of epitopes. A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the full cDNA sequence of NY-ESO-1 was used to transduce CD8-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells. These modified antigen-presenting cells were then used to restimulate memory effector cells against NY-ESO-1 from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Specific CD8+ T cells thus sensitized were assayed on autologous B cell targets infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding NY-ESO-1. Strong polyclonal responses were observed against NY-ESO-1 in antibody-positive patients, regardless of their HLA profile. Because the vectors do not cross-react immunologically, only responses to NY-ESO-1 were detected. The approach described here allows monitoring of CD8+ T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in the context of various HLA alleles and has led to the definition of NY-ESO-1 peptides presented by HLA-Cw3 and HLA-Cw6 molecules. PMID:11005863

  5. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  6. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Raman Spectroscopy in the screening of soils, ground water, and surface waters for pollutants is described. A probe accessory for conducting surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is undergoing testing for dilute chlorinated solvents

  7. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  8. Dynamics of long ring Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergey V.; Melnikov, Leonid A.; Mazhirina, Yulia A.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical model for dynamics of long fiber ring Raman laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees numerical method. Different regimes of a long ring fiber Raman laser are investigated.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  10. Micro-raman and tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy of carbon allotropes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, G.G.; With, de G.; Loos, J.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data are obtained on various carbon allotropes like diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene and single wall carbon nanotubes by micro-Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging, and the potentials of these techniques for

  11. Detection and quantitative analysis of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide: FY 93 Florida State University Raman spectroscopy report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, C.K.; Vickers, T.J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-11

    This report provides a summary of work to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with tank waste materials. It contains Raman spectra from organics, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetetraacteic acid (HEDTA), imino diacetic acid (IDA), kerosene, tributyl phosphate (TBP), acetone and butanol, anticipated to be present in tank wastes and spectra from T-107 real and BY-104 simulant materials. The results of investigating Raman for determining moisture content in tank materials are also presented. A description of software algorithms developed to process Raman spectra from a dispersive grating spectrometer system and an in initial design for a data base to support qualitative and quantitative application of remote Raman sensing with tank wastes.

  12. Detection and quantitative analysis of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide: FY 93 Florida State University Raman spectroscopy report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, C.K.; Vickers, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a summary of work to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with tank waste materials. It contains Raman spectra from organics, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetetraacteic acid (HEDTA), imino diacetic acid (IDA), kerosene, tributyl phosphate (TBP), acetone and butanol, anticipated to be present in tank wastes and spectra from T-107 real and BY-104 simulant materials. The results of investigating Raman for determining moisture content in tank materials are also presented. A description of software algorithms developed to process Raman spectra from a dispersive grating spectrometer system and an in initial design for a data base to support qualitative and quantitative application of remote Raman sensing with tank wastes

  13. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed......A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  14. Mixture analysis with laser raman spctroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.S.; Bark, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Trace amount of methyl orange was determined in colored medium by resonance Raman spectrometry. Without major modification of a commercial laser Raman spectrometer, the resonance Raman active molecule could be determined satisfactorily in 10sup(-5)M range when the background fluorescence was more than 20 times stronger than the signal. Use of fluorescence quenching agent was found helpful to improve the Raman signal. Suggestions for the improvement of analytical method is presented. (Author)

  15. Raman excitation profiles of hybrid systems constituted by single-layer graphene and free base phthalocyanine: Manifestations of two mechanisms of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, T.; Mojzeš, P.; Melníková Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin; Sutrová, Veronika; Šloufová, I.; Vlčková, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 10 (2017), s. 1270-1281 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphene-enhanced Raman scattering * single-layer graphene * free base phthalocyanine * Raman excitation profiles * photoinduced charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Polymer science (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  16. A phase I study of vaccination with NY-ESO-1f peptide mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51 in patients with cancers expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Midori; Uenaka, Akiko; Wada, Hisashi; Sato, Eiichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Jun; Seto, Yasuyuki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Naomoto, Yoshio; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Oka, Mikio; Pan, Linda; Hoffman, Eric W; Old, Lloyd J; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2011-12-15

    We conducted a phase I clinical trial of a cancer vaccine using a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide (NY-ESO-1 91-110) that includes multiple epitopes recognized by antibodies, and CD4 and CD8 T cells. Ten patients were immunized with 600 μg of NY-ESO-1f peptide mixed with 0.2 KE Picibanil OK-432 and 1.25 ml Montanide ISA-51. Primary end points of the study were safety and immune response. Subcutaneous injection of the NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was well tolerated. Vaccine-related adverse events observed were fever (Grade 1), injection-site reaction (Grade 1 or 2) and induration (Grade 2). Vaccination with the NY-ESO-1f peptide resulted in an increase or induction of NY-ESO-1 antibody responses in nine of ten patients. The sera reacted with recombinant NY-ESO-1 whole protein as well as the NY-ESO-1f peptide. An increase in CD4 and CD8 T cell responses was observed in nine of ten patients. Vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells responded to NY-ESO-1 91-108 in all patients with various HLA types with a less frequent response to neighboring peptides. The findings indicate that the 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide includes multiple epitopes recognized by CD4 and CD8 T cells with distinct specificity. Of ten patients, two with lung cancer and one with esophageal cancer showed stable disease. Our study shows that the NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was well tolerated and elicited humoral, CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in immunized patients. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  17. Raman Microscopy and Microspectroscopy of Biological Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N.M.; Otto, C.; Segers-Nolten, G.M.J.; Greve, J.; Merlin, Jean Claude; Turrell, Sylvia; Huvenne, Jean Pierre

    With a confocal Raman microspectrometer it is possible to collect Raman signal of a volume of only 1 µm3 Therefore, this technique offers the possibility to obtain information about the chemical composition of small cell structures like granules, without destroying the cell [1], This makes Raman

  18. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  19. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Carbon Nanomembranes from Aromatic Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianghui; Mainka, Marcel; Paneff, Florian; Hachmeister, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Huser, Thomas

    2018-02-27

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS) was employed to investigate the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of biphenylthiol, 4'-nitro-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol, and p-terphenylthiol on Au surfaces and their structural transformations into carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) induced by electron irradiation. The high sensitivity of SERS allows us to identify two types of Raman scattering in electron-irradiated SAMs: (1) Raman-active sites exhibit similar bands as those of pristine SAMs in the fingerprint spectral region, but with indications of an amorphization process and (2) Raman-inactive sites show almost no Raman-scattering signals, except a very weak and broad D band, indicating a lack of structural order but for the presence of graphitic domains. Statistical analysis showed that the ratio of the number of Raman-active sites to the total number of measurement sites decreases exponentially with increasing the electron irradiation dose. The maximum degree of cross-linking ranged from 97 to 99% for the three SAMs. Proof-of-concept experiments were conducted to demonstrate potential applications of Raman-inactive CNMs as a supporting membrane for Raman analysis.

  20. Spontaneous CD8 T cell responses against the melanocyte differentiation antigen RAB38/NY-MEL-1 in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Senta M; Gerlinger, Marco; de la Rosa, Olga; Nuber, Natko; Knights, Ashley; Gati, Asma; Laumer, Monika; Strauss, Laura; Exner, Carolin; Schäfer, Niklaus; Urosevic, Mirjana; Dummer, Reinhard; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Mackensen, Andreas; Jaeger, Elke; Lévy, Frédéric; Knuth, Alexander; Jäger, Dirk; Zippelius, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    The melanocyte differentiation Ag RAB38/NY-MEL-1 was identified by serological expression cloning (SEREX) and is expressed in the vast majority of melanoma lesions. The immunogenicity of RAB38/NY-MEL-1 has been corroborated previously by the frequent occurrence of specific Ab responses in melanoma patients. To elucidate potential CD8 T cell responses, we applied in vitro sensitization with overlapping peptides spanning the RAB38/NY-MEL-1 protein sequence and the reverse immunology approach. The identified peptide RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) exhibited a marked response in ELISPOT assays after in vitro sensitization of CD8 T cells from HLA-A *0201(+) melanoma patients. In vitro digestion assays using purified proteasomes provided evidence of natural processing of RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) peptide. Accordingly, monoclonal RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58)-specific T cell populations were capable of specifically recognizing HLA-A2(+) melanoma cell lines expressing RAB38/NY-MEL-1. Applying fluorescent HLA-A2/RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) multimeric constructs, we were able to document a spontaneously developed memory/effector CD8 T cell response against this peptide in a melanoma patient. To elucidate the Ag-processing pathway, we demonstrate that RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) is produced efficiently by the standard proteasome and the immunoproteasome. In addition to the identification of a RAB38/NY-MEL-1-derived immunogenic CD8 T cell epitope, this study is instrumental for both the onset and monitoring of future RAB38/NY-MEL-1-based vaccination trials.

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  2. Detection and quantitative analysis of chemical species in Hanford tank materials using Raman spectroscopy technology: FY94, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, T.J.; Mann, C.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work

  3. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented

  4. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  5. 77 FR 42510 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY; Correction AGENCY: National... of human remains under the control of the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The... Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma...

  6. 78 FR 62293 - Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    ... Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast... zone on the navigable waters of Oyster Bay near Oyster Bay, NY for the Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary... Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display is scheduled for October 19, 2013 and is one of...

  7. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a...

  8. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84 Section 110.84 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock... Triangulation Marker “N-5” on Bird Island Pier; thence southeasterly along the pier a distance of approximately...

  9. Raman microscopic studies of PVD deposited hard ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    PVD hard ceramic coatings grown via the combined cathodic arc/unbalance magnetron deposition process were studied using Raman microscopy. Characteristic spectra from binary, multicomponent, multilayered and superlattice coatings were acquired to gain knowledge of the solid-state physics associated with Raman scattering from polycrystalline PVD coatings and to compile a comprehensive spectral database. Defect-induced first order scattering mechanisms were observed which gave rise to two pronounced groups of bands related to the acoustical (150- 300cm -1 ) and optical (400-7 50cm -1 ) parts of the phonon spectrum. Evidence was gathered to support the theory that the optic modes were mainly due to the vibrations of the lighter elements and the acoustic modes due to the vibrations of the heavier elements within the lattice. A study into the deformation and disordering on the Raman spectral bands of PVD coatings was performed. TiAIN and TiZrN coatings were intentionally damaged via scratching methods. These scratches were then analysed by Raman mapping, both across and along, and a detailed spectral interpretation performed. Band broadening occurred which was related to 'phonon relaxation mechanisms' as a direct result of the breaking up of coating grains resulting in a larger proportion of grain boundaries per-unit-volume. A direct correlation of the amount of damage with band width was observed. Band shifts were also found to occur which were due to the stresses caused by the scratching process. These shifts were found to be the largest at the edges of scratches. The Raman mapping of 'droplets', a defect inherent to PVD deposition processes, found that higher compressive stresses and large amounts of disorder occurred for coating growth onto droplets. Strategies designed to evaluate the ability of Raman microscopy to monitor the extent of real wear on cutting tools were evaluated. The removal of a coating layer and subsequent detection of a base layer proved

  10. Assessment of argon ion laser dispersive Raman spectroscopy for hot cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    Characterization of high-level waste tank materials at Hanford is conducted to support safety assessments and waste treatment activities. Raman spectroscopy is expected to give chemical species information which may assist in defining layering in tank waste. This report describes the dispersive Raman system used in this year's investigation and the methology used to collect and evaluate data taken on tank waste samples. The current argon-ion Raman system was found not to be suitable for screening of tank cores, owing to silica interference, fluorescence interferences, and the extensive time required to collect and treat the data. Recommendations are given for further development

  11. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  12. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE ROCKLAND COUNTY, NY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Demographics by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is a summary of key demographic groups for the EnviroAtlas community. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online...

  14. Matter of 381 Search Warrants Directed to Facebook, 2017 N.Y. Lexis 767, 2; 2017 NY Slip op. 02586, 2 (N.Y. April 4, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trad. Leopoldo Villar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The growing importance of electronic communications gives a special interest to its protection, which involves several fundamental rights and guarantees such as freedom, privacy and property. Due to the importance of the discussion and the different positions it reflects on an issue of such sensitivity and pertinence in the world today, we publish below the translation of the decision by the Supreme Court of the State of New York of April 4, 2017, on the 381 search warrants directed to Facebook user accounts, ordered by the same Court in 2013 in response to a request by the New York County District Attorney, supported in turn by an affidavit given by a prosecutor in a criminal investigation. Facebook filed a motion seeking annulment of the search warrants and disclosure of the Prosecutor’s affidavit but both motions were rejected by the Appeals Division, whereupon Facebook appealed to the New York Supreme Court, which dismissed the appeal. Although most agreed that the appeal was not appropriate, the views of the judges contain interpretations that make their reading very useful and particularly the opinión given by the dissenting judge offers enriching arguments for defending the rights of users of electronic services.

  15. Abnormal anti-Stokes Raman emission as a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering-like process in disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltog, Ioan; Baibarac, Mihaela; Smaranda, Ion; Lefrant, Serge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that, by continuous single beam excitation, one can generate an abnormal anti-Stokes Raman emission (AASRE) whose properties are similar to a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The effect has been observed in materials which possess intrinsically nonlinear properties (LiNbO 3 and CdS), which have the electric susceptibility of third order different from zero, χ (3) ≠ 0, as well as in materials that become nonlinear under resonant optical excitation. In the latter case, we used poly-3,4-ethylendioxythiophene (PEDOT) in its undoped state deposited electrochemically on Au support. Raman studies corroborated with images of optical microscopy demonstrate that the production of AASRE is conditioned by the existence of a particular morphology of the sample able to ensure efficient transport of the light inside the sample through a multiple light scattering mechanism. In this context, it was found that LiNbO 3 and CdS in powder form as well as the PEDOT films layered on a rough Au substrate are suitable morphological forms. We explain AASRE as resulting from a wave-mixing mechanism of the incident laser light ω l with a Stokes-shifted Raman light ω S produced by a spontaneous Raman light scattering process, both strongly scattered inside the sample. As a CARS process, AASRE is conditioned by the achievement of phase-matching requirements, which makes the difference between the wave vectors of mixing light close to zero, Δk =/2k l - k S - k CARS /∼ 0. In condensed media, the small dispersion of the refractive index makes Δk ∼ 0 so that the formation of a favourable phase-matching geometry may be accomplished even at a crossing angle θ of travelling scattered light ω l and ω S . For tightly focused beams, the requirement of phase matching relaxes; it is no longer sensitive to the Raman shift, so that a wide intense anti-Stokes Raman spectrum is observed at an angle larger than the Stokes Raman spectrum.

  16. 75 FR 25290 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of.... Tonawanda Seneca Nation traditional religious leaders have identified these medicine faces as being needed...-Haudenosaunee consultants, the museum has determined that the medicine faces are both sacred objects and objects...

  17. 75 FR 25289 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meet the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of...- 9). They are of Onondaga origin and were made circa 1970. Onondaga Nation traditional religious... that these medicine faces are culturally affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, and are both sacred...

  18. 75 FR 23801 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of... center of the Seneca religious fire. This was agreed upon by representatives from the Seneca Nation of.... Tonawanda Seneca Nation traditional religious leaders have identified these medicine faces as being needed...

  19. 77 FR 30242 - Safety Zone; City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration, Niagara River, Tonawanda, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration, Niagara River, Tonawanda, NY AGENCY: Coast... vessels from a portion of the Niagara River during the City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration fireworks... read as follows: Sec. 165.T09-0352 Safety Zone; City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration, Niagara River...

  20. 76 FR 3516 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., across the Harlem River, New York City, New York. The deviation is necessary to facilitate bridge... River at mile 0.0 has a vertical clearance in the closed position of 55 feet at mean high water and 60...

  1. 77 FR 38486 - Safety Zone; City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration, Niagara River, Tonawanda, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration, Niagara River, Tonawanda, NY AGENCY... safety zone on the Niagara River, Tonawanda, New York. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Niagara River during the City of Tonawanda July 4th Celebration fireworks on July...

  2. 77 FR 42642 - Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... portion of the St. Lawrence River during the City of Ogdensburg Fireworks display. This temporary safety... as follows: Sec. 165.T09-0608 Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River...

  3. 76 FR 40234 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... at mile 0.0, across the Harlem River at New York City, New York. This interim rule is necessary to... The 103rd Street (Wards Island) Pedestrian Bridge, across the Harlem River, mile 0.0, at New York City...

  4. 78 FR 35756 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulation governing the operation of the Willis Avenue Bridge across the Harlem River, mile 1... found at 33 CFR 117.789(b)(2). The bridge owner, New York City Department of Transportation, requested a...

  5. 77 FR 43167 - Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... establishes a temporary safety zone on the waters of the East River in the vicinity of Randall's Island, NY.... This temporary safety zone will restrict vessels from a portion of the East River around the location... area is a temporary safety zone: all navigable waters of the East River within a 164-yard radius of the...

  6. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an... cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the...

  7. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ...: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an inventory of a human remain... human remain should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 7...

  8. 78 FR 45957 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, New York, NY... Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... August 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Dr. Nan Rothschild, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, New York...

  9. 77 FR 42508 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The New York University College of Dentistry has completed an inventory... the New York University College of Dentistry. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  10. 77 FR 42513 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The New York University College of Dentistry has completed an inventory... the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  11. 77 FR 42507 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The New York University College of Dentistry has completed an inventory... the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  12. 77 FR 42640 - Safety Zone; Can-Am Festival Fireworks, Black River Bay, Sackets Harbor, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Can-Am Festival Fireworks, Black River Bay, Sackets Harbor, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... Black River Bay during the Can-Am Festival Fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to... Can-Am Festival Fireworks. This zone will be effective and enforced from 9:15 p.m. until 10:45 p.m. on...

  13. 77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...'' W (Port Morris Stacks), and all waters of the Bronx Kill southeast of the Bronx Kill Rail Road...-AA87 Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... waters of the East River and Bronx Kill, in the vicinity of Randalls and Wards Islands, New York. This...

  14. 75 FR 42608 - Safety Zone; Lyme Community Days, Chaumont Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Lyme Community Days, Chaumont Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for Lyme Community Days Fireworks on Chaumont Bay, Lyme, New York. All vessels are prohibited from transiting the zone except as...

  15. 78 FR 50108 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rochester Museum & Science Center... that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of...

  16. 78 FR 34582 - Safety Zone; Rochester Yacht Club Fireworks, Genesee River, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Rochester Yacht Club Fireworks, Genesee River, Rochester, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... the Genesee River during the Rochester Yacht Club fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is... necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Rochester Yacht Club fireworks display...

  17. En ny vej at gå for udsatte unge i USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg; Andersen, Frans Ørsted

    2018-01-01

    kommet forslag om en ny ungdomsuddannelse, der skal kunne løse nogle af problemerne. Samtidig er der stigende mangel på arbejdskraft indenfor det teknisk-naturvidenskabelige-IT- og håndværks-mæssige område. Et område, som i USA ofte omtales som STEM, dvs. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math. I denne...

  18. SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF METHYLENE CHLORIDE EMISSIONS FROM EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, ROCHESTER, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an assessment of potential control technologies for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane or DCM) emission sources at Eastman Kodak Company's Kodak Park facility in Rochester, NY. DCM is a solvent used by Kodak in the manufacture of cellulo...

  19. 77 FR 39638 - Safety Zone; Barbara Harder Wedding Fireworks, Lake Erie, Lake View, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may disproportionately affect children. 10. Indian Tribal... be held on Lake Erie near Lake View, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate to a gathering of watercraft pose a significant risk to public safety and...

  20. 76 FR 31679 - Saratoga and North Creek Railway, LLC-Operation Exemption-Warren County, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... that it is negotiating the terms of an agreement with the County to restore common carrier rail freight... operate approximately 39.07 miles of rail line owned by Warren County, NY (the County), a noncarrier... Class III rail carrier and a subsidiary of Permian Basin Railways, Inc., which in turn is owned by Iowa...

  1. 77 FR 51912 - Safety Zone; Tom Lyons Productions Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Sands Point, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket Number USCG-2012-0618] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Tom Lyons Productions Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Sands Point, NY AGENCY.... 165.T01-0618 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0618 Safety Zone; Tom Lyons Productions Fireworks, Long...

  2. 77 FR 65360 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and... submersible pumps and related controllers at the Xylem Water Systems U.S.A., LLC, facilities located in Auburn...

  3. 78 FR 50102 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    .... 3003, of the completion of an inventory of associated funerary objects under the control of the....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY AGENCY: National... inventory of associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native...

  4. Contribution of Cultural Eutrophication to Marsh Loss in Jamaica Bay (NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of salt marsh area in the Jamaica Bay Estuary (NY) has accelerated in recent years, with loss rates as high as 45 acres per year. A contributing factor to this acceleration is likely cultural eutrophication due to over 6 decades of sewage effluent inputs. We examined marsh...

  5. 77 FR 46349 - Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... announced by a later notice in the Federal Register. B. Regulatory History and Information This is a first time event with no regulatory history. C. Basis and Purpose The legal basis for this temporary rule is... Bay'' restaurant in Patchogue, NY. This rule will be effective from 8:30 p.m. on November 3, 2012...

  6. 78 FR 74009 - Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0962] Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2011 (76 FR 69614). [[Page 74010

  7. 78 FR 46855 - Safety Zone; East End Maritime Foundation Fireworks Display, Greenport Harbor, Greenport, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; East End Maritime Foundation Fireworks Display, Greenport Harbor, Greenport, NY... temporary rule proposes to establish a safety zone for the East End Maritime Foundation fireworks display....1. 0 2. Add Sec. 165.T01-0600 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0600 Safety Zone; East End Maritime...

  8. 78 FR 27856 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    .... APHIS-2012-0079] Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY... nematode regulations by removing areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties in New York from the list of... nematode, and we determined that regulation of these areas was no longer necessary. As a result of that...

  9. 78 FR 1713 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...-0079] Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY AGENCY: Animal... are amending the golden nematode regulations by removing areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties in... areas in these two counties are free of golden nematode, and we have determined that regulation of these...

  10. 76 FR 60733 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Smith Point Bridge, 6.1, across Narrow Bay, between Smith Point and Fire Island, New York. The deviation is necessary to facilitate bridge...

  11. 78 FR 23845 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Smith Point Bridge, mile 6.1, across Narrow Bay, between Smith Point and Fire Island, New York. The deviation is necessary to facilitate the Smith Point...

  12. Afprøvning af ny feedbackpraksis på UCN Pædagoguddannelsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Eva; Rasmussen, Anna Ørnemose; Stenderup, Mogens Larsen

    2017-01-01

    I forbindelse med implementering af ny pædagoguddannelse (BEK nr 354 af 07/04/2017) har pædagoguddannelsens ledernetværk igangsat flere nationale sektorprojekter herunder projekt Feedbackformer i en kompetencestyret uddannelse. Alle projekternes formål er at understøtte udvikling og implementering...

  13. 75 FR 76943 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ...-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Navigation Area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Hudson River in New York, south of the Troy Locks. This... within the waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when ice is a threat to navigation. DATES...

  14. 78 FR 31454 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... that governs the highway bridge (Troy Green Island) across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy... the regulations for the 112th Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been...

  15. 78 FR 56607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... operation of the highway bridge across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy and Green Island, New York... Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been converted to a fixed bridge. It is...

  16. 76 FR 8654 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Hudson River in New York, south of the Troy Locks. This action is necessary to... Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when ice is a threat to navigation. DATES: This rule is effective in...

  17. 75 FR 15739 - International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,580] International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in response to a petition filed on May 21, 2009 on behalf of workers of International...

  18. 77 FR 38488 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY... restrict vessels from a portion of the St. Lawrence River during the Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce... of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence...

  19. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching at Fire Island (NY) during hurricane Sandy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, P.L.M.; McCall, R.T.; Den Bieman, J.P.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused a breach at Fire Island (NY, USA), near Pelican Island. This paper aims at modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching processes that occured during the hurricane event at this stretch of coast with the numerical model XBeach. By using the default settings, the

  20. 75 FR 11937 - Eagle Sportswear, Inc.; New York, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,023] Eagle Sportswear, Inc.; New York, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974... company official on behalf of workers of Eagle Sportswear, Inc., New York, New York. The petitioner has...

  1. 77 FR 30451 - Safety Zone; Olcott Fireworks, Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY. This proposed rule is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Ontario during the Olcott fireworks display. The safety zone established by this proposed rule is necessary to protect spectators, participants, and vessels from the hazards associated with firework display...

  2. 76 FR 4078 - Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [DA 10-2443; MM Docket No. 99-238; RM-9669] Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the...

  3. Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy to investigate healthy and cancerous colon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, A.; Rezaei, H.; Malekfar, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, spontaneous Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra have been investigated. The samples which were kept in the formalin solution selected from the human's healthy and cancerous colon tissues. The Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra were collected by adding colloidal solution contained silver nanoparticles to the top of the samples. The recorded spectra were compared for the spontaneous Raman spectra of healthy and cancerous colon samples. The spontaneous and surface enhanced Raman scattering data were also collected and compared for both healthy and damaged samples.

  4. Calculation of the Raman intensity in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Marcus; Venezuela, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is one of the most important experimental techniques for characterization of carbon materials because it can give a lot of information about electronic and phonon structure in a non destructive way. We use a third-order quantum field model to obtain the theoretical Raman intensity for graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT). The most important Raman peaks in graphitic materials comes from to the iLo and iTo phonon branches near to Γ and K points and, in this work, we focus our attention on some of these peaks, like the G, D and 2D bands, as a function of laser energy. The electronic and phonon dispersion used in our calculations reproduces the graphene ab initio results with GW corrections and the zone folding method is used to obtain the CNT ones. Our results show that the experimental G band Raman excitation profile for CNT can be reproduced if we use the proper electronic and phonon dispersions. We also show that the phonon dispersion may influence the shape of the graphene D band and the dispersive behavior of the 2D band for graphene and CNT. This work was supported by the Brazilian Nanocarbon Institute of Science and Technology (INCT/Nanocarbono), the Brazilian Network on Carbon Nanotube Research and the Brazilian agency CAPES

  5. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  6. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G.C. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Department of Physics, Government Science College, Chatrapur, Orissa 761 020 (India)]. E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in; Bishoyi, K.C. [P.G. Department of Physics, F.M. College (Autonomous), Balasore, Orissa 756 001 (India); Behera, S.N. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2005-03-15

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G.C.; Bishoyi, K.C.; Behera, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations

  8. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  9. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, J.; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2016), s. 3504-3508 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00431S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05935S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : angular momentum theory * diamagnetic molecules * excited electronic states * magnetic field * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  10. Raman spectroscopy of organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ledinský, Martin; Löper, P.; Niesen, B.; Holovský, Jakub; Moon, S.J.; Yum, J. H.; De Wolf, S.; Fejfar, Antonín; Ballif, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2015), 401-406 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mixed iodide and bromide lead perovskites * micro-Raman mapping * local chemical sensitivity * moisture-induced degradation * lead iodide * photoluminesce Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015

  11. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynariková, K.; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, F.; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, A.; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 11 (2015), s. 29635-29647 ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * bacteria * yeasts * culture media Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.033, year: 2015

  12. Plasmonic Colloidal Nanoantennas for Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectrocopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Tyler J.

    Plasmonic nanoantennas that a support localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) are capable of confining visible light to subwavelength dimensions due to strong electromagnetic field enhancement at the probe tip. Nanoantenna enable optical methods such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), a technique that uses scanning probe microscopy tips to provide chemical information with nanoscale spatial resolution and single-molecule sensitivities. The LSPR supported by the probe tip is extremely sensitive to the nanoscale morphology of the nanoantenna. Control of nanoscale morphology is notoriously difficult to achieve, resulting in TERS probes with poor reproducibility. In my thesis, I demonstrate high-performance, predictable, and broadband nanospectroscopy probes that are fabricated by self-assembly. Shaped metal nanoparticles are organized into dense layers and deposited onto scanning probe tips. When coupled to a metal substrate, these probes support a strong optical resonance in the gap between the substrate and the probe, producing dramatic field enhancements. I show through experiment and electromagnetic modeling that close-packed but electrically isolated nanoparticles are electromagnetically coupled. Hybridized LSPRs supported by self-assembled nanoparticles with a broadband optical response, giving colloidal nanoantenna a high tolerance for geometric variation resulting from fabrication. I find that coupled nanoparticles act as a waveguide, transferring energy from many neighboring nanoparticles towards the active TERS apex. I also use surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to characterize the effects of nanoparticle polydispersity and gap height on the Raman enhancement. These colloidal probes have consistently achieved dramatic Raman enhancements in the range of 108-109 with sub-50 nm spatial resolution. Furthermore, in contrast to other nanospectroscopy probes, these colloidal probes can be fabricated in a scalable fashion with a batch

  13. Detecting Temporal and Spatial Effects of Epithelial Cancers with Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Keller

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cancers, including those of the skin and cervix, are the most common type of cancers in humans. Many recent studies have attempted to use Raman spectroscopy to diagnose these cancers. In this paper, Raman spectral markers related to the temporal and spatial effects of cervical and skin cancers are examined through four separate but related studies. Results from a clinical cervix study show that previous disease has a significant effect on the Raman signatures of the cervix, which allow for near 100% classification for discriminating previous disease versus a true normal. A Raman microspectroscopy study showed that Raman can detect changes due to adjacent regions of dysplasia or HPV that cannot be detected histologically, while a clinical skin study showed that Raman spectra may be detecting malignancy associated changes in tissues surrounding nonmelanoma skin cancers. Finally, results of an organotypic raft culture study provided support for both the skin and the in vitro cervix results. These studies add to the growing body of evidence that optical spectroscopy, in this case Raman spectral markers, can be used to detect subtle temporal and spatial effects in tissue near cancerous sites that go otherwise undetected by conventional histology.

  14. Two-magnon Raman scattering in LiMnPO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon Filho, C.J. [Instituto de Física ”Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Gomes, P.F. [Instituto de Física ”Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Goiás, 75801-615, Jataí, Goiás (Brazil); García-Flores, A.F.; Barberis, G.E. [Instituto de Física ”Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Granado, E., E-mail: egranado@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física ”Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    Two-magnon Raman scattering is observed in the orthophosphate LiMnPO{sub 4}, carrying quantitative information on the magnetic interactions between local Mn{sup 2+} moments. A simulated annealing fitting procedure of the Raman signal to theoretical curves derived from a magnetic Hamiltonian was carried out, taking exchange and anisotropy constants as free fitting parameters. Previously reported inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data [J. Li et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 144410 (2009)] were also used in the fit. It is shown that the combined application of INS and Raman scattering data in the fit reduces the ambiguity of the determined set of exchange parameters with respect to fitting procedures using INS or Raman data independently. The temperature dependence of the Raman signal does not show a collapse of the two-magnon excitations at the long-range magnetic ordering temperature, T{sub N}=34K, supporting significant short-range spin correlations above T{sub N}. - Highlights: • A two-magnon Raman scattering signal was observed in the orthophosphate LiMnPO{sub 4}. • Calculations under the Fleury–Loudon were carried out to simulate the observed signal. • A combined fit using Raman and neutron data yields a robust set of magnetic parameters. • The nearest-neighbor interaction is largely dominant over the remaining terms. • This work is a step forward in combining techniques to obtain exchange constants.

  15. Raman scattering in a Heisenberg S = 1/2 antiferromagnet on the anisotropic triangular lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Natalia; Brenig, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    We investigate two-magnon Raman scattering from the S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice (THAF), considering both isotropic and anisotropic exchange interactions. We find that the Raman intensity for the isotropic THAF is insensitive to the scattering geometry, while both the line profile and the intensity of the Raman response for the anisotropic THAF shows a strong dependence on the scattering geometry. For the isotropic case we present an analytical and numerical study of the Raman intensity including both the effect of renormalization of the one-magnon spectrum by 1 = S corrections and final-state magnonmagnon interactions. The bare Raman intensity displays two peaks related to one-magnon van-Hove singularities. We find that 1 = S self-energy corrections to the one-magnon spectrum strongly modify this intensity profile. The central Raman-peak is significantly enhanced due to plateaus in the magnon dispersion, the high frequency peak is suppressed due to magnon damping, and the overall spectral support narrows considerably. Additionally we investigate final-state interactions by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation to O(1 = S). In contrast to collinear antiferromagnets, the non-collinear nature of the magnetic ground state leads to an irreducible magnon scattering which is retarded and non-separable already to lowest order. We show that final-state interactions lead to a rather broad Raman-continuum centered around approximately twice the 'roton'-energy.

  16. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S; Yuzyuk, Yury I; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Dovbeshko, Galina I; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm −1 ) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  17. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...... fiberbaserede Raman-forstærkere med henblik på at identificere både deres begrænsninger og nye anvendelsesmuligheder i optiske kommunikationssystemer. En numerisk forstærkermodel er blevet udviklet for bedre at forstå forstærkerens dynamik, dens gain- og støjbegrænsninger. Modellen bruges til at forudsige...... forstærkerens statiske og dynamiske egenskaber, og det eftervises at dens resultater er i god overensstemmelse med eksperimentelle forstærkermålinger. Dispersions-kompenserende fiber er på grund af sin store udbredelse og fiberens høje Raman gain effektivitet et meget velegnet Raman gain-medium. Tre nye...

  18. Raman technique application for rubber blends characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitthipong, W.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been employed in a number of studies to examine the morphological changes in a variety of materials. It is a non-destructive analysis method and an equally useful method for the investigation of material structure. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been developed to employ as an imaging instrumentation. Sample surface scanning in X- and Y-axis and sample depth (Z-axis can be carried out by modifying the focus of the laser beam from the Raman microscope. Therefore, three-dimensional images can be thus built by using special software. The surface and bulk properties of immiscible rubber blend were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained by Raman spectroscopy were in good agreement with those of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The combination of Raman spectrometry and SEM clearly elucidates the identification of phases between the dispersed phase and the matrix (continuous phase of the immiscible rubber blends.

  19. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  20. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  1. Reduction of Raman scattering and fluorescence from anvils in high pressure Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierker, S. B.; Aronson, M. C.

    2018-05-01

    We describe a new design and use of a high pressure anvil cell that significantly reduces the Raman scattering and fluorescence from the anvils in high pressure Raman scattering experiments. The approach is particularly useful in Raman scattering studies of opaque, weakly scattering samples. The effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with measurements of two-magnon Raman scattering in La2CuO4.

  2. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  3. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  4. Raman microspectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, and stable-isotope Raman microspectroscopy for biofilm characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Kubryk, Patrick; Niessner, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant form of microbial life on our planet. These aggregates of microorganisms, which are embedded in a matrix formed by extracellular polymeric substances, may colonize nearly all interfaces. Detailed knowledge of microorganisms enclosed in biofilms as well as of the chemical composition, structure, and functions of the complex biofilm matrix and their changes at different stages of the biofilm formation and under various physical and chemical conditions is relevant in different fields. Important research topics include the development and improvement of antibiotics and medical devices and the optimization of biocides, antifouling strategies, and biological wastewater treatment. Raman microspectroscopy is a capable and nondestructive tool that can provide detailed two-dimensional and three-dimensional chemical information about biofilm constituents with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope and without interference from water. However, the sensitivity of Raman microspectroscopy is rather limited, which hampers the applicability of Raman microspectroscopy especially at low biomass concentrations. Fortunately, the resonance Raman effect as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering can help to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, the combination of Raman microspectroscopy with other microscopic techniques, mass spectrometry techniques, or particularly with stable-isotope techniques can provide comprehensive information on monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Here, an overview of different Raman microspectroscopic techniques, including resonance Raman microspectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, for in situ detection, visualization, identification, and chemical characterization of biofilms is given, and the main feasibilities and limitations of these techniques in biofilm research are presented. Future possibilities of and challenges for Raman microspectroscopy alone and in combination with other

  5. In silico SNP analysis of the breast cancer antigen NY-BR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaloglu, Zeynep; Bitzer, Julia; Halama, Niels; Huang, Zhiqin; Zapatka, Marc; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Jäger, Dirk; Zörnig, Inka

    2016-11-18

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies with increasing incidences every year and a leading cause of death among women. Although early stage breast cancer can be effectively treated, there are limited numbers of treatment options available for patients with advanced and metastatic disease. The novel breast cancer associated antigen NY-BR-1 was identified by SEREX analysis and is expressed in the majority (>70%) of breast tumors as well as metastases, in normal breast tissue, in testis and occasionally in prostate tissue. The biological function and regulation of NY-BR-1 is up to date unknown. We performed an in silico analysis on the genetic variations of the NY-BR-1 gene using data available in public SNP databases and the tools SIFT, Polyphen and Provean to find possible functional SNPs. Additionally, we considered the allele frequency of the found damaging SNPs and also analyzed data from an in-house sequencing project of 55 breast cancer samples for recurring SNPs, recorded in dbSNP. Over 2800 SNPs are recorded in the dbSNP and NHLBI ESP databases for the NY-BR-1 gene. Of these, 65 (2.07%) are synonymous SNPs, 191 (6.09%) are non-synoymous SNPs, and 2430 (77.48%) are noncoding intronic SNPs. As a result, 69 non-synoymous SNPs were predicted to be damaging by at least two, and 16 SNPs were predicted as damaging by all three of the used tools. The SNPs rs200639888, rs367841401 and rs377750885 were categorized as highly damaging by all three tools. Eight damaging SNPs are located in the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), a domain known for its frequent involvement in protein-protein interactions. No distinctive features could be observed in the allele frequency of the analyzed SNPs. Considering these results we expect to gain more insights into the variations of the NY-BR-1 gene and their possible impact on giving rise to splice variants and therefore influence the function of NY-BR-1 in healthy tissue as well as in breast cancer.

  6. Analysis of European honeybee (Apis mellifera) wings using ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy: A pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machovič, Vladimír; Lapčák, L.; Havelcová, Martina; Borecká, Lenka; Novotná, M.; Novotná, M.; Javůrková, I.; Langrová, I.; Hájková, Š.; Brožová, A.; Titěra, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2017), s. 22-29 ISSN 1211-3174 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : honeybee wings * ATR-FTIR * Raman spectroscopy * protein * lipid * chitin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry

  7. Enhancement of Raman scattering from monolayer graphene by photonic crystal nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Issei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sota, Masaki; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kato, Yuichiro K.

    Monolayer graphene is an atomically thin two-dimensional material that shows strong Raman scattering, while photonic crystal nanocavities with small mode volumes allow for efficient optical coupling at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrate resonant enhancement of graphene Raman G' band by coupling to photonic crystal cavity modes. Hexagonal-lattice photonic crystal L3 cavities are fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates. and monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition are transferred onto the nanocavities. Excitation wavelength dependence of Raman spectra show that the Raman intensity is enhanced when the G' peak is in resonance with the cavity mode. By performing imaging measurements, we confirm that such an enhancement is only observed at the cavity position. Work supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP16K13613, JP25107002 and MEXT (Photon Frontier Network Program, Nanotechnology Platform).

  8. Raman spectra studies of dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Simone.

    1977-10-01

    This work deals with the homogenous and heterogeneous dipeptides derived from alanine and glycine, in the solid state or in aqueous solutions, in the zwitterions or chlorhydrates form. The Raman spectra comparative study of these various forms of hydrogenated or deuterated compounds allows to specify some of the attributions which are necessary in the conformational study of the like tripeptides. These compounds contain only one peptidic group; therefore there is no possibility of intramolecular hydrogen bond which caracterise vibrations of non bonded peptidic groups and end groups. Infrared spectra of solid dipeptides will be presented and discussed in the near future [fr

  9. H-Index of Astrophysicists at Raman Research Institute: Performance of Different Calculators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, B. M.; Manjunath, M.

    2012-08-01

    H-index, a single number proposed by J. E. Hirsch in 2005 has gained popularity as an index number to measure the research performance of individuals, institutions, universities, etc. There are many calculators to derive the h-in dex number, such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, etc. However, h-index can be calculated manually, provided we have access to a complete list of publications of a scientist and the number of citations received by them. It is observed that h-index for a given scientist at a ny given point of time differs from one calculator to the other. Here is an attempt to calculate the H-index of scientists of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute using Google Scholar Free calculator, Web of Science Paid calculator and The SAO/NASA As trophysics Data System manual calculation and comparison of the results. Application of this h- index phenomenon to the research output of RRI scientists in a group is done while keeping in mi nd Hirsch's systematic in vestigation to predict the position of a scientist using h-index in physics. It is believed that the higher the academic age of a scientist, the higher will be the h-index. An attempt is made to find whether this assumption is true with respect to the sample studied by including the superannuated scientists from Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute under the purview of this study.

  10. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy: Stimulated Raman Gain via Elimination of Cross Phase Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Young Jong; Yu, Jong Wan; Kim, Seong Keun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new femtosecond probe technique by using stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The cross phase modulation in femtosecond time scale associated with off-resonant interaction was shown to be eliminated by integrating the transient gain/loss signal over the time delay between the Raman pump pulse and the continuum pulse. The stimulated Raman gain of neat cyclohexane was obtained to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Spectral and temporal widths of stimulated Raman spectra were controlled by using a narrow band pass filter. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy was proposed as a highly useful probe in time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

  11. Ny krigsførelse i informationsalderen? Om ‘Revolution in Military Affairs’ og Irakkrigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Claus Hansen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Artiklen diskuterer, hvorvidt man efter Golfkrigen kan tale om en ‘Revolu- tion in Military Affairs’ – RMA – som nogle amerikanske krigsteoretikere hævder har fundet sted med anvendelsen af ny teknologi i moderne krigs- førelse. Forfatteren viser, hvordan moderne krigsstrategier har inkorpore- ret ny teknologi og mediebrug som bl.a. informationskrig, ‘Systems of Sys- tems’ og Network Centric Warfare. Forfatteren påpeger, at den strategiske anvendelse af informationsoperationer – herunder ‘embedded’ journalister – ikke har medført en demokratisering af nyhedsdækningen og heller ikke indebærer en øget sandhedsværdi. Afslutningsvis peger forfatteren på behovet for en ‘Revolution in Diplomatic Affairs’.

  12. Dynamics of snow-air mercury exchange at Ny Ålesund during springtime 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manca G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Continuous time series of flux measurements were carried out in Ny Ålesund, Spitsbergen, during a springtime field campaign from 31 of March to 3 of May, 2011. Flux measurements were integrated with mercury speciation analysis in order to understand the fate of mercury during atmospheric elemental gaseous mercury depletion events (AMDEs. Moreover a methodology for quality assurance of flux measurements is presented. Measurements were made at Gruvebadet, 1 km west from the Ny-Ålesund village (78˚55' N, 11˚56' E at an elevation of 18 m above sea level. Ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury, divalent reactive gaseous mercury and particulate phase mercury were semicontinuously measured using an integrated Tekran system. Mercury depletion events were observed during the month of April and were characterized by an incomplete mercury destruction. Indeed Hg0 concentration was never below 0.49 ng m−3.

  13. 85 km Long Reach PON System Using a Reflective SOA-EA Modulator and Distributed Raman Fiber Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Öhman, Filip; Yvind, Kresten

    2006-01-01

    We report on a bidirectional 85 km long reach PON system supported by distributed fiber Raman amplification with a record 7.5 Gb/s remote carrier modulated upstream signal by employing a reflective SOA-EA monolithically integrated circuit......We report on a bidirectional 85 km long reach PON system supported by distributed fiber Raman amplification with a record 7.5 Gb/s remote carrier modulated upstream signal by employing a reflective SOA-EA monolithically integrated circuit...

  14. Nanophotonics with Surface Enhanced Coherent Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Alexander

    Nonlinear nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field of research that aims at detecting and disentangling weak congested optical signatures on the nanoscale. Sub-wavelength field confinement of the local electromagnetic fields and the resulting field enhancement is achieved by utilizing plasmonic near-field antennas. This allows for probing nanoscopic volumes, a property unattainable by conventional far-field microscopy techniques. Combination of plasmonics and nonlinear optical microscopy provides a path to visualizing a small chemical and spatial subset of target molecules within an ensemble. This is achieved while maintaining rapid signal acquisition, which is necessary for capturing biological processes in living systems. Herein, a novel technique, wide-field surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (wfSE-CARS) is presented. This technique allows for isolating weak vibrational signals in nanoscopic proximity to the surface by using chemical sensitivity of coherent Raman microspectroscopy (CRM) and field confinement from surface plasmons supported on a thin gold film. Uniform field enhancement over a large field of view, achieved with surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in wfSE-CARSS, allows for biomolecular imaging demonstrated on extended structures like phospholipid droplets and live cells. Surface selectivity and chemical contrast are achieved at 70 fJ/mum2 incident energy densities, which is over five orders of magnitude lower than used in conventional point scanning CRM. Next, a novel surface sensing imaging technique, local field induced metal emission (LFIME), is introduced. Presence of a sample material at the surface influences the local fields of a thin flat gold film, such that nonlinear fluorescence signal of the metal can be detected in the far-field. Nanoscale nonmetallic, nonfluorescent objects can be imaged with high signal-to-background ratio and diffraction limited lateral resolution using LFIME. Additionally, structure of the

  15. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  16. Designprocesser og arbejdsmiljø: Udvikling af ny teknologi til fødevareindustrien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    1999-01-01

    Dette papir handler om muligheder og betingelser for at inddrage arbejdsmiljøhensyn i designprocesser. Baggrunden for det er, at jeg har haft mulighed for at følge udviklingen af en ny maskine til fødevareindustrien næsten lige fra de grundlæggende idéer blev udviklet og foreløbig frem til i dag,...

  17. Agil Stage-Gate®: ny model for udviklingsprojekter i mellemstore virksomheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsmand, Tomas; Edwards, Kasper; Hvidt, Nicoline

    Lær at udvikle nye produkter hurtigere og med større træfsikkerhed – ved at arbejde i sprint med agile metoder og træffe de rigtige beslutninger med Stage-Gate® Se også tilhørende: "Værktøjskasse til Agil Stage-Gate®: Ny model for udviklingsprojekter i mellemstore virksomheder" på http://dx.doi.org...

  18. Preferential expression of NY-BR-1 and GATA-3 in male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biserni, Giovanni Battista; Di Oto, Enrico; Moskovszky, Linda Eszter; Foschini, Maria Pia; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2018-02-01

    Male breast cancer is an uncommon disease often discovered in advanced stage; thus, in the setting of metastatic adenocarcinoma, breast origin must be taken to account. Breast markers as NY-BR-1, GATA-3, mammaglobin, and BRST-2 are established tools for labelling primary and metastatic female breast cancer; however, none of them has been sufficiently studied in male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of these markers in male breast cancer. Thirty consecutive cases of male breast cancer and eight loco-regional metastases were re-revaluated, assembled in tissue micro array (TMA), and stained with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for NY-BR-1, GATA-3, mammaglobin, and BRST-2. The IHC stains were scored either positive or negative. In addition, concordant expression patterns of primary tumors and matched metastasis were noted. 30 of 30 (100%) primary tumors and 8 of 8 (100%) metastases were positive for NY-BR-1. 30 of 30 (100%) primary tumors and 6 of 8 (75%) metastases were positive for GATA-3. 22 of 30 (73.3%) primary tumors and 6 of 8 (75%) metastases were positive for Mammaglobin. 18 of 30 (60%) primary tumors and 5 of 8 (62.5%) metastases were positive for BRST-2. Differences in staining percentage were not significant with Fisher's exact test. We found a high sensitivity for all the markers analyzed. Moreover, the expression of NY-BR-1 and GATA-3 seemed the most effective for labelling male breast cancer in primary and metastatic setting.

  19. Energy Optimization Assessment at U.S. Army Installations: West Point Military Academy, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    chillers to work unnecessarily more than needed. Other buildings had setpoints at different areas above 55 °F. Many buildings are air-conditioned and... optimal . The cost of 12.5 cents/KWh makes it unlikely, especially where steam adsorption chillers exist. 11.8.2 Solution Use the existing steam...ER D C/ CE R L TR -0 8 -1 4 Energy Optimization Assessment at U.S. Army Installations West Point Military Academy, NY David M

  20. A novel murine T-cell receptor targeting NY-ESO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Shannon F; Parkhurst, Maria R; Hong, Young; Zheng, Zhili; Feldman, Steven A; Rao, Mahadev; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Beard, Rachel E; Xu, Hui; Black, Mary A; Robbins, Paul F; Schrump, David A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Cancer testis antigens, such as NY-ESO-1, are expressed in a variety of prevalent tumors and represent potential targets for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy. DNA encoding a murine anti-NY-ESO-1 TCR gene (mTCR) was isolated from immunized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and inserted into a γ-retroviral vector. Two mTCR vectors were produced and used to transduce human PBL. Transduced cells were cocultured with tumor target cell lines and T2 cells pulsed with the NY-ESO-1 peptide, and assayed for cytokine release and cell lysis activity. The most active TCR construct was selected for production of a master cell bank for clinical use. mTCR-transduced PBL maintained TCR expression in short-term and long-term culture, ranging from 50% to 90% efficiency 7-11 days after stimulation and 46%-82% 10-20 days after restimulation. High levels of interferon-γ secretion were observed (1000-12000 pg/mL), in tumor coculture assays and recognition of peptide-pulsed cells was observed at 0.1 ng/mL, suggesting that the new mTCR had high avidity for antigen recognition. mTCR-transduced T cells also specifically lysed human tumor targets. In all assays, the mTCR was equivalent or better than the comparable human TCR. As the functional activity of TCR-transduced cells may be affected by the formation of mixed dimers, mTCRs, which are less likely to form mixed dimers with endogenous hTCRs, may be more effective in vivo. This new mTCR targeted to NY-ESO-1 represents a novel potential therapeutic option for adoptive cell-transfer therapy for a variety of malignancies.

  1. Immunohistochemical assessment of NY-ESO-1 expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma resection specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Stephen J; Hng, Keng Ngee; Clark, Peter; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Hawkins, Robert E; Ang, Yeng

    2014-04-14

    To assess NY-ESO-1 expression in a cohort of esophageal adenocarcinomas. A retrospective search of our tissue archive for esophageal resection specimens containing esophageal adenocarcinoma was performed, for cases which had previously been reported for diagnostic purposes, using the systematised nomenclature of human and veterinary medicine coding system. Original haematoxylin and eosin stained sections were reviewed, using light microscopy, to confirm classification and tumour differentiation. A total of 27 adenocarcinoma resection specimens were then assessed using immunohistochemistry for NY-ESO-1 expression: 4 well differentiated, 14 moderately differentiated, 4 moderate-poorly differentiated, and 5 poorly differentiated. Four out of a total of 27 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma examined (15%) displayed diffuse cytoplasmic and nuclear expression for NY-ESO-1. They displayed a heterogeneous and mosaic-type pattern of diffuse staining. Diffuse cytoplasmic staining was not identified in any of these structures: stroma, normal squamous epithelium, normal submucosal gland and duct, Barrett's esophagus (goblet cell), Barrett's esophagus (non-goblet cell) and high grade glandular dysplasia. All adenocarcinomas showed an unexpected dot-type pattern of staining at nuclear, paranuclear and cytoplasmic locations. Similar dot-type staining, with varying frequency and size of dots, was observed on examination of Barrett's metaplasia, esophageal submucosal gland acini and the large bowel negative control, predominantly at the crypt base. Furthermore, a prominent pattern of apical (luminal) cytoplasmic dot-type staining was observed in some cases of Barrett's metaplasia and also adenocarcinoma. A further morphological finding of interest was noted on examination of haematoxylin and eosin stained sections, as aggregates of lymphocytes were consistently noted to surround submucosal glands. We have demonstrated for the first time NY-ESO-1 expression by esophageal

  2. Udvikling af en internetsøgestrategi til identifikation af ny medicinsk teknologi inden for prostatacancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Marianne; Vondeling, Hindrik; Douw, Karla

    2007-01-01

    internetsider efter efficiens. Her er efficiens forstået som mindst antal minutter brugt pr. fund af information om en ny væsentlig medicinsk teknologi. Resultater: Strategien består af ti sider, som bør benyttes i følgende rækkefølge: YahooHealth, DoctorsGuide, The National Electronic Library for Medicines...

  3. 77 FR 30443 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish a temporary safety zone on the St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY. This proposed rule is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the St. Lawrence River during the Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce fireworks display. The safety zone established by this proposed rule is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a fireworks display.

  4. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  5. RAMAN-SPECTRA OF HUMAN DENTAL CALCULUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    Raman spectra of human dental calculus have been observed for the first time by use of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral features of calculus were influenced easily by heating caused by laser irradiation. Therefore, the measurements were carried out at relatively low power (5 mW, 1-mu m spot

  6. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  7. Characterization of Materials by Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper reports on the use of phonon spectra obtained with the Raman spectroscopy for characterization of different materials. The Raman scattering spectra obtained for zinc selenide crystals, mixed crystals zinc selenide admixtured with magnesium or beryllium, oxide crystals including strontium lanthanum gallate, molecular crystals of triammonium hydrogen diseleniate and a homologous series of polyoxyethylene glycols are analysed.

  8. INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF ION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both n (CN) and n (CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  9. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  10. Confocal Raman Microscopy; applications in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the use of confocal Raman microscopy and spectroscopy in the field of tissue engineering. Moreover, it describes the combination of two already existing technologies, namely scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy in one apparatus for the enhancement

  11. Raman spectra of human dentin mineral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuda, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    Human dentin mineral has been investigated by using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Fluorescence and thermal problems were largely avoided by preparing dentin samples by grinding and ultrasonic agitation in acetone. The Raman spectral features were consistent with those of impure hydroxyapatite containing

  12. Development of a Raman spectrometer to study surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Chadha, Ridhima; Kapoor, Sudhir; Sarkar, Sisir K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2011-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool, which provides enormous information on the vibrational and structural details of materials. This understanding is not only interesting due to its fundamental importance, but also of considerable importance in optoelectronics and device applications of these materials in nanotechnology. In this report, we begin with a brief introduction on the Raman effect and various Raman scattering techniques, followed by a detailed discussion on the development of an instrument with home-built collection optics attachment. This Raman system consists of a pulsed laser excitation source, a sample compartment, collection optics to collect the scattered light, a notch filter to reject the intense laser light, a monochromator to disperse the scattered light and a detector to detect the Raman signal. After calibrating the Raman spectrometer with standard solvents, we present our results on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) investigations on three different kinds of chemical systems. (author)

  13. 75 FR 58425 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under... remains as a ``Pima ... medicine man.'' The two associated funerary objects were a pair of metal spurs. In...

  14. Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis of the Nyírlugos obsidian core depot find

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kasztovszky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Nyírlugos obsidian core depot find is one of the most important lithic assemblages in the collection of the Hungarian National Museum (HNM. The original set comprised 12 giant obsidian cores, of which 11 are currently on the permanent archaeological exhibition of the HNM. One of the cores is known to be inDebrecen. The first publication attributed the hoard, on the strength of giant (flint blades known from the Early and Middle Copper Age Tiszapolgár and Bodrogkeresztúr cultures, to the Copper Age. In the light of recent finds it is more likely to belong to the Middle Neolithic period. The source area was defined as Tokaj Mts., about100 kmto the NW from Nyírlugos. The size and beauty of the exceptional pieces exclude any invasive analysis. Using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA, we can measure major chemical components and some key trace elements of stone artefacts with adequate accuracy to successfully determine provenance of obsidian. Recent methodological development also facilitated the study of relatively large objects like the Nyírlugos cores. The cores were individually measured by PGAA. The results show that the cores originate from the Carpathian 1 sources, most probably the Viničky variety (C1b. The study of the hoard as a batch is an important contribution to the assessment of prehistoric trade and allows us to reconsider the so-called Carpathian, especially Carpathian 1 (Slovakian sources.

  15. Climatology and time series of surface meteorology in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maturilli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A consistent meteorological dataset of the Arctic site Ny-Ålesund (11.9° E, 78.9° N spanning the 18 yr-period 1 August 1993 to 31 July 2011 is presented. Instrumentation and data handling of temperature, humidity, wind and pressure measurements are described in detail. Monthly mean values are shown for all years to illustrate the interannual variability of the different parameters. Climatological mean values are given for temperature, humidity and pressure. From the climatological dataset, we also present the time series of annual mean temperature and humidity, revealing a temperature increase of +1.35 K per decade and an increase in water vapor mixing ratio of +0.22 g kg−1 per decade for the given time period, respectively. With the continuation of the presented measurements, the Ny-Ålesund high resolution time series will provide a reliable source to monitor Arctic change and retrieve trends in the future. The relevant data are provided in high temporal resolution as averages over 5 (1 min before (after 14 July 1998, respectively, placed on the PANGAEA repository (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.793046. While 6 hourly synoptic observations in Ny-Ålesund by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute reach back to 1974 (Førland et al., 2011, the meteorological data presented here cover a shorter time period, but their high temporal resolution will be of value for atmospheric process studies on shorter time scales.

  16. Decadal Climate Change in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, A Representative Area of the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghu Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, global warming hiatus/slowdown has attracted considerable attention and has been strongly debated. Many studies suggested that the Arctic is undergoing rapid warming and significantly contributes to a continual global warming trend rather than a hiatus. In this study, we evaluated the climate changes of Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, a representative location of the northern North Atlantic sector of the Arctic, based on observational records from 1975–2014. The results showed that the annual warming rate was four times higher than the global mean (+0.76 °C·decade−1 and was also much greater than Arctic average. Additionally, the warming trend of Ny-Ålesund started to slow down since 2005–2006, and our estimates showed that there is a 8–9 years-lagged, but significant, correlation between records of Ny-Ålesund and global HadCRUT4 datasets. This finding indicates that the Arctic was likely experiencing a hiatus pattern, which just appeared later than the low-mid latitudes due to transport processes of atmospheric circulations and ocean currents, heat storage effect of cryospheric components, multidecadal variability of Arctic cyclone activities, etc. This case study provides a new perspective on the global warming hiatus/slowdown debate.

  17. Research Article. A new gravity laboratory in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breili K.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA has recently established a new gravity laboratory in Ny-Ålesund at Svalbard, Norway. The laboratory consists of three independent pillars and is part of the geodetic core station that is presently under construction at Brandal, approximately 1.5 km north of NMA’s old station. In anticipation of future use of the new gravity laboratory, we present benchmark gravity values, gravity gradients, and final coordinates of all new pillars. Test measurements indicate a higher noise level at Brandal compared to the old station. The increased noise level is attributed to higher sensitivity to wind.We have also investigated possible consequences of moving to Brandal when it comes to the gravitational signal of present-day ice mass changes and ocean tide loading. Plausible models representing ice mass changes at the Svalbard archipelago indicate that the gravitational signal at Brandal may differ from that at the old site with a size detectable with modern gravimeters. Users of gravity data from Ny-Ålesund should, therefore, be cautious if future observations from the new observatory are used to extend the existing gravity record. Due to its lower elevation, Brandal is significantly less sensitive to gravitational ocean tide loading. In the future, Brandal will be the prime site for gravimetry in Ny-Ålesund. This ensures gravity measurements collocated with space geodetic techniques like VLBI, SLR, and GNSS.

  18. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  19. Relaxation oscillations in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachen, G.I.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Light pulses created by stimulated Raman scattering having been found to exhibit a complex time dependence which resembles relaxation oscillations. A focused laser pulse generated both forward and backward Raman emissions which appeared as a series of pulses with durations much shorter than the incident laser pulse. Time dependence of the Raman emission was observed directly by use of a streak camera. The number of observed pulses increased with the intensity of the incident pulse, while separation of the pulses in time depended on the length of the focal region. Beam focusing was incorporated in the coupled wave equations for stimulated Raman scattering. These rate equations were then solved numerically, and the results are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The short Raman pulses are created by a process associated with depletion of the incident laser pulse. This process occurs under a broad range of conditions

  20. Raman spectra of filled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, S.M.; Behera, S.N.; Sarangi, S.N.; Entel, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Raman spectra of a metallic carbon nanotube filled with atoms or molecules have been investigated theoretically. It is found that there will be a three way splitting of the main Raman lines due to the interaction of the nanotube phonon with the collective excitations (plasmons) of the conduction electrons of the nanotube as well as its coupling with the phonon of the filling material. The positions and relative strengths of these Raman peaks depend on the strength of the electron-phonon interaction, phonon frequency of the filling atom and the strength of interaction of the nanotube phonon and the phonon of the filling atoms. Careful experimental studies of the Raman spectra of filled nanotubes should show these three peaks. It is also shown that in a semiconducting nanotube the Raman line will split into two and should be observed experimentally

  1. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Zauner, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report low resolution surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) conducted with a chip based spectrometer. The flat field spectrometer presented here is fabricated in SU-8 on silicon, showing a resolution of around 3 nm and a free spectral range of around 100 nm. The output facet...... is projected onto a CCD element and visualized by a computer. To enhance the otherwise rather weak Raman signal, a nanosurface is prepared and a sample solutions is impregnated on this surface. The surface enhanced Raman signal is picked up using a Raman probe and coupled into the spectrometer via an optical...... fiber. The obtained spectra show that chip based spectrometer together with the SERS active surface can be used as Raman sensor....

  2. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  3. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan

    of the aromatics, Toluene and Naphthalene, in the gasoline. Chapter 6 shows examples of other applications of DUV Raman spectroscopy, for instance for the illegal red food additive: Sudan I. For this dye Raman spectra - useful to indicate an unwanted presence - could not be obtained with green or blue laser line...... Raman spectrometry was further applied to detect another illegal food additive, Melamine, in milk sample. It was shown that the DUV constitutes a more sensitive measurement method than traditional Raman spectrometry and realizes a direct detection in liquid milk. In another research field regarding...... spectra of the gasoline samples. It is virtually unimportant what the rest of the sample consisted of. The most intense characteristic band is located at 1381 cm-1. The Raman spectra of home-made artificial gasoline mixtures - with gradually increasing Naphthalene contents - can be used to determine...

  4. Raman scattering of Cisplatin near silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Duplanty, Michael; Torres, Marjorie; Moazzezi, Mojtaba; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2018-03-01

    The Raman scattering of Cisplatin (the first generation of anticancer drugs) has been studied. In the presence of silver nanoparticles, strong modifications of Raman spectra have been observed. The Raman frequencies have been shifted and the line profiles are broadened. We develop a theoretical model to explain the observed features of the Raman scattering. The model takes into account self-consistently the interaction of molecules with surface plasmonic waves excited in the silver nanoparticles, and it provides a qualitative agreement with the observed Raman spectra. We have demonstrated that the using silver nanoparticles can increase sensitivity of the technique, and potentially it has a broader range of applications to both spectroscopy and microscopy.

  5. Pulse compression by Raman induced cavity dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rougemont, F.; Xian, D.K.; Frey, R.; Pradere, F.

    1985-01-01

    High efficiency pulse compression using Raman induced cavity dumping has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Through stimulated Raman scattering the electromagnetic energy at a primary frequency is down-converted and extracted from a storage cavity containing the Raman medium. Energy storage may be achieved either at the laser frequency by using a laser medium inside the storage cavity, or performed at a new frequency obtained through an intracavity nonlinear process. The storage cavity may be dumped passively through stimulated Raman scattering either in an oscillator or in an amplifier. All these cases have been studied by using a ruby laser as the pump source and compressed hydrogen as the Raman scatter. Results differ slightly accordingly to the technique used, but pulse shortenings higher than 10 and quantum efficiencies higher than 80% were obtained. This method could also be used with large power lasers of any wavelength from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared spectral region

  6. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  7. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Almost 100 years after the discovery of the Raman scattering phenomenon, related analytical techniques have emerged as important tools in biomedical sciences. Raman spectroscopy and microscopy are frontier, non-invasive analytical techniques amenable for diverse biomedical areas, ranging from...... molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  8. Værktøjskasse til Agil Stage-Gate®: Ny model for udviklingsprojekter i mellemstore virksomheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsmand, Tomas; Edwards, Kasper; Hvidt, Nicoline

    Denne værktøjskasse er et tillæg for guiden Agil Stage-Gate: Ny model for udviklingsprojekter i mellemstore virksomheder. (http://dx.doi.org/10.11581/DTU:00000028)......Denne værktøjskasse er et tillæg for guiden Agil Stage-Gate: Ny model for udviklingsprojekter i mellemstore virksomheder. (http://dx.doi.org/10.11581/DTU:00000028)...

  9. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V N; Sdvizhenskii, P A; Grishin, M Ya; Filichkina, V A; Shchegolikhin, A N; Pershin, S M

    2018-03-20

    Raman signal enhancement by laser crater production was systematically studied for 785 nm continuous wave laser pumping. Laser craters were produced in L-aspartic acid powder by a nanosecond pulsed solid state neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532 nm, 8 ns, 1 mJ/pulse), while Raman spectra were then acquired by using a commercial spectrometer with 785 nm laser beam pumping. The Raman signal enhancement effect was studied in terms of the number of ablating pulses used, the lens-to-sample distance, and the crater-center-laser-spot offset. The influence of the experiment parameters on Raman signal enhancement was studied for different powder materials. Maximum Raman signal enhancement reached 11 fold for loose powders but decreased twice for pressed tablets. Raman signal enhancement was demonstrated for several diverse powder materials like gypsum or ammonium nitrate with better results achieved for the samples tending to give narrow and deep craters upon the laser ablation stage. Alternative ways of cavity production (steel needle tapping and hole drilling) were compared with the laser cratering technique in terms of Raman signal enhancement. Drilling was found to give the poorest enhancement of the Raman signal, while both laser ablation and steel needle tapping provided comparable results. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Raman signal can be enhanced 10 fold with the aid of simple cavity production by steel needle tapping in rough highly reflective materials. Though laser crater enhancement Raman spectroscopy requires an additional pulsed laser, this technique is more appropriate for automatization compared to the needle tapping approach.

  10. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bonetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potential precocious diagnostic use. Cryosections from surgically explanted stenotic aortic valves (n=4 were studied matching Raman maps against specific histological patterns. Raman maps revealed the presence of phospholipids/triglycerides and cholesterol, which showed spatial overlapping with one another and Raman-identified hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the Raman patterns correlated with those displayed by both von-Kossa-calcium- and Nile-blue-stained serial cryosections. Raman analysis also provided the first identification of carotenoids, which co-localized with the identified lipid moieties. Additional fit concerned the distribution of collagen and elastin. The good correlation of Raman maps with high-affinity staining patterns proved that Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable tool in evaluating calcification degree, alteration/displacement of extracellular matrix components, and accumulation rate of different lipid forms in calcified heart valves. In addition, the novel identification of carotenoids supports the concept that valve stenosis is an atherosclerosis-like valve lesion, consistently with their previous Raman microspectroscopical identification inside atherosclerotic plaques.

  11. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, A; Bonifacio, A; Della Mora, A; Livi, U; Marchini, M; Ortolani, F

    2015-04-20

    Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potential precocious diagnostic use. Cryosections from surgically explanted stenotic aortic valves (n=4) were studied matching Raman maps against specific histological patterns. Raman maps revealed the presence of phospholipids/triglycerides and cholesterol, which showed spatial overlapping with one another and Raman-identified hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the Raman patterns correlated with those displayed by both von-Kossa-calcium- and Nile-blue-stained serial cryosections. Raman analysis also provided the first identification of carotenoids, which co-localized with the identified lipid moieties. Additional fit concerned the distribution of collagen and elastin. The good correlation of Raman maps with high-affinity staining patterns proved that Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable tool in evaluating calcification degree, alteration/displacement of extracellular matrix components, and accumulation rate of different lipid forms in calcified heart valves. In addition, the novel identification of carotenoids supports the concept that valve stenosis is an atherosclerosis-like valve lesion, consistently with their previous Raman microspectroscopical identification inside atherosclerotic plaques.

  12. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  13. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matrices; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  14. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations into the laser-Raman shift spectra of bacterial and mammalian cells have revealed that many Raman lines observed at 4-6 K, do not appear in the spectra of cells held at 300 K. At 300 K, Raman activity, at set frequencies, is observed only when the cells are metabolically active; however, the actual live cell spectrum, between 0 and 3400 cm -1 , has been found to alter in a specific way with time as the cells' progress through their life cycles. Lines above 300 cm -1 , from in vivo Raman active states, appear to shift to higher wave numbers whereas those below 300 cm -1 seem to shift to lower ones. The transient nature of many shift lines observed and the intensity of them when present in the spectrum indicates that, in, vivo, a metabolically induced condensation of closely related states occurs at a set time in the life of a living cell. In addition, the calculated ratio between the intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes lines observed suggests that the metabolically induced 'collective' Raman active states are produced, in vivo, by non thermal means. It appears, therefore, that the energetics of the well established cell 'time clock' may be studied by laser-Raman spectroscopy; moreover, Raman spectroscopy may yield a new type of information regarding the physics of such biological phenomena as nutrition, virus infection and oncogenesis. (orig.)

  15. Templated green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in onion epidermal cells suitable for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Guehlke, Marina

    2016-01-01

    We report fast and simple green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in the epidermal cells of onions after incubation with AgNO3 solution. The biological environment supports the generation of silver nanostructures in two ways. The plant tissue delivers reducing chemicals for the initial...... for one-and two-photon-excited spectroscopy such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS). Our studies demonstrate a templated green preparation of enhancing plasmonic nanoparticles and suggest a new route to deliver silver nanoparticles as basic...... building blocks of plasmonic nanosensors to plants by the uptake of solutions of metal salts....

  16. Direct transfer and Raman characterization of twisted graphene bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmen, R.; Arezki, H.; Boutchich, M.; Ajlani, H.; Oueslati, M.; Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A.

    2015-01-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is constituted of a two-graphene layer with a mismatch angle θ between the two hexagonal structures. It has recently attracted much attention—thanks to its diverse electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the tBLG fabricated by the direct transfer of graphene monolayer prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto another CVD graphene layer remaining attached to the copper foil. We show that high quality and homogeneous tBLG can be obtained by the direct transfer which prevents interface contamination. In this situation, the top graphene layer plays a supporting mechanical role to the bottom graphene layer as confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of annealing tBLG was also investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra exhibit a splitting of the G peak as well as a change in the 2D band shape indicating a possible decoupling of the two monolayers. We attribute these changes to the different interactions of the top and bottom layers with the substrate

  17. Characterization of conducting polyaniline blends by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose E. Pereira da; Temperini, Marcia L.A.; Torresi, Susana I. Cordoba de

    2005-01-01

    Raman and optical microscopy were used to investigate possible interactions between polyaniline (PANI) and different insulating polymers in conducting blends. Resonance Raman and optical micrographs were used to study the physical interaction in materials. Analysis Raman spectra was done investigating the relative intensity of bands at 574 and 607 cm -1 . A relationship between Raman bands and conductivity was also proposed. (author)

  18. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Chair. The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have ...

  19. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  20. Detection of laser damage by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchet, P.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Adar, F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that Raman miroscopy is a sensitive and quantitative tool to detect and characterize laser-induced damage in solids. After damage is induced with single or multiple high power laser pulses, a Raman microprobe maps the surface of the sample with one micron spatial resolution. By performing accurate measurements of the Stokes line, the authors have been able to measure stress, strain and crystallinity in various samples which had been exposed to high intensity pulses. These results are compared to those obtained using conventional tools such as Nomarski microscopy. Major advantages of Raman microscopy include sensitivity to subtle structural modifications and the fact that it gives quantitative measurements

  1. Raman band intensities of tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F

    2005-05-15

    Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of bands in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.

  2. Raman overtone intensities measured for H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the vibrational fundamental, first overtone and second overtone transitions of the H 2 molecule were recorded using visible and ultraviolet argon--ion laser excitation. The ratios of transition polarizability matrix elements, α 01,21 /α 01,11 and α 01,31 /α 01,11 , were determined from the measured intensities of the Q(1) Raman lines v,J=0,1→v',1 for v'=1,2,3. The experimentally determined value of the Raman first overtone matrix element is in good agreement with the value from the best ab initio calculation

  3. Mode-dependent dispersion in Raman line shapes: Observation and implications from ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umapathy, S.; Mallick, B.; Lakshmanna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) enables one to obtain the vibrational structural information of molecular systems including fluorescent materials. URLS, a nonlinear process analog to stimulated Raman gain, involves a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond broadband white light continuum. Under nonresonant condition, the Raman response appears as a negative (loss) signal, whereas, on resonance with the electronic transition the line shape changes from a negative to a positive through a dispersive form. The intensities observed and thus, the Franck-Condon activity (coordinate dependent), are sensitive to the wavelength of the white light corresponding to a particular Raman frequency with respect to the Raman pump pulse wavelength, i.e., there is a mode-dependent response in URLS.

  4. Potential drug – nanosensor conjugates: Raman, infrared absorption, surface – enhanced Raman, and density functional theory investigations of indolic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pięta, Ewa, E-mail: Ewa.Pieta@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Paluszkiewicz, Czesława [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Oćwieja, Magdalena [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-30239 Krakow (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Molecular fragments involved in the adsorption process were determined. • Formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold substrates was observed. • Indole moiety strongly interacts with gold nanosensors. • The synthesized sensors are characterized by high stability and reproducibility. • Chemical mechanism plays a crucial role in the enhancement of the Raman signal. - Abstract: An extremely important aspect of planning cancer treatment is not only the drug efficiency but also a number of challenges associated with the side effects and control of this process. That is why it is worth paying attention to the promising potential of the gold nanoparticles combined with a compound treated as a potential drug. This work presents Raman (RS), infrared absorption (IR) and surface–enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopic investigations of N–acetyl–5–methoxytryptamine (melatonin) and α–methyl–DL–tryptophan, regarding as anti breast cancer agents. The experimental spectroscopic analysis was supported by the quantum-chemical calculations based on the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP 6–311G(d,p) level of theory. The studied compounds were adsorbed onto two colloidal gold nanosensors synthesized by a chemical reduction method using sodium borohydride (SB) and trisodium citrate (TC), respectively. Its morphology characteristics were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been suggested that the NH moiety from the aromatic ring, a well-known proton donor, causes the formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold surface.

  5. Cancer testis antigens and NY-BR-1 expression in primary breast cancer: prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balafoutas, Dimitrios; zur Hausen, Axel; Mayer, Sebastian; Hirschfeld, Marc; Jaeger, Markus; Denschlag, Dominik; Gitsch, Gerald; Jungbluth, Achim; Stickeler, Elmar

    2013-06-03

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) comprise a family of proteins, which are physiologically expressed in adult human tissues solely in testicular germ cells and occasionally placenta. However, CTA expression has been reported in various malignancies. CTAs have been identified by their ability to elicit autologous cellular and or serological immune responses, and are considered potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. The breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1, expressed specifically in normal and malignant breast tissue, has also immunogenic properties. Here we evaluated the expression patterns of CTAs and NY-BR-1 in breast cancer in correlation to clinico-pathological parameters in order to determine their possible impact as prognostic factors. The reactivity pattern of various mAbs (6C1, MA454, M3H67, 57B, E978, GAGE #26 and NY-BR-1 #5) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue micro array series of 210 randomly selected primary invasive breast cancers in order to study the diversity of different CTAs (e.g. MAGE-A, NY-ESO-1, GAGE) and NY-BR-1. These expression data were correlated to clinico-pathological parameters and outcome data including disease-free and overall survival. Expression of at least one CTA was detectable in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 37.2% of the cases. NY-BR-1 expression was found in 46.6% of tumors, respectively. Overall, CTA expression seemed to be linked to adverse prognosis and M3H67 immunoreactivity specifically was significantly correlated to shorter overall and disease-free survival (p=0.000 and 0.024, respectively). Our findings suggest that M3H67 immunoreactivity could serve as potential prognostic marker in primary breast cancer patients. The exclusive expression of CTAs in tumor tissues as well as the frequent expression of NY-BR-1 could define new targets for specific breast cancer therapies.

  6. Identification of NY-BR-1-specific CD4(+) T cell epitopes using HLA-transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardyan, Adriane; Osen, Wolfram; Zörnig, Inka; Podola, Lilli; Agarwal, Maria; Aulmann, Sebastian; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schmidt, Manfred; Halama, Niels; Leuchs, Barbara; von Kalle, Christof; Beckhove, Philipp; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Jäger, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan B

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer represents the second most common cancer type worldwide and has remained the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. The differentiation antigen NY-BR-1 appears overexpressed in invasive mammary carcinomas compared to healthy breast tissue, thus representing a promising target antigen for T cell based tumor immunotherapy approaches. Since efficient immune attack of tumors depends on the activity of tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) effector T cells, NY-BR-1 was screened for the presence of HLA-restricted CD4(+) T cell epitopes that could be included in immunological treatment approaches. Upon NY-BR-1-specific DNA immunization of HLA-transgenic mice and functional ex vivo analysis, a panel of NY-BR-1-derived library peptides was determined that specifically stimulated IFNγ secretion among splenocytes of immunized mice. Following in silico analyses, four candidate epitopes were determined which were successfully used for peptide immunization to establish NY-BR-1-specific, HLA-DRB1*0301- or HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted CD4(+) T cell lines from splenocytes of peptide immunized HLA-transgenic mice. Notably, all four CD4(+) T cell lines recognized human HLA-DR-matched dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with lysates of NY-BR-1 expressing human tumor cells, demonstrating natural processing of these epitopes also within the human system. Finally, CD4(+) T cells specific for all four CD4(+) T cell epitopes were detectable among PBMC of breast cancer patients, showing that CD4(+) T cell responses against the new epitopes are not deleted nor inactivated by self-tolerance mechanisms. Our results present the first NY-BR-1-specific HLA-DRB1*0301- and HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted T cell epitopes that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention against breast cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  7. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components; Espectrometria Raman con componentes opticos simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula [Direccion de Investigacion y Desarrollo, Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2014-07-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  9. An Empirical Study on Raman Peak Fitting and Its Application to Raman Quantitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xueyin; Mayanovic, Robert A

    2017-10-01

    Fitting experimentally measured Raman bands with theoretical model profiles is the basic operation for numerical determination of Raman peak parameters. In order to investigate the effects of peak modeling using various algorithms on peak fitting results, the representative Raman bands of mineral crystals, glass, fluids as well as the emission lines from a fluorescent lamp, some of which were measured under ambient light whereas others under elevated pressure and temperature conditions, were fitted using Gaussian, Lorentzian, Gaussian-Lorentzian, Voigtian, Pearson type IV, and beta profiles. From the fitting results of the Raman bands investigated in this study, the fitted peak position, intensity, area and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the measured Raman bands can vary significantly depending upon which peak profile function is used in the fitting, and the most appropriate fitting profile should be selected depending upon the nature of the Raman bands. Specifically, the symmetric Raman bands of mineral crystals and non-aqueous fluids are best fit using Gaussian-Lorentzian or Voigtian profiles, whereas the asymmetric Raman bands are best fit using Pearson type IV profiles. The asymmetric O-H stretching vibrations of H 2 O and the Raman bands of soda-lime glass are best fit using several Gaussian profiles, whereas the emission lines from a florescent light are best fit using beta profiles. Multiple peaks that are not clearly separated can be fit simultaneously, provided the residuals in the fitting of one peak will not affect the fitting of the remaining peaks to a significant degree. Once the resolution of the Raman spectrometer has been properly accounted for, our findings show that the precision in peak position and intensity can be improved significantly by fitting the measured Raman peaks with appropriate profiles. Nevertheless, significant errors in peak position and intensity were still observed in the results from fitting of weak and wide Raman

  10. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    hydroxyapatite ; 1073cm-1, carbonate from carbonate apatite; 1442cm-1, cholesterol and cholesterol esters. 17 Table 1. Tentative assignment and Raman peak...allowed for the discrete location of atherosclerotic plaques. Raman peaks at 961 and 1073 cm-1 reveal the presence of calcium hydroxyapatite and... hydroxyapatite are located within the vessel wall. Similarly, Fig. 5 maps the Raman intensity of the peak at 1073cm-1, which is indicative of

  11. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; van Welle, A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1984-01-01

    Raman spectra of intact chromosomes (Chinese hamster), recorded with a microspectrometer, are reported. The spectra could be assigned to protein and DNA contributions. Protein and DNA conformations and the ratio of base pairs in DNA were determined.

  12. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  13. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Petrov, Georgi I; Zhang, Hao F; Noojin, Gary D; Denton, Michael L; Thomas, Robert J; Scully, Marlan O

    2009-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species.

  14. Primes of the form x2+ny2 Fermat, class field theory, and complex multiplication

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, David A

    2014-01-01

    An exciting approach to the history and mathematics of number theory ". . . the author's style is totally lucid and very easy to read . . .the result is indeed a wonderful story." -Mathematical ReviewsWritten in a unique and accessible style for readers of varied mathematical backgrounds, the Second Edition of Primes of the Form p = x2+ ny2 details the history behind how Pierre de Fermat's work ultimately gave birth to quadratic reciprocity and the genus theory of quadratic forms. The book also illustrates how results of Euler and Gauss can be fully understood only in the context of class fi

  15. Detection of aniline oligomers on polyaniline-gold interface using resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trchová, Miroslava; Morávková, Zuzana; Dybal, Jiří; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-01-22

    In situ deposited conducting polyaniline films prepared by the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in aqueous media of various acidities on gold and silicon supports were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. Enhanced Raman bands were found in the spectra of polyaniline films produced in the solutions of weak acids or in water on gold surface. These bands were weak for the films prepared in solutions of a strong acid on a gold support. The same bands are present in the Raman spectra of the reaction intermediates deposited during aniline oxidation in water or aqueous solutions of weak or strong acids on silicon removed from the reaction mixture at the beginning of the reaction. Such films are formed by aniline oligomers adsorbed on the surface. They were detected on the polyaniline-gold interface using resonance Raman scattering on the final films deposited on gold. The surface resonance Raman spectroscopy of the monolayer of oligomers found in the bulk polyaniline film makes this method advantageous in surface science, with many applications in electrochemistry, catalysis, and biophysical, polymer, or analytical chemistry.

  16. Raman assisted lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level.......We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level....

  17. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  18. Insight into boron-doped diamond Raman spectra characteristic features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mortet, Vincent; Vlčková Živcová, Zuzana; Taylor, Andrew; Frank, Otakar; Hubík, Pavel; Trémouilles, D.; Jomard, F.; Barjon, J.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 115, May (2017), s. 279-284 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk 7AMB16FR004 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : diamond * boron doping * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  19. Raman scattering in orthorhombic CuInS2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhagan, V.M.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Litvinchuk, A.P.; Kruszynska, M.; Kolny-Olesiak, J.; Himcinschi, C.; Zahn, D.R.T.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of non-resonant and resonant Raman scattering in orthorhombic nanocrystalline CuInS 2 semiconductor, supported by density functional first principle lattice dynamics calculations. A larger number of dominant phonon modes in comparison with standard tetragonal CuInS 2 phases is shown to be associated with peculiarities of cation sublattice ordering and is the ''fingerprint'' of the corresponding structural polymorph. Good overall agreement is found between theoretical and experimental phonon mode frequencies. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Transition polarizability model of induced resonance Raman optical activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, S.; Bouř, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 25 (2013), s. 2152-2158 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : induced resonance Raman optical activity * europium complexes * density functional computations * light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.601, year: 2013

  1. Fragmentation of neutral van der Waals clusters with visible laser light: A new variant of the Raman effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatovic, A.; Howorka, F.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed strong photodissociation (using visible laser light) of neutral van der Waals clusters (Ar, N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , NH 3 ) produced by supersonic expansion and detected by electron ionization/mass spectrometer. Several tests were performed, all of them supporting this surprising discovery. We suggest that Raman induced photodissociation (RIP) is responsible for this phenomenon. This first observation of Raman induced photodissociation provides a new technique for the study of neutral van der Waals clusters. (orig.)

  2. Citrus fruits freshness assessment using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvapil, Fran; Brezestean, Ioana; Barchewitz, Daniel; Glamuzina, Branko; Chiş, Vasile; Cintă Pinzaru, Simona

    2018-03-01

    The freshness of citrus fruits commonly available in the market was non-destructively assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Intact clementine, mandarin and tangerine species were characterised concerning their carotenoids skin Raman signalling in a time course from the moment they were acquired as fresh stock, supplying the market, to the physical degradation, when they were no longer attractive to consumers. The freshness was found to strongly correlate to the peel Raman signal collected from the same area of the intact fruits in a time course of a maximum of 20days. We have shown that the intensity of the carotenoid Raman signal is indeed a good indicator of fruit freshness and introduced a Raman coefficient of freshness (C Fresh ), whose time course is linearly decreasing, with different slope for different citrus groups. Additionally, we demonstrated that the freshness assessment could be achieved using a portable Raman instrument. The results could have a strong impact for consumer satisfaction and the food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology’. PMID:27799424

  4. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.

  5. Prospects for in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, E.B.; Manoharan, R.; Koo, T.-W.; Shafer, K.E.; Motz, J.T.; Fitzmaurice, M.; Kramer, J.R.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a potentially important clinical tool for real-time diagnosis of disease and in situ evaluation of living tissue. The purpose of this article is to review the biological and physical basis of Raman spectroscopy of tissue, to assess the current status of the field and to explore future directions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy and the molecular level information it provides are explained. An overview of the evolution of Raman spectroscopic techniques in biology and medicine, from early investigations using visible laser excitation to present-day technology based on near-infrared laser excitation and charge-coupled device array detection, is presented. State-of-the-art Raman spectrometer systems for research laboratory and clinical settings are described. Modern methods of multivariate spectral analysis for extracting diagnostic, chemical and morphological information are reviewed. Several in-depth applications are presented to illustrate the methods of collecting, processing and analysing data, as well as the range of medical applications under study. Finally, the issues to be addressed in implementing Raman spectroscopy in various clinical applications, as well as some long-term directions for future study, are discussed. (author)

  6. Physical and Chemical Properties of TiOxNy Prepared by Low-Temperature Oxidation of Ultrathin Metal Nitride Directly Deposited on SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yue-Ping; HAN Yan

    2009-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of titanium oxynitride (TiOxNy) formed by low-temperature oxidation of titanium nitride (TIN) layer are investigated for advanced metal-oxide--semiconductor (MOS) gate dielectric application.TiOx Ny exhibits polycrystalline properties after the standard thermal process for MOS device fabrication,showing the preferred orientation at [200].Superior electrical properties of TiOxNy can be maintained before and after the annealing,probably due to the nitrogen incorporation in the oxide bulk and at the interface.Naturally formed transition layer between TiOxNy and SiO2 is also confirmed.

  7. Isolation of a halophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain NY-6 for organic contaminants removal in saline wastewater on ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Yu, Zhenjiang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Dan; Zhao, Fangbo

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this research was to examine if certain strains of Bacillus bacteria, could survive in dry powder products and if so, could the bacteria degrade organic contaminants in saline wastewater on a ship. As part of the study, we isolated 7 domesticated strains named NY1, NY2,..., and NY7, the strain NY6 showed to have the best performance for organic matter degradation and could survive in dry powder more than 3 months. NY6 was identified as Bacillus aerius, based on the morphological and physic-chemical properties. Its optimal growth conditions were as follows: salinity was 2%; temperature was 37°C; pH was in 6.5-7.0; best ratio of C: N: P was 100:5:1. The capability of its dry powder for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal was 800mg COD/g in synthesized marine wastewater with 2% salinity. The spores in the dry powder were 1.972×108 g -1.

  8. Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum induces immune responses to cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 and maturation of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobergslien, Anne; Vasovic, Vlada; Mathiesen, Geir; Fredriksen, Lasse; Westby, Phuong; Eijsink, Vincent GH; Peng, Qian; Sioud, Mouldy

    2015-01-01

    Given their safe use in humans and inherent adjuvanticity, Lactic Acid Bacteria may offer several advantages over other mucosal delivery strategies for cancer vaccines. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immune responses in mice after oral immunization with Lactobacillus (L) plantarum WCFS1 expressing a cell-wall anchored tumor antigen NY-ESO-1. And to investigate the immunostimulatory potency of this new candidate vaccine on human dendritic cells (DCs). L. plantarum displaying NY-ESO-1 induced NY-ESO-1 specific antibodies and T-cell responses in mice. By contrast, L. plantarum displaying conserved proteins such as heat shock protein-27 and galectin-1, did not induce immunity, suggesting that immune tolerance to self-proteins cannot be broken by oral administration of L. plantarum. With respect to immunomodulation, immature DCs incubated with wild type or L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 upregulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secreted a large amount of interleukin (IL)-12, TNF-α, but not IL-4. Moreover, they upregulated the expression of immunosuppressive factors such as IL-10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Although L. plantarum-matured DCs expressed inhibitory molecules, they stimulated allogeneic T cells in-vitro. Collectively, the data indicate that L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 can evoke antigen-specific immunity upon oral administration and induce DC maturation, raising the potential of its use in cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26185907

  9. Awareness Support in Scientific Event Management with ginkgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Maicher, Julian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Maicher, J., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). Awareness Support in Scientific Event Management with ginkgo. In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Knowledge Management and Knowledge Technologies (i-Know’11) (pp. 40:1–40:8). New York, NY, USA: ACM.

  10. Orbital Period Variations in the NY Vir System, Revisited in the Light of New Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baştürk Özgür

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available NY Virginis is an eclipsing binary system with a subdwarf B primary and an M type dwarf secondary. Recent studies (Qian et al. 2012; Lee et al. 2014 suggested the presence of two circumbinary planets with a few Jovian masses within the system. Lee et al. (2014 examined the orbital stabilities of the suggested planets, using the best-fit parameters derived from their eclipse timing variation analysis. They found that the outer companion should be ejected from the system in about 800 000 years. An observational report from Pulley et al. (2016 pointed out that the recent mideclipse times of the binary deviate significantly from the models suggested by Lee et al. (2014. In fact, variations in the orbital period of the system had already been recognized by many authors, but the parameters of these variations vary significantly as new data accumulate. Here, we analyze the eclipse timing variations of the NY Vir system, using new mid-eclipse times that we have obtained together with earlier published measurements in order to understand the nature of the system and constrain its parameters.

  11. Thermal stability of atomic layer deposited WCxNy electrodes for metal oxide semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Danek, Michal; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2018-01-01

    This study is a thorough investigation of the chemical, structural, and electrical stability of W based organo-metallic films, grown by atomic layer deposition, for future use as gate electrodes in advanced metal oxide semiconductor structures. In an earlier work, we have shown that high effective work-function (4.7 eV) was produced by nitrogen enriched films (WCxNy) dominated by W-N chemical bonding, and low effective work-function (4.2 eV) was produced by hydrogen plasma resulting in WCx films dominated by W-C chemical bonding. In the current work, we observe, using x-ray diffraction analysis, phase transformation of the tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride phases after 900 °C annealing to the cubic tungsten phase. Nitrogen diffusion is also observed and is analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. After this 900 °C anneal, WCxNy effective work function tunability is lost and effective work-function values of 4.7-4.8 eV are measured, similar to stable effective work function values measured for PVD TiN up to 900 °C anneal. All the observed changes after annealing are discussed and correlated to the observed change in the effective work function.

  12. Quantum statistics of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering by master equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, P.S.; Dash, J.

    1991-01-01

    A quantum theoretical density matrix formalism of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering using master equation approach is presented. The atomic system is described by two energy levels. The effects of upper level population and the cavity loss are incorporated. The photon statistics, coherence characteristics and the building up of the Stokes field are investigated. (author). 8 figs., 5 refs

  13. Characterization of excited electronic states of naphthalene by resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonang, C.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The first resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering from naphthalene are reported. Fourth harmonic of a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser is used to resonantly excite the 1 B 1u + transition, producing Raman spectra that confirm the dominance of the vibronically active ν 28 (b 3g ) mode and the Franck--Condon active a g modes, ν 5 and ν 3 . A synchronously pumped stilbene dye laser and its second harmonic are employed as the excitation sources for hyper-Raman and Raman scattering from the overlapping 1 B 2 u + and 1 A g - states. The Raman spectra indicate that the equilibrium geometry of naphthalene is distorted primarily along ν 5 , ν 8 , and ν 7 normal coordinates upon excitation to 1 B 2 u + . The hyper-Raman spectrum shows that ν 25 (b 2u ) is the mode principally responsible for vibronic coupling between the 1 A g - and 1 B 2u + states. The results demonstrate the advantageous features of resonance hyper-Raman scattering for the case of overlapping one- and two-photon allowed transitions. Calculations based on simple molecular orbital configurations are shown to qualitatively agree with the experimental results

  14. Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman imaging techniques for cell biological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Bakker schut, T.C.; Bakker Schut, T.C.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Grond, M.; Grond, M.; Maraboeuf, F.; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Figdor, Carl; Greve, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  15. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  16. Development and Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman Imaging Techniques for Cell Biological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PUPPELS, G J; SCHUT, T C B; SIJTSEMA, N M; GROND, M; MARABOEUF, F; DEGRAUW, C G; FIGDOR, C G; GREVE, J

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  17. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  18. Soft mode in cubic PbTiO.sub.3./sub. by hyper-Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, Jiří; Hehlen, B.; Kania, A.; Gregora, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6 (2013), "064101-1"-"064101-4" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08109 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : soft mode * PbTiO 3 * hyper-Raman scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  19. Distributed fiber Raman amplification in long reach PON bidirectional access links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Kjær, Rasmus; Öhman, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Raman fiber amplification is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to support long reach passive optical network (PON) links. An 80 km, bidirectional, single fiber link is demonstrated using both standard intensity optical modulators at 10 Gb/s and up to 7.5 Gb/s using novel...

  20. Hybrid RSOA and fibre raman amplified long reach feeder link for WiMAX-on-fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Martinez, Javier; Yu, Xianbin

    2009-01-01

    A distributed fibre Raman amplified long reach optical access feeder link using a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier in the remote base station is experimentally demonstrated for supporting WiMAXover- fibre transmission. The measured values for the error vector magnitude for quadrature...

  1. Structural changes in polyaniline near the middle oxidation peak studied by in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávková, Zuzana; Dmitrieva, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 9 (2017), s. 1229-1234 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry * polaron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  2. Rhombohedral PLZT piezoelectric microfibers: a combined Raman and X ray diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozielski, L.; Buixaderas, Elena; Clemens, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, 10-11 (2014), s. 982-991 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15110S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Raman scattering * X-ray difraccion * piezoelectrics * microfibers * PLZT * extrusion method Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2014

  3. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Keša, P.; Nikorovič, M.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Valušová, E.; Antalík, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), 015602:1-9 ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : holographic optical tweezers * Raman microspectroscopy * human-computer interface Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016

  4. Following the Mechanisms of Bacteriostatic versus Bactericidal Action Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bernatová, Silvie; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Šerý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šiler, Martin; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.; Dvořáčková, M.; Růžička, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2013), s. 13188-13199 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * antibiotics * bacteria * bactericidal * bacteriostatic Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2013

  5. Microanalysis of clay-based pigments in painted artworks by the means of Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košařová, V.; Hradil, David; Němec, I.; Bezdička, Petr; Kanický, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 11 (2013), s. 1570-1577 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * clay-based pigments * clay minerals * iron oxides * microanalysis of paintings Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013

  6. The effect of a thin gold layer on graphene: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Valeš, Václav; Vejpravová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 105 (2014), s. 60929-60935 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemical vapor deposition * graphene * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  7. Detection of aniline oligomers on polyaniline-gold interface using resonance Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trchová, Miroslava; Morávková, Zuzana; Dybal, Jiří; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2014), s. 942-950 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0911; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * aniline oligomers * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 6.723, year: 2014

  8. Addressing Raman features of individual layers in isotopically labeled Bernal stacked bilayer graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    da Costa, Sara; Ek Weis, Johan; Frank, Otakar; Fridrichová, Michaela; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2016), 025022 ISSN 2053-1583 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene bilayer * Raman spectroscopy * isotope labeling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.937, year: 2016

  9. Polarized Raman scattering study of PSN single crystals and epitaxial thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jan; Rafalovskyi, Iegor; Gregora, Ivan; Borodavka, Fedir; Savinov, Maxim; Drahokoupil, Jan; Tyunina, Marina; Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Bing, Y.; Ye, Z. -G.; Hlinka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2015), "1550013-1"-"1550013-6" ISSN 2010-135X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-04121S; GA ČR GA15-15123S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : PSN * relaxors * ferroelectrics * complex perovskites * Raman scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Analysis of composition homogeneity and polarization orientation of PZTsubmicron fibers by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, J.; Trodahl, J.; Sandu, C.; Gregora, Ivan; Setter, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 10 (2014), s. 2311-2316 ISSN 0955-2219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lead zirconate–titanate * submicron fiber * Raman scattering * ferroelectric Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  11. Raman spectroscopy and magnetic properties of KMCr(CN).sub.6./sub. under pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zentková, M.; Vavra, M.; Mihalik, M.; Mihalik jr., M.; Lazurová, J.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Kamarád, Jiří; Kamenev, K.; Míšek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2015), 22-27 ISSN 0895-7959 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * magnetic phase transition * high pressure * diamond anvil cell Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.014, year: 2015

  12. Diamond/carbon nanotube composites: Raman, FTIR and XPS spectroscopic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Ižák, Tibor; Vretenár, V.; Kozak, Halyna; Holovský, Jakub; Artemenko, Anna; Hulman, M.; Skákalová, V.; Lee, D. S.; Kromka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 111, Jan (2016), s. 54-61 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-22102J; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK037 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * carbon nanotubes * spectroscopy * Raman * FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  13. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinkhasova, P.; Chen, H.; Kaňka, Jiří; Mergo, P.; Du, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 7 (2015), 0711061-0711064 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11038 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Photonic crystal fibers * Raman scattering * Crystal whiskers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  14. Detection of Molecular Chirality by Induced Resonance Raman Optical Activity in Europium Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Bouř, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 44 (2012), s. 11058-11061 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : europium * complexes * raman optical activity * resonance Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.734, year: 2012

  15. A mutation in the envelope protein fusion loop attenuates mouse neuroinvasiveness of the NY99 strain of West Nile virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuliu; Li Li; Woodson, Sara E.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Kinney, Richard M.; Barrett, Alan D.T.; Beasley, David W.C.

    2006-01-01

    Substitutions were engineered individually and in combinations at the fusion loop, receptor-binding domain and a stem-helix structure of the envelope protein of a West Nile virus strain, NY99, and their effects on mouse virulence and presentation of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were assessed. A single substitution within the fusion loop (L107F) attenuated mouse neuroinvasiveness of NY99. No substitutions attenuated NY99 neurovirulence. The L107F mutation also abolished binding of a non-neutralizing MAb, 3D9, whose epitope had not been previously identified. MAb 3D9 was subsequently shown to be broadly cross-reactive with other flaviviruses, consistent with binding near the highly conserved fusion loop

  16. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  17. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  18. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors with Multi-MgxNy/GaN Buffer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, P. C.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, Z. H.; Chang, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer. Compared with conventional HEMT devices with a low-temperature GaN buffer, smaller gate and source-drain leakage current could be achieved with this new buffer design. Consequently, the electron mobility was larger for the proposed device due to the reduction of defect density and the corresponding improvement of crystalline quality as result of using the multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer.

  19. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors with Multi-MgxNy/GaN Buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer. Compared with conventional HEMT devices with a low-temperature GaN buffer, smaller gate and source-drain leakage current could be achieved with this new buffer design. Consequently, the electron mobility was larger for the proposed device due to the reduction of defect density and the corresponding improvement of crystalline quality as result of using the multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer.

  20. Duration of US residence is associated with overweight risk in Filipino immigrants living in NY metro area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afable, Aimee; Ursua, Rhodora; Wyatt, Laura C.; Aguilar, David; Kwon, Simona C.; Islam, Nadia S.; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between years living in the US and overweight risk among a community sample of Filipino adult immigrants living in the New York (NY) metropolitan area. We found a significant and adverse association between years living in the US and overweight risk. Compared to Filipinos who lived in the US less than 5 years, those who lived in the US 10 years or longer had a higher overweight risk; this association was only present among Filipinos who migrated to NY metropolitan area at 30 years or younger. Studies on causal mechanisms explaining this pattern are needed. PMID:26605951

  1. Broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2017-09-01

    We report broadband stimulated Raman measurements in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region, which enables selective probing of the aromatic amino acid residues inside proteins through the resonance enhancement. We combine the narrowband DUV Raman pump pulse (1000 cm-1) to realize stimulated Raman measurements covering a >1500 cm-1 spectral window. The stimulated Raman measurements for neat solvents, tryptophan, tyrosine, and glucose oxidase are performed using 240- and 290-nm Raman pump, highlighting the high potential of the DUV stimulated Raman probe for femtosecond time-resolved study of proteins.

  2. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekka Pajander, Jari; Matero, Sanni Elina; Sloth, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. METHODS: A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet....../particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X......-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. RESULTS: XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis...

  3. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.J.M. de; Somintac, A.; Estacio, E.; Salvador, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nonresonant Raman scattering measurements were performed on a three-layered sample of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots. The thermal annealing step was done during the growth of each GaAs spacer layer, where the substrate temperature was raised from 530 deg. C to 580 deg. C as measured by a pyrometer. Three Raman signals are clearly seen at 264 cm -1 , 268 cm -1 , and 271.5 cm -1 which can be attributed to the longitudinal optic (LO) phonons of the dots. These three different signals are attributed to different degrees of In/Ga alloying or intermixing in each dot layer as a consequence of the different thermal treatments that each layer was subjected to. The Raman signal of the wetting layer (WL) is remarkably weak and suggests erosion of the wetting layer. In contrast, Raman scattering measurements on an unannealed sample show two overlapping features at 259.5 cm -1 and 261.5 cm -1 , which are attributed to the LO phonons of the dots. The WL signal is clearly observed at 251.5 cm -1 . To support our Raman observations, the appearance of a strong higher-energy peak in photoluminescence measurements suggests that alloying did occur in the annealed sample

  5. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajander, Jari Pekka; Matero, Sanni; Sloth, Jakob; Wan, Feng; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet/particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis, whereas Raman analysis indicated that a mixture of α-mannitol and δ-mannitol was detected in the single particles from DKA. In addition Raman mapping indicated that the presence of lysozyme seemed to favor the appearance of α-mannitol in the particles from DKA evidenced by close proximity of lysozyme and mannitol in the particles. It suggested that the presence of lysozyme tend to induce metastable solid state forms upon the drying process.

  6. Measurement of the human esophageal cancer in an early stage with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ishigaki, Mika; Taketani, Akinori; Andriana, Bibin B.; Ishihara, Ryu; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    The esophageal cancer has a tendency to transfer to another part of the body and the surgical operation itself sometimes gives high risk in vital function because many delicate organs exist near the esophagus. So the esophageal cancer is a disease with a high mortality. So, in order to lead a higher survival rate five years after the cancer's treatment, the investigation of the diagnosis methods or techniques of the cancer in an early stage and support the therapy are required. In this study, we performed the ex vivo experiments to obtain the Raman spectra from normal and early-stage tumor (stage-0) human esophageal sample by using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra are collected by the homemade Raman spectrometer with the wavelength of 785 nm and Raman probe with 600-um-diameter. The principal component analysis (PCA) is performed after collection of spectra to recognize which materials changed in normal part and cancerous pert. After that, the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is performed to predict the tissue type. The result of PCA indicates that the tumor tissue is associated with a decrease in tryptophan concentration. Furthermore, we can predict the tissue type with 80% accuracy by LDA which model is made by tryptophan bands.

  7. A quarter century of stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1987-01-01

    To round out a quarter century of SRS the timing of this writing (1986) requires a look ahead of only one year into the future. The proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy present a picture of current activity. Further progress will be made in time-resolved spectroscopy with subpicosecond resolution, in the study of hyper-Raman and other higher order effects with CARS, in extension of resonant Raman excitation in the UV region of spectrum, and in the development of Raman laser sources. During past few years extensive theoretical investigations have been made for four-wave light mixing in the case of one or more very strong light beams. The perturbation approach for those fields ceases to be valid. If only one light field is strong, the usual approach is to make a transformation to a rotating coordinate system so that the strong Hamiltonian for this light field becomes time-independent. Very recently these techniques have been extended to the case of two or more strong fields. CARS-type experiments with strong beams are likely to receive more attention. Extrapolation of the current activities instills confidence in the vitality of stimulated Raman scattering for the foreseeable future

  8. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... del omhandler den tilgangelige molekylære information ved overfladeforstærket resonans Raman spredning (SERRS), samt hvordan adgangen til denne information kan optimeres. Anden del omhandler, hvordan det molekylære informationsindhold kan forøges ved at kombinere polariserede Raman og resonans Raman...... målinger på frie molekyler med multivariat analyse. I tredje og sidste del, som er et eksperimentelt afsnit, præsenteres og diskuteres overfladeforstærkede Raman målinger (SERS) på tre udvalgte pesticider. Afhandlingen indledes med en diskussion af teorien bag SERRS med speciel fokus på den molekylære...

  9. Polarization Sensitive Coherent Raman Measurements of DCVJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Josiah; Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Shiver, Tegan; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy which recently developed into coherent Raman microscopy has been used to produce label free imaging of thin layers of material and find the spatial distributions of certain chemicals within samples, e.g. cancer cells.(1) Not all aspects of coherent scattering have been used for imaging. Among those for example are special polarization sensitive measurements. Therefore we have investigated the properties of polarization sensitive CARS spectra of a highly fluorescent molecule, DCVJ.(2) Spectra has been recorded by using parallel polarized and perpendicular polarized excitations. A special polarization arrangement was developed to suppress the non-resonant background scattering from the sample. These results can be used to improve the imaging properties of a coherent Raman microscope in the future. This is the first time coherent Raman polarization sensitive measurements have been used to characterize the vibrational modes of DCVJ. 1: K. I. Gutkowski, et al., ``Fluorescence of dicyanovinyl julolidine in a room temperature ionic liquid '' Chemical Physics Letters 426 (2006) 329 - 333 2: Fouad El-Diasty, ``Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: Spectroscopy and microscopy'' Vibrational Spectroscopy 55 (2011) 1-37

  10. Characterization of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Nicotine Utilizing Plasmonic Nanometals for the Applications of Medical and Chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ashley; Rigo, Maria; Seo, Jaetae; HU Team

    2011-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has received a great deal of interest for its applications in biological sensing and cell imaging due to the ease with which it can be used to extract significant data from tissue and cells. This study has focused on the application of SERS for nicotine detection. Liquid nicotine was diluted and combined with Au nanoparticles (NPs). The nicotine-gold solution was analyzed by acquiring Raman spectra data using a Delta Nu Spectrometer. Absorption data shows the characteristic peak of Au NPs at ~528 nm while showing successful aggregation of the nicotine particles. Data taken from Raman spectra shows characteristic Raman shifts of nicotine at ~1030 cm-1 and ~1590 cm-1. Currently work is being done to optimize the SERS signal for nicotine in the 1590-1600 region using higher concentrations of nicotine and various sizes of Au NPs. This work at Hampton University was supported by the National Science Foundation (HRD-0734635 and HRD-063037).

  11. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  12. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and...

  13. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  14. Raman scattering of rare earth hexaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, Norio; Hasegawa, Takumi; Udagawa, Masayuki; Iga, Fumitoshi; Kunii, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering spectra were measured for the rare-earth hexaborides RB 6 (R = Ce, Gd, or Dy). All Raman-active phonons due to B 6 vibrations were observed in the range 600 - 1400 cm -1 . Anomalous peaks were detected below 200 cm -1 , which correspond to vibrations of rare-earth ion excited by second-order Raman scattering process. The intensity and energy of the rare-earth mode decrease with decreasing temperature. This suggests that the rare-earth ion vibrates in a shallow and anharmonic potential due to the boron cage. Using the reported values of mean square displacement of rare-earth ion, we estimated the anharmonic contribution for the rare-earth vibrations.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and natural iowaite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Adebajo, Moses O; Erickson, Kristy L

    2005-02-01

    The chemistry of a magnesium based hydrotalcite known as iowaite Mg6Fe2Cl2(OH)16.4H2O has been studied using Raman spectroscopy. Iowaite has chloride as the counter anion in the interlayer. The formula of synthetic iowaite was found to be Mg5.78Fe2.09(Cl,(CO3)0.5)(OH)16.4H2O. Oxidation of natural iowaite results in the formation of Mg4FeO(Cl,CO3) (OH)8.4H2O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the iowaite is a layered structure with a d(001) spacing of 8.0 angtsroms. For synthetic iowaite three Raman bands at 1376, 1194 and 1084 cm(-1) are attributed to CO3 stretching vibrations. These bands are not observed for the natural iowaite but are observed when the natural iowaite is exposed to air. The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows three bands at 708, 690 and 620 cm(-1) and upon exposure to air, two broad bands are found at 710 and 648 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of synthetic iowaite has a very broad band at 712 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows an intense band at 527 cm(-1). The air oxidized iowaite shows two bands at 547 and 484 cm(-1) attributed to the (CO3)(2-)nu2 bending mode. Raman spectroscopy has proven most useful for the study of the chemistry of iowaite and chemical changes induced in natural iowaite upon exposure to air.

  16. Phonon populations by nanosecond-pulsed Raman scattering in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compaan, A.; Lee, M.C.; Trott, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the first time-resolved Raman studies of phonon populations under pulsed-laser-annealing conditions, a number of cw Raman studies have been performed which provide a much improved basis for interpreting the pulsed Raman data. Here we present new pulsed Raman results and interpret them with reference to temperature-dependent resonance effects, high-carrier-density effects, phonon anharmonicity, and laser-induced strain effects. The pulsed Raman data: Stokes to anti-Stokes ratios, shift and shape of the first-order peak, and second-order spectra: indicate the existence of a phase in which the Raman signal disappears followed by a rapidly cooling solid which begins within 300 K of the 1685 K normal melting temperature of Si. We identify a major difficulty in pulsed Raman studies in Si to be the decrease in Raman intensity at high temperatures

  17. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on a flat graphene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weigao; Ling, Xi; Xiao, Jiaqi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Xu, Hongxing; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an attractive analytical technique, which enables single-molecule sensitive detection and provides its special chemical fingerprints. During the past decades, researchers have made great efforts towards an ideal SERS substrate, mainly including pioneering works on the preparation of uniform metal nanostructure arrays by various nanoassembly and nanotailoring methods, which give better uniformity and reproducibility. Recently, nanoparticles coated with an inert shell were used to make the enhanced Raman signals cleaner. By depositing SERS-active metal nanoislands on an atomically flat graphene layer, here we designed a new kind of SERS substrate referred to as a graphene-mediated SERS (G-SERS) substrate. In the graphene/metal combined structure, the electromagnetic “hot” spots (which is the origin of a huge SERS enhancement) created by the gapped metal nanoislands through the localized surface plasmon resonance effect are supposed to pass through the monolayer graphene, resulting in an atomically flat hot surface for Raman enhancement. Signals from a G-SERS substrate were also demonstrated to have interesting advantages over normal SERS, in terms of cleaner vibrational information free from various metal-molecule interactions and being more stable against photo-induced damage, but with a comparable enhancement factor. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a freestanding, transparent and flexible “G-SERS tape” (consisting of a polymer-layer-supported monolayer graphene with sandwiched metal nanoislands) to enable direct, real time and reliable detection of trace amounts of analytes in various systems, which imparts high efficiency and universality of analyses with G-SERS substrates. PMID:22623525

  18. Raman spectroscopy reveals biophysical markers in skin cancer surgical margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J.; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Fox, Matthew C.; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2018-02-01

    The recurrence rate of nonmelanoma skin cancer is highly related to the residual tumor after surgery. Although tissueconserving surgery, such as Mohs surgery, is a standard method for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, they are limited by lengthy and costly frozen-section histopathology. Raman spectroscopy (RS) is proving to be an objective, sensitive, and non-destructive tool for detecting skin cancer. Previous studies demonstrated the high sensitivity of RS in detecting tumor margins of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, those studies rely on statistical classification models and do not elucidate the skin biophysical composition. As a result, we aim to discover the biophysical differences between BCC and primary normal skin structures (including epidermis, dermis, hair follicle, sebaceous gland and fat). We obtained freshly resected ex vivo skin samples from fresh resection specimens from 14 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. Raman images were acquired from regions containing one or more structures using a custom built 830nm confocal Raman microscope. The spectra were grouped using K-means clustering analysis and annotated as either BCC or each of the five normal structures by comparing with the histopathology image of the serial section. The spectral data were then fit by a previously established biophysical model with eight primary skin constituents. Our results show that BCC has significant differences in the fit coefficients of nucleus, collagen, triolein, keratin and elastin compared with normal structures. Our study reveals RS has the potential to detect biophysical changes in resection margins, and supports the development of diagnostic algorithms for future intraoperative implementation of RS during Mohs surgery.

  19. Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis of different sperm regions: a species comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, S; Da Costa, R; Wübbeling, F; Redmann, K; Schlatt, S

    2018-04-01

    are unique to the midpiece as they might be a reference to the identification of sperm mitochondria, whose function is highly correlated with that of sperm. In the future, Raman micro-spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in assessment of male fertility. N/A. This work was supported by BMBF project 'Sperm Ident' (FKZ:13N13024) and the DAAD-CRUP bilateral exchange program (AI A06/16-57213087). S.A. is a recipient of a fellowship from the Portuguese foundation for science and technology (FCT-SFRH/BPD/110160/2015) and R.DC. is a recipient of a DAAD PhD stipend (91590556). There is no competing interest.

  20. Chemical and geochemical composition of spring-summer Arctic aerosol collected at Ny Alesund, Svalbard Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Cappelletti, David; Giardi, Fabio; Grotti, Marco; Lucarelli, Franco; Moroni, Beatrice; Nava, Silvia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2017-04-01

    Since March 2010, spring-summer (usually March - September) campaigns were continuously carried out at the Italian Gruvebadet Observatory, Ny Alesund, Svalbard Island. Aerosol was sampled by PM10 (daily) and 4-stage (4-day resolution) collector devices and size distribution was evaluated at 10 min resolution in the range 10 nm - 20 um (106 size classes by a TSI SMPS-APS integrated system). Six-year (2010-2015) PM10 and size-segregated (>10, 10-2.5, 2.5-1, metal content (major and trace metals, including Rare Earth Elements - REEs, by PIXE and ICP-MS), Pb isotopic composition (by ICP-MS) and Elemental and Organic Carbon (EC-OC) concentrations. The data set was elaborated by multi-parametric statistical analysis (Positive Matrix Factorization - PMF), in order to identifying and quantifying the contribution of the main anthropic and natural aerosol sources. Particular attention was spent in evaluating the anthropic contribution of nss-sulphate, nitrate, EC and heavy metals during the Arctic Haze in spring. The isotopic composition of Pb was used in identifying the source areas (North America, Greenland, North Europe, Siberia, Iceland) of anthropic emissions as a function of seasonality (different atmospheric circulation pathway). Crustal metals and, especially, REEs anomalies (with respect to the Chondrite-normalized profile) allowed characterizing the dust emissions from their Potential Source Areas (PSA). Biogenic markers (especially methane sulfonic acid - MSA - and bio-nss-sulphate) was used to obtain relevant information about the relationship between marine biogenic activity (primary productivity) and sea ice coverage and atmospheric conditions (irradiance, temperature, circulation pathways). The seasonal pattern of the nitrate deposition was also investigated. Chemical and geochemical measurements were compared with high-resolution size distribution and back-trajectory cluster analysis in order to understand the seasonal pattern of the contributions of long

  1. Composition and sources of winter and summertime aerosols at Ny Alesund, Spitsbergen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Cornille, P.; Pacyna, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Filter samples of < 2.5 μm aerosol were collected in (late) winter of 1983, 1984, 1986, and 1987 and in the summer of 1984, 1986, and 1987 at Ny Alesund, Spitsbergen, and analyzed for over 40 elements by a combination of INAA and PIXE. The data sets of the various sampling campaigns and the combined winter and combined summer data were examined by receptor modeling, including absolute principal component analysis (APCA), chemical mass balance (CMB) and multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques. APCA yielded four components, both for the winter and for the summer aerosol. For the winter aerosol, the components were identified as a general pollution component, crustal dust, sea-salt, and a halogen (Br,I) component. The CMB and MLR calculations were used to obtain source (source region) apportionments for the anthropogenic trace elements and for sulfate. For the summer, about 50% of the sulfate was attributed to a marine biogenic source

  2. Evaluation of the ceramographies of the KNK II/1 test zone fuel assembly NY-202-IA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, F.

    1983-12-01

    From the 211 fuel pins of the KNK II/1 fuel assembly NY-202-IA six intact fuel pins were selected in addition to the defective pin for destructive post-irradiation examinations in the Hot Cells of the KfK Karlsruhe. The assembly had been unloaded due to a pin failure after 192 equivalent full-power days and a maximum burnup of 5.4 %. The main aspect of these investigations was to record the fuel and fuel pin behavior and thus to allow a comparison of the status before and after irradiation. The results can also be used for comparative calculations and adaptations of existing calculational models. This report documents in detailed form the results of the fuel and fuel pin examinations [de

  3. Strømmålinger for ny forbindelse over Limfjorden i Lindholmlinien ved Aalborg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Larsen, Torben

    På foranledning af "Undersøgelsesgruppen af 1. maj 1975", repræsenteret ved Rambøll og Hannemann A/S, Nørresundby har laboratoriet i november og december udført en række strømmålinger i området mellem Egholm og jernbanebroen i Limfjorden ved Aalborg med henblik på at fremskaffe et grundlag...... for vurderingen af besejlingsforholdene ved en kommende ny forbindelse over limfjorden ved lindholmlinien. Ved undersøgelsens planlægning har medvirket civilingeniør J. C. Schmidt, Rambøll og Hannemann A/S, ingeniørdocent H. F. Burchart og civilingeniør Torben Larsen. Herværende rapport er udarbejdet af Torben...

  4. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  5. Upgrade of an old Raman Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of a conventional Jeol Raman spectrometer with a single channel photo multiplier detector is described. New optical components (fibres, mirror, lens and CCD detector) have been chosen to design a high quality and easy-to-use instrument. Tests have shown that with this modified...... spectrometer Raman spectra can be acquired of a quality comparable to the spectra obtained previously, but the time needed to obtain a spectrum is markedly reduced. Selected test spectra and a simple calibration procedure to obtain the wavenumber values from the band CCD pixel position are presented....

  6. Raman spectroscopic study of reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, R. A.

    1990-12-01

    The Raman spectra of reacting molecules in liquids can yield information about various aspects of the reaction dynamics. The author discusses the analysis of Raman spectra for three prototypical unimolecular reactions, the rotational isomerization of n-butane and 1,2-difluoroethane, and the barrierless exchange of axial and equatorial hydrogens in cyclopentane via pseudorotation. In the first two cases the spectra are sensitive to torsional oscillations of the gauche conformer, and yield estimates of the torsional solvent friction. In the case of cyclopentane, the spectra can be used to discriminate between different stochastic models of the pseudorotation dynamics, and to determine the relevant friction coefficients.

  7. Blood proteins analysis by Raman spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, D. N.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Lykina, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Kuzmina, T. P.; Davydkin, I. L.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to study the possibility of plasma proteins (albumin, globulins) concentration measurement using Raman spectroscopy setup. The blood plasma and whole blood were studied in this research. The obtained Raman spectra showed significant variation of intensities of certain spectral bands 940, 1005, 1330, 1450 and 1650 cm-1 for different protein fractions. Partial least squares regression analysis was used for determination of correlation coefficients. We have shown that the proposed method represents the structure and biochemical composition of major blood proteins.

  8. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  9. Raman spectroscopy: a structural probe of glycosaminoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, R.; Stanley, H.E.; Yannas, I.V.

    1978-01-01

    The authors report the first Raman spectroscopic study of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate and hyaluronic acid, both in solution and in the solid state. To aid in spectral identification, infrared spectra were also recorded from films of these samples. Vibrational frequencies for important functional groups like the sulfate groups, glycosidic linkages, C-OH and the N-acetyl group can be identified from the Raman spectra. Certain differences in the spectra of the different glycosaminoglycans can be interpreted in terms of the geometry of the various substituents, while other differences can be related to differences in chemical composition. (Auth.)

  10. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D. [Department of Physics, 1150 University Avenue, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  11. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S Klar

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC.We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165 peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels.These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment.

  12. NY-ESO-1- and survivin-specific T-cell responses in the peripheral blood from patients with glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Poiret, Thomas; Persson, Oscar

    2018-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma is grim. Ex vivo expanded tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-reactive T-cells from patients with glioma may represent a viable source for anticancer-directed cellular therapies. Immunohistochemistry was used to test the survivin (n = 40 samples) and NY-ESO...

  13. 75 FR 23800 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meets the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of... responsibility within the Haudenosaunee Confederacy to bring back national cultural patrimony and sacred objects... not have the authority to do so. Furthermore, Onondaga Nation traditional religious leaders have...

  14. 75 FR 23799 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meets the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of... responsibility within the Haudenosaunee Confederacy to bring back national cultural patrimony and sacred objects... not have the authority to do so. Furthermore, Onondaga Nation traditional religious leaders have...

  15. MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen expression during human gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are expressed in several cancers and during normal adult male germ cell differentiation. Little is known about their role in fetal development of human germ cells. METHODS: We examined expression of the CTAs MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 in fetal gonads...

  16. 75 FR 29727 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 37 Under Alternative Site Framework Orange County, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... Zone 37 Under Alternative Site Framework Orange County, NY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign... reorganization of general-purpose zones; Whereas, Orange County, New York, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 37... under the ASF with a service area of Orange County, New York, adjacent to the New York/Newark Customs...

  17. 75 FR 24612 - Order Finding That the Zone 6-NY Financial Basis Contract Traded on the IntercontinentalExchange...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Order Finding That the Zone 6-NY Financial Basis Contract.... Although Transco's Zone 6 hub is a major trading center for natural gas in the United States and, as noted... AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Final order. SUMMARY: On October 9, 2009, the...

  18. Examination of Below-Ground Structure and Soil Respiration Rates of Stable and Deteriorating Salt Marshes in Jamaica Bay (NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan imaging is currently being used to examine below-ground peat and root structure in cores collected from salt marshes of Jamaica Bay, part of the Gateway National Recreation Area (NY). CAT scans or Computer-Aided Tomography scans use X-ray equipment to produce multiple i...

  19. 76 FR 29797 - Westpoint Home, Inc., New York Corporate Sales Office, New York, NY, Including Employees Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... Home, Inc., New York Corporate Sales Office, working off-site in Illinois, Georgia, Minnesota, Indiana...,218B, TA-W-74,218C, TA-W-74,218D] Westpoint Home, Inc., New York Corporate Sales Office, New York, NY, Including Employees Working Off-Site in Illinois, Georgia, Minnesota, Indiana, North Carolina; Westpoint...

  20. En ny historie om guld og svovl - guld-svovlbindingen i thiolers adsorption på guldnanopartikler og plane guldoverflader

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    En netop publiceret større australsk-dansk undersøgelse giver ny indsigt i, hvordan thioldækkede Au-overflader er opbygget. Det har betydning for design, syntese og dannelsesmekanismer for Au-nanopartikler og Au-overflader med skræddersyede fysiske og kemiske egenskaber....

  1. RAMAN THE MAN, HIS CONTRIBUTION AND HIS MESSAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GV

    Since research careers did not exist back then, Raman decided to join the .... the sea is blue, Raman was constantly thinking about the quantum aspect ..... Referring to the many papers published by Raman in the Journal of ... After that, the creative period ceases abruptly, though scientific .... science of international quality.

  2. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have occupied the ...

  3. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes | Liu | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the addition of NaOH or KOH on commercial Degussa Titania P25 was investigated using TEM, Raman and in situ Raman spectroscopy. Treatment of titania with conc. NaOH generated a tubular material corresponding to a sodium titanate. An in situ Raman study on the sodium titanate nanotubes as a function ...

  4. Analyzing the fundamental properties of Raman amplification in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    The Raman response of germanosilicate fibers is presented. This includes not only the material dependence but also the relation between the spatial-mode profile of the light and the Raman response in the time and frequency domain. From the Raman-gain spectrum, information is derived related...

  5. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas...... the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient is derived using a classical electromagnetic model. We also present experimental verification of our theoretical findings....

  6. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives...

  7. Lattice dynamics of binary and ternary phases in Ti–Si–C system: A combined Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wdowik, U.D.; Twardowska, A.; Mȩdala-Wa̧sik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of the x-ray diffraction and the Raman spectroscopy experiments on the multiphase Ti–Si–C system containing Ti_3SiC_2 as the major phase and TiSi_2, TiC_x, and Ti_5Si_3/Ti_5Si_3C_x impurity phases are reported. Experimental studies are supported by the density functional theory calculations of the Raman spectra performed for the major and concomitant phases. The effect of carbon vacancies and impurities on the TiC_x and Ti_5Si_3C_x Raman spectra is investigated. It is shown that identification and refinement of the phase composition of the multicomponent Ti–Si–C system based on the theoretical Raman spectroscopy can be achieved when both frequencies and intensities of the simulated Raman-active modes are simultaneously considered. - Highlights: • Multiphase Ti-Si-C system is explored by Raman spectroscopy and DFT methods. • Ab initio Raman spectra of Ti3SiC2, TiSi2, TiCx, Ti5Si3/Ti5Si3Cx are investigated. • Raman intensities play key role in refinement of spectra from multiphase samples.

  8. Lattice dynamics of binary and ternary phases in Ti–Si–C system: A combined Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wdowik, U.D., E-mail: sfwdowik@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Twardowska, A.; Mȩdala-Wa̧sik, M.

    2015-11-15

    Results of the x-ray diffraction and the Raman spectroscopy experiments on the multiphase Ti–Si–C system containing Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} as the major phase and TiSi{sub 2}, TiC{sub x}, and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}C{sub x} impurity phases are reported. Experimental studies are supported by the density functional theory calculations of the Raman spectra performed for the major and concomitant phases. The effect of carbon vacancies and impurities on the TiC{sub x} and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}C{sub x} Raman spectra is investigated. It is shown that identification and refinement of the phase composition of the multicomponent Ti–Si–C system based on the theoretical Raman spectroscopy can be achieved when both frequencies and intensities of the simulated Raman-active modes are simultaneously considered. - Highlights: • Multiphase Ti-Si-C system is explored by Raman spectroscopy and DFT methods. • Ab initio Raman spectra of Ti3SiC2, TiSi2, TiCx, Ti5Si3/Ti5Si3Cx are investigated. • Raman intensities play key role in refinement of spectra from multiphase samples.

  9. A low-cost Raman spectrometer design used to study Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The paper discusses the design of a low cost Raman spectrometer. ... system. We observe both the radial-breathing mode (RBM) and the tangential mode ... broadened due to the inherent tube diameter distribution present in the material.

  10. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  11. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Yingzhou

    2017-08-02

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-M x (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-M x complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS.

  12. NIR–FT Raman, FT–IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Single crystals of (S)-phenylsuccinic acid (SPSA) were grown by the slow evaporation tech- nique and vibrational ... the shift of Raman frequencies, enhancing or weak- ening of .... Harmonic vibrational wave numbers were cal- culated using ...

  13. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  14. Raman imaging using fixed bandpass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landström, L.; Kullander, F.; Lundén, H.; Wästerby, P.

    2017-05-01

    By using fixed narrow band pass optical filtering and scanning the laser excitation wavelength, hyperspectral Raman imaging could be achieved. Experimental, proof-of-principle results from the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) tabun (GA) as well as the common CWA simulant tributyl phosphate (TBP) on different surfaces/substrates are presented and discussed.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of garnet-group minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingsheng, P.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Dien, L.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the natural end members of the garnet-group minerals, which include pyrope, almandine and spessarite of Fe-Al garnet series and grossularite, andradite and uvarovite of Ca-Fe garnet series, have been studied. Measured Raman spectra of these minerals are reasonably and qualitatively assigned to the internal modes, translational and rotatory modes of SiO4 tetrahedra, as well as the translational motion of bivalent cations in the X site. The stretch and rotatory Alg modes for the Fe-Al garnet series show obvious Raman shifts as compared with those for the Ca-Fe garnet series, owing to the cations residing in the X site connected with SiO4 tetrahedra by sharing the two edges. The Raman shifts of all members within either of the series are attributed mainly to the properties of cations in the X site for the Fe-Al garnet series and in the Y site for the Ca-Fe garnet series. ?? 1994 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Raman spectroscopic studies of hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-01-07

    Raman spectroscopic measurements of simple hydrogen and tetrahydrofuran+hydrogen sII clathrate hydrates have been performed. Both the roton and vibron bands illuminate interesting quantum dynamics of enclathrated H(2) molecules. The complex vibron region of the Raman spectrum has been interpreted by observing the change in population of these bands with temperature, measuring the absolute H(2) content as a function of pressure, and with D(2) isotopic substitution. Quadruple occupancy of the large sII clathrate cavity shows the highest H(2) vibrational frequency, followed by triple and double occupancies. Singly occupied small cavities display the lowest vibrational frequency. The vibrational frequencies of H(2) within all cavity environments are redshifted from the free gas phase value. At 76 K, the progression from ortho- to para-H(2) occurs over a relatively slow time period (days). The rotational degeneracy of H(2) molecules within the clathrate cavities is lifted, observed directly in splitting of the para-H(2) roton band. Raman spectra from H(2) and D(2) hydrates suggest that the occupancy patterns between the two hydrates are analogous, increasing confidence that D(2) is a suitable substitute for H(2). The measurements suggest that Raman is an effective and convenient method to determine the relative occupancy of hydrogen molecules in different clathrate cavities.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...

  18. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucleic...

  19. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field tries to drive the electron with its frequency. If the applied field is of the form E = E0eiωt , the driving ..... (CARS),8 coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS), ... gain or loss process in which only two beams are required and it is a self ...

  20. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Fedorov, A. N.; Khokhlova, O. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The laser crater enhanced Raman scattering (LCERS) spectroscopy technique has been systematically studied for chosen sampling strategy and influence of powder material properties on spectra intensity enhancement. The same nanosecond pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 0.1-1.5 mJ/pulse) was used for laser crater production and Raman scattering experiments for L-aspartic acid powder. Increased sampling area inside crater cavity is the key factor for Raman signal improvement for the LCERS technique, thus Raman signal enhancement was studied as a function of numerous experimental parameters including lens-to-sample distance, wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) and laser pulse energy utilized for crater production. Combining laser pulses of 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths for crater ablation was shown to be an effective way for additional LCERS signal improvement. Powder material properties (particle size distribution, powder compactness) were demonstrated to affect LCERS measurements with better results achieved for smaller particles and lower compactness.

  1. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  2. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  3. Quantum Zeno effect in Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thun, K.; Peřina, Jan; Křepelka, Jaromír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 299, - (2002), s. 19-30 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : quantum measurement * Raman scattering * Zeno effect Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2002

  4. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  5. Measured stimulated Raman gain in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopert, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report is about the stimulated Raman effect in methane due to the nu 1 vibration. For various gas pressures between 150 torr and 30 atm, the Raman lineshape function was both experimentally measured and synthesized using a computer model. The stimulated Raman gain was measured by sending a pump laser beam provided by an argon-ion laser and a weak probe beam provided by a tunable dye laser through a cell of methane gas. The stimulated Raman effect caused some of the energy from the pump beam to be transferred to the probe beam. The intensity of the pump beam was low so the gain of the probe beam was on the order of parts per million. A two detector arrangement and a differential amplifier system that had a feedback loop to balance the detectors was constructed to measure the small gains. A detailed description of this detection system that was able to measure gains as small as 0.2 parts per million is provided

  6. Quasiperiodic Raman technique for ultrashort pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Yin, G.Y.; Harris, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new Raman technique that produces 200 sidebands, ranging in wavelength from 3 μm to 195 nm. By studying multiphoton ionization of nitric oxide (NO) molecules, we show mutual phase coherence among 15 visible sidebands covering 0.63 octaves of bandwidth

  7. Construction of coherent antistokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been built. It consists of a Raman cell, which is filled with CO 2 gas at 5 atm pressure and a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex lens into Raman cell. The Antistokes signals (CARS signals) are generated due to Four-wave mixing process. The antistokes signals were directed to monochrometer entrance slit by prism . The signals are detected by photomultiplier detector which is fixed on the exit slit and connected to data acquisition card located inside the computed case. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the ν 1 beam (Nd- YAG laser beam) and the ν 2 beam (the stokes beam or the dye laser beam) exactly corresponds to a vibrational - rotational Raman resonance (ν 2 - ν 1 = ν M ) in the 12 CO 2 or 13 CO 2 molecule, then the antistokes signals (ν 3 ) will be generated. The spectra of the CARS signals have been recorded to determine the isotope shift of 12 CO 2 , 13 CO 2 , which is 18.3 cm -1 . (author)

  8. A Raman Spectrometer for the ExoMars 2020 Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, A. G.; Rull, F.; Maurice, S.; Hutchinson, I.; Canora, C. P.; Seoane, L.; Rodríguez, P.; Canchal, R.; Gallego, P.; Ramos, G.; López, G.; Prieto, J. A. R.; Santiago, A.; Santamaría, P.; Colombo, M.; Belenguer, T.; Forni, O.

    2017-09-01

    The Raman project is devoted to the development of a Raman spectrometer and the support science associated for the rover EXOMARS mission to be launched in 2020. ExoMars is a double mission with two different launch opportunities, first one launched in March 2016 allowed to put in orbit the TGO with the communication system for the next mission. And the second one in 2020, deploying a rover which includes for the first time in the robotic exploration of Mars, a drill capable to obtain samples from the subsurface up to 2 meters depth. These samples will be crushed into a fine powder and delivered to the analytical instruments suite inside the rover by means of a dosing station. The EQM has been already qualified under a very demanding thermo mechanical environment, and under EMC tests, finally achieving required scientific performances. The RLS Engineering and Qualification Model has been manufactured and is expected to be delivered by May 2017, after a full qualification testing campaign developed during 2016 Q4, and 2017 Q1. It will finally delivered to ESA, by July 2017. December 2017 at TAS-I premises will do RLS FM delivery to ESA, for its final integration on the ExoMars 2020 Rover.

  9. Two-step Raman spectroscopy method for tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.

    2014-05-01

    Two-step Raman spectroscopy phase method was proposed for differential diagnosis of malignant tumor in skin and lung tissue. It includes detection of malignant tumor in healthy tissue on first step with identification of concrete cancer type on the second step. Proposed phase method analyze spectral intensity alteration in 1300-1340 and 1640-1680 cm-1 Raman bands in relation to the intensity of the 1450 cm-1 band on first step, and relative differences between RS intensities for tumor area and healthy skin closely adjacent to the lesion on the second step. It was tested more than 40 ex vivo samples of lung tissue and more than 50 in vivo skin tumors. Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Support Vector Machine were used for tumors type classification on phase planes. It is shown that two-step phase method allows to reach 88.9% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity for malignant melanoma diagnosis (skin cancer); 100% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity for adenocarcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer); 90.9% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity for squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer).

  10. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilodeau, T.G.; Ewing, K.J.; Nau, G.M.; Aggarwal, I.D.

    1995-01-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1,000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a 60 Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photo bleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, T. G.; Ewing, K. J.; Nau, G. M.; Aggarwai, I. D.

    1995-02-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote in situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a /sup 60/Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photobleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light.

  13. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar 2 , N 2 , HCl, CO 2 , and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar 2 . The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures

  14. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  15. Raman amplification of OAM modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Kasper; Gregg, Patrick; Galili, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The set of fibre modes carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a possible basis for mode division multiplexing. In this regard, fibres supporting OAM modes have been fabricated [1], and optical communication using these fibres, has been demonstrated [2]. A vital part of any long range...

  16. Fast label-free detection of Legionella spp. in biofilms by applying immunomagnetic beads and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Dragana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Legionellae colonize biofilms, can form a biofilm by itself and multiply intracellularly within the protozoa commonly found in water distribution systems. Approximately half of the known species are pathogenic and have been connected to severe multisystem Legionnaires' disease. The detection methods for Legionella spp. in water samples are still based on cultivation, which is time consuming due to the slow growth of this bacterium. Here, we developed a cultivation-independent, label-free and fast detection method for legionellae in a biofilm matrix based on the Raman spectroscopic analysis of isolated single cells via immunomagnetic separation (IMS). A database comprising the Raman spectra of single bacterial cells captured and separated from the biofilms formed by each species was used to build the identification method based on a support vector machine (SVM) discriminative classifier. The complete method allows the detection of Legionella spp. in 100 min. Cross-reactivity of Legionella spp. specific immunomagnetic beads to the other studied genera was tested, where only small cell amounts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli compared to the initial number of cells were isolated by the immunobeads. Nevertheless, the Raman spectra collected from isolated non-targeted bacteria were well-discriminated from the Raman spectra collected from isolated Legionella cells, whereby the Raman spectra of the independent dataset of Legionella strains were assigned with an accuracy of 98.6%. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was also used to differentiate between isolated Legionella species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of low active-pharmaceutical-ingredient signal drugs based on thin layer chromatography and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Qingxia; Liu, Yan; Lu, Feng

    2016-11-30

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) embedded in the excipients of the formula can usually be unravelled by normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS). However, more and more drugs with low API content and/or low Raman scattering coefficient were insensitive to NRS analysis, which was for the first time defined as Low API-Signal Drugs (LASIDs) in this paper. The NRS spectra of these LASIDs were similar to their dominant excipients' profiles, such as lactose, starch, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), etc., and were classified into three types as such. 21 out of 100 kinds of drugs were screened as LASIDs and characterized further by Raman microscopic mapping. Accordingly, we proposed a tailored solution to the qualitation and quantitation problem of these LASIDs, using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) detection on the thin layer chromatographic (TLC) plate both in situ and after-separation. Experimental conditions and parameters including TLC support matrix, SERS substrate, detection mode, similarity threshold, internal standard, etc., were optimized. All LASIDs were satisfactorily identified and the quantitation results agreed well with those of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For some structural analogues of LASIDs, although they presented highly similar SERS spectra and were tough to distinguish even with Raman microscopic mapping, they could be successfully discriminated from each other by coupling SERS (with portable Raman spectrometer) with TLC. These results demonstrated that the proposed solution could be employed to detect the LASIDs with high accuracy and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  20. Persistent deNOx Ability of CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd/TiO2-xNy Luminescent Photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huihui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd/TiO2-xNy composite luminescent photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by a simple planetary ball milling process. Improvement of photocatalytic deNOx ability of TiO2-xNy, together with the persistent photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of NO after turning off the light were realized, by coupling TiO2-xNy with long afterglow phosphor, CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd. The novel persistent photocatalytic behavior was related to the overlap between the absorption wavelength of TiO2-xNy and the emission wavelength of the CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd. It was found that CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd/TiO2-xNy composites provided the luminescence to persist photocatalytic reaction for more than 3 h after turning off the light. Graphical Abstract CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd/TiO2-xNy composite luminescent photocatalyst with persistent deNOx activity after turning off the light was successfully synthesized by a simple planetary ball milling process. The novel persistent photocatalytic behavior was related to the overlap between the absorption wavelength of TiO2-xNy and the emission wavelength of the CaAl2O4:(Eu, Nd. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  1. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hurley, David H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-03-19

    The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  2. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shiwei

    2015-12-09

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication.

  3. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of thiabendazole pesticide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Wang, Xiao-bin; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique was used to analyze the Raman peaks of thiabendazole pesticides in the present paper. Surface enhanced substrates of silver nanoparticle were made based on microwave technology. Raman signals of thiabendazole were collected by laser Micro-Raman spectrometer with 514. 5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively. The Raman peaks at different excitation wavelengths were analyzed and compared. The Raman peaks 782 and 1 012 at 785 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were C--H out-of-plane vibrations. While 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were vng and C==N stretching. The study results showed that the intensity of Raman peak and Raman shift at different excitation wavelengths were different And strong Raman signals were observed at 782, 1012, 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of carbendazim pesticide. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in agricultural products and food based on Raman spectrum.

  4. Measurement of serum antibodies against NY-ESO-1 by ELISA: A guide for the treatment of specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yu; Huang, Qian-Rong; Zheng, Guang-Shun; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 has been identified as one of the most immunogenic antigens; thus, is a highly attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. The present study analyzed the expression of serum antibodies (Abs) against NY-ESO-1 in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), with the aim of guiding the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific-immunotherapy for these patients. Furthermore, the present study was the first to evaluate the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and investigate the possible influencing factors. A total of 239 serum samples from 155 pathologically confirmed patients with advanced CRC (stages III and IV) were collected. The presence of spontaneous Abs against NY-ESO-1 was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results demonstrated that 24.5% (38/155) of the investigated patients were positive for NY-ESO-1-specific Abs. No statistically significant correlations were identified between the expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs and clinicopathological parameters, including age and gender, location, grading, local infiltration, lymph node status, metastatic status and K-ras mutation status (P>0.05). In 59 patients, the kinetic expression of anti-NY-ESO-1 Abs was analyzed, of which 14 patients were initially positive and 45 patients were initially negative. Notably, 16/59 (27.1%) patients changed their expression status during the study period, and the initially positive patients were more likely to change compared with the initially negative patients (85.7 vs. 8.8%; Pguide the treatment of NY-ESO-1-based specific immunotherapy for patients with advanced CRC.

  5. Raman Spectra from Pesticides on the Surface of Fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P X; Zhou Xiaofang; Cheng, Andrew Y S; Fang Yan

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectra of several vegetables and fruits were studied by micro-Raman spectrometer (514.5 nm) and Near-infrared Fourier Transform Raman spectrometer (FTRaman). It is shown that at 514.5 nm excitation, most of the spectra are from that of carotene with some very strong fluorescence in some cases. While at 1064 nm wavelength excitation, the spectra from the different samples demonstrate different characteristic Raman spectra without fluorescence. We discuss the spectroscopic difference by the two excitation wavelengths, and the application of Raman spectra for detection of pesticides left on the surface of vegetables and fruits. Raman spectra of fruits and pesticides were successfully recorded, and using the FT-Raman spectra the pesticides left on the surface of the fruits can be detected conveniently

  6. Raman spectroscopy in nanomedicine: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Mark E; Byrne, Hugh J

    2013-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a branch of vibration spectroscopy that is capable of probing the chemical composition of materials. Recent advances in Raman microscopy have significantly added to the range of applications, which now extend from medical diagnostics to exploring the interfaces between biological organisms and nanomaterials. In this review, Raman is introduced in a general context, highlighting some of the areas in which the technique has been successful in the past, as well as some of the potential benefits it offers over other analytical modalities. The subset of Raman techniques that specifically probe the nanoscale, namely surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, will be described and specific applications relevant to nanomedical applications will be reviewed. Progress in the use of traditional label-free Raman for investigation of nanoscale interactions will be described, and recent developments in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering will be explored, particularly its applications to biomedical and nanomedical fields.

  7. Raman tensor elements of β-Ga2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranert, Christian; Sturm, Chris; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-11-03

    The Raman spectrum and particularly the Raman scattering intensities of monoclinic β-Ga 2 O 3 are investigated by experiment and theory. The low symmetry of β-Ga 2 O 3 results in a complex dependence of the Raman intensity for the individual phonon modes on the scattering geometry which is additionally affected by birefringence. We measured the Raman spectra in dependence on the polarization direction for backscattering on three crystallographic planes of β-Ga 2 O 3 and modelled these dependencies using a modified Raman tensor formalism which takes birefringence into account. The spectral position of all 15 Raman active phonon modes and the Raman tensor elements of 13 modes were determined and are compared to results from ab-initio calculations.

  8. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in art and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leona, Marco

    2005-11-01

    The identification of natural dyes found in archaeological objects and in works of art as textile dyes and lake pigments is a demanding analytical task. To address the problems raised by the very low dye content of dyed fibers and lake pigments, and by the requirement to remove only microscopic samples, surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques were investigated for application to museum objects. SERS gives excellent results with the majority of natural dyes, including: alizarin, purpurin, laccaic acid, carminic acid, kermesic acid, shikonin, juglone, lawsone, brazilin and brazilein, haematoxylin and haematein, fisetin, quercitrin, quercetin, rutin, and morin. In this study, limits of detection were determined for representative dyes and different SERS supports such as citrate reduced Ag colloid and silver nanoisland films. SERS was successfully used to identify natural madder in a microscopic fragment from a severely degraded 11th Century Byzantine textile recently excavated in Amorium, Turkey.

  10. PENGARUH KOMPRES DINGIN TERHADAP PENURUNAN NYERI PERSALINAN KALA I FASE AKTIF DI BPS NY. MUJIYATI KABUPATEN LAMONGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilin Turlina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research to determine the effect of cold pack on the decrese of pain childbirth at 1 active phase. The study design used Pre-Eksperiment Pratest-Postes Design. The population in this research where all women who give birth in BPS Ny.Mujiyati, Amd.Keb. Sample taken by simple random sampling. Data taken by observasion and analyzed using Wilcoxon Sign Rank Test significance 0,05. The result showed that cold pack was influence on the decrase of pain childbirth at 1 active phase in BPS Ny.Mujiyati, Amd.Keb. Joto Sanur village, Tikung SubDistrict, Lamongan District, year 2013.Keywords: cold pack, painful childbirth reduction

  11. High temperature dielectric properties of (BxNyOz thin films deposited using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Badi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric integrity has been one of the major obstacle in bringing out capacitor devices with suitable performance characteristics at high temperatures. In this paper, BxNyOz dielectric films for high temperature capacitors solutions are investigated. The films were grown on silicon substrate by using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition technique. The as-grown films were characterized by SEM, XRD, and XPS. The capacitor structures were fabricated using BxNyOz as a dielectric and titanium as metal electrodes. The elaborated devices were subjected to electrical and thermal characterization. They exhibited low electrical loss and very good stability when subjected to high temperature for a prolonged period of time.

  12. Negative differential resistance and switch behavior of T-BxNy (x, y = 5, 6, 11) molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Liang; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Xin, Jian-Guo

    2017-05-01

    The electronic transport properties of T-BxNy (x, y = 5, 6, 11) molecular junction are investigated based on first-principle density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. Strong negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior is observed for T-B5N6 molecule under negative and positive bias voltages, with an obvious switch effect for T-B6N5. However, only small NDR is shown for the complex of the two molecules. The projected device density of states, the spatial distribution of molecular orbitals, and the effect of transmission spectra under various bias voltages on the electronic transport properties are analyzed. The obvious effect of bias voltage on the changes in the electronic distribution of frontier molecular orbitals is responsible for the NDR or switch behavior. Therefore, different functional molecular devices can be obtained with different structures of T-BxNy.

  13. Raman spectroscopic analysis of gunshot residue offering great potential for caliber differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Justin; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-05-15

    Near-infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy combined with advanced statistics was used to differentiate gunshot residue (GSR) particles originating from different caliber ammunition. The firearm discharge process is analogous to a complex chemical reaction. The reagents of this process are represented by the chemical composition of the ammunition, firearm, and cartridge case. The specific firearm parameters determine the conditions of the reaction and thus the subsequent product, GSR. We found that Raman spectra collected from these products are characteristic for different caliber ammunition. GSR particles from 9 mm and 0.38 caliber ammunition, collected under identical discharge conditions, were used to demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microspectroscopy for the discrimination and identification of GSR particles. The caliber differentiation algorithm is based on support vector machines (SVM) and partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analyses, validated by a leave-one-out cross-validation method. This study demonstrates for the first time that NIR Raman microspectroscopy has the potential for the reagentless differentiation of GSR based upon forensically relevant parameters, such as caliber size. When fully developed, this method should have a significant impact on the efficiency of crime scene investigations.

  14. QSpec: online control and data analysis system for single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell phenotyping is critical to the success of biological reductionism. Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS has shown promise in resolving the dynamics of living cells at the individual level and to uncover population heterogeneities in comparison to established approaches such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Given that the number of single-cells would be massive in any experiment, the power of Raman profiling technique for single-cell analysis would be fully utilized only when coupled with a high-throughput and intelligent process control and data analysis system. In this work, we established QSpec, an automatic system that supports high-throughput Raman-based single-cell phenotyping. Additionally, a single-cell Raman profile database has been established upon which data-mining could be applied to discover the heterogeneity among single-cells under different conditions. To test the effectiveness of this control and data analysis system, a sub-system was also developed to simulate the phenotypes of single-cells as well as the device features.

  15. Identification of mineral compositions in some renal calculi by FT Raman and IR spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonannavar, J.; Deshpande, Gouri; Yenagi, Jayashree; Patil, Siddanagouda B.; Patil, Nikhil A.; Mulimani, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper accurate and reliable Raman and IR spectral identification of mineral constituents in nine samples of renal calculi (kidney stones) removed from patients suffering from nephrolithiasis. The identified mineral components include Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate (COM, whewellite), Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate (COD, weddellite), Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate Hexahydrate (MAPH, struvite), Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate (CHPD, brushite), Pentacalcium Hydroxy Triphosphate (PCHT, hydroxyapatite) and Uric Acid (UA). The identification is based on a satisfactory assignment of all the observed IR and Raman bands (3500-400 cm- 1) to chemical functional groups of mineral components in the samples, aided by spectral analysis of pure materials of COM, MAPH, CHPD and UA. It is found that the eight samples are composed of COM as the common component, the other mineral species as common components are: MAPH in five samples, PCHT in three samples, COD in three samples, UA in three samples and CHPD in two samples. One sample is wholly composed of UA as a single component; this inference is supported by the good agreement between ab initio density functional theoretical spectra and experimental spectral measurements of both sample and pure material. A combined application of Raman and IR techniques has shown that, where the IR is ambiguous, the Raman analysis can differentiate COD from COM and PCHT from MAPH.

  16. Raman investigation of GaP–Si interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondi, A.; Cornet, C.; Boyer, S.; Nguyen Thanh, T.; Létoublon, A.; Pedesseau, L.; Durand, O. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Moreac, A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR-CNRS n°6251, Université Rennes1, Campus de Beaulieu — 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Ponchet, A. [CEMES, UPR CNRS 8011, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Le Corre, A. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Even, J., E-mail: jacky.even@insa.rennes.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France)

    2013-08-31

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the residual strain in thin GaP layers deposited on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Different growth conditions were used to obtain a clean GaP–Si interface, including migration enhanced epitaxy. The strain induced Raman shifts of the longitudinal and the transverse optical GaP lattice modes were analyzed. The effects of crystalline defects are discussed, supported by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering studies. Finally, Raman Spectroscopy reveals the presence of disorder (or surface)-activated optical phonons. This result is discussed in the light of surface morphology analyses. - Highlights: ► GaP thin layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. ► Strain-induced Raman shifts of the optical GaP modes are analyzed. ► Simulation of optical GaP modes by density functional perturbation theory. ► Comparison with X-ray diffraction and electron and scanning probe microscopy data.

  17. Theory of two-magnon Raman scattering in alkaline iron selenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.S. [Department of Physics, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 006004 (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Zhang, A.M. [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Xu, T.F. [Department of Physics, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 006004 (China); Wu, W.C., E-mail: wu@phy.ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Two-magnon Raman scattering is theoretically studied for alkaline iron selenides. • Underlying spin interactions of the √(5)×√(5) AF superstructure are investigated in details. • Optimal set of exchange parameters is revealed when fitting to experiments. - Abstract: Motivated by the recent experiment of two-magnon Raman scattering in alkaline iron selenide superconductors (Zhang et al., 2012), we investigate in details the underlying spin interactions of the √(5)×√(5) antiferromagnetic superstructure. Based on the linear spin wave approximation, the Fleury-London (FL) two-magnon Raman cross-sections are calculated. By comparing theoretical results with the Raman data in both A{sub g} and B{sub g} channels, an optimal set of exchange parameters which are consistent with the fitting to the neutron scattering data are obtained. It reveals that the experimentally observed broad and asymmetric peaks around 1600 cm{sup −1} are dominantly originated from quasiparticle excitations in two nearly degenerate magnon bands in the (0,±π) and (±π,0) directions. The result thus supports that the magnetic properties in alkaline iron selenide AFe{sub 1.6+x}Se{sub 6} superconductors can be basically described by the quantum spin model with up to third nearest-neighbor exchange couplings.

  18. Investigation by Raman Spectroscopy of the Decomposition Process of HKUST-1 upon Exposure to Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Todaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an experimental investigation by Raman spectroscopy of the decomposition process of Metal-Organic Framework (MOF HKUST-1 upon exposure to air moisture (T=300 K, 70% relative humidity. The data collected here are compared with the indications obtained from a model of the process of decomposition of this material proposed in literature. In agreement with that model, the reported Raman measurements indicate that for exposure times longer than 20 days relevant irreversible processes take place, which are related to the occurrence of the hydrolysis of Cu-O bonds. These processes induce small but detectable variations of the peak positions and intensities of the main Raman bands of the material, which can be related to Cu-Cu, Cu-O, and O-C-O stretching modes. The critical analyses of these changes have permitted us to obtain a more detailed description of the process of decomposition taking place in HKUST-1 upon interaction with moisture. Furthermore, the reported Raman data give further strong support to the recently proposed model of decomposition of HKUST-1, contributing significantly to the development of a complete picture of the properties of this considerable deleterious effect.

  19. Silver Nanoparticle-Enhanced Resonance Raman Sensor of Chromium(III) in Seawater Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2015-04-29

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Tris-EDTA), upon binding Cr(III) in aqueous solutions at pH 8.0 on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), was found to provide a sensitive and selective Raman marker band at ~563 cm-1, which can be ascribed to the metal-N band. UV-Vis absorption spectra also supported the aggregation and structural change of EDTA upon binding Cr(III). Only for Cr(III) concentrations above 500 nM, the band at ~563 cm-1 become strongly intensified in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra. This band, due to the metal-EDTA complex, was not observed in the case of 50 mM of K+, Cd2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Na+, Cu2+, NH4+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ ions. Seawater samples containing K, Mg, Ca, and Na ion concentrations higher than 8 mM also showed the characteristic Raman band at ~563 cm-1 above 500 nM, validating our method. Our approach may be useful in detecting real water samples by means of AgNPs and Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Identification of mineral compositions in some renal calculi by FT Raman and IR spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonannavar, J; Deshpande, Gouri; Yenagi, Jayashree; Patil, Siddanagouda B; Patil, Nikhil A; Mulimani, B G

    2016-02-05

    We present in this paper accurate and reliable Raman and IR spectral identification of mineral constituents in nine samples of renal calculi (kidney stones) removed from patients suffering from nephrolithiasis. The identified mineral components include Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate (COM, whewellite), Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate (COD, weddellite), Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate Hexahydrate (MAPH, struvite), Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate (CHPD, brushite), Pentacalcium Hydroxy Triphosphate (PCHT, hydroxyapatite) and Uric Acid (UA). The identification is based on a satisfactory assignment of all the observed IR and Raman bands (3500-400c m(-1)) to chemical functional groups of mineral components in the samples, aided by spectral analysis of pure materials of COM, MAPH, CHPD and UA. It is found that the eight samples are composed of COM as the common component, the other mineral species as common components are: MAPH in five samples, PCHT in three samples, COD in three samples, UA in three samples and CHPD in two samples. One sample is wholly composed of UA as a single component; this inference is supported by the good agreement between ab initio density functional theoretical spectra and experimental spectral measurements of both sample and pure material. A combined application of Raman and IR techniques has shown that, where the IR is ambiguous, the Raman analysis can differentiate COD from COM and PCHT from MAPH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.