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Sample records for supplement acquired brain

  1. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images

  3. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Witzani, Linde [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Helmer, Hanns [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Dietrich, Wolfgang [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Eppel, Wolfgang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Langer, Martin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  4. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  5. Functionality predictors in acquired brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Hoyas, E; Pedrero Pérez, E J; Águila Maturana, A M; García López-Alberca, S; González Alted, C

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals who have survived an acquired brain injury present consequences affecting the sensorimotor, cognitive, affective or behavioural components. These deficits affect the proper performance of daily living activities. The aim of this study is to identify functional differences between individuals with unilateral acquired brain injury using functional independence, capacity, and performance of daily activities. Descriptive cross-sectional design with a sample of 58 people, with right-sided injury (n=14 TBI; n=15 stroke) or left-sided injury (n = 14 TBI, n = 15 stroke), right handed, and with a mean age of 47 years and time since onset of 4 ± 3.65 years. The functional assessment/functional independence measure (FIM/FAM) and the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) were used for the study. The data showed significant differences (P<.000), and a large size effect (dr=0.78) in the cross-sectional estimates, and point to fewer restrictions for patients with a lesion on their right side. The major differences were in the variables 'speaking' and 'receiving spoken messages' (ICF variables), and 'Expression', 'Writing' and 'intelligible speech' (FIM/FAM variables). In the linear regression analysis, the results showed that only 4 FIM/FAM variables, taken together, predict 44% of the ICF variance, which measures the ability of the individual, and up to 52% of the ICF, which measures the individual's performance. Gait alone predicts a 28% of the variance. It seems that individuals with acquired brain injury in the left hemisphere display important differences regarding functional and communication variables. The motor aspects are an important prognostic factor in functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...... behavior was registered with the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS). The nurse or therapist allocated the individual patient assessed ABS during each shift. Intensity of agitated behavior was tested using exact test. A within-subject shift effect was analyzed with repeated-measure ANOVA. Findings: The onset...... of agitated behavior was at a median of 14 (1–28) days from admission. Seven patients remained agitated beyond 3 weeks from onset. Severe intensity of agitation was observed in 86 of 453 nursing shifts. Differences in agitated behavior between day, evening, and night shifts were found, F(2.20) = 7.90, p...

  7. Music interventions for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Wendy L; Clark, Imogen; Tamplin, Jeanette; Bradt, Joke

    2017-01-20

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, and sensory processing, and in emotional disturbances, which can severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music interventions have been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions, and sensory perceptions. An update of the systematic review published in 2010 was needed to gauge the efficacy of music interventions in rehabilitation for people with ABI. To assess the effects of music interventions for functional outcomes in people with ABI. We expanded the criteria of our existing review to: 1) examine the efficacy of music interventions in addressing recovery in people with ABI including gait, upper extremity function, communication, mood and emotions, cognitive functioning, social skills, pain, behavioural outcomes, activities of daily living, and adverse events; 2) compare the efficacy of music interventions and standard care with a) standard care alone, b) standard care and placebo treatments, or c) standard care and other therapies; 3) compare the efficacy of different types of music interventions (music therapy delivered by trained music therapists versus music interventions delivered by other professionals). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1946 to June 2015), Embase (1980 to June 2015), CINAHL (1982 to June 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to June 2015), LILACS (1982 to January 2016), and AMED (1985 to June 2015). We handsearched music therapy journals and conference proceedings, searched dissertation and specialist music databases, trials and research registers, reference lists, and contacted relevant experts and music therapy associations to identify unpublished research. We imposed no language restriction. We performed the original search in 2009. We included all randomised controlled trials

  8. Behavior Management for Children and Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifer, Keith J.; Amari, Adrianna

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral problems such as disinhibition, irritability, restlessness, distractibility, and aggression are common after acquired brain injury (ABI). The persistence and severity of these problems impair the brain-injured individual's reintegration into family, school, and community life. Since the early 1980s, behavior analysis and therapy have…

  9. Predictors of Outcome following Acquired Brain Injury in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Abigail R.; DeMatt, Ellen; Salorio, Cynthia F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) in children and adolescents can result from multiple causes, including trauma, central nervous system infections, noninfectious disorders (epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, genetic/metabolic disorders), tumors, and vascular abnormalities. Prediction of outcomes is important, to target interventions, allocate resources,…

  10. Rehabilitation of discourse impairments after acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigiane Gindri

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Language impairments in patients with acquired brain injury can have a negative impact on social life as well as on other cognitive domains. Discourse impairments are among the most commonly reported communication deficits among patients with acquired brain damage. Despite advances in the development of diagnostic tools for detecting such impairments, few studies have investigated interventions to rehabilitate patients presenting with these conditions. Objective: The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of the methods used in the rehabilitation of discourse following acquired brain injury. Methods: The PubMed database was searched for articles using the following keywords: "rehabilitation", "neurological injury", "communication" and "discursive abilities". Results: A total of 162 abstracts were found, but only seven of these met criteria for inclusion in the review. Four studies involved samples of individuals with aphasia whereas three studies recruited samples of individuals with traumatic brain injury. Conclusion: All but one article found that patient performance improved following participation in a discourse rehabilitation program.

  11. Socio-emotional behaviour following acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    May, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Socio-emotional behaviour difficulties following acquired brain injury (ABI) have been shown to have a persisting negative effect on quality of life. A systematic review was carried out to look at the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of available psychological treatments for socio-emotional behaviour difficulties following ABI. Research was carried out to further understand socio-emotional behaviour by exploring the possible underlying cognitive aspects (specif...

  12. Mentoring programme for adolescent survivors of acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Michael; Bellerose, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    To report the findings of a mentor-adolescent relationship between two survivors of acquired brain injury (ABI). Case study report. The adolescent, a survivor of Eastern Equine Encephalitis, was paired with an adult mentor, a survivor of a TBI. Baseline scores on the Youth Quality of Life (YQOL), Wisconsin Quality of Life Index (WQLI) and the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index-4 (MPAI-4) were recorded. The mentor provided support to the adolescent during the 10-week relationship conducted as a community-based programme for adults with acquired brain injury. In addition, both participants attended group activities that address the long-term needs of survivors of ABI. Post-programme scores were recorded on the YQOL, WQLI, MPAI-4 and a retrospective questionnaire. The adolescent demonstrated improved quality of life on the YQOL and improved ability, adjustment and participation on the MPAI-4. The mentor demonstrated improved quality of life on the WQLI and improved adjustment and participation on the MPAI-4. Both participants indicated satisfaction with the programme on the retrospective questionnaire. The mentor programme provided enhanced quality of life and psycho-social support to both participants. The authors do caution, however, that these findings are preliminary and examination of the efficacy of such programming is ongoing.

  13. Radionuclide brain imaging in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, D.C.; Gacinovic, S.; Miller, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) may produce a variety of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and signs. CNS involvement in patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) includes AIDS dementia complex or HIV-1 associated cognitive/motor complex (widely known as HIV encephalopathy), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), opportunistic infections such as Toxoplasma gondii, TB, Cryptococcus and infiltration by non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma. High resolution structural imaging investigations, either X-ray Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have contributed to the understanding and definition of cerebral damage caused by HIV encephalopathy. Atrophy and mainly high signal scattered white matter abnormalities are commonly seen with MRI. PML produces focal white matter high signal abnormalities due to multiple foci of demyelination. However, using structural imaging techniques there are no reliable parameters to distinguish focal lesions due to opportunistic infection (Toxoplasma gondii abscess) from neoplasm (lymphoma infiltration). It is studied the use of radionuclide brain imaging techniques in the investigation of HIV infected patients. Brain perfusion Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET), neuroreceptor and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies are reviewed. Greater emphasis is put on the potential of some radiopharmaceuticals, considered to be brain tumour markers, to distinguish intracerebral lymphoma infiltration from Toxoplasma infection. SPET with 201 Tl using quantification (tumour to non-tumour radioactivity ratios) appears a very promising technique to identify intracerebral lymphoma

  14. Music Therapy, Acquired Brain Injury and Interpersonal Communication Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Søren

    2012-01-01

    that music is a useful tool to stimulate interaction since musical interaction can be engaged at almost any cognitive and physical level and still be meaningful (Baker & Tamplin, 2006; Gilbertson, 2005; Hald, 2011). In addition, music therapy researchers specialising in ABI have found that: - Music therapy......Acquired brain injury (ABI) often affects physical, cognitive and psychological aspects of a person's functioning (Bateman, et al., 2010). Psychosocial problems associated with ABI may be the major challenge facing the rehabilitation process (Morton & Wehman, 1995) Consequently, interventions...... is a powerful means to improve communication, general behavior, and musical behavior (Purdie, Hamilton & Baldwin, 1997). - Music therapy can increase emotional stability, clarify thoughts, stimulate spontaneous interaction, and increase motivation and cooperation (Nayak, Wheeler, Shiflett & Agostinelli, 2000...

  15. Direct cost associated with acquired brain injury in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Amy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquired Brain Injury (ABI from traumatic and non traumatic causes is a leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is limited research summarizing the health system economic burden associated with ABI. The objective of this study was to determine the direct cost of publicly funded health care services from the initial hospitalization to three years post-injury for individuals with traumatic (TBI and non-traumatic brain injury (nTBI in Ontario Canada. Methods A population-based cohort of patients discharged from acute hospital with an ABI code in any diagnosis position in 2004 through 2007 in Ontario was identified from administrative data. Publicly funded health care utilization was obtained from several Ontario administrative healthcare databases. Patients were stratified according to traumatic and non-traumatic causes of brain injury and whether or not they were discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation center. Health system costs were calculated across a continuum of institutional and community settings for up to three years after initial discharge. The continuum of settings included acute care emergency departments inpatient rehabilitation (IR complex continuing care home care services and physician visits. All costs were calculated retrospectively assuming the government payer’s perspective. Results Direct medical costs in an ABI population are substantial with mean cost in the first year post-injury per TBI and nTBI patient being $32132 and $38018 respectively. Among both TBI and nTBI patients those discharged to IR had significantly higher treatment costs than those not discharged to IR across all institutional and community settings. This tendency remained during the entire three-year follow-up period. Annual medical costs of patients hospitalized with a brain injury in Ontario in the first follow-up year were approximately $120.7 million for TBI and $368.7 million for nTBI. Acute care cost accounted for 46

  16. Ability to manage everyday technology after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte; Malinowsky, Camilla; Jacobsson, Lars; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2013-01-01

    To investigate and describe how persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) manage everyday technology (ET) in their daily activities and to explore whether the ability to manage ET was related to the severity of the disability. Eighty-one persons with ABI were observed while managing ET by using the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META). The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) was used to assess the severity of disability after the ABI. A computer application of a Rasch measurement model was used to generate measures of the participants' ability to manage ET and the measures were compared groupwise with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The degree of severity of disability had a significant main effect on the ability to manage ET. The groups with severe and moderate disability exhibited a significantly lower ability to manage ET compared to the group with good recovery. The result indicates that the ability to manage ET in daily activities can be related to the global severity of disability after ABI. This demonstrates the importance of considering the ability to manage ET to support the performance of activities at home, at work and in society in persons with ABI.

  17. Resilience in family caregivers of persons with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Las Hayas, Carlota; López de Arroyabe, Elena; Calvete, Esther

    2015-08-01

    The authors' purpose was to develop the Questionnaire of Resilience in Caregivers of Acquired Brain Injury (QRC-ABI) and explore its psychometric properties The QRC-ABI was developed to measure the process of resilience, including resilient factors that, according to the literature, are the most relevant for caregivers. This is a cross-sectional study of Spanish primary caregivers of individuals with ABI. It included 237 caregivers (77.6% women and 21.1% men) who completed the QRC-ABI, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (Weiss & Berger, 2006), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (Skevington, Lotfy, O'Connell, & the WHOQOL Group, 2004) assessment, and the Positive Aspects of Caregiving (Tarlow et al., 2004) assessment. An item pool of 36 items was developed, from which 17 were finally selected based on a consensus among researchers and adequate symmetry indexes and kurtoses. Confirmatory factor analysis of the QRC-ABI confirmed a hierarchical solution in which 4 resilience dimensions were explained by a broader general resilience factor. The internal consistency of each scale was >.80. Convergent validity was supported through positive correlations of the QRC-ABI with quality of life, positive aspects of caregiving, and posttraumatic growth, and a negative correlation with perceived burden. The new QRC-ABI showed good reliability and validity. Our results are consistent with previous studies that have argued that resilient qualities are important for a healthy and positive adaptation to the challenging adversities faced by caregivers of individuals with ABI. Future interventions based on resilience should promote these factors in caregivers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Learning after acquired brain injury. Learning the hard way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boosman, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: When the brain has suffered damage, the learning process can be considerably disturbed. Brain damage can influence what is learned, but also how learning takes place. What patients can learn can be viewed in terms of ‘learning ability’ and how patients learn in terms of ‘learning style’.

  19. A Danish national strategy for treatment and rehabilitation after acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase W

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the establishment of a Danish national strategy for treatment and rehabilitation of acquired brain injury, particularly traumatic brain injury, in 1997. The vision was to create a system of tax-financed continuous treatment, restoration of function, and outpatient rehabilitat......This study describes the establishment of a Danish national strategy for treatment and rehabilitation of acquired brain injury, particularly traumatic brain injury, in 1997. The vision was to create a system of tax-financed continuous treatment, restoration of function, and outpatient...

  20. Symptomatic acquired zinc deficiency in at-risk premature infants: high dose preventive supplementation is necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarot, Sébastien; Chantier, Emilie; Kuster, Alice; Hello, Muriel; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Blouin, Eric; Stalder, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is a cofactor for several enzymes involved in many metabolisms. Zinc deficiency induces various disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, either inherited or acquired. We report three cases of premature infants (24-31 wks gestational age) with low birthweight (650 to 940 g) and enteropathy, two of whom presented with necrotizing enterocolitis. All infants were fed by total parenteral nutrition. At a chronological age ranging from 73 to 80 days, all infants developed a periorificial dermatitis. Before the onset of the first signs, they had received zinc supplementation ranging from 146% to 195% of the recommended dose (400 microg/kg/day). Increased zinc supplementation over a course of 6-18 days induced a complete resolution of symptoms in all cases. No abnormality in the neurologic examination and no recurrence were observed at the end of the zinc treatment. Low birthweight premature infants with enteropathy on total parenteral nutrition are at risk of developing zinc deficiency. The usual recommended zinc supplementation is probably insufficient for those infants. A delay in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency may lead to severe complications.

  1. Early rehabilitation and participation in focus - a Danish perspective on patients with severe acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Helle Rønn; Pallesen, Hanne; Buhl, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Early neurorehabilitation is an interdisciplinary field. Thus, in order to eliminate unnecessary barriers for individuals with severe acquired brain injury in early rehabilitation, we need rehabilitation science that supports both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Participation can b...

  2. Acquired brain injury services in the Republic of Ireland: experiences and perceptions of families and professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Garret L

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to highlight the experiences and perceptions of rehabilitation services among families of people with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and among professionals working in ABI rehabilitation services in Ireland.

  3. The effects of aluminium and selenium supplementation on brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This in vivo study was designed to investigate the potential of aluminium (Al), in the absence of added iron, to participate in either antioxidant or pro-oxidant events. Some markers of oxidative stress were determined in liver and brain of rats exposed to aluminium lactate, either alone or in the presence of dietary supplements ...

  4. Issues of cultural diversity in acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerica, Anthony; Krch, Denise

    2014-01-01

    With the general population in the United States becoming increasingly diverse, it is important for rehabilitation professionals to develop the capacity to provide culturally sensitive treatment. This is especially relevant when working with minority populations who have a higher risk for brain injury and poorer rehabilitation outcomes. This article presents a number of clinical vignettes to illustrate how cultural factors can influence behavior in patients recovering from brain injury, as well as rehabilitation staff. The main objectives are to raise awareness among clinicians and stimulate research ideas by highlighting some real world examples of situations where a specialized, patient-centered approach needs to consider factors of cultural diversity. Because one's own world view impacts the way we see the world and interpret behavior, it is important to understand one's own ethnocentrism when dealing with a diverse population of patients with brain injury where behavioral sequelae are often expected. Being able to see behavior after brain injury with an open mind and taking into account cultural and contextual factors is an important step in developing culturally competent rehabilitation practices.

  5. Leucine supplementation improves acquired growth hormone resistance in rats with protein-energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Zhao, Jie; Wan, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Chao; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    -CON group. Our data are the first to demonstrate that long-term supplementation with leucine improved acquired growth hormone resistance in rats with protein-energy malnutrition. Leucine might promote skeletal muscle protein synthesis by regulating downstream anabolic signaling transduction.

  6. Seeing mathematics: perceptual experience and brain activity in acquired synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Berit; Vanni, Simo; Silvanto, Juha

    2013-01-01

    We studied the patient JP who has exceptional abilities to draw complex geometrical images by hand and a form of acquired synesthesia for mathematical formulas and objects, which he perceives as geometrical figures. JP sees all smooth curvatures as discrete lines, similarly regardless of scale. We carried out two preliminary investigations to establish the perceptual nature of synesthetic experience and to investigate the neural basis of this phenomenon. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, image-inducing formulas produced larger fMRI responses than non-image inducing formulas in the left temporal, parietal and frontal lobes. Thus our main finding is that the activation associated with his experience of complex geometrical images emerging from mathematical formulas is restricted to the left hemisphere.

  7. Shopping with Acquired Brain Injuries, Coping Strategies and Maslowian Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Skehan, Terry; Rydén, Monica; Lagerkrans, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A positive outcome of the modern welfare state is prolonged life expectancy. In Sweden, the expected life span has increased with approximatively 25 years during the 20th century [Statistics Sweden]. However, ageing is associated with an increased risk for acquiring cognitive and physical disabilities. This study is based on anonymized interviews with groups of older persons who experience cognitive problems and relatives. The interviewees were asked about everyday activities like shopping groceries, clothes or other necessities. The interviewees identified problems and described a series of strategies for coping. This paper uses fictionalized characters to present problems and coping strategies that the interviewees use to overcome cognitive challenges when shopping groceries. The strategies range from complete withdrawal, an increased dependency on proxies to the development of elaborate techniques to mask their problem and obtain assistance. Following the current trend in the design of the Swedish sales environment - large scale, abundance of goods and Maslowian strategies for making people stay longer (and spend more money) - accessibility in the built environment is often an absent friend.

  8. Adding insult to brain injury: young adults' experiences of residing in nursing homes following acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Aoife; Heary, Caroline; Ward, Marcia; MacNeela, Pádraig

    2017-08-28

    There is general consensus that adults under age 65 with acquired brain injury residing in nursing homes is inappropriate, however there is a limited evidence base on the issue. Previous research has relied heavily on third-party informants and qualitative studies have been of questionable methodological quality, with no known study adopting a phenomenological approach. This study explored the lived experiences of young adults with brain injury residing in aged care facilities. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed to collect and analyze data from six semi-structured interviews with participants regarding their experiences of living in nursing homes. Two themes were identified, including "Corporeal prison of acquired brain injury: broken selves" and "Existential prison of the nursing home: stagnated lives". Results illustrated that young adults with acquired brain injury can experience aged care as an existential prison in which their lives feel at a standstill. This experience was characterized by feelings of not belonging in a terminal environment, confinement, disempowerment, emptiness and hope for greater autonomy through rehabilitation. It is hoped that this study will provide relevant professionals, services and policy-makers with insight into the challenges and needs of young adults with brain injury facing these circumstances. Implications for rehabilitation This study supports the contention that more home-like and age-appropriate residential rehabilitation services for young adults with acquired brain injury are needed. As development of alternative accommodation is a lengthy process, the study findings suggest that the interim implementation of rehabilitative care in nursing homes should be considered. Taken together with existing research, it is proposed that nursing home staff may require training to deliver evidence-based rehabilitative interventions to those with brain injury. The present findings add support to the call for systemic

  9. Botulinum toxin in the management of sialorrhoea in acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, A

    2016-06-01

    Sialorrhoea as a consequence of severe acquired brain injury can significantly negatively impact on quality of life. Medications used in its management have many side effects which can cause problems in the severely disabled. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment of sialorrhoea in a number of neurological conditions but may also have a role to play in the management of sialorrhoea following severe ABI. We report on 4 cases of sialorrhoea following acquired brain injury causing a variety of problems, whose parotid glands were injected with Botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) 50mu each, under ultrasound guidance. All cases had a clinically and statistically significant reduction in drooling as measured by the teacher drooling scale (p=0.005) and carers Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.012). There were no side effects reported. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for sialorrhoea associated with acquired brain injury.

  10. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  11. Enhanced task-related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Aboo-Bakkar, Zainie; Conway, Myra E; Adlam, Anna-Lynne R; Fulford, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High flavonoid intakes attenuate age-related cognitive decline, but data from human intervention studies are sparse. We investigated whether 12 weeks of blueberry concentrate supplementation improved brain perfusion, task-related activation, and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Participants were randomised to consume either 30 mL blueberry concentrate providing 387 mg anthocyanidins (5 female, 7 male; age 67.5 ± 3.0 y; body mass index, 25.9 ± 3.3 kg·m -2 ) or isoenergetic placebo (8 female, 6 male; age 69.0 ± 3.3 y; body mass index, 27.1 ± 4.0 kg·m -2 ). Pre- and postsupplementation, participants undertook a battery of cognitive function tests and a numerical Stroop test within a 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging scanner while functional magnetic resonance images were continuously acquired. Quantitative resting brain perfusion was determined using an arterial spin labelling technique, and blood biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured. Significant increases in brain activity were observed in response to blueberry supplementation relative to the placebo group within Brodmann areas 4/6/10/21/40/44/45, precuneus, anterior cingulate, and insula/thalamus (p blueberry versus placebo supplementation (p = 0.05). Supplementation with an anthocyanin-rich blueberry concentrate improved brain perfusion and activation in brain areas associated with cognitive function in healthy older adults.

  12. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, Elise; Rytter, Hana Malá; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used...

  13. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...

  14. Constraint-induced movement therapy for children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Pedersen, Kristina; Pallesen, H.; Kristensen, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 125-137 Danish children with acquired brain injury (ABI) require rehabilitation annually, 30-40 of these at a highly specialized level. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has shown significant effects in increasing function in children with cerebral palsy. More knowledge of h...

  15. Reliability of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Trishna; Pfeifer, Megan; Banerjee-Guenette, Priyanka; Hunter, Theresa; Ito, Julia; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, Virginia; Levac, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate reliability and feasibility of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument (MLSRI) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). The MLSRI quantifies the extent to which motor learning strategies (MLS) are used within physiotherapy (PT) interventions. Methods: PT sessions conducted by ABI team physiotherapists with a…

  16. Thinking Allowed: Use of Egocentric Speech after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Sian A.; Skidmore, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of thinking aloud made by young people who have sustained a severe acquired brain injury (ABI). The phenomenon is compared with the concepts of egocentric speech and inner speech before the form of thinking aloud by pupils with ABI is examined. It is suggested that by using thinking aloud, this group of pupils is able…

  17. Effective return-to-work interventions after acquired brain injury: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker-Cools, Birgit H. P. M.; Daams, Joost G.; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    To gather knowledge about effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). A database search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library using keywords and Medical Subject Headings. Studies were included if they met inclusion

  18. Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lisat-9): Reliability and Validity for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Balk, Gerlof A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminant validity of the Dutch version of the life satisfaction questionnaire (Lisat-9 DV) to assess patients with an acquired brain injury. The reliability study used a test-retest design, and the validity study used a cross-sectional design. The setting was the general rehabilitation…

  19. A Review of Family Intervention Guidelines for Pediatric Acquired Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Wesley R.; Paulos, Stephanie K.; Cole, Carolyn A. S.; Tankard, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acquired brain injury (BI) not only affects the child with the injury, but also greatly impacts their family. Studies suggest there are higher rates of caregiver and sibling psychological distress after a child in the family has sustained a BI. Also, family functioning after BI impacts the child's recovery. In reviewing the literature,…

  20. Service Use and Satisfaction Following Acquired Brain Injury: A Preliminary Analysis of Family Caregiver Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Green, Richard; Jones, Clair

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to understand how use and satisfaction with services following discharge from an acquired brain injury (ABI) acute-care facility related to family caregiver outcomes. Methods: A correlational and descriptive study design was used. Nineteen primary family caregivers of persons recently discharged from an ABI acute-care…

  1. Burst-suppression is reactive to photic stimulation in comatose children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, Dragos A.; Moldovan, Mihai; Sharma, Roy

    2016-01-01

    reactivity. We quantified reactivity by measuring the change in the burst ratio (fraction of time in burst) following photic stimulation. Results: Photic stimulation evoked bursts in all patients, resulting in a transient increase in the burst ratio, while the mean heart rate remained unchanged......Objective: Burst-suppression is an electroencephalographic pattern observed during coma. In individuals without known brain pathologies undergoing deep general anesthesia, somatosensory stimulation transiently increases the occurrence of bursts. We investigated the reactivity of burst......-suppression in children with acquired brain injury. Methods: Intensive care unit electroencephalographic monitoring recordings containing burst-suppression were obtained from 5 comatose children with acquired brain injury of various etiologies. Intermittent photic stimulation was performed at 1 Hz for 1 min to assess...

  2. An exploration of the experiences of young adults who acquired a brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Schrover, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    In the United Kingdom at least 15,600 young adults are admitted to hospital following an acquired brain injury each year. For those who survive, the brain injury-related consequences to their psychological well-being (e.g. feelings of anxiety and low mood, low self-esteem) and social environment (e.g. very limited social support, loss of relationships and friendships) are understood to be the ones that have the most effect on a young person’s life in the long term. The social environment, suc...

  3. Patients with severe acquired brain injury show increased arousal in tilt-table training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian G; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) are often mobilised using a tilt-table. Complications such as orthostatic intolerance have been reported. The primary objective of this study was to investigate if using a tilt-table was feasible for mobilising patients with severe ABI admitted...... for sub-acute rehabilitation. We also investigated change in arousal, treatment duration before termination due to orthostatic reactions and change in muscle tone....

  4. Factors associated with self-esteem following acquired brain injury in adults : a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Curvis, Will; Simpson, Jane; Hampson, Natalie

    2018-01-01

    Self-esteem is potentially a key factor in psychological and psychosocial well-being following acquired brain injury (ABI). The current review aimed to identify, synthesise and appraise all existing quantitative empirical studies on predictors or correlates of self-esteem following ABI in adulthood. In total, 27 papers met the inclusion criteria. A range of clinical factors were related to self-esteem after ABI, including the degree of physical and functional impairment. It is unclear if cogn...

  5. Determining the quality of life in persons with acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Balanč, Mateja

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and assessing the quality of life of persons with acquired brain injury is an important element of rehabilitation, and enables assistance and support to both the injured and their families. By identifying and assessing quality of life, we can better understand the impact of injuries on the individual and his/her life. Different levels of injuries can severely affect cognitive, physical, emotional-behavioral and social life not only of a injured person but also of members of his f...

  6. Focal perinatal acquired brain injury - a sonographic study of the course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franek, A.

    1985-06-01

    A case of a perinatal acquired focal brain lesion is reported, and the process of resorption and healing demonstrated by ultrasound. Within four weeks a cortical area of increased echogenicity was resorbed. After two months, the resulting porencephalic cyst had been transformed into glial tissue of very high echogenicity. The neurologic development of two children with such glial focus was good. These cases demonstrate that porencephalic cysts are not always the final state after resorption of a focal brain lesion. They are no reliable prognostic indicator of poor neurological outcome. Traumatic and complicated delivery, asphyxia and coagulopathy are conditions which have been found several times in connection with a focal brain lesion. In contrast to periventricular injury, prematurity does not seem to be a factor of higher risk.

  7. A Study of Emotionalism in Patients Undergoing Rehabilitation following Severe Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna McGrath

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the phenomenon of emotionalism in a sample of brain injured patients of mixed aetiology, with a view to identifying issues relevant to clinical management, and possible causal factors. 82 subjects with severe acquired brain injury undergoing rehabilitation participated in a structured interview in which they were asked to report the presence/absence of emotionalism and degree of distress associated with it. Their overt crying behaviour was also observed and recorded. Independent variables that predicted crying during the interview were identified using a multiple logistic regression procedure. Prevalence rates of emotionalism-tearfulness were high in this sample (52% self-report, 36–41% Emotionalism-laughter was much less common (13% Emotionalism-tearfulness was usually accompanied by negative affect, occurred in response to identifiable precipitants, and was often controllable. It was associated with major personal distress in about half the subjects who reported it. Independent variables which predicted crying behaviour were female gender and focal damage to the right cerebral hemisphere. It is concluded that an increased readiness to cry is common in people with severe acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. The behaviour is meaningful, though not always distressing. The intensity of the behaviour is variable, and it may be most appropriate to regard emotionalism as a dimension rather than a syndrome. Implications for clinical management are discussed.

  8. Elderly persons with ICU-acquired weakness: the potential role for β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adam; Wilund, Kenneth; Fitschen, Peter J; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Agarwala, Ravi; Drover, John W; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired weakness is common and characterized by muscle loss, weakness, and paralysis. It is associated with poor short-term outcomes, including increased mortality, but the consequences of reduced long-term outcomes, including decreased physical function and quality of life, can be just as devastating. ICU-acquired weakness is particularly relevant to elderly patients who are increasingly consuming ICU resources and are at increased risk for ICU-acquired weakness and complications, including mortality. Elderly patients often enter critical illness with reduced muscle mass and function and are also at increased risk for accelerated disuse atrophy with acute illness. Increasingly, intensivists and researchers are focusing on strategies and therapies aimed at improving long-term neuromuscular function. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), an ergogenic supplement, has shown efficacy in elderly patients and certain clinical populations in counteracting muscle loss. The present review discusses ICU-acquired weakness, as well as the unique physiology of muscle loss and skeletal muscle function in elderly patients, and then summarizes the evidence for HMB in elderly patients and in clinical populations. We subsequently postulate on the potential role and strategies in studying HMB in elderly ICU patients to improve muscle mass and function. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Life goals and social identity in people with severe acquired brain injury: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachelle; Levack, William M M; Sinnott, K Anne

    2015-01-01

    While there is a growing body of literature exploring life goals in rehabilitation, little research has been undertaken that includes the voice of the end-user. This study examined the views and experiences of people with severe acquired brain injury regarding the place of "life goals" in residential rehabilitation. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to collect and analyze data from five semi-structured interviews with participants in a residential rehabilitation setting. Three inter-related themes emerged from this study. Social connectedness (being 'part of things') emerged as a life goal of central importance for all participants (Theme 1). However, in order to achieve this sense of belonging, the participants needed to tentatively balance the opportunities arising within their environmental milieu (Theme 2) with the interpersonal factors relating to their unchanged, changed and changing self-identity (Theme 3). This study suggests that social identity and social connectedness ought to be primary foci of rehabilitation rather than matters only of secondary concern. Consideration needs to be given to both the environmental contexts and the intrapersonal strategies that support people who require residential rehabilitation services to achieve social connection, and thus their life goals, following a severe acquired brain injury. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need to better support people with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) in terms of their social relationships and social identity during the delivery of person-centered rehabilitation services. Within the clinical setting there should be regular, in depth and open dialogue in which the individuals' values and preferences are discovered. A focus on the coherence between daily activities and the person's life goals is required for people with severe ABI. Clinicians need to consider how life goals for individual people change or are re-prioritized over the life span.

  10. Training of attention and memory deficits in children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen Sjö, Nina; Spellerberg, Stine Marie; Weidner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    supervision in the school-setting maintains the child’s motivation throughout the training programme and (3) whether positive changes in memory, attention and executive functions are found with this implementation of the training method. Methods: Seven children with memory and ⁄ or attention deficits after......) sustaining of motivation and (3) improvements in learning and memory.......This pilot study concerns cognitive rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury (ABI). Aim: The aim is threefold; to determine (1) whether the Amsterdam Memory and Attention Training for Children (AMAT-C) programme for children with ABI can be integrated in the child’s school, (2) whether...

  11. Randomized trial of two swallowing assessment approaches in patients with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Annette; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann; Sjölund, Bengt H.

    2014-01-01

    trial. SETTING: Specialized, national neurorehabilitation centre. SUBJECTS: Adult patients with acquired brain injury. Six hundred and seventy-nine patients were assessed for eligibility and 138 were randomly allocated between June 2009 and April 2011. INTERVENTIONS: Assessment by Facial-Oral Tract....... Seven patients were left for analysis, 4 of whom developed aspiration pneumonia within 10 days after initiating oral intake (1 control/3 interventions). CONCLUSION: In the presence of a structured clinical assessment with the Facial-Oral Tract Therapy approach, it is unnecessary to undertake...

  12. Constraint-induced movement therapy for children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristina Schmidt; Pallesen, Hanne; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 125–137 Danish children with acquired brain injury (ABI) require rehabilitation annually, 30–40 of these at a highly specialized level. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has shown significant effects in increasing function in children with cerebral palsy. More knowledge of how...... CIMT can be adapted for the rehabilitation of children with ABI is needed. The primary purpose of the study was to generate new knowledge about the pedagogical initiatives and frameworks involved in children’s participation in and activities during CIMT. Four children with ABI participated in the 60 h...

  13. CT and MR imaging evaluation of the inherited and prenatally acquired migrational disorders of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, S.E.; Osborn, R.E.; Naidich, T.P.; Bohan, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    The migrational disorders are a rare group of congenital malformations of the brain seen in children. They are primarily cortical and gray matter abnormalities. Forty patients, divided into two groups, were studied. In one group were patients with the classic migrational lesions of lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, heterotopia, and polymicrogyria in which the underlying cause is genetic, chromosomal, or unknown. In the second group were patients with lesions caused by a prenatally acquired infection (toxoplasmosis or cytomegalic virus) or a metabolic abnormality. The CT and MR imaging findings in these two groups are discussed

  14. Intelligent speed adaptation as an assistive device for drivers with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarborg, Brith; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk; Agerholm, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) was tested as an assistive device for drivers with an acquired brain injury (ABI). The study was part of the “Pay as You Speed” project (PAYS) and used the same equipment and technology as the main study (Lahrmann et al., in press-a, in press-b). Two drivers......, and in general they described driving with ISA as relaxed. ISA reduced the percentage of the total distance that was driven with a speed above the speed limit (PDA), but the subjects relapsed to their previous PDA level in Baseline 2. This suggests that ISA is more suited as a permanent assistive device (i...

  15. Arts-based social skills interventions for adolescents with acquired brain injuries: five case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sabrina; Gray, Julia; Colantonio, Angela; Polatajko, Helene; Cameron, Deb; Wiseman-Hakes, Catherine; Rumney, Peter; Keightley, Michelle

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the value of arts-based programs for adolescents with childhood brain disorder to facilitate social skills and participation. The current study extends this work by examining the feasibility and effectiveness of an arts-based intervention for youth with acquired brain injuries (ABI). A case study approach was used with four adolescent participants and one case control. A battery of quantitative measures were administered four and one week pre-intervention, one week post-intervention, as well six to eight month post-intervention. Improvements in pragmatic communication skills and social and participation goals were observed across intervention participants. Similar improvements were not seen with the case control participant. Results support the use of an arts-based intervention for youth with ABI to facilitate social skills and participation. Findings also highlight the need for more sensitive measures of these skills for these youth. Suggested guidelines for program implementation are provided.

  16. Wii-habilitation as balance therapy for children with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatla, Sandy K; Radomski, Anna; Cheung, Jessica; Maron, Melissa; Jarus, Tal

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Nintendo Wii compared to traditional balance therapy in improving balance, motivation, and functional ability in children undergoing acute rehabilitation after brain injury. A non-concurrent, randomized multiple baseline single-subject research design was used with three participants. Data were analyzed by visual inspection of trend lines. Daily Wii balance training was equally motivating to traditional balance therapy for two participants and more motivating for one participant. While improvements in dynamic balance were observed, the results for static balance remain inconclusive. All participants demonstrated improvements in functional ability. Wii balance therapy is a safe, feasible, and motivating intervention for children undergoing acute rehabilitation after an acquired brain injury. Further research to examine the effectiveness of Wii balance therapy in this population is warranted.

  17. Postinjury personality and outcome in acquired brain injury: the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kelley D; Franks, Susan F; Hall, James R

    2010-03-01

    To examine the relationship between postinjury personality and outcome in individuals with acquired brain injury. It was hypothesized that patients with differing levels of Introversive, Dejected, and Oppositional coping styles as described by Millon's Theory of Personality would show different outcomes after completion of a rehabilitation program. A retrospective chart review and completion of an outcome assessment was undertaken to examine study hypotheses. A postacute brain injury rehabilitation program. Fifty patients who completed the rehabilitation program between 2005 and 2008, who were 18 years of age or older, who possessed at least a sixth-grade reading level, and who completed a valid Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) were selected. Rehabilitation therapists who worked with these patients were also recruited to assess patient outcomes. Charts of patients that met inclusion criteria were reviewed. Rehabilitation therapists completed the outcome measure retrospectively. The MBMD was used to predict outcome. The MBMD is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess psychosocial factors that relate to the course of medical treatment in chronic illness. The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) was used to assess patient outcome. It is a 29-item assessment designed to evaluate the common physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social issues after acquired brain injury. Findings supported our hypotheses that patients with differing levels of Introversive and Oppositional Coping Styles would have significantly different outcomes after rehabilitation. Thus, individuals with mild/moderate to moderate/severe limitations had significantly greater scores on the Introversive and Oppositional coping compared with individuals with more successful outcomes. The results of this study support the idea that postinjury personality is an important factor in understanding outcome after completion of a brain-injury rehabilitation program

  18. Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Sallam, Atiya A; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Moktar, Norhayati; Surin, Johari

    2014-08-15

    Despite the intensive global efforts to control intestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is still very high in many developing countries particularly among children in rural areas. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU) on STH reinfection. The effect of the supplement was assessed at 3 and 6 months after receiving interventions; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/daily of albendazole tablets. Almost all children (98.6%) were infected with at least one STH species. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection was 67.8%, 95.5% and 13.4%, respectively. Reinfection rates of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm were high; at 6 months, assessment reached 80% of the prevalence reported before treatment. There were no significant differences in the reinfection rates and intensities of STH between vitamin A supplemented-children and those who received placebo at 3 and 6 months (p > 0.05). Vitamin A supplementation showed no protective effect against STH reinfection and this could be due to the high endemicity of STH in this community. Long-term interventions to reduce poverty will help significantly in reducing this continuing problem and there is no doubt that reducing intestinal parasitic infection would have a positive impact on the health, nutrition and education of these children. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00936091.

  19. Use of yoked prisms in patients with acquired brain injury: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Surbhi; Han, Esther; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical practices for prescribing yoked prisms, as well as to assess related patient responses, in a sample of visually-symptomatic patients having acquired brain injury (ABI). The clinical records of individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) that were assessed for yoked prisms were reviewed retrospectively. This query resulted in 60 patient records for analysis between January 2011 and December 2012. The following diagnostic groups were analysed: homonymous hemianopsia (HH)/homonymous quadranopsia, abnormal egocentric localization (AEL) and visual neglect. HH/homonymous quadranopsia (58.3%) was the primary indication to prescribe yoked prisms, followed by visual neglect/unilateral spatial inattention (USI) (40.0%) and AEL (11.7%). The most common favourable patient responses were increased awareness of their blind visual field and improved gait, mobility and balance. The magnitude and direction of prisms prescribed were dependent upon the subjective responses in patients manifesting AEL. In contrast, base direction was dependent upon the direction of visual field loss in patients with HH/homonymous quadranopsia and visual neglect. Two-thirds of the present sample population responded favourably to the yoked prisms. The results of the present study should prove useful to clinicians for the successful prescription of yoked prisms as a treatment modality in patients presenting with the above three diagnoses.

  20. Fast attainment of computer cursor control with noninvasively acquired brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Trent J.; Gentili, Rodolphe J.; Contreras-Vidal, José L.

    2011-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are allowing humans and non-human primates to drive prosthetic devices such as computer cursors and artificial arms with just their thoughts. Invasive BCI systems acquire neural signals with intracranial or subdural electrodes, while noninvasive BCI systems typically acquire neural signals with scalp electroencephalography (EEG). Some drawbacks of invasive BCI systems are the inherent risks of surgery and gradual degradation of signal integrity. A limitation of noninvasive BCI systems for two-dimensional control of a cursor, in particular those based on sensorimotor rhythms, is the lengthy training time required by users to achieve satisfactory performance. Here we describe a novel approach to continuously decoding imagined movements from EEG signals in a BCI experiment with reduced training time. We demonstrate that, using our noninvasive BCI system and observational learning, subjects were able to accomplish two-dimensional control of a cursor with performance levels comparable to those of invasive BCI systems. Compared to other studies of noninvasive BCI systems, training time was substantially reduced, requiring only a single session of decoder calibration (~20 min) and subject practice (~20 min). In addition, we used standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography to reveal that the neural sources that encoded observed cursor movement may implicate a human mirror neuron system. These findings offer the potential to continuously control complex devices such as robotic arms with one's mind without lengthy training or surgery.

  1. Incidence and mortality of acquired brain injury in young Danish adults between 1994 and 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibæk, Maiken; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    identified in the Danish National Patient Register. Incidence rates (IRs) and estimated annual percentage changes (EAPC) were estimated by Poisson regression. Mortality was estimated by the Kaplan–Meier estimator and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were computed using Cox regression with 1994–1998. Results......Background: We estimated the annually incidence and mortality of acquired brain injury (ABI) in people aged 15–30 years during 1994–2013. Methods: All Danes with a first-ever hospital diagnosis of ABI, including traumatic brain injury (TBI), encephalopathy, CNS-infection or brain tumour, were......: A total of 10,542 individuals were hospitalized with a first-time diagnosis of ABI. The IR for ABI decreased from 63.36 to 33.91/100,000 person-years from 1994 to 2013 [EAPC: −2.78% (95% CI: −3.26 to −2.28)] mainly driven by a decreasing IR of TBI [EAPC: −6.53% (95% CI: –9.57 to –3.39)] during 2007...

  2. Motivation in rehabilitation and acquired brain injury: can theory help us understand it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusec, Andrea; Velikonja, Diana; DeMatteo, Carol; Harris, Jocelyn E

    2018-04-25

    In acquired brain injury (ABI) populations, low motivation to engage in rehabilitation is associated with poor rehabilitation outcomes. Motivation in ABI is thought to be influenced by internal and external factors. This is consistent with Self-determination Theory, which posits that motivation is intrinsic and extrinsic. This paper discusses the benefit of using Self-determination Theory to guide measurement of motivation in ABI. Using a narrative review of the Self-determination Theory literature and clinical rehabilitation research, this paper discusses the unique role intrinsic and extrinsic motivation has in healthcare settings and the importance of understanding both when providing rehabilitation in ABI. Based on the extant literature, it is possible that two independently developed measures of motivation for ABI populations, the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust Motivation Questionnaire-Self and the Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire, may assess intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, respectively. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in ABI may be two equally important but independent factors that could provide a comprehensive understanding of motivation in individuals with ABI. This increased understanding could help facilitate behavioural approaches in rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Conceptualization of motivation in ABI would benefit from drawing upon Self-determination Theory. External factors of motivation such as the therapeutic environment or social support should be carefully considered in rehabilitation in order to increase engagement. Assessing motivation as a dual rather than a global construct may provide more precise information about the extent to which a patient is motivated.

  3. After a child's acquired brain injury (ABI): An ethnographic study of being a parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R; Caine, Vera; Yager, Jerome Y; Joyce, Anthony S; Newton, Amanda S

    2016-11-30

    To explore the meanings associated with being a parent of a child with an aquired brain injury (ABI). An ethnographic study was conducted with parents of children aged 3 to 10 years who had acquired a severe brain injury. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit parents from the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. Data collection involved participant observation, fieldwork and semi-structured interviews. Field notes and interviews transcriptions were analysed using a thematic analysis framework and informed by symbolic interactionism theory. Six parent dyads (mothers and fathers) and 4 mothers participated in the study.Parents' meanings of `parenting' a child with severe brain injury were shaped by the injury, wide range of familial dynamics, and interactions. Six main themes related to parental meanings emerged from our data: (1) Getting `back to normal'; (2) Relying on a support system; (3) Worrying something bad may happen after the injury; (4) Going through a range of emotions following the injury; (5) Changing family dynamics after the injury; and (6) Ongoing performativity. Parents' meanings of `parenting' a child are extensively impacted by their child's functioning after the ABI. Having a greater appreciation of these experiences may be beneficial for medical professionals.

  4. Impact of comprehensive day treatment on societal participation for persons with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, J F

    2001-07-01

    To evaluate comprehensive day treatment (CDT) for survivors of brain injury by time since injury and to identify outcome predictors. Before and after. Rehabilitation center. Ninety-six program graduates; 17 dropouts with acquired brain injury. Comprehensive Day Treatment Program: daily group sessions to build cognitive and behavioral skills through a transdisciplinary approach, supportive feedback, and a variety of therapeutic modalities. Obtained outcome measures before and after the program, and at 1-year follow-up. Independent living status, vocational independence scale at program end and 1-year follow-up; and Rasch-analyzed Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-22) and goal attainment scaling (GAS) at program end. age, education, severity of initial injury, time since injury, and preadmission MPAI-22. Significant goal achievement on GAS and improvement on MPAI-22; increased societal participation at 1-year follow-up for those treated postacutely and many years after injury: 72% of graduates living independently; 39% working independently, 10% in transitional placements, and 18% in supported or volunteer work. Long-term outcomes were modestly related linearly to preadmission MPAI-22 and nonlinearly to time since injury. CDT improves societal participation even among persons with a long history of limited participation after brain injury. This de facto extended baseline analysis indicates the effectiveness of CDT and paves the way for randomized control trials of active treatment components. Relationships of predictors to outcomes are not sufficiently strong for patient selection. More effective interventions for vocational reintegration are needed for those most severely disabled after brain injury. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  5. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A. Des Roches

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  6. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...... a one-year period (n=206 (59% with dysphagia). OC-data were collected by clinical examinations and verified by cultivation/microscopy in every 3 weeks during first 10 weeks of admission. . Dysphagia improvement was defined by: 1) first positive change in food consistency, 2) initiation of at least soft....... The OC prevalence was 24.8% at one week after admission and reduced to 10.1% ten weeks after admission. Adjusted hazard ratios for improvement in dysphagia were 0.64-0.77 in OC compared to without OC, though not statistically significant. Conclusion: Prevalence of OC was high at admission but reduced...

  7. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Kothari, Mohit

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to a rehabilitation centre were...... recruited over a one-year period. OC-data were collected by clinical examinations and verified by cultivation/microscopy in every 3 weeks during first 10 weeks of admission. Data on dysphagia were collected through medical record reviews. Dysphagia improvement was defined by: 1) First positive change.......7%, respectively. The OC prevalence was 24.8% after one week of admission and reduced to 10.1% after ten weeks of admission. Adjusted hazard ratios for improvement in dysphagia were 0.64-0.77 in OC compared to without OC, though not statistically significant. Conclusion: Prevalence of OC was high at admission...

  8. Assessment of fitness to drive after acquired brain injury: The role of neuropsychological tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Annette

    It is a well established fact that Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) can affect fitness to drive. Some cognitive functions have been emphasized as particular important when driving e.g. attention, reaction time, visual perception, and executive functioning. Research attempts have been made in order...... to identify a neuropsychological test battery to predict driving ability. However, there is no consensus as to which test such a test battery should consist of. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between some neuropsychological test results and the results of an on-road test.......g. WCST will not predict the driving ability of this group. This illustrates that many things can affect the predictive value a neuropsychological test and the belief that neuropsychological testing on its own cannot predict fitness to drive. As findings in the field of driving assessment of older people...

  9. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Roches, Carrie A; Kiran, Swathi

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  10. Perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with acquired brain injury of different severity: a comparison with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, Mandana; Kottorp, Anders; Nygård, Louise; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2014-07-01

    To compare the perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with acquired brain injury with different levels of severity of disability with that of controls. This comparison study recruited 2 samples of persons with acquired brain injury and controls, comprising a total of 161 participants, age range 18-64 years. The long and short versions of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire and the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale were used to evaluate participants. Persons with acquired brain injury demonstrated lower mean levels of perceived ability in use of everyday technology than controls (F = 21.84, degrees of freedom = 1, p technology between persons with severe disability and good recovery, between persons with severe disability and controls, and between persons with moderate disability and controls. No significant mean difference was found between persons with severe disability and moderate disability, between persons with moderate disability and good recovery, and between persons with good recovery and controls. Perceived difficulty in using everyday technology is significantly increased among persons with acquired brain injury with severe to moderate disability compared with controls. Rehabilitation services should consider the use of everyday technology in order to increase participation in everyday activities after acquired brain injury.

  11. Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, F; Holmström, L; Eliasson, A-C; Flodmark, O; Forssberg, H; Tournier, J-D; Vollmer, B

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and fiber tractography can be used to investigate alterations in white matter tracts in patients with early acquired brain lesions and cerebral palsy. Most existing studies have used diffusion tensor tractography, which is limited in areas of complex fiber structures or pathologic processes. We explored a combined normalization and probabilistic fiber-tracking method for more realistic fiber tractography in this patient group. This cross-sectional study included 17 children with unilateral cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing controls. DWI data were collected at 1.5T (45 directions, b=1000 s/mm(2)). Regions of interest were defined on a study-specific fractional anisotropy template and mapped onto subjects for fiber tracking. Probabilistic fiber tracking of the corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex was performed by using constrained spherical deconvolution. Tracts were qualitatively assessed, and DTI parameters were extracted close to and distant from lesions and compared between groups. The corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex were realistically reconstructed in both groups. Structural changes to tracts were seen in the cerebral palsy group and included splits, dislocations, compaction of the tracts, or failure to delineate the tract and were associated with underlying pathology seen on conventional MR imaging. Comparisons of DTI parameters indicated primary and secondary neurodegeneration along the corticospinal tract. Corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex showed dissimilarities in both structural changes and DTI parameters. Our proposed method offers a sensitive means to explore alterations in WM tracts to further understand pathophysiologic changes following early acquired brain injury. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Omega-3 supplementation improves cognition and modifies brain activation in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Isabelle; Hughes, Matthew; Rowsell, Renee; Cockerell, Robyn; Pipingas, Andrew; Crewther, Sheila; Crewther, David

    2014-03-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-rich and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich supplementations on cognitive performance and functional brain activation. A double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design, with a 30-day washout period between two supplementation periods (EPA-rich and DHA-rich) was employed. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained during performance of Stroop and Spatial Working Memory tasks prior to supplementation and after each 30-day supplementation period. Both supplementations resulted in reduced ratio of arachidonic acid to EPA levels. Following the EPA-rich supplementation, there was a reduction in functional activation in the left anterior cingulate cortex and an increase in activation in the right precentral gyrus coupled with a reduction in reaction times on the colour-word Stroop task. By contrast, the DHA-rich supplementation led to a significant increase in functional activation in the right precentral gyrus during the Stroop and Spatial Working Memory tasks, but there was no change in behavioural performance. By extending the theory of neural efficiency to the within-subject neurocognitive effects of supplementation, we concluded that following the EPA-rich supplementation, participants' brains worked 'less hard' and achieved a better cognitive performance than prior to supplementation. Conversely, the increase in functional activation and lack of improvement in time or accuracy of cognitive performance following DHA-rich supplementation may indicate that DHA-rich supplementation is less effective than EPA-rich supplementation in enhancing neurocognitive functioning after a 30-day supplementation period in the same group of individuals.

  13. Further validation of the Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) in patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosman, Hileen; van Heugten, Caroline M; Winkens, Ieke; Smeets, Sanne M J; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2016-01-01

    The Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) evaluates motivation for rehabilitation in four subscales: Interest in rehabilitation, Lack of anger, Lack of denial, and Reliance on professional help. The objective of this study was to further validate the MOT-Q in 122 inpatients and 92 outpatients with acquired brain injury (ABI). The main measures were motivation for rehabilitation (MOT-Q), self-awareness (Patient Competency Rating Scale), and treatment motivation (Visual Analogue Scale). The MOT-Q showed adequate feasibility in terms of few items with missing responses and few undecided responses. We found no floor or ceiling effects, and significant item-total MOT-Q correlations for 29 of 31 items. Internal consistency was good for the MOT-Q total and acceptable to good for the subscales. The MOT-Q scores were significantly intercorrelated except for the subscales Lack of denial and Reliance on professional help in the inpatient group. The MOT-Q total and subscales were significantly associated with treatment motivation. The Lack of denial subscale showed no significant association with treatment motivation and no to moderate significant associations with self-awareness. In conclusion, the overall MOT-Q is a valid instrument to assess motivation for rehabilitation in patients with ABI. Further research is needed to examine the validity of the subscales.

  14. Supplementation with complex milk lipids during brain development promotes neuroplasticity without altering myelination or vascular density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamond B. Guillermo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplementation with complex milk lipids (CML during postnatal brain development has been shown to improve spatial reference learning in rats. Objective: The current study examined histo-biological changes in the brain following CML supplementation and their relationship to the observed improvements in memory. Design: The study used the brain tissues from the rats (male Wistar, 80 days of age after supplementing with either CML or vehicle during postnatal day 10–80. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin, glutamate receptor-1, myelin basic protein, isolectin B-4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was performed. The average area and the density of the staining and the numbers of astrocytes and capillaries were assessed and analysed. Results: Compared with control rats, CML supplementation increased the average area of synaptophysin staining and the number of GFAP astrocytes in the CA3 sub-region of the hippocampus (p<0.01, but not in the CA4 sub-region. The supplementation also led to an increase in dopamine output in the striatum that was related to nigral dopamine expression (p<0.05, but did not alter glutamate receptors, myelination or vascular density. Conclusion: CML supplementation may enhance neuroplasticity in the CA3 sub-regions of the hippocampus. The brain regions-specific increase of astrocyte may indicate a supporting role for GFAP in synaptic plasticity. CML supplementation did not associate with postnatal white matter development or vascular remodelling.

  15. Post-injury personality in the prediction of outcome following severe acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattran, Charlotte Jane; Oddy, Michael; Wood, Rodger Llewellyn; Moir, Jane Frances

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the utility of five measures of non-cognitive neurobehavioural (NCNB) changes that often occur following acquired brain injury, in predicting outcome (measured in terms of participation and social adaptation) at 1-year follow-up. The study employed a longitudinal, correlational design. Multiple regression was employed to investigate the value of five new NCNB measures of social perception, emotional regulation, motivation, impulsivity and disinhibition in the prediction of outcome as measured by the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI). Two NCNB measures (motivation and emotional regulation) were found to significantly predict outcome at 1-year follow-up, accounting for 53% of the variance in MPAI total scores. These measures provide a method of quantifying the extent of NCNB changes following brain injury. The predictive value of the measures indicates that they may represent a useful tool which could aid clinicians in identifying early-on those whose symptoms are likely to persist and who may require ongoing intervention. This could facilitate the planning of rehabilitation programmes.

  16. What is known about sexual health after pediatric acquired brain injury: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grahame; Simons-Coghill, Martine; Bates, Annerley; Gan, Caron

    2017-01-01

    Positive sexual development is a core task in the transition from childhood/adolescence to adulthood. Little is known about the extent of research addressing this topic after acquired brain injury (ABI). To identify publications (1980 to 2016) addressing positive sexual health among children/adolescents with ABI. A scoping review. A search conducted using OVID and PubMed databases yielded 2021 citations with 28 publications meeting the inclusion criteria (six reviews, one expert account, 19 observational and two intervention studies). Teenagers with ABI reported poorer body image, feeling less sexually or physically attractive than sex and age matched non brain-damaged controls. The one study with findings on sexual orientation, reported 15% of adolescents with ABI identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual. Precocious puberty was a rare outcome from ABI, but the most common focus of the publications (14/28). Finally, two case studies (genital touching and classroom masturbation respectively) found that behavioral interventions were an effective means of extinguishing inappropriate sexual behaviour after childhood ABI. Sexual health is a neglected area of research in post-ABI care for children/adolescents. A better understanding of the needs and challenges will help rehabilitation professionals and parents provide more informed and effective supports.

  17. Evidence of Big-Five personality changes following acquired brain injury from a prospective longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Anne; Schmukle, Stefan C; Exner, Cornelia

    2016-03-01

    Many studies using different assessment methods have reported personality changes after acquired brain injury (ABI). However, to our knowledge, no prospective study has yet been conducted to examine whether previous cross-sectional and retrospective results can be replicated in a longitudinal prospective design. Further, because clinical control groups were only rarely used, it remains debatable if the personality changes found are unique to patients with ABI or if they also affect patients with other disabilities. This study examined personality change in 114 participants with different kinds of ABI, 1321 matched controls (general control, GC), and 746 matched participants with restrictive impairments other than brain injury (clinical control, CC) in a prospective longitudinal design using data from the panel survey Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA). Participants with ABI showed significantly larger declines in Extraversion and Conscientiousness compared with the GC group. When the ABI participants were compared with the CC group, only the difference in Conscientiousness remained significant. Our prospective data corroborate evidence from previous cross-sectional studies that patients with ABI experience larger declines in Extraversion and Conscientiousness than the general population. Whereas the effect on Conscientiousness was unique to patients with ABI, the decline in Extraversion was also observed in participants with other impairments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Posttraumatic growth following acquired brain injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Louise Kinsella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea that acquired brain injury (ABI caused by stroke, haemorrhage, infection or traumatic insult to the brain can result in posttraumatic growth (PTG for individuals is increasingly attracting psychological attention. However PTG also attracts controversy as a result of ambiguous empirical findings. The extent that demographic variables, injury factors, subjective beliefs, and psychological health are associated with PTG following ABI is not clear. Consequently, this systematic review and meta-analysis explores the correlates of variables within these four broad areas and PTG. From a total of 744 published studies addressing PTG in people with ABI, eight studies met inclusion criteria for detailed examination. Meta-analysis of these studies indicated that growth was related to employment, longer education, subjective beliefs about change post-injury, relationship status, older age, longer time since injury, and lower levels of depression. Results from homogeneity analyses indicated significant inter-study heterogeneity across variables. There is general support for the idea that people with ABI can experience growth, and that various demographics, injury-related variables, subjective beliefs and psychological health are related to growth. The contribution of social integration and the forming of new identities post-ABI to the experience of PTG is explored. These meta-analytic findings are however constrained by methodological limitations prevalent in the literature. Clinical and research implications are discussed with specific reference to community and collective factors that enable PTG.

  19. Behavioural ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms and driving behaviour after an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Ulleberg, Pål; Schultheis, Maria T; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether measurements of self-regulatory mechanisms and cognition predict driving behaviour after an acquired brain injury (ABI). Consecutive follow-up study. At baseline participants included 77 persons with stroke and 32 persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), all of whom completed a multidisciplinary driving assessment (MDA). A follow-up cohort of 34 persons that succeeded the MDA was included. Baseline measurements: Neuropsychological tests and measurements of self-regulatory mechanisms (BRIEF-A and UPPS Impulsive Behaviour Scale), driving behaviour (DBQ) and pre-injury driving characteristics (mileage, compensatory driving strategies and accident rates). Follow-up measurements: Post-injury driving characteristics were collected by mailed questionnaires from the participants who succeeded the MDA. A MDA, which included a medical examination, neuropsychological testing and an on-road driving test, was considered in the decision for or against granting a driver's license. Self-regulatory mechanisms and driving behaviour were examined for research purposes only. At baseline, self-regulatory mechanisms were significantly associated to aberrant driving behaviour, but not with neuropsychological data or with the outcome of the on-road driving test. Aspects of self-regulation were associated to driving behaviour at follow-up. It is recommended that self-regulatory measurements should regularly be considered in the driving assessments after ABI.

  20. An Exploratory Study of Reading Comprehension in College Students After Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Griffiths, Gina G; Fickas, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This exploratory study builds on the small body of existing research investigating reading comprehension deficits in college students with acquired brain injury (ABI). Twenty-four community college students with ABI completed a battery of questionnaires and standardized tests to characterize self-perceptions of academic reading ability, performance on a standardized reading comprehension measure, and a variety of cognitive functions of this population. Half of the participants in the sample reported traumatic brain injury (n = 12) and half reported nontraumatic ABI (n = 12). College students with both traumatic and nontraumatic ABI cite problems with reading comprehension and academic performance postinjury. Mean performance on a standardized reading measure, the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (Brown, Fischo, & Hanna, 1993), was low to below average and was significantly correlated with performance on the Speed and Capacity of Language Processing Test (Baddeley, Emslie, & Nimmo-Smith, 1992). Injury status of traumatic versus nontraumatic ABI did not differentiate results. Regression analysis showed that measures of verbal attention and suppression obtained from the California Verbal Language Test-II (Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000) predicted total scores on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test. College students with ABI are vulnerable to reading comprehension problems. Results align with other research suggesting that verbal attention and suppression problems may be contributing factors.

  1. Novel insights into the rehabilitation of memory post acquired brain injury: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane eSpreij

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acquired Brain Injury (ABI frequently results in memory impairment, causing significant disabilities in daily life and is therefore a critical target for cognitive rehabilitation. Current understanding of brain plasticity has led to novel insights in remediation-oriented approaches for the rehabilitation of memory deficits. We will describe 3 of these approaches that have emerged in the last decade: Virtual Reality (VR training, Computer-Based Cognitive Retraining (CBCR and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NBS and evaluate its effectiveness. Methods: A systematic literature search was completed for intervention studies about improving the memory function after ABI. Information concerning study content and reported effectiveness were extracted. Quality of the studies and methods were evaluated. Results: A total of 786 studies were identified, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were found representing the VR technique, 7 studies representing CBCR and 5 studies NBS. All 3 studies found a significant improvement of the memory function after VR-based training, however these studies are considered preliminary. All 7 studies have shown that CBCR can be effective in improving memory function in individuals with ABI. Four studies of the 5 did not found significant improvement of the memory function after the use of NBS in ABI patients. Conclusion: On the basis of this review, CBCR is considered the most promising novel approach of the last decade, because of the positive results in improving memory function post ABI. The number of studies representing VR were limited and the methodological quality low, therefore the results should be considered preliminary. The studies representing NBS did not found evidence for the use of NBS in improving memory function

  2. Social skills treatment for people with severe, chronic acquired brain injuries: a multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Skye; Tate, Robyn; Togher, Leanne; Bornhofen, Cristina; Long, Esther; Gertler, Paul; Bowen, Rebecca

    2008-09-01

    To determine whether social skills deficits including unskilled, inappropriate behavior, problems reading social cues (social perception), and mood disturbances (such as depression and anxiety) could be remediated after severe traumatic brain injuries. Randomized controlled trial comparing a social skills program with social activity alone or with waitlist control. Several participants were reassigned after randomization. Hospital outpatient and community facilities. Fifty-one outpatients from 3 brain injury units in Sydney, Australia, with severe, chronic acquired brain injuries were recruited. A total of 39 people (13 in skills training, 13 in social activity, 13 in waitlist) completed all phases of the study. Twelve-week social skills treatment program encompassing weekly 3-hour group sessions focused on shaping social behavior and remediating social perception and 1-hour individual sessions to address psychologic issues with mood, self-esteem, etc. Primary outcomes were: (1) social behavior during encounters with a confederate as rated on the Behaviorally Referenced Rating System of Intermediary Social Skills-Revised (BRISS-R), (2) social perception as measured by The Awareness of Social Inference Test, and (3) depression and anxiety as measured by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. Secondary outcomes were: relative report on social behavior and participation using: the Katz Adjustment Scale-R1; the Social Performance Survey Schedule; the La Trobe Communication Questionnaire; and the Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale (both relative and self-report). Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that social activity alone did not lead to improved performance relative to waitlist (placebo effect) on any outcome variable. On the other hand, the skills training group improved differentially on the Partner Directed Behavior Scale of the BRISS-R, specifically the self-centered behavior and partner involvement behavior subscales. No treatment effects

  3. Developing a comprehensive framework of community integration for people with acquired brain injury: a conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nusratnaaz M; Kersten, Paula; Siegert, Richard J; Theadom, Alice

    2018-03-06

    Despite increasing emphasis on the importance of community integration as an outcome for acquired brain injury (ABI), there is still no consensus on the definition of community integration. The aim of this study was to complete a concept analysis of community integration in people with ABI. The method of concept clarification was used to guide concept analysis of community integration based on a literature review. Articles were included if they explored community integration in people with ABI. Data extraction was performed by the initial coding of (1) the definition of community integration used in the articles, (2) attributes of community integration recognized in the articles' findings, and (3) the process of community integration. This information was synthesized to develop a model of community integration. Thirty-three articles were identified that met the inclusion criteria. The construct of community integration was found to be a non-linear process reflecting recovery over time, sequential goals, and transitions. Community integration was found to encompass six components including: independence, sense of belonging, adjustment, having a place to live, involved in a meaningful occupational activity, and being socially connected into the community. Antecedents to community integration included individual, injury-related, environmental, and societal factors. The findings of this concept analysis suggest that the concept of community integration is more diverse than previously recognized. New measures and rehabilitation plans capturing all attributes of community integration are needed in clinical practice. Implications for rehabilitation Understanding of perceptions and lived experiences of people with acquired brain injury through this analysis provides basis to ensure rehabilitation meets patients' needs. This model highlights the need for clinicians to be aware and assess the role of antecedents as well as the attributes of community integration itself to

  4. Testosterone supplementation restores vasopressin innervation in the senescent rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The vasopressin (AVP) innervation in the male rat brain is decreased in senescence. This decrease is particularly pronounced in brain regions where AVP fiber density is dependent on plasma levels of sex steroids. Since plasma testosterone levels decrease progressively with age in the rat, the

  5. Effects of Aging and Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Supplementation on Brain Arginine Metabolism in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musalmah Mazlan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that altered arginine metabolism is involved in the aging and neurodegenerative processes. This study sought to determine the effects of age and vitamin E supplementation in the form of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF on brain arginine metabolism. Male Wistar rats at ages of 3 and 21 months were supplemented with TRF orally for 3 months prior to the dissection of tissue from five brain regions. The tissue concentrations of L-arginine and its nine downstream metabolites were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found age-related alterations in L-arginine metabolites in the chemical- and region-specific manners. Moreover, TRF supplementation reversed age-associated changes in arginine metabolites in the entorhinal cortex and cerebellum. Multiple regression analysis revealed a number of significant neurochemical-behavioral correlations, indicating the beneficial effects of TRF supplementation on memory and motor function.

  6. Social communication features in children following moderate to severe acquired brain injury: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M; Clark, Brenda; Scott, Ori; Wilkes, Courtney; Reynolds, Shawn; Ricci, Florencia; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the social communication deficits of children with moderate to severe acquired brain injury or autism spectrum disorder, while accounting for the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Parents of 20 children aged 6 to 10 years (10 acquired brain injury; 10 autism spectrum disorder) completed the Social Communication Questionnaire, and Conners 3 Parent Short. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between groups in Social Communication Questionnaire restricted repetitive behavior scores, but not reciprocal social interaction or social communication. Multiple linear regressions indicated diagnosis did not predict reciprocal social interaction or social communication scores and that Conners 3 Parent Short Form hyperactivity scores were the strongest predictor of Social Communication Questionnaire reciprocal social interaction scores after accounting for age and Intelligence Quotient. The lack of difference in social communication deficits between groups may help in understanding the pathophysiology underlying the behavioral consequences of acquired brain injury. The link between hyperactivity and reciprocal interaction suggests that targeting hyperactivity may improve social outcomes in children following acquired brain injury. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Usual and Virtual Reality Video Game-Based Physiotherapy for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Miller, Patricia; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how therapists promote learning of functional motor skills for children with acquired brain injuries. This study explores physiotherapists' description of these interventions in comparison to virtual reality (VR) video game-based therapy. Six physiotherapists employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in…

  8. How Can Educational Psychologists Support the Reintegration of Children with an Acquired Brain Injury upon Their Return to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Heather; Howe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of reintegration into school for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and considers the role of the educational psychologist (EP) in supporting these children. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals in two specialist settings: a specialist rehabilitation centre and a children's hospital with…

  9. Visual rehabilitation with Retimax Vision Trainer in patients with severe Acquired Brain Injury: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Chiari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Retimax Vision Trainer is a device that has the purpose to improve visual function by means of the detection of a visual evoked potential associated with a sound feedback. We evaluated the effectiveness of rehabilitative treatment in two patients with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI. Results, subjectively appreciated, are objectively confirmed by the improvement of visual function.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Mini-Mental State Examination in patients with acquired brain injury in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhan, Atilla H; Kutlay, Sehim; Küçükdeveci, Ayse A; Cotuk, Cigdem; Oztürk, Gülsah; Tesio, Luigi; Tennant, Alan

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in patients with acquired brain injury in Turkey. A total of 207 patients with acquired brain injury were assessed. Reliability was tested by internal consistency and the person separation index; internal construct validity by Rasch analysis; external construct validity by correlation with cognitive disability; and cross-cultural validity by differential item functioning analysis compared with Italian MMSE data. Reliability was adequate with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.75 and person separation index of 0.76. After collapsing some categories, and adjustment for differential item functioning, internal construct validity was supported by fit of the data to Rasch model. Differential item functioning for culture was found in 2 items and after adjustment, data could be pooled between Turkey and Italy. External construct validity was supported by expected associations. The Turkish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination can be used as a cognitive screening tool in acquired brain injury. Cross-cultural validity between Italy and Turkey is supported, given appropriate adjustment for differential item functioning. However, shortfalls in reliability at the individual level, as well as the presence of differential item functioning suggest that a better instrument should be developed to screen for cognitive deficits following acquired brain injury.

  11. Caregiver wellbeing: an examination of the coping-appraisel process of caring for individuals with an acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-12-09

    Objective: Previous literature has demonstrated empirical support for a stress process model of caregiving (Chronister & Chan, 2006). This study examined whether a coping–appraisal stress model helps in our understanding of the experience of caregiving for people with an acquired brain injury.\\r\

  12. Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale : A New Scale to Measure the Different Aspects of Fatigue After Acquired Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C.; Hogenkamp, Antoinette; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J.; Egberink, Iris J. L.; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    Objectives: To develop the Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale (DMFS), a new scale to assess the nature and impact of fatigue and coping with fatigue in the chronic phase after acquired brain injury (ABI) and to analyze the psychometric properties of this scale in a mixed group of patients with ABI.

  13. Changes in gait patterns induced by rhythmic auditory stimulation for adolescents with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Yoo, Ga Eul; Chong, Hyun Ju; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-12-01

    The effects of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on gait in adolescents with acquired brain injury (ABI) were investigated. A total of 14 adolescents with ABI were initially recruited, and 12 were included in the final analysis (n = 6 each). They were randomly assigned to the experimental (RAS) or the control (conventional gait training) groups. The experimental group received gait training with RAS three times a week for 4 weeks. For both groups, spatiotemporal parameters and kinematic data, such as dynamic motions of joints on three-dimensional planes during a gait cycle and the range of motion in each joint, were collected. Significant group differences in pre-post changes were observed in cadence, walking velocity, and step time, indicating that there were greater improvements in those parameters in the RAS group compared with the control group. Significant increases in hip and knee motions in the sagittal plane were also observed in the RAS group. The changes in kinematic data significantly differed between groups, particularly from terminal stance to mid-swing phase. An increase of both spatiotemporal parameters and corresponding kinematic changes of hip and knee joints after RAS protocol indicates that the use of rhythmic cueing may change gait patterns in adolescents with ABI. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Impact of parental acquired brain injury on children: Review of the literature and conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiar, Anna Maria Vitale; Dumas, Jean E

    2015-01-01

    Data on children's adjustment following parental acquired brain injury (ABI) are disparate and spare, and appear inconclusive. Nonetheless, they suggest that children's well-being is at risk, but often neglected. Indeed, lack of a unifying conceptual model makes it difficult to integrate available evidence, in order to circumscribe relevant factors and understand how these may influence children's outcomes in more or less favourable ways. The present review proposes the coping competence model as a theoretical framework apt to clarify these issues and organize the available evidence. In brief, the model states that impact of parental ABI on children reflects the extent of the challenges children face and their preponderant ways of coping with them, i.e. pro-socially, anti-socially or asocially. Evidence shows that children deal with some common socioaffective as well as achievement challenges. Further, it is consistent with the three main coping modalities supported by the model. Overall, children's outcomes appear variable, but clearly at risk and in need of special attention. This review summarizes these outcomes, raises conceptual as well as methodological questions to be addressed in future research and eventually presents relevant issues for support and clinical services.

  15. Virtual reality-based prospective memory training program for people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ben C B; Man, David W K

    2013-01-01

    Acquired brain injuries (ABI) may display cognitive impairments and lead to long-term disabilities including prospective memory (PM) failure. Prospective memory serves to remember to execute an intended action in the future. PM problems would be a challenge to an ABI patient's successful community reintegration. While retrospective memory (RM) has been extensively studied, treatment programs for prospective memory are rarely reported. The development of a treatment program for PM, which is considered timely, can be cost-effective and appropriate to the patient's environment. A 12-session virtual reality (VR)-based cognitive rehabilitation program was developed using everyday PM activities as training content. 37 subjects were recruited to participate in a pretest-posttest control experimental study to evaluate its treatment effectiveness. Results suggest that significantly better changes were seen in both VR-based and real-life PM outcome measures, related cognitive attributes such as frontal lobe functions and semantic fluency. VR-based training may be well accepted by ABI patients as encouraging improvement has been shown. Large-scale studies of a virtual reality-based prospective memory (VRPM) training program are indicated.

  16. Effective return-to-work interventions after acquired brain injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker-Cools, Birgit H P M; Daams, Joost G; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-01-01

    To gather knowledge about effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). A database search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library using keywords and Medical Subject Headings. Studies were included if they met inclusion criteria: adult patients with non-progressive ABI, working pre-injury and an intervention principally designed to improve RTW as an outcome. The methodological quality of included studies was determined and evidence was assessed qualitatively. Twelve studies were included, of which five were randomized controlled trials and seven were cohort studies. Nine studies had sufficient methodological quality. There is strong evidence that work-directed interventions in combination with education/coaching are effective regarding RTW and there are indicative findings for the effectiveness of work-directed interventions in combination with skills training and education/coaching. Reported components of the most effective interventions were tailored approach, early intervention, involvement of patient and employer, work or workplace accommodations, work practice and training of social and work-related skills, including coping and emotional support. Effective RTW interventions for patients with ABI are a combination of work-directed interventions, coaching/education and/or skills training. These interventions have the potential to facilitate sustained RTW for patients with ABI.

  17. Investigating therapists’ intention to use serious games for acquired brain injury cognitive rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Elaklouk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury is one cause of long-term disability. Serious games can assist in cognitive rehabilitation. However, therapists’ perception and feedback will determine game adoption. The objective of this study is to investigate therapists’ intention to use serious games for cognitive rehabilitation and identify underlying factors that may affect their acceptance. The respondents are 41 therapists who evaluated a “Ship Game” prototype. Data were collected using survey questionnaire and interview. A seven-point Likert scale was used for items in the questionnaire ranging from (1 “strongly disagree” to (7 “strongly agree”. Results indicate that the game is easy to use (Mean = 5.83, useful (Mean = 5.62, and enjoyable (Mean = 5.90. However intention to use is slightly low (Mean = 4.60. Significant factors that can affect therapists’ intention to use the game were gathered from interviews. Game-based intervention should reflect therapists’ needs in order to achieve various rehabilitation goals, providing suitable and meaningful training. Hence, facilities to tailor the game to the patient’s ability, needs and constraints are important factors that can increase therapists’ intention to use and help to deliver game experience that can motivate patients to undergo the practices needed. Moreover, therapists’ supervision, database functionality and quantitative measures regarding a patient’s progress also represent crucial factors.

  18. Factors affecting return to oral intake in inpatient rehabilitation after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaersgaard, Annette; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2015-01-01

    To extend previous observations by investigating if differences exist in time to initiation or to recovery of total oral intake in patients with acquired brain injury assessed by either Facial-Oral Tract Therapy (F.O.T.T.) or Fibreoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) and to investigate whether other factors influence these outcomes. Randomized controlled trial. One hundred and nineteen patients with dysphagia in inpatient neurorehabilitation were randomized. The main outcome was time to maximum on the Functional Oral Intake Scale. There was no difference in time to initiation or recovery of total oral intake using F.O.T.T. or FEES. Oral intake was initiated for 42% on admission and 92% at discharge; 2.5% of the patients were on total oral intake within 24 hours of admission and 37% at discharge. The likelihood of recovery to total oral intake before discharge was found to depend on age, Functional Independence Measure score, length of stay and number of dysphagia interventions. There was no significant difference in time to initiation and recovery of total oral intake before discharge, whether assessed by F.O.T.T. or FEES, indicating that an instrumental assessment is unnecessary for standard evaluation. Age, functional independence and length of stay had a significant influence.

  19. Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matérne, Marie; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Strandberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW). The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI. Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person's cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations. It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW.

  20. Training of attention and memory deficits in children with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjö, N Madsen; Spellerberg, S; Weidner, S; Kihlgren, M

    2010-02-01

    This pilot study concerns cognitive rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury (ABI). The aim is threefold; to determine (1) whether the Amsterdam Memory and Attention Training for Children (AMAT-C) programme for children with ABI can be integrated in the child's school, (2) whether supervision in the school-setting maintains the child's motivation throughout the training programme and (3) whether positive changes in memory, attention and executive functions are found with this implementation of the training method. Seven children with memory and/or attention deficits after ABI were trained with AMAT-C. Measures used were programme evaluation questions, neuropsychological tests and a questionnaire concerning executive functions. Overall, children, parents and trainers were satisfied with the programme and the children were motivated throughout the programme. The children showed significant improvements in neuropsychological subtests, primarily in tests of learning and memory. No overall change in executive functions was noted. Provision of AMAT-C training and supervision at the child's school appears to ensure (1) satisfaction with the programme, (2) sustaining of motivation and (3) improvements in learning and memory.

  1. Factors associated with self-esteem following acquired brain injury in adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curvis, William; Simpson, Jane; Hampson, Natalie

    2018-01-01

    Self-esteem is potentially a key factor in psychological and psychosocial well-being following acquired brain injury (ABI). The current review aimed to identify, synthesise and appraise all existing quantitative empirical studies on predictors or correlates of self-esteem following ABI in adulthood. In total, 27 papers met the inclusion criteria. A range of clinical factors were related to self-esteem after ABI, including the degree of physical and functional impairment. It is unclear if cognitive impairment is related to high or low self-esteem. Additionally, psychological variables such as coping styles, adjustment and perception of problems or rehabilitation are related to self-esteem following ABI. Depression is strongly associated with low self-esteem, alongside anxiety, psychological distress and quality of life. Limitations of the available research and recommendations for clinical practice and further research are discussed. In particular, there is a need to engage with contemporary theoretical understandings of self-esteem, integrated with and supported by developments in how self-esteem is conceptualised and measured over time in an ABI population. The findings of the review suggest that self-esteem is an important factor to consider following ABI, particularly in the context of developing individualised, formulation-driven rehabilitation interventions that take into account biological, social and psychological factors.

  2. Music evoked autobiographical memory after severe acquired brain injury: preliminary findings from a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, A; Samson, S

    2014-01-01

    Music evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) have been characterised in the healthy population, but not, to date, in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). Our aim was to investigate music compared with verbal evoked autobiographical memories. Five patients with severe ABI and matched controls completed the experimental music (MEAM) task (a written questionnaire) while listening to 50 "Number 1 Songs of the Year" (from 1960 to 2010). Patients also completed the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) and a standard neuropsychological assessment. With the exception of Case 5, who reported no MEAMs and no autobiographical incidents on the AMI and who also had impaired pitch perception, the range of frequency and type of MEAMs in patients was broadly in keeping with their matched controls. The relative preservation of MEAMs in four cases was particularly noteworthy given their impaired verbal and/or visual anterograde memory, and in three cases, autobiographical memory impairment. The majority of MEAMs in both cases and matched controls were of a person/people or a period of life. In three patients music was more efficient at evoking autobiographical memories than the AMI verbal prompts. This is the first study of MEAMs after ABI. The findings suggest that music is an effective stimulus for eliciting autobiographical memories, and may be beneficial in the rehabilitation of autobiographical amnesia, but only in patients without a fundamental deficit in autobiographical recall memory and intact pitch perception.

  3. Response actions to difficulties in using everyday technology after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Lövgren Engström, Ann-Louice; Lexell, Jan

    2012-03-01

    People with acquired brain injury (ABI) have difficulties using everyday technology (ET) in daily tasks at home and in society. To support them in managing the demands imposed by using ET, knowledge is needed concerning their response actions to the difficulties. The aim of this study was to explore and describe what characterizes response actions to difficulties using ET, their conditions, and how they influence the experiences of tasks in daily life among people with ABI. Interviews and observations were undertaken with 13 persons with an ABI. Data were analysed qualitatively using the constant comparative method. The participants' response actions were categorized as (i) deliberate and organized planning, (ii) random and inflexible repeating (iii), re-evaluating tasks, (iv) explaining difficulties related to others, and (iv) proving and protecting capability. Certain conditions were decisive for the different response actions to be applied and also for their effectiveness in enabling engagement in tasks in daily life. Each participant used several types of response actions and the same action could be applied in several situations. To support people with an ABI to manage the demands imposed by using ET, it is important to identify the uniqueness of each client and his or her response actions to difficulties using ET and thereafter adjust the interventions accordingly.

  4. The challenges of everyday technology in the workplace for persons with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte; Prellwitz, Maria; Larsson Lund, Maria

    2013-07-01

    To explore and describe how persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) managed the everyday technology (ET) that they needed to use in their workplace and how this use influences their opportunities to work. Nine persons with an ABI were interviewed and observed when managing ET in their workplace. The data were analysed qualitatively with a constant comparative method. The main category, "The challenge of managing ET in the workplace", consisted of three categories, all of which reflected different kinds of discrepancies between the participants' ability to manage ET and the demands that ET imposes on them in work: "Struggling with ET to be able to continue to work; "Depending on strategies to cope with ET to continue in a particular profession", and "Managing ET at work but concerned about keeping up with the changes". The result revealed discrepancies between the abilities of the persons with ABI to manage ET in relation to the demands that technology imposed on them in their work setting. This indicated that professionals need to consider the role of ET when designing interventions supporting a person's return to work after an ABI.

  5. Participation after acquired brain injury: Associations with everyday technology and activities in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, Mandana; Kottorp, Anders; Nygård, Louise; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2015-01-01

    The development of the information society has led to increased use of everyday technology and changed the conditions for participation. Enabling participation in everyday life situations is an important rehabilitation goal after acquired brain injury (ABI). Identifying factors associated with individuals' experienced participation and problems therein is therefore essential. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between perceived difficulty in everyday technology use, perceived ability in the activities of daily living (ADL), and perceived participation, and participation problems in persons with ABI. Eighty-one persons with ABI participated in the study and were assessed by the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, and the ADL taxonomy. Findings showed that the combined model of difficulty in everyday technology (ET) use, ADL ability, and the interaction between them explained both participation in various domains of everyday life, and also overall level of perceived participation and the perceived problems. The findings underscore the importance of evaluating individuals' ability in both ET use and ADL after ABI to increase the probability of explaining these persons' participation in desired everyday life situations and, also, for rehabilitation design.

  6. Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: influence on activity and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2010-12-01

    Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.

  7. Reliability of the Cooking Task in adults with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Frédérique; Swaine, Bonnie; Taillefer, Chantal; Lamoureux, Julie; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often leads to deficits in executive functioning (EF) responsible for severe and long-standing disabilities in daily life activities. The Cooking Task is an ecological and valid test of EF involving multi-tasking in a real environment. Given its complex scoring system, it is important to establish the tool's reliability. The objective of the study was to examine the reliability of the Cooking Task (internal consistency, inter-rater and test-retest reliability). A total of 160 patients with ABI (113 men, mean age 37 years, SD = 14.3) were tested using the Cooking Task. For test-retest reliability, patients were assessed by the same rater on two occasions (mean interval 11 days) while two raters independently and simultaneously observed and scored patients' performances to estimate inter-rater reliability. Internal consistency was high for the global scale (Cronbach α = .74). Inter-rater reliability (n = 66) for total errors was also high (ICC = .93), however the test-retest reliability (n = 11) was poor (ICC = .36). In general the Cooking Task appears to be a reliable tool. The low test-retest results were expected given the importance of EF in the performance of novel tasks.

  8. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), but the studie...

  9. Systematic review of clinical practice guidelines to identify recommendations for rehabilitation after stroke and other acquired brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannin, Natasha A; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Rehabilitation clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) contain recommendation statements aimed at optimising care for adults with stroke and other brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the quality, scope and consistency of CPG recommendations for rehabilitation covering the acquired brain injury populations. Design Systematic review. Interventions Included CPGs contained recommendations for inpatient rehabilitation or community rehabilitation for adults with an acquired brain injury diagnosis (stroke, traumatic or other non-progressive acquired brain impairments). Electronic databases (n=2), guideline organisations (n=4) and websites of professional societies (n=17) were searched up to November 2017. Two independent reviewers used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, and textual syntheses were used to appraise and compare recommendations. Results From 427 papers screened, 20 guidelines met the inclusion criteria. Only three guidelines were rated high (>75%) across all domains of AGREE-II; highest rated domains were ‘scope and purpose’ (85.1, SD 18.3) and ‘clarity’ (76.2%, SD 20.5). Recommendations for assessment and for motor therapies were most commonly reported, however, varied in the level of detail across guidelines. Conclusion Rehabilitation CPGs were consistent in scope, suggesting little difference in rehabilitation approaches between vascular and traumatic brain injury. There was, however, variability in included studies and methodological quality. PROSPERO registration number CRD42016026936. PMID:29490958

  10. Therapeutic brain modulation with targeted large neutral amino acid supplements in the Pah-enu2 phenylketonuria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Danique; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Mazzola, Priscila N; van Faassen, Martijn Hjr; de Blaauw, Pim; Pascucci, Tiziana; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Kema, Ido P; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van der Zee, Eddy A; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2016-11-01

    Phenylketonuria treatment consists mainly of a Phe-restricted diet, which leads to suboptimal neurocognitive and psychosocial outcomes. Supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) has been suggested as an alternative dietary treatment strategy to optimize neurocognitive outcome in phenylketonuria and has been shown to influence 3 brain pathobiochemical mechanisms in phenylketonuria, but its optimal composition has not been established. In order to provide additional pathobiochemical insight and develop optimal LNAA treatment, several targeted LNAA supplements were investigated with respect to all 3 biochemical disturbances underlying brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria. Pah-enu2 (PKU) mice received 1 of 5 different LNAA-supplemented diets beginning at postnatal day 45. Control groups included phenylketonuria mice receiving an isonitrogenic and isocaloric high-protein diet or the AIN-93M diet, and wild-type mice receiving the AIN-93M diet. After 6 wk, brain and plasma amino acid profiles and brain monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were measured. Brain Phe concentrations were most effectively reduced by supplementation of LNAAs, such as Leu and Ile, with a strong affinity for the LNAA transporter type 1. Brain non-Phe LNAAs could be restored on supplementation, but unbalanced LNAA supplementation further reduced brain concentrations of those LNAAs that were not (sufficiently) included in the LNAA supplement. To optimally ameliorate brain monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations, LNAA supplementation should include Tyr and Trp together with LNAAs that effectively reduce brain Phe concentrations. The requirement for Tyr supplementation is higher than it is for Trp, and the relative effect of brain Phe reduction is higher for serotonin than it is for dopamine and norepinephrine. The study shows that all 3 biochemical disturbances underlying brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria can be targeted by specific LNAA supplements. The study thus

  11. Intervention and societal costs of residential community reintegration for patients with acquired brain injury: a cost-analysis of the Brain Integration Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heugten, C.M. van; Geurtsen, G.J.; Derksen, R.E.; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Evers, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the intervention costs of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with acquired brain injury and to compare the societal costs before and after treatment. METHODS: A cost-analysis was performed identifying costs of

  12. Intervention and societal costs of residential community reintegration for patients with acquired brain injury: a cost-analysis of the Brain Integration Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heugten, Caroline M.; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Derksen, R. Elze; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Evers, Silvia M. A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the intervention costs of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with acquired brain injury and to compare the societal costs before and after treatment. A cost-analysis was performed identifying costs of healthcare, informal care, and

  13. Multi-disciplinary rehabilitation for acquired brain injury in adults of working age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Pick, Anton; Nair, Ajoy; Disler, Peter B; Wade, Derick T

    2015-12-22

    Evidence from systematic reviews demonstrates that multi-disciplinary rehabilitation is effective in the stroke population, in which older adults predominate. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of rehabilitation following acquired brain injury (ABI) in younger adults has not been established, perhaps because this scenario presents different methodological challenges in research. To assess the effects of multi-disciplinary rehabilitation following ABI in adults 16 to 65 years of age. We ran the most recent search on 14 September 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), Embase Classic+Embase (OvidSP), Web of Science (ISI WOS) databases, clinical trials registers, and we screened reference lists. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing multi-disciplinary rehabilitation versus routinely available local services or lower levels of intervention; or trials comparing an intervention in different settings, of different intensities or of different timing of onset. Controlled clinical trials were included, provided they met pre-defined methodological criteria. Three review authors independently selected trials and rated their methodological quality. A fourth review author would have arbitrated if consensus could not be reached by discussion, but in fact, this did not occur. As in previous versions of this review, we used the method described by Van Tulder 1997 to rate the quality of trials and to perform a 'best evidence' synthesis by attributing levels of evidence on the basis of methodological quality. Risk of bias assessments were performed in parallel using standard Cochrane methodology. However, the Van Tulder system provided a more discriminative evaluation of rehabilitation trials, so we have continued to use it for our primary synthesis of evidence. We subdivided trials in terms of

  14. Whose decision is it anyway? How clinicians support decision-making participation after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Lucy; Douglas, Jacinta M; Bigby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    To raise professional awareness of factors that may influence the support offered by clinicians to people with acquired brain injury (ABI), and to consider the potential implications of these factors in terms of post-injury rehabilitation and living. A review of the literature was conducted to identify factors that determine how clinicians provide support and influence opportunities for individuals with ABI to participate in decision making across the rehabilitation continuum. Clinical case studies are used to highlight two specific issues: (1) hidden assumptions on the part of the practitioner, and (2) perceptions of risk operating in clinical practice. There are a range of factors which may influence the decision-making support provided by clinicians and, ultimately, shape lifetime outcomes for individuals with ABI. A multidimensional framework may assist clinicians to identify relevant factors and consider their potential implications including those that influence how clinicians involved in supporting decision making approach this task. Participation in decision making is an undisputed human right and central to the provision of person-centred care. Further research is required to understand how clinical practice can maximise both opportunities and support for increased decision-making participation by individuals with ABI. There is an increasing focus on the rights of all individuals to be supported to participate in decision making about their life. A number of changes associated with ABI mean that individuals with ABI will require support with decision making. Clinicians have a critical role in providing this support over the course of the rehabilitation continuum. Clinicians need to be aware of the range of factors that may influence the decision-making support they provide. A multidimensional framework may be used by clinicians to identify influences on the decision-making support they provide.

  15. Participant and service provider perceptions of an outpatient rehabilitation program for people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Frédérique; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Lamontagne, Marie-Eve; Alifax, Anne; Fradelizi, Pascaline; Barette, Maude; Swaine, Bonnie

    2017-09-01

    A holistic, intensive and interdisciplinary rehabilitation program for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) was developed at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, France (5 days/week for 7 weeks). This program, recently demonstrated effective, aimed to optimize the ability of people with ABI to perform activities and improve their participation by using individual and group interventions involving ecologically valid activities inside (e.g., in the gym and kitchen) and outside the hospital. However, the perception of the quality of the program by participants and service providers has not yet been reported. This study had 3 objectives: (1) report the perception of participants (adults with ABI) in terms of service quality of the program, (2) report the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis) of the program as perceived by service providers, and (3) triangulate findings to draw conclusions about the program's quality and provide recommendations for quality improvement. We used a mixed-methods design with a validated questionnaire (Perception of Quality of Rehabilitation Services [PQRS-Montreal]) and interviews (structured around a SWOT analysis) involving program participants and service providers. We included 33 program participants (mean age 43.6 years) and 12 service providers (mean years with program 7.6 years). In general, study participants showed a convergence of opinion about the high quality of the program, particularly regarding the team and its participant-focused approach. Specific aspects of the program were viewed more negatively by both participants and service providers (i.e., addressing sexuality, family involvement and return to work/volunteer work/school). Participant and service provider perceptions of the rehabilitation program under study were generally positive. A reliable and valid questionnaire and interviews helped identify aspects of the program that worked well and those that could be targeted for future quality

  16. Associations between executive functioning, coping, and psychosocial functioning after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters Gregório, Gisela; Ponds, Rudolf W H M; Smeets, Sanne M J; Jonker, Frank; Pouwels, Climmy G J G; Verhey, Frans R; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2015-09-01

    To examine the relationships between executive functioning, coping, depressive symptoms, and quality of life in individuals with neuropsychiatric symptoms after acquired brain injury (ABI). Cross-sectional study. Individuals (n = 93) in the post-acute and chronic phase (>3 months) after ABI and their significant others (N = 58) were recruited from outpatient clinics of four mental health centres in the Netherlands. Outcome measures were the Trail Making Test, Stroop Colour Word Test, Frontal Systems Behavioural Scale, Utrecht Coping List, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Life Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were analysed with multiple regression analyses. Self-reported executive dysfunction was associated with greater use of passive coping styles (β = .37, p executive functioning (β = -.94, p executive functioning tests were not associated with coping, depressive symptoms, or quality of life. For clinicians, these data indicate that individuals who report greater difficulties with executive functioning after ABI are inclined to use maladaptive passive coping styles, which should be targeted in treatment. In comparison, individuals who report greater difficulties with executive functioning should not be prompted to use problem-focused coping styles. These individuals may benefit from other coping styles, such as the use of seeking social support or acceptance of problems. Coping influences the association between executive functioning and quality of life. Individuals who report difficulties with executive functioning after ABI may be inclined to use passive coping styles, which are maladaptive. Problem-focused coping strategies may be more useful for individuals who have strong executive abilities. This study was a cross-sectional study; thus, a cause-and-effect relationship could not be established between executive functioning, coping, and psychosocial functioning. As this research was part of standard clinical care, non-traditional tests for executive

  17. Rehabilitation of Upper Limb in Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beretta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injuries (ABIs can lead to a wide range of impairments, including weakness or paralysis on one side of the body known as hemiplegia. In hemiplegic patients, the rehabilitation of the upper limb skills is crucial, because the recovery has an immediate impact on patient quality of life. For this reason, several treatments were developed to flank physical therapy (PT and improve functional recovery of the upper limbs. Among them, Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT and robot-aided therapy have shown interesting potentialities in the rehabilitation of the hemiplegic upper limb. Nevertheless, there is a lack of quantitative evaluations of effectiveness in a standard clinical setting, especially in children, as well as a lack of direct comparative studies between these therapeutic techniques. In this study, a group of 18 children and adolescents with hemiplegia was enrolled and underwent intensive rehabilitation treatment including PT and CIMT or Armeo®Spring therapy. The effects of the treatments were assessed using clinical functional scales and upper limb kinematic analysis during horizontal and vertical motor tasks. Results showed CIMT to be the most effective in terms of improved functional scales, while PT seemed to be the most significant in terms of kinematic variations. Specifically, PT resulted to have positive influence on distal movements while CIMT conveyed more changes in the proximal kinematics. Armeo treatment delivered improvements mainly in the vertical motor task, showing trends of progresses of the movement efficiency and reduction of compensatory movements of the shoulder with respect to other treatments. Therefore, every treatment gave advantages in a specific and different upper limb district. Therefore, results of this preliminary study may be of help to define the best rehabilitation treatment for each patient, depending on the goal, and may thus support clinical decision.

  18. Rehabilitation of Upper Limb in Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Preliminary Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Elena; Cesareo, Ambra; Biffi, Emilia; Schafer, Carolyn; Galbiati, Sara; Strazzer, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    Acquired brain injuries (ABIs) can lead to a wide range of impairments, including weakness or paralysis on one side of the body known as hemiplegia. In hemiplegic patients, the rehabilitation of the upper limb skills is crucial, because the recovery has an immediate impact on patient quality of life. For this reason, several treatments were developed to flank physical therapy (PT) and improve functional recovery of the upper limbs. Among them, Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and robot-aided therapy have shown interesting potentialities in the rehabilitation of the hemiplegic upper limb. Nevertheless, there is a lack of quantitative evaluations of effectiveness in a standard clinical setting, especially in children, as well as a lack of direct comparative studies between these therapeutic techniques. In this study, a group of 18 children and adolescents with hemiplegia was enrolled and underwent intensive rehabilitation treatment including PT and CIMT or Armeo®Spring therapy. The effects of the treatments were assessed using clinical functional scales and upper limb kinematic analysis during horizontal and vertical motor tasks. Results showed CIMT to be the most effective in terms of improved functional scales, while PT seemed to be the most significant in terms of kinematic variations. Specifically, PT resulted to have positive influence on distal movements while CIMT conveyed more changes in the proximal kinematics. Armeo treatment delivered improvements mainly in the vertical motor task, showing trends of progresses of the movement efficiency and reduction of compensatory movements of the shoulder with respect to other treatments. Therefore, every treatment gave advantages in a specific and different upper limb district. Therefore, results of this preliminary study may be of help to define the best rehabilitation treatment for each patient, depending on the goal, and may thus support clinical decision.

  19. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  20. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert eBoonstra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The food supplement version of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB, but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  1. Interventions for dysarthria due to stroke and other adult-acquired, non-progressive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Claire; Bowen, Audrey; Tyson, Sarah; Butterfint, Zoe; Conroy, Paul

    2017-01-25

    Dysarthria is an acquired speech disorder following neurological injury that reduces intelligibility of speech due to weak, imprecise, slow and/or unco-ordinated muscle control. The impact of dysarthria goes beyond communication and affects psychosocial functioning. This is an update of a review previously published in 2005. The scope has been broadened to include additional interventions, and the title amended accordingly. To assess the effects of interventions to improve dysarthric speech following stroke and other non-progressive adult-acquired brain injury such as trauma, infection, tumour and surgery. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2016), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL on 6 May 2016. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavioral Abstracts (LLBA) (1976 to November 2016) and PsycINFO (1800 to September 2016). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials, we searched major trials registers: WHO ICTRP, the ISRCTN registry, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted academic institutions and other researchers regarding other published, unpublished or ongoing trials. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysarthria interventions with 1) no intervention, 2) another intervention for dysarthria (this intervention may differ in methodology, timing of delivery, duration, frequency or theory), or 3) an attention control. Three review authors selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We attempted to contact study authors for clarification and missing data as required. We calculated standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI), using a random-effects model, and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the influence of methodological quality. We planned to conduct subgroup analyses for underlying clinical

  2. Communication and quality of life outcomes in people with acquired brain injury following project-based treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Behn, N.

    2016-01-01

    Communication impairments are common following acquired brain injury (ABI) and have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life (QOL) post-injury. While some treatments have improved communication skills, few have measured QOL, and even fewer have shown improved QOL for people with ABI following communication-based treatments. Project-based treatment is an alternative treatment approach that could have an impact on communication skills and QOL for people with ABI who are long-term post...

  3. Towards a Mobile Assistive Technology for Monitoring and Assessing Cognitive Fatigue in Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Edward; Moore, George; Galway, Leo; Linden, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Those living with an acquired brain injury often have issues with fatigue due to factors resulting from the injury. Cognitive impairments such as lack of memory, concentration and planning have a great impact on an individual’s ability to carry out general everyday tasks, which subsequently has the effect of inducing cognitive fatigue. Moreover, there is difficulty in assessing cognitive fatigue, as there are no real biological markers that can be measured. Rather, it is a very subjective eff...

  4. Informant Report of Financial Capacity for Individuals With Chronic Acquired Brain Injury: An Assessment of Informant Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderaraman, Preeti; Cosentino, Stephanie; Lindgren, Karen; James, Angela; Schultheis, Maria

    2018-03-29

    Primarily, to investigate the association between informant report and objective performance on specific financial capacity (FC) tasks by adults with chronic, moderate to severe acquired brain injury, and to examine the nature of misestimates by the informants. Cross-sectional design. A postacute, community-based rehabilitation center. Data were obtained from 22 chronic acquired brain injury (CABI) adults, mean age of 46.6 years (SD = 8.67), mean years of education of 13.45 years (SD = 2.15), with moderate to severe acquired brain injury (86% had traumatic brain injury), with a mean postinjury period of 17.14 years (SD = 9.5). Whereas the CABI adults completed the Financial Competence Assessment Inventory interview-a combination of self-report and performance-based assessment, 22 informants completed a specifically designed parallel version of the interview. Pearson correlations and 1-sample t tests based on the discrepancy scores between informant report and CABI group's performance were used. The CABI group's performance was not associated with its informant's perceptions. One-sample t tests revealed that informants both underestimated and overestimated CABI group's performance. Results indicate lack of correspondence between self- and informant ratings. Further investigation revealed that misestimations by informants occurred in contrary directions with CABI adults' performance being inaccurately rated. These findings raise critical issues related to assuming that the informant report can be used as a "gold standard" for collecting functional data related to financial management, and the idea that obtaining objective data on financial tasks may represent a more valid method of assessing financial competency in adults with brain injury.

  5. Iron supplement prevents lead-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier during rat development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiang; Luo Wenjing; Zheng Wei; Liu Yiping; Xu Hui; Zheng Gang; Dai Zhongming; Zhang Wenbin; Chen Yaoming; Chen Jingyuan

    2007-01-01

    Children are known to be venerable to lead (Pb) toxicity. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) in immature brain is particularly vulnerable to Pb insults. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Pb exposure damaged the integrity of the BBB in young animals and iron (Fe) supplement may prevent against Pb-induced BBB disruption. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water containing 342 μg Pb/mL as Pb acetate, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day with 7 mg Fe/kg and 14 mg Fe/kg as FeSO 4 solution as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. The control group received sodium acetate in drinking water. Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in blood by 6.6-folds (p < 0.05) and brain tissues by 1.5-2.0-folds (p < 0.05) as compared to controls. Under the electron microscope, Pb exposure in young animals caused an extensive extravascular staining of lanthanum nitrate in brain parenchyma, suggesting a leakage of cerebral vasculature. Western blot showed that Pb treatment led to 29-68% reduction (p < 0.05) in the expression of occludin as compared to the controls. Fe supplement among Pb-exposed rats maintained the normal ultra-structure of the BBB and restored the expression of occludin to normal levels. Moreover, the low dose Fe supplement significantly reduced Pb levels in blood and brain tissues. These data suggest that Pb exposure disrupts the structure of the BBB in young animals. The increased BBB permeability may facilitate the accumulation of Pb. Fe supplement appears to protect the integrity of the BBB against Pb insults, a beneficial effect that may have significant clinical implications

  6. Neurosurgical targets for compulsivity: what can we learn from acquired brain lesions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figee, Martijn; Wielaard, Ilse; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Treatment efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgical techniques in refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is greatly dependent on the targeting of relevant brain regions. Over the years, several case reports have been published on either the emergence or resolution of

  7. Effect of zinc supplementation on neuronal precursor proliferation in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Elise C; Morris, Deborah R; Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Brownstein, Naomi C; Levenson, Cathy W

    2016-05-01

    There is great deal of debate about the possible role of adult-born hippocampal cells in the prevention of depression and related mood disorders. We first showed that zinc supplementation prevents the development of the depression-like behavior anhedonia associated with an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This work then examined the effect of zinc supplementation on the proliferation of new cells in the hippocampus that have the potential to participate in neurogenesis. Rats were fed a zinc adequate (ZA, 30ppm) or zinc supplemented (ZS, 180ppm) diet for 4wk followed by TBI using controlled cortical impact. Stereological counts of EdU-positive cells showed that TBI doubled the density of proliferating cells 24h post-injury (pprecursor cells in the hippocampus was robust, use of targeted irradiation to eliminate these cells after zinc supplementation and TBI revealed that these cells are not the sole mechanism through which zinc acts to prevent depression associated with brain injury, and suggest that other zinc dependent mechanisms are needed for the anti-depressant effect of zinc in this model of TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Whey protein concentrate supplementation protects rat brain against aging-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Geetika; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is a rich source of sulfur-containing amino acids and is consumed as a functional food, incorporating a wide range of nutritional attributes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of WPC on rat brain during aging. Young (4 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats were supplemented with WPC (300 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in terms of ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP), total thiol (T-SH), protein carbonyl (PC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured in brain of control and experimental (WPC supplemented) groups. In addition, gene expression and histopathological studies were also performed. The results indicate that WPC augmented the level of FRAP, T-SH, and AChE in old rats as compared with the old control. Furthermore, WPC-treated groups exhibited significant reduction in LHP, PC, ROS, and NO levels in aged rats. WPC supplementation also downregulated the expression of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6), and upregulated the expression of marker genes associated with autophagy (Atg3, Beclin-1, LC3B) and neurodegeneration (neuron specific enolase, Synapsin-I, MBP-2). The findings suggested WPC to be a potential functional nutritional food supplement that prevents the progression of age-related oxidative damage in Wistar rats.

  9. Neuropsychology of colour vision: Studies in patients with acquired brain damage, healthy participants, and cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, T.C.W.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied the neuropsychology of low-level sensory and higher-order visual perception in healthy participants, patients with acquired deficits in visual perception, and a man with a selective developmental deficit in colour processing. In neuropsychological literature, sensory

  10. A Clarion Call for Social Work Attention: Brothers and Sisters of Persons With Acquired Brain Injury in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund

    2016-08-11

    This article presents a clarion call for increased social work attention to the needs of siblings of persons with acquired brain injury (ABI) in the United States. The article overviews how siblings are psychosocially affected, how they provide care to the injured brothers and sisters, and how they personally develop as a result of their experiences. The article highlights the fact that social workers and other professionals often overlook the needs of siblings of persons with ABI and makes an appeal for social workers to advance clinical practice and research to benefit this often neglected population.

  11. The nature of self-esteem and its relationship to anxiety and depression in adult acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Longworth, Catherine; Deakins, Joseph; Rose, David; Gracey, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) has a negative impact on self-esteem, which is in turn associated with mood disorders, maladaptive coping and reduced community participation. The aim of the current research was to explore self-esteem as a multi-dimensional construct and identify which factors are associated with symptoms of anxiety or depression. Eighty adults with ABI aged 17–56 years completed the Robson Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), of whom 65 also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Sca...

  12. Intravenous saline administration in patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance for tilt-table mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian; Olesen, Niels; Hovind, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Primary objective: This study aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous saline administration on orthostatic hypotension (OH) during head up tilt (HUT) and the change in the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system before and after HUT in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI). Research...... artery blood flow velocity. Blood samples were collected before and after two HUT sessions separated by 1 hour and saline was administered in between. Main outcomes and results: Patients’ ability to stand upright did not change after saline administration due to OH. The patients showed signs of reduced...... fluid administration. Research focusing on the ability to retain fluid after bed rest is warranted....

  13. Computer- and Suggestion-based Cognitive Rehabilitation following Acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas Kristoffer

    . That is, training does not cause cognitive transfer and thus does not constitute “brain training” or “brain exercise” of any clinical relevance. A larger study found more promising results for a suggestion-based treatment in a hypnotic procedure. Patients improved to above population average in a matter...... of 4-8 hours, making this by far the most effective treatment compared to computer-based training, physical exercise, phamaceuticals, meditation, and attention process training. The contrast between computer-based methods and the hypnotic suggestion treatment may be reflect a more general discrepancy...

  14. The Overt Behaviour Scale-Self-Report (OBS-SR) for acquired brain injury: exploratory analysis of reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Glenn; Simpson, Grahame K; Brown, Suzanne; Kremer, Peter; Gillett, Lauren

    2017-05-23

    The objectives were to test the properties, via a psychometric study, of the Overt Behaviour Scale-Self-Report (OBS-SR), a version of the OBS-Adult Scale developed to provide a client perspective on challenging behaviours after acquired brain injury. Study sample 1 consisted of 37 patients with primary brain tumour (PBT) and a family-member informant. Sample 2 consisted of 34 clients with other acquired brain injury (mixed brain injury, MBI) and a service-provider informant. Participants completed the OBS-SR (at two time points), and the Awareness Questionnaire (AQ) and Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-III (MPAI-III) once; informants completed the OBS-Adult and AQ once only. PBT-informant dyads displayed "good" levels of agreement (ICC 2,k  = .74; OBS-SR global index). Although MBI-informant dyads displayed no agreement (ICC 2,k  = .22; OBS-SR global index), the sub-group (17/29) rated by clinicians as having moderate to good levels of awareness displayed "fair" agreement (ICC 2,k  = .58; OBS-SR global index). Convergent/divergent validity was demonstrated by significant correlations between OBS-SR subscales and MPAI-III subscales with behavioural content (coefficients in the range .36 -.61). Scores had good reliability across one week (ICC 2,k  = .69). The OBS-SR took approximately 15 minutes to complete. It was concluded that the OBS-SR demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity, providing a useful resource in understanding clients' perspectives about their behaviour.

  15. Improving the Quality of Staff and Participant Interaction in an Acquired Brain Injury Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, John M.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Weekly observations of direct-care staff in a facility for persons with brain injury yielded less than optimal interactional style with facility residents. Following an observational baseline, staff were asked to self-rate a 15-min video sample of their interaction behavior with participants on their unit. They were then asked to compare their…

  16. Neural correlates of apathy in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, acquired brain injury, and psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, Claire; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Knegtering, Henderikus; Aleman, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Apathy can be described as a loss of goal-directed purposeful behavior and is common in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although previous studies investigated associations between abnormal brain functioning and apathy, it is unclear whether the neural basis of apathy is similar

  17. Post-stroke acquired amusia: A comparison between right- and left-brain hemispheric damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Zahra; Esmaili, Mahdiye; Delbari, Ahmad; Mehrpour, Masoud; Mohajerani, Majid H

    2017-01-01

    Although extensive research has been published about the emotional consequences of stroke, most studies have focused on emotional words, speech prosody, voices, or facial expressions. The emotional processing of musical excerpts following stroke has been relatively unexplored. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of chronic stroke on the recognition of basic emotions in music. Seventy persons, including 25 normal controls (NC), 25 persons with right brain damage (RBD) from stroke, and 20 persons with left brain damage (LBD) from stroke between the ages of 31-71 years were studied. The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) test, which consists of a set of short musical pieces expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness, and fear) and neutrality, was used to test musical emotional perception. Both stroke groups were significantly poorer than normal controls for the MEB total score and its subtests (p right hemisphere dominance in processing negative emotions.

  18. Acquired self-control of insula cortex modulates emotion recognition and brain network connectivity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lee, Sangkyun; Soekadar, Surjo R; Caria, Andrea; Veit, Ralf; Kircher, Tilo; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2013-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) is a novel technique that has allowed subjects to achieve self-regulation of circumscribed brain regions. Despite its anticipated therapeutic benefits, there is no report on successful application of this technique in psychiatric populations. The objectives of the present study were to train schizophrenia patients to achieve volitional control of bilateral anterior insula cortex on multiple days, and to explore the effect of learned self-regulation on face emotion recognition (an extensively studied deficit in schizophrenia) and on brain network connectivity. Nine patients with schizophrenia were trained to regulate the hemodynamic response in bilateral anterior insula with contingent rtfMRI neurofeedback, through a 2-weeks training. At the end of the training stage, patients performed a face emotion recognition task to explore behavioral effects of learned self-regulation. A learning effect in self-regulation was found for bilateral anterior insula, which persisted through the training. Following successful self-regulation, patients recognized disgust faces more accurately and happy faces less accurately. Improvements in disgust recognition were correlated with levels of self-activation of right insula. RtfMRI training led to an increase in the number of the incoming and outgoing effective connections of the anterior insula. This study shows for the first time that patients with schizophrenia can learn volitional brain regulation by rtfMRI feedback training leading to changes in the perception of emotions and modulations of the brain network connectivity. These findings open the door for further studies of rtfMRI in severely ill psychiatric populations, and possible therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Social cognition and executive functioning predictors of supervisors' appraisal of interpersonal behaviour in the workplace following acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Giles; Rowberry, Michelle; Dunne, Stephen; Goshawk, Michelle; Mahadevan, Mythreyi; Tyerman, Ruth; Salter, Mandy; Hillier, Martin; Berry, Alister; Tyerman, Andy

    2016-03-23

    Social cognition and executive functioning difficulties following acquired brain injury have been linked to negative employment outcomes, such as demotion and loss of vocational roles. These are very counter-intuitive and challenging difficulties for other employees and work supervisors who have little or no brain injury knowledge, whose perceptions of play a key role in their responses to these difficulties and the final outcome of such problems for vocational status. This study aimed to study the relationship between social cognition and executive functioning difficulties and the perceptions of work supervisors' appraisal of survivor interpersonal behaviour and social skills in the workplace. The performance of 73 survivors of acquired brain injury (47% TBI, 38% CVA, 15% other ABI type; 73% male; mean age 45.44 years, range 19-64 years; mean time since injury 6.36 years, range 10.5-31.33 years), currently in a vocational rehabilitation placement) on neuropsychological tests of executive functioning and social cognition was measured. Informant ratings on the Social Skills Factor subscale from the Work Personality Profile (WPP, Bolton & Roessler, 1986) were used as the primary outcome measure, a vocational functioning questionnaire assessing social and presentational aspects of workplace behaviour. The raters were non-clinical workplace informants acting in a supervisory role (supervisory placement providers and job coaches). Correlational analysis identified significant associations between the WPP and survivor goal-orientated planning and implementation, mentalising ability, recognition of positive and negative emotions, and recognition of simple sarcasm (all significant at p executive functioning explained 32 % of the variance in the WPP ratings (F (2, 52) =  12.15, p executive functioning and social cognition difficulties for the perceptions and appraisal of work colleagues, consistent with other studies that have identified negative vocational outcomes

  20. Assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury: the clinical potential of the depression, anxiety and stress scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Tamara; Little, Trudi; Turner, Ben; Hawkes, Anna; Shum, David

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the clinical potential of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS 42) and its shorter version (DASS 21) for assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury. Participants included 23 individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), 25 individuals with brain tumour and 29 non-clinical controls. Investigations of internal consistency, test-re-test reliability, theory-consistent differences, sensitivity to change and concurrent validity were conducted. Internal consistency of the DASS was generally acceptable (r > 0.70), with the exception of the anxiety scale for the TBI sample. Test-re-test reliability (1-3 weeks) was sound for the depression scale (r > 0.75) and significant but comparatively lower for other scales (r = 0.60-0.73, p scale (p DASS in the context of hospital discharge was demonstrated for depression and stress (p 0.05). Concurrent validity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was significant for all scales of the DASS (p DASS following ABI, further research examining the factor structure of existing and modified versions of the DASS is recommended.

  1. Altered Recruitment of the Attention Network Is Associated with Disability and Cognitive Impairment in Pediatric Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Strazzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed abnormalities of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI activity during a sustained attention task (Conners’ Continuous Performance Test (CCPT in 20 right-handed pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI patients versus 7 right-handed age-matched healthy controls, and we estimated the correlation of such abnormalities with clinical and cognitive deficits. Patients underwent the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM evaluations. During fMRI, patients and controls activated regions of the attention network. Compared to controls, ABI patients experienced a decreased average fMRI recruitment of the left cerebellum and a decreased deactivation of the left anterior cingulate cortex. With increasing task demand, compared to controls, ABI patients had an impaired ability to increase the recruitment of several posterior regions of the attention network. They also experienced a greater activation of frontal regions, which was correlated with worse performance on FIM, WISC, and fMRI CCPT. Such abnormal brain recruitment was significantly influenced by the type of lesion (focal versus diffuse axonal injury and time elapsed from the event. Pediatric ABI patients experienced an inability to optimize attention network recruitment, especially when task difficulty was increased, which likely contributes to their clinical and cognitive deficits.

  2. Neural correlates of apathy in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, acquired brain injury, and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Claire; van Tol, Marie-José; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C; Knegtering, Henderikus; Aleman, André

    2016-10-01

    Apathy can be described as a loss of goal-directed purposeful behavior and is common in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although previous studies investigated associations between abnormal brain functioning and apathy, it is unclear whether the neural basis of apathy is similar across different pathological conditions. The purpose of this systematic review was to provide an extensive overview of the neuroimaging literature on apathy including studies of various patient populations, and evaluate whether the current state of affairs suggest disorder specific or shared neural correlates of apathy. Results suggest that abnormalities within fronto-striatal circuits are most consistently associated with apathy across the different pathological conditions. Of note, abnormalities within the inferior parietal cortex were also linked to apathy, a region previously not included in neuroanatomical models of apathy. The variance in brain regions implicated in apathy may suggest that different routes towards apathy are possible. Future research should investigate possible alterations in different processes underlying goal-directed behavior, ranging from intention and goal-selection to action planning and execution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Rehabilitation goal setting with community dwelling adults with acquired brain injury: a theoretical framework derived from clinicians' reflections on practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Sarah; Fleming, Jennifer; Doig, Emmah

    2017-06-11

    The aim of this study was to explore clinicians' experiences of implementing goal setting with community dwelling clients with acquired brain injury, to develop a goal setting practice framework. Grounded theory methodology was employed. Clinicians, representing six disciplines across seven services, were recruited and interviewed until theoretical saturation was achieved. A total of 22 clinicians were interviewed. A theoretical framework was developed to explain how clinicians support clients to actively engage in goal setting in routine practice. The framework incorporates three phases: a needs identification phase, a goal operationalisation phase, and an intervention phase. Contextual factors, including personal and environmental influences, also affect how clinicians and clients engage in this process. Clinicians use additional strategies to support clients with impaired self-awareness. These include structured communication and metacognitive strategies to operationalise goals. For clients with emotional distress, clinicians provide additional time and intervention directed at new identity development. The goal setting practice framework may guide clinician's understanding of how to engage in client-centred goal setting in brain injury rehabilitation. There is a predilection towards a client-centred goal setting approach in the community setting, however, contextual factors can inhibit implementation of this approach. Implications for Rehabilitation The theoretical framework describes processes used to develop achievable client-centred goals with people with brain injury. Building rapport is a core strategy to engage clients with brain injury in goal setting. Clients with self-awareness impairment benefit from additional metacognitive strategies to participate in goal setting. Clients with emotional distress may need additional time for new identity development.

  4. Schools-based interventions for reducing stigmatization of acquired brain injury: the role of interpersonal contact and visible impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Lynn G; Fortune, Dónal G

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of contact versus education interventions for adolescents in reducing stigmatizing attitudes toward people with acquired brain injury (ABI), and whether visibility of ABI affects the intervention outcome. 408 students (age range = 14-17 years) from 13 schools in the Mid-West of Ireland were randomly allocated to one of the three interventions: Education only, Contact (Visible Disability), or Contact ("Invisible" Disability). Stigmatizing attitudes were measured before and after intervention. Results suggest that a Contact intervention was more effective in reducing stigmatizing attitudes in terms of social restrictiveness, benevolence, and community mental health beliefs than education alone. Visibility of ABI impacted the effectiveness of the contact intervention on Community Mental Health beliefs only. Contact with a person with ABI is thus more effective in promoting positive attitudes than ABI education alone, while the presence of visible impairment was not found to increase this intervention effect.

  5. A Qualitative Synthesis of Families’ and Students’ Hospital-to-School Transition Experiences Following Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R. Hartman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI is one of the greatest causes of death and disability among children in Canada. Following ABI, children are required to transition back to school and adapt to the physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional demands of the school environment. We conducted a qualitative systematic review of students’ and parents’ experiences of the transition back to school following ABI. We identified 20 articles that met our inclusion criteria. Six themes emerged: (a lack of ABI-specific education for families and professionals, (b communication-related factors as a facilitator and/or barrier to transition, (c emotional focus, (d peer relationships, (e supports, and (f ABI sequelae in the classroom. Students’ and families’ personal motivations and abilities and the support they receive in their environment affect their experiences of transitioning back to school and the disrupted occupations they face.

  6. A Qualitative Synthesis of Families’ and Students’ Hospital-to-School Transition Experiences Following Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Laura R.; Tibbles, Alana; Paniccia, Alicia; Lindsay, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is one of the greatest causes of death and disability among children in Canada. Following ABI, children are required to transition back to school and adapt to the physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional demands of the school environment. We conducted a qualitative systematic review of students’ and parents’ experiences of the transition back to school following ABI. We identified 20 articles that met our inclusion criteria. Six themes emerged: (a) lack of ABI-specific education for families and professionals, (b) communication-related factors as a facilitator and/or barrier to transition, (c) emotional focus, (d) peer relationships, (e) supports, and (f) ABI sequelae in the classroom. Students’ and families’ personal motivations and abilities and the support they receive in their environment affect their experiences of transitioning back to school and the disrupted occupations they face. PMID:28462322

  7. A preliminary report of 99Tcm-ECD brain SPECT imaging in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Tong Yuwei; Luo Jinxiang; Chen Jian; Wu Qiulian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: 99 Tc m -ECD brain SPECT imaging was performed on 5 patients with AIDS and 16 sex- and age-matched normal controls. The rCBF percentages compared to the cerebellum were calculated using a semi-quantitative processing software. Results: Hypo-perfusions in the right and left frontal, temporal, parietal lobe, basal ganglia and left thalamus were seen in 1 patient with dementia. Hypo-perfusions in the right and left frontal and temporal lobe were seen in 4 patients without dementia. The rCBF in the right and left frontal, temporal, parietal lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus, straight gyri and pons decreased significantly in patients with AIDS than those of the control subjects (P < 0.01). Conclusion: There is reduced cortico-subcortical rCBF in patients with AIDS

  8. Usual and virtual reality video game-based physiotherapy for children and youth with acquired brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Miller, Patricia; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about how therapists promote learning of functional motor skills for children with acquired brain injuries. This study explores physiotherapists' description of these interventions in comparison to virtual reality (VR) video game-based therapy. Six physiotherapists employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Physiotherapists describe using interventions that motivate children to challenge performance quality and optimize real-life functioning. Intervention strategies are influenced by characteristics of the child, parent availability to practice skills outside therapy, and therapist experience. VR use motivates children to participate, but can influence therapist use of verbal strategies and complicate interventions. Physiotherapists consider unique characteristics of this population when providing interventions that promote learning of motor skills. The VR technology has advantageous features but its use with this population can be challenging; further research is recommended.

  9. Effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach for outpatients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kenneth N K; Howie, Dorothy R

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach with 33 outpatients with moderate acquired brain injury, in the Hong Kong context. We compared an experimental training intervention with this explicit problem-solving approach, which taught metacomponential strategies, with a conventional cognitive training approach that did not have this explicit metacognitive training. We found significant advantages for the experimental group on the Metacomponential Interview measure in association with the explicit metacomponential training, but transfer to the real-life problem-solving measures was not evidenced in statistically significant findings. Small sample size, limited time of intervention, and some limitations with these tools may have been contributing factors to these results. The training program was demonstrated to have a significantly greater effect than the conventional training approach on metacomponential functioning and the component of problem representation. However, these benefits were not transferable to real-life situations.

  10. A Qualitative Synthesis of Families' and Students' Hospital-to-School Transition Experiences Following Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Laura R; Tibbles, Alana; Paniccia, Alicia; Lindsay, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is one of the greatest causes of death and disability among children in Canada. Following ABI, children are required to transition back to school and adapt to the physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional demands of the school environment. We conducted a qualitative systematic review of students' and parents' experiences of the transition back to school following ABI. We identified 20 articles that met our inclusion criteria. Six themes emerged: (a) lack of ABI-specific education for families and professionals, (b) communication-related factors as a facilitator and/or barrier to transition, (c) emotional focus, (d) peer relationships, (e) supports, and (f) ABI sequelae in the classroom. Students' and families' personal motivations and abilities and the support they receive in their environment affect their experiences of transitioning back to school and the disrupted occupations they face.

  11. The adaptation process following acute onset disability: an interactive two-dimensional approach applied to acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Ingrid M H; Wade, Derick T; Stapert, Sven Z; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2012-09-01

    To describe a new model of the adaptation process following acquired brain injury, based on the patient's goals, the patient's abilities and the emotional response to the changes and the possible discrepancy between goals and achievements. The process of adaptation after acquired brain injury is characterized by a continuous interaction of two processes: achieving maximal restoration of function and adjusting to the alterations and losses that occur in the various domains of functioning. Consequently, adaptation requires a balanced mix of restoration-oriented coping and loss-oriented coping. The commonly used framework to explain adaptation and coping, 'The Theory of Stress and Coping' of Lazarus and Folkman, does not capture this interactive duality. This model additionally considers theories concerned with self-regulation of behaviour, self-awareness and self-efficacy, and with the setting and achievement of goals. THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODEL: Our model proposes the simultaneous and continuous interaction of two pathways; goal pursuit (short term and long term) or revision as a result of success and failure in reducing distance between current state and expected future state and an affective response that is generated by the experienced goal-performance discrepancies. This affective response, in turn, influences the goals set. This two-dimensional representation covers the processes mentioned above: restoration of function and consideration of long-term limitations. We propose that adaptation centres on readjustment of long-term goals to new achievable but desired and important goals, and that this adjustment underlies re-establishing emotional stability. We discuss how the proposed model is related to actual rehabilitation practice.

  12. Intervention and societal costs of residential community reintegration for patients with acquired brain injury: a cost-analysis of the Brain Integration Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heugten, Caroline M; Geurtsen, Gert J; Derksen, R Elze; Martina, Juan D; Geurts, Alexander C H; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the intervention costs of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with acquired brain injury and to compare the societal costs before and after treatment. A cost-analysis was performed identifying costs of healthcare, informal care, and productivity losses. The costs in the year before the Brain Integration Programme (BIP) were compared with the costs in the year after the BIP using the following cost categories: care consumption, caregiver support, productivity losses. Dutch guidelines were used for cost valuation. Thirty-three cases participated (72% response). Mean age was 29.8 years, 59% traumatic brain injury. The BIP costs were €68,400. The informal care and productivity losses reduced significantly after BIP (p costs per patient were €48,449. After BIP these costs were €39,773; a significant reduction (p costs after the BIP advocates the allocation of resources and, from an economic perspective, favours reimbursement of the BIP costs by healthcare insurance companies. However, this cost-analysis is limited as it does not relate costs to clinical effectiveness. :

  13. The effect of fish oil supplementation on brain DHA and EPA content and fatty acid profile in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Kelly J; Pickens, C Austin; Wiesinger, Jason A; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2017-12-18

    Supplementation with omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids may improve cognitive performance and protect against cognitive decline. However, changes in brain phospholipid fatty acid composition after supplementation with n-3 fatty acids are poorly described. The purpose of this study was to feed increasing n-3 fatty acids and characterise the changes in brain phospholipid fatty acid composition and correlate the changes with red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma in mice. Increasing dietary docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) did not alter brain DHA. Brain EPA increased and total n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased across treatment groups, and correlated with fatty acid changes in the RBC (r > 0.7). Brain cis-monounsaturated fatty acids oleic and nervonic acid (p acids arachidic, behenic, and lignoceric acid (p acid changes upon increasing n-3 intake should be further investigated to determine their effects on cognition and neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubukata S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiho Ubukata,1,2 Rumi Tanemura,2 Miho Yoshizumi,1 Genichi Sugihara,1 Toshiya Murai,1 Keita Ueda1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 2Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan Abstract: Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. Keywords: Eyes test, social emotion perception, social function, social participation, theory of mind

  15. Self-concept and self-esteem after acquired brain injury: a control group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie; Kelly, Amber; Couchman, Grace

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the multidimensional self-concept, global self-esteem and psychological adjustment of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared with healthy controls. Group comparison on self-report questionnaires. Forty-one individuals who had sustained a TBI were compared with an age- and gender-matched sample of 41 trauma-free control participants on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (second edition) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). Participants with TBI rated significantly lower mean levels of global self-esteem and self-concept on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and Tennessee Self Concept Scale than the control group. Survivors of TBI rated themselves more poorly on a range of self-dimensions, including social, family, academic/work and personal self-concept compared to controls. They also reported higher mean levels of depression and anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Overall self-concept was most strongly associated with depressive symptoms and anxiety. Self-concept may be lowered following TBI and is associated with negative emotional consequences. Clinicians may improve the emotional adjustment of survivors of TBI by considering particular dimensions of self-concept for intervention focus.

  16. Difficulties in using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Ann-Louice Lövgreen; Lexell, Jan; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and describe the characteristics of the difficulties using everyday technology in persons with an aquired brain injury (ABI), and their experiences of how these difficulties influenced their life. Thirteen persons with an ABI were interviewed about their difficulties in using everyday technology and were observed in their use of technology. Data were analysed qualitatively with a constant comparative method. The results showed that the persons' experiences formed two categories: “A variety of combinations of difficulties in the use of everyday technology” and “Restrictions in life”. The difficulties identified were related not only to everyday technology itself but also to the interaction between the technology, the task, the person, and the environment. These difficulties influenced their experiences of restrictions in occupational performance, personal identification, and participation in society. The results emphasize that occupational therapists who design interventions for people with an ABI need to accommodate both the technology and other interacting aspects in order to overcome difficulties in using everyday technology.

  17. Creatine supplementation in the aging population: effects on skeletal muscle, bone and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualano, Bruno; Rawson, Eric S; Candow, Darren G; Chilibeck, Philip D

    2016-08-01

    This narrative review aims to summarize the recent findings on the adjuvant application of creatine supplementation in the management of age-related deficits in skeletal muscle, bone and brain metabolism in older individuals. Most studies suggest that creatine supplementation can improve lean mass and muscle function in older populations. Importantly, creatine in conjunction with resistance training can result in greater adaptations in skeletal muscle than training alone. The beneficial effect of creatine upon lean mass and muscle function appears to be applicable to older individuals regardless of sex, fitness or health status, although studies with very old (>90 years old) and severely frail individuals remain scarce. Furthermore, there is evidence that creatine may affect the bone remodeling process; however, the effects of creatine on bone accretion are inconsistent. Additional human clinical trials are needed using larger sample sizes, longer durations of resistance training (>52 weeks), and further evaluation of bone mineral, bone geometry and microarchitecture properties. Finally, a number of studies suggest that creatine supplementation improves cognitive processing under resting and various stressed conditions. However, few data are available on older adults, and the findings are discordant. Future studies should focus on older adults and possibly frail elders or those who have already experienced an age-associated cognitive decline.

  18. Assessment of neuro-optometric rehabilitation using the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM) test in adults with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Neera; Ciuffreda, Kenneth Joseph

    This pilot study sought to determine the efficacy of using the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM) test in the adult, acquired brain injury (ABI) population to quantify clinically the effects of controlled, laboratory-performed, oculomotor-based vision therapy/vision rehabilitation. Nine adult subjects with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and five with stroke were assessed before and after an eight-week, computer-based, versional oculomotor (fixation, saccades, pursuit, and simulated reading) training program (9.6h total). The protocol incorporated a cross-over, interventional design with and without the addition of auditory feedback regarding two-dimensional eye position. The clinical outcome measure was the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM) test score (ratio, errors) taken before, midway, and immediately following training. For the DEM ratio parameter, improvements were found in 80-89% of the subjects. For the DEM error parameter, improvements were found in 100% of the subjects. Incorporation of the auditory feedback component revealed a trend toward enhanced performance. The findings were similar for both DEM parameters, as well as for incorporation of the auditory feedback, in both diagnostic groups. The results of the present study demonstrated considerable improvements in the DEM test scores following the oculomotor-based training, thus reflecting more time-optimal and accurate saccadic tracking after the training. The DEM test should be considered as another clinical test of global saccadic tracking performance in the ABI population. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. All rights reserved.

  19. Reliability of the Client-Centeredness of Goal Setting (C-COGS) Scale in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Emmah; Prescott, Sarah; Fleming, Jennifer; Cornwell, Petrea; Kuipers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    To examine the internal reliability and test-retest reliability of the Client-Centeredness of Goal Setting (C-COGS) scale. The C-COGS scale was administered to 42 participants with acquired brain injury after completion of multidisciplinary goal planning. Internal reliability of scale items was examined using item-partial total correlations and Cronbach's α coefficient. The scale was readministered within a 1-mo period to a subsample of 12 participants to examine test-retest reliability by calculating exact and close percentage agreement for each item. After examination of item-partial total correlations, test items were revised. The revised items demonstrated stronger internal consistency than the original items. Preliminary evaluation of test-retest reliability was fair, with an average exact percent agreement across all test items of 67%. Findings support the preliminary reliability of the C-COGS scale as a tool to evaluate and promote client-centered goal planning in brain injury rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  20. Nutritional parameters predicting pressure ulcers and short-term mortality in patients with minimal conscious state as a result of traumatic and non-traumatic acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Montalcini, Tiziana; Moraca, Marta; Ferro, Yvelise; Romeo, Stefano; Serra, Sebastiano; Raso, Maria Girolama; Rossi, Francesco; Sannita, Walter G.; Dolce, Giuliano; Pujia, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between malnutrition and worse outcomes as pressure ulcers and mortality is well established in a variety of setting. Currently none investigation was conducted in patients with long-term consequences of the acquired brain injury in which recovery from brain injury could be influenced by secondary complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between various nutritional status parameters (in particular albumin) and pressure ulcers formation...

  1. Non-pharmacological interventions for perceptual disorders following stroke and other adult-acquired, non-progressive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Audrey; Knapp, Peter; Gillespie, David; Nicolson, Donald J; Vail, Andy

    2011-04-13

    Stroke and other adult-acquired brain injury may impair perception leading to distress and increased dependence on others. Perceptual rehabilitation includes functional training, sensory stimulation, strategy training and task repetition. To examine the evidence for improvement in activities of daily living (ADL) six months post randomisation for active intervention versus placebo or no treatment. We searched the trials registers of the Cochrane Stroke Group and the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (May 2009) but not the Injuries Group, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2009), EMBASE (1980 to August 2009), CINAHL (1982 to August 2009), PsycINFO (1974 to August 2009), REHABDATA and PsycBITE (May to June 2009). We also searched trials and research registers, handsearched journals, searched reference lists and contacted authors. Randomised controlled trials of adult stroke or acquired brain injury. Our definition of perception excluded visual field deficits, neglect/inattention and apraxia. One review author assessed titles, abstracts and keywords for eligibility. At least two review authors independently extracted data. We requested unclear or missing information from corresponding authors. We included six single-site trials in rehabilitation settings, involving 338 participants. Four trials included people with only stroke. All studies provided sensory stimulation, sometimes with another intervention. Sensory stimulation typically involved practising tasks that required visuo-perceptual processing with occupational therapist assistance. Repetition was never used and only one study included functional training. No trials provided data on longer term improvement in ADL scores. Only three trials provided any data suitable for analysis. Two of these trials compared active to placebo intervention. There was no evidence of a difference in ADL scores at the scheduled end of intervention: mean

  2. Assessment of emotion processing skills in acquired brain injury using an ability-based test of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah E; Wrench, Joanne M; Wilson, Sarah J

    2018-04-01

    Social and emotional problems are commonly reported after moderate to severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and pose a significant barrier to rehabilitation. However, progress in assessment of emotional skills has been limited by a lack of validated measurement approaches. This study represents the first formal psychometric evaluation of the use of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) V2.0 as a tool for assessing skills in perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions following ABI. The sample consisted of 82 participants aged 18-80 years in the postacute phase of recovery (2 months-7 years) after moderate to severe ABI. Participants completed the MSCEIT V2.0 and measures of cognition and mood. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were collated from participant interview and medical files. Results revealed deficits across all MSCEIT subscales (approximately 1 SD below the normative mean). Internal consistency was adequate at overall, area, and branch levels, and MSCEIT scores correlated in expected ways with key demographic, clinical, cognitive, and mood variables. MSCEIT performance was related to injury severity and clinician-rated functioning after ABI. Confirmatory factor analysis favored a 3-factor model of EI due to statistical redundancy of the Using Emotions branch. Overall, these findings suggest that the MSCEIT V2.0 is sensitive to emotion processing deficits after moderate to severe ABI, and can yield valid and reliable scores in an ABI sample. In terms of theoretical contributions, our findings support a domain-based, 3-factor approach for characterizing emotion-related abilities in brain-injured individuals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Modified egg as a nutritional supplement during peak brain development: a new target for fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Niva

    2009-01-01

    Though eggs have the unique capacity, like breastmilk, to concentrate essential nutrients required for early growth and brain development of offspring - i.e. n-3 PUFA, increasingly deficient and sources contaminated - cholesterol and allergy concerns often exclude them from perinatal recommendations. Egg's potential contribution of key nutrients required for peak brain development are re-evaluated vis-à-vis fortification, accessibility, and risks. Contributions of standard (USDA) and fortified (selected market-available) egg compositions to perinatal requirements for critical brain-supporting nutrients were compared to human and cow milks, and risks and recommendations evaluated. Standard egg has already higher concentrations/kcal of iron, selenium, zinc, choline, vitamins B12 and E, and essential amino acids (plus taurine) than human milk. Fortified egg could further yield significant n-3 PUFA % recommendations for pregnancy-lactation (total n-3 69.6-75.0% [DRI=1400-1300 mg/day]), including DHA (120.1-129.3%, mostly approximately 80% [calculated DRI=140-130 mg/day]), plus antioxidant vitamins A (9.0-15.2%) and E (51.6-65.3%), and minerals iodine (33.6-44.5%) and selenium (33.7-39.3%); % recommendations for children (1-3 y) even more. Cholesterol, important for nerve membranes and learning, may not be generally contraindicated in childbearing-aged women (approximately 10.5% hypercholesterolemia), and early-life egg exposure may increase tolerance. Egg-inclusive perinatal nutrition programs have shown significant contributions. Eggs, especially target-fortified, may provide a unique nutritional supplement for peak brain development continously during pregnancy, nursing, and infancy (from 6 months), especially vs. insufficiencies. Missing nutritional opportunities by egg exclusion vs. concerns of hypercholesterolemia or allergy could be addressed individually, rather than as general recommendations, warranting further research and targeted egg design.

  4. Prospective study of a community reintegration programme for patients with acquired chronic brain injury: effects on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Meijer, Ron; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with psychosocial problems due to acquired chronic brain injury on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning. Design: A prospective cohort study with waiting list control and 1-year follow-up.

  5. Evaluating the CARE4Carer Blended Care Intervention for Partners of Patients With Acquired Brain Injury : Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, Vincent Cm; Schepers, Vera Pm; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Heugten, Caroline M; Visser-Meily, Johanna Ma

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Support programs for partners of patients with acquired brain injury are necessary since these partners experience several unfavorable consequences of caregiving, such as a high burden, emotional distress, and poor quality of life. Evidence-based support strategies that can be included

  6. Short-Term and Long-Term Outcomes of a Vocational Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Caroline H.; Goossens, Paulien H.; van Zee, Inge E.; Verpoort, Kirsten N.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van Velzen, Judith M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe short-term and long-term work status after a vocational rehabilitation (VR) program in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) in the Netherlands. Methods Patients with ABI who participated in a VR program between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. The 4-month VR

  7. The course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute period after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Hough, Andrea; Meader, Laura M; Brennan, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute stage of acquired brain injury. At Time 1, 30 family relatives of in-patients in rehabilitation units and 30 relatives of patients recently discharged from such units completed questionnaires relating to their emotional health, engagement in the rehabilitation process and expectations about the future consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 2 (12-18 months later), 23 of the original sample completed questionnaires about their emotional health and actual consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 1, optimism about future consequences and controllability was associated with greater engagement in the rehabilitation process and better emotional health. The two groups did not differ on any of the measures, which did not support the expectation that the patient's discharge home would trigger a loss of optimism and emotional upset for the family. At Time 2, the actual consequences were worse than had been expected at Time 1 and greater disappointment was associated with a greater decline in emotional wellbeing. Family expectations about recovery are linked with important variables such as emotional wellbeing and engagement in the rehabilitation process and need careful management by clinicians.

  8. Dimensionality and scaling properties of the Patient Categorisation Tool in patients with complex rehabilitation needs following acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Siegert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the scaling properties of the Patient Categorisation Tool (PCAT as an instrument to measure complexity of rehabilitation needs. Design: Psychometric analysis in a multicentre cohort from the UK national clinical database. Patients: A total of 8,222 patents admitted for specialist inpatient rehabilitation following acquired brain injury. Methods: Dimensionality was explored using principal components analysis with Varimax rotation, followed by Rasch analysis on a random sample of n = 500. Results: Principal components analysis identified 3 components explaining 50% of variance. The partial credit Rasch model was applied for the 17-item PCAT scale using a “super-items” methodology based on the principal components analysis results. Two out of 5 initially created super-items displayed signs of local dependency, which significantly affected the estimates. They were combined into a single super-item resulting in satisfactory model fit and unidimensionality. Differential item functioning (DIF of 2 super-items was addressed by splitting between age groups (<65 and ≥ 65 years to produce the best model fit (χ2/df = 54.72, p = 0.235 and reliability (Person Separation Index (PSI = 0.79. Ordinal-to-interval conversion tables were produced. Conclusion: The PCAT has satisfied expectations of the unidimensional Rasch model in the current sample after minor modifications, and demonstrated acceptable reliability for individual assessment of rehabilitation complexity.

  9. Family function and its relationship to injury severity and psychiatric outcome in children with acquired brain injury: a systematized review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax Pericall, Maria Teresa; Taylor, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The psychological and psychiatric outcome of children with acquired brain injury is influenced by many variables. A review was undertaken to clarify the contribution of family function, how it relates to injury severity, and what particular aspects of family function influence psychological outcome in this group. A systematized review of the literature of studies published between 1970 and 2012 from OvidMedline, PsychoInfo, PsycARTICLES, and Cochrane was undertaken focusing on family function, injury severity, and psychiatric outcome. Thirty-six papers met the inclusion criteria. Injury severity was linked to the development of organic personality change. Family function before injury, measured by the Family Assessment Device or the Clinical Rating Scale, had a statistically significant effect on general psychological functioning in six out of eight studies. Family function had a significant effect for oppositional defiant disorder and secondary attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. The effects of family function may differ depending on the age of the child and the severity of the injury. Some styles of parenting moderated recovery. After injury, family function was related to the child's contemporaneous psychiatric symptoms. The level of evidence for these papers was 3 or 4 (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria). Screening for some aspects of family functioning before injury and family function during the rehabilitation phase may identify children at risk of psychiatric disorders. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Cognitive rehabilitation therapy after acquired brain injury in Argentina: psychosocial outcomes in connection with the time elapsed before treatment initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saux, Gastón; Demey, Ignacio; Rojas, Galeno; Feldberg, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) on psychosocial outcomes in Argentinean patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), in connection with the time elapsed between injury and treatment initiation. Self-reported data from patients in a naturalistic setting was collected before and after CRT. An outpatient sample of 75 Spanish-speaking patients with cognitive disturbances secondary to ABI (49 male/26 female, age: 50.2 ± 20.1 years; education 14.3 ± 3.2 years) completed a set of scales on their daily living activities, memory self-perception, quality-of-life and mood. Single and multi-group analyses were conducted, considering pre- and post- responses and the time elapsed between injury and treatment initiation. The influence of socio-demographic moderators was controlled during comparisons. Results suggest an improvement in several psychosocial indicators after treatment. Additionally, correlations and group comparisons showed greater improvement in subjective memory and quality-of-life self-reports in patients who began treatment earlier than those who began treatment after a longer time period. Overall, results suggest that CRT is associated with positive results in different areas of the psychosocial domain and that post-injury time can mediate this effect.

  11. Comparability of Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory ratings by staff, significant others and people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F

    2004-06-01

    To determine the internal consistency, reliability and comparability of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) and sub-scales completed by people with acquired brain injury (ABI), family and significant others (SO) and rehabilitation staff. 134 people with ABI consecutively seen for outpatient rehabilitation evaluation. MPAI-4 protocols based on independent ratings by the people with ABI undergoing evaluation, SO and rehabilitation staff were submitted to Rasch Facets analysis to determine the internal consistency of the overall measure and sub-scales (Ability, Adjustment and Participation indices) for each rater group and for a composite measure based on all rater groups. Rater agreement for individual items was also examined. Rasch indicators of internal consistency were entirely within acceptable limits for 3-rater composite full scale and sub-scale measures; these indicators were generally within acceptable limits for measures based on a single rater group. Item agreement was generally acceptable; disagreements suggested various sources of bias for specific rater groups. The MPAI-4 possesses satisfactory internal consistency regardless of rating source. A composite measure based on ratings made independently by people with ABI, SO and staff may serve as a 'gold standard' for research purposes. In the clinical setting, assessment of varying perspectives and biases may not only best represent outcome as evaluated by all parties involved but be essential to developing effective rehabilitation plans.

  12. Self-esteem as a predictor of psychological distress after severe acquired brain injury: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Evans, Samantha; Alderman, Nick; Knight, Caroline; Oddy, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the effects of severe acquired brain injury (ABI) on self-esteem. A within-subjects design investigated 22 severe ABI survivors' self-reported responses on measures of self-esteem, mood and awareness of deficit. Data on cognitive ability and awareness of degree of executive impairment were included in the analysis. Self-esteem was measured using Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg) and psychological distress by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Self-esteem was found to be consistent over a two-week interval. Participants reported that their self-esteem had suffered following ABI when contrasting their current self-esteem with their retrospective perceptions. Self-esteem was highly correlated with psychological distress. More intact cognitive functioning and awareness of deficit were associated with lower self-esteem. The paradoxical finding that survivors who were more impaired cognitively and/or less aware of their deficits reported higher self-esteem poses an ethical dilemma for clinicians. It is hoped that this finding, along with the consistency of self-esteem ratings sparks further debate about how best to address issues of self-esteem among severe ABI survivors, particularly in the context of psychological distress, during rehabilitation.

  13. The nature of self-esteem and its relationship to anxiety and depression in adult acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longworth, Catherine; Deakins, Joseph; Rose, David; Gracey, Fergus

    2016-08-31

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) has a negative impact on self-esteem, which is in turn associated with mood disorders, maladaptive coping and reduced community participation. The aim of the current research was to explore self-esteem as a multi-dimensional construct and identify which factors are associated with symptoms of anxiety or depression. Eighty adults with ABI aged 17-56 years completed the Robson Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), of whom 65 also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; 57.5% of the sample had clinically low self-esteem. The RSES had good internal consistency (α =   .89), and factor analysis identified four factors, which differed from those found previously in other populations. Multiple regression analysis revealed anxiety was differentially predicted by "Self-Worth" and "Self-Efficacy", R 2  =   .44, F(4, 58) =   9, p Self-Regard", R 2  =   .38, F(4, 58) =   9, p self-esteem after ABI. Self-esteem after ABI is multidimensional and differs in structure from self-esteem in the general population. A multidimensional model of self-esteem may be helpful in development of transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural accounts of adjustment.

  14. A comparison of automatic and intentional instructions when using the method of vanishing cues in acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Venn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-four participants with acquired brain injury learned word lists under two forms of vanishing cues - one in which the learning trial instructions encouraged intentional retrieval (i.e., explicit memory) and one in which they encouraged automatic retrieval (which encompasses implicit memory). The automatic instructions represented a novel approach in which the cooperation of participants was actively sought to avoid intentional retrieval. Intentional instructions resulted in fewer errors during the learning trials and better performance on immediate and delayed retrieval tests. The advantage of intentional over automatic instructions was generally less for those who had more severe memory and/or executive impairments. Most participants performed better under intentional instructions on both the immediate and the delayed tests. Although those who were more severely impaired in both memory and executive function also did better with intentional instructions on the immediate retrieval test, they were significantly more likely to show an advantage for automatic instructions on the delayed test. It is suggested that this pattern of results may reflect impairments in the consolidation of intentional memories in this group. When using vanishing cues, automatic instructions may be better for those with severe consolidation impairments, but otherwise intentional instructions may be better.

  15. Comprehensive oral-health assessment of individuals with acquired brain-injury in neuro-rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Mohit; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

    2016-01-01

    To perform a detailed clinical oral health assessment and oral-health-related social and behavioural aspect assessment in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI). Prospective observational study. Thirteen individuals with ABI were recruited. Individual's social and behavioural history, bed-side oral examination score (BOE), tooth condition and periodontal status (bleeding, plaque and clinical attachment loss) were thoroughly examined. The entire examination took up to 60 minutes, using proper dental armamentarium. All evaluated individuals were diagnosed with chronic generalized periodontitis. A relationship between active periodontal disease and severe BOE score was observed (p = 0.01). Significant interaction between severe BOE scores (≥ 15 or ≥ 14) and periodontal disease severity of ≥ 2 mm (p = 0.01) was observed. The same interaction was seen between severe BOE scores and the combination of 75% extent and 2 mm severity (p = 0.01). Severity and activity of periodontitis showed dependence on individual brushing frequency (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05, respectively). Individuals with ABI had a poor status across a range of oral-, dental- and periodontal-related parameters. Further structured studies are required to define evidence-based assessment approaches for such clinical reality.

  16. Identifying participation needs of people with acquired brain injury in the development of a collective community smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Pigot, Hélène; Couture, Mélanie; Bier, Nathalie; Swaine, Bonnie; Therriault, Pierre-Yves; Giroux, Sylvain

    2016-11-01

    This study explored the personalized and collective participation needs of people with acquired brain injury (ABI) living in a future shared community smart home. An action research study was conducted with 16 persons, seven with ABI, four caregivers and five rehabilitation or smart home healthcare providers. Twelve interviews and two focus groups were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for content. Seventy personalized and 18 collective participation needs were reported related to daily and social activities. Personalized needs concerned interpersonal relationships, general organization of activities, leisure, housing, fitness and nutrition. Collective needs related mainly to housing, general organization of activities and nutrition. Personalized and collective participation needs of people with ABI planning to live in a community smart home are diverse and concern daily as well as social activities. Implications for Rehabilitation To meet participation needs of people with ABI, the design of smart homes must consider all categories of daily and social activities. Considering personalized and collective needs allowed identifying exclusive examples of each. As some persons with ABI had difficulty identifying their needs as well as accepting their limitations and the assistance required, rehabilitation professionals must be involved in needs identification.

  17. Humor-A Rehabilitative Tool in the Post-Intensive Care of Young Adults With Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Kate

    The aim of the study was to describe how paid carers use humor in providing compassionate post-intensive rehabilitation care to young adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) who are unable to perform or direct their own care. This is a qualitative study underpinned by symbolic interactionism. Paid carers in a residential aged care facility were interviewed. Interview data were analyzed using grounded theory methods of coding, comparative analysis, memoing, and theoretical sampling. With young adult's assent, paid carers appropriately used humor, at times even crude humor, as a rehabilitative tool to activate and elicit responses from young people with ABI who could not perform or direct their own care. The use of humor while caring for this population demonstrated that compassion still exists within nursing; however, it may not always be reverent. Humor may be an effective way to provide compassionate care and can be used as a rehabilitative tool to elicit responses from young people with ABI who have no means of verbal communication.

  18. A systematic review of factors affecting driving and public transportation among youth and young adults with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Stoica, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Although many people with an acquired brain injury (ABI) encounter difficulties with executive functioning and memory which could negatively affect driving, few people are assessed for fitness to drive after injury. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize the literature on factors affecting driving and public transportation among youth and young adults with ABI, post injury. Seven databases were systematically searched for articles from 1980 to 2016. Studies were screened independently by two researchers who performed the data extraction. Study quality was appraised using the Standard Quality Assessment Criteria (Kmet) for evaluating primary research from a variety of fields. Of the 6577 studies identified in the search, 25 met the inclusion criteria, which involved 1527 participants with ABI (mean age = 25.1) across eight countries. Six studies focused on driving assessment and fitness to drive, ten on driving performance or risk of accidents and nine studies explored issues related to accessing or navigating public transportation. Quality assessment of the included studies ranged from 0.60 to 0.95. Our findings highlight several gaps in clinical practice and research along with a critical need for enhanced fitness to drive assessments and transportation-related training for young people with ABI.

  19. Assessment and Treatment of Cognition and Communication Skills in Adults With Acquired Brain Injury via Telepractice: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jaumeiko J; Frymark, Tobi; Franceschini, Nicole M; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2015-05-01

    This is a systematic review of assessment and treatment of cognitive and communicative abilities of individuals with acquired brain injury via telepractice versus in person. The a priori clinical questions were informed by previous research that highlights the importance of considering any functional implications of outcomes, determining disorder- and setting-specific concerns, and measuring the potential impact of diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficacy data on interpretation of findings. A literature search of multiple databases (e.g., PubMed) was conducted using key words and study inclusion criteria associated with the clinical questions. Ten group studies were accepted that addressed assessment of motor speech, language, and cognitive impairments; assessment of motor speech and language activity limitations/participation restrictions; and treatment of cognitive impairments and activity limitations/participation restrictions. In most cases, equivalence of outcomes was noted across service delivery methods. Limited findings, lack of diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficacy data, and heterogeneity of assessments and interventions precluded robust evaluation of clinical implications for telepractice equivalence and the broader area of telepractice efficacy. Future research is needed that will build upon current knowledge through replication. In addition, further evaluation at the impairment and activity limitation/participation restriction levels is needed.

  20. Oral supplements of inulin during gestation offsets rotenone-induced oxidative impairments and neurotoxicity in maternal and prenatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Gokul; Muralidhara

    2018-05-25

    Environmental insults including pesticide exposure and their entry into the immature brain are of increased concern due to their developmental neurotoxicity. Several lines of evidence suggest that maternal gut microbiota influences in utero fetal development via modulation of host's microbial composition with prebiotics. Hence we examined the hypothesis if inulin (IN) supplements during pregnancy in rats possess the potential to alleviate brain oxidative response and mitochondrial deficits employing a developmental model of rotenone (ROT) neurotoxicity. Initially, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged during gestational days (GDs) 6-19 with 0 (control), 10 (low), 30 (mid) or 50 (high) mg/kg bw/day of ROT to recapitulate developmental effects on general fetotoxicity (assessed by the number of fetuses, fetal body and placental weights), markers of oxidative stress and cholinergic activities in maternal brain regions and whole fetal-brain. Secondly, dams orally supplemented with inulin (2×/day, 2 g/kg/bw) on GD 0-21 were administered ROT (50 mg/kg, GD 6-19). IN supplements increased maternal cecal bacterial numbers that significantly corresponded with improved exploratory-related behavior among ROT administered rats. In addition, IN supplements improved fetal and placental weight on GD 19. IN diminished gestational ROT-induced increased reactive oxygen species levels, protein and lipid peroxidation biomarkers, and cholinesterase activity in maternal brain regions (cortex, cerebellum, and striatum) and fetal brain. Moreover, in the maternal cortex, mitochondrial assessment revealed IN protected against ROT-induced reduction in NADH cytochrome c oxidoreductase and ATPase activities. These data suggest a potential role for indigestible oligosaccharides in reducing oxidative stress-mediated developmental origins of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; Lannin, Natasha A; Bragge, Peter; Hunter, Peter; Holland, Anne E; Tavender, Emma; O'Connor, Denise; Khan, Fary; Teasell, Robert; Gruen, Russell

    2014-09-17

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is little information regarding the most effective way to organise ABI health care services. The aim of this review was to identify the most up-to-date high quality evidence to answer specific questions regarding the organisation of health care services for people with an ABI. We conducted a systematic review of English papers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included the most recently published high quality systematic reviews and any randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before after studies or interrupted time series studies published subsequent to the systematic review. We searched for papers that evaluated pre-defined organisational interventions for adults with an ABI. Organisational interventions of interest included fee-for-service care, integrated care, integrated care pathways, continuity of care, consumer engagement in governance and quality monitoring interventions. Data extraction and appraisal of included reviews and studies was completed independently by two reviewers. A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee

  2. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Zivi, Ilaria; Valsecchi, Roberto; Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto; Saltuari, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, pverticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the short-term and long-term functional and neurological outcome of ABI patients. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02828371.

  3. Evaluation of use of reading comprehension strategies to improve reading comprehension of adult college students with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Gina G; Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Kirk, Cecilia; Fickas, Stephen; Biancarosa, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Adults with mild to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI) often pursue post-secondary or professional education after their injuries in order to enter or re-enter the job market. An increasing number of these adults report problems with reading-to-learn. The problem is particularly concerning given the growing population of adult survivors of ABI. Despite the rising need, empirical evaluation of reading comprehension interventions for adults with ABI is scarce. This study used a within-subject design to evaluate whether adult college students with ABI with no more than moderate cognitive impairments benefited from using reading comprehension strategies to improve comprehension of expository text. Integrating empirical support from the cognitive rehabilitation and special education literature, the researchers designed a multi-component reading comprehension strategy package. Participants read chapters from an introductory-level college anthropology textbook in two different conditions: strategy and no-strategy. The results indicated that reading comprehension strategy use was associated with recall of more correct information units in immediate and delayed free recall tasks; more efficient recall in the delayed free recall task; and increased accuracy recognising statements from a sentence verification task designed to reflect the local and global coherence of the text. The findings support further research into using reading comprehension strategies as an intervention approach for the adult ABI population. Future research needs include identifying how to match particular reading comprehension strategies to individuals, examining whether reading comprehension performance improves further through the incorporation of systematic training, and evaluating texts from a range of disciplines and genres.

  4. [Evaluation of memory in acquired brain injury: a comparison between the Wechsler Memory Scale and the Rivermead Behaviour Memory Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinea-Hidalgo, A; Luna-Lario, P; Tirapu-Ustárroz, J

    Learning processes and memory are frequently compromised in acquired brain injury (ABI), while at the same time such involvement is often heterogeneous and a source of deficits in other cognitive capacities and significant functional limitations. A good neuropsychological evaluation of memory is designed to study not only the type, intensity and nature of the problems, but also the way they manifest in daily life. This study examines the correlation between a traditional memory test, the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III), and a memory test that is considered to be functional, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT), in a sample of 60 patients with ABI. All the correlations that were observed were moderate. Greater correlations were found among the verbal memory subtests than among the visual memory tests. An important number of subjects with below-normal scalar scores on the WMS-III correctly performed (either fully or partially) the corresponding test in the RBMT. The joint use of the WMS-III and RBMT in evaluation can provide a more comprehensive analysis of the memory deficits and their rehabilitation. The lower scores obtained in the WMS-III compared to those of the RBMT indicate greater sensitivity of the former. Nevertheless, further testing needs to be carried out in the future to compare the performance in the tests after the patients and those around them have subjectively assessed their functional limitations. This would make it possible to determine which of the two tests offers the best balance between sensitivity and specificity, as well as a higher predictive value.

  5. Parenting program versus telephone support for Mexican parents of children with acquired brain injury: A blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Clara; Catroppa, Cathy; Hearps, Stephen J C; Yáñez-Téllez, Guillermina; Prieto-Corona, Belén; de León, Miguel A; García, Antonio; Sandoval-Lira, Lucero; Anderson, Vicki

    2017-09-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) during childhood typically causes behavior problems in the child and high levels of stress in the family. The aims of this study are: (1) to investigate the effectiveness and feasibility of a parenting intervention in improving behavior and self-regulation in Mexican children with ABI compared to telephone support; (2) to investigate the effectiveness and feasibility of a parenting intervention in improving parenting skills, parent self-efficacy and decreasing parental stress in parents of children with ABI compared to telephone support. Our secondary aims are (1) to explore the impact that parent characteristics have on the intervention outcomes; (2) to investigate if changes are maintained 3 months after the intervention. The research design is a blind randomized controlled trial (RCT). Eligible participants include children with a diagnosis of ABI, between 6 and 12 years of age, and their parents. Sixty-six children and their parents will be randomly allocated to either a parenting program group or telephone support group. The parenting program involves six face-to-face weekly group sessions of 2.5 h each. Participants in the control group receive an information sheet with behavioral strategies, and six weekly phone calls, in which strategies to improve academic skills are provided. Children and their parents are evaluated by blind assessors before the intervention, immediately after the intervention and 3-months post-intervention. This study will be the first to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a parenting program for Mexican parents of children with ABI. ACTRN12617000360314.

  6. Family members' needs and experiences of driving disruption over time following an acquired brain injury: an evolving issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Phyllis; Gustafsson, Louise; Liddle, Jacki; Fleming, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Family members often assume the role of driver for individuals who are not driving post-acquired brain injury (ABI). Given that return to driving can be unpredictable and uncertain, the impact of driving disruption on family members may vary at different stages post-injury. This study aims to understand the needs and experiences of family members over time during driving disruption following an ABI. A qualitative prospective longitudinal research design was used with semi-structured interviews at recruitment to study, 3 and 6 months later. Fourteen family members completed 41 interviews. The longitudinal data revealed four phases of driving disruption: (1) Wait and see, (2) Holding onto a quick fix, (3) No way out, and (4) Resolution and adjustment. The phases described a process of building tension and a need for support and resolution over time. Holding onto a quick fix is a pivotal phase whereby supports, such as engagement in realistic goal setting, are essential to facilitate family members' resolution of driving disruption issues. Family members who see no way out might not actively seek help and these points to a need for long-term and regular follow-ups. Future research can explore ways to support family members at these key times. Implications for rehabilitation Health professionals need to facilitate the process of fostering hope in family members to set realistic expectations of return to driving and the duration of driving disruption. It is necessary to follow-up with family members even years after ABI as the issue of driving disruption could escalate to be a crisis and family members might not actively seek help. Health professionals can consider both practical support for facilitating transport and emotional support when addressing the issue of driving disruption with family members.

  7. A Systematic Review of Hospital-to-School Reintegration Interventions for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Hartman, Laura R.; Reed, Nick; Gan, Caron; Thomson, Nicole; Solomon, Beverely

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We reviewed the literature on interventions that aimed to improve hospital-to-school reintegration for children and youth with acquired brain injury (ABI). ABI is the leading cause of disability among children and youth. A successful hospital-to-school reintegration process is essential to the rehabilitative process. However, little is known about the effective components of of such interventions. Methods and findings Our research team conducted a systematic review, completing comprehensive searches of seven databases and selected reference lists for relevant articles published in a peer-reviewed journal between 1989 and June 2014. We selected articles for inclusion that report on studies involving: a clinical population with ABI; sample had an average age of 20 years or younger; an intentional structured intervention affecting hospital-to-school transitions or related components; an experimental design; and a statistically evaluated health outcome. Two independent reviewers applied our inclusion criteria, extracted data, and rated study quality. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to the heterogeneity of the studies reported. Of the 6933 articles identified in our initial search, 17 articles (reporting on 350 preadolescents and adolescents, aged 4–19, (average age 11.5 years, SD: 2.21) met our inclusion criteria. They reported on interventions varying in number of sessions (one to 119) and session length (20 minutes to 4 hours). The majority of interventions involved multiple one-to-one sessions conducted by a trained clinician or educator, homework activities, and parental involvement. The interventions were delivered through different settings and media, including hospitals, schools, and online. Although outcomes varied (with effect sizes ranging from small to large), 14 of the articles reported at least one significant improvement in cognitive, social, psychological, or behavioral functioning or knowledge of ABI. Conclusions Cognitive, behavioral

  8. Usability of a virtual reality environment simulating an automated teller machine for assessing and training persons with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kenneth N K; Chow, Kathy Y Y; Chan, Bianca C H; Lam, Kino C K; Lee, Jeff C K; Li, Teresa H Y; Yan, Elaine W H; Wong, Asta T Y

    2010-04-30

    This study aimed to examine the usability of a newly designed virtual reality (VR) environment simulating the operation of an automated teller machine (ATM) for assessment and training. Part I involved evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of a non-immersive VR program simulating an ATM (VR-ATM). Part II consisted of a clinical trial providing baseline and post-intervention outcome assessments. A rehabilitation hospital and university-based teaching facilities were used as the setting. A total of 24 persons in the community with acquired brain injury (ABI)--14 in Part I and 10 in Part II--made up the participants in the study. In Part I, participants were randomized to receive instruction in either an "early" or a "late" VR-ATM program and were assessed using both the VR program and a real ATM. In Part II, participants were assigned in matched pairs to either VR training or computer-assisted instruction (CAI) teaching programs for six 1-hour sessions over a three-week period. Two behavioral checklists based on activity analysis of cash withdrawals and money transfers using a real ATM were used to measure average reaction time, percentage of incorrect responses, level of cues required, and time spent as generated by the VR system; also used was the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination. The sensitivity of the VR-ATM was 100% for cash withdrawals and 83.3% for money transfers, and the specificity was 83% and 75%, respectively. For cash withdrawals, the average reaction time of the VR group was significantly shorter than that of the CAI group (p = 0.021). We found no significant differences in average reaction time or accuracy between groups for money transfers, although we did note positive improvement for the VR-ATM group. We found the VR-ATM to be usable as a valid assessment and training tool for relearning the use of ATMs prior to real-life practice in persons with ABI.

  9. Technological aids for the rehabilitation of memory and executive functioning in children and adolescents with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Mark; Hawley, Carol; Blackwood, Bronagh; Evans, Jonathan; Anderson, Vicki; O'Rourke, Conall

    2016-07-01

    The use of technology in healthcare settings is on the increase and may represent a cost-effective means of delivering rehabilitation. Reductions in treatment time, and delivery in the home, are also thought to be benefits of this approach. Children and adolescents with brain injury often experience deficits in memory and executive functioning that can negatively affect their school work, social lives, and future occupations. Effective interventions that can be delivered at home, without the need for high-cost clinical involvement, could provide a means to address a current lack of provision.We have systematically reviewed studies examining the effects of technology-based interventions for the rehabilitation of deficits in memory and executive functioning in children and adolescents with acquired brain injury. To assess the effects of technology-based interventions compared to placebo intervention, no treatment, or other types of intervention, on the executive functioning and memory of children and adolescents with acquired brain injury. We ran the search on the 30 September 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), EMBASE Classic + EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), two other databases, and clinical trials registers. We also searched the internet, screened reference lists, and contacted authors of included studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing the use of a technological aid for the rehabilitation of children and adolescents with memory or executive-functioning deficits with placebo, no treatment, or another intervention. Two review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts identified by the search strategy. Following retrieval of full-text manuscripts, two review authors

  10. Music Therapy, Acquired Brain Injury and Interpersonal Communication Competencies:Randomized cross-over study on music therapy in neurological rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Hald, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often affects physical, cognitive and psychological aspects of a person's functioning (Bateman, et al., 2010). Psychosocial problems associated with ABI may be the major challenge facing the rehabilitation process (Morton & Wehman, 1995) Consequently, interventions that music is a useful tool to stimulate interaction since musical interaction can be engaged at almost any cognitive and physical level and still be meaningful (Baker & Tamplin, 2006; Gilbertson...

  11. Effectiveness of a Wii balance board-based system (eBaViR) for balance rehabilitation: a pilot randomized clinical trial in patients with acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Gómez, José-Antonio; Lloréns, Roberto; Alcañiz, Mariano; Colomer, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the main cause of death and disability among young adults. In most cases, survivors can experience balance instability, resulting in functional impairments that are associated with diminished health-related quality of life. Traditional rehabilitation therapy may be tedious. This can reduce motivation and adherence to the treatment and thus provide a limited benefit to patients with balance disorders. We present eBaViR (easy Balance Virtual Rehabilita...

  12. HUMANICS 1. A feasibility study to create a home internet based telehealth product to supplement acquired brain injury therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the project was to produce a unique, cost effective, and user-friendly computer based telehealth system product which had longevity and the ability to be integrated modularly into a future internet-based health care communication provision. This was conceptualised as an aid to home-ba...

  13. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Frazzitta

    Full Text Available Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome.Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0, at ICU discharge (T1 and at Rehab discharge (T2. Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively.Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy. Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01, while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41. All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all, as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all. The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006 and (borderline for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058.A stepping verticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the

  14. Intelligent speed adaptation as an assistive device for drivers with acquired brain injury: a single-case field experiment.

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    Klarborg, Brith; Lahrmann, Harry; NielsAgerholm; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) was tested as an assistive device for drivers with an acquired brain injury (ABI). The study was part of the "Pay as You Speed" project (PAYS) and used the same equipment and technology as the main study (Lahrmann et al., in press-a, in press-b). Two drivers with ABI were recruited as subjects and had ISA equipment installed in their private vehicle. Their speed was logged with ISA equipment for a total of 30 weeks of which 12 weeks were with an active ISA user interface (6 weeks=Baseline 1; 12 weeks=ISA period; 12 weeks=Baseline 2). The subjects participated in two semi-structured interviews concerning their strategies for driving with ABI and for driving with ISA. Furthermore, they gave consent to have data from their clinical journals and be a part of the study. The two subjects did not report any instances of being distracted or confused by ISA, and in general they described driving with ISA as relaxed. ISA reduced the percentage of the total distance that was driven with a speed above the speed limit (PDA), but the subjects relapsed to their previous PDA level in Baseline 2. This suggests that ISA is more suited as a permanent assistive device (i.e. cognitive prosthesis) than as a temporary training device. As ABI is associated with a multitude of cognitive deficits, we developed a conceptual framework, which focused on the cognitive parameters that have been shown to relate to speeding behaviour, namely "intention to speed" and "inattention to speeding". The subjects' combined status on the two independent parameters made up their "speeding profile". A comparison of the speeding profiles and the speed logs indicated that ISA in the present study was more efficient in reducing inattention to speeding than affecting intention to speed. This finding suggests that ISA might be more suited for some neuropsychological profiles than for others, and that customisation of ISA for different neuropsychological profiles may be required

  15. Usability of a virtual reality environment simulating an automated teller machine for assessing and training persons with acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teresa HY

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aimed to examine the usability of a newly designed virtual reality (VR environment simulating the operation of an automated teller machine (ATM for assessment and training. Design Part I involved evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of a non-immersive VR program simulating an ATM (VR-ATM. Part II consisted of a clinical trial providing baseline and post-intervention outcome assessments. Setting A rehabilitation hospital and university-based teaching facilities were used as the setting. Participants A total of 24 persons in the community with acquired brain injury (ABI - 14 in Part I and 10 in Part II - made up the participants in the study. Interventions In Part I, participants were randomized to receive instruction in either an "early" or a "late" VR-ATM program and were assessed using both the VR program and a real ATM. In Part II, participants were assigned in matched pairs to either VR training or computer-assisted instruction (CAI teaching programs for six 1-hour sessions over a three-week period. Outcome Measures Two behavioral checklists based on activity analysis of cash withdrawals and money transfers using a real ATM were used to measure average reaction time, percentage of incorrect responses, level of cues required, and time spent as generated by the VR system; also used was the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination. Results The sensitivity of the VR-ATM was 100% for cash withdrawals and 83.3% for money transfers, and the specificity was 83% and 75%, respectively. For cash withdrawals, the average reaction time of the VR group was significantly shorter than that of the CAI group (p = 0.021. We found no significant differences in average reaction time or accuracy between groups for money transfers, although we did note positive improvement for the VR-ATM group. Conclusion We found the VR-ATM to be usable as a valid assessment and training tool for relearning the use of ATMs prior to real

  16. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Methods Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale–DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). Conclusions A stepping verticalization

  17. Prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ki Young; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Christopher C; Jo, Si On; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jo, You Hwan; Suh, Gil Joon; Singer, Adam J

    2011-02-01

    The prognostic role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether NT-proBNP level could predict mortality in hospitalised CAP patients. We performed a structured medical record review of all hospitalised CAP patients from May 2003 to October 2006, and classified patients into the 30-day survival and non-survival group. Data included demographic and clinical characteristics, and laboratory findings including NT-proBNP levels. The APACHE II scores, PSI (pneumonia severity index) and CURB65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and aged 65 or more) scores were calculated. Comparisons between survivors and non-survivors were made with χ(2), non-parametric tests and logistic regression and ROC analysis were used to compare the ability of NT-proBNP (adjusted for age, heart failure and creatinine), APACHE II, PSI and CURB65 to predict mortality. Of 502 patients, 61 (12.2%) died within 30 days. NT-proBNP levels were measured in 167 patients and were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (median 841.7 (IQR 267.1-3137.3) pg/ml vs 3658.0 (1863.0-7025.0) pg/ml, p=0.019). NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of mortality (adjusted OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.02, p=0.002). The AUC for NT-proBNP was 0.712 (95% CI, 0.613 to 0.812), which was comparable to those of PSI (0.749, p=0.531) and CURB65 (0.698, p=0.693), but inferior to that of APACHE II (0.831, p=0.037). Adding NT-proBNP to APACHE II, PSI and CURB65 did not significantly increase the AUCs, respectively. NT-proBNP level is an independent predictor of mortality in hospitalised CAP patients. The performance of NT-proBNP level is comparable to those of PSI and CURB65 in predicting mortality.

  18. Validation of the Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) as a cognitive screening test in patients with acquired brain injury in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlay, Sehim; Kuçukdeveci, Ayse A; Elhan, Atilla H; Yavuzer, Gunes; Tennant, Alan

    2007-02-28

    Assessment of cognitive impairment with a valid cognitive screening tool is essential in neurorehabilitation. The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Turkish-adapted version of the Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) among acquired brain injury patients in Turkey. Some 155 patients with acquired brain injury admitted for rehabilitation were assessed by the adapted version of MEAMS at admission and discharge. Reliability was tested by internal consistency, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and person separation index; internal construct validity by Rasch analysis; external construct validity by associations with physical and cognitive disability (FIM); and responsiveness by Effect Size. Reliability was found to be good with Cronbach's alpha of 0.82 at both admission and discharge; and likewise an ICC of 0.80. Person separation index was 0.813. Internal construct validity was good by fit of the data to the Rasch model (mean item fit -0.178; SD 1.019). Items were substantially free of differential item functioning. External construct validity was confirmed by expected associations with physical and cognitive disability. Effect size was 0.42 compared with 0.22 for cognitive FIM. The reliability and validity of the Turkish version of MEAMS as a cognitive impairment screening tool in acquired brain injury has been demonstrated.

  19. Acetate supplementation reduces microglia activation and brain interleukin-1β levels in a rat model of Lyme neuroborreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brissette Catherine A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have found that acetate supplementation significantly reduces neuroglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in a rat model of neuroinflammation induced with lipopolysaccharide. To test if the anti-inflammatory effect of acetate supplementation is specific to a TLR4-mediated injury, we measured markers of neuroglia activation in rats subjected to B. burgdorferi-induced neuroborreliosis that is mediated in large part by a TLR2-type mechanism. Methods In this study, rats were subjected to Lyme neuroborreliosis following an intravenous infusion of B. burgdorferi (B31-MI-16. Acetate supplementation was induced using glyceryl triacetate (6g/kg by oral gavage. Immunohistochemistry, qPCR, and western blot analyses were used to measure bacterial invasion into the brain, neuroglial activation, and brain and circulating levels of interleukin 1β. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by a Tukey’s post hoc tests or using a Student’s t test assuming unequal variances when appropriate. Results We found that acetate supplementation significantly reduced microglia activation by 2-fold as determined by immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. Further, acetate supplementation also reduced the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β by 2-fold as compared to controls. On the other hand, the inoculation of rats with B. burgdorferi had no effect on astroglial activation as determined by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis despite significant increases in circulation levels of antigen toward B. burgdorferi and presence of the bacteria in the central nervous system. Conclusions These results suggest that microglial activation is an essential component to neuroborreliosis and that acetate supplementation may be an effective treatment to reduce injury phenotype and possibly injury progression in Lyme neuroborreliosis.

  20. Evaluating the CARE4Carer Blended Care Intervention for Partners of Patients With Acquired Brain Injury: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Vincent Cm; Schepers, Vera Pm; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Heugten, Caroline M; Visser-Meily, Johanna Ma

    2018-02-16

    Support programs for partners of patients with acquired brain injury are necessary since these partners experience several unfavorable consequences of caregiving, such as a high burden, emotional distress, and poor quality of life. Evidence-based support strategies that can be included in these support programs are psychoeducation, skill building, problem solving, and improving feelings of mastery. A promising approach would seem to be to combine web-based support with face-to-face consultations, creating a blended care intervention. This paper outlines the protocol of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the CARE4Carer blended care intervention for partners of patients with acquired brain injury. A multicenter two-arm randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A total of 120 partners of patients with acquired brain injury will be recruited from five rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. The blended care intervention consists of a nine-session web-based support program and two face-to-face consultations with a social worker. Themes that will be addressed are: giving partners insight into their own situation, including possible pitfalls and strengths, learning how to cope with the situation, getting a grip on thoughts and feelings, finding a better balance in the care for the patient with acquired brain injury, thinking about other possible care options, taking care of oneself, and communication. The intervention lasts 20 weeks and the control group will receive usual care. The outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and at 24- and 40-week follow-up. The primary outcome is caregiver mastery. Secondary outcome measures are strain, burden, family functioning, emotional functioning, coping, quality of life, participation, and social network. The effect of the intervention on the primary and secondary outcome measures will be determined. Additional a process evaluation will be conducted. The findings of this study will be used to improve the care for

  1. A systematic review of the efficacy of self-management programs for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Taryn M; Dean, Catherine M; Hush, Julia M; Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai

    2015-04-19

    Individuals living with acquired brain injury, typically caused by stroke or trauma, are far less likely to achieve recommended levels of physical activity for optimal health and well-being. With a growing number of people living with chronic disease and disability globally, self-management programs are seen as integral to the management of these conditions and the prevention of secondary health conditions. However, to date, there has been no systematic review of the literature examining the efficacy of self-management programs specifically on physical activity in individuals with acquired brain injury, whether delivered face-to-face or remotely. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of self-management programs in increasing physical activity levels in adults living in the community following acquired brain injury. The efficacy of remote versus face-to-face delivery was also examined. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Electronic databases were searched. Two independent reviewers screened all studies for eligibility, assessed risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. Five studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Studies were widely heterogeneous with respect to program content and delivery characteristics and outcomes, although all programs utilized behavioral change principles. Four of the five studies examined interventions in which physical activity was a component of a multifaceted intervention, where the depth to which physical activity specific content was covered, and the extent to which skills were taught and practiced, could not be clearly established. Three studies showed favorable physical activity outcomes following self-management interventions for stroke; however, risk of bias was high, and overall efficacy remains unclear. Although not used in isolation from face-to-face delivery, remote delivery via telephone was the predominant form of delivery in two studies with support for its inclusion

  2. Professionals' views on the use of smartphone technology to support children and adolescents with memory impairment due to acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackett, Ruth; Thomas, Sophie; Thomas, Shirley

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To identify from a health-care professionals' perspective whether smartphones are used by children and adolescents with acquired brain injury as memory aids; what factors predict smartphone use and what barriers prevent the use of smartphones as memory aids by children and adolescents. Method A cross-sectional online survey was undertaken with 88 health-care professionals working with children and adolescents with brain injury. Results Children and adolescents with brain injury were reported to use smartphones as memory aids by 75% of professionals. However, only 42% of professionals helped their clients to use smartphones. The only factor that significantly predicted reported smartphone use was the professionals' positive attitudes toward assistive technology. Several barriers to using smartphones as memory aids were identified, including the poor accessibility of devices and cost of devices. Conclusion Many children and adolescents with brain injury are already using smartphones as memory aids but this is often not facilitated by professionals. Improving the attitudes of professionals toward using smartphones as assistive technology could help to increase smartphone use in rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Smartphones could be incorporated into rehabilitation programs for young people with brain injury as socially acceptable compensatory aids. Further training and support for professionals on smartphones as compensatory aids could increase professionals' confidence and attitudes in facilitating the use of smartphones as memory aids. Accessibility could be enhanced by the development of a smartphone application specifically designed to be used by young people with brain injury.

  3. An algorithm based on OmniView technology to reconstruct sagittal and coronal planes of the fetal brain from volume datasets acquired by three-dimensional ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G; Capponi, A; Pietrolucci, M E; Capece, A; Aiello, E; Mammarella, S; Arduini, D

    2011-08-01

    To describe a novel algorithm, based on the new display technology 'OmniView', developed to visualize diagnostic sagittal and coronal planes of the fetal brain from volumes obtained by three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography. We developed an algorithm to image standard neurosonographic planes by drawing dissecting lines through the axial transventricular view of 3D volume datasets acquired transabdominally. The algorithm was tested on 106 normal fetuses at 18-24 weeks of gestation and the visualization rates of brain diagnostic planes were evaluated by two independent reviewers. The algorithm was also applied to nine cases with proven brain defects. The two reviewers, using the algorithm on normal fetuses, found satisfactory images with visualization rates ranging between 71.7% and 96.2% for sagittal planes and between 76.4% and 90.6% for coronal planes. The agreement rate between the two reviewers, as expressed by Cohen's kappa coefficient, was > 0.93 for sagittal planes and > 0.89 for coronal planes. All nine abnormal volumes were identified by a single observer from among a series including normal brains, and eight of these nine cases were diagnosed correctly. This novel algorithm can be used to visualize standard sagittal and coronal planes in the fetal brain. This approach may simplify the examination of the fetal brain and reduce dependency of success on operator skill. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Assessment of neuro-optometric rehabilitation using the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM test in adults with acquired brain injury

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    Neera Kapoor

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This pilot study sought to determine the efficacy of using the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM test in the adult, acquired brain injury (ABI population to quantify clinically the effects of controlled, laboratory-performed, oculomotor-based vision therapy/vision rehabilitation. Methods: Nine adult subjects with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and five with stroke were assessed before and after an eight-week, computer-based, versional oculomotor (fixation, saccades, pursuit, and simulated reading training program (9.6 h total. The protocol incorporated a cross-over, interventional design with and without the addition of auditory feedback regarding two-dimensional eye position. The clinical outcome measure was the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM test score (ratio, errors taken before, midway, and immediately following training. Results: For the DEM ratio parameter, improvements were found in 80–89% of the subjects. For the DEM error parameter, improvements were found in 100% of the subjects. Incorporation of the auditory feedback component revealed a trend toward enhanced performance. The findings were similar for both DEM parameters, as well as for incorporation of the auditory feedback, in both diagnostic groups. Discussion: The results of the present study demonstrated considerable improvements in the DEM test scores following the oculomotor-based training, thus reflecting more time-optimal and accurate saccadic tracking after the training. The DEM test should be considered as another clinical test of global saccadic tracking performance in the ABI population. Resumen: Objetivo: Este estudio piloto trató de determinar la eficacia del uso de la prueba DEM (Developmental Eye Movement en la población adulta con daño cerebral adquirido (DCA para cuantificar clínicamente los efectos de la rehabilitación/terapia visual controlada, realizada en laboratorio, y de carácter oculomotor. Métodos: Se valoraron nueve sujetos adultos con

  5. The effect of tryptophan supplemented diets on brain serotonergic activity and plasma cortisol under undisturbed and stressed conditions in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, C.I.M.; Silva, P.I.M.; Costas, B.

    2013-01-01

    -term supplementation with TRP supplemented diets changes brain serotonergic activity and the stress response associated with slaughter handling in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Adult fish (n. =. 108, 490.6. ±. 4.0. g, 12 individuals per tank) were exposed to one of the three treatments...

  6. Efficacy of a Micro-Prompting Technology in Reducing Support Needed by People With Severe Acquired Brain Injury in Activities of Daily Living: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼNeill, Brian; Best, Catherine; OʼNeill, Lauren; Ramos, Sara D S; Gillespie, Alex

    2017-11-29

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an automated interactive prompting technology in supporting the morning routine of persons with acquired brain injury. The morning routine included maintaining personal hygiene and dressing. An inpatient neurorehabilitation hospital. Persons with acquired brain injury who required prompting when following their morning routine (n = 24), but were not limited by physical disability or dysphasia, took part in the study. Participants (67% with traumatic brain injury) had impairment on indices of memory and executive function. A randomized control trial evaluated the effect of an automated interactive micro-prompting device on the number of prompts by trained staff required for successful completion of the morning routine. Study-specific checklists assessed sequence performance, errors, and verbal prompts required over baseline, rehabilitation as usual, intervention, and return to baseline conditions. The intervention significantly reduced the support required to complete the task compared with usual rehabilitation. Micro-prompting technology is an effective assistive technology for cognition, which reduces support needs in people with significant cognitive impairments.

  7. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E.; Kleijn, R.; Colzato, L.S.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Nieuwenhuis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer

  8. Sensory Supplementation to Enhance Adaptation Following G-transitions and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott; Rupert, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Sensory supplementation can be incorporated as online feedback for improving spatial orientation awareness for manual control tasks (e.g. TSAS, Shuttle ZAG study). Preliminary data with vestibular patients and TBI military population is promising for rehabilitation training. Recommend that sensory supplementation be incorporated as a training component in an integrated countermeasure approach.

  9. A dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme for improving balance control in patients with acquired brain injury: a single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirone, Eliana; Goria, Paolo Filiberto; Anselmino, Arianna

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme on balance impairments among adult patients with acquired brain injury. Single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Single rehabilitation centre. Sixteen participants between 12 and 18 months post-acquired brain injury with balance impairments and a score task home-based programme six days a week for seven weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Balance Evaluation System Test; secondary measures were the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale and Goal Attainment Scaling. At the end of the pilot study, the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in Balance Evaluation System Test scores (17.87, SD 6.05) vs. the control group (5.5, SD 3.53; P = 0.008, r = 0.63). There was no significant difference in improvement in Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale scores between the intervention group (25.25, SD 25.51) and the control group (7.00, SD 14.73; P = 0.11, r = 0.63). There was no significant improvement in Goal Attainment Scaling scores in the intervention (19.37, SD 9.03) vs. the control group (16.28, SD 6.58; P = 0.093, r = 0.63). This pilot study shows the safety, feasibility and short-term benefit of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme to improve balance control in patients with acquired brain injury. A sample size of 26 participants is required for a definitive study.

  10. Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve mobility in people with acquired brain injury and its effects on strength are unclear: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide G de Sousa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does 4 weeks of active functional electrical stimulation (FES cycling in addition to usual care improve mobility and strength more than usual care alone in people with a sub-acute acquired brain injury caused by stroke or trauma? Design: Multi centre, randomised, controlled trial. Participants: Forty patients from three Sydney hospitals with recently acquired brain injury and a mean composite strength score in the affected lower limb of 7 (SD 5 out of 20 points. Intervention: Participants in the experimental group received an incremental, progressive, FES cycling program five times a week over a 4-week period. All participants received usual care. Outcome measures: Outcome measures were taken at baseline and at 4 weeks. Primary outcomes were mobility and strength of the knee extensors of the affected lower limb. Mobility was measured with three mobility items of the Functional Independence Measure and strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. Secondary outcomes were strength of the knee extensors of the unaffected lower limb, strength of key muscles of the affected lower limb and spasticity of the affected plantar flexors. Results: All but one participant completed the study. The mean between-group differences for mobility and strength of the knee extensors of the affected lower limb were –0.3/21 points (95% CI –3.2 to 2.7 and 7.5 Nm (95% CI –5.1 to 20.2, where positive values favoured the experimental group. The only secondary outcome that suggested a possible treatment effect was strength of key muscles of the affected lower limb with a mean between-group difference of 3.0/20 points (95% CI 1.3 to 4.8. Conclusion: Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve mobility in people with acquired brain injury and its effects on strength are unclear. Trial registration: ACTRN12612001163897. [de Sousa DG, Harvey LA, Dorsch S, Leung J, Harris W (2016 Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve

  11. Involvement of neuronal IL-1β in acquired brain lesions in a rat model of neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Alexandre; Lavoie, Karine; Brochu, Marie-Elsa; Grbic, Djordje; Lepage, Martin; Gris, Denis; Sebire, Guillaume

    2013-09-05

    Infection-inflammation combined with hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is the most prevalent pathological scenario involved in perinatal brain damage leading to life-long neurological disabilities. Following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or HI aggression, different patterns of inflammatory responses have been uncovered according to the brain differentiation stage. In fact, LPS pre-exposure has been reported to aggravate HI brain lesions in post-natal day 1 (P1) and P7 rat models that are respectively equivalent - in terms of brain development - to early and late human preterm newborns. However, little is known about the innate immune response in LPS plus HI-induced lesions of the full-term newborn forebrain and the associated neuropathological and neurobehavioral outcomes. An original preclinical rat model has been previously documented for the innate neuroimmune response at different post-natal ages. It was used in the present study to investigate the neuroinflammatory mechanisms that underline neurological impairments after pathogen-induced inflammation and HI in term newborns. LPS and HI exerted a synergistic detrimental effect on rat brain. Their effect led to a peculiar pattern of parasagittal cortical-subcortical infarcts mimicking those in the human full-term newborn with subsequent severe neurodevelopmental impairments. An increased IL-1β response in neocortical and basal gray neurons was demonstrated at 4 h after LPS + HI-exposure and preceded other neuroinflammatory responses such as microglial and astroglial cell activation. Neurological deficits were observed during the acute phase of injury followed by a recovery, then by a delayed onset of profound motor behavior impairment, reminiscent of the delayed clinical onset of motor system impairments observed in humans. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) reduced the extent of brain lesions confirming the involvement of IL-1β response in their pathophysiology. In rat pups at a neurodevelopmental age

  12. Oral Supplementation with Bovine Colostrum Prevents Septic Shock and Brain Barrier Disruption During Bloodstream Infection in Preterm Newborn Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Anders; Worsøe, Päivi; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Preterm infants have increased risk of neonatal sepsis, potentially inducing brain injury, and they may benefit from early initiation of enteral milk feeding. Using preterm pigs as models, we hypothesized that early provision of bovine colostrum to parentally nourished newborns protects against...... = 15) or oral provision of bovine colostrum with supplementary parenteral nutrition (SE + COL, n = 14), and compared with uninfected, TPN-nourished controls (CON + TPN, n = 11). SE-infected animals showed multiple signs of sepsis, including lethargy, hypotension, respiratory acidosis, internal organ...... hemorrhages, cellular responses (leukopenia, thrombocytopenia), brain barrier disruption and neuroinflammation. At 24 h, colostrum supplementation reduced the SE abundance in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, both p colostrum feeding normalized arterial blood pressure (38.5 ± 1.20 vs 30...

  13. [Comparison of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III and the Spain-Complutense Verbal Learning Test in acquired brain injury: construct validity and ecological validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Lario, P; Pena, J; Ojeda, N

    2017-04-16

    To perform an in-depth examination of the construct validity and the ecological validity of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) and the Spain-Complutense Verbal Learning Test (TAVEC). The sample consists of 106 adults with acquired brain injury who were treated in the Area of Neuropsychology and Neuropsychiatry of the Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra and displayed memory deficit as the main sequela, measured by means of specific memory tests. The construct validity is determined by examining the tasks required in each test over the basic theoretical models, comparing the performance according to the parameters offered by the tests, contrasting the severity indices of each test and analysing their convergence. The external validity is explored through the correlation between the tests and by using regression models. According to the results obtained, both the WMS-III and the TAVEC have construct validity. The TAVEC is more sensitive and captures not only the deficits in mnemonic consolidation, but also in the executive functions involved in memory. The working memory index of the WMS-III is useful for predicting the return to work at two years after the acquired brain injury, but none of the instruments anticipates the disability and dependence at least six months after the injury. We reflect upon the construct validity of the tests and their insufficient capacity to predict functionality when the sequelae become chronic.

  14. Statistical process control: A feasibility study of the application of time-series measurement in early neurorehabilitation after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Gabriela; Schult, Marie-Louise; Bartfai, Aniko; Elg, Mattias

    2017-01-31

    Progress in early cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury is uneven and unpredictable, and thus the evaluation of rehabilitation is complex. The use of time-series measurements is susceptible to statistical change due to process variation. To evaluate the feasibility of using a time-series method, statistical process control, in early cognitive rehabilitation. Participants were 27 patients with acquired brain injury undergoing interdisciplinary rehabilitation of attention within 4 months post-injury. The outcome measure, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, was analysed using statistical process control. Statistical process control identifies if and when change occurs in the process according to 3 patterns: rapid, steady or stationary performers. The statistical process control method was adjusted, in terms of constructing the baseline and the total number of measurement points, in order to measure a process in change. Statistical process control methodology is feasible for use in early cognitive rehabilitation, since it provides information about change in a process, thus enabling adjustment of the individual treatment response. Together with the results indicating discernible subgroups that respond differently to rehabilitation, statistical process control could be a valid tool in clinical decision-making. This study is a starting-point in understanding the rehabilitation process using a real-time-measurements approach.

  15. Systematic instruction of assistive technology for cognition (ATC) in an employment setting following acquired brain injury: A single case, experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Laurie E; Glang, Ann; Pinkelman, Sarah; Albin, Richard; Harwick, Robin; Ettel, Deborah; Wild, Michelle R

    2015-01-01

    Assistive technology for cognition (ATC) can be an effective means of compensating for cognitive impairments following acquired brain injury. Systematic instruction is an evidence-based approach to training a variety of skills and strategies, including the use of ATC. This study experimentally evaluated systematic instruction applied to assistive technology for cognition (ATC) in a vocational setting. The study used a single-case, multiple-probe design across behaviors design. The participant was a 50-year old female with cognitive impairments following an acquired brain injury (ABI). As a part-time employee, she was systematically instructed on how to operate and routinely use selected applications (apps) on her iPod Touch to support three work-related skills: (a) recording/recalling the details of work assignments, (b) recording/recalling work-related meetings and conversations, and (c) recording/performing multi-step technology tasks. The experimental intervention was systematic instruction applied to ATC. The dependent measures were: (a) the use of ATC at work as measured by an ATC routine task analysis; and (b) recall of work-related tasks and information. Treatment effects were replicated across the three work-related skills and were maintained up to one year following the completion of intensive training across behaviors with periodic review (booster sessions). Systematic instruction is a critical component to teaching the routine use of ATC to compensate for cognitive impairments following ABI.

  16. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations.

  17. Who among patients with acquired brain injury returned to work after occupational rehabilitation? The rapid-return-to-work-cohort-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Randi Wågø; Haveraaen, Lise Aasen; Brouwers, Evelien P M; Skarpaas, Lisebet Skeie

    2017-07-20

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is known to be severely disabling. On average, 40% of employees return to work (RTW) within two years after injury. There is, however, limited research on what might contribute to successful RTW. To examine factors that might impact the time-to first RTW for patients with ABI, participating in a RTW-program. The study was designed as a cohort study of patients on sick leave due to mild or moderate ABI (n = 137). The mean age of the patients was 51 years, and 58% were men. The most common diagnoses were stroke (75%) and traumatic brain injury (12%). Data were collected through questionnaires, and combined with register data on sickness absence. Survival analyses were used to analyse the effect of different variables on time to first RTW (full or partial), at one- and two-year follow-up. Generally, women (HR = 0.447; CI: 0.239-0.283) had higher RTW-rates than men, and patients with non-comorbid impairments returned to work earlier than patients with multiple impairments. Although not statistically significant, receiving individual consultations and participating in group-sessions were generally associated with a delayed RTW at both follow-up-times. The only service-related factor significantly associated with delayed RTW was meetings with the social insurance office (HR = 0.522; CI: 0.282-0.965), and only at one-year follow-up. Women and patients with non-comorbid impairments returned to work earlier than men and patients with multiple impairments. There seems to be an association between intense and long-lasting participation in the RTW program and prolonged time-to first-RTW, even after controlling for level of cognitive impairments and comorbidity. Implications for Rehabilitation Acquired brain injury (ABI) is known to be severely disabling, and persons with ABI often experience difficulties in regard to returning to work. This study provides information on prognostic factors that might contribute to return to work (RTW

  18. [Depersonalization syndrome after acquired brain damage. Overview based on 3 case reports and the literature and discussion of etiological models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulig, M; Böttger, S; Sommer, M; Prosiegel, M

    1998-12-01

    Depersonalization after brain damage is still only rarely reported and poorly understood. We describe three patients between the ages of 21 and 25 who experienced depersonalization and derealization for periods of 6 weeks to 4 months, two after traumatic brain injury, the third after surgical and radiation treatment of a pineocytoma. Each one believed to be living in a nightmare and thought about committing suicide in order to wake up. One patient developed symptoms as described in Cotard delusion. Aspects of neuroanatomy, psychodynamics, and anthropology are discussed with reference to the literature. Frontal and temporal lesions seem only to play a facilitating role but not to be a necessary condition. There is evidence for additional influence of psychological and premorbid personality factors. Summarizing the current state of information we consider depersonalization with the experience of being in a dream or being dead as a heuristic reaction to brain damage. Similar models have already been discussed in neuropsychological disorders as for instance reduplicative paramnesias, neglect, and anosognosia.

  19. Prospective study of a community reintegration programme for patients with acquired chronic brain injury: effects on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurtsen, Gert J; van Heugten, Caroline M; Meijer, Ron; Martina, Juan D; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2011-01-01

    To examine the effects of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with psychosocial problems due to acquired chronic brain injury on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning. A prospective cohort study with waiting list control and 1-year follow-up. Forty-one caregivers of which 28 female. Mean age was 48 ± 8.3 years and 33 caregivers were parents. A structured residential treatment programme was offered to the patients directed at domestic life, work, leisure time and social interactions. The Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury (IEQ-BI) for emotional burden, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) for psychological health and the Family Assessment Device (FAD) for family functioning were used. There was an overall significant effect of Time for all outcome measures (MANOVA T(2 )= 9.1, F(15,317) = 64.1, p = 0.000). The effect sizes were moderate for three IEQ-BI sub-scales (partial η(2 )= 0.12-0.17) and small for two sub-scales (partial η(2 )= 0.05-0.09). The effect size for GHQ was moderate (partial η(2 )= 0.11). As for FAD no significant time effects were present (partial η(2 )= 0.00-0.04). Emotional burden and psychological health of the caregivers improved significantly when patients with acquired brain injury and psychosocial problems followed a residential community reintegration programme. Family dynamics remained stable.

  20. Chronic pyruvate supplementation increases exploratory activity and brain energy reserves in young and middle-aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennariikka eKoivisto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of pyruvate when given in systemic injections. Impaired glucose uptake and metabolism are found in Alzheimer's disease (AD and in AD mouse models. We tested whether dietary pyruvate supplementation is able to provide added energy supply to brain and thereby attenuate aging- or AD-related cognitive impairment. Mice received ~ 800 mg/kg/day Na-pyruvate in their chow for 2- 6 months. In middle-aged wild-type mice and in 6.5-month-old APP/PS1 mice, pyruvate facilitated spatial learning and increased exploration of a novel odor. However, in passive avoidance task for fear memory, the treatment group was clearly impaired. Independent of age, long-term pyruvate increased explorative behavior, which likely explains the paradoxical impairment in passive avoidance. We also assessed pyruvate effects on body weight, muscle force and endurance, and found no effects. Metabolic post-mortem assays revealed increased energy compounds in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as increased brain glycogen storages in the pyruvate group. Pyruvate supplementation may counteract aging-related behavioral impairment but its beneficial effect seems related to increased explorative activity rather than direct memory enhancement.

  1. Brain serotonin and dopamine modulators, perceptual responses and endurance performance during exercise in the heat following creatine supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilduff Liam P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present experiment examined the responses of peripheral modulators and indices of brain serotonin (5-HT and dopamine (DA function and their association with perception of effort during prolonged exercise in the heat after creatine (Cr supplementation. Methods Twenty one endurance-trained males performed, in a double-blind fashion, two constant-load exercise tests to exhaustion at 63 ± 5% V˙ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafeOvayLbaiaaaaa@2D11@O2 max in the heat (ambient temperature: 30.3 ± 0.5 °C, relative humidity: 70 ± 2% before and after 7 days of Cr (20 g·d-1 Cr + 140 g·d-1 glucose polymer or placebo (Plc (160 g·d-1 glucose polymer supplementation. Results 3-way interaction has shown that Cr supplementation reduced rectal temperature, heart rate, ratings of perceived leg fatigue (P P P P > 0.05; Cr group, n = 11: 47.0 ± 4.7 min vs. 49.7 ± 7.5 min, P > 0.05. However, after dividing the participants into "responders" and "non-responders" to Cr, based on their intramuscular Cr uptake, performance was higher in the "responders" relative to "non-responders" group (51.7 ± 7.4 min vs.47.3 ± 4.9 min, p Conclusion although Cr influenced key modulators of brain 5-HT and DA function and reduced various thermophysiological parameters which all may have contributed to the reduced effort perception during exercise in the heat, performance was improved only in the "responders" to Cr supplementation. The present results may also suggest the demanding of the pre-experimental identification of the participants into "responders" and "non-responders" to Cr supplementation before performing the main experimentation. Otherwise, the possibility of the type II error may be enhanced.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF NINTENDO WII® ON THE POSTURAL CONTROL OF PATIENTS AFFECTED BY ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vicario Mendez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literature demonstrates that postural control after suffering a brain injury can actually relate to its functional prognosis. Postural control is a result of complex interactions of different body systems that co-operate in order to control the position of the body in the space and is determined by the functional task as well as by the environment in which it is developed. The use in rehabilitation of Nintendo's Wii® gives some results on motor functions. This study analyses the effects of the Nintendo Wii® console on postural control during the execution of an everyday life task consisting of getting up and walking three meters.

  3. Goal Management Training for rehabilitation of executive functions: a systematic review of effectiveness in patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny-Pacini, Agata; Chevignard, Mathilde; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    To determine if Goal Management Training (GMT) is effective for the rehabilitation of executive functions following brain injury when administered alone or in combination with other interventions. Systematic review, with quality appraisal specific to executive functions research and calculation of effect sizes. Twelve studies were included. Four studies were "Proof-of-principle" studies, testing the potential effectiveness of GMT and eight were rehabilitation studies. Effectiveness was greater when GMT was combined with other interventions. The most effective interventions appeared to be those combing GMT with: Problem Solving Therapy; personal goal setting; external cueing or prompting apply GMT to the current task; personal homework to increase patients' commitment and training intensity; ecological and daily life training activities rather than paper-and-pencil, office-type tasks. Level of support for GMT was higher for studies measuring outcome in terms of increases in participation in everyday activities rather than on measures of executive impairment. Comprehensive rehabilitation programs incorporating GMT, but integrating other approaches, are effective in executive function rehabilitation following brain injury in adults. There is insufficient evidence to support use of GMT as a stand-alone intervention.

  4. Program for Research on Dietary Supplements in Military Operations and Healthcare Metabolically Optimized Brain - JWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol; Vitamins / Minerals / Antioxidants / Dietary supplements (not specified); Herbal Medicine (Subsets: Ginseng and Gingko Biloba); Diet...looking specifically at the role of glucose (Hoyland 2008). c. Other Intervention Groupings considered: i. Herbal Medicine : 58 abstracts identified...involved herbal medicine (excluding gingko biloba and ginseng) as an intervention on the healthy adult population. 31 separate herb or herbal

  5. Effect of perinatally supplemented flavonoids on brain structure, circulation, cognition, and metabolism in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Carola I F; Zerbi, Valerio; Mutsaers, Martina P C; Jochems, Mieke; Vos, Claudia A; Vos, Julle O; Berg, Brian M; van Tol, Eric A F; Gross, Gabriele; Jouni, Zeina E; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that flavanol consumption can beneficially affect cognition in adults, but little is known about the effect of flavanol intake early in life. The present study aims to assess the effect of dietary flavanol intake during the gestational and postnatal period on brain structure, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cognition, and brain metabolism in C57BL/6J mice. Female wild-type C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to either a flavanol supplemented diet or a control diet at gestational day 0. Male offspring remained on the corresponding diets throughout life and performed cognitive and behavioral tests during puberty and adulthood assessing locomotion and exploration (Phenotyper and open field), sensorimotor integration (Rotarod and prepulse inhibition), and spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze, MWM). Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at 11.7T measured brain metabolism, CBF, and white and gray matter integrity in adult mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses evaluated inflammation, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, and vascular density. Cognitive and behavioral tests demonstrated increased locomotion in Phenotypers during puberty after flavanol supplementation (p = 0.041) but not in adulthood. Rotarod and prepulse inhibition demonstrated no differences in sensorimotor integration. Flavanols altered spatial learning in the MWM in adulthood (p = 0.039), while spatial memory remained unaffected. Additionally, flavanols increased diffusion coherence in the visual cortex (p = 0.014) and possibly the corpus callosum (p = 0.066) in adulthood. Mean diffusion remained unaffected, a finding that corresponds with our immunohistochemical data showing no effect on neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and vascular density. However, flavanols decreased CBF in the cortex (p = 0.001) and thalamus (p = 0.009) in adulthood. Brain metabolite levels and neuroinflammation remained unaffected by flavanols. These data suggest

  6. Brain substrates of implicit and explicit memory: the importance of concurrently acquired neural signals of both memory types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Joel L; Paller, Ken A

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive understanding of human memory requires cognitive and neural descriptions of memory processes along with a conception of how memory processing drives behavioral responses and subjective experiences. One serious challenge to this endeavor is that an individual memory process is typically operative within a mix of other contemporaneous memory processes. This challenge is particularly disquieting in the context of implicit memory, which, unlike explicit memory, transpires without the subject necessarily being aware of memory retrieval. Neural correlates of implicit memory and neural correlates of explicit memory are often investigated in different experiments using very different memory tests and procedures. This strategy poses difficulties for elucidating the interactions between the two types of memory process that may result in explicit remembering, and for determining the extent to which certain neural processing events uniquely contribute to only one type of memory. We review recent studies that have succeeded in separately assessing neural correlates of both implicit memory and explicit memory within the same paradigm using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with an emphasis on studies from our laboratory. The strategies we describe provide a methodological framework for achieving valid assessments of memory processing, and the findings support an emerging conceptualization of the distinct neurocognitive events responsible for implicit and explicit memory.

  7. Long-term multi-species Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium dietary supplement enhances memory and changes regional brain metabolites in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Caroline; Li, Jia V; Marchesi, Julian R; Plummer, Sue; Garaiova, Iveta; Good, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Ageing is associated with changes in the gut microbiome that may contribute to age-related changes in cognition. Previous work has shown that dietary supplements with multi-species live microorganisms can influence brain function, including induction of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and production of brain derived neurotrophic factor, in both young and aged rodents. However, the effect of such dietary supplements on memory processes has been less well documented, particularly in the context of aging. The main aim of the present study was to examine the impact of a long-term dietary supplement with a multi-species live Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria mixture (Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60, L. acidophilus CUL21, Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 and B. lactis CUL34) on tests of memory and behavioural flexibility in 15-17-month-old male rats. Following behavioural testing, the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex was extracted and analysed ex vivo using 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) spectroscopy to examine brain metabolites. The results showed a small beneficial effect of the dietary supplement on watermaze spatial navigation and robust improvements in long-term object recognition memory and short-term memory for object-in-place associations. Short-term object novelty and object temporal order memory was not influenced by the dietary supplement in aging rats. 1 H NMR analysis revealed diet-related regional-specific changes in brain metabolites; which indicated changes in several pathways contributing to modulation of neural signaling. These data suggest that chronic dietary supplement with multi-species live microorganisms can alter brain metabolites in aging rats and have beneficial effects on memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of the Aboriginal Communication Assessment After Brain Injury (ACAABI): A screening tool for identifying acquired communication disorders in Aboriginal Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth M; Ciccone, Natalie; Hersh, Deborah; Katzenellebogen, Judith; Coffin, Juli; Thompson, Sandra; Flicker, Leon; Hayward, Colleen; Woods, Deborah; McAllister, Meaghan

    2017-06-01

    Acquired communication disorders (ACD), following stroke and traumatic brain injury, may not be correctly identified in Aboriginal Australians due to a lack of linguistically and culturally appropriate assessment tools. Within this paper we explore key issues that were considered in the development of the Aboriginal Communication Assessment After Brain Injury (ACAABI) - a screening tool designed to assess the presence of ACD in Aboriginal populations. A literature review and consultation with key stakeholders were undertaken to explore directions needed to develop a new tool, based on existing tools and recommendations for future developments. The literature searches revealed no existing screening tool for ACD in these populations, but identified tools in the areas of cognition and social-emotional wellbeing. Articles retrieved described details of the content and style of these tools, with recommendations for the development and administration of a new tool. The findings from the interview and focus group views were consistent with the approach recommended in the literature. There is a need for a screening tool for ACD to be developed but any tool must be informed by knowledge of Aboriginal language, culture and community input in order to be acceptable and valid.

  9. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, Erica [SimonMed Imaging, Department of Radiology, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Zhang, Wei [Texas Children' s Hospital, Outcomes and Impact Service, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-10-15

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor; Yang, Erica; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar

    2017-01-01

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  11. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, A.; Nieto, S.; Sanhueza, J.; Morgado, N.; Rojas, I.; Zanartu, P.

    2010-07-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (Dha) is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHA containing lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC), obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine) supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born from female rats supplemented with DHA-LPC before and during pregnancy. We also evaluated the effect of DHA supplementation on learning and memory capabilities of pups through the Skinner test for operant conditioning. Female Wistar rats received 40-day supplementation of DHA-LPC (8 mg DHA/kg b.w/daily.), before and during pregnancy. After delivery, plasma, erythrocyte, liver, and adipose tissue DHA and plasma choline were analyzed. Brains from 60 day-old pups separated into frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus, and occipital cortex, were assessed for DHA, acetylcholine, and acetylcholine transferase (CAT) activity. Pups were subjected to the Skinner box test. DHA-LPC supplementation produces higher choline and liver DHA contents in the mothers plasma and increases the pups DHA and acetylcholine in the cerebellum and hippocampus. CAT was not modified by supplementation. The Skinner test shows that pups born from DHA-LPC supplemented mothers exhibit better scores of learning and memory than the controls. Conclusion: DHA-LPC may be an adequate form for DHA supplementation during the perinatal period. (Author) 66 refs.

  12. Effects of animal-assisted therapy on concentration and attention span in patients with acquired brain injury: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocheva, Vanya; Hund-Georgiadis, Margret; Hediger, Karin

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that brain-injured patients frequently suffer from cognitive impairments such as attention and concentration deficits. Numerous rehabilitation clinics offer animal-assisted therapy (AAT) to address these difficulties. The authors' aim was to investigate the immediate effects of AAT on the concentration and attention span of brain-injured patients. Nineteen patients with acquired brain injury were included in a randomized, controlled, within-subject trial. The patients alternately received 12 standard therapy sessions (speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy) and 12 paralleled AAT sessions with comparable content. A total of 429 therapy sessions was analyzed consisting of 214 AAT and 215 control sessions. Attention span and instances of distraction were assessed via video coding in Noldus Observer. The Mehrdimensionaler Befindlichkeitsbogen ([Multidimensional Affect Rating Scale] MDBF questionnaire; Steyer, Schwenkmezger, Notz, & Eid, 1997) was used to measure the patient's self-rated alertness. Concentration was assessed through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) via self-assessment and therapist's ratings. The patients' attention span did not differ whether an animal was present or not. However, patients displayed more instances of distraction during AAT. Moreover, patients rated themselves more concentrated and alert during AAT sessions. Further, therapists' evaluation of patients' concentration indicated that patients were more concentrated in AAT compared with the control condition. Although the patients displayed more instances of distraction while in the presence of an animal, it did not have a negative impact on their attention span. In addition, patients reported to be more alert and concentrated when an animal was present. Future studies should examine other attentional processes such as divided attention and include neurobiological correlates of attention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Early (N170/M170 face-sensitivity despite right lateral occipital brain damage in acquired prosopagnosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eAlonso Prieto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130 ms and a peak at about 170 ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response to faces as typically identified in neuroimaging. Event related potentials were recorded in response to faces, cars and their phase-scrambled versions in a well-known brain-damaged case of prosopagnosia (PS. Despite the patient’s right inferior occipital gyrus lesion encompassing the most posterior cortical area showing preferential response to faces (occipital face area, OFA, we identified an early face-sensitive component over the right occipito-temporal hemisphere of the patient that was identified as the N170. A second experiment supported this conclusion, showing the typical N170 increase of latency and amplitude in response to inverted faces. In contrast, there was no N170 in the left hemisphere, where PS has a lesion to the middle fusiform gyrus and shows no evidence of face-preferential response in neuroimaging (no left fusiform face area, or lFFA. These results were replicated by a magneto-encephalographic (MEG investigation of the patient, disclosing a M170 component only in the right hemisphere. These observations indicate that face preferential activation in the inferior occipital cortex is not necessary to elicit early visual responses associated with face perception (N170/M170 on the human scalp. These results further suggest that when the right inferior occipital cortex is damaged, the integrity of the middle fusiform gyrus and/or the superior temporal sulcus – two areas showing face preferential responses in the patient’s right hemisphere - might be necessary to generate

  14. Benefits of Docosahexaenoic Acid, Folic Acid, Vitamin D and Iodine on Foetal and Infant Brain Development and Function Following Maternal Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation

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    Nancy L. Morse

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literature is increasingly reporting on dietary deficiencies in many populations of some nutrients critical for foetal and infant brain development and function. Purpose: To highlight the potential benefits of maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and other important complimentary nutrients, including vitamin D, folic acid and iodine during pregnancy and/or breast feeding for foetal and/or infant brain development and/or function. Methods: English language systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, cross-sectional and case-control studies were obtained through searches on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials from January 2000 through to February 2012 and reference lists of retrieved articles. Reports were selected if they included benefits and harms of maternal supplementation of DHA, vitamin D, folic acid or iodine supplementation during pregnancy and/or lactation. Results: Maternal DHA intake during pregnancy and/or lactation can prolong high risk pregnancies, increase birth weight, head circumference and birth length, and can enhance visual acuity, hand and eye co-ordination, attention, problem solving and information processing. Vitamin D helps maintain pregnancy and promotes normal skeletal and brain development. Folic acid is necessary for normal foetal spine, brain and skull development. Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone production necessary for normal brain and nervous system development during gestation that impacts childhood function. Conclusion: Maternal supplementation within recommended safe intakes in populations with dietary deficiencies may prevent many brain and central nervous system malfunctions and even enhance brain development and function in their offspring.

  15. Carnosine supplementation protects rat brain tissue against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

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    Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Biberoglu, Gursel; Mertoglu Caglar, Oznur

    2010-06-01

    Ethanol causes oxidative stress and tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of antioxidant carnosine on the oxidative stress induced by ethanol in the rat brain tissue. Forty male rats were divided equally into four groups as control, carnosine (CAR), ethanol (EtOH), and ethanol plus carnosine (EtOH + CAR). Rats in the control group (n = 10) were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.9% saline; EtOH group (n = 10) with 2 g/kg/day ethanol, CAR group (n = 10) received carnosine at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day and EtOH + CAR group (n = 10) received carnosine (orally) and ethanol (i.p.). All animals were sacrificed using ketamine and brain tissues were removed. Malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and tissue carnosine levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured. Endogenous CAR levels in the rat brain tissue specimens were significantly increased in the CAR and EtOH groups when compared to the control animals. MDA and PCO levels in the EtOH group were significantly increased as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). CAR treatment also decreased MDA levels in the CAR group as compared to the control group. Increased SOD activities were obtained in the EtOH + CAR group as compared to the control (P < 0.05). CAR levels in the rat brain were significantly increased in the CAR, EtOH and CAR + EtOH groups when compared to the control animals. These findings indicated that carnosine may appear as a protective agent against ethanol-induced brain damage.

  16. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

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    Jingfen Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective memory complaints (SMCs are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47–88, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML and attention/concentration deficits (SAD were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n=47 or placebo (n=51, using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe. Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3 (44/47 and severe SAD (43/47 than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp. before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%(13/44 (P<0.01 and SAD (34.9%(15/43(P<0.01 than placebo (5.1% (2/39 and 13.5% (5/37, resp.. Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs.

  17. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingfen; Shi, Rong; Chen, Su; Dai, Lihua; Shen, Tian; Feng, Yi; Gu, Pingping; Shariff, Mina; Nguyen, Tuong; Ye, Yeats; Rao, Jianyu; Xing, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47-88), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML) and attention/concentration deficits (SAD) were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n = 47) or placebo (n = 51), using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe). Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3) (44/47) and severe SAD (43/47) than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp.) before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%)(13/44) (P < 0.01) and SAD (34.9%)(15/43)(P < 0.01) than placebo (5.1% (2/39) and 13.5% (5/37), resp.). Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs.

  18. Acquired neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Trocello, Jean-Marc; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-09-01

    Acquired neuropathies represent most of the neuropathies encountered in clinical practice. Hundreds of causes have been identified even though up to 41% of patients are still classified as idiopathic (Rajabally and Shah in J Neurol 258:1431-1436, 1). Routine evaluation relies on comprehensive medical history taking, clinical examination, nerve conduction studies and laboratory tests. Other investigations such as nerve biopsy or nerve or muscle imaging are performed in specific settings. This review focuses on recent advances in acquired neuropathies.

  19. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC, a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats

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    Jian Guan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16 or blank gels (n = 16 from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark–light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  20. Changes in aspects of social functioning depend upon prior changes in neurodisability in people with acquired brain injury undergoing post-acute neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Dónal G; Walsh, R Stephen; Waldron, Brian; McGrath, Caroline; Harte, Maurice; Casey, Sarah; McClean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Post-acute community-based rehabilitation is effective in reducing disability. However, while social participation and quality of life are valued as distal outcomes of neurorehabilitation, it is often not possible to observe improvements on these outcomes within the limited time-frames used in most investigations of rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to examine differences in the sequence of attainments for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) undergoing longer term post-acute neurorehabilitation. Participants with ABI who were referred to comprehensive home and community-based neurorehabilitation were assessed at induction to service, at 6 months and again at 1.5 years while still in service on the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI-4), Community Integration Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and World Health Organisation Quality of Life measure. At 6 months post-induction to service, significant differences were evident in MPAI abilities, adjustment, and total neurodisability; and in anxiety and depression. By contrast, there was no significant effect at 6 months on more socially oriented features of experience namely quality of life (QoL), Community Integration and Participation. Eighteen month follow-up showed continuation of the significant positive effects with the addition of QoL-related to physical health, Psychological health, Social aspects of QoL and Participation at this later time point. Regression analyses demonstrated that change in QoL and Participation were dependent upon prior changes in aspects of neurodisability. Age, severity or type of brain injury did not significantly affect outcome. Results suggest that different constructs may respond to neurorehabilitation at different time points in a dose effect manner, and that change in social aspects of experience may be dependent upon the specific nature of prior neurorehabilitation attainments.

  1. Changes in aspects of social functioning depend upon prior changes in neurodisability in people with acquired brain injury undergoing post-acute neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donal Gerard Fortune

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-acute community-based rehabilitation is effective in reducing disability. However, while social participation and quality of life are valued as distal outcomes of neurorehabilitation, it is often not possible to observe improvements on these outcomes within the limited time-frames used in most investigations of rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to examine differences in the sequence of attainments for people with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI undergoing longer term post-acute neurorehabilitation. Participants with ABI who were referred to comprehensive home and community-based neurorehabilitation were assessed at induction to service, at 6 months and again at 1.5 years while still in service on the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI-4, Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and World Health Organisation Quality of Life measure (WHOQoL-Bref. At 6 month post-induction to service, significant differences were evident in MPAI abilities, adjustment, and total neurodisability; and in anxiety and depression. By contrast, there was no significant effect at 6 months on more socially oriented features of experience namely Quality of life (QoL, Community Integration and Participation. Eighteen month follow-up showed continuation of the significant positive effects with the addition of QoL-related to physical health, Psychological health, Social aspects of QoL and Participation at this later time point. Regression analyses demonstrated that change in QoL and Participation were dependent upon prior changes in aspects of neurodisability. Age, severity or type of brain injury did not significantly affect outcome. Results suggest that different constructs may respond to neurorehabilitation at different time points in a dose effect manner, and that change in social aspects of experience may be dependent upon the specific nature of prior neurorehabilitation attainments.

  2. Nutritional parameters predicting pressure ulcers and short-term mortality in patients with minimal conscious state as a result of traumatic and non-traumatic acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalcini, Tiziana; Moraca, Marta; Ferro, Yvelise; Romeo, Stefano; Serra, Sebastiano; Raso, Maria Girolama; Rossi, Francesco; Sannita, Walter G; Dolce, Giuliano; Pujia, Arturo

    2015-09-17

    The association between malnutrition and worse outcomes as pressure ulcers and mortality is well established in a variety of setting. Currently none investigation was conducted in patients with long-term consequences of the acquired brain injury in which recovery from brain injury could be influenced by secondary complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between various nutritional status parameters (in particular albumin) and pressure ulcers formation and short-term mortality in minimal conscious state patients. In this prospective, observational study of 5-months duration, a 30 patients sample admitted to a Neurological Institute was considered. All patients underwent a complete medical examination. Anthropometric parameters like mid-arm circumference and mid-arm muscle circumference and nutritional parameters as serum albumin and blood hemoglobin concentration were assessed. At univariate and logistic regression analysis, mid-arm circumference (p = 0.04; beta = -0.89), mid-arm muscle circumference (p = 0.050; beta = -1.29), hemoglobin (p = 0.04, beta -1.1) and albumin (p = 0.04, beta -7.91) were inversely associated with pressure ulcers. The area under the ROC curve for albumin to predict sores was 0.76 (p = 0.02) and mortality was 0.83 (p = 0.03). Patient with lower albumin had significantly higher short-term mortality than those with higher serum albumin (p = 0.03; χ(2) test = 6.47). Albumin, haemoglobin and mid-arm circumference are inversely associated with pressure ulcers. Albumin is a prognostic index in MCS patients. Since albumin and haemoglobin could be affected by a variety of factors, this association suggests to optimize nutrition and investigate on other mechanism leading to mortality and pressure ulcers.

  3. The Effect of 4 Weeks of Flaxseed Extract Supplementation on Serum Concentration of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and C-Reactive Protein

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    Hosein Nazari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Omega-3 Supplementation has different effects on the body. Terefore, this study was carried out with the aim of investigating the effect of 4 weeks of flaxseed extract supplementation on serum concentrations of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and C-reactive protein (CRP. Methods: In this double-blind study, 24 male students (mean age, 23.21±1.98 were randomly divided into two groups, including flaxseed extract (n=12 and placebo (n=12. After 4 weeks of supplementation with flaxseed extract, serum levels of BDNF and CRP was measured in fasting state. BDNF level was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit, and CRP level was measured using an immunoturbidimetric assay kit. Data were analyzed using t-test. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: After four weeks of supplementation with flaxseed extract the mean serum level of BDNF significantly increased (p<0.001, but no significant change was observed in the serum level of CRP (p<0.591. Conclusion: It seems that supplementation with flaxseed extract through increasing BDNF level is useful for the improvement of cognitive and functional benefits of the brain.

  4. Evaluation of the quality of picture in studies of sect brain acquired with various collimators; Evaluacion de la calidad de imagen en estudios de spect cerebral adquiridos con distintos colimadores

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    Moran Velasco, V.; Prieto Azcarete, E.; Barbes Fernandez, B.; Sancho rodriguez, L.; Ribelles Segura, M. J.; Richter echevarria, J. A.; Arbizu Lostao, J.; Marti-Climent, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    On the practice clinic , the performance of the systems SPECT depends on in large measurement of the quality of image. The goal of East study was evaluate how affect the parameters of reconstruction of studies SPECT of perfusion brain acquired with a collimator of holes parallel (LEHR) and other of holes in fan (Fan-Beam). (Author)

  5. Measuring cognitive assessment and intervention burden in patients with acquired brain injured:  Development of the ”How Much is Too Much” questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tomaszczyk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design and preliminarily test a questionnaire intended to measure patient treatment burden resulting from participation in cognitive assessments and interventions. Methods: An expert consensus process was used to develop the concept of patient treatment burden and to determine the first set of questionnaire items and administration protocol. The pilot questionnaire was administered to 20 patients with mild to severe acquired brain injuries on completion of a 2-h or longer neuropsychological assessment. Following preliminary testing, the questionnaire was revised and re-evaluated by a second expert panel and content validity was assessed. Results: Burden was defined as psychologically and/or physically aversive symptoms in response to cognitive assessment or intervention. The first questionnaire contained 21 items assigned to 3 categories: physical, cognitive, and emotional. Eighty-five percent of patients endorsed symptom level increases, with “tired/fatigued” the most frequently endorsed item (80% of patients. Instructions and test items were easily understood, and the questionnaire was quick to administer. Content validity ratio (CVR of the revised questionnaire yielded 23 acceptable items and a subset met the highest CVR threshold (>0.78. Conclusion: This patient-reported outcome will ultimately help patients give voice to aversive experiences, and help clinicians and researchers to monitor and adapt assessments/treatments appropriately. Future steps in development are described.

  6. The effects of problem-solving skills training based on metacognitive principles for children with acquired brain injury attending mainstream schools: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D Y K; Fong, K N K

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training programme based on metacognitive principles for children with acquired brain injury (ABI) who attend mainstream schools. Thirty-two children with moderate to severe ABI studying in mainstream schools were allocated randomly by matched pairs to either an experimental or a comparison group. The participants in the experimental group received problem-solving skills training based on metacognitive principles, while those in the comparison group were on a waiting list to receive the experimental intervention shortly after the intervention in the experimental group had been completed. All participants were measured pre- and post-intervention using measures of abstract reasoning, metacognition, problem-solving functional behaviour in the home environment or social situations and individual goal-directed behaviour. Significant differences in post-test scores were found for all measurements between children in the experimental group and those in the comparison group, using the baselines of dependent variables, years of schooling and the full IQ scores as the covariates. The results of this study supported the use of explicit problem-solving skills training to improve daily functioning for children with ABI, and the need for a larger-scale, randomised controlled study with long-term follow-up.

  7. Evaluation of an attention and memory intervention post-childhood acquired brain injury: Preliminary efficacy, immediate and 6 months post-intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catroppa, Cathy; Stone, Kate; Hearps, Stephen J C; Soo, Cheryl; Anderson, Vicki; Rosema, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Impairments in attention and memory are common sequelae following paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI). While it has been established that such impairments are long-term and, therefore, affect quality-of-life, there is a scarcity of evidence-based interventions to treat these difficulties. The current study aimed to pilot the efficacy of the Amsterdam Memory and Attention Training for Children (Amat-c: English version) using both neuropsychological and ecologically sensitive measures. It was expected that children with attention and memory difficulties post-ABI would show improved performance post-intervention on cognitive and ecological measures, with maintenance at 6 months post-intervention. Ten children with an ABI, between the ages of 8-13 years at the time of recruitment were identified through audits of presentations to a metropolitan paediatric hospital. Each child underwent screening, the 18 week intervention programme, pre-intervention, immediate and 6 month post-intervention assessments. Findings supported the hypothesis that children would show post-intervention (immediate and 6 month) improvement in areas of attention and memory, with generalization to everyday life. Preliminary results provide support for the efficacy of the Amat-c post-childhood ABI. A larger study is needed to confirm these findings, as a reduction in attention and memory difficulties will enhance everyday functioning.

  8. Bridging the gap between theory and practice: dynamic systems theory as a framework for understanding and promoting recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries.

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    Levac, Danielle; DeMatteo, Carol

    2009-11-01

    A theoretical framework can help physiotherapists understand and promote recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries (ABI). Physiotherapy interventions for this population have traditionally been based in hierarchical-maturational theories of motor development emphasizing the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in controlling motor behaviour. In contrast, Dynamic Systems Theory (DST) views movement as resulting from the interaction of many subsystems within the individual, features of the functional task to be accomplished, and the environmental context in which the movement takes place. DST is now a predominant theoretical framework in pediatric physiotherapy. The purpose of this article is to describe how DST can be used to understand and promote recovery of function after pediatric ABI. A DST-based approach for children and youth with ABI does not treat the impaired CNS in isolation but rather emphasizes the role of all subsystems, including the family and the environment, in influencing recovery. The emphasis is on exploration, problem solving, and practice of functional tasks. A case scenario provides practical recommendations for the use of DST to inform physiotherapy interventions and clinical decision making in the acute phase of recovery from ABI. Future research is required to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based in this theoretical framework.

  9. The First Six Years of Building and Implementing a Return-to-Work Service for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury. The Rapid-Return-to-Work-Cohort-Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haveraaen, L; Brouwers, E P M; Sveen, U; Skarpaas, L S; Sagvaag, H; Aas, R W

    2017-12-01

    Background and objective Despite large activity worldwide in building and implementing new return-to-work (RTW) services, few studies have focused on how such implementation processes develop. The aim of this study was to examine the development in patient and service characteristics the first six years of implementing a RTW service for persons with acquired brain injury (ABI). Methods The study was designed as a cohort study (n=189). Data were collected by questionnaires, filled out by the service providers. The material was divided into, and analyzed with, two implementation phases. Non-parametrical statistical methods and hierarchical regression analyses were applied on the material. Results The number of patients increased significantly, and the patient group became more homogeneous. Both the duration of the service, and the number of consultations and group session days were significantly reduced. Conclusion The patient group became more homogenous, but also significantly larger during the first six years of building the RTW service. At the same time, the duration of the service decreased. This study therefore questions if there is a lack of consensus on the intensity of work rehabilitation for this group.

  10. Affiliative and "self-as-doer" identities: Relationships between social identity, social support, and emotional status amongst survivors of acquired brain injury (ABI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, R Stephen; Muldoon, Orla T; Gallagher, Stephen; Fortune, Donal G

    2015-01-01

    Social support is an important factor in rehabilitation following acquired brain injury (ABI). Research indicates that social identity makes social support possible and that social identity is made possible by social support. In order to further investigate the reciprocity between social identity and social support, the present research applied the concepts of affiliative and "self-as-doer" identities to an analysis of relationships between social identity, social support, and emotional status amongst a cohort of 53 adult survivors of ABI engaged in post-acute community neurorehabilitation. Path analysis was used to test a hypothesised mediated model whereby affiliative identities have a significant indirect relationship with emotional status via social support and self-as-doer identification. Results support the hypothesised model. Evidence supports an "upward spiral" between social identity and social support such that affiliative identity makes social support possible and social support drives self-as-doer identity. Our discussion emphasises the importance of identity characteristics to social support, and to emotional status, for those living with ABI.

  11. Back home after an acquired brain injury: building a "low-cost" team to provide theory-driven cognitive rehabilitation after routine interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, Davide; Hoerold, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) could benefit from further cognitive rehabilitation, after they have returned home. However, a lack of specialist services to provide such rehabilitation often prevents this. This leads to reduced reintegration of patients, increased social disadvantages and ultimately, higher economic costs. 10 months post-stroke, a 69 year-old woman was discharged from an inpatient rehabilitation program and returned home with severe cognitive impairments. We describe a pilot project which provided an individualised, low cost rehabilitation program, supervised and trained by a neuropsychologist. Progress was monitored every 3 months in order to decide on continuation of the program, based on the achieved results and predicted costs. Post intervention, despite severe initial impairment, cognitive and most notably daily functioning had improved. Although the financial investment was moderately high for the family, the intervention was still considered cost-effective when compared with the required costs of care in a local non-specialist care home. Moreover, the pilot experience was used to build a "local expert team" available for other individuals requiring rehabilitation. These results encourage the development of similar local "low cost" teams in the community, to provide scientifically-grounded cognitive rehabilitation for ABI patients returning home.

  12. Using single-case experimental design methodology to evaluate the effects of the ABC method for nursing staff on verbal aggressive behaviour after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkens, Ieke; Ponds, Rudolf; Pouwels, Climmy; Eilander, Henk; van Heugten, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The ABC method is a basic and simplified form of behavioural modification therapy for use by nurses. ABC refers to the identification of Antecedent events, target Behaviours, and Consequent events. A single-case experimental AB design was used to evaluate the effects of the ABC method on a woman diagnosed with olivo-ponto-cerebellar ataxia. Target behaviour was verbal aggressive behaviour during ADL care, assessed at 9 time points immediately before implementation of the ABC method and at 36 time points after implementation. A randomisation test showed a significant treatment effect between the baseline and intervention phases (t = .58, p = .03; ES [Nonoverlap All Pairs] = .62). Visual analysis, however, showed that the target behaviour was still present after implementation of the method and that on some days the nurses even judged the behaviour to be more severe than at baseline. Although the target behaviour was still present after treatment, the ABC method seems to be a promising tool for decreasing problem behaviour in patients with acquired brain injury. It is worth investigating the effects of this method in future studies. When interpreting single-subject data, both visual inspection and statistical analysis are needed to determine whether treatment is effective and whether the effects lead to clinically desirable results.

  13. Muscle contractures in patients with cerebral palsy and acquired brain injury are associated with extracellular matrix expansion, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and reduced rRNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Walden, Ferdinand; Gantelius, Stefan; Liu, Chang; Borgström, Hanna; Björk, Lars; Gremark, Ola; Stål, Per; Nader, Gustavo A; Pontén, Eva

    2018-03-23

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) and acquired brain injury (ABI) commonly develop muscle contractures with advancing age. An underlying growth defect contributing to skeletal muscle contracture formation in CP/ABI has been suggested. The biceps muscles of children and adolescents with CP/ABI (n=20) and typically developing controls (n=10) were investigated. We used immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and western blotting to assess gene expression relevant to growth and size homeostasis. Classical pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in extracellular matrix production were elevated in skeletal muscle of children with CP/ABI. Intramuscular collagen content was increased and satellite cell number decreased and this was associated with reduced levels of RNA polymerase (POL) I transcription factors, 45s pre-rRNA and 28S rRNA. The present study provides novel data suggesting a role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced ribosomal production in the development/maintenance of muscle contractures; possibly underlying stunted growth and perimysial extracellular matrix expansion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluating the usability of a single UK community acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation service website: implications for research methodology and website design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Gavin; Groom, Christina

    2010-04-01

    Information provision is an important resource for those living with acquired brain injury (ABI) and their families. Web-based health information services are now common additions to health service provision. Ideally, they should be easy to use and provide useful, relevant and accurate information. ABI injuries do not affect individuals in the same way, and survivors can have a wide range of abilities and impairments. Therefore, any informational resource intended for this group should take account of their needs and help to compensate for their limitations. This pilot study recruited a group of individuals with ABI (of a median Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale rating of "lower moderate disability") who were clients of a UK National Health Service rehabilitation service and asked them to assess a specialised website provided by that service and hosted by their employing Primary Care Trust organisation. Participants completed a practical task and then gave their opinions on various aspects of website design, and content. They were also asked to suggest improvements and recommend additions. Overall the results were favourable. However, improvements in the legibility, layout and writing style were identified. There were also requests to add more information on the existing topics and add additional topics. The discussion also evaluates the utility of the methodology and the implications of the results for others considering constructing their own website.

  15. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Massimiani, Maria Pia; Paravati, Stefano; Agosti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Return to work (RTW) for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology) in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state) at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery) between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM) gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS), which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM-admission FIM)/(Maximum possible FIM-Admission FIM) x 100. The cut-off value (criterion) deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%). Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself.

  16. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury.

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    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Return to work (RTW for people with acquired brain injury (ABI represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS, which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM-admission FIM/(Maximum possible FIM-Admission FIM x 100. The cut-off value (criterion deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%. Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself.

  17. Perceived difficulty in the use of everyday technology: relationships with everyday functioning in people with acquired brain injury with a special focus on returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to explore the relationships between difficulties in the use of everyday technology (ET) and the ability to perform activities of daily life (ADL) in the home and in society and in the workplace in people with acquired brain injury (ABI). The investigation comprises an explorative cross-sectional study of 74 people with ABI. The short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate the participants. Rasch-generated person ability measures of ET use and ADL were used in correlation analyses, in group comparisons by ANOVA and in logistic regressions. Difficulty in the use of ET was significantly correlated with ADL limitations. People who worked full- or part-time had significantly higher ability to use ET than those with some type of full-time, long-term sickness compensation. The ability to use ET, ADL ability and age were significantly related to return to work. The ability to use ET is related to all areas of everyday functioning in people with ABI. Therefore, a patient's ability to use ET needs to be considered in rehabilitation strategies following an ABI to enhance the patient's performance of activities in the home and in society and to support his or her likelihood of returning to work.

  18. Evaluation of a computer-based prompting intervention to improve essay writing in undergraduates with cognitive impairment after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Alexander K; Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Fickas, Stephen F; Horney, Mark A; McIntosh, Kent

    2017-11-06

    This study evaluated a computer-based prompting intervention for improving expository essay writing after acquired brain injury (ABI). Four undergraduate participants aged 18-21 with mild-moderate ABI and impaired fluid cognition at least 6 months post-injury reported difficulty with the writing process after injury. The study employed a non-concurrent multiple probe across participants, in a single-case design. Outcome measures included essay quality scores and number of revisions to writing counted then coded by type using a revision taxonomy. An inter-scorer agreement procedure was completed for quality scores for 50% of essays, with data indicating that agreement exceeded a goal of 85%. Visual analysis of results showed increased essay quality for all participants in intervention phase compared with baseline, maintained 1 week after. Statistical analyses showed statistically significant results for two of the four participants. The authors discuss external cuing for self-monitoring and tapping of existing writing knowledge as possible explanations for improvement. The study provides preliminary evidence that computer-based prompting has potential to improve writing quality for undergraduates with ABI.

  19. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  20. Acquired amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Golden, Hannah L; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of music suggest that a further review of the topic of amusia is timely. In this chapter, we first consider previous taxonomies of amusia and propose a fresh framework for understanding the amusias, essentially as disorders of cognitive information processing. We critically review current cognitive and neuroanatomic findings in the published literature on amusia. We assess the extent to which the clinical and neuropsychologic evidence in amusia can be reconciled; both with the information-processing framework we propose, and with the picture of the brain organization of music and language processing emerging from cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging studies. The balance of evidence suggests that the amusias can be understood as disorders of musical object cognition targeting separable levels of an information-processing hierarchy and underpinned by specific brain network dysfunction. The neuroanatomic associations of the amusias show substantial overlap with brain networks that process speech; however, this convergence leaves scope for separable brain mechanisms based on altered connectivity and dynamics across culprit networks. The study of the amusias contributes to an increasingly complex picture of the musical brain that transcends any simple dichotomy between music and speech or other complex sounds. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ENDURANCE EXERCISE TRAINING AND DIFERULOYL METHANE SUPPLEMENT: CHANGES IN NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR AND OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCED BY LEAD IN RAT BRAIN

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    Valiollah Dabidi Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years it has been known that lead is life-threatening, not only as an air pollutant but also because of it has been associated with several conditions including degenerative disease of the nervous system. In the current study we investigated neuroprotection effects of exercise training and/or curcumin on lead acetate-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus. Forty rats were randomly divided into five groups: 1 lead acetate, 2 curcumin, 3 endurance training, 4 training curcumin, and 5 sham. The rats in the training groups performed treadmill running consisting of 15 to 22 m/min for 25 to 64 min, 5 times a week for 8 weeks. All groups except sham received lead acetate (20 mg/kg, whereas the sham group received curcumin solvent. In addition, the curcumin and training curcumin groups received curcumin solution (30mg/kg intra peritoneally. Chronically administration of lead acetate resulted in a significantly increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA in plasma, but not in hippocampus. In addition, it led to significantly decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in hippocampus and total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels, as compared to sham group. Treadmill running, curcumin supplementation, or both resulted in a significant decrease in MDA levels and significantly increased BDNF and TAC levels, as compared to lead acetate group. These results provide a rationale for an inhibitory role of curcumin and regular exercise in the attenuation of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an independent predictor of poor global outcome in severe traumatic brain injury up to 5 years after discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesinger, Matthew Ryan; Kumar, Raj G; Wagner, Amy K; Puyana, Juan Carlos; Peitzman, Andrew P; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L

    2015-02-01

    Long-term outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) correlate with initial head injury severity and other acute factors. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is a common complication in TBI. Limited information exists regarding the significance of infectious complications on long-term outcomes after TBI. We sought to characterize risks associated with HAP on outcomes 5 years after TBI. This study involved data from the merger of an institutional trauma registry and the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems outcome data. Individuals with severe head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score ≥ 4) who survived to rehabilitation were analyzed. Primary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) at 1, 2, and 5 years. GOSE was dichotomized into low (GOSE score GOSE score ≥ 6). Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds of low GOSE score associated with HAP after controlling for age, sex, head and overall injury severity, cranial surgery, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ventilation days, and other important confounders. A general estimating equation model was used to analyze all outcome observations simultaneously while controlling for within-patient correlation. A total of 141 individuals met inclusion criteria, with a 30% incidence of HAP. Individuals with and without HAP had similar demographic profiles, presenting vitals, head injury severity, and prevalence of cranial surgery. Individuals with HAP had lower presenting GCS score. Logistic regression demonstrated that HAP was independently associated with low GOSE scores at follow-up (1 year: odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.76-23.14; p = 0.005) (2 years: OR, 7.30; 95% CI, 1.87-27.89; p = 0.004) (5-years: OR, 6.89; 95% CI, 1.42-33.39; p = 0.017). Stratifying by GCS score of 8 or lower and early intubation, HAP remained a significant independent predictor of low GOSE score in all strata. In the general estimating equation model, HAP continued to be an independent

  3. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jingfen; Shi, Rong; Chen, Su; Dai, Lihua; Shen, Tian; Feng, Yi; Gu, Pingping; Shariff, Mina; Nguyen, Tuong; Ye, Yeats; Rao, Jianyu; Xing, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47?88), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML) and attention/concentration deficits (SAD) w...

  4. Acquired Methemoglobinaemia

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    Adil Al-Lawati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquired methemoglobinaemia is a relatively rare condition and, therefore infrequently encountered in acute medical practice. Suspicion of the condition may be triggered when the measured PaO2 is ‘out of keeping’ with the oxygen saturations that are discovered with pulse oximetry. We describe two separate cases of acquired methemoglobinaemia secondary to the recreational use of alkyl nitrites (’poppers’. The patients presented at separate times to two different teaching hospitals in London, UK. The similarity of these cases has led the authors to conclude that a raised awareness of this potentially fatal condition, and its association with a widely-available recreational drug, is necessary to ensure a correct and timely diagnosis.

  5. Improving child and parenting outcomes following paediatric acquired brain injury: a randomised controlled trial of Stepping Stones Triple P plus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Felicity L; Whittingham, Koa; Boyd, Roslyn N; McKinlay, Lynne; Sofronoff, Kate

    2014-10-01

    Persistent behavioural difficulties are common following paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI). Parents and families also experience heightened stress, psychological symptoms and burden, and there is evidence of a reciprocal relationship between parent and child functioning, which may be mediated by the adoption of maladaptive parenting practices. Despite this, there is currently a paucity of research in family interventions in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Stepping Stones Triple P: Positive Parenting Program (SSTP), with an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) workshop, in improving child outcomes and parenting practices following paediatric ABI. Fifty-nine parents of children (mean age 7 years, SD 3 years, 1 month; 35 males, 24 females) with ABI (Traumatic injuries 58%, Tumour 17%, Encephalitis or meningitis 15%, Cardiovascular accident 7%, Hypoxia 3%) who were evidencing at least mild behaviour problems were randomly assigned to treatment or care-as-usual conditions over 10 weeks. Mixed-model repeated-measures linear regression analyses were conducted to compare conditions from pre- to postintervention on child behavioural and emotional functioning (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) and dysfunctional parenting style (Parenting Scale). Assessment of maintenance of change was conducted at a 6-month follow-up. The trial was registered on Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ID: ACTRN12610001051033, www.anzctr.org.au). Significant time-by-condition interactions were identified on number and intensity of child behaviour problems, child emotional symptoms and parenting laxness and overreactivity, indicating significant improvements in the treatment condition, with medium-to-large effect sizes. Most improvements were maintained at 6 months. Group parenting interventions incorporating Triple P and ACT may be efficacious in improving child and parenting outcomes following

  6. Performance of a tracheostomy removal protocol for pediatric patients in rehabilitation after acquired brain injury: Factors associated with timing and possibility of decannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Marco; Galbiati, Sara; Locatelli, Federica; Clementi, Emilio; Strazzer, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    We assessed the performance of a tracheostomy decannulation protocol privileging safety over quickness, in pediatric patients undergoing rehabilitation from severe acquired brain injury. We analyzed factors associated with decannulation timing and possibility and examined cases of failure. A safe decannulation protocol should minimize failures. Retrospective observational study. Patients aged 0-17 admitted to rehabilitation with tracheostomy in the last 15 years (n = 123). We collected data on clinical and respiratory conditions at admittance, during the first rehabilitation stay and following follow-up controls. We described the sample and tested associations of several factors with the possibility to decannulate patients during either the first stay or follow-up. We described failures, defined as the cases in which tracheostomy tube had to be placed back immediately or after less than 1 month from removal. At admittance, 93.5% patients were dysphagic and 37.9% had respiratory complications (mainly accumulation of supraglottic secretions). At first discharge, dysphagia was reduced (62.1%) and respiratory complications increased (41.1%). Tracheostomy was removed during the first stay in 55.3% patients, during follow-up in 13%, without failures among the 80 patients who followed the protocol. Four decannulations performed against protocol recommendations resulted in three failures. Decannulation was mainly prevented by the persistence of respiratory complications and dysphagia that constituted a relevant risk of aspiration and suffocation; decannulation was mainly postponed because of respiratory complications and breath-holding spells in very young children. By applying a decannulation protocol that privileges safety over quickness, we encountered no failure. Respiratory complications and dysphagia that lead to supraglottic stagnation, and breath-holding spells, are key elements to consider before performing decannulation in pediatric patients. © 2017 Wiley

  7. Life goal attainment in the adaptation process after acquired brain injury: the influence of self-efficacy and of flexibility and tenacity in goal pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Ingrid; Stapert, Sven; Köhler, Sebastian; Wade, Derick; van Heugten, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    To investigate attainment of important life goals and to examine whether self-efficacy, tenacity in goal pursuit and flexibility in goal adjustment contribute to adaptation by affecting levels of emotional distress and quality of life in patients with newly acquired brain injury. Data were collected from a prospective clinical cohort study of 148 patients assessed after discharge home (mean time since injury = 15 weeks) and one year later. At follow-up, attainment of life goals (set at baseline) and satisfaction with attainment was scored (10-point scale) and patients were asked how they adjusted unattained goals. Emotional distress was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), quality of life with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-9), self-efficacy with the TBI Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SEsx) and tenacity and flexibility with the Assimilative/Accommodative Coping Questionnaire (AACQ). Random effects regression analyses and structural equation modelling were used. In total, only 13 % of initial life goals were achieved in one year. Patients who maintained efforts to reach their original goals had higher average levels of tenacity, but did not differ in level of self-efficacy compared with patients that disengaged. Patients with higher self-efficacy were more successful in attaining important life goals, which correlated with higher quality of life. Patients with higher self-efficacy, higher tenacity in goal pursuit, and higher flexibility in goal adjustment were less emotionally distressed, again correlating with higher quality of life. To optimise adaptation it seems appropriate to promote self-efficacy and both tenacity and flexibility during rehabilitation treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Systematic review of physiotherapy interventions to improve gross motor capacity and performance in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baque, Emmah; Sakzewski, Leanne; Barber, Lee; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the efficacy of physiotherapy interventions to improve gross motor capacity, performance and societal participation in children aged 5-17 years with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, cohort, case series, case-control and case studies were included and classified according to grades of evidence. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using the Downs and Black (D&B) scale and quantitative data was analysed using effect sizes. Two home-based studies investigated functional strength training (one randomized controlled trial, n = 20, level 2b, D&B = 16/32 and one non-randomized self-control study, n = 19, level 4, D&B = 15/32). Four studies evaluated virtual reality including: one pilot study, n = 50, level 4, D&B = 22/32; one single-subject, non-concurrent, randomized multiple baseline study, n = 3, level 4, D&B = 15/32; one case series study, n = 2, level 4, D&B = 15/32; one case study, n = 1, level 4, D&B = 15/32. Effect sizes for the randomized controlled trial ranged between 0.30-1.29 for the Functional Reach and Timed Up and Go outcome measures. There is preliminary evidence to support the efficacy of physiotherapy interventions to improve gross motor outcomes in children with an ABI. Both functional strength training and virtual-reality based therapy are potential treatment options for clinicians to prescribe in either home or clinical settings.

  9. A randomised controlled trial of a web-based multi-modal therapy program to improve executive functioning in children and adolescents with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesana, Adina; Ross, Stephanie; Lloyd, Owen; Whittingham, Koa; Ziviani, Jenny; Ware, Robert S; McKinlay, Lynne; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2017-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of a multi-modal web-based therapy program, Move it to improve it (Mitii™) delivered at home to improve Executive Functioning (EF) in children with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Randomised Waitlist controlled trial. Home environment. Sixty children with an ABI were matched in pairs by age and intelligence quotient then randomised to either 20-weeks of Mitii™ training or 20 weeks of Care As Usual (waitlist control; n=30; 17 males; mean age=11y, 11m (±2y, 6m); Full Scale IQ=76.24±17.84). Fifty-eight children completed baseline assessments (32 males; mean age=11.87±2.47; Full Scale IQ=75.21±16.76). Executive functioning was assessed on four domains: attentional control, cognitive flexibility, goal setting, and information processing using subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (D-KEFS), Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT), Tower of London (TOL), and Test of Everyday Attention for Children (Tea-Ch). Executive functioning performance in everyday life was assessed via parent questionnaire (Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning; BRIEF). No differences were observed at baseline measures. Groups were compared at 20-weeks using linear regression with no significant differences found between groups on all measures of EF. Out of a potential total dose of 60 hours, children in the Mitii™ group completed a mean of 17 hours of Mitii™ intervention. Results indicate no additional benefit to receiving Mitii™ compared to standard care. Mitii™, in its current form, was not shown to improve EF in children with ABI.

  10. Response to HER2 Inhibition in a Patient With Brain Metastasis With EGFR TKI Acquired Resistance and an HER2 Amplification

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    Arenda D. Meedendorp

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man was referred to our university hospital for treatment of advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung after disease progression on two lines of EGFR TKI and one line of chemotherapy. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis upon progression showed an HER2 amplification. At our weekly Molecular Tumor Board (MTB, a decision was made to treat this patient with afatinib, which resulted in a partial response. However, progression was observed with a facial nerve paresis due to a metastasis in the skull. A biopsy of a location in the thorax revealed the presence of an EGFR-T790M mutation associated with acquired resistance, after which treatment with osimertinib was started. After 6 months, disease progression was observed, and a new biopsy was taken from the pelvic bone, which revealed the original amplification of HER2 together with the EGFR-L858R mutation, the EGFR-T790M mutation was not detected. The MTB decided to treat the patient with trastuzumab/paclitaxel. A partial response was observed in different bone lesions, while the skull metastasis with ingrowth in the brain remained stable for 6 months. Because of progression of the bone metastases after 6 months, a biopsy of a lesion in the thorax wall was taken. In this lesion, the EGFR-T790M mutation could be detected again. The MTB advised to start treatment with a combination of osimertinib and afatinib. This resulted in an impressive clinical improvement and a partial response of the bone metastases on the most recent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computer tomography-scan. In conclusion, adjusting treatment to the mutational make-up of the tumor is a great challenge. For optimal treatment response multiple biopsies and re-biopsy upon progression are imperative. As more genes are investigated, treatment decision becomes increasingly difficult, therefore, expert opinions from an MTB is essential.

  11. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia is an Independent Predictor of Poor Global Outcome in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury up to 5 Years after Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesinger, Matthew R.; Kumar, Raj G.; Wagner, Amy K.; Puyana, Juan C.; Peitzman, Andrew P.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Long-term outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) correlate with initial head injury severity and other acute factors. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is a common complication in TBI. Little information exists regarding the significance of infectious complications on long-term outcomes post-TBI. We sought to characterize risks associated with HAP on outcomes 5 years post-TBI. Methods Ddata from the merger of an institutional trauma registry and the TBI Model Systems outcome data. Individuals with severe head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale≥4), who survived to rehabilitation were analyzed. Primary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Scaled-Extended (GOSE) at 1, 2, and 5 years. GOSE was dichotomized into LOW (GOSEGOSE≥6). Logistic regression was utilized to determine adjusted odds of LOW-GOSE associated with HAP after controlling for age, sex, head and overall injury severity, cranial surgery, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), ventilation days, and other important confounders. A general estimating equation (GEE) model was used to analyze all outcome observations simultaneously while controlling for within-patient correlation. Results A total of 141 individuals met inclusion criteria, with a 30% incidence of HAP. Individuals with and without HAP had similar demographic profiles, presenting vitals, head injury severity, and prevalence of cranial surgery. Individuals with HAP had lower presenting GCS. Logistic regression demonstrated that HAP was independently associated with LOW-GOSE scores at follow-up (1year: OR=6.39, 95%CI: 1.76-23.14, p=0.005; 2-years: OR=7.30, 95%CI 1.87-27.89, p=0.004; 5-years: OR=6.89, 95%CI: 1.42-33.39, p=0.017). Stratifying by GCS≤8 and early intubation, HAP remained a significant independent predictor of LOW-GOSE in all strata. In the GEE model, HAP continued to be an independent predictor of LOW-GOSE (OR: 4.59; 95%CI: 1.82-11.60′ p=0.001). Conclusion HAP is independently associated with poor outcomes in severe-TBI extending 5

  12. Effectiveness of a Wii balance board-based system (eBaViR for balance rehabilitation: a pilot randomized clinical trial in patients with acquired brain injury

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    Alcañiz Mariano

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquired brain injury (ABI is the main cause of death and disability among young adults. In most cases, survivors can experience balance instability, resulting in functional impairments that are associated with diminished health-related quality of life. Traditional rehabilitation therapy may be tedious. This can reduce motivation and adherence to the treatment and thus provide a limited benefit to patients with balance disorders. We present eBaViR (easy Balance Virtual Rehabilitation, a system based on the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board® (WBB, which has been designed by clinical therapists to improve standing balance in patients with ABI through motivational and adaptative exercises. We hypothesize that eBaViR, is feasible, safe and potentially effective in enhancing standing balance. Methods In this contribution, we present a randomized and controlled single blinded study to assess the influence of a WBB-based virtual rehabilitation system on balance rehabilitation with ABI hemiparetic patients. This study describes the eBaViR system and evaluates its effectiveness considering 20 one-hour-sessions of virtual reality rehabilitation (n = 9 versus standard rehabilitation (n = 8. Effectiveness was evaluated by means of traditional static and dynamic balance scales. Results The final sample consisted of 11 men and 6 women. Mean ± SD age was 47.3 ± 17.8 and mean ± SD chronicity was 570.9 ± 313.2 days. Patients using eBaViR had a significant improvement in static balance (p = 0.011 in Berg Balance Scale and p = 0.011 in Anterior Reaches Test compared to patients who underwent traditional therapy. Regarding dynamic balance, the results showed significant improvement over time in all these measures, but no significant group effect or group-by-time interaction was detected for any of them, which suggests that both groups improved in the same way. There were no serious adverse events during treatment in either group. Conclusions The

  13. Effectiveness of a Wii balance board-based system (eBaViR) for balance rehabilitation: a pilot randomized clinical trial in patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Gómez, José-Antonio; Lloréns, Roberto; Alcañiz, Mariano; Colomer, Carolina

    2011-05-23

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the main cause of death and disability among young adults. In most cases, survivors can experience balance instability, resulting in functional impairments that are associated with diminished health-related quality of life. Traditional rehabilitation therapy may be tedious. This can reduce motivation and adherence to the treatment and thus provide a limited benefit to patients with balance disorders. We present eBaViR (easy Balance Virtual Rehabilitation), a system based on the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board® (WBB), which has been designed by clinical therapists to improve standing balance in patients with ABI through motivational and adaptative exercises. We hypothesize that eBaViR, is feasible, safe and potentially effective in enhancing standing balance. In this contribution, we present a randomized and controlled single blinded study to assess the influence of a WBB-based virtual rehabilitation system on balance rehabilitation with ABI hemiparetic patients. This study describes the eBaViR system and evaluates its effectiveness considering 20 one-hour-sessions of virtual reality rehabilitation (n = 9) versus standard rehabilitation (n = 8). Effectiveness was evaluated by means of traditional static and dynamic balance scales. The final sample consisted of 11 men and 6 women. Mean ± SD age was 47.3 ± 17.8 and mean ± SD chronicity was 570.9 ± 313.2 days. Patients using eBaViR had a significant improvement in static balance (p = 0.011 in Berg Balance Scale and p = 0.011 in Anterior Reaches Test) compared to patients who underwent traditional therapy. Regarding dynamic balance, the results showed significant improvement over time in all these measures, but no significant group effect or group-by-time interaction was detected for any of them, which suggests that both groups improved in the same way. There were no serious adverse events during treatment in either group. The results suggest that eBaViR represents a safe and effective

  14. Oral leucine supplementation is sensed by the brain but neither reduces food intake nor induces an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus.

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    Thais T Zampieri

    Full Text Available Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity.

  15. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates microglial-induced inflammation by inhibiting the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangrong; Wu, Shukai; Chen, Chunnuan; Xie, Baoyuan; Fang, Zhongning; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Junyan; Fu, Huangde; He, Hefan

    2017-07-24

    Microglial activation and the subsequent inflammatory response in the central nervous system play important roles in secondary damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, an important mediator in late inflammatory responses, interacts with transmembrane receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate downstream signaling pathways, such as the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway, leading to a cascade amplification of inflammatory responses, which are related to neuronal damage after TBI. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) is a commonly used clinical immunonutrient, which has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of ω-3 PUFA on HMGB1 expression and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway are not clear. The Feeney DM TBI model was adopted to induce brain injury in rats. Modified neurological severity scores, brain water content, and Nissl staining were employed to determine the neuroprotective effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Assessment of microglial activation in lesioned sites and protein markers for proinflammatory, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, and HMGB1 were used to evaluate neuroinflammatory responses and anti-inflammation effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis were used to detect HMGB1 nuclear translocation, secretion, and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to evaluate the effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation and gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroinflammatory response after TBI. It was found that ω-3 PUFA supplementation inhibited TBI-induced microglial activation and expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ), reduced brain edema, decreased neuronal apoptosis, and improved neurological

  16. Changes in regional brain monoaminergic activity and temporary down-regulation in stress response from dietary supplementation with l-tryptophan in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basic, D.; Schjolden, J.; Krogdahl, A.

    2013-01-01

    . Previous studies in teleosts demonstrate that 7 d of dietary administration with l-tryptophan (Trp), the direct precursor of 5-HT, suppresses the endocrine stress response. The present study investigated how long the suppressive effects of a Trp-enriched feed regimen, at doses corresponding to two, three......The brain monoamines serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and dopamine (DA) both play an integrative role in behavioural and neuroendocrine responses to challenges, and comparative models suggest common mechanisms for dietary modulation of transmission by these signal substances in vertebrates...... or four times the Trp levels in commercial feed, last in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) when the fish are reintroduced to a diet with standard amino acid composition. We also wanted to determine whether Trp supplementation induced changes in brain monoaminergic neurochemistry in those forebrain...

  17. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, I.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHAcontaining lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC, obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born from female rats supplemented with DHA-LPC before and during pregnancy. We also evaluated the effect of DHA supplementation on learning and memory capabilities of pups through the Skinner test for operant conditioning. Female Wistar rats received 40-day supplementation of DHA-LPC (8 mg DHA/kg b.w/daily., before and during pregnancy. After delivery, plasma, erythrocyte, liver, and adipose tissue DHA and plasma choline were analyzed. Brains from 60 day-old pups separated into frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus, and occipital cortex, were assessed for DHA, acetylcholine, and acetylcholine transferase (CAT activity. Pups were subjected to the Skinner box test. DHA-LPC supplementation produces higher choline and liver DHA contents in the mother’s plasma and increases the pups’ DHA and acetylcholine in the cerebellum and hippocampus. CAT was not modified by supplementation. The Skinner test shows that pups born from DHA-LPC supplemented mothers exhibit better scores of learning and memory than the controls. Conclusion: DHA-LPC may be an adequate form for DHA supplementation during the perinatal period.El ácido docosahexaenoico (DHA que requiere el feto y el recién nacido lo aporta la madre desde sus reservas y la dieta, por lo cual se sugiere suplementar a la madre con DHA. No hay consenso sobre la mejor forma de suplementación. Proponemos que un lisofosfolípido que contiene DHA y colina (DHA-LPC obtenido de huevos con alto contenido de DHA es

  18. Fos Protein Expression in Olfactory-Related Brain Areas after Learning and after Reactivation of a Slowly Acquired Olfactory Discrimination Task in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullet, Florence; Lienard, Fabienne; Datiche, Frederique; Cattarelli, Martine

    2005-01-01

    Fos protein immunodetection was used to investigate the neuronal activation elicited in some olfactory-related areas after either learning of an olfactory discrimination task or its reactivation 10 d later. Trained rats (T) progressively acquired the association between one odor of a pair and water-reward in a four-arm maze. Two groups of…

  19. Effects of Six-Week Ginkgo biloba Supplementation on Aerobic Performance, Blood Pro/Antioxidant Balance, and Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Physically Active Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sadowska-Krępa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of Ginkgo biloba leaves, a natural source of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds, are commonly used as therapeutic agents for the improvement of both cognitive and physiological performance. The present study was aimed to test the effects of a six-week supplementation with 160 mg/day of a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba or a matching placebo on aerobic performance, blood antioxidant capacity, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level in healthy, physically active young men, randomly allocated to two groups (n = 9 each. At baseline, as well as on the day following the treatment, the participants performed an incremental cycling test for the assessment of maximal oxygen uptake. Venous blood samples taken at rest, then immediately post-test and following 1 h of recovery, were analyzed for activities of antioxidant enzymes and plasma concentrations of non-enzymatic antioxidants, total phenolics, uric acid, lipid peroxidation products, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Our results show that six weeks’ supplementation with Ginkgo biloba extract in physically active young men may provide some marginal improvements in their endurance performance expressed as VO2max and blood antioxidant capacity, as evidenced by specific biomarkers, and elicit somewhat better neuroprotection through increased exercise-induced production of BDNF.

  20. Late Maternal Folate Supplementation Rescues from Methyl Donor Deficiency-Associated Brain Defects by Restoring Let-7 and miR-34 Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, Andréa; Kerek, Racha; Pourié, Grégory; Helle, Déborah; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine

    2017-09-01

    The micronutrients folate and vitamin B12 are essential for the proper development of the central nervous system, and their deficiency during pregnancy has been associated with a wide range of disorders. They act as methyl donors in the one-carbon metabolism which critically influences epigenetic mechanisms. In order to depict further underlying mechanisms, we investigated the role of let-7 and miR-34, two microRNAs regulated by methylation, on a rat model of maternal deficiency. In several countries, public health policies recommend periconceptional supplementation with folic acid. However, the question about the duration and periodicity of supplementation remains. We therefore tested maternal supply (3 mg/kg/day) during the last third of gestation from embryonic days (E) 13 to 20. Methyl donor deficiency-related developmental disorders at E20, including cerebellar and interhemispheric suture defects and atrophy of selective cerebral layers, were associated with increased brain expression (by 2.5-fold) of let-7a and miR-34a, with subsequent downregulation of their regulatory targets such as Trim71 and Notch signaling partners, respectively. These processes could be reversed by siRNA strategy in differentiating neuroprogenitors lacking folate, with improvement of their morphological characteristics. While folic acid supplementation helped restoring the levels of let-7a and miR-34a and their downstream targets, it led to a reduction of structural and functional defects taking place during the perinatal period. Our data outline the potential role of let-7 and miR-34 and their related signaling pathways in the developmental defects following gestational methyl donor deficiency and support the likely usefulness of late folate supplementation in at risk women.

  1. Healthy body, healthy mind: A mixed methods study of outcomes, barriers and supports for exercise by people who have chronic moderate-to-severe acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Laura S; Charrette, Ann L; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Doucett, Julia M; Fong, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Few people with chronic moderate-to-severe brain injury are following recommended physical activity guidelines. Investigate effects of planned, systematic physical activity while cultivating social and emotional well-being of people with chronic moderate-to-severe brain injury. Moderate-to-intensive physical activity would be associated with improvements in impairment and activity limitation measures (endurance, mobility, gait speed) immediately post-intervention and six weeks later (study week 12). The intervention was a single group pre-/post-intervention study with 14 people with chronic moderate-to-severe brain injury who live in brain injury group homes and exercised 60-90 min, 3 days per week for 6 weeks at a maximum heart rate of 50-80%. Pre-post measures (administered weeks 0, 6 and 12) were the 6 Minute Walk Test, High-level Mobility Assessment Tool and 10 Meter Walk Test. The qualitative component used a brief survey and semi-structured interview guide with participants, family members, and staff. Following program completion, post-intervention group changes were noted on all outcome measures and greater than minimal detectable change for people with brain injury. Three transitioned from low to high ambulatory status and maintained this change at 12 weeks. During interviews, participants agreed the program was stimulating. More than eighty percent liked working out in a group and felt better being active. Program impact included physical, cognitive and social/emotional aspects. Social aspects (group format, trainers) were highly motivating and supported by residents, family, and staff. Investments in transportation and recruiting and training interns to assist participants are critical to program sustainability and expansion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Microdialysate concentration changes do not provide sufficient information to evaluate metabolic effects of lactate supplementation in brain-injured patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienel, G. A.; Rothman, D. L.; Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia an....... In such cases, lactate will not be metabolizable and lactate flooding may be harmful. More rigorous approaches are required to evaluate metabolic and physiological effects of administration of hypertonic sodium lactate to brain-injured patients.......Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia...... and deficits in oxidative metabolism, respectively. In addition, patterns of metabolite concentrations can distinguish between ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction, and are helpful to choose and evaluate therapy. Increased intracranial pressure can be life-threatening after brain injury, and hypertonic...

  3. Effect of type of cue, type of response, time delay and two different ongoing tasks on prospective memory functioning after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Sarah A; Buckheit, Carol A; Waxman, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Failures of prospective memory (PM) are one of the most frequent, and least studied, sequelae of brain injury. PM, also referred to as memory for intentions, is the ability to remember to carry out a future task. Successful completion of a PM task requires the ability to monitor time, keep the action to be performed periodically in awareness, remember the task to be performed, and initiate the action. Although PM has been shown to be a common difficulty after brain injury, it remains unknown which aspects of performance are impaired. In this study, the performance of 25 individuals with brain injury and that of 25 healthy participants were measured separately on the following variables: time until completion of the task, difficulty of the ongoing task being performed while waiting, whether the task to be performed is an action or is verbal, and whether the cue to perform the task is the passing of a particular amount of time (e.g., 10 minutes) or is an external cue (e.g., an alarm sounding). Individuals with brain injury demonstrated impairment compared to healthy adults on virtually all variables. PM performance was also compared to a battery of standard neuropsychological measures of attention, memory, and executive functions, and to self-report measures of PM functioning, in order to determine the underlying cognitive deficits responsible for poor PM performance, if any. PM performance was correlated with measures of executive functioning but not to self-report measures of PM functioning. Implications are discussed in terms of cognitive rehabilitation recommendations.

  4. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as lysophosphatidylcholine, but not as free acid, enriches brain DHA and improves memory in adult mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sugasini, Dhavamani; Thomas, Riya; Yalagala, Poorna C. R.; Tai, Leon M.; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2017-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is uniquely concentrated in the brain, and is essential for its function, but must be mostly acquired from diet. Most of the current supplements of DHA, including fish oil and krill oil, do not significantly increase brain DHA, because they are hydrolyzed to free DHA and are absorbed as triacylglycerol, whereas the transporter at blood brain barrier is specific for phospholipid form of DHA. Here we show that oral administration of DHA to normal adult mice as lysopho...

  5. Goal Management Training Combined With External Cuing as a Means to Improve Emotional Regulation, Psychological Functioning, and Quality of Life in Patients With Acquired Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornås, Sveinung; Løvstad, Marianne; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Schanke, Anne-Kristine; Stubberud, Jan

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether goal management training (GMT) expanded to include external cuing and an emotional regulation module is associated with improved emotional regulation, psychological functioning, and quality of life (QOL) after chronic acquired brain injury (ABI). Randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment at baseline, posttraining, and 6-month follow-up. Outpatient. Persons with ABI and executive dysfunction (N=70; 64% traumatic brain injury; 52% men; mean age ± SD, 43±13y; mean time since injury ± SD, 8.1±9.4y). Eight sessions of GMT in groups, including a new module addressing emotional regulation, and external cuing. A psychoeducative control condition (Brain Health Workshop) was matched on amount of training, therapist contact, and homework. Emotional regulation was assessed with the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust Regulation of Emotions Questionnaire, the Emotional Control subscale and the Emotion Regulation factor (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version), and the Positive and Negative Affect subscales from the Dysexecutive Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25) and QOL (Quality of Life After Brain Injury Scale). Findings indicated beneficial effects of GMT on emotional regulation skills in everyday life and in QOL 6 months posttreatment. No intervention effects on measures of psychological distress were registered. GMT is a promising intervention for improving emotional regulation after ABI, even in the chronic phase. More research using objective measures of emotional regulation is needed to investigate the efficacy of this type of training. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does supplementation of contrast MR imaging with thallium-201 brain SPECT improve differentiation between benign and malignant ring-like contrast-enhanced cerebral lesions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Sakata, Ikuko; Iwasaki, Yoshie; Kosuda, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could supplement magnetic resonance (MR) imaging diagnostic information by visual comparison of two separate data sets from patients with ring-like contrast-enhanced cerebral lesions. A combination of MR imaging and 201 Tl brain SPECT sets obtained from 13 patients (10 men, 3 women) ranging in age from 26 years to 86 years (mean 61.0 years) were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 12 patients had a solitary lesion, and the others had multiple lesions. All but two intracranial foci were pathologically confirmed. The final diagnoses were six glioblastomas, two cerebral metastases from lung cancer, and one each of abscess, resolving hematoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma, toxoplasmosis, and radiation necrosis. The two separate image formats (MR images and SPECT) were shown to ten readers with practical experience. All of the MR images for each patient were shown to each reader first. After interpreting them, the readers were shown the SPECT images. Images were scored in terms of how benign or malignant the foci were on a 5-point scale from ''definitely benign'' to ''definitely malignant.'' The improvement in the performance of all ten readers was from 67.7% to 93.8% in mean accuracy (P=0.0028) and from 0.730 to 0.971 in mean Az value (P=0.0069) after they were shown the 201 Tl brain SPECT images. 201 Tl brain SPECT should substantially increase confidence in the diagnosis of intracranial lesions with ring-like contrast enhancement when MR imaging does not permit differentiation between benign and malignant disease. (author)

  7. Increased 3-nitrotyrosine levels in mitochondrial membranes and impaired respiratory chain activity in brain regions of adult female rats submitted to daily vitamin A supplementation for 2 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Morrone, Maurílio; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2011-10-10

    Vitamin A supplementation among women is a common habit worldwide in an attempt to slow aging progression due to the antioxidant potential attributed to retinoids. Nonetheless, vitamin A elicits a myriad of side effects that result from either therapeutic or inadvertent intake at varying doses for different periods. The mechanism behind such effects remains to be elucidated. In this regard, we performed the present work aiming to investigate the effects of vitamin A supplementation at 100, 200, or 500IU/kgday(-1) for 2 months on female rat brain, analyzing tissue lipid peroxidation levels, antioxidant enzyme activities (both Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase - SOD - and Mn-SOD); glutathione S-transferase (GST) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme activity; mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and redox parameters in mitochondrial membranes, as well as quantifying α- and β-synucleins, β-amyloid peptide(1-40), immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein/78kDa glucose-regulated protein (BiP/GRP78), receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), D2 receptor, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) contents in rat frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum. We observed increased lipid peroxidation marker levels, altered Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD enzyme activities, mitochondrial nitrosative stress, and impaired respiratory chain activity in such brain regions. On the other hand, we did not find any change in MAO and GST enzyme activities, and on α- and β-synucleins, β-amyloid peptide(1-40), GRP78/BiP, RAGE, D2 receptor, and TNF-α contents. Importantly, we did not observed any evidence regarding an antioxidant effect of such vitamin at low doses in this experimental model. The use of vitamin A as an antioxidant therapy among women needs to be reexamined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A multi-ingredient dietary supplement abolishes large-scale brain cell loss, improves sensory function, and prevents neuronal atrophy in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, J A; Aksenov, V; Samigullina, R; Aksenov, S; Rodgers, W H; Rollo, C D; Boreham, D R

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) are a recognized model of accelerated aging with characteristics including chronic oxidative stress, reduced longevity, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, muscle wasting, and elevated inflammatory processes. Growth hormone/IGF-1 activate the Target of Rapamycin known to promote aging. TGM particularly express severe cognitive decline. We previously reported that a multi-ingredient dietary supplement (MDS) designed to offset five mechanisms associated with aging extended longevity, ameliorated cognitive deterioration and significantly reduced age-related physical deterioration in both normal mice and TGM. Here we report that TGM lose more than 50% of cells in midbrain regions, including the cerebellum and olfactory bulb. This is comparable to severe Alzheimer's disease and likely explains their striking age-related cognitive impairment. We also demonstrate that the MDS completely abrogates this severe brain cell loss, reverses cognitive decline and augments sensory and motor function in aged mice. Additionally, histological examination of retinal structure revealed markers consistent with higher numbers of photoreceptor cells in aging and supplemented mice. We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:382-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Damage Control Resuscitation Supplemented with Vasopressin in a Severe Polytrauma Model with Traumatic Brain Injury and Uncontrolled Internal Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J Michael; Wang, Xu; St John, Alexander E; Lim, Esther B; Stern, Susan A; White, Nathan J

    2018-03-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of traumatic death worldwide and particularly on the battlefield. They are especially challenging when present simultaneously (polytrauma), and clear blood pressure end points during fluid resuscitation are not well described for this situation. The goal of this study is to evaluate for any benefit of increasing blood pressure using a vasopressor on brain blood flow during initial fluid resuscitation in a swine polytrauma model. We used a swine polytrauma model with simultaneous TBI, femur fracture, and HS with uncontrolled noncompressible internal bleeding from an aortic tear injury. Five animals were assigned to each of three experimental groups (hydroxyethyl starch only [HES], HES + 0.4 U/kg vasopressin, and no fluid resuscitation [No Fluids]). Fluids were given as two 10 mL/kg boluses according to tactical field care guidelines. Primary outcomes were mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and brain blood flow at 60 min. Secondary outcomes were blood flows in the heart, intestine, and kidney; arterial blood lactate level; and survival at 6 hr. Organ blood flow was measured using injection of colored microspheres. Five animals were tested in each of the three groups. There was a statistically significant increase in MAP with vasopressin compared with other experimental groups, but no significant increase in brain blood flow during the first 60 min of resuscitation. The vasopressin group also exhibited greater total internal hemorrhage volume and rate. There was no difference in survival at 6 hours. In this experimental swine polytrauma model, increasing blood pressure with vasopressin did not improve brain perfusion, likely due to increased internal hemorrhage. Effective hemostasis should remain the top priority for field treatment of the polytrauma casualty with TBI.

  10. Repeatability of Brain Volume Measurements Made with the Atlas-based Method from T1-weighted Images Acquired Using a 0.4 Tesla Low Field MR Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Suzuki, Makoto; Mizukami, Shinya; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Fukuda, Michinari; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-10-11

    An understanding of the repeatability of measured results is important for both the atlas-based and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) methods of magnetic resonance (MR) brain volumetry. However, many recent studies that have investigated the repeatability of brain volume measurements have been performed using static magnetic fields of 1-4 tesla, and no study has used a low-strength static magnetic field. The aim of this study was to investigate the repeatability of measured volumes using the atlas-based method and a low-strength static magnetic field (0.4 tesla). Ten healthy volunteers participated in this study. Using a 0.4 tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner and a quadrature head coil, three-dimensional T 1 -weighted images (3D-T 1 WIs) were obtained from each subject, twice on the same day. VBM8 software was used to construct segmented normalized images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) images]. The regions-of-interest (ROIs) of GM, WM, CSF, hippocampus (HC), orbital gyrus (OG), and cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL) were generated using WFU PickAtlas. The percentage change was defined as[100 × (measured volume with first segmented image - mean volume in each subject)/(mean volume in each subject)]The average percentage change was calculated as the percentage change in the 6 ROIs of the 10 subjects. The mean of the average percentage changes for each ROI was as follows: GM, 0.556%; WM, 0.324%; CSF, 0.573%; HC, 0.645%; OG, 1.74%; and CPL, 0.471%. The average percentage change was higher for the orbital gyrus than for the other ROIs. We consider that repeatability of the atlas-based method is similar between 0.4 and 1.5 tesla MR scanners. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that the level of repeatability with a 0.4 tesla MR scanner is adequate for the estimation of brain volume change by the atlas-based method.

  11. Sports Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sports Supplements KidsHealth / For Teens / Sports Supplements What's in ... really work? And are they safe? What Are Sports Supplements? Sports supplements (also called ergogenic aids ) are ...

  12. Utilidad de un programa de rehabilitación neuropsicológica de la memoria en daño cerebral adquirido (Usefulness of a Program of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation of Memory in Acquired Brain Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José De los Reyes-Aragón

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Este estudio evaluó la utilidad de un programa de rehabilitación cognitiva y funcional de memoria para pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido. Diez participantes con deterioro cognitivo leve o moderado participaron en el estudio, cinco de ellos asistieron durante cuatro meses a un programa semanal de rehabilitación, mientras que los otros cinco no recibieron intervención neuropsicológica. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo de rehabilitación mejoró la puntuación en la Escala de Memoria de Wechsler III. De igual forma, se encontró que la puntuación en la escala de fallos de memoria de la vida diaria solo mejoró en el grupo que recibió rehabilitación. Los resultados sugieren que el programa de rehabilitación de la memoria resulta útil en el tratamiento de las secuelas tanto cognitivas como funcionales resultantes del daño cerebral adquirido. ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the usefulness of a cognitive and functional rehabilitation of memory program for patients with acquired brain injury. Ten participants with mild- to -moderate cognitive impairment participated in the study; five of them for four months attended a weekly rehabilitation program, while the other five did not receive any neuropsychological intervention. The results showed that the rehabilitation group improved the score in the Wechsler III Memory Scale. Similarly, it was found that the score on the memory scale of failure of the daily life only improved in the group that received rehabilitation. The results suggest that memory rehabilitation program is useful in the treatment of both cognitive and functional sequels resulting from acquired brain damage.

  13. Chronic pyruvate supplementation increases exploratory activity and brain energy reserves in young and middle-aged mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Hennariikka; Leinonen, Henri; Puurula, Mari

    2016-01-01

    to brain and thereby attenuate aging- or AD-related cognitive impairment. Mice received ~800 mg/kg/day Na-pyruvate in their chow for 2-6 months. In middle-aged wild-type mice and in 6.5-month-old APP/PS1 mice, pyruvate facilitated spatial learning and increased exploration of a novel odor. However......, in passive avoidance task for fear memory, the treatment group was clearly impaired. Independent of age, long-term pyruvate increased explorative behavior, which likely explains the paradoxical impairment in passive avoidance. We also assessed pyruvate effects on body weight, muscle force, and endurance...

  14. O2 supplementation to secure the near-infrared spectroscopy determined brain and muscle oxygenation in vascular surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Secher, Niels H; Eiberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses three questions for securing tissue oxygenation in brain (rScO2) and muscle (SmO2) for 100 patients (age 71 ± 6 years; mean ± SD) undergoing vascular surgery: (i) Does preoxygenation (inhaling 100% oxygen before anesthesia) increase tissue oxygenation, (ii) Does inhalation...... of 70% oxygen during surgery prevent a critical reduction in rScO2 (patients and the intraoperative inspired oxygen fraction was set to 0.70 while tissue...... oxygenation was determined by INVOS 5100C. Preoxygenation increased rScO2 (from 65 ± 8 to 72 ± 9%; P patients. Following anesthesia and tracheal intubation an eventual change...

  15. Combining Exergame Training with Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Study assessing the Effect on Neuronal Structure/Function in the Elderly Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schättin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A common problem in the older population is the risk of falling that might lead to injury, immobility, and reduced survival. Age-related neuronal changes, e.g. decline in grey- and white-matter, affect neuronal, cognitive, and motor functioning. The improvement of these factors might decrease fall events in elderly. Studies showed that the sole administration of video game-based physical exercise, a so-called exergame, or omega-3 fatty acid (FA may improve motor and/or cognitive functioning through neuronal changes in the brain of older adults. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of a combination of exergame training with omega-3 FA supplementation on the elderly brain. We hypothesize that an intervention using a combination approach differently effects on the neuronal structure and function of the elderly’s brain as compared to the sole administration of exergame training. The study is a parallel, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial lasting 26 weeks. Sixty autonomous living, non-smoking, and right-handed healthy older (>65 years adults who live independently or in a senior residency are included, randomized, and allocated to one of two study groups. The experimental group receives a daily amount of 13.5ml fish oil (including 2.9g of omega-3 FA, whereas the control group receives a daily amount of 13.5ml olive oil for 26 weeks. After 16 weeks, both groups start with an exergame training program three times per week. Measurements are performed on three time-points by treatment blinded investigators: pre-intervention measurement, blood sample after 16 week, and post-intervention measurements. The main outcomes are motor evoked potentials of the right M. tibialis anterior (transcranial magnetic stimulation and response-related potentials (electroencephalography during a cognitive test. For secondary outcomes, reaction times during cognitive tests and spatio-temporal parameters during gait performance are measured. Statistics

  16. Evaluation of Tetrahydrobiopterin Therapy with Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation in Phenylketonuria: Effects on Potential Peripheral Biomarkers, Melatonin and Dopamine, for Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Yano

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is due to a defective hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine (Phe hydroxylase. Transport of the precursor amino acids from blood into the brain for serotonin and dopamine synthesis is reported to be inhibited by high blood Phe concentrations. Deficiencies of serotonin and dopamine are involved in neurocognitive dysfunction in PKU.(1 To evaluate the effects of sapropterin (BH4 and concurrent use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA on the peripheral biomarkers, melatonin and dopamine with the hypothesis they reflect brain serotonin and dopamine metabolism. (2 To evaluate synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA. (3 To determine the effects of blood Phe concentrations on the peripheral biomarkers concentrations.Nine adults with PKU completed our study consisting of four 4-week phases: (1 LNAA supplementation, (2 Washout, (3 BH4 therapy, and (4 LNAA with BH4 therapy. An overnight protocol measured plasma amino acids, serum melatonin, and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine in first void urine after each phase.(1 Three out of nine subjects responded to BH4. A significant increase of serum melatonin levels was observed in BH4 responders with decreased blood Phe concentration. No significant change in melatonin, dopamine or Phe levels was observed with BH4 in the subjects as a whole. (2 Synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA were observed in serum melatonin in BH4 responders. (3 The relationship between serum melatonin and Phe showed a significant negative slope (p = 0.0005 with a trend toward differing slopes among individual subjects (p = 0.066. There was also a negative association overall between blood Phe and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine (P = 0.040 and 0.047.Blood Phe concentrations affected peripheral monoamine neurotransmitter biomarker concentrations differently in each individual with PKU. Melatonin levels increased with BH4 therapy only when blood Phe decreased. Monitoring peripheral neurotransmitter metabolites may assist in

  17. The Preventive Effect of Calcium Supplementation on Weak Bones Caused by the Interaction of Exercise and Food Restriction in Young Female Rats During the Period from Acquiring Bone Mass to Maintaining Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yuki; Agata, Umon; Kakutani, Yuya; Kato, Shoyo; Noma, Yuichi; Hattori, Satoshi; Ogata, Hitomi; Ezawa, Ikuko; Omi, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing calcium (Ca) intake is important for female athletes with a risk of weak bone caused by inadequate food intake. The aim of the present study was to examine the preventive effect of Ca supplementation on low bone strength in young female athletes with inadequate food intake, using the rats as an experimental model. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: the sedentary and ad libitum feeding group (SED), voluntary running exercise and ad libitum feeding group (EX), voluntary running exercise and 30% food restriction group (EX-FR), and a voluntary running exercise, 30% food-restricted and high-Ca diet group (EX-FR+Ca). To Ca supplementation, we used 1.2% Ca diet as "high-Ca diet" that contains two-fold Ca of normal Ca diet. The experiment lasted for 12 weeks. As a result, the energy availability, internal organ weight, bone strength, bone mineral density, and Ca absorption in the EX-FR group were significantly lower than those in the EX group. The bone strength and Ca absorption in the EX-FR+Ca group were significantly higher than those in the EX-FR group. However, the bone strength in the EX-FR+Ca group did not reach that in the EX group. These results suggested that Ca supplementation had a positive effect on bone strength, but the effect was not sufficient to prevent lower bone strength caused by food restriction in young female athletes.

  18. Prospective longitudinal evaluation of the effect of deployment-acquired traumatic brain injury on posttraumatic stress and related disorders: results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray B; Kessler, Ronald C; Heeringa, Steven G; Jain, Sonia; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Sun, Xiaoying; Thomas, Michael L; Ursano, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for deleterious mental health and functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the strength and specificity of the association between deployment-acquired TBI and subsequent posttraumatic stress and related disorders among U.S. Army personnel. A prospective, longitudinal survey of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams was conducted 1-2 months prior to an average 10-month deployment to Afghanistan (T0), upon redeployment to the United States (T1), approximately 3 months later (T2), and approximately 9 months later (T3). Outcomes of interest were 30-day prevalence postdeployment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, and suicidality, as well as presence and severity of postdeployment PTSD symptoms. Complete information was available for 4,645 soldiers. Approximately one in five soldiers reported exposure to mild (18.0%) or more-than-mild (1.2%) TBI(s) during the index deployment. Even after adjusting for other risk factors (e.g., predeployment mental health status, severity of deployment stress, prior TBI history), deployment-acquired TBI was associated with elevated adjusted odds of PTSD and generalized anxiety disorder at T2 and T3 and of major depressive episode at T2. Suicidality risk at T2 appeared similarly elevated, but this association did not reach statistical significance. The findings highlight the importance of surveillance efforts to identify soldiers who have sustained TBIs and are therefore at risk for an array of postdeployment adverse mental health outcomes, including but not limited to PTSD. The mechanism(s) accounting for these associations need to be elucidated to inform development of effective preventive and early intervention programs.

  19. A review of creatine supplementation in age-related diseases: more than a supplement for athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel N.; Agharkar, Amruta S.; Gonzales, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is an endogenous compound synthesized from arginine, glycine and methionine. This dietary supplement can be acquired from food sources such as meat and fish, along with athlete supplement powders. Since the majority of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, dietary creatine supplementation has traditionally been important for athletes and bodybuilders to increase the power, strength, and mass of the skeletal muscle. However, new uses for creatine have emerged suggesting that it may be important in preventing or delaying the onset of neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. On average, 30% of muscle mass is lost by age 80, while muscular weakness remains a vital cause for loss of independence in the elderly population. In light of these new roles of creatine, the dietary supplement’s usage has been studied to determine its efficacy in treating congestive heart failure, gyrate atrophy, insulin insensitivity, cancer, and high cholesterol. In relation to the brain, creatine has been shown to have antioxidant properties, reduce mental fatigue, protect the brain from neurotoxicity, and improve facets/components of neurological disorders like depression and bipolar disorder. The combination of these benefits has made creatine a leading candidate in the fight against age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, long-term memory impairments associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, and stroke. In this review, we explore the normal mechanisms by which creatine is produced and its necessary physiology, while paying special attention to the importance of creatine supplementation in improving diseases and disorders associated with brain aging and outlining the clinical trials involving creatine to treat these diseases. PMID:25664170

  20. Stability of person ability measures in people with acquired brain injury in the use of everyday technology: the test-retest reliability of the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte; Larsson-Lund, Maria; Kottorp, Anders

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META) in a sample of people with acquired brain injury (ABI). The META was administered twice within a two-week period to 25 people with ABI. A Rasch measurement model was used to convert the META ordinal raw scores into equal-interval linear measures of each participant's ability to manage everyday technology (ET). Test-retest reliability of the stability of the person ability measures in the META was examined by a standardized difference Z-test and an intra-class correlations analysis (ICC 1). The results showed that the paired person ability measures generated from the META were stable over the test-retest period for 22 of the 25 subjects. The ICC 1 correlation was 0.63, which indicates good overall reliability. The META demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability in a sample of people with ABI. The results illustrate the importance of using sufficiently challenging ETs (relative to a person's abilities) to generate stable META measurements over time. Implications for Rehabilitation The findings add evidence regarding the test-retest reliability of the person ability measures generated from the observation assessment META in a sample of people with ABI. The META might support professionals in the evaluation of interventions that are designed to improve clients' performance of activities including the ability to manage ET.

  1. Psychology: Teacher Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Rebecca

    This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

  2. Home and family in cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jesper; Wulf-Andersen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    The focus of the present article is the home and family environment of patients suffering acquired brain injury. In order to obtain the optimal outcome of posttraumatic cognitive rehabilitation it is important (a) to obtain a sufficient intensity of rehabilitative training, (b) to achieve...... the maximum degree of generalization from formalized training to the daily environment of the patient, and (c) to obtain the best possible utilization of “cognitive reserves” in the form of cognitive abilities and “strategies” acquired pretraumatically. Supplementing the institution-based cognitive training...

  3. Sex, Gender, and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Angela

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this supplemental issue is to address major knowledge, research, and clinical practice gaps regarding the limited focus on brain injury in girls and women as well as limited analysis of the effect of sex and gender in research on acquired brain injury. Integrating sex and gender in research is recognized as leading to better science and, ultimately, to better clinical practice. A sex and gender analytical approach to rehabilitation research is crucial to understanding traumatic brain injury and improving quality of life outcomes for survivors. Put another way, the lack of focus on sex and gender reduces the rigor of research design, the generalizability of study findings, and the effectiveness of clinical implementation and knowledge dissemination practices. The articles in this supplement examine sex and gender using a variety of methodological approaches and research contexts. Recommendations for future research on acquired brain injury that consciously incorporates sex and gender are made throughout this issue. This supplement is a product of the Girls and Women with ABI Task Force of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An internet survey of the characteristics and physical activity of community-dwelling Australian adults with acquired brain injury: Exploring interest in an internet-delivered self-management program focused on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Taryn M; Dean, Catherine M; Dear, Blake F; Hush, Julia M; Titov, Nickolai

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) are more likely to be physically inactive and experience barriers to accessing services to address inactivity. This study was designed to guide the development of an internet-delivered self-management program to increase physical activity after ABI. The aims of this study were to examine the current physical activity status of community-dwelling Australian adults with ABI, the barriers to physical activity they experience and to explore interest an internet-delivered self-management program aimed at increasing physical activity. An online survey of Australian adults with ABI was used to collect information about demographic characteristics; general health; emotional well-being; mobility and physical activity status, and satisfaction; barriers to physical activity; confidence in overcoming barriers, and; interest in an internet self-management program. Data were analyzed descriptively and correlational analyses examined relationships between variables. Data were analyzed from 59 respondents. Over half were not satisfied with their current physical activity status. The most frequently reported barriers were pain/discomfort, fatigue and fear, and confidence to overcome these barriers was very low. Interest in an internet-delivered self-management program was high (74%) and not related to the amount of physical activity, satisfaction with physical activity and mobility status or total number of barriers. Australian adults with ABI are not satisfied with their activity levels and experience barriers in maintaining their physical activity levels. Participants were interested in accessing an internet-delivered self-management program aimed at improving physical activity levels. Therefore such a program warrants development and evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transfer of omega-3 fatty acids across the blood-brain barrier after dietary supplementation with a docosahexaenoic acid-rich omega-3 fatty acid preparation in patients with Alzheimer's disease: the OmegAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund Levi, Y; Vedin, I; Cederholm, T; Basun, H; Faxén Irving, G; Eriksdotter, M; Hjorth, E; Schultzberg, M; Vessby, B; Wahlund, L-O; Salem, N; Palmblad, J

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the transfer of essential fatty acids (FAs) across the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) in adulthood. In this study, we investigated whether oral supplementation with omega-3 (n-3) FAs would change the FA profile of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A total of 33 patients (18 receiving the n-3 FA supplement and 15 receiving placebo) were included in the study. These patients were participants in the double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized OmegAD study in which 204 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) received 2.3 g n-3 FA [high in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] or placebo daily for 6 months. CSF FA levels were related to changes in plasma FA and to CSF biomarkers of AD and inflammation. At 6 months, the n-3 FA supplement group displayed significant increases in CSF (and plasma) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), DHA and total n-3 FA levels (P acid were strongly correlated, in contrast to those of DHA. Changes in DHA levels in CSF were inversely correlated with CSF levels of total and phosphorylated tau, and directly correlated with soluble interleukin-1 receptor type II. Thus, the more DHA increased in CSF, the greater the change in CSF AD/inflammatory biomarkers. Oral supplementation with n-3 FAs conferred changes in the n-3 FA profile in CSF, suggesting transfer of these FAs across the BBB in adults. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  7. SPORT SUPPLEMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandаr Marinkov

    2016-01-01

    Sport supplementation is essential for athletes performance and achievements. The well balanced and structured supplementation is a challenge for sport medicine because must be done a balance between potential benefits and potential risks (anti-doping rule violations and others). In this review are structured the most used categories sport supplementations. Nutritional supplements used in sport could be divided in some main categories like: amino acids, vitamins, proteins and antioxidants. Fo...

  8. Acquired bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B one marrow aplasia ... Laboratory approach to a suspected acquired bleeding disorder. (LER = leuko- .... lymphocytic leukaemia, and lymphoma). ... cells), a bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy (BMAT) is not ..... transplantation.

  9. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  10. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  11. A postal survey of data in general practice on the prevalence of Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) in patients aged 18-65 in one county in the west of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finnerty, Fionnuala

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very little is known about the prevalence of acquired brain injury (ABI) in Ireland. ABI prevalence has previously been obtained from Belgian general practitioners using a postal survey. We attempted to ascertain the prevalence of ABI in County Mayo through a postal survey of all general practitioners in the county.The specific objectives of this project were to:1. identify whether general practitioners are a. aware of patients with ABI aged 18-65 in their practices b. able to provide prevalence data on ABI in patients aged 18-65 c. able to provide data on age, gender and patient diagnosis 2. analyse prevalence of ABI from any available data from general practitioners. METHODS: A pilot postal survey was performed initially in order to assess the feasibility of the study. It was established that general practitioners did have the necessary information required to complete the questionnaire. A main postal survey was then undertaken. A postal questionnaire was administered to all general practices in County Mayo in the west of Ireland (n = 59). The response rate was 32.2% (n = 19). RESULTS: General practitioners who replied on behalf of their practice could provide data on patient age, gender and diagnosis. In the nineteen practices, there were 57 patients with ABI. The age-specific prevalence of ABI in the area surveyed was estimated at 183.7 per 100,000. The mean patient population per practice was 2,833 (SD = 950). There were found to be significantly more patients with ABI in rural areas than urban areas (p = 0.006). There were also significant differences in the ages of patients in the different ABI categories. Patients whose ABI was of traumatic origin were significantly younger than those patients with ABI of haemorrhagic origin (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Although this is a small-scale study, we have ascertained that general practitioners do have data on patients with ABI. Also, some prevalence data now exist where none was available before. These can

  12. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  13. Neural basis of acquired amusia and its recovery after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sihvonen, A.J.; Ripollés, P.; Leo, V.; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, S.; Särkämö, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although acquired amusia is a relatively common disorder after stroke, its precise neuroanatomical basis is still unknown. To evaluate which brain regions form the neural substrate for acquired amusia and its recovery, we performed a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and morphometry (VBM) study with 77 human stroke subjects. Structural MRIs were acquired at acute and 6 month poststroke stages. Amusia and aphasia were behaviorally assessed at acute and 3 month poststroke stages using t...

  14. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with α-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Hernandez Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylserine (PS in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55% and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids or α-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%. At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue ethanolamine plasmalogen status. The combination of multivariate and bivariate statistics allowed to underline that the accretion pattern of n-3 LC-PUFA in PE and PS differ.

  15. Fueling and Imaging Brain Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Dienel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models.

  16. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  17. The effect of tryptophan supplemented diets on brain serotonergic activity and plasma cortisol under undisturbed and stressed conditions in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, C.I.; Silva, P.I.M.; Costas, B.; Larsen, B.K.; Santos, G.A.; Conceicao, L.E.C.; Dias, J.; Overli, O.; Höglund, E.; Schrama, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) supplemented diets have been shown to have therapeutic effects in farmed animals including fish by modulating the activity of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT). The effects reported in fish have been obtained using individually-housed fish and include a

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besser MW

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin W Besser,1 Stephen G MacDonald2 1Department of Haematology, 2Department of Specialist Haemostasis, The Pathology Partnership, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. Keywords: Clauss fibrinogen assay, fibrinogen antigen, viscoelastic testing, ­gravimetric fibrinogen assay, PT-derived fibrinogen, functional fibrinogen, direct oral anticoagulant, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia

  20. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypertirichosis lanuginose developed rapidly in a patient with no detectable malignancy. Soft, fine, downy hair growth was noticed on the face, ears, limbs and trunk. Bilaterally symmetrical vitiliginous macules were present on the ear and preauricular region. This case is reported because of its rarity, absence of any detectable malignancy and development of vitiligo, which to our knowledge has not been reported earlier.

  1. Nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gry Bjerg; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have indicated that cancer patients have significantly altered taste sensitivity without specifying the preferences. One of the related problems is low compliance to nutritional therapy with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in patients suffering severe weight loss...

  2. Supplemental information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supplemental information showing results of inter-comparison between C-PORT, AERMOD and R-LINE dispersion algorithms. This dataset is associated with the following...

  3. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is the most common manifestation of a syndrome, consisting of increased bone metabolism, mostly new bone formation and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue, which we have characterised as the acquired hyperostosis syndrome. In part I we discuss the terminology, radiological appearances, scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings, bacteriology, histology, nosology, complications, treatment and differential diagnosis of SCCH. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is regarded as a phaenotype of SCCH, depending on the age. CRMO occurs in children, adolescents and young adults, SCCH predominantly in middleaged and elderly adults. (orig.) [de

  4. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Sucar Batista

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of diseases or skin disorders genetically transmitted and it is characterized by the appearance of bullae, ulcers and skin wounds. It usually appears at birth or in the first months of life. This is a case of a 72-year-old female patient who comes to the dermatology department with skin lesions of 6 months of evolution. A skin biopsy was performed, taking a sample for direct and indirect immunofluorescence. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa of unknown etiology was diagnosed. Treatment was started with low-dose colchicine to increase it later, according to the patient’s tolerance and disease progression.

  5. Functional brain activity changes after four weeks supplementation with a multi-vitamin/mineral combination: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial exploring functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials during working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J White

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the neurocognitive effects of four weeks daily supplementation with a multivitamin and mineral combination (MVM in healthy adults (aged 18-40 years. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, participants underwent assessments of brain activity using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI; n=32, 16 females and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential recordings (SSVEP; n=39, 20 females during working memory and continuous performance tasks at baseline and following four weeks of active MVM treatment or placebo. There were several treatment-related effects suggestive of changes in functional brain activity associated with MVM administration. SSVEP data showed latency reductions across centro-parietal regions during the encoding period of a spatial working memory task following four weeks of active MVM treatment. Complementary results were observed with the fMRI data, in which a subset of those completing fMRI assessment after SSVEP assessment (n=16 demonstrated increased BOLD response during completion of the Rapid Visual Information Processing task (RVIP within regions of interest including bilateral parietal lobes. No treatment-related changes in fMRI data were observed in those who had not first undergone SSVEP assessment, suggesting these results may be most evident under conditions of fatigue. Performance on the working memory and continuous performance tasks did not significantly differ between treatment groups at follow-up. In addition, within the fatigued fMRI sample, increased RVIP BOLD response was correlated with the change in number of target detections as part of the RVIP task. This study provides preliminary evidence of changes in functional brain activity during working memory associated with four weeks of daily treatment with a multivitamin and mineral combination in healthy adults, using two distinct but complementary measures of functional brain activity.

  6. Effect of diet with omega-3 in basal brain electrical activity and during status epilepticus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Daniella Tavares; da Silva, Eva Luana Almeida; Costa, Edbhergue Ventura Lola; Nogueira, Romildo Albuquerque

    2017-11-01

    Western diets are high in saturated fat and low in omega-3. Certain animals cannot produce omega-3 from their own lipids, making it necessary for it to be acquired from the diet. However, omega-3s are important components of the plasma membrane, and altering their proportions can promote physical and chemical alterations in the membranes, which may modify neuronal excitability. These alterations occur in healthy individuals, as well as in patients with epilepsy who are more sensitive to changes in brain electrical activity. This study evaluated the effect of a diet supplemented with omega-3 on the basal brain electrical activity both before and during status epilepticus in rats. To evaluate the brain electrical activity, we recorded electrocorticograms (ECoG) of animals both with and without omega-3 supplementation before and during status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Calculation of the average brain wave power by a power spectrum revealed that omega-3 supplementation reduced the average power of the delta wave by 20% and increased the average power of the beta wave by 45%. These effects were exacerbated when status epilepticus was induced in the animals supplemented with omega-3. The animals with and without omega-3 supplementation exhibited increases in basal brain electrical activities during status epilepticus. The two groups showed hyperactivity, but no significant difference between them was noted. Even though the brain activity levels observed during status epilepticus were similar between the two groups, neuron damage to the animals supplemented with omega-3 was more slight, revealing the neuroprotective effect of the omega-3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intercontrole acquiring by Framatome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome group, as the worldwide leader in nuclear power plant construction, has reinforced his competences in nuclear services thanks to the acquiring of the Intercontrole company, specialized in non-destructive testing in nuclear and industrial environments. After a presentation of the functioning principle and of the safety aspects of a PWR reactor, this press dossier presents in a first part the role of nuclear services and in particular of non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants (in-service inspection, regulatory aspects, testing processes). This part is illustrated with some examples of inspection performed on some components of the primary coolant loop (steam generators, reactor vessel, pressurizer, pipes, primary pumps). A second part presents the technical centres and units of Framatome in charge of performing non-destructive inspections, while a third part describes the industrial policy and strategy of the group in this domain (market of nuclear park maintenance in France, in the USA and worldwide, creation of the 'inspection and control' centre of Framatome). A last part presents the activities of the Intercontrole company and of its daughter companies with some examples of actions realized in the nuclear and natural gas domains. (J.S.)

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [de

  9. Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic omega-3 fatty acid does not influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in diabetes mellitus patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients...... with major depression, we tested whether (a) omega- 3 ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid (E-EPA) leads to increased serum BDNF levels and (b) whether changes in BDNF levels are associated with corresponding changes in depression. METHODS: Patients received 1 g/day E-EPA (n = 13) or placebo (n = 12) for 12 weeks...

  10. Staged residential post-acute rehabilitation for adults following acquired brain injury: A comparison of functional gains rated on the UK Functional Assessment Measure (UK FIM+FAM) and the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Diana; Seaman, Karla; Sharp, Kristylee; Singer, Rachel; Wagland, Janet; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2017-01-01

    To compare the UK Functional Assessment Measure (UK FIM+FAM) and Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) as measures of functional change in patients with brain injury receiving a staged residential post-acute community-based rehabilitation programme. Longitudinal cohort study of consecutive admissions (N = 42) over 3 years. Patients were assessed at admission and discharge/annual review. We examined groups according to stage of independence on admission: Maximum support (stages 1 and 2: N = 17); moderate/maximum self-care/household support (stage 3: N = 15); minimal self-care and moderate household/community support (stages 4-6: N = 10). Median (IQR) age: 50 (37-56) years. Male:female ratio: (71%:29%). Aetiology: stroke (50%), traumatic (36%) and other brain injuries (14%). Both tools demonstrated significant gains in overall scores and all subscales (p MPAI-4 was more sensitive to changes in adjustment and participation for clients admitted in the later stages (4-6). The UK FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 provide complementary evaluation across functional tasks ranging from self-care to participation. This study supports their use for longitudinal outcome evaluation in community residential rehabilitation services that take patients at different stages of recovery.

  11. 2017 Military Supplement: Dodecafluoropentane Emulsion (Ddfpe) as a Resuscitation Fluid for Treatment of Hemorrhagic Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kaitlin; Moon-Massat, Paula F; Unger, Evan C

    2017-11-15

    Dodecafluoropentane emulsion (DDFPe) is a novel nanotechnology for oxygen delivery with therapeutic potential for hemorrhagic shock and/or traumatic brain injury (TBI). DDFPe demonstrates efficacy at smaller doses than previously tested perfluorocarbon oxygen therapeutics. This smaller dose potentially eliminates toxicities exhibited by previous oxygen therapeutics, while anti-inflammatory properties of DDFPe may alleviate damage from ischemia reperfusion injury. This mini-review summarizes our progress in developing a battle-field ready product to prevent combat death due to hemorrhagic shock and/or TBI. Preclinical studies, for both indications, show promising effects of DDFPe as a resuscitation fluid. DDFPe may become a part of the toolkit for tactical healthcare professionals in battlefield and domestic emergency medicine.

  12. Learning-by-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo Gaetano; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    In horizontal acquisitions, the post-acquisition integration of the R&D function often damages the inventive labor force and results in lower innovative productivity of acquired inventors. In this paper we study post-acquisition integration in terms of R&D team reorganization-i.e., the creation...... of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms-and assess the impact of this integration action in the period that immediately follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors...

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Could Alleviate the Risks of Traumatic Brain Injury – A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathy R. Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an acquired brain trauma that occurs when any sudden trauma/injury causes damage to the brain. TBI is characterized by tissue damage and imbalance in the cerebral blood flow and metabolism. It has been established through laboratory experiments that the dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs could reduce the oxidative stress developed in brain due to TBI. The inclusion of omega-3 FA in diet could normalize the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and thus, it could restore the survival of neuronal cells. BDNF improves the synaptic transmission by regulating synapsin 1 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP response element binding protein. The brain tissue analysis of TBI models supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs showed significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, nucleic acid and protein oxidation, thereby promoting neuronal and glial cell survival. Thus, omega-3 FA intake could be considered as a therapeutic option to reduce the secondary neuronal damages initiated by TBI.

  14. O2 supplementation to secure the near-infrared spectroscopy determined brain and muscle oxygenation in vascular surgical patients: a presentation of 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Zillo Rokamp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses three questions for securing tissue oxygenation in brain (rScO2 and muscle (SmO2 for 100 patients (age 71 ± 6 yrs; mean ± SD undergoing vascular surgery: i Does preoxygenation (inhaling 100% oxygen before anesthesia increase tissue oxygenation, ii Does inhalation of 70% oxygen during surgery prevent a critical reduction in rScO2 (< 50%, and iii is a decrease in rScO2 and/or SmO2 related to reduced blood pressure and/or cardiac output? Intravenous anesthesia was provided to all patients and the intraoperative inspired oxygen fraction was set to 0.70 while tissue oxygenation was determined by INVOS 5100C. Preoxygenation increased rScO2 (from 65 ± 8% to 72 ± 9%; P < 0.05 and SmO2 (from 75 ± 9% to 78 ± 9%; P < 0.05 and during surgery rScO2 and SmO2 were maintained at the baseline level in most patients. Following anesthesia and tracheal intubation an eventual change in rScO2 correlated to cardiac output and cardiac stroke volume (coefficient of contingence=0.36; P=0.0003 rather to a change in mean arterial pressure and for five patients rScO2 was reduced to below 50%. We conclude that i increased oxygen delivery enhances tissue oxygenation, ii oxygen supports tissue oxygenation but does not prevent a critical reduction in cerebral oxygenation sufficiently, and iii an eventual decrease in tissue oxygenation seems related to a reduction in cardiac output rather than to hypotension.

  15. REVIEW OF A CASE OF CHILD WITH ACQUIRED APHASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana FILIPOVA

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Achieved children speech disabilities are manifested at certain level of development of speech from the age of 3 to 12 years. The speech disabilities with children from the age of one to three years have developmental and acquired characteristics. It is well-known when and why the disabilities occurr at acquired aphasia or disphasia.The child with acquired aphasia or disphasia has early brain impairements and a relative improvement happens with adequate treatment and prompt rehabilitation treatment. It is more obvious with children than with adults.This fast and complete rehabilitation happens due to the plastic character of child’s brain and the possibilities for intro-hemisphere and inter-hemisphere reorganization of speech functions in childhood.

  16. Family and home in cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Camilla; Mogensen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) severely affects both the injured patient and her/his family. This fact alone calls for a therapeutic approach addressing not only the individual victim of ABI but also her/his family. Additionally, the optimal outcome of posttraumatic cognitive rehabilitation may...... be best obtained by supplementing the institution-based cognitive training with home-based training. Moving cognitive training and other therapeutic interventions into the home environment does, however, constitute an additional challenge to the family structure and psychological wellbeing of all family...... members. We presently argue in favour of an increased utilization of family-based intervention programs for the families of brain injured patients – in general and especially in case of utilization of home-based rehabilitative training....

  17. Acquired ichthyosis with hoffman's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana B

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with features of acquired ichthyosis with Hoffman's syndrome. Laboratory tests support hypothyodism. Myoedema and hypertrophy of muscles were present. Patient was previously treated for Pellagra.

  18. Somatically acquired structural genetic differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magaard Koldby, Kristina; Nygaard, Marianne; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    Structural genetic variants like copy number variants (CNVs) comprise a large part of human genetic variation and may be inherited as well as somatically acquired. Recent studies have reported the presence of somatically acquired structural variants in the human genome and it has been suggested t...... with age.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 20 April 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.34....

  19. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  20. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  1. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  2. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  3. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  10. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  11. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  12. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  13. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  14. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Acquiring taste in home economics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbak Larsen, Christian

    Objective: To explore how home economics was taught in Denmark before the recent Danish school reform, which also revised the objectives and content of home economics, naming it Food Knowledge (Madkundskab) Methods: Participant observation was done in home economic lessons in two case schools...... appreciated by the group of boys, and others again learned to stick with their idiosyncrasies when pressured by the teacher. Conclusions: Children were acquiring taste in the home economic lessons, but not only the kind of tastes that the teacher had planned for. This leads to reflections on the very complex...... process of taste acquiring and to a call for further research into taste acquiring in complex real life contexts as home economics lessons....

  17. A review of creatine supplementation in age-related diseases: more than a supplement for athletes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel N. Smith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Creatine is an endogenous compound synthesized from arginine, glycine and methionine. This dietary supplement can be acquired from food sources such as meat and fish, along with athlete supplement powders. Since the majority of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, dietary creatine supplementation has traditionally been important for athletes and bodybuilders to increase the power, strength, and mass of the skeletal muscle. However, new uses for creatine have emerged suggesting that it may be important in preventing or delaying the onset of neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. On average, 30% of muscle mass is lost by age 80, while muscular weakness remains a vital cause for loss of independence in the elderly population. In light of these new roles of creatine, the dietary supplement’s usage has been studied to determine its efficacy in treating congestive heart failure, gyrate atrophy, insulin insensitivity, cancer, and high cholesterol. In relation to the brain, creatine has been shown to have antioxidant properties, reduce mental fatigue, protect the brain from neurotoxicity, and improve facets/components of neurological disorders like depression and bipolar disorder. The combination of these benefits has made creatine a leading candidate in the fight against age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, long-term memory impairments associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, and stroke. In this review, we explore the normal mechanisms by which creatine is produced and its necessary physiology, while paying special attention to the importance of creatine supplementation in improving diseases and disorders associated with brain aging and outlining the clinical trials involving creatine to treat these diseases.

  18. Comparative dermatology: acquired digital fibrokeratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz da

    2008-01-01

    Demonstra-se quadro característico de fibroqueratoma digital adquirido em trabalhadora rural de 42 anos de idade, que se compara a corno de rinoceronte.It is presented a case of a 42 year-old white female farmer with the classical feature of acquired digital fibrokeratoma, which is compared to rhinoceros horn.

  19. Difficulties in swallowing and eating following acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Annette

    på grund af fejlsynkning, hvilket efterlod syv patienter til analysen. Fire af disse udviklede lungebetændelse inden for 10 dage efter initiering af oralt indtag; en patient evalueret ved hjælp af F.O.T.T. og tre patienter ved hjælp af FEES. Studie I (artikel II) afdækker, om der er forskel i...

  20. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  1. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  2. Universal acquired melanosis (Carbon baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 3-year-old girl born with fair complexion which became darker. The color change was insidious in onset at the age of 5 months, asymptomatic and progressive involving the entire body surface. Histopathology revealed increased pigmentation of the epidermal basal layer. Universal acquired melanosis is a rare form of hypermelanosis which was synonymously referred to as "Carbon baby". This is a rare presentation with only one earlier case report.

  3. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  4. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  5. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Kou; Armin Iraji

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy;however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrat-ed both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the ifeld is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treat-ment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plas-ticity investigation.

  6. Constitutional and acquired autosomal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Cook, Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Chromosomal imbalances can result from numerical or structural anomalies. Numerical chromosomal abnormalities are often referred to as aneuploid conditions. This article focuses on the occurrence of constitutional and acquired autosomal aneuploidy in humans. Topics covered include frequency, mosaicism, phenotypic findings, and etiology. The article concludes with a consideration of anticipated advances that might allow for the development of screening tests and/or lead to improvements in our understanding and management of the role that aneuploidy plays in the aging process and acquisition of age-related and constitutional conditions.

  7. Children and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Digest for health professionals Children and Dietary Supplements Share: September 2012 © Matthew Lester Research has shown that many children use herbs and other dietary supplements. However, there are little data available on their ...

  8. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  9. MRI of the foetal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, P.; Jones, R.; Britton, J.; Foote, S.; Thilaganathan, B.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound examinations for foetal brain abnormalities have been a part of the routine antenatal screening programme in the UK for many years. In utero brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now being used increasingly successfully to clarify abnormal ultrasound findings, often resulting in a change of diagnosis or treatment plan. Interpretation requires an understanding of foetal brain development, malformations and acquired diseases. In this paper we will outline the technique of foetal MRI, relevant aspects of brain development and provide illustrated examples of foetal brain pathology

  10. Acquired Duodenal Obstruction in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hung Chien

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum is a rare cause of acquired duodenal obstruction in children, and a high degree of suspicion is therefore required to make an early and accurate diagnosis. We report a 6-year-old boy whose epigastrium was impacted by the handlebar of his bicycle during a traffic accident. The boy then experienced epigastralgia. Six days later, progressive bilious vomiting suggestive of gastrointestinal obstruction was noted. Imaging studies revealed a large hematoma extending from the fourth portion of the duodenum to the jejunum. Conservative methods of treatment failed to manage his condition. He underwent laparoscopic surgery to evacuate the hematoma. We also report a case of duodenal obstruction in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl who presented for the first time with acute symptoms of proximal intestinal obstruction. Contrast examinations showed apparent barium retention over the stomach and proximal duodenum. She underwent surgery due to persistent obstruction, and a mushroom-like foreign body was detected embedded in the orifice of the windsock duodenal web. After duodenoduodenostomy and removal of the bezoar, she had a smooth recovery and tolerated feeding well. We conclude that blunt abdominal trauma and incomplete duodenal obstruction, such as that caused by duodenal web, should be considered as possible causes of acquired proximal gastrointestinal obstruction in previously healthy children, despite their rarity.

  11. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, E; Wüst, J; Speich, R; Flury, G; Krause, M

    1993-08-21

    We report the history of a 38-year-old male native of Sri Lanka admitted to the emergency ward because of chest pain and shortness of breath. On physical and radiographic examination a bilateral predominantly right-sided pneumonia was found. The patient was admitted to the medical ICU and an antibiotic regimen with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and erythromycin was initiated. Shortly afterwards septic shock developed. The patient was intubated and received high doses of catecholamines. He died 30 hours after admission to the hospital. Cultures from sputum, tracheal aspirate and blood grew Acinetobacter baumanni. Acinetobacter is an ubiquitous gram-negative rod with coccobacillary appearance in clinical specimens, that may appear gram-positive due to poor discoloration on Gram-stain. It is a well known causative agent of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units. Community-acquired pneumonias, however, are quite rare. Sporadic cases have been reported from the US, Papua-New Guinea and Australia. Interestingly, these pneumonias are fulminant and have a high mortality. Chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol consumption appear to be predisposing factors. Due to the rapid course and poor prognosis, prompt diagnosis and adequate antibiotic treatment are indicated. Antibiotics use for community-acquired pneumonias, such as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or macrolides, are not sufficient. Appropriate antibiotics for the initial treatment of suspected Acinetobacter infections include imipenem and carboxy- and ureidopenicillins combined with an aminoglycoside.

  13. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the pneumonia acquired in the community in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The pneumonia acquired in the community in adults, is the acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma that is developed away from the hospital environment, it is manifested in the first 48 hours from the entrance to the hospital or after seven days of having left. The supplement includes clinical square, epidemiology, etiology classification, diagnostic, treatment and prevention among others

  15. Oxidative stress and damage in liver, but not in brain, of Fischer 344 rats subjected to dietary iron supplementation with lipid-soluble[(3,5,5-Trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Morgan, Evan; Christen, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene] (......, they also demonstrated that the brain is well protected against dietary iron overload by using iron in a lipid-soluble formulation.......Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl......)ferrocene] (TMHF), which is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. At both ages, iron concentration increased markedly in the liver but failed to increase in the brain. In the liver of TMHF-treated young rats, levels of a- and ¿-tocopherols and glutathione (GSH) were also higher. In contrast, the brain...

  16. Acquired hyperostosis syndrome. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-12-01

    In the second part of this publication, we describe some additional findings in cases of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH). These include focal hyperostosis of the spine, in the pelvis and in the extremities and psoriatric skin lesions and severe forms of acne (acne conglobata, acne fulminans). An analysis of our 13 patients and of the relevant literature indicates that the hyperostosis is due to increased bone metabolism and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue and that these are the pathogenic bases of the changes in the axial skeleton, the pelvis and the bones of the extremities. We have suggested a scheme which would categorise the syndrom into complete, incomplete and possibly acquired forms. (orig./GDG).

  17. And the Winner is - Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    New entrants to a market tend to be superior to incumbents in originating radical innovations. We provide a new explanation for this phenomenon, based on markets for technology. It applies in industries where successful entrepreneurial firms, or their technologies, are acquired by incumbents...... that then commercialize the innovation. To this end we analyze an innovation game between one incumbent and a large number of entrants. In the first stage, firms compete to develop innovations of high quality. They do so by choosing, at equal cost, the success probability of their R&D approach, where a lower probability...... the incumbent performs the least radical project. Entrants pick pairwise different projects; the bigger the number of entrants, the more radical the most radical project. Generally, entrants tend to choose more radical R&D approaches and generate the highest value innovation in case of success. We illustrate...

  18. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  19. Family and home in cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury: The importance of family oriented interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf-Andersen, Camilla; Mogensen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) severely affects both the injured patient and her/his family. This fact alone calls for a therapeutic approach addressing not only the individual victim of ABI but also her/his family. Additionally, the optimal outcome of posttraumatic cognitive rehabilitation may be best obtained by supplementing the institution-based cognitive training with home-based training. Moving cognitive training and other therapeutic interventions into the home environment does, however, constitute an additional challenge to the family structure and psychological wellbeing of all family members. We presently argue in favour of an increased utilization of family-based intervention programs for the families of brain injured patients - in general and especially in case of utilization of home-based rehabilitative training.

  20. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  1. 48 CFR 1845.505-14 - Reports of Government property. (NASA supplements paragraphs (b))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (NASA supplements paragraphs (b)) (b) When the clause at 1852.245-73, Financial Reporting of NASA... contractor acquired property for purposes of reporting the acquisition cost in the property classifications...

  2. Seagull to acquire arkla exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Seagull Energy Corp., Houston, has agreed to acquire Arkla Exploration Inc. from Arkla Inc., Shreveport, La., for about $402 million. The transaction-expected to net Seagull reserves totaling about 578 bcf of gas and 7.3 million bbl of oil and condensate-would more than double Seagull's proved reserves and nearly double its total assets. According to Seagull's 1991 annual report, the company's reserves at yearend 1991 were estimated at 401.2 bcf of gas equivalent (bcfe), including 335.1 bcf of gas and 11 million bbl of oil. Independent engineers at yearend 1991 estimated Arkla's proved reserves at 635 bcf of gas and 9 million bbl of liquids. Seagull Chairman Barry J. Galt said the company plans to keep many of Arkla Exploration's employees and to establish a meaningful presence in Shreveport. Arkla's already got good people in Shreveport and an operating base, a Seagull official said. We want to move in, put our name on the door, and continue the good operations Arkla already has. Seagull has lined up financing for the acquisition from a group of major U.S. banks. A new credit facility-consisting of a $475 million line of revolving credit and a $150 million 3 year term loan-will replace an exiting $225 million line of revolving credit. Boards of both companies have approved the deal, which Seagull and Arkla hope to close before yearend, subject to regulatory approvals and purchase price adjustments

  3. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction.

  4. Dietary supplement intake during pregnancy; better safe than sorry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Alie; Bast, Aalt; Godschalk, Roger

    2018-06-01

    Consumption of dietary supplements and specifically niche products such as supplements targeting pregnant women is increasing. The advantages of dietary supplementation during pregnancy with folic acid have been established, but health effects of many other supplements have not been confirmed. EU and US legislation on dietary supplements requires the product to be safe for the direct consumer, the mother. Long-term health effects for the fetus due to fetal programming (in utero adaptation of the fetal epigenome due to environmental stimuli such as supplementation) are not taken into account. Such epigenetic alterations can, however, influence the response to health challenges in adulthood. We therefore call for both conducting research in birth cohorts and animal studies to identify potential health effects in progeny of supplement consuming mothers as well as the establishment of a nutrivigilance scheme to identify favorable and adverse effects post-marketing. The acquired knowledge can be used to create more effective legislation on dietary supplement intake during pregnancy for safety of the child. Increasing knowledge on the effects of consuming supplements will create a safer environment for future mothers and their offspring to optimize their health before, during and after pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  6. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated.

  7. Congenital and acquired mitochondrial disorders of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Nikitina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical presentations of disorders of the nervous system manifest in young and middle-aged patients with congenital and acquired mitochondrial dysfunctions and cognitive disorders manifest in patients with mitochondrial diseases more often. Nowadays the effective methods of initial diagnosing of these conditions are neurological and neuropsychological examination of patients, using of biochemical markers of mitochondrial diseases: the indices of lactate, total homocysteine in plasma and liquor. Neuro-visual study (Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, MR spectroscopy, tractography, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, mitochondrial DNA typing is actually used for the differential diagnosing of mitochondrial diseases with other disorders that are accompanied by demyelinating disorders.

  8. Harvard Aging Brain Study : Dataset and accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagley, Alexander; LaPoint, Molly; Huijbers, Willem; Hedden, Trey; McLaren, Donald G.; Chatwal, Jasmeer P.; Papp, Kathryn V.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Blacker, Deborah; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Schultz, Aaron P.

    2017-01-01

    The Harvard Aging Brain Study is sharing its data with the global research community. The longitudinal dataset consists of a 284-subject cohort with the following modalities acquired: demographics, clinical assessment, comprehensive neuropsychological testing, clinical biomarkers, and neuroimaging.

  9. Resveratrol food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Grunert, Klaus G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Consumers increasingly choose food supplements in addition to their diet. Research on supplement users finds they are likely to be female, older and well-educated; Furthermore, supplement users are often characterised as being especially health-oriented, an observation which is termed...... the ‘inverse supplement hypothesis’. However, results are dependent on the substance in question. Little is known so far about botanicals in general, and more specifically, little is known about resveratrol. The psychographic variables of food supplement users are yet relatively underexplored. By comparing US...... and Danish respondents, we aimed to identify whether sociodemographic variables, health status, health beliefs and behaviour and interest in food aspects specifically relevant to resveratrol (e.g., naturalness, indulgence, and Mediterranean food) explain favourable attitudes and adoption intentions toward...

  10. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: An Unusual Consequence of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome—Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a well-described syndrome characterized by the classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy results from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency. Common causes include alcoholism and gastric disorders. Wernicke’s has been described in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS; however, given these patients’ immunosuppressed state, the diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy is not apparent. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old previously healthy male presented to the ER complaining of progressive dyspnea. Workup revealed HIV/AIDS and PCP pneumonia. He was treated and improved. On day 14 he became confused and developed nystagmus and ataxia. Considering his immunocompromised state, infectious and neoplastic etiologies topped the differential diagnosis. CT head was negative. Lumbar puncture was unremarkable. Brain MRI revealed increased T2 signal in the medial thalamus bilaterally. Intravenous thiamine was administered resulting in resolution of symptoms. Discussion. The classic triad of Wernicke’s encephalopathy occurs in 10% of cases. When immunosuppressed patients develop acute neurologic symptoms infectious or neoplastic etiologies must be excluded. However, given the relative safety of thiamine supplementation, there should be a low threshold for initiating therapy in order to reverse the symptoms and prevent progression to Korsakoff dementia, which is permanent.

  11. Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A Listen En Español Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines It is best to get vitamins and minerals ... this section Medication Other Treatments Herbs, Supplements, and Alternative Medicines Types of Dietary Supplements Side Effects and Drug ...

  12. Social Media as a Communication Support for Persons with Mild Acquired Cognitive Impairment: A Social Network Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghdam, Aboozar; Hamidi, Ulrika; Bartfai, Aniko; Koch, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted as a social network analysis of a Facebook group for Swedish speaking persons (1310 members) with perceived brain fatigue after an illness or injury to the brain to address the lack of research examining social media and the potential value of on-line support for persons with mild acquired cognitive impairment.

  13. Neural Basis of Acquired Amusia and Its Recovery after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Ripollés, Pablo; Leo, Vera; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, Seppo; Särkämö, Teppo

    2016-08-24

    Although acquired amusia is a relatively common disorder after stroke, its precise neuroanatomical basis is still unknown. To evaluate which brain regions form the neural substrate for acquired amusia and its recovery, we performed a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and morphometry (VBM) study with 77 human stroke subjects. Structural MRIs were acquired at acute and 6 month poststroke stages. Amusia and aphasia were behaviorally assessed at acute and 3 month poststroke stages using the Scale and Rhythm subtests of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and language tests. VLSM analyses indicated that amusia was associated with a lesion area comprising the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, insula, and striatum in the right hemisphere, clearly different from the lesion pattern associated with aphasia. Parametric analyses of MBEA Pitch and Rhythm scores showed extensive lesion overlap in the right striatum, as well as in the right Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. Lesions associated with Rhythm scores extended more superiorly and posterolaterally. VBM analysis of volume changes from the acute to the 6 month stage showed a clear decrease in gray matter volume in the right superior and middle temporal gyri in nonrecovered amusic patients compared with nonamusic patients. This increased atrophy was more evident in anterior temporal areas in rhythm amusia and in posterior temporal and temporoparietal areas in pitch amusia. Overall, the results implicate right temporal and subcortical regions as the crucial neural substrate for acquired amusia and highlight the importance of different temporal lobe regions for the recovery of amusia after stroke. Lesion studies are essential in uncovering the brain regions causally linked to a given behavior or skill. For music perception ability, previous lesion studies of amusia have been methodologically limited in both spatial accuracy and time domain as well as by small sample sizes, providing

  14. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  15. Dietary supplements for football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespel, P; Maughan, R J; Greenhaff, P L

    2006-07-01

    Physical training and competition in football markedly increase the need for macro- and micronutrient intake. This requirement can generally be met by dietary management without the need for dietary supplements. In fact, the efficacy of most supplements available on the market is unproven. In addition, players must be cautious of inadequate product labelling and supplement impurities that may cause a positive drug test. Nonetheless, a number of dietary supplements may beneficially affect football performance. A high endurance capacity is a prerequisite for optimal match performance, particularly if extra time is played. In this context, the potential of low-dose caffeine ingestion (2 - 5 mg . kg body mass(-1)) to enhance endurance performance is well established. However, in the case of football, care must be taken not to overdose because visual information processing might be impaired. Scoring and preventing goals as a rule requires production of high power output. Dietary creatine supplementation (loading dose: 15 - 20 g . day(-1), 4 - 5 days; maintenance dose: 2 - 5 g g . day(-1)) has been found to increase muscle power output, especially during intermittent sprint exercises. Furthermore, creatine intake can augment muscle adaptations to resistance training. Team success and performance also depend on player availability, and thus injury prevention and health maintenance. Glucosamine or chondroitin may be useful in the treatment of joint pain and osteoarthritis, but there is no evidence to support the view that the administration of these supplements will be preventative. Ephedra-containing weight-loss cocktails should certainly be avoided due to reported adverse health effects and positive doping outcomes. Finally, the efficacy of antioxidant or vitamin C intake in excess of the normal recommended dietary dose is equivocal. Responses to dietary supplements can vary substantially between individuals, and therefore the ingestion of any supplement must be assessed

  16. And the Winner is – Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    value in case of success—that is, a more radical innovation. In the second stage, successful entrants bid to be acquired by the incumbent. We assume that entrants cannot survive on their own, so being acquired amounts to a ‘prize’ in a contest. We identify an equilibrium in which the incumbent chooses...

  17. Acquired Inventors’ Productivity after Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    Effective integration of the R&D functions of the acquired and acquiring firms is essential for knowledge recombination after acquisition. However, prior research suggests that the post-acquisition integration process often damages the inventive labor force. We argue that an examination of the mu...

  18. Acquired intrathoracic kidney in thoracic kyphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Kawashima, Akira; Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Russell, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    Two cases of acquired intrathoracic kidney associated with thoracic kyphosis are reported, with emphasis on the radiographic manifestations. A search of the scientific literature disclosed that the acquired type of this abnormality is rare. The importance of recognizing this entity from a differential diagnostic standpoint is underscored. (author)

  19. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  20. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  1. Acquired Severe Disabilities and Complex Health Care Needs: Access to Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah L.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined one high school student's access to inclusive education and experiences in an inclusive English class after he acquired severe disabilities and complex health care needs from a nontraumatic brain injury. Multiple sources of data (i.e., interviews, field notes, and documents) were collected and analyzed to formulate…

  2. Effect of supplemental taurine on juvenile channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurine is a beta-amino sulfur amino acid found in most animal tissues. It has many important biological functions in mammals including membrane stabilization, antioxidation, cellular osmoregulation, detoxification, neuromodulation, and brain and eye development. Taurine supplementation in juvenil...

  3. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  4. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dietary supplements, making it hard to identify any benefits from the MVMs. Should I take an MVM? MVMs cannot take the place of eating a variety of foods that are important to a healthy diet. Foods ...

  5. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  6. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primary Mitochondrial Disorders Weight Loss A Acai Aloe Vera Anabolic Steroids Antioxidants (see Exercise and Athletic Performance ) ... Pills (see Weight Loss ) Dietary Supplements Vitamin D E Echinacea Ephedra Essiac/Flor-Essence European Elder Evening ...

  7. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and US Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database Toggle navigation Menu Home About DSID Mission Current ... values can be saved to build a small database or add to an existing database for national, ...

  8. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report. A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests’ results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10% with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion. While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization.

  9. Antioxidant supplements and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues is considered involved in the aging process and in the development of chronic diseases in humans, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, the leading causes of death in high-income countries. This has stimulated interest in the preventive potential of a...... of antioxidant supplements. Today, more than one half of adults in high-income countries ingest antioxidant supplements hoping to improve their health, oppose unhealthy behaviors, and counteract the ravages of aging....

  10. Invasive Glioblastoma Cells Acquire Stemness and Increased Akt Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Molina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most aggressive brain tumor in adults. The dismal prognosis is due to postsurgery recurrences arising from escaped invasive tumor cells. The signaling pathways activated in invasive cells are under investigation, and models are currently designed in search for therapeutic targets. We developed here an in vivo model of human invasive GBM in mouse brain from a GBM cell line with moderate tumorigenicity that allowed simultaneous primary tumor growth and dispersal of tumor cells in the brain parenchyma. This strategy allowed for the first time the isolation and characterization of matched sets of tumor mass (Core and invasive (Inv cells. Both cell populations, but more markedly Inv cells, acquired stem cell markers, neurosphere renewal ability, and resistance to rapamycin-induced apoptosis relative to parental cells. The comparative phenotypic analysis between Inv and Core cells showed significantly increased tumorigenicity in vivo and increased invasion with decreased proliferation in vitro for Inv cells. Examination of a large array of signaling pathways revealed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk down-modulation and Akt activation in Inv cells and an opposite profile in Core cells. Akt activation correlated with the increased tumorigenicity, stemness, and invasiveness, whereas Erk activation correlated with the proliferation of the cells. These results underscore complementary roles of the Erk and Akt pathways for GBM proliferation and dispersal and raise important implications for a concurrent inhibitory therapy.

  11. Acquired Encephalocele With Hydrocephalus and Pineal Region Epidermoid Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Bayoumi, Ahmed B; Akakin, Akin; Yener, Yasin; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-07-01

    A combination of trauma and a missed inflammatory response (nasal operation) concomitant with hydrocephalus and tumor in secondary encephalocele has not been described in the English literature yet. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the clinic with rhinorrhea that started 3 months ago. In his medical history, nothing abnormal was present except a nasal operation performed 1 year ago. Brain magnetic resonance imaging depicted left frontal encephalocele concomitant with obstructive hydrocephalus caused by an epidermoid cyst originated from the pineal region. A 2-staged surgery was planned. In the first stage, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was conveyed successfully. In the second-stage surgery, the herniated brain tissue was excised, and the frontal sinus was cleansed with serum saline combined with antibiotic. The bony defect and the dura defect were repaired. The patient's presenting complaint recovered fully, and he was discharged to home in a well condition. Acquired encephalocele is a rare entity. In case of rhinorrhea and encephalocele, even in the presence of prior history of nasal surgery, intracranial evaluation should be conveyed to exclude the presence of hydrocephalus and/or tumor. The cranial defect should be repaired to prevent future infections and brain tissue damage.

  12. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets Search the list ... Supplements: Background Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets ...

  13. Active components in food supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemelink M; Jansen EHJM; Piersma AH; Opperhuizen A; LEO

    2000-01-01

    The growing food supplement market, where supplements are both more diverse and more easily available (e.g. through Internet) formed the backdrop to the inventory of the active components in food supplements. The safety of an increased intake of food components via supplements was also at issue

  14. Corpus callosum demyelination associated with acquired stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Barbara McElwee; Guitar, Barry; Solomon, Andrew

    2018-04-21

    Compared with developmental stuttering, adult onset acquired stuttering is rare. However, several case reports describe acquired stuttering and an association with callosal pathology. Interestingly, these cases share a neuroanatomical localisation also demonstrated in developmental stuttering. We present a case of adult onset acquired stuttering associated with inflammatory demyelination within the corpus callosum. This patient's disfluency improved after the initiation of immunomodulatory therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for subsection (d) hospitals that rank in the worst performing quartile with respect to hospital-acquired...

  16. Enhancing Medicares Hospital Acquired Conditions Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The current Medicare policy of non-payment to hospitals for Hospital Acquired Conditions (HAC) seeks to avoid payment for preventable complications identified within...

  17. Common acquired kidney diseases in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5. Common acquired kidney diseases in children. Examination of the urine is probably the most important investigation ... result from the same streptococcal infection. .... musculoskeletal system. ... Prediction of histopathology from clinical.

  18. How are Concepts of Infinity Acquired?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzęsicki Kazimierz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Concepts of infinity have been subjects of dispute since antiquity. The main problems of this paper are: is the mind able to acquire a concept of infinity? and: how are concepts of infinity acquired? The aim of this paper is neither to say what the meanings of the word “infinity” are nor what infinity is and whether it exists. However, those questions will be mentioned, but only in necessary extent.

  19. Differences in microbiological profile between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Teresa; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Aragão, Irene; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Sarmento, António

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological profiles were analysed and compared for intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections according to place of acquisition: community-acquired, with a separate analysis of healthcare-associated, and hospital-acquired. Prospective cohort study performed at a university tertiary care hospital over 1 year. Inclusion criteria were meeting the Centers for Disease Control definition of intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections. A total of 1035 patients were included in the study. More than 25% of intra-abdominal infections were polymicrobial; multi-drug resistant gram-negatives were 38% in community-acquired, 50% in healthcare-associated and 57% in hospital-acquired. E. coli was the most prevalent among urinary infections: 69% in community-acquired, 56% in healthcare-associated and 26% in hospital-acquired; ESBL producers' pathogens were 10% in healthcare-associated and 3% in community-acquired and hospital-acquired. In respiratory infections Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most prevalent in community-acquired (54%) and MRSA in healthcare-associated (24%) and hospital-acquired (24%). A significant association was found between MRSA respiratory infection and hospitalization in the previous year (adjusted OR = 6.3), previous instrumentation (adjusted OR = 4.3) and previous antibiotic therapy (adjusted OR = 5.7); no cases were documented among patients without risk factors. Hospital mortality rate was 10% in community-acquired, 14% in healthcare-associated and 19% in hospital-acquired infection. This study shows that healthcare-associated has a different microbiologic profile than those from community or hospital acquired for the four main focus of infection. Knowledge of this fact is important because the existing guidelines for community-acquired are not entirely applicable for this group of patients.

  20. Explaining brain size variation: from social to cultural brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Carel P; Isler, Karin; Burkart, Judith M

    2012-05-01

    Although the social brain hypothesis has found near-universal acceptance as the best explanation for the evolution of extensive variation in brain size among mammals, it faces two problems. First, it cannot account for grade shifts, where species or complete lineages have a very different brain size than expected based on their social organization. Second, it cannot account for the observation that species with high socio-cognitive abilities also excel in general cognition. These problems may be related. For birds and mammals, we propose to integrate the social brain hypothesis into a broader framework we call cultural intelligence, which stresses the importance of the high costs of brain tissue, general behavioral flexibility and the role of social learning in acquiring cognitive skills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inszenierung eines Supplements / Staging a Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas-M. Seibert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Richter Adam, Anwalt Liebling und William, der Detektiv. Die Rechtspraxis setzt etwas voraus, das sie nicht nur begründet oder ergänzt, sondern grundsätzlich in Frage stellt. So macht der Zwang, in einem Verfahren zu entscheiden und zu begründen, zugleich deutlich, dass jede Form der Entscheidung unangemessen, unbegründet und in ganz anderer Weise neu herzustellen ist. Das ist das juridische Supplement im Geiste von Jacques Derrida. Supplementiert wird die Wahrheit des Rechts in anderen Medien: in Drama, Film und Literatur etwa. Dort wird in Szene gesetzt, was in der real erlebbaren Rechtswelt nicht wirklich erlebt werden kann, was aber doch – wie kein Amtsträger bestreiten würde – zum Verfahrensergebnis gehört. Judge Adam, Advocate “Liebling” and William, the Detective. Legal practice is based on something that is not only an integral part of it and complements it, but also puts it into question generally. The compulsion to argue and reach decisions in a legal trial clarifies simultaneously that all forms of decision are inapproprate, unreasonable, and can be recreated in an entirely new manner [to suit the needs of the trial]. This is the legalistic supplement in the spirit of Jacques Derrida. The legal truth is supplemented by other forms of media such as drama, film and literature, which are able to stage scenes that cannot be experienced in a real life legal world, but – as no legal official would deny – are an integral part of the trial and verdict procedure.

  2. A review of creatine supplementation in age-related diseases: more than a supplement for athletes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ak

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel N. Smith; Amruta S. Agharkar; Eric B. Gonzales

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is an endogenous compound synthesized from arginine, glycine and methionine. This dietary supplement can be acquired from food sources such as meat and fish, along with athlete supplement powders. Since the majority of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, dietary creatine supplementation has traditionally been important for athletes and bodybuilders to increase the power, strength, and mass of the skeletal muscle. However, new uses for creatine have emerged suggesting that it may b...

  3. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit eBrogaard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  4. [Neural mechanism underlying autistic savant and acquired savant syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Kato, Motoichiro

    2008-07-01

    It is well known that the cases with savant syndrome, demonstrate outstanding mental capability despite coexisting severe mental disabilities. In many cases, savant skills are characterized by its domain-specificity, enhanced memory capability, and excessive focus on low-level perceptual processing. In addition, impaired integrative cognitive processing such as social cognition or executive function, restricted interest, and compulsive repetition of the same act are observed in savant individuals. All these are significantly relevant to the behavioral characteristics observed in individuals with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). A neurocognitive model of savant syndrome should explain these cognitive features and the juxtaposition of outstanding talents with cognitive disabilities. In recent neuropsychological studies, Miller (1998) reported clinical cases of "acquired savant," i.e., patients who improved or newly acquired an artistic savant-like skill in the early stage of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Although the relationship between an autistic savant and acquired savant remains to be elucidated, the advent of neuroimaging study of ASD and the clarification of FTD patients with savant-like skills may clarify the shared neural mechanisms of both types of talent. In this review, we classified current cognitive models of savant syndrome into the following 3 categories. (1) A hypermnesic model that suggests that savant skills develop from existing or dormant cognitive functions such as memory. However, recent findings obtained through neuropsychological examinations imply that savant individuals solve problems using a strategy that is fairly different from a non-autistic one. (2) A paradoxical functional facilitation model (Kapur, 1996) that offers possible explanations about how pathological states in the brain lead to development of prodigious skills. This model emphasizes the role of reciprocal inhibitory interaction among adjacent or distant cortical regions

  5. Recovering With Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The First 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Katarina L; Shafer, Jennifer N; Harmon, Tyson G; Jacks, Adam

    2016-12-01

    This study was intended to document speech recovery for 1 person with acquired apraxia of speech quantitatively and on the basis of her lived experience. The second author sustained a traumatic brain injury that resulted in acquired apraxia of speech. Over a 2-year period, she documented her recovery through 22 video-recorded monologues. We analyzed these monologues using a combination of auditory perceptual, acoustic, and qualitative methods. Recovery was evident for all quantitative variables examined. For speech sound production, the recovery was most prominent during the first 3 months, but slower improvement was evident for many months. Measures of speaking rate, fluency, and prosody changed more gradually throughout the entire period. A qualitative analysis of topics addressed in the monologues was consistent with the quantitative speech recovery and indicated a subjective dynamic relationship between accuracy and rate, an observation that several factors made speech sound production variable, and a persisting need for cognitive effort while speaking. Speech features improved over an extended time, but the recovery trajectories differed, indicating dynamic reorganization of the underlying speech production system. The relationship among speech dimensions should be examined in other cases and in population samples. The combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods offers advantages for understanding clinically relevant aspects of recovery.

  6. Functional neural changes associated with acquired amusia across different stages of recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Leo, Vera; Saunavaara, Jani; Parkkola, Riitta; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, Seppo

    2017-09-12

    Brain damage causing acquired amusia disrupts the functional music processing system, creating a unique opportunity to investigate the critical neural architectures of musical processing in the brain. In this longitudinal fMRI study of stroke patients (N = 41) with a 6-month follow-up, we used natural vocal music (sung with lyrics) and instrumental music stimuli to uncover brain activation and functional network connectivity changes associated with acquired amusia and its recovery. In the acute stage, amusic patients exhibited decreased activation in right superior temporal areas compared to non-amusic patients during instrumental music listening. During the follow-up, the activation deficits expanded to comprise a wide-spread bilateral frontal, temporal, and parietal network. The amusics showed less activation deficits to vocal music, suggesting preserved processing of singing in the amusic brain. Compared to non-recovered amusics, recovered amusics showed increased activation to instrumental music in bilateral frontoparietal areas at 3 months and in right middle and inferior frontal areas at 6 months. Amusia recovery was also associated with increased functional connectivity in right and left frontoparietal attention networks to instrumental music. Overall, our findings reveal the dynamic nature of deficient activation and connectivity patterns in acquired amusia and highlight the role of dorsal networks in amusia recovery.

  7. Supplementation in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    We therefore designed this study to measure thoracic aortic ring .... contraction obtained from pilot study (1 x 10-6. M for control and 1 x .... muscle cell hyperpolarisation20. Similarly, several reports have suggested that potassium supplementation enhances endothelium- dependent relaxations, increased vascular activity of ...

  8. Pennzoil to acquire part of Chevron's production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Pennzoil Co., Houston, will exchange 48% of its $2.2 billion investment in Chevron Corp. for a chunk of chevron's U.S. producing leases. The trade is to involve a tax free exchange of 15.75 million chevron Corp. shares held by Pennzoil for all the stock of Chevron PBC Inc., a Chevron unit owning Gulf of Mexico, Gulf Coast, Permian basin, and other U.S. oil and gas producing leases. Sixty percent of the acquired reserves are in the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf Coast where Pennzoil's operations are concentrated, and 60% of the acquired reserves consist of natural gas, mirroring Pennzoil's reserve ratios

  9. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  10. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Print this issue Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More ... Gut in Check Wise Choices Safe Use of Supplements Tell all of your health care providers about ...

  11. 2017 Annual Disability Statistics Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, E. A; Houtenville, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The "Annual Disability Statistics Supplement" is a companion report to the "Annual Disability Statistics Compendium." The "Supplement" presents statistics on the same topics as the "Compendium," with additional categorizations by demographic characteristics including age, gender and race/ethnicity. In…

  12. Effect of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium-201 image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.; Greenberg, I.D.; Corne, R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effect of different types of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium image quality, 78 patients were prospectively randomized to one of three protocols: dipyridamole infusion alone, dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip, and dipyridamole with low-level treadmill exercise. Heart-to-lung, heart-to-liver, and heart-to-adjacent infradiaphragmatic activity ratios were generated from anterior images acquired immediately following the test. Additionally, heart-to-total infradiaphragmatic activity was graded semiquantitatively. Results showed a significantly higher ratio of heart to subdiaphragmatic activity in the treadmill group as compared with dipyridamole alone (p less than 0.001) and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise (p less than 0.001). No significant difference was observed between patients receiving the dipyridamole infusion, and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise. The authors conclude that low-level treadmill exercise supplementation of dipyridamole infusion is an effective means of improving image quality. Supplementation with isometric handgrip does not improve image quality over dipyridamole alone

  13. Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation Exerts Its Effect through Three Synergistic Mechanisms: Proof of Principle in Phenylketonuria Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique van Vliet

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU was the first disorder in which severe neurocognitive dysfunction could be prevented by dietary treatment. However, despite this effect, neuropsychological outcome in PKU still remains suboptimal and the phenylalanine-restricted diet is very demanding. To improve neuropsychological outcome and relieve the dietary restrictions for PKU patients, supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAA is suggested as alternative treatment strategy that might correct all brain biochemical disturbances caused by high blood phenylalanine, and thereby improve neurocognitive functioning.As a proof-of-principle, this study aimed to investigate all hypothesized biochemical treatment objectives of LNAA supplementation (normalizing brain phenylalanine, non-phenylalanine LNAA, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in PKU mice.C57Bl/6 Pah-enu2 (PKU mice and wild-type mice received a LNAA supplemented diet, an isonitrogenic/isocaloric high-protein control diet, or normal chow. After six weeks of dietary treatment, blood and brain amino acid and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were assessed.In PKU mice, the investigated LNAA supplementation regimen significantly reduced blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations by 33% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal chow (p<0.01, while alleviating brain deficiencies of some but not all supplemented LNAA. Moreover, LNAA supplementation in PKU mice significantly increased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations from 35% to 71% and from 57% to 86% of wild-type concentrations (p<0.01, respectively, but not brain dopamine concentrations (p = 0.307.This study shows that LNAA supplementation without dietary phenylalanine restriction in PKU mice improves brain biochemistry through all three hypothesized biochemical mechanisms. Thereby, these data provide proof-of-concept for LNAA supplementation as a valuable alternative dietary treatment strategy in PKU. Based on these

  14. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  15. Aetiological considerations of acquired aplastic anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Sarwar, I.; Mehmood, T.; Naz, F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anaemia is one of the important causes of pancytopenia. This study was conducted to observe the mode of presentation of acquired aplastic anaemia and to find out its possible etiological factors. Methods: It is a hospital based descriptive study of 100 patients of acquired aplastic anaemia. Results: Out of 100 patients 60 were male and 40 female. Majority (44%) of the patients were between 12 - 20 years of age. Patient presented with variable symptoms majority (40%) with fever. Most of the patients had haemoglobin levels between 4 - 6 gm/dl. (53%). Seventy percent of the cases had no obvious cause, while in 30% some known causative factors were found. Chloramphenicol was found to be the most common causative drug. Mortality was 35%. Thirty patients were partially treated and 15 were lost to follow up. Twenty patients showed improvement with treatment. Conclusions: Acquired aplastic anaemia is common among males and more prevalent in younger age group. It is idiopathic in 70% cases while 30% had some cause. It has very high mortality. Doctors need to keep in mind this fatal condition in patients presenting with anaemia and should properly investigate before prescribing antibiotics and haematinics. (author)

  16. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  17. Acquired dysfibrinogenemia secondary to multiple myeloma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlín, R.; Sobotková, A.; Riedel, Tomáš; Salaj, P.; Suttnar, J.; Reicheltová, Z.; Májek, P.; Khaznadar, T.; Dyr, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 2 (2008), s. 75-81 ISSN 0001-5792 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : acquired dysfibrinogenemia * amorphous clot * fibrinogen Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2008

  18. Acquired secondary Grynfeltt's hernia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renck, Decio Valente; Lopes Junior, Joao Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition whose diagnosis is hardly achieved. The prevalence is higher in elderly men. The present case report describes the case of a male, 78-year-old patient who underwent pleural effusion drainage 17 years before presenting with clinical manifestations and tomographic findings compatible with acquired secondary Grynfeltt's hernia. (author)

  19. Radiological pulmonary manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Ossa, Alfonso Jaramillo

    1999-01-01

    In this article are reviewed the principal radiologic manifestations of inflammatory and tumoral diseases the compromise the lungs of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In the group of inflammatory diseases the radiologic aspects of pneumocystosis, cytomegalovirus disease, cryptococcosis, tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonias are emphasized. In the neoplasic diseases' group the aspects of lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma are specially presented. (author)

  20. Some Characteristics of Patients with Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of studies relating the information from the history of patients with community-acquired pneumonia to the mortality of the disease. The relationship between age, sex, occupation, marital status, smoking history, alcohol use, concomitant COPD / bronchial asthma, source of referral and the mortality of patients ...

  1. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  2. A Case Of Bilateral Acquired Localized Lipoatrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Tanrıkulu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipoatrophy is characterized by inflammation and tissue loss in fatty tissue. This disease may be congenital or acquired, primary or secondary. Secondary lipoatrophy develops with infections, collagen tissue diseases, tumors and drug injections. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old female patient who developed lipoatrophy following intramuscular steroid injection to both buttocks.

  3. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  4. Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become a Member Home Early Development & Well-Being Brain Development A child’s brain undergoes an amazing period of development from birth ... neural connections each second. The development of the brain is influenced by many factors, including a child’s ...

  5. Tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Diana; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2013-06-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease for which the main treatment is the dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet has to be initiated in the neonatal period to prevent or reduce mental handicap. However, the diet is very restrictive and unpalatable and can be difficult to follow. A deficiency of the amino acid tyrosine has been suggested as a cause of some of the neuropsychological problems exhibited in phenylketonuria. Therefore, this review aims to assess the efficacy of tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria. To assess the effects of tyrosine supplementation alongside or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet for people with phenylketonuria, who commenced on diet at diagnosis and either continued on the diet or relaxed the diet later in life. To assess the evidence that tyrosine supplementation alongside, or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet improves intelligence, neuropsychological performance, growth and nutritional status, mortality rate and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional studies were identified from handsearches of the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (from inception in 1978 to 1998). The manufacturers of prescribable dietary products used in the treatment of phenylketonuria were also contacted for further references.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 28 June 2012. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials investigating the use of tyrosine supplementation versus placebo in people with phenylketonuria in addition to, or instead of, a phenylalanine-restricted diet. People treated for maternal phenylketonuria were excluded. Two authors independently assessed the trial eligibility, methodological quality

  6. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  7. Nutrition and dietary supplements in psychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Plemenitaš

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches to management of medical conditions are based on a holistic view, taking into account bidirectional connections between physical and mental health. The current pharmacologically focused model has so far provided modest benefits in addressing the burden of poor mental health. Convincing data suggest that diet quality and select nutrient-based supplements might influence a range of neurochemical modulatory activities, improving the management of mental disorders. Examples of these nutrient-based supplements include omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosyl methionine, N-acetyl cysteine, zinc, B vitamins (including folic acid, and vitamin D. The traditional Mediterranean diet is considered to be the most beneficial diet in our region. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we are increasingly aware of the role of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of mental disorders. Bidirectional signalling between the brain and the gut microbiome involving vagal neurocrine and endocrine signalling mechanisms influences mental and physical wellbeing. These findings suggest that using prebiotics, probiotics or in the strict sense psychobiotics, as well as incorporating fermented foods in the diet, could have a potential role in the management of mental disorders. As of now, we lack sufficient evidence to implement recommendations for dietary supplements in treatment guidelines, however, this might change in light of emerging data from contemporary research studies, at least for certain indications.

  8. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however, the brain is beginning to relinquish its secrets. Scientists have learned more about the brain in ... through the activity of these lobes. At the top of each temporal lobe is an area responsible ...

  9. Neurocysticercosis as an infectious acquired epilepsy worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Volkmer, Randy

    2017-11-01

    Aside from brain injury and genetic causes, there is emerging information on brain infection and inflammation as a common cause of epilepsy. Neurocysticercosis (NCC), the most common cause of epilepsy worldwide, is caused by brain cysts from the Taenia solium tapeworm. In this article, we provide a critical analysis of current and emerging information on the relationship between NCC infection and epilepsy occurrence. We searched PubMed and other databases for reports on the prevalence of NCC and incidence of epilepsy in certain regions worldwide. NCC is caused by brain cysts from the T. solium and related tapeworms. Many people with NCC infection may develop epilepsy but the rates are highly variable. MRI imaging shows many changes including localization of cysts as well as the host response to treatment. Epilepsy, in a subset of NCC patients, appears to be due to hippocampal sclerosis. Serologic and brain imaging profiles are likely diagnostic biomarkers of NCC infection and are also used to monitor the course of treatments. Limited access to these tools is a key limitation to identify and treat NCC-related epilepsy in places with high prevalence of this parasite infestation. Overall, NCC is a common infection in many patients with epilepsy worldwide. Additional clinical and animal studies could confirm common pathology of NCC as a postinfectious epilepsy that is curable. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. EDM forum supplement overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Ned

    2012-07-01

    The Agency for Health Research and Quality funded the Electronic Data Methods Forum (EDM Forum) to share the experiences and learnings from 11 research teams funded through three different grant programs, each of which involve the use of electronic clinical data in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research. This overview is meant to describe the context in which the EDM forum was created and to introduce the set of papers in this supplement to Medical Care that describe the challenges and approaches to the use of electronic clinical data in the three key areas of analytic methods, clinical informatics and data governance. The participants in the EDM Forum are providing innovative approaches to generate information that can support the building of a "learning health care system." The compilation of papers presented in this supplement should serve as a resource to others working to develop the infrastructure for collecting, validating and using electronic data for research.

  11. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  12. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  13. HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Borrione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 1400 herbal products or herbal-derived compounds are commonly commercialised for health uses worldwide (Tyler, 1996. Herbs are considered dietary supplements, and therefore are subjected to a very limited form of regulation, and advertisements normally highlight their potential activities without mentioning any side effect. Also, herbs are generally believed to be 'natural', and hence safe. Many nutritional supplements contains herb compounds usually not present in the diet (e.g. Ginko biloba, horse- chestnut, and only 10% of the herbs used in nutritional supplements are commonly present in the food (e.g. garlic, soy, blueberry, green the, ginger, curcuma (Eisenberg et al., 1993. There is much interest in "alternative natural approaches" in sport. It is appealing for athletes to use 'natural' substances with similar activity to 'pharmacological' ones in term of improving performance, are not considered doping, and are considered side-effects free (Table 1. Indeed, many herbal dietary supplements marketed on internet are presented as legal alternative to illicit drugs (Denneey et al., 2005. EcdysteroidsEcdysteroids are the steroid hormones of arthropods (Figure 1. They also occur in some plants, where they are known as phytoecdysteroids, and are believed to contribute to deter invertebrate predators. In insects, they regulate moulting and metamorphosis, may regulate reproduction and diapause. Most actions of ecdysteroids are mediated by intracellular receptor complexes, which regulate gene expression in a tissue- and development-specific manner (Lehmann et al 1989.Several phytoecdysteroids have anabolic growth-promoting effects on mice, rats, pigs and Japanese quails. Ecdysteroids stimulate muscle growth, and this anabolic effect promotes increased physical performance without training. Ecdysteroids are also able to increase muscle ATP content in vitamin D-deprived rats (Báthori, 2002. Ecdysteroids stimulate protein synthesis in the

  14. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo, E-mail: andreafariasm@gmail.com [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira de Pernambuco (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-15

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  15. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  16. Phylogenetically Acquired Representations and Evolutionary Algorithms.

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak , Adrianna

    2006-01-01

    First, we explain why Genetic Algorithms (GAs), inspired by the Modern Synthesis, do not accurately model biological evolution, being rather an artificial version of artificial, rather than natural selection. Being focused on optimisation, we propose two improvements of GAs, with the aim to successfully generate adapted, desired behaviour. The first one concerns phylogenetic grounding of meaning, a way to avoid the Symbol Grounding Problem. We give a definition of Phylogenetically Acquired Re...

  17. Acquiring Procedural Skills from Lesson Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-13

    Teachers of Mathematics . Washington, D)C: NCTM . Brueckner, I..J. (1930) Diagnostic aund remedial teaching in arithmetic. Philadelphia. PA: Winston. Burton...arithmetic and algebra, fr-m multi-lesson curricula. The central hypothesis is that students and teachers obey cc: :-.entions that cause the goal hierarchy...students and • . teachers obey conventions that cause the goal hierarchy of the acquired procedure to be a particular structural function of the sequential

  18. Brucella abortus infection acquired in microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, P L; Mastrandrea, S; Rappelli, P; Cappuccinelli, P

    2000-05-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated.

  19. Reversible chronic acquired complete atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovec, P; Milcinski, G; Voga, G; Korsic, L

    1982-01-01

    The return of atrioventricular conduction is reported in a case after nearly four years of complete acquired heart block. After recovery from atrioventricular block, right bundle branch block persisted, but P-R interval and H-V interval were normal. Three months later a relapse of second degree infranodal atrioventricular block was noted. A short review of similar cases from the literature is given.

  20. Domestically Acquired Fascioliasis in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberg, Scott A.; Perlada, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of domestically acquired fascioliasis are reported. Patient One was a 63-year-old male who developed a febrile illness 2 months after eating watercress in Marin County. Patient Two was a 38-year-old male who had eaten watercress with Patient One, and also developed a febrile illness. Both patients had eosinophilia and liver lesions on imaging. Diagnosis was made by serology and treatment was with triclabendazole. PMID:23836562

  1. Domestically acquired fascioliasis in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberg, Scott A; Perlada, David E

    2013-09-01

    Two cases of domestically acquired fascioliasis are reported. Patient One was a 63-year-old male who developed a febrile illness 2 months after eating watercress in Marin County. Patient Two was a 38-year-old male who had eaten watercress with Patient One, and also developed a febrile illness. Both patients had eosinophilia and liver lesions on imaging. Diagnosis was made by serology and treatment was with triclabendazole.

  2. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  3. Acquired Credit Unions: Drivers of Takeover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raymond Sant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study acquired credit unions and analyze their financial performance up to six years prior to merger, on a quarterly basis. The primary focus is on balance sheet (asset liability management and profitability variables (return on assets. We find that acquired credit unions during the period 2008 (third quarter to 2014 (first quarter experienced negative return on assets for several quarters prior to their takeover. This was the result of a declining loan portfolio and increasing charge offs. In spite of decreasing lending activity, such credit unions continued to increase their deposits, i.e., adding to their cost base. Due to declining loans, their net interest margin as a proportion of deposits was also in decline. We argue that this is an indicator of poor management ability. Furthermore, our analysis finds that operating expenses were increasing over time, something that has been documented in previous literature also for smaller credit unions and is attributable to lack of economies of scale. The average asset size of the acquired credit unions in our sample is about $22 million just before acquisition. We attribute our findings to poor business strategy followed by such credit unions. We also conclude that signs of trouble are evident up to two years before merger on average and regulatory policy may have to become more proactive to manage the consolidation challenge faced by the credit union industry in general.

  4. Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins ability to cross the blood brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... demonstration that Kenyan purple tea ACNs can cross the BBB, reinforcing the brain's antioxidant capacity. Hence, there is need to study ACNs as suitable candidates for dietary supplements that could support antioxidant capacity in the brain and have potential to provide neuroprotection in neurodegenerative conditions.

  5. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sookyoung Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group. All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  6. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  7. Determinants of dietary supplement use - healthy individuals use dietary supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Christina L F; Christensen, Jane; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2015-01-01

    influence the use of dietary supplements. Only few studies investigating the use of dietary supplements have been conducted in the Danish population. The present cross-sectional study is based on 54 948 Danes, aged 50-64 years, who completed self-administrated questionnaires on diet, dietary supplements...... and lifestyle between 1993 and 1997. A health index including smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diet, and a metabolic risk index including waist circumference, urinary glucose and measured hypertension were constructed. Logistic regression was used to investigate these determinants in relation...... to the intake of dietary supplements. We found that 71 % of the participants were dietary supplement users; female sex, older age groups and higher educated participants were more likely to be users of any dietary supplements. One additional point in the health index was associated with 19, 16 and 9 % higher...

  8. 48 CFR 1845.502-70 - Contractor-acquired property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Contractor-acquired... Possession of Contractors 1845.502-70 Contractor-acquired property. All contractor-acquired property must be... contractor-acquired. (2) Submission of DD Form 1419, DOD Industrial Plant Requisition, or equivalent format...

  9. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  10. Acquiring neural signals for developing a perception and cognition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Li, Yunyi; Chen, Genshe; Shen, Dan; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh; Lynch, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The understanding of how humans process information, determine salience, and combine seemingly unrelated information is essential to automated processing of large amounts of information that is partially relevant, or of unknown relevance. Recent neurological science research in human perception, and in information science regarding contextbased modeling, provides us with a theoretical basis for using a bottom-up approach for automating the management of large amounts of information in ways directly useful for human operators. However, integration of human intelligence into a game theoretic framework for dynamic and adaptive decision support needs a perception and cognition model. For the purpose of cognitive modeling, we present a brain-computer-interface (BCI) based humanoid robot system to acquire brainwaves during human mental activities of imagining a humanoid robot-walking behavior. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model. The BCI system consists of a data acquisition unit with an electroencephalograph (EEG), a humanoid robot, and a charge couple CCD camera. An EEG electrode cup acquires brainwaves from the skin surface on scalp. The humanoid robot has 20 degrees of freedom (DOFs); 12 DOFs located on hips, knees, and ankles for humanoid robot walking, 6 DOFs on shoulders and arms for arms motion, and 2 DOFs for head yaw and pitch motion. The CCD camera takes video clips of the human subject's hand postures to identify mental activities that are correlated to the robot-walking behaviors. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model.

  11. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  12. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF FOOD SUPPLEMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Magdalena; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Kamińska, Dorota; Długaszewska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists note that the food offered today - as a result of very complex technological processing - is devoid of many components that are important for the organism and the shortages have to be supplemented. The simplest for it is to consume diet supplements that provide the missing element in a concentrated form. In accordance with the applicable law, medicinal products include all substances or mixtures of substances that are attributed with properties of preventing or treating diseases with humans or animals. Permits to admit supplements to the market are issued by the Chief Sanitary Inspector and the related authorities; permits for medicines are issued by the Chief Pharmaceutical Inspector and the Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products. Therefore, admittance of a supplement to the market is less costly and time consuming_than admittance of a medicine. Supplements and medicines may contain the same component but medicines will have a larger concentration than supplements. Sale of supplements at drug stores and in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids or powders makes consumer often confusing supplements with medicines. Now there are no normative documents specifying limits of microbiological impurities in diet supplements. In Polish legislation, diet supplements are subject to legal acts concerning food. Medicines have to comply with microbiological purity requirements specified in the Polish Pharmacopeia. As evidenced with the completed tests, the proportion of diet supplement samples with microbiological impurities is 6.5%. Sales of diet supplements have been growing each year, they are consumed by healthy people but also people with immunology deficiencies and by children and therefore consumers must be certain that they buy safe products.

  14. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaohui, E-mail: lzhtrhos@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijingxbh@yahoo.com.cn [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopengf05@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Lv, Han, E-mail: chrislvhan@126.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Dong, Cheng, E-mail: derc007@sina.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Liu, Wenjuan, E-mail: wenjuanliu@163.com [Jining No. 1 People' s Hospital, No. 6 Health Street, Jining 272100 (China); Wang, Zhenchang, E-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition.

  15. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Li, Jing; Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition

  16. Issues in Nutrition: Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Barth

    2017-01-01

    The majority of American adults report use of one or more dietary supplements every day or occasionally. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 defines dietary supplements and regulates their manufacture and distribution. One of the most commonly used supplements is vitamin D. Measurement of serum levels of vitamin D must be undertaken with the caveats that different laboratories define normal levels differently, and that there is rarely a clinical correlation with the actual level. Patients should understand that supplements should not be used to excess, as there are toxicities and other adverse effects associated with most of them. There currently is considerable research being performed on probiotics and how the gut microbiome affects health and disease states. Protein supplements may be useful in reducing mortality rates in elderly patients but they do not appear to increase quality of life. If used, protein supplements should contain essential amino acids. Casein and whey supplements, derived from dairy sources, help transport essential amino acids to tissues. Although there have been many studies investigating the role of vitamin supplements in disease prevention, there have been few conclusive positive results. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  18. Bodybuilding supplementation and tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M S; Batley, H; Ahmed, F

    2015-07-10

    Supplementation is a key component in bodybuilding and is increasingly being used by amateur weight lifters and enthusiasts to build their ideal bodies. Bodybuilding supplements are advertised to provide nutrients needed to help optimise muscle building but they can contain high amounts of sugar. Supplement users are consuming these products, while not being aware of their high sugar content, putting them at a higher risk of developing dental caries. It is important for dental professionals to recognise the increased risk for supplement users and to raise awareness, provide appropriate preventative advice and be knowledgeable of alternative products to help bodybuilders reach their goals, without increasing the risk of dental caries.

  19. Acquired apraxia of speech: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollman-Porter, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is an acquired adult neurogenic communication disorder that often occurs following stroke. The purpose of this article is to review current research studies addressing the diagnostic and therapeutic management of AOS. Traditional definitions and characteristics are compared with current features that assist in the differential diagnosis of AOS. Prognostic indicators are reviewed in addition to how neuroplasticity may impact treatment in chronic AOS. Treatment techniques discussed include the articulatory kinematic approach (AKA), use of augmentative/alternative communication devices, intersystemic facilitation/reorganization, and constraint-induced therapy. Finally, the need to address functional communication through support groups, outside the therapeutic environment, is discussed.

  20. Acquired Methemoglobinemia - A Sporadic Holi Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masavkar, Sanjeevani Satish; Mauskar, Anupama; Patwardhan, Gaurav; Bhat, Vasudeva; Manglani, Mamta V

    2017-06-15

    To study clinical profile and outcome in patients with methemoglobinemia following exposure to toxic colors during Holi festival. This retrospective study included 112 children (5 to 12 years) admitted with methemoglobinemia after playing Holi. Clinical and treatment details were reviewed. The common symptoms were giddiness, vomiting and headache. Treatment included thorough skin wash, intravenous fluid and methylene blue in 111 children. Age 7-9 and > 11 years, vomiting, giddiness, cyanosis, PaO2 < 80 mm Hg and oxygen saturation < 95% were associated with higher need for methylene blue. All children had a good outcome. Timely diagnosis and management of acquired methemoglobinemia can save lives.

  1. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Juergens, R.; Steinbrich, W.; Diederich, N.; Koeln Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.) [de

  2. Trans-differentiation of neural stem cells: a therapeutic mechanism against the radiation induced brain damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeung Min Joo

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an indispensable therapeutic modality for various brain diseases. Though endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs would provide regenerative potential, many patients nevertheless suffer from radiation-induced brain damage. Accordingly, we tested beneficial effects of exogenous NSC supplementation using in vivo mouse models that received whole brain irradiation. Systemic supplementation of primarily cultured mouse fetal NSCs inhibited radiation-induced brain atrophy and thereby preserved brain functions such as short-term memory. Transplanted NSCs migrated to the irradiated brain and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. In addition, neurotrophic factors such as NGF were significantly increased in the brain by NSCs, indicating that both paracrine and replacement effects could be the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. Interestingly, NSCs also differentiated into brain endothelial cells, which was accompanied by the restoration the cerebral blood flow that was reduced from the irradiation. Inhibition of the VEGF signaling reduced the migration and trans-differentiation of NSCs. Therefore, trans-differentiation of NSCs into brain endothelial cells by the VEGF signaling and the consequential restoration of the cerebral blood flow would also be one of the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that exogenous NSC supplementation could prevent radiation-induced functional loss of the brain. Therefore, successful combination of brain radiation therapy and NSC supplementation would provide a highly promising therapeutic option for patients with various brain diseases.

  3. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  4. Botanical supplements: detecting the transition from ingredients to supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods were developed using flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) and chemometrics for the comparison of spectral similarities and differences of 3 botanical ingredients and their supplements: Echinacea purpurea aerial samples and solid and liquid supplements, E. purpurea root samples and solid s...

  5. Food supplements: survey of the ASL TO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valfrè, R; Bioletti, L; Spagna, S; Rolle, M; Zucaro, D; Vietti, F; Laurenti, P

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increase of the consumption of supplements reveals problems concerning the safety of use. Current legislation states that supplements must be free of any therapeutic purpose and must have quality guarantees for the users' safety. The operators of the of Hygiene, Food and Nutrition Service (SIAN) of ASL TO 3 (province of Turin) conducted a surveillance in order to asses the situation on the territory, to know the use and consumption in local gyms. During the official control at the manufacturers / packers of supplements, located on the territory of the ASL TO 3, labels of supplement produced / packed were acquired, to analyze the components indicated, to carry out a deep evaluation of the individual product . Updating of the register of companies located in the territory of the ASL TO 3 was carried out; and during the period October 2011-March 2013 the labels of the products of these companies have been found and analyzed. The detailed content of the labels (ingredients, dose, method of recruitment, composition, etc. ..) was written in a database. It was also checked how many local gyms marketed supplements, and, in a small sample, a questionnaire was administered to visitors, in order to assess consumption. 355 labels were acquired and loaded on the database. 80% of them falls within the category of supplements based on ingredients derived from plants or similar. For these products was evaluated the presence on the label of not allowed plant extracts (according to the Ministerial Decree of 9 July 2012): only 2 products (of the same company) contained an ingredient not allowed. In all the examined labels was evaluated the presence of the substances for which there are specific warnings: 97% of the label is compliant and 3% are not in compliance. In the analyzed products the indications for use mainly found on the labels are related to increased demand and/or reduced intake, followed by antioxidant action. The study also evaluated the sale of

  6. Electrical Signaling, Photosynthesis and Systemic Acquired Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Szechyńska-Hebda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical signaling in higher plants is required for the appropriate intracellular and intercellular communication, stress responses, growth and development. In this review, we have focus on recent findings regarding the electrical signaling, as a major regulator of the systemic acquired acclimation (SAA and the systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The electric signaling on its own cannot confer the required specificity of information to trigger SAA and SAR, therefore, we have also discussed a number of other mechanisms and signaling systems that can operate in combination with electric signaling. We have emphasized the interrelation between ionic mechanism of electrical activity and regulation of photosynthesis, which is intrinsic to a proper induction of SAA and SAR. In a special way, we have summarized the role of non-photochemical quenching and its regulator PsbS. Further, redox status of the cell, calcium and hydraulic waves, hormonal circuits and stomatal aperture regulation have been considered as components of the signaling. Finally, a model of light-dependent mechanisms of electrical signaling propagation has been presented together with the systemic regulation of light-responsive genes encoding both, ion channels and proteins involved in regulation of their activity. Due to space limitations, we have not addressed many other important aspects of hormonal and ROS signaling, which were presented in a number of recent excellent reviews.

  7. Acquired pulmonary artery stenosis in four dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Schober, Karsten E; Bonagura, John D; Smeak, Daniel D

    2008-04-15

    4 dogs with acquired pulmonary artery stenosis (PAS) were examined for various clinical signs. One was a mixed-breed dog with congenital valvular PAS that subsequently developed peripheral PAS, one was a Golden Retriever with pulmonary valve fibrosarcoma, one was a Pembroke Welsh Corgi in which the left pulmonary artery had inadvertently been ligated during surgery for correction of patent ductus arteriosus, and one was a Boston Terrier with a heart-base mass compressing the pulmonary arteries. All 4 dogs were evaluated with 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography to characterize the nature and severity of the stenoses; other diagnostic tests were also performed. The mixed-breed dog with valvular and peripheral PAS was euthanized, surgical resection of the pulmonic valve mass was performed in the Golden Retriever, corrective surgery was performed on the Pembroke Welsh Corgi with left pulmonary artery ligation, and the Boston Terrier with the heart-base mass was managed medically. Acquired PAS in dogs may manifest as a clinically silent heart murmur, syncope, or right-sided heart failure. The diagnosis is made on the basis of imaging findings, particularly results of 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment may include surgical, interventional, or medical modalities and is targeted at resolving the inciting cause.

  8. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  9. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Anand Mudar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches.

  10. Cortisol modifies extinction learning of recently acquired fear in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy builds on the mechanism of fear extinction leading to decreased fear responses. How the stress hormone cortisol affects brain regions involved in fear extinction in humans is unknown. For this reason, we tested 32 men randomly assigned to receive either 30 mg hydrocortisone or placebo 45 min before fear extinction. In fear acquisition, a picture of a geometrical figure was either partially paired (conditioned stimulus; CS+) or not paired (CS−) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus; UCS). In fear extinction, each CS was presented again, but no UCS occurred. Cortisol increased conditioned skin conductance responses in early and late extinction. In early extinction, higher activation towards the CS− than to the CS+ was found in the amygdala, hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus. This pattern might be associated with the establishment of a new memory trace. In late extinction, the placebo compared with the cortisol group displayed enhanced CS+/CS− differentiation in the amygdala, medial frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. A change from early deactivation to late activation of the extinction circuit as seen in the placebo group seems to be needed to enhance extinction and to reduce fear. Cortisol appears to interfere with this process thereby impairing extinction of recently acquired conditioned fear. PMID:23945999

  11. Functional outcomes of community-based brain injury rehabilitation clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christine; Dorstyn, Diana; Polychronis, Con; Denson, Linley

    2015-01-01

    Community-based rehabilitation can help to maximize function following acquired brain injury (ABI); however, data on treatment outcome is limited in quantity. To describe and evaluate client outcomes of an outpatient programme for adults with moderate-to-severe traumatic and non-traumatic ABI. Two phase design involving retrospective and longitudinal study of programme completers with ABI (n = 47). Changes in functioning were measured with the Mayo-Portland Inventory (MPAI-4), administered pre- and immediately post-rehabilitation and at 3 years follow-up. Self-ratings were supplemented with MPAI-4 data from significant others (n = 32) and staff (n = 32). Injured individuals and informants reported improved physical and psychosocial functioning immediately following the completion of community rehabilitation, with medium-to-large and significant treatment gains noted on the MPAI-4 ability, adjustment and participation sub-scales (Cohen's d range = 0.31-1.10). A deterioration in individuals' adjustment was further reported at follow-up, although this was based on limited data. Issues with longer-term rehabilitation service provision were additionally noted. The data support the need for continuity of care, including ongoing emotional support, to cater to the complex and dynamic needs of the ABI population. However, these results need to be considered in the context of a small sample size and quasi-experimental design.

  12. Teacher Perceptions of Music as a Supplemental Teaching Method for Reading and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Ronald J.

    2017-01-01

    Supplemental instructional methods are needed to help students achieve grade-level proficiency in reading and literacy in inner-city elementary schools. Teachers employ music concepts and skills during literacy instruction as a motivator for students to acquire proficiency in literacy and reading. Interviews, informal observations and focus group…

  13. 76 FR 14588 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Nonavailability Exception for Procurement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Nonavailability Exception for Procurement of Hand or Measuring... Subjects in 48 CFR Part 225 Government procurement. Ynette R. Shelkin, Editor, Defense Acquisition... requirement at 10 U.S.C. 2533a (Berry Amendment) to acquire only domestic hand or measuring tools. DATES...

  14. Food Components and Supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    The major part of food consists of chemical compounds that can be used for energy production, biological synthesis, or maintenance of metabolic processes by the host. These components are defined as nutrients, and can be categorized into macronutrients (proteins, carbohydrates, triglycerides......, and alcohol), minerals, and micronutrients. The latter category comprises 13 vitamins and a hand full of trace elements. Many micronutrients are used as food supplements and are ingested at doses exceeding the amounts that can be consumed along with food by a factor of 10–100. Both macro- and micronutrients...... can interact with enzyme systems related to xenobiotic metabolism either by regulation of their expression or direct interference with their enzymatic activity. During food consumption, we consume a wide range of xenobiotics along with the consumable food, either as an original part of the food (e...

  15. Food Components and Supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    acting as carcinogens) to health-protective effects (e.g., flavonoids ameliorating detrimental effects of mitochondrial oxidative stress). In particular, secondary plant metabolites along with vitamins, specific types of macronutrients and live bacteria (probiotics) as well as substances promoting.......g., secondary plant metabolites such as flavonoids), or as contaminants that enter the food chain at different stages or during the food production process. For these components, a wide spectrum of biological effects was observed that ranges from health-threatening impacts (e.g., polycyclic aromatic amines....... The supplements and contaminants can compete directly with drug oxidation, induce or suppress the expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, change the bioavailability of drugs, and, in the case of live bacteria, bring in their own xenobiotic metabolism, including cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity. In numerous...

  16. Image processing techniques for quantification and assessment of brain MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijf, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to acquire digital images of the human brain. A variety of acquisition protocols is available to generate images in vivo and noninvasively, giving great opportunities to study the anatomy and physiology of the human brain. In my thesis,

  17. Dietary Supplements for Health, Adaptation, and Recovery in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Eric S; Miles, Mary P; Larson-Meyer, D Enette

    2018-03-01

    Some dietary supplements are recommended to athletes based on data that supports improved exercise performance. Other dietary supplements are not ergogenic per se, but may improve health, adaptation to exercise, or recovery from injury, and so could help athletes to train and/or compete more effectively. In this review, we describe several dietary supplements that may improve health, exercise adaptation, or recovery. Creatine monohydrate may improve recovery from and adaptation to intense training, recovery from periods of injury with extreme inactivity, cognitive processing, and reduce severity of or enhance recovery from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Omega 3-fatty acid supplementation may also reduce severity of or enhance recovery from mTBI. Replenishment of vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency will likely improve some aspects of immune, bone, and muscle health. Probiotic supplementation can reduce the incidence, duration, and severity of upper respiratory tract infection, which may indirectly improve training or competitive performance. Preliminary data show that gelatin and/or collagen may improve connective tissue health. Some anti-inflammatory supplements, such as curcumin or tart cherry juice, may reduce inflammation and possibly delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) does not consistently increase strength and/or lean mass or reduce markers of muscle damage, but more research on recovery from injury that includes periods of extreme inactivity is needed. Several dietary supplements, including creatine monohydrate, omega 3-fatty acids, vitamin D, probiotics, gelatin, and curcumin/tart cherry juice could help athletes train and/or compete more effectively.

  18. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  19. Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) prescribes several approaches to achieve its goal of doubling the salmon and steelhead runs of the Columbia River. Among those approaches are habitat restoration, improvements in adult and juvenile passage at dams and artificial propagation. Supplementation will be a major part of the new hatchery programs. The purpose of the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) is to provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities, to construct a conceptual framework and model for evaluating the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and to develop a plan for better regional coordination of research and monitoring and evaluation of supplementation. RASP has completed its first year of work. Progress toward meeting the first year's objectives and recommendations for future tasks are contained in this report

  20. Merge or Acquire - A Strategic Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadhesh Pratap SINGH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Merger or acquisition is always a long-debated topic in the field of Strategy and Finance from a long time. This article proposes a strategic framework using five steps process to deal with this issue. The step one defines the objective of merger or acquisition. Second step deals with SWOT analysis. Step three follows the framework proposed by Dyer JH et. al (2004 to decide on when to ally and when to acquire. Step four applies Parenting Fit matrix. Finally, the fifth and final step carried out the valuation to take a call on the price for acquisition. All along this journey, the paper takes up a relevant example of Bank of America’s acquisition to Merrill Lynch and concludes.