WorldWideScience

Sample records for supervisors received training

  1. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus on the experi......This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus...... on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  2. Novice supervisors' tasks and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    2012-01-01

    were confronted with complicated jobs, e.g., group, internal and interdisciplinary supervision, but were not prepared, i.e. trained, prior to these tasks. These findings imply that more training is needed for novice supervisors. Preferably, this training should be introduced before, or at least...... parallel to, the first supervisor tasks, preparing the novice supervisors for the often complicated tasks they are meeting....

  3. Training facilitators and supervisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Binow; O Connor, Maja; Krogh, Kristian;

    At the Master’s program in Medicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, we have developed a faculty development program for facilitators and supervisors in 4 progressing student modules in communication, cooperation, and leadership. 1) A course for module 1 and 3 facilitators inspired by the apprentic...

  4. Training to Develop Savvy Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Charles D.; Forester, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Many companies face problems when they change their hiring practices in order to meet their evolving needs. A three-phase supervisory training program can help reduce those problems and make supervisors more flexible and more effective. The phases are process theory and application, documentation and decision making, and supervisory…

  5. Supervisor trainees' and their supervisors' perceptions of attainment of knowledge and skills: an empirical evaluation of a psychotherapy supervisor training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Eva C; Ogren, Marie-Louise; Boëthius, Siv Boalt

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the success of a 2-year, part-time training programme for psychotherapy supervisors. A second aim was to examine factors that might contribute to perceived knowledge and skills attainment during the training course. This is a naturalistic, longitudinal study where several measures are used to examine group process and outcome. Supervisor trainees' (N=21) and their facilitators' (N=6) ratings of learning (knowledge and skills), relations to the supervisor and supervision group, usage of the group, and supervisor style were completed at three time points. The findings suggested that both trainees and their supervisors perceived that the trainees attained a substantial amount of knowledge and skills during the course. In accordance with the literature and expectations, the regression analysis suggested a strong negative association between a strong focus on group processes in the initial and middle phases of the training and perceived knowledge and skills attainment in the final phase of the training. The expected, positive role of relations among trainees in the supervision group in the first half of the training and perceived knowledge and skills attainment in the final part of the training was obtained, whilst the hypothesized significance of the relationship between trainee and supervisor did not receive support. The supervisory course seemed to provide a training that allowed trainees to attain knowledge and skills that are necessary for psychotherapy supervisors. The results of this pilot study also emphasize the need of more research on learning in the context of group supervision in psychotherapy.

  6. Training Supervisors in Employee Performance Appraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ronald R.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents a training program for supervisors designed to improve an organization's performance appraisal system. Legal issues surrounding performance appraisal are discussed. Course topics include (1) definition and purpose of performance appraisal, (2) how appraisals can improve performance, (3) negative reactions and how to overcome…

  7. Novice supervisors' tasks and training - a descriptive study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus H.; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    , i.e. trained, prior to these tasks. These findings imply that more training is needed for novice supervisors. Preferably, this training should be introduced before, or at least parallel to, the first supervisor tasks, preparing the novice supervisors for the often complicated tasks they are meeting....

  8. 29 CFR 1960.55 - Training of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... well as other appropriate rules and regulations. (b) This supervisory training should include introductory and specialized courses and materials which will enable supervisors to recognize and eliminate,...

  9. MOECSW trains master trainers and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Ministry of Education, Culture and Social Welfare (MOECSW), as part of the Population Education Programs (formal and informal), undertook a series of training programs to upgrade the knowledge and skills of master trainers, supervisors, and resource persons. As part of the Population Education in the Formal School Sector Project (NEP/93/P01), under the Curriculum Development Centre five training courses were organized to train 220 master trainers. Under the "Three Steps Training Strategy," these 220 master trainers would teach 825 secondary school headmasters who would reach 2025 secondary school teachers. The training courses were held in Dhangadi, April 23-27, 1995; in Pokhara, April 2-7; and in Biratnagar, February 20-24. The areas covered included: 1) the pedagogical aspect of population education (content, scope, objectives, nature, teaching methodologies); 2) demography and population dynamics (composition, distribution and density, sources of population data, demographic transition, consequences and determinants of population growth); 3) family life and adolescence and human sexuality education, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education; 4) maternal and child health, and family planning; 5) environment; and 6) population policy and programs. As part of the Population Education Programme (NEP/93/P08), a Master Trainers Training Workshop was held in Makwanpur, March 26-28, 1995. These master trainers would train trainers who would train the facilitators and teachers at learning centers for adult learners under the literacy and post literacy programs. This course focused on the approaches and strategies for integrating population education in development programs, and non-formal education, adult literacy, post literacy, and out-of-school children programs. Dr. D. de Rebello and Mr. S. Hutabarat, CST Advisors on Population Education, organized the training courses and served as resource persons.

  10. School Counseling Site Supervisor Training: A Web-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jacqueline M.; Tyson, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    A need exists for training school counseling site supervisors in providing clinical supervision to school counseling practicum and internship students. This article outlines a Web-based training program containing six modules to assist counselor education programs in educating school counseling site supervisors. The authors also address the…

  11. Training the Trainers: Learning to Be a Principal Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Amy

    2017-01-01

    While most principal supervisors are former principals themselves, few come to the role with specific training in how to do the job effectively. For this reason, both the Washington, D.C., and Tulsa, Oklahoma, principal supervisor programs include a strong professional development component. In this article, the author takes a look inside these…

  12. Requirements for nurse supervisor training: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Khadijeh; Nasiriani, Khadijeh; Salimi, Tahere

    2016-01-01

    Supervisors should have certain characteristics and adequate preparation for their roles. Yet, there are no well-educated experts knowing about the supervisor's role and responsibilities and how to train them. So, this research was conducted with the purpose of finding the factors affecting nursing supervisor training. This research is an inductive content analysis. Participants were 25 in number, consisting of nurses and supervisors in Shahid Sadoughi University hospitals. The participants were chosen by a purposive sampling method. Data collection was done by semi-structured interviews and reviewing documents. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Findings included two main themes: Firstly, establishment of a supervisory infrastructure that includes "making the appointments and retention of supervisors, clarifying the duties and authority of supervisor, developing supervisory culture, specializing supervision, and conducting practice-based training" and secondly, comprehensive supervisory competencies that include "acquiring scientific, managing, communicative, professional, ethical, pedagogical, and supporting adequacy." Clinical supervisor has a major role in ensuring the quality of nursing care. This leads to improvements in patient care and nurses' personal and professional development. So, it is necessary that for effective supervision in nursing, first an infrastructure is provided for supervision and then the comprehensive competency of a supervisor is enhanced to apply effective supervision.

  13. The Supervisor and On-the-Job Training. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadwell, Martin M.

    This training book is designed to help supervisors give accurate and effective on-the-job training (OJT) to employees under their supervision. Chapter 1 identifies good and bad training and good and bad reasons for training. Chapter 2 examines human learning and three motivators: desire for reward, fear of punishment, and curiosity. Chapter 3…

  14. Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M B; Reid, D H

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated procedures for training supervisors in a residential setting to provide feedback for maintaining direct-service staff members ' teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Using classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback, 10 supervisors were initially trained to implement teaching programs themselves. The training improved supervisors' teaching skills but was insufficient to improve the quality of feedback they provided to direct-service staff regarding the staff members' teaching skills. Subsequently, classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback that targeted supervisors' feedback skills were provided. Following training in provision of feedback, all supervisors met criterion for providing feedback to their staff. Results also indicated that maintenance of teaching skills was greater for direct-service staff whose supervisors had received training in providing feedback relative to staff whose supervisors had not received such training. The need for analysis of other variables that affect maintenance of staff performance, as well as variables that affect other important areas of supervisor performance, is discussed.

  15. Supervisor's role in training programs as a manager of learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the training literature, a supervisor's role in training programs has two major elements: supervisor support and supervisor communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees' motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is interesting, but the role of supervisor's role as a predicting variable is less emphasized in a training program models. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effect of supervisor's role in training programs on motivation to learn using 152 usable questionnaires gathered from non-academic employees who have worked in a technological based public university, Malaysia. The outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed that the supervisor support and supervisor communication significantly associated with motivation to learn. Statistically, this result demonstrates that supervisor's role in training programs does act as an important predictor of motivation to learn in the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implication and conclusion are elaborated.

  16. Supervisor perspectives on the summative in-training assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarff, Catherine E; Bearman, Margaret; Corderoy, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    Assessment is a fundamental component of medical education and exists in many formats. In-training assessments are one such example and they serve to provide feedback to learners about their performance during a period of clinical attachment. However, in addition to trainee knowledge and performance, many factors influence the assessment given to a trainee. This study used an anonymous survey to investigate the perceptions of supervisors of the influences on their assessments of Australian dermatology trainees, focusing on the summative in-training assessment (SITA) format. A response rate of 41% was achieved. The importance of reporting underperformance and providing feedback to trainees was agreed on, but current limitations in the ability of the tool to do this were noted. Implications for practice are discussed including the education and support of supervisors, consideration of logistical issues, the process of SITA completion and supervisor appointment. Further research into the impact of supervisor concerns about potential challenges to a judgement and hesitations about making negative comments about a trainee are required. Examination of the trainee perspective is also required. Quality feedback is essential for learners to guide and improve their performance. Supervisors face many potential influences on their assessments and if these are too great, they may jeopardise the quality of the assessment given. Attention to highlighted areas may serve to improve the process, so allowing trainees to develop into the best clinicians they can be. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  17. EAP Referrals: From Supervisor Training to Client Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rob; Colan, Neil

    For several decades Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) have been a resource in the workplace to handle troubled employees. The areas of supervisor training and employee motivation provide opportunities for involvement of psychologists in the EAP field. Surveys conducted with EAP directors revealed that many programs are planning to do supervisor…

  18. Exploring differential effects of supervisor support on transfer of training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, D.J.J.M.; Nijhof, W.J.; Wognum, A.A.M.; Veldkamp, B.P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of other transfer‐influencing factors in a systemic approach of the transfer process. Design/methodology/approach – A rev

  19. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  20. SUPERVISOR COMMUNICATION IN TRAINING PROGRAM: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman ISMAIL

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough review of human resource development literature shows that theability of supervisors to use good communication styles in managingprograms will invoke employees’ motivation to learn, this may lead toincreased positive individual attitudes and behaviors. The nature of thisrelationship is interesting, but little is known about the influence ofemployees’ motivation to learn in training management literature. Therefore,this study was conducted to examine the effect of supervisor communicationin training program and motivation to learn on individual attitudes andbehaviors using 100 usable questionnaires gathered from technicalemployees who have worked in one city based local authority in EastMalaysia (CLAEASTMALAYSIA. Outcomes of stepwise regression analysisshowed that relationship between motivation to learn and supervisorcommunication had been an important predictor of transfer of competencyand job performance. Statistically, this result confirms that motivation to learndoes act as a full mediating role in the training model of the in theorganizational sample. In addition, implications and limitations of the study,as well as directions future research are discussed.

  1. Utilization of Online Training for On-Site Clinical Supervisors: One University's Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.; Schnurman-Crook, Abrina

    2001-01-01

    The need to train on-site clinical supervisors often clashes with the practicality of time constraints of a variety of counseling professionals, as well as a significant geographical separation. This article is an overview of how one university developed online training to provide supervision training to clinical supervisors unable to attend live…

  2. Supervision in neuropsychological assessment: a survey of training, practices, and perspectives of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Laura A Schwent; Pedersen, Heather A; Roper, Brad L; Rey-Casserly, Celiane

    2014-01-01

    Within the psychology supervision literature, most theoretical models and practices pertain to general clinical or counseling psychology. Supervision specific to clinical neuropsychology has garnered little attention. This survey study explores supervision training, practices, and perspectives of neuropsychology supervisors. Practicing neuropsychologists were invited to participate in an online survey via listservs and email lists. Of 451 respondents, 382 provided supervision to students, interns, and/or fellows in settings such as VA medical centers (37%), university medical centers (35%), and private practice (15%). Most supervisors (84%) reported supervision was discussed in graduate school "minimally" or "not at all." Although 67% completed informal didactics or received continuing education in supervision, only 27% reported receiving training specific to neuropsychology supervision. Notably, only 39% were satisfied with their training in providing supervision and 77% indicated they would likely participate in training in providing supervision, if available at professional conferences. Results indicate that clinical neuropsychology as a specialty has paid scant attention to developing supervision models and explicit training in supervision skills. We recommend that the specialty develop models of supervision for neuropsychological practice, supervision standards and competencies, training methods in provision of supervision, and benchmark measures for supervision competencies.

  3. Supervisor Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  4. Feedback from educational supervisors and trainees on the implementation of curricula and the assessment system for core medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gavin; Barrett, James; Jones, Mike; Parry, David; Wade, Winnie

    2008-10-01

    A pilot of core medical training (CMT) was conducted in 2006-7 with 160 trainees and 130 supervisors in the 10 hospitals within the Mersey Deanery. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to gain feedback from trainees and supervisors in relation to the components of CMT (the curricula, workplace-based assessments, appraisal, and the e-portfolio). There was generally a positive attitude to the CMT package. In particular the opportunities to give and receive feedback were appreciated; the e-portfolio was identified as helpful for recording assessment outcomes and supporting educational development for the trainees. The workplace-based assessments were well received. Many of the benefits of the components of CMT depended on the skill of the supervisor. The time required for effective training supervision and workplace-based assessments was identified as an important issue. This pilot was invaluable in informing the widespread implementation of CMT in 2007.

  5. Training Process Cycles for Special Education Teachers and University Supervisors: A Turkish Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuran, Sezgin; Ergenekon, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    In special education teacher training programs, the teaching practicum's role is both wide and extensive. Since, during this process, providing qualitative and satisfactory consulting services to supervisors is crucial, it is very important that university supervisors be experienced and have obtained proficiency in the field of consultation.…

  6. Industrial Safety. MAS-123. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to promote and monitor the industrial safety program at their plant. The following topics are covered in the module's individual sections:…

  7. The Supervisor Training Curriculum: Evidence-Based Ways to Promote Work Quality and Enjoyment among Support Staff (Trainee Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Trainee Guide for the Supervisor Training Curriculum" summarizes key points in the Curriculum and is meant as a note taking and reference tool. The Supervisor Training Curriculum instructs supervisors on ways in which they can direct and motivate staff working with people with intellectual disabilities. Based on three decades of applied…

  8. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Laharnar

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA.

  9. The Perceived Impacts of Supervisor Reinforcement and Learning Objectives Importance on Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Pucel, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This study, conducted within a Managerial Leadership Program in an oil refinery and chemical company in Korea, investigates the relationships between: perceived importance of training objectives and perceived transfer of training relative to those objectives, and types of supervisor reinforcement which trainees perceive to be most motivating and…

  10. On-The-Job Training: A Practical Guide for Food Service Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    The on-the-job training guide was developed to assist food service supervisors in preparing, presenting, and evaluating a Job Instruction Training (JIT) lesson, a method which employs step-by-step learning of job-related tasks. Part 1, preparing for a JIT lesson, discusses the checklist of duties, the job description, the skills inventory, the…

  11. DOE handbook: Guide to good practices for the selection, training, and qualification of shift supervisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. The Handbook incorporates editorial changes to DOE-STD-1061-93, ``Guide to Good Practices for the Selection, Training, and Qualification of shift Supervisors,`` and supersedes DOE-STD-1061-93. Technical content of this Handbook has not changed from the original technical standard. Changes are primarily editorial improvements, redesignation of the standard to a Handbook, and format changes to conform with current Technical Standards Program procedures. This guide, used in conjunction with a facility-specific job analysis, provides a framework for the selection, training, qualification, and professional development of reactor facility and non-reactor nuclear facility shift supervisors. Training and qualification programs based on this guide should provide assurance that shift supervisors perform their jobs safely and competently.

  12. Training organizational supervisors to detect and prevent cyber insider threats: two approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dee H. Andrews

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyber insider threat is intentional theft from, or sabotage of, a cyber system by someone within the organization. This article explores the use of advanced cognitive and instructional principles to accelerate learning in organizational supervisors to mitigate the cyber threat. It examines the potential advantage of using serious games to engage supervisors. It also posits two systematic instructional approaches for this training challenge – optimal path modelling and a competency-based approach. The paper concludes by discussing challenges of evaluating training for seldom occurring real world phenomena, like detecting a cyber-insider threat.

  13. Managerial work behavior and hierarchical level: implications for the managerial training of first-line supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodela, E S

    1991-04-01

    Mintzberg proposed that managers at all levels enact ten roles. There is, however, a relative importance ascribed to the various roles given the manager's location in the hierarchy. Like Mintzberg's ideas on the utility of ten roles, we found that managers at all levels, to varying degrees, need the three skills proposed by Katz. We have argued that a variety of roles and skills describe what managers do. At the same time, the predominance of one role or skill over another may be influenced by the location of the manager in the hierarchy. The question is not whether roles would be enacted at different levels or whether skills will be required, but whether one role or skill or a set of roles and skills will be predominant for the first-line supervisor. The first-line supervisor's work requires that he or she be predominantly proficient in the areas of human and technical skills in order to fulfill supervisory responsibilities. Current empirical research supports this assertion; however, the continuing study of managerial roles and skills and other variables such as functional specialty will offer other opportunities for the study of first-line supervisors. For example, will the predominance of the roles and skills that we have discussed vary if the supervisor is a line or staff manager or if the supervisor works in a production or service related organization? Organizations adapt to change to meet the expectations of those within and outside the organization with something at stake. Organizations need managers to facilitate the realization of organizational goals, so organizations need to continuously train managers, targeting appropriate roles and skills given each manager's location in the hierarchy. The preceding pages should provide resource materials to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating and designing the training and development of first-line supervisors. This roles-and-skills information can be productively utilized to assist the

  14. How personality traits affect clinician-supervisors' work engagement and subsequently their teaching performance in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2016-11-01

    Clinician-supervisors often work simultaneously as doctors and teachers. Supervisors who are more engaged for their teacher work are evaluated as better supervisors. Work engagement is affected by the work environment, yet the role of supervisors' personality traits is unclear. This study examined (i) the impact of supervisors' personality traits on work engagement in their doctors' and teachers' roles and (ii) how work engagement in both roles affects their teaching performance. Residents evaluated supervisors' teaching performance, using the validated System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities. Supervisors' reported work engagement in doctor and teacher roles separately using the validated Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Supervisors' personality traits were measured using the Big Five Inventory's five factor model covering conscientiousness, agreeableness, extraversion, emotional stability and openness. Overall, 549 (68%) residents and 636 (78%) supervisors participated. Conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness were positively associated with supervisors' engagement in their teacher work, which was subsequently positively associated with teaching performance. Conscientious, extraverted, and agreeable supervisors showed more engagement with their teacher work, which made them more likely to deliver adequate residency training. In addition to optimizing the work environment, faculty development and career planning could be tailor-made to fit supervisors' personality traits.

  15. Improving health and safety conditions in agriculture through professional training of Florida farm labor supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Maria C; Monaghan, Paul F; Tovar-Aguilar, J Antonio; Galindo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Roka, Fritz M; Asuaje, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Because farm labor supervisors (FLSs) are responsible for ensuring safe work environments for thousands of workers, providing them with adequate knowledge is critical to preserving worker health. Yet a challenge to offering professional training to FLSs, many of whom are foreign-born and have received different levels of education in the US and abroad, is implementing a program that not only results in knowledge gains but meets the expectations of a diverse audience. By offering bilingual instruction on safety and compliance, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) FLS Training program is helping to improve workplace conditions and professionalize the industry. A recent evaluation of the program combined participant observation and surveys to elicit knowledge and satisfaction levels from attendees of its fall 2012 trainings. Frequency distributions and dependent- and independent-means t-tests were used to measure and compare participant outcomes. The evaluation found that attendees rated the quality of their training experience as either high or very high and scored significantly better in posttraining knowledge tests than in pretraining knowledge tests across both languages. Nonetheless, attendees of the trainings delivered in English had significantly higher posttest scores than attendees of the trainings delivered in Spanish. As a result, the program has incorporated greater standardization of content delivery and staff development. Through assessment of its program components and educational outcomes, the program has documented its effectiveness and offers a replicable approach that can serve to improve the targeted outcomes of safety and health promotion in other states.

  16. 5 CFR 412.202 - Systematic training and development of supervisors, managers, and executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Systematic training and development of supervisors, managers, and executives. 412.202 Section 412.202 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS SUPERVISORY, MANAGEMENT, AND EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT Succession...

  17. Supporting transfer of training : effects of the supervisor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, Derk-Jan Jacob Matthias

    2004-01-01

    One of the best-known and most widely used ways to improve employee performance in organisations is the use of corporate training. As a consequence, the effects of training are of major interest to both scholars and scientists in the field of human resource development. The results of research indic

  18. Aging and training and development willingness: employee and supervisor mindsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vianen, A.E.M.; Dalhoeven, B.A.G.W.; de Pater, I.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined individual and situational factors that impact the relationship between age and employee training and development willingness. We proposed that the relationship between age and training and development willingness would be moderated by employees' entity self-theory and per

  19. Training of young researchers and PhD supervisors for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2004-01-01

    If Europe is to develop an integrated knowledge society and ERA, the research practice has to be developed. Further development of the research practice can among others take place through training of young researchers, which is not only based on the principles of apprenticeship, but a training...... which contributes to break down the usual ways of thinking and to incorporate both intercultural and interdisciplinary principles, and a valued orientation towards trade and industry. The PhD supervisors should also be trained so that light is thrown on the aims, methods and contents of the supervision...

  20. The influence of family-supportive supervisor training on employee job performance and attitudes: An organizational work-family intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Hammer, Leslie B; Crain, Tori L; Bodner, Todd E

    2016-07-01

    Training supervisors to increase their family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) has demonstrated significant benefits for employee physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among employees with high levels of family-to-work conflict in prior research in a grocery store context. We replicate and extend these results in a health care setting with additional important employee outcomes (i.e., employee engagement, organizational commitment, and supervisor ratings of job performance), and consider the role of the 4 dimensions underlying the FSSB. Using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 143 health care employees completed surveys at 2 time periods approximately 10 months apart, along with their supervisors who provided ratings of employees' job performance. Between these surveys, we offered their supervisors FSSB training; 86 (71%) of these supervisors participated. Results demonstrated significant and beneficial indirect effects of FSSB training on changes in employee job performance, organizational commitment, engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions through changes in employee perceptions of their supervisor's overall FSSBs. Further analyses suggest that these indirect effects are due primarily to changes in the creative work-family management dimension of FSSB. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Cross-lagged relations between mentoring received from supervisors and employee OCBs: Disentangling causal direction and identifying boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T; Butts, Marcus M; Hoffman, Brian J; Sauer, Julia B

    2015-07-01

    Although mentoring has documented relationships with employee attitudes and outcomes of interest to organizations, neither the causal direction nor boundary conditions of the relationship between mentoring and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) has been fully explored. On the basis of Social Learning Theory (SLT; Bandura, 1977, 1986), we predicted that mentoring received by supervisors would causally precede OCBs, rather than employee OCBs resulting in the receipt of more mentoring from supervisors. Results from cross-lagged data collected at 2 points in time from 190 intact supervisor-employee dyads supported our predictions; however, only for OCBs directed at individuals (OCB-Is) and not for OCBs directed at the organization (OCB-Os). Further supporting our theoretical rationale for expecting mentoring to precede OCBs, we found that coworker support operates as a substitute for mentoring in predicting OCB-Is. By contrast, no moderating effects were found for perceived organizational support. The results are discussed in terms of theoretical implications for mentoring and OCB research, as well as practical suggestions for enhancing employee citizenship behaviors.

  2. Core Competencies in Advanced Training: What Supervisors Say about Graduate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Graves, Todd

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to identify needed mental health skills, many professional organizations have or are in the process of establishing core competency standards for their professions. The AAMFT identified 128 core competencies for the independent practice of MFT. The aim of this study was to learn the opinions of AAMFT Approved Supervisors as to how…

  3. Core Competencies in Advanced Training: What Supervisors Say about Graduate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Graves, Todd

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to identify needed mental health skills, many professional organizations have or are in the process of establishing core competency standards for their professions. The AAMFT identified 128 core competencies for the independent practice of MFT. The aim of this study was to learn the opinions of AAMFT Approved Supervisors as to how…

  4. Training Issues for Supervisors of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Persons Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serovich, Julianne M.; Mosack, Katie E.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies three special issues and considerations Marital and Family Therapy supervisors might face with the increasing HIV/AIDS epidemic. Issues include: (1) the importance of educating therapists regarding various aspects of the disease process and transmission; (2) the ethical and legal ramifications; and (3) the considerations provided to…

  5. Training food service supervisors using hand-held computers to conduct nutritional screening of institutionalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta, J

    1995-01-01

    Six food service supervisors (FSSs) working in skilled nursing facilities were trained to use a hand-held computer, COMPU-CAL/PRO 5.1, to screen institutionalized elderly patients for selected nutritional variables and to record results in the medical record. The study demonstrates that hand-held computer-assisted nutritional screenings: (1) are readily adaptable to on-going efforts, (2) are useful in identifying potential indicators of poor nutritional status in institutionalized elderly patients, (3) can be taught to FSS in a relatively short time, (4) increase nutritionally relevant variables that can be assessed, and (5) improve the quality of documentation in the medical record.

  6. Role of Headmasters, Teachers, and Supervisors in Knowledge Transfer about Occupational Health and Safety to Pupils in Vocational Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Marie Andersson

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Teachers and supervisors did not plan the training in OHS in accordance with the provisions of systematic work environment management. Instead, the teachers based the training on their own experiences. Most of the supervisors did not receive information from the schools as to what should be included when introducing OHS issues in WPL.

  7. Evaluation of a training program for nurse supervisors who monitor nurses in an alternative-to-discipline program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiz, David; Truxillo, Donald; OʼNeill, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Nurse alternative-to-discipline programs aim to protect the public from the harm of impaired practice and to support nurses in early recovery from substance use disorders. Supervisor observation of work behavior is one key monitoring activity that protects the public. We evaluate a supervisory training called "Fit to Perform" for nurse managers to help them monitor and manage nurses enrolled in an alternative-to-discipline program. We observed significant mean changes in knowledge, training utility, self-efficacy, and substance abuse stigma. The results suggest that the training positively affects knowledge about substance use disorders, confidence to supervise nurses enrolled in an alternative-to-discipline program, and reduces stigma, which may create a supportive workplace for nurses in recovery.

  8. The national portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: experiences of registrars and supervisors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louis; Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-11-08

    In South Africa the submission of a portfolio of learning has become a national requirement for assessment of family medicine training. A national portfolio has been developed, validated and implemented. The aim of this study was to explore registrars' and supervisors' experience regarding the portfolio's educational impact, acceptability, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 purposively selected registrars and supervisors from all eight South African training programmes. The portfolio primarily had an educational impact through making explicit the expectations of registrars and supervisors in the workplace. This impact was tempered by a lack of engagement in the process by registrars and supervisors who also lacked essential skills in reflection, feedback and assessment. The acceptability of the portfolio was limited by service delivery demands, incongruence between the clinical context and educational requirements, design of the logbook and easy availability of the associated tools. The use of the portfolio for formative assessment was strongly supported and appreciated, but was not always happening and in some cases registrars had even organised peer assessment. Respondents were unclear as to how the portfolio would be used for summative assessment. The learning portfolio had a significant educational impact in shaping work-place based supervision and training and providing formative assessment. Its acceptability and usefulness as a learning tool should increase over time as supervisors and registrars become more competent in its use. There is a need to clarify how it will be used in summative assessment.

  9. Training-Based SWIPT: Optimal Power Splitting at the Receiver

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    We consider a point-to-point system with simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) over a block fading channel. Each transmission block consists of a training phase and a data transmission phase. Pilot symbols are transmitted during the training phase for channel estimation at the receiver. To enable SWIPT, the receiver adopts a power-splitting design, such that a portion of the received signal is used for channel estimation or data detection, while the remaining is used fo...

  10. Do Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (PHO) Fellows Receive Communication Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Wilson; Bylund, Carma L.; Kesselheim, Jennifer; Leonard, David; Leavey, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has established communication as a core competency for physicians in training. However, data suggest that most pediatric residents perceive inadequate training in the delivery of bad news and the majority of former trainees in pediatric oncology received no formal training in the delivery of bad news during fellowship. The study examines communication training in ACGME accredited US pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) fellowship programs. Methods An online survey was distributed to 315 PHO fellows in training via the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) fellow email registry. Each fellow received an initial request to participate and 2 reminders, while participation was encouraged through a random incentive drawing. Results One hundred and ten fellows (35%) responded. Eighty percent of respondents perceived communication training to be important to fellow education, however only 32% reported receiving communication training (other than direct observation). The most common reported teaching method of fellowship communication training was formal lecture (42%). Twenty-three percent of respondents reported neither communication training nor frequent feedback on their communication skills from faculty observation. This same group was the least satisfied with their programs’ approach to teaching communication (P communication training in PHO fellowships despite ACGME requirements and fellows’ interest in this training. Didactic learning remains the most frequently described training method, yet educational theory identifies the limitation of didactic lectures alone. Communication training employing novel teaching methods and emphasizing communication challenges identified by fellows should be developed and evaluated. PMID:24039096

  11. Training State and Community Instructors in Use of NHTSA Curriculum Packages: Driver Improvement Analysis, Driver License Examiner-Supervisor and Traffic Record Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, V. E.; Tiryakioglu, Dona

    A series of five national instructor training institutes were planned for each of three emerging highway safety technician areas for which curriculum packages have been prepared (Driver Improvement Analysis, Driver License Examiner-Supervisor, and Traffic Record Analysis). Technical Education Research Centers and Dunlap & Associates…

  12. Assessment of Clinical Supervisor Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy

    1999-01-01

    Presents a focus and process to assist those training clinical supervisors to assess competencies of the supervisor. States that process creates a practical framework that can be adapted for supervision competencies in other fields. Concludes that assessment methodology gives meaning to the support and structure vital at all levels of training…

  13. GP supervisors' experience in supporting self-regulated learning: a balancing act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Kramer, Anneke W M; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-08-01

    Self-regulated learning is essential for professional development and lifelong learning. As self-regulated learning has many inaccuracies, the need to support self-regulated learning has been recommended. Supervisors can provide such support. In a prior study trainees reported on the variation in received supervisor support. This study aims at exploring supervisors' perspectives. The aim is to explore how supervisors experience self-regulated learning of postgraduate general practitioners (GP) trainees and their role in this, and what helps and hinders them in supervising. In a qualitative study using a phenomenological approach, we interviewed 20 supervisors of first- and third-year postgraduate GP trainees. Supervisors recognised trainee activity in self-regulated learning and adapted their coaching style to trainee needs, occasionally causing conflicting emotions. Supervisors' beliefs regarding their role, trainees' role and the usefulness of educational interventions influenced their support. Supervisors experienced a relation between patient safety, self-regulated learning and trainee capability to learn. Supervisor training was helpful to exchange experience and obtain advice. Supervisors found colleagues helpful in sharing supervision tasks or in calibrating judgments of trainees. Busy practice occasionally hindered the supervisory process. In conclusion, supervisors adapt their coaching to trainees' self-regulated learning, sometimes causing conflicting emotions. Patient safety and entrustment are key aspects of the supervisory process. Supervisors' beliefs about their role and trainees' role influence their support. Supervisor training is important to increase awareness of these beliefs and the influence on their behaviour, and to improve the use of educational instruments. The results align with findings from other (medical) education, thereby illustrating its relevance.

  14. Does Research Degree Supervisor Training Work? The Impact of a Professional Development Induction Workshop on Supervision Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Alistair; Loeser, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Supervisor induction and continued professional development programmes constitute good practice and are enshrined in institutional policies and national codes of practice. However, there is little evidence about whether they have an impact on either supervisors' learning or day-to-day practice. Set in a discussion of previous literature, this…

  15. Usefulness of a virtual community of practice and web 2.0 tools for general practice training: experiences and expectations of general practitioner registrars and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    General practice training is a community of practice in which novices and experts share knowledge. However, there are barriers to knowledge sharing for general practioner (GP) registrars, including geographic and workplace isolation. Virtual communities of practice (VCoP) can be effective in overcoming these barriers using social media tools. The present study examined the perceived usefulness, features and barriers to implementing a VCoP for GP training. Following a survey study of GP registrars and supervisors on VCoP feasibility, a qualitative telephone interview study was undertaken within a regional training provider. Participants with the highest Internet usage in the survey study were selected. Two researchers worked independently conducting thematic analysis using manual coding of transcriptions, later discussing themes until agreement was reached. Seven GP registrars and three GP supervisors participated in the study (average age 38.2 years). Themes emerged regarding professional isolation, potential of social media tools to provide peer support and improve knowledge sharing, and barriers to usage, including time, access and skills. Frequent Internet-using GP registrars and supervisors perceive a VCoP for GP training as a useful tool to overcome professional isolation through improved knowledge sharing. Given that professional isolation can lead to decreased rural work and reduced hours, a successful VCoP may have a positive outcome on the rural medical workforce.

  16. Training Psychologists for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Raw World: A Rubric for Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Robert D.; Gorman, Angela A.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2009-01-01

    Empirically supported treatments (EST) hold much promise in relieving psychological distress and dysfunction. However, various obstacles to effective training and clinical practice have truncated dissemination efforts. One such obstacle is the perceived applicability of EST procedures to raw world clinical practice. This article proposes a rubric…

  17. Providing Competency Training to Clinical Supervisors through an Interactional Supervision Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer; Matlin, Samantha L.; Migdole, Scott J.; Farkas, Melanie S.; Money, Roy W.; Shulman, Lawrence; Hoge, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Training in supervisory competencies is essential to effective clinical practice and helps address the current national crisis in the behavioral health workforce. Interactional supervision, the approach used in the current study, is well established in clinical social work and focuses the task of the supervisee on the interpersonal exchanges…

  18. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are sca

  19. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  20. Returning the Favor: Positive Employee Responses to Supervisor and Peer Support for Training Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Tian, Amy; Cordery, John; Gamble, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on social exchange theory and associated notions of reciprocity, we argue that interpersonal support for training transfer in the workplace is associated with increased employee task performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and reduced turnover intention. We test our hypotheses using survey data from 786 Chinese retail…

  1. Supervisor as Supervisee: Factors that Influence Doctoral Students' Self-Efficacy as Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melodie Henson

    2009-01-01

    There have been many studies on supervising counselors-in-training; few researchers, however, have empirically examined the experiences of doctoral students as they train to become supervisors. More specifically, little is known about what factors influence the self-efficacy of doctoral students as supervisors-in-training while they work in the…

  2. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  3. Work force retention: Role of work environment, organization commitment, supervisor support and training & development in ceramic sanitary ware industries in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umamaheswari S, Jayasree Krishnan

    2016-07-01

    Although retention of employees has become hot topic in this career turbulent era, practically no empirical research is carried out in the fast growing ceramic sector till now and this research fills the gap in the literature. The literatures surveys reported that organization commitment is an important determinant of retention and work environment, supervisor support and training and development are the most relevant antecedents increasing commitment towards organization. This paper examines the impact of the above factors over organization commitment and explores the effects of organization commitment on retention, and verifies the mediating effect of organization commitment on the relationship between proposed factors and retention. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was completed by 416 employees working in five ceramic sanitary ware factories located at different places in India. Questionnaire consisting of items adopted from previous researches were used to collect data. The selection of respondents was based on the simple random sampling. Findings: Findings reveals that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhances it. Moreover organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retention. However multiple regression analysis indicated that training and development did not have any notable influence on retention. Limitations: This study was conducted in a particular country and also in a particular sector of manufacturing industry, which limits generalization .Possibility of bias towards their organization and assumption that respondents know about their organization are other limitations. Implications: This paper offers recommendations to HR(Human resource) managers that they should extend their support to work environment, supervisor support and training and development in order to generate better relationship with employees and to reduce their likelihood of leaving the company

  4. Work force retention: Role of work environment, organization commitment, supervisor support and training & development in ceramic sanitary ware industries in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umamaheswari S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although retention of employees has become hot topic in this career turbulent era, practically no empirical research is carried out in the fast growing ceramic sector till now and this research fills the gap in the literature. The literatures surveys reported that organization commitment is an important determinant of retention and work environment, supervisor support and training and development are the most relevant antecedents increasing commitment towards organization. This paper examines the impact of the above factors over organization commitment and explores the effects of organization commitment on retention, and verifies the mediating effect of organization commitment on the relationship between proposed factors and retention. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was completed by 416 employees working in five ceramic sanitary ware factories located at different places in India. Questionnaire consisting of items adopted from previous researches were used to collect data. The selection of respondents was based on the simple random sampling. Findings: Findings reveals that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhances it. Moreover organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retention. However multiple regression analysis indicated that training and development did not have any notable   influence on retention. Limitations: This study was conducted in a particular country and also in a particular sector of manufacturing industry, which limits generalization .Possibility of bias towards their organization and assumption that respondents know about their organization are other limitations. Implications: This paper offers recommendations to HR(Human resource managers that they should extend their support to work environment, supervisor support and training and development in order to generate better relationship with employees and to reduce their

  5. A PROJECT TO PROVIDE TEACHER-SUPERVISOR TRAINING NEEDED TO IMPLEMENT IN 12 SCHOOLS SERVICING DISADVANTAGED PUPILS THE PHILOSOPHY, OBJECTIVES, CURRICULUM, BEING DEVELOPED FOR DISADVANTAGED PUPILS IN THE NEW TYPE OF INTERMEDIATE (MIDDLE)SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TYREE, MARSHALL

    TWO OF THE 10 SESSIONS OF A TEACHER AND SUPERVISOR TRAINING PROGRAM IN PREPARATION FOR THE OPENING OF SOME OF THE NEW YORK CITY PILOT INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS WERE EVALUATED. DATA CONSISTED OF OBSERVER REPORTS AND PARTICIPANTS' RESPONSES TO QUESTIONNAIRES. THE PARTICIPANTS MAINTAINED A HIGH LEVEL OF ACHIEVEMENT AND COOPERATION DURING BOTH SESSIONS.…

  6. Statewide CBT Training for Clinicians and Supervisors Treating Youth: The New York State Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleacher, Alissa A.; Nadeem, Erum; Moy, Amanda J.; Whited, Andria L.; Albano, Anne Marie; Radigan, Marleen; Wang, Rui; Chassman, Janet; Myrhol-Clarke, Britt; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several states have undertaken efforts to disseminate evidence-based treatments to agencies and clinicians in their children's service system. In New York, the Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center adopted a unique translation-based training and consultation model in which an initial 3-day training was combined with a year…

  7. The pharmacy supervisor and the employee pharmacist's job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, M A; Kirk, K W

    1990-05-01

    It seems obvious that satisfaction with one's immediate supervisor would have a significant impact on one's general job satisfaction. However, this relationship has received little attention in the pharmacy literature. This study was designed to determine 1) whether there are differences in job-related satisfaction between pharmacists whose immediate supervisors are pharmacists and those whose supervisors are not pharmacists, and 2) whether the occurrence of conflict between a pharmacist and his or her immediate supervisor is related to the employee pharmacist's job and career satisfaction. The most pronounced finding was the importance of supervisors being pharmacists: satisfaction on five of six satisfaction subscales was related to whether one's supervisor was a pharmacist. Moreover, pharmacists who had the fewest conflicts and disagreements with their supervisors were more satisfied with their choice of pharmacy as a career, their employers, their supervisors, and their jobs.

  8. The training of specialists in Family and Community Health Nursing according to the supervisors of the teaching units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martínez-Riera, José Ramón; Mármol-López, María Isabel; Pastor-Gallardo, Francisco Javier; Gras-Nieto, Elvira; Holgado-Fernández, Ana

    To analyze the current situation of the training of specialists in family and community nursing from the perspective of nurses responsible for teaching units. Exploratory analysis using nominal group technique of the contributions made by representatives of 19 multidisciplinary teaching units in family and community care from 11 Spanish autonomous communities. They categorized and weighted those contributions. The emerging categories on the strengths and difficulties encountered related to the tutors, the environment where the training took place, the structure of the teaching unit, the organization of the teaching and the official programme of the speciality, the external supports and the theoretical training. Training in Family and Community Nursing is an opportunity to improve primary health care to train in news and necessary but complex skills. Support is required for training to be effective and the specialty and training should be made known. Tutors are a key part of this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. 10 CFR 36.51 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training. 36.51 Section 36.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Training. (a) Before an individual is permitted to operate an irradiator without a supervisor present, the... received on-the-job training or simulator training in the use of the irradiator as described in the...

  10. Effectiveness of a Training Program in Supervisors' Ability to Provide Feedback on Residents' Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond…

  11. Implementation of the participatory approach for supervisors to prevent sick leave : a process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijeveld, R. A.; Schaafsma, F. G.; Ketelaar, S.M.; Boot, C. R. L.; Bultmann, U.; Anema, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    To perform a process evaluation of a multifaceted strategy to implement the participatory approach for supervisors to prevent sick leave in three organisations. The implementation strategy incorporated a working group meeting with stakeholder representatives, supervisor training, and optional superv

  12. Doctoral Supervisor Education in Denmark: Aiming to foster reflective practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Kobayashi, Sofie

    Quality in doctoral supervision is an increasing organisational focus area for universities and the need for supervisor development and training is widely recognised. However, there is no systematic overview of competence development activities for doctoral supervisors in Europe in general and th......, the content and the quality criteria for good supervisor education. We hope that these insights can inspire the development in other European countries....

  13. Internship in School Psychology: Education and practice of the supervisor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Neto, Walter Mariano de Faria; Guzzo,Raquel Souza Lobo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the training and practice of the internship supervisor in the field of Educational Psychology. The research was carried out through semi-structured interviews with six internship supervisors. Data was collected into three groups, as follows: characteristics of the supervisor (emphasis on the importance of his/her personal and professional background); relationship with the working setting (knowledge on curriculum structure and on the relationship betwee...

  14. Perception of a sample of mathematics teachers on training received in the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Chaves Esquivel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to determine the perception of a sample of 249 mathematics teachers regarding the training received in their university. We identified strengths and weaknesses of the academic programs that train teachers of mathematics in the country, according to the teachers. The sample included educators trained in public and private universities, working at different educational regions of the country. The information was gathered through a questionnaire. Overall, educators perceive training in theoretical mathematics as the main strength. However, according to the scale used, all other aspects related to the formation process of a math teacher had a low perception. Within the mentioned weaknesses are: training in educational elements, evaluative, methodological, philosophical, psychological and historical, as well as the lack of adequate preparation in the use of technological resources in teaching. These opinions are a valuable input to the universities, because they show the opinions held by graduates of the training received.

  15. How Federal Employees and Supervisors View Performance Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampp, Lary C.; And Others

    A semantic differential instrument of four scales was used to evaluate employees' and supervisors' attitudes toward a differentiated performance appraisal training process. The sample included 237 employees and 83 supervisors in the Health Resources Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The study found the instrument…

  16. Effects of Supervisor and Supervisee Theoretical Orientation and Supervisor-Supervisee Matching on Interns' Perceptions of Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putney, Martha W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Findings from 84 interns from 32 nationwide training sites revealed that cognitive-behavioral supervisors were perceived to be in consultant role and to focus on skills and strategies more than were humanistic, psychodynamic, and existential supervisors, who were perceived more as using relationship model, playing therapist role, and focusing on…

  17. Making Training Stick: A Close Examination of How Trainee Readiness, Supervisor Support, and Practice Foster Transfer in a Mobile Technology-Based Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putter, Stefanie E.

    2013-01-01

    Although today's organizations are investing copious amounts of time, money, and resources on employee learning and development, trainees often fail to apply their learning and skills on the job, bringing into question the true value of organizational training. In an attempt to improve understanding of the key individual and organizational…

  18. Care, Thoughtfulness, and Tact: A Conceptual Framework for University Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The pedagogical work of university supervisors has received little attention in teacher education literature. Based on this concern, this paper provides a conceptual framework for university supervisors, recasting their role as teacher pedagogues focused on responding to the particular contextual needs of student teachers as they learn to teach.…

  19. Consistency of Supervisor and Peer Ratings of Assessment Interviews Conducted by Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Craig J.; Deane, Frank P.; Caputi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Observation of counsellor skills through a one-way mirror, video or audio recording followed by supervisors and peers feedback is common in counsellor training. The nature and extent of agreement between supervisor-peer dyads are unclear. Using a standard scale, supervisors and peers rated 32 interviews by psychology trainees observed through a…

  20. Supervisors interventioner ved parallelprocesser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2006-01-01

    Artiklen reflekterer over supervisors anvendelse af, holdning til og intervention ved parallelprocesser. Parallelprocesser betegner en række mere eller mindre forskellige fænomener, der alle har til fælles, at en relation eller et tema i det psykoterapeutiske forhold gentages i det supervisoriske...

  1. A Local Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, James

    1974-01-01

    Direct supervision of teachers for agricultural programs in Ohio is moving from the State to the local level. The primary function of the local supervisor is to improve the instruction in programs for high school and adult students in the Vocational Education Planning District. Other duties vary according to local policies. (AG)

  2. Supervisand og supervisor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet redegør for aspekter ved det komplekse forhold mellem supervisand og supervisor, og der anlægges en række forskellige perspektiver. Først beskrives forholdet fra supervisandens perspektiv. At indtræde i rollen som supervisand er, foruden at være lærerigt og fagligt udviklende, ofte også ...

  3. Supervisand og supervisor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet redegør for aspekter ved det komplekse forhold mellem supervisand og supervisor, og der anlægges en række forskellige perspektiver. Først beskrives forholdet fra supervisandens perspektiv. At indtræde i rollen som supervisand er, foruden at være lærerigt og fagligt udviklende, ofte også ...

  4. 49 CFR 232.203 - Training requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... training curriculum that covers the skills and knowledge the employee will need to possess in order to... satisfaction of the employee's supervisor or designated instructor; (6) An employee hired or working prior to... if the employee receives training and testing on the specific Federal regulatory...

  5. Scratching the Knowledge Base Surface of Ministry of Education (MOE English Teacher Supervisors in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ayatollah Razmjoo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the expert observation that the teacher “supervisor’s role is, in part, culturally defined” (Bailey, 2006, p.6, and the perceived gap that few supervisors receive formal training, in the current study, the researchers report on the views of Ministry of Education (MOE teachers and supervisors in the Iranian context as to what constitutes the knowledge base of supervisors. Having conducted qualitative content analysis on the data gleaned from interviews with the teachers and supervisors and open-ended questionnaires, we came up with a framework of supervisory skill/knowledge domains – one encompassing public relations skills, subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and contextual sensitivity. The results show that teachers by and large, by voicing their discontent with current supervisory routines, opt for humanistic supervisory procedures. The study, hoping to be taken up with more supervisory knowledge base studies, ends with advice on building supervisory preparation courses into existing teacher development programs. Keywords: Iran, language teacher supervision, knowledge base, Ministry of Education, pedagogical content knowledge

  6. Coming soon - Launch of e-learning initiative for supervisors

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    In early July, the Learning and Development group is launching a new learning initiative specifically targeted at supervisors here at CERN. With the assistance of  experts on the subject, we have designed an exclusive series of five e-learning modules. These modules will help supervisors to synthesise some of the important processes that influence and impact their daily work and build key competencies as people managers.   Each module may take up to a maximum of 60 minutes to complete and covers the following topics: • CERN as an Organisation • People Management (Part 1) • People Management (Part 2) • Financial Management • Administrative Information Tools for Supervisors Supervisors will receive an invitation from the L&D group to access the modules on a dedicated e-learning space created on SharePoint. We recommend that all newly appointed supervisors access and complete the five modules within the first month of taking up their su...

  7. Supervisor self-disclosure: supervisees' experiences and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Sarah; Edwards, Lisa M; Hess, Shirley A; Hill, Clara E

    2011-12-01

    Twelve graduate-level supervisees were interviewed regarding their experiences of supervisor self-disclosure (SRSD); data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research. When describing a specific SRSD experience, supervisees reported a range of antecedents (e.g., difficult clinical situation, self-doubt, tension in supervision relationship) followed by supervisor disclosures about clinical experiences or personal information. Supervisees perceived that their supervisors disclosed primarily to normalize, but also to build rapport and to instruct. The SRSDs had mostly positive effects (e.g., normalization), though some negative effects (e.g., deleterious impact on supervision relationship) were reported. Implications of these findings for supervision, training, and research are addressed.

  8. Do respiratory therapists receive training and education in smoking cessation? A national study of post-secondary training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Timothy R; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Wiblishauser, Michael; Glassman, Tavis; Thompson, Amy

    2011-10-01

    To assess the tobacco-related education provided by post-secondary respiratory therapy training programs in the United States. A cross-sectional research design was used to survey the entire population of program directors of post-secondary, respiratory therapy training programs in the United States. A valid and reliable questionnaire was developed and mailed using a 2-wave mailing technique (73% return rate). Internal reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha) for the various components of the questionnaire ranged from 0.78 to 0.91. More than half of programs (56%) offered no teaching on the 5R's. Nearly half (47%) offered no teaching on the 5A's. Of the 13 tobacco-related topics listed in the basic science and clinical science sections of the questionnaire, only one topic (i.e., diseases linked to tobacco use) received 3h or more of instruction by approximately a third of programs (35.8%). The majority of programs (>90%) spent no time teaching students about the socio-political aspects of tobacco use cessation. Moreover, 41% of programs did not formally evaluate students' competence in providing smoking cessation counseling to patients. Tobacco-related education is a very minor component of the education and training received by respiratory therapy students in the United States. Respiratory therapy training programs in the United States have great potential to strengthen the tobacco-related education that they provide to students. Practicing respiratory therapists would likely benefit from continuing medical education focused on how to use evidence-based smoking cessation counseling techniques with patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Are UK radiologists satisfied with the training and support received in suspected child abuse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, R.S. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nwachuckwu, C. [Department of Paediatrics, Whipps Cross Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Pervaiz, A. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Wallace, C.; Landes, C. [Department of Radiology, Royal Liverpool Childrens NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Offiah, A.C. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: OffiaA@gosh.nhs.uk

    2009-07-15

    Aim: To determine current practice and perceptions of the adequacy of training and support received for the reporting of skeletal surveys in suspected physical child abuse. Materials and methods: A list of telephone numbers of UK hospitals with a radiology department was obtained from Royal College of Radiologists. One hundred hospitals were then randomly selected for inclusion in the survey. An 18-item questionnaire was successfully administered to consultant radiologists from 84 departments. Results: Sixty-one percent of departments had a named radiologist to report their skeletal surveys, 16% assigned surveys to a random radiologist, and 23% referred them elsewhere. Only 52% of departments had a dedicated paediatric radiologist, thus in a significant proportion of departments (25%) initial reports on skeletal surveys for physical abuse were provided by non-paediatric radiologists. Fifteen percent did not have ready access to a paediatric radiology opinion. Sixty-one percent thought that the service could be improved. Expert evidence was provided by 5% of respondents. Seventy-three percent would never consider providing expert evidence, even if given adequate radiology and/or legal training. Conclusion: The survey shows significant dissatisfaction amongst consultant radiologists with the current service, confirms a low number of paediatric radiologists taking on this work, and suggests the potential to increase numbers of radiology child abuse experts by 27% if given improved training and support. Appropriate service and education strategies should be implemented.

  10. Development and Evaluation of Veteran Supportive Supervisor Training (VSST): Improving Reintegration of the Oregon National Guard and Reserves in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    include area code) 162 INTRODUCTION: The funded research project, Study for Employment Retention of Veterans (SERVe), addresses reintegration and...training was not a barrier to successful job completion, due to the military’s reliance on on-the-job training  Civilian life o Veterans generally do not...proposed research project addresses veteran reintegration and retention in the civilian workforce, health, and work outcomes among National Guard (NG

  11. Associations of Work Stress, Supervisor Unfairness, and Supervisor Inability to Speak Spanish with Occupational Injury among Latino Farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouser, Jessica Miller; Bush, Ashley; Gan, Wenqi; Swanberg, Jennifer

    2017-06-22

    Little is known about how psychosocial work factors such as work stress, supervisor fairness, and language barriers affect risk of occupational injury among Latino farmworkers. This study attempts to address these questions. Surveys were administered via interviews to 225 Latino thoroughbred farmworkers. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of occupational injury in the past year in relation to occupational characteristics. Work stress (OR 6.70, 95% CI 1.84-24.31), supervisor unfairness (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.14-9.73), longer tenure at farm (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.13-6.34), and supervisor inability to speak Spanish (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.05-5.00) were significantly associated with increased odds of occupational injury. Due to the associations between work stress, supervisor unfairness, supervisor inability to speak Spanish and injury, supervisor training to improve Spanish language ability and equitable management practices is merited. Future research is needed to understand the antecedents of work stress for Latino farmworkers.

  12. Midwifery students receiving the newborn at birth: A pilot study of the impact of structured training in neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Angela; Sweet, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The experience of midwifery students in receiving the newborn at birth, before and after structured training in neonatal resuscitation: A pilot study. The practice of receiving the newborn, including neonatal resuscitation is an essential component of midwifery. Anecdotal evidence suggests preparation for the task is ad hoc within midwifery curricula, leading to student's anxiety. This paper reports impacts of neonatal resuscitation training upon levels of knowledge, preparedness, and anxiety for midwifery students receiving the newborn. Midwifery students participated in an online questionnaire before and after neonatal resuscitation training. The responses collected were subjected to descriptive analysis. Of 10 students invited, 6 completed the pre and post course questionnaires. Knowledge of the responsibility in receiving the newborn and instigation of resuscitation increased after attending the course. Steps to prepare to receive the newborn and clinical signs for initial assessment remained static. Students felt more prepared to receive the newborn after the course but did not improve in their preparation to initiate resuscitation. Anxiety levels remained static. Structured neonatal resuscitation training and strategies to ensure application of skills learnt should be embedded into midwifery curricula. Midwifery students' experience in receiving the newborn and neonatal resuscitation is worthy of further study.

  13. Differences of energy intake and energy expenditure of elite Taekwondo players receiving summer vs. winter intensive training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kang Ok

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the energy expenditure and energy intake as an experiment of energy balance of elite Taekwondo players receiving summer vs. winter intensive training. The summer training group (STG, n = 15) and the winter training group (WTG, n = 18) wore an accelerometer for the measurement of energy expenditure and maintained a daily dietary record for measurement of energy intake, for seven consecutive days during summer or winter intensive training. The total energy expenditure (TEE) (834.1 kcal, p Taekwondo players should be considered.

  14. Supervisor Attraction as a Function of Level of Supervisor Skillfulness and Supervisees' Perceived Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Larry Ronald; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This laboratory analogue investigated the effects of supervisor skillfulness and supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity on the attraction of the supervisee to the supervisor. Results showed a main effect of supervisor skillfulness on attraction but did not show attraction to vary as a function of supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity.…

  15. Supervisor Attraction as a Function of Level of Supervisor Skillfulness and Supervisees' Perceived Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Larry Ronald; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This laboratory analogue investigated the effects of supervisor skillfulness and supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity on the attraction of the supervisee to the supervisor. Results showed a main effect of supervisor skillfulness on attraction but did not show attraction to vary as a function of supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity.…

  16. Food Service Supervisor. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food service supervisor component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; nutrient…

  17. Supervisor support: does supervisor support buffer or exacerbate the adverse effects of supervisor undermining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Henderson, Melanie M; Lim, Sandy; Vinokur, Amiram D

    2014-05-01

    Empirical investigations concerning the interplay between supervisor support and supervisor undermining behaviors and their effects on employees yielded contradictory findings, with some studies suggesting that support buffers the adverse effects of undermining, and others suggesting that support exacerbates these adverse effects. Seeking to explain such contradictory findings, we integrate uncertainty-management perspectives with coping theory to posit that relational uncertainty is inherent in the mixture of supervisor support and undermining. Hence, whether supervisor support buffers or exacerbates the adverse effects of supervisor undermining on employee health and well-being depends on factors pertaining to employee ability to resolve and manage such relational uncertainty. Specifically, we hypothesize a buffering effect for employees with high self-esteem and high quality of work life, and an exacerbating effect for employees with low self-esteem and low quality of work life. Analyses of 2-wave data collected from a probability stratified sample of U.S. Air Force personnel supported our predictions. Two supplementary studies of the U.S. military replicated our core findings and demonstrated its practical significance. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. An Analysis of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for Consumers with Hearing Impairments Who Received College or University Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Daniel L.; Wilson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive ability of vocational rehabilitation services for deaf and hard of hearing consumers who received college and university training. The RSA-911 database for fiscal year 2004 was analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of 21 services in leading to competitive employment. A model predicting…

  19. 20 CFR 1010.210 - In which Department job training programs do covered persons receive priority of service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In which Department job training programs do covered persons receive priority of service? 1010.210 Section 1010.210 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE... PRIORITY OF SERVICE FOR COVERED PERSONS Understanding Priority of Service § 1010.210 In which...

  20. 2006-2007 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2006-07 programme of lectures by filling in the 2006-07 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire, which can be found at: http://academia.web.cern.ch/academia/questionnaire/ If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received.

  1. 2006-2007 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2006-07 programme of lectures by filling in the 2006-07 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire, which can be found at: http://academia.web.cern.ch/academia/questionnaire/ If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received.

  2. The Role of Training in Reducing Poverty: The Case of Agricultural Workers Receiving Microcredit in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Kazi Tanvir; Parvez, Asif; Hilton, David; Kabir, G. M. Shamsul; Wahid, Ishraat Saira

    2014-01-01

    The policy of providing microcredit and skill training to poor agricultural workers in developing countries is well-established. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the effectiveness of the training part of that policy. BRAC (formerly the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), the largest non-governmental organization in…

  3. How to Cope with an Incompetent Supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Herbert S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problem of incompetent library supervisors in terms of the process that results in the selection of such supervisors, inappropriate supervisory behaviors, and the effects on employees. Several strategies for coping with an incompetent supervisor are suggested. (4 references) (CLB)

  4. Supervisor leadership in relation to resident job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Martha A; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Scheele, Fedde; Schripsema, Nienke R; Jaarsma, A Debbie C; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2016-08-01

    Research from outside the medical field shows that leadership behaviours influence job satisfaction. Whether the same is true for the medical training setting needs to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residents' overall appreciation of their supervisor's leadership and observation of specific supervisor leadership behaviours on job satisfaction. We invited residents (N = 117) to rate how often they observed certain task and relation-oriented leadership behaviours in their supervisor and overall appreciation of their supervisor's leadership. Furthermore, they rated their satisfaction with 13 different aspects of their jobs on a 10-point scale. Using exploratory factor analysis we identified four factors covering different types of job satisfaction aspects: personal growth, autonomy, affective, and instrumental job satisfaction aspects. Influence of overall appreciation for supervisor leadership and observation of certain leadership behaviours on these job satisfaction factors were analysed using multiple regression analyses. The affective aspects of job satisfaction were positively influenced by overall appreciation of leadership (B = 0.792, p = 0.017), observation of specific instructions (B = 0.972, p = 0.008) and two-way communication (B = 1.376, p = 0.008) and negatively by mutual decision-making (B = -1.285, p = 0.007). No effects were found for the other three factors of job satisfaction. We recommend that supervisors become more aware of whether and how their behaviours influence residents' job satisfaction. Especially providing specific instructions and using two-way communication seem important to help residents deal with their insecurities and to offer them support.

  5. Modulation of Circulating Angiogenic Factors and Tumor Biology by Aerobic Training in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Lee W.; Fels, Diane R.; West, Miranda; Allen, Jason D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Barry, William T; Wilke, Lee G.; Masko, Elisabeth; Douglas, Pamela S.; Dash, Rajesh C.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Marcom, P. Kelly; Kimberly L Blackwell; Kimmick, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic exercise training (AET) is an effective adjunct therapy to attenuate the adverse side-effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with early breast cancer. Whether AET interacts with the antitumor efficacy of chemotherapy has received scant attention. We carried out a pilot study to explore the effects of AET in combination with neoadjuvant doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide (AC+AET), relative to AC alone, on: (i) host physiology [exercise capacity (VO2 peak), brachial artery flow-mediated di...

  6. Management of Obstetric Perineal Tears: Do Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents Receive Adequate Training? Results of an Anonymous Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cornet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To evaluate the obstetrics and gynaecology residents' perspective of their training and experience in the management of perineal tears that occur during assisted vaginal delivery. We hypothesised that residents would perceive room for improvement in their knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and the training received in tears repair. Design. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Population/Setting. Seventy-two major residents from all teaching hospitals in Catalonia. Methods. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate experience, perception of the training and supervision provided. Results. The questionnaire was sent to all residents (=72, receiving 46 responses (64%. The participants represented 15 out of the 16 teaching hospitals included in the study (94% of the hospitals represented. Approximately, 52% of residents were in their third year while 48% were in their fourth. The majority of them thought that their knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy was poor (62%, although 98% felt confident that they would know when an episiotomy was correctly indicated. The survey found that they lacked experience in the repair of major degree tears (70% had repaired fewer than ten, and most did not carry out followup procedures. Conclusion. The majority of them indicated that more training in this specific area is necessary (98%.

  7. Genetic Counseling Supervisors' Self-Efficacy for Select Clinical Supervision Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Sabra Ledare; Veach, Pat McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M; LeRoy, Bonnie S; Callanan, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Supervision is a primary instructional vehicle for genetic counseling student clinical training. Approximately two-thirds of genetic counselors report teaching and education roles, which include supervisory roles. Recently, Eubanks Higgins and colleagues published the first comprehensive list of empirically-derived genetic counseling supervisor competencies. Studies have yet to evaluate whether supervisors possess these competencies and whether their competencies differ as a function of experience. This study investigated three research questions: (1) What are genetic counselor supervisors' perceptions of their capabilities (self-efficacy) for a select group of supervisor competencies?, (2) Are there differences in self-efficacy as a function of their supervision experience or their genetic counseling experience, and 3) What training methods do they use and prefer to develop supervision skills? One-hundred thirty-one genetic counselor supervisors completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographics, self-efficacy (self-perceived capability) for 12 goal setting and 16 feedback competencies (Scale: 0-100), competencies that are personally challenging, and supervision training experiences and preferences (open-ended). A MANOVA revealed significant positive effects of supervision experience but not genetic counseling experience on participants' self-efficacy. Although mean self-efficacy ratings were high (>83.7), participant comments revealed several challenging competencies (e.g., incorporating student's report of feedback from previous supervisors into goal setting, and providing feedback about student behavior rather than personal traits). Commonly preferred supervision training methods included consultation with colleagues, peer discussion, and workshops/seminars.

  8. Use of Pictorial Evaluations to Measure Knowledge Gained by Hispanic Landscape Workers Receiving Safety Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauske, Ellen M.; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Martinez-Espinoza, Alfredo D.; Orellana, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Landscape work is dangerous. In the Southeast, Hispanic workers predominate in landscape industries. The incidence of functional illiteracy in this group of workers is high. A pictorial knowledge-based evaluation instrument was developed to measure the effectiveness of the trainings. No reading skills were required to take the evaluation. The…

  9. Use of Pictorial Evaluations to Measure Knowledge Gained by Hispanic Landscape Workers Receiving Safety Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauske, Ellen M.; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Martinez-Espinoza, Alfredo D.; Orellana, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Landscape work is dangerous. In the Southeast, Hispanic workers predominate in landscape industries. The incidence of functional illiteracy in this group of workers is high. A pictorial knowledge-based evaluation instrument was developed to measure the effectiveness of the trainings. No reading skills were required to take the evaluation. The…

  10. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  11. 博士生培养过程中师生互动关系研究——基于博士研究生的视角%Supervisor-Doctoral Student Interaction Research in the Process of Doctoral training- Based on the Perspective of Doctoral Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓平; 梅红

    2012-01-01

    以全国博士质量调查结果为基础,借鉴国外师生互动关系研究、导师人际行为模型的思想,利用西安高校博士生调查数据,分析了博士生怎样看待导师对其的指导,并从学生的视角分析了体验到的不同师生互动关系对其科研创新能力的影响。结果显示:导师与博士生互动关系处于“高度合作+一定程度强势指导”和“高度合作+一定程度尊重学生观点和意见”时.更有利于博士生科研能力、创新能力的培养,有利于推进博士生的科研和学位论文进展。%This paper is based on the Chinese Doctoral Quality findings in 2007. Thinking to the research of foreign supervisor-doctoral student interaction and the model for interpersonal supervisor behavior, the paper analyzed the information about doctoral student's perceptions of their relationship with their supervisor can be useful for providing detailed feedback to supervisor aiming at improving the training quality. The results showed: when the supervisor-doctoral student interactive relationship in a "high degree of cooperation + certain extent the strong guidance, friendly helps" or "a high degree of cooperation + certain degree of respect and understand for student views and opinions", it is more conducive to the doctoral research and innovation ability, this interpersonal style also is conducive to promoting the progress of the doctoral student research and dissertation.

  12. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  13. The NA48 trigger supervisor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, R; Berotto, F; Bertolino, F; Govi, G; Menichetti, E; Sozzi, M

    2000-01-01

    The NA48 experiment aims to measure direct CP violation in the K/sub L//sup 0/ decays system with an accuracy of 2*10/sup -4/. High performances are required to the trigger and acquisition systems. This paper describes the NA48 Trigger Supervisor, a 40 MHz pipelined hardware system which correlates and processes trigger informations from local trigger sources, searching for interesting patterns. The trigger packet include a timestamp information used by the readout systems to retrieve detector data. The design architecture and functionality during 98 data taking are described. (5 refs).

  14. Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cader SA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Samária Ali Cader,1 Rodrigo Gomes de Souza Vale,1 Victor Emmanuel Zamora,2 Claudia Henrique Costa,2 Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas11Laboratory of Human Kinetics Bioscience, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State, 2Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, School of Medicine, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT and identify predictors of successful weaning.Methods: Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14 that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT® device or to a control group (n = 14 that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer.Results: The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H2O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4–10, and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/min/L, 95% CI −26 to 6 in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (Χ2 = 1.47; P = 0.20. However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08–18.06. The receiver

  15. The role of supervisor emotional support on individual job satisfaction: A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Sabine; Galletta, Maura

    2017-02-01

    Supervisor emotional support is a strong determinant of job satisfaction. There is no study examining the effect of supervisor emotional support at the group level on job satisfaction. Multilevel statistical techniques can help disentangle the effects of subjective assessments from those of group factors. The study's aim was to examine the moderating role of supervisor emotional support (group-level variable) on the relationship between work engagement and job satisfaction (individual-level variables). A cross-sectional study was performed in 39units from three Belgian hospitals. A total of 323 nurses completed a self-reported questionnaire. We carried out a multilevel analysis by using Hierarchical Linear Modeling. The results showed that the cross-level interaction was significant. Hence, at individual-level, the nurses with high levels of work engagement showed high levels of job satisfaction and this relationship was stronger when supervisor emotional support at group-level was high. Contextual differences among groups had an impact on the form of the work engagement-job satisfaction relationship. This relationship between work engagement and job satisfaction is an individual and group level phenomenon. Ways to enhance emotional supervisor support include training supervisors in providing support and enhancing communication between nurses and supervisors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Moving empirically supported practices to addiction treatment programs: recruiting supervisors to help in technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Maryann; Storti, Susan A; Larson, Mary Jo

    2010-05-01

    Federal and state funding agencies are encouraging or mandating the use of empirically supported treatments in addiction programs, yet many programs have not moved in this direction (Forman, Bovasso, and Woody, 2001 ; Roman and Johnson, 2002 ; Willenbring et al., 2004 ). To improve the skills of counselors in community addiction programs, the authors developed an innovative Web-based course on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), a widely accepted empirically-supported practice (ESP) for addiction. Federal funding supports this Web course and a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness. Since supervisors often play a pivotal role in helping clinicians transfer learned skills from training courses to the workplace, the authors recruited supervisor-counselor teams, engaging 54 supervisors and 120 counselors. Lessons learned focus on supervisor recruitment and involvement, supervisors' perceptions of CBT, their own CBT skills and their roles in the study, and implications for technology transfer for the addiction field as a whole. Recruiting supervisors proved difficult because programs lacked clinical supervisors. Recruiting counselors was also difficult because programs were concerned about loss of third-party reimbursement. Across the addiction field, technology transfer will be severely hampered unless such infrastructure problems can be solved. Areas for further investigation are identified.

  17. TRANSFORMED MOTORIC CHARACTERISTICS AFTER RECEIVED PROGRAMMED TRAINING PROCESS ON SUPERIOR KARATE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žarko Kostovski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is made on intentional sample of participants, members of Macedonian Karate Representation, in the period of preparing to qualify for the world championship in Tokyo 2008. Within the research, were used 19 (nineteen variables for evaluation the following motorics areas: tests for evaluate muscles strength, explosive strength, movement frequency of lower extremity, rhythmic and coordination. Basic purpose of the research was to establish difference within the variables to evaluate motorics abilities between male karate athletes on the age of 18 to 28 (seniors, after a nine-day programmed training in the period of preparing. Using comparative method the results from the both measures, whereby there were evident numerical improvement in the whole motorist abilities, but no difference in the levels of statistic significances.

  18. Major issues in the training of security personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauf, W.M.; Robertson, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of the response component of a physical protection system depends greatly upon the training received by the security personnel. The issues and problems in the area of training which were of greatest concern to the attendees of the 1980 and 1981 INMM sponsored Technical Workshops on Guard Training are discussed. The attendees were training supervisors of managers of security personnel and represented a variety of organizations and companies including DOE facilities, NRC licensees, the military, private security contractors, and governmental agencies. Major categories of concern include: professionalism in security, legal constraints and obligations, physical and psychological testing and standards, governmental requirements, morale and motivation, and tactical training techniques.

  19. The Effect of Supervisor's Locus of Control and Employee Behavior on Supervisor Attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Maxine

    Two theoretical areas that lend themselves to study as they relate to supervisor-worker relations are locus of control and attribution theory. This study examined two general problems: (1) how a supervisor behaves toward an employee in relation to how that employee performs in the work place; and (2) how a supervisor's locus of control influences…

  20. Training Directors' Perceptions about the Successful Implementation of Supervisory Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul

    1992-01-01

    In a sample of 285 (of 1,363) corporations, reports of supervisor reaction to supervisory training were assessed to measure program success. Results highlight the importance of training administrators' role in convincing supervisors and their superiors of the value of training before implementation. (SK)

  1. Ergonomics Risk Assessment with Participation of Supervisors in Production Line: a Successful Experience in Pars Khodro Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Mazloumi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: According to previous researches, workers' participation in issues affecting their working condition is the key to success in ergonomics interventions in working environments. Therefore, the present study was performed to increase active particapitation of supervisors in production line and also to identify and assess ergonomics risks and presenting modification actions (Kaizen by themselves in Pars Khodro automobile manufacturing company. Methods: A manual regarding lifting objects and body postures, according to the Finish evaluation method, was provided for supervisors in production line and related trainings were presented to them. Then, they were asked to insert the results of their assessments and suggestions in special forms during one year. The presented assessments and suggestions were examined by ergonomics experts. Results: According to the assessments conducted by supervisors, 26 work stations had high ergonomics risks, 51 had ergonomics risks with an average level, and 45 had low ergonomics risks. Moreover, the number of required Kaizens presented by supervisors was increased from 18 cases in the first year to 42 cases in the second year, after implementation of ergonomics training and identifying and assessing ergonomic risks by supervisors. Conclusion: Empowering and training supervisors increased workers' participation. In case of adequate training, supervisors can present practical solutions to reduce ergonomics risks in their workstations.

  2. Clinical supervision of psychotherapy: essential ethics issues for supervisors and supervisees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E; Molzon, Corey H

    2014-11-01

    Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of every mental health professional's training. The importance of ensuring that supervision is provided competently, ethically, and legally is explained. The elements of the ethical practice of supervision are described and explained. Specific issues addressed include informed consent and the supervision contract, supervisor and supervisee competence, attention to issues of diversity and multicultural competence, boundaries and multiple relationships in the supervision relationship, documentation and record keeping by both supervisor and supervisee, evaluation and feedback, self-care and the ongoing promotion of wellness, emergency coverage, and the ending of the supervision relationship. Additionally, the role of clinical supervisor as mentor, professional role model, and gatekeeper for the profession are discussed. Specific recommendations are provided for ethically and effectively conducting the supervision relationship and for addressing commonly arising dilemmas that supervisors and supervisees may confront.

  3. The Forgotten Educator: Experiential Learning's Internship Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosland, Jeffrey K.; Lowenthal, Diane J.

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have addressed the role of the university, student interns and, the faculty advisor; here, we attempt to fill in a missing piece of the experiential-learning process by examining the role and importance of the often overlooked internship supervisor. A survey was developed and distributed to 343 recent internship supervisors. Their…

  4. Supervisor Development through Creative Approaches to Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Catherine; Peseta, Tai; McCormack, Coralie

    2010-01-01

    The development of research higher degree supervisors is a relatively recent phenomenon. In most cases, supervisor development continues within the traditional workshop mode and remains firmly located within what Bob Smith calls the "administrative framing" of supervision. This framing ensures that a liberal and policy-orientated discourse retains…

  5. The Forgotten Educator: Experiential Learning's Internship Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosland, Jeffrey K.; Lowenthal, Diane J.

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have addressed the role of the university, student interns and, the faculty advisor; here, we attempt to fill in a missing piece of the experiential-learning process by examining the role and importance of the often overlooked internship supervisor. A survey was developed and distributed to 343 recent internship supervisors. Their…

  6. Effects of participating in skill training and workfare on employment entries for lone mothers receiving means-tested benefits in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Zabel, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates employment effects of further vocational training, short classroom training, as well as One-Euro-Jobs for lone mothers receiving Unemployment Benefit II (UB II) in Germany. Lone mothers receiving UB II participate in these active labor market programs at very high rates. As soon as their youngest child is aged three or above, their program entry rates are as high as for childless singles. This paper examines whether lone mothers can actually profit from partici-pating ...

  7. Developing a Compassionate Internal Supervisor: Compassion-Focused Therapy for Trainee Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Tobyn; Dixon, Alison; Kolts, Russell

    2016-07-25

    The concept of an 'internal supervisor' has been used in psychotherapy to describe the way in which the supervisory relationship is internalized and utilized by the supervisee. This research explores the possibility, and potential benefit, of training therapists to develop a 'compassionate internal supervisor'. A training programme was developed for trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists using adapted versions of compassion-focused therapy interventions. The training focused on guided imagery exercises and reflective practices undertaken for a 4-week period. Seven trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists were interviewed, utilizing a semi-structured format, regarding their experience of the training programme. The resulting transcriptions were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The analysis identified six super-ordinate themes: (1) the varied nature of the supervisor image, (2) blocks and their overcoming, (3) increased compassion and regulation of emotion, (4) impact on cognitive processes, (5) internalization and integration, and (6) professional and personal benefit. The themes describe the varied ways in which participants created and experienced their compassionate supervisor imagery. Working with the personal blocks encountered in the process provided participants with a deeper understanding of the nature of compassion and its potential to support them in their training, practice and personal lives. The process and impact of 'internalizing' a compassionate supervisory relationship is described by participants and then discussed for potential implications for psychotherapy training and self-practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Clinical supervisors' perceived needs for teaching communication skills in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, N Junod; Sommer, J; Hudelson, P; Demaurex, F; Luthy, C; Louis-Simonet, M; Nendaz, M; De Grave, W; Dolmans, D; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2009-07-01

    Lack of faculty training is often cited as the main obstacle to post-graduate teaching in communication skills. To explore clinical supervisors' needs and perceptions regarding their role as communication skills trainers. Four focus group discussions were conducted with clinical supervisors from two in-patient and one out-patient medical services from the Geneva University Hospitals. Focus groups were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed in a thematic way using Maxqda software for qualitative data analysis. Clinical supervisors said that they frequently addressed communication issues with residents but tended to intervene as rescuers, clinicians or coaches rather than as formal instructors. They felt their own training did not prepare them to teach communication skills. Other barriers to teach communication skills include lack of time, competing demands, lack of interest and experience on the part of residents, and lack of institutional priority given to communication issues. Respondents expressed a desire for experiential and reflective training in a work-based setting and emphasised the need for a non-judgmental learning atmosphere. Results suggest that organisational priorities, culture and climate strongly influence the degree to which clinical supervisors may feel comfortable to teach communication skills to residents. Attention must be given to these contextual factors in the development of an effective communication skills teaching program for clinical supervisors.

  9. Venue of receiving diabetes self-management education and training and its impact on oral diabetic medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Noxon, Virginia; Lu, Zhiqiang Kevin

    2017-04-01

    To determine predictors associated with the diabetes self-management education and training (DSME) venue and its impact on oral antidiabetic (OAD) medication adherence. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey household component (MEPS-HC) data (2010-2012) identified adults with diabetes prescribed OAD medication(s) who completed a supplemental Diabetes Care Survey (DCS). Based on the DCS responses to questions about the number and type of DSME venue(s), two groups were created: (1) multiple venues (a physician or health professional plus internet and/or group classes) vs (2) single venue (physician or health professional only). The medication possession ratio (MPR) measured medication adherence, with 0.80 the cut-point defining adherent. Logistic regression examined factors associated with the DSME venue and its effect on OAD medication adherence. Of the 2119 respondents, 41.6% received DSME from multiple venues. Age (medication adherence was suboptimal (mean MPR 0.66 vs 0.64, p=0.245), and venue showed no influence on adherence (OR: 0.92, 95% CI, 0.73-1.16). Sociodemographic characteristics influence where adults with diabetes receive DSME. Adding different DSME venues may not address suboptimal OAD medication adherence. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. How Does Supervisor Support Influence Turnover Intent Among Frontline Hospital Workers? The Mediating Role of Affective Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Helen M; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Bright, Charlotte Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Turnover among frontline hospital service workers can disrupt organizational effectiveness, reduce profitability, and limit the ability to provide high-quality, patient-centered care. This concern is compounded by the increasing reliance on frontline supervisors to manage this workforce, often without necessary training and support. However, research addressing the relationship between frontline supervisor support and intent to turnover among service workers and the process by which these variables are related is limited. By surveying 270 housekeeping and dietary service workers employed at 2 US hospitals, this study examined the relationship between supervisor support and turnover intent and assessed the mediating role of affective commitment between supervisor support and intent to turnover. Turnover intentions were lower for workers who reported greater levels of supervisor support and affective commitment; both supervisor support and affective commitment were significant predictors of turnover intent when tested individually. However, when controlling for affective commitment, supervisor support no longer predicted turnover intent, indicating that affective commitment fully mediated the relationship between supervisor support and intent to turnover. Implications for further research and organizational practice are discussed.

  11. Mobile learning: a workforce development strategy for nurse supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology provides opportunities for using mobile learning strategies in healthcare environments. To realise the vision of the National Workforce Development Strategy there needs to be innovation of health professionals to further develop knowledge and skills of clinical supervisors to access and gain an understanding of the value of mobile learning at the workplace. The use of digital technology by clinical supervisors was explored in 2012 as part of a teaching development grant to evaluate the use of Web 2.0 technology to develop a community of practice about clinical supervision. Prior to developing the virtual network of clinical supervisors, feedback about the use of Web 2.0 technology by clinicians was sought via an online survey. Over 90% of respondents used social media, 85% understood what a blog and wiki were and approximately half of the respondents used smart phones. More than one-third indicated they would participate in a virtual community of practice and would like to receive information about clinical facilitation at least once per week. Findings indicate both inhibitors and opportunities for workforce development within healthcare environments that need to be addressed. Support of graduate-ready nurses can be achieved through an integrated outlook that enables health professionals within organisations to undertake mobile learning in situ. A flexible and collaborative approach to continuing professional development within organisations could enhance practice development and could positively impact on workforce development.

  12. CERN's Merit Appraisal and Recognition System from the point of view of the supervisor

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The required training consists of 2 parts : This presentation explaining “CERN’s merit recognition system”, followed by a session of questions/answers – duration : 2 hours A training session on “How to get, as a supervisor, the most out of the annual interview” – duration : 1 day. This hands-on training focuses on how to set smart work and development objectives, how to give feedback and how to run the annual interview in a constructive way.

  13. Integration of Lower Level Supervisors into the Management Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-31

    sessions. Brief (2-3 hour) training "work sessions" could be developed to help lower level supervisors 4 solve specific problema . These sessions...34 In D. Cartwright (ed.), Studies in Social Power. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press, 1959. Gardner, B.B. & Whyte, W.F. "The man in the...line supervisory problem redefined." Personnel Journal, 1975, 54(12), 620-623+. Stouffer, S.A. "An analysis of conflicting social norms." American

  14. Misery loves company: team dissonance and the influence of supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate on team cohesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoverink, Adam C; Umphress, Elizabeth E; Gardner, Richard G; Miner, Kathi N

    2014-11-01

    The organizational justice literature has examined the effects of supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate, or a team's shared perception of the dignity and respect it receives from its supervisor, on a number of important outcomes directed at organizational authorities. Considerably less is known about the potential influence of these shared perceptions on coworker-directed outcomes. In 2 experiments, we predict that a low (unfair) supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate generates greater team cohesiveness than a high (fair) supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate. We further examine the process through which this effect occurs. Drawing from cognitive dissonance theory, we predict that low (vs. high) supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate generates greater team dissonance, or shared psychological discomfort, for team members and that this dissonance serves as an underlying mechanism through which supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate influences a team's cohesiveness. Our results demonstrate support for these predictions in that low supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate led to higher levels of both team dissonance and team cohesiveness than did high supervisor-focused interpersonal justice climate, and team dissonance mediated this relationship. Implications and areas for future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Ombuds' Corner: Supervisor and supervisee

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2010-01-01

    Starting with this issue, the Bulletin introduces a new series of articles aiming to better explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN. We will publish practical examples of situations of potential misunderstanding that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are imaginary and used only to improve clarity.   John* and his supervisor Pat* have been working together for about four years, during which time they have had several disagreements and a few real explosions. They usually avoid each other for some time after each incident until things calm down again. During a meeting between them concerning objectives, the latent tension between them resulted in a fight during which John told Pat that she was mobbing him. Pat ended the meeting by throwing John out of her office. She said that she was no longer prepared to talk to him alone. John asked the Ombuds to facilitate the situation. When cont...

  16. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowl...

  17. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain the...

  18. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a goo...

  19. Supervisor or mentor: is there a difference? Implications for paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Andrew; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah

    2015-09-01

    The formal roles of educational and clinical supervisor focus on education planning and goal setting against required training elements. Assessment of performance is integral to these roles that necessarily involve some elements of developmental support to trainees. Mentoring is increasingly seen as a desirable route to support doctors in training. Definitions vary, but core expectations of mentors are that they encourage personal development and offer psychosocial support to a trainee within a longitudinal relationship. A key question is whether a supervisor is the appropriate individual to act as a mentor to an individual trainee. The supervisor's role as an assessor of performance can pose challenges and potential conflicts when providing support relating to other personal needs of trainees along their career paths. It is apparent from the literature that mentoring is a multifaceted role, with different actions required of mentors and supervisors. There is evidence that mentorship can affect specialty choice, academic output and commitment to organisations. Addressing the challenges posed by an ideal of providing mentoring to all trainees is potentially as important as ensuring supervisors of competence. The potential benefits for the profession are of enhancing the development and retention of trainees of high calibre within the paediatric discipline.

  20. A Mobile-Based Community Health Management Information System for Community Health Workers and Their Supervisors in 2 Districts of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemba, Godfrey; Chiluba, Boniface; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Silavwe, Vichaels; Lunze, Karsten; Mwale, Rodgers K; Russpatrick, Scott; Hamer, Davidson H

    2017-09-27

    Effective community health management information systems (C-HMIS) are important in low-resource countries that rely heavily on community-based health care providers. Zambia currently lacks a functioning C-HMIS to provide real-time, community-based health information from community health workers (CHWs) to health center staff and higher levels of the health system. We developed a C-HMIS mobile platform for use by CHWs providing integrated community case management (iCCM) services and their supervisors to address challenges of frequent stock-outs and inadequate supportive supervision of iCCM-trained CHWs. The platform used simple feature mobile phones on which were loaded the District Health Information System version 2 (DHIS2) software and Java 2 platform micro edition (J2ME) aggregation and tracker applications. This project was implemented in Chipata and Chadiza districts, which supported previous mHealth programs and had cellular coverage from all 3 major network carriers in Zambia. A total of 40 CHWs and 20 CHW supervisors received mobile phones with data bundles and training in the mobile application, after which they implemented the program over a period of 5.5 months, from February to mid-July 2016. CHWs used the mobile phones to submit data on iCCM cases seen, managed, and referred, as well as iCCM medical and diagnostic supplies received and dispensed. Using their mobile phones, the supervisors tracked CHWs' reported cases with medicine consumption, sent CHWs feedback on their referrals, and received SMS reminders to set up mentorship sessions. CHWs were able to use the mobile application to send weekly reports to health center supervisors on disease caseloads and medical commodities consumed, to make drug and supply requisitions, and to send pre-referral notices to health centers. Health center staff used the mobile system to provide feedback to CHWs on the case outcomes of referred patients and to receive automated monthly SMS reminders to invite CHWs to

  1. Modulation of circulating angiogenic factors and tumor biology by aerobic training in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lee W; Fels, Diane R; West, Miranda; Allen, Jason D; Broadwater, Gloria; Barry, William T; Wilke, Lee G; Masko, Elisabeth; Douglas, Pamela S; Dash, Rajesh C; Povsic, Thomas J; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Marcom, P Kelly; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Kimmick, Gretchen; Turkington, Timothy G; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Aerobic exercise training (AET) is an effective adjunct therapy to attenuate the adverse side-effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with early breast cancer. Whether AET interacts with the antitumor efficacy of chemotherapy has received scant attention. We carried out a pilot study to explore the effects of AET in combination with neoadjuvant doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide (AC+AET), relative to AC alone, on: (i) host physiology [exercise capacity (VO2 peak), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BA-FMD)], (ii) host-related circulating factors [circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAF)], and (iii) tumor phenotype [tumor blood flow ((15)O-water PET), tissue markers (hypoxia and proliferation), and gene expression] in 20 women with operable breast cancer. AET consisted of three supervised cycle ergometry sessions/week at 60% to 100% of VO2 peak, 30 to 45 min/session, for 12 weeks. There was significant time × group interactions for VO2 peak and BA-FMD, favoring the AC+AET group (P 0.05). Whole-genome microarray tumor analysis revealed significant differential modulation of 57 pathways (P < 0.01), including many that converge on NF-κB. Data from this exploratory study provide initial evidence that AET can modulate several host- and tumor-related pathways during standard chemotherapy. The biologic and clinical implications remain to be determined.

  2. Safety and Health for Industrial/Vocational Education; for Supervisors and Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firenze, Robert J.; Walters, James B.

    This course is designed to enable industrial/vocational education supervisors and instructors to establish and administer effective safety and health programs in their schools. Although the course is intended as complete training to be given over a 3-day period, it may be divided into individual units for presentation over longer periods of time.…

  3. Management competencies required in the transition from a technician to a supervisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibongile R. Mahlangu (Kubheka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Technicians are frequently promoted to supervisory positions based on their technical abilities, with scant attention focused on developing management competencies. This oversight often poses significant challenges. The effective transition from technician to supervisor is important in any organisation.Research objective: The primary objective is to identify and verify the competencies that are required for a technician and a supervisory position; the secondary objective is to identify the gap that must be filled with relevant training interventions to enable technicians to make an effective transition to a supervisory position.Motivation for this study: The identification of the management competencies required for a technician who makes a career change to a supervisor position.Research method: The sequential mixed method approach was used to enable the twophase data collection process: phase one was the quantitative phase and phase two was the qualitative phase. Main findings: The overall findings confirm that there are indeed management competencies that technicians require training and development on before being promoted to a supervisory position.Implication: Organisations need to identify the key competencies for a technician and a supervisor and implement development or training interventions that are essential to successfully transition an employee from the level of a technician to the level of a supervisor.Contribution: Organisations need to implement essential development or training interventions focused on developing management competencies and put in place support interventions such as coaching, job shadowing, mentoring and networking.

  4. Manager/Supervisor Perceptions of the Educational Needs of Urban Agribusiness Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbstreit, Steven R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study assessed the perceptions of 65 (of 72 surveyed) urban agribusiness managers/supervisors regarding the need for education or training for employees they supervise. Results showed that those who plan and conduct adult agriculture programs should work cooperatively with agribusinesses to develop programs that meet the needs of each…

  5. Supervisor Involvement and Professional Development Needs Associated with SAE Programming and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Rebecca G.; Pate, Michael L.; Sorensen, Tyson J.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive survey research study sought to gather evidence of school-based agriculture teachers' perceptions of community supervisor involvement with supervision and planning of students' Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) work activities and safety training professional development needs. Responding teachers indicated they agreed to…

  6. Evaluating Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Changes among Counselor Educators and Site Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Veronica; Reese, Mary Kate; Campos, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of pretest-posttest scores on the Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Instrument (Page & Hulse-Killacky, [Page, B. J., 1999]) following a supervision workshop indicated a significant positive relationship between workshop training and supervisors' feedback self-efficacy in giving corrective feedback. Furthermore, the association…

  7. Supervisor Attachment, Supervisory Working Alliance, and Affect in Social Work Field Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Susanne; Mohr, Jonathan; Deal, Kathleen Holtz; Hwang, Jeongha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study focused on interrelationships among supervisor attachment, supervisory working alliance, and supervision-related affect, plus the moderating effect of a field instructor training. Method: The researchers employed a pretest-posttest follow-up design of 100 randomly assigned field instructors and 64 students in two…

  8. Clinical Supervision Model in Teaching Practice: Does It Make a Difference in Supervisors' Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Esim; Kesner, John Edward; Salihoglu, Umut Muharrem

    2016-01-01

    In search for better practices there has been a plethora of research in preservice teacher training. To contribute to the literature, the current study aims at investigating teacher trainees' and cooperating teachers' views about the performance and contribution of supervisors during teaching practice after using Clinical Supervision Model.…

  9. 42 CFR 493.1451 - Standard: Technical supervisor responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and the test system is functioning properly; (7) Identifying training needs and assuring that each individual performing tests receives regular in-service training and education appropriate for the type...

  10. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Recreational Football Training in Men with Type 2 Diabetes, Untrained Elderly Men and in Men with Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jakob Friis

    Numerous people in the general population are not suffuciently physically active and the use of new exercise training modalities which could promote physically active lifestyles are important. The present PhD thesis includes studies , which investigated the effect of recreational football training...... in middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes, 65-75-year-old untrained men, men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy and the effect of life-long participation in football training in veteran football players. The primary purpose was to evaluate the structure and function of the heart...

  11. Effects of communication training on real practice performance: a role-play module versus a standardized patient module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Claudia; Woermann, Ulrich; Shaha, Maya; Rethans, Jan-Joost; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of modules involving standardized patients and role-plays on training communication skills. The first module involved standardized patients and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE); the second module consisted of peer role-plays and a written examination. A randomized posttest-only control group design with first-year nursing students was used. The intervention group received one-to-one communication training with direct oral feedback from the standardized patient. The control group had training with peer role-playing and mutual feedback. The posttest involved students' rating their self-efficacy, and real patients and clinical supervisors evaluated their communication skills. No significant differences were found between self-efficacy and patient ratings. However, the clinical supervisors rated the intervention group's communication skills to be significantly (p communication training modules including standardized patients and an OSCE are superior to communication training modules with peer role-playing.

  12. Measuring the Effectiveness of a Genetic Counseling Supervision Training Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Carrie L; He, Hua; Wusik, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Genetic counselors who receive formal training report increased confidence and competence in their supervisory roles. The effectiveness of specific formal supervision training has not been assessed previously. A day-long GC supervision conference was designed based on published supervision competencies and was attended by 37 genetic counselors. Linear Mixed Model and post-hoc paired t-test was used to compare Psychotherapy Supervisor Development Scale (PSDS) scores among/between individuals pre and post conference. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model and post-hoc McNemar's test was used to determine if the conference had an effect on GC supervision competencies. PSDS scores were significantly increased 1 week (p competencies, attendees were more likely to agree they were able to perform them after the conference than before. These effects remained significant 6 months later. For the three remaining competencies, the majority of supervisors agreed they could perform these before the conference; therefore, no change was found. This exploratory study showed this conference increased the perceived confidence and competence of the supervisors who attended and increased their self-reported ability to perform certain supervision competencies. While still preliminary, this supports the idea that a one day conference on supervision has the potential to impact supervisor development.

  13. Listening to and Sharing of Self in Psychoanalytic Supervision: The Supervisor's Self-Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C Edward

    2016-08-01

    Just as the analyst's self-perspective is critical to effective analytic process, the supervisor's self-perspective is accordingly critical to effective supervision process. But the supervisor's self-perspective has received virtually no attention as a listening/experiencing perspective in the psychoanalytic supervision literature. In this paper, the author defines the supervisor's self-perspective and considers five ways by which it contributes to an effective supervisory process: (1) sharing one's own impressions of/reactions to patients; (2) sharing personal disclosures about the supervisee-patient relationship; (3) sharing personal disclosures about the supervisee as a developing analytic therapist; (4) sharing personal disclosures about the supervisor-supervisee relationship; and (5) using one's own self-reflection as a check and balance for supervisory action. The supervisor's self-perspective provides the missing supervisory voice in the triadic complement of subject-other-self, has the potential to be eminently educative across the treatment/supervision dyads, and serves as a prototype for the supervisee's own development and use of analytic (or analyst) self-perspective.

  14. The Role of the TP TESL Supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, James Mannes

    2001-01-01

    Examines the changing role of the student teacher supervisor in elementary school English as a Second Language education, arguing for a development model of supervision. Data collected over 6 years in Brunei indicated that there were tensions over different models of student teacher supervision used. The key functions of the student teacher…

  15. Roles, responsabilities and situations faced by supervisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca VLASA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Supervision is a dinamic proces which includes changes, acquisitions which have as a result the improving of work conditions, the rise of eficiency, the satisfactions of the employees and the avoiding of professional exhaustion. Nowadays, supervisors are permanently challenged with continuous transformations. The success criteria of the leaders is no longer their capacity to manage teams and unexpected situations, but their real capacity to anticipate and guide their actions. A supervisor does not have the power to fire or hire employees, but he can recommend this to the superior level of management. However, the supervisor can have the following roles: guide, mentor, attorney (for organisation, atorney (for employees. One of the supervisor’s responsabilities is the organisation of the department, but he also has to revise employee’s needs, to set performance standards, to ensure that employees follow the politics, the confidentiality and the procedures of the organisation. Although the purpose to help the employee become efficient seems simple, it can become a frustrating experience. One study about stress factors among supervisors revealed that they confrunt with two kind of problems: their status and the pressure at the work place which affects their performance.

  16. The Evaluation Supervisor as Internal Auditor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Irvin J.

    The role of the evaluation supervisor as internal auditor and his or her responsibility for assuring the independence and objectivity of evaluation results are discussed. Four sources of compromise of objectivity are discussed: factual, political, involvement, and affective. The first two sources of compromise cannot be accepted, A code of ethical…

  17. Program to prepare school level supervisors for professional pedagogical guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isdarey Hernández González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Doing an appropriate professional pedagogical guidance becomes a social problem of top priority, due to the fact that when students get to Ninth Grade they face, for the first time, the chance to select a school to continue his studies. However, there are barriers around this social task; like the lack of schools staff preparation and particularly that of the school level supervisors who should lead the School Grade Boards, among its functions are to plan actions for labour and vocational development and also for the professional pedagogical guidance. This article is a result of a research activity carried out by the author who is a Ph. D. Candidate on Pedagogical Sciences. This investigation has as an objective to propose a developmental program to increase the school level supervisors preparation on the professional pedagogical guidance in Junior High School. This program is conceived as a system and starts with an upgrade course, goes on with workshops and ends with a training course. Its main axis is the research method acquisition. This program was carried out through pedagogical practice and showed its efficiency.

  18. A Model for the Supervisor-Doctoral Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainhard, Tim; van der Rijst, Roeland; van Tartwijk, Jan; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    The supervisor-doctoral student interpersonal relationship is important for the success of a PhD-project. Therefore, information about doctoral students' perceptions of their relationship with their supervisor can be useful for providing detailed feedback to supervisors aiming at improving the quality of their supervision. This paper describes the…

  19. 7 CFR 58.53 - Supervisor of packaging required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervisor of packaging required. 58.53 Section 58.53... Packaging Products with Official Identification § 58.53 Supervisor of packaging required. The official....54 through 58.57, shall be done only under the supervision of a supervisor of packaging....

  20. 46 CFR 197.210 - Designation of diving supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of diving supervisor. 197.210 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations General § 197.210 Designation of diving supervisor. The name of the diving supervisor for each commercial diving operation shall be— (a)...

  1. 46 CFR 197.404 - Responsibilities of the diving supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. 197.404... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.404 Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. (a) The diving supervisor shall— (1) Be fully cognizant of...

  2. Endorsement for Licensure: Practices and Challenges Reported by Counselor Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method study was to explore the extent to which supervisors of post-matriculation, pre-licensed counselors engage in gatekeeping. Two-hundred seventy-nine supervisors of post-matriculation, pre-licensed counselors completed an online survey that assessed (1) what methods of supervision supervisors of post-matriculation,…

  3. 42 CFR 493.1469 - Standard: Cytology general supervisor qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Cytology general supervisor... Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1469 Standard: Cytology general supervisor qualifications. The cytology general supervisor must be qualified to supervise cytology services...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1471 - Standard: Cytology general supervisor responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Cytology general supervisor... Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1471 Standard: Cytology general supervisor responsibilities. The technical supervisor of cytology may perform the duties of the cytology...

  5. Why and how do general practitioners teach? An exploration of the motivations and experiences of rural Australian general practitioner supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Gerard; Fry, Jennifer; O'Meara, Peter; Tourle, Vianne

    2015-10-29

    In medical education, a learner-centred approach is recommended. There is also a trend towards workplace-based learning outside of the hospital setting. In Australia, this has resulted in an increased need for General Practitioner (GP) supervisors who are receptive to using adult learning principles in their teaching. Little is known about what motivates Australian GP supervisors and how they currently teach. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with 20 rural GP supervisors who work within one Regional Training Provider region in Australia explored their reasons for being a supervisor and how they performed their role. Data was analysed using a thematic analysis approach. GP supervisors identified both personal and professional benefits in being a supervisor, as well as some benefits for their practice. Supervision fulfilled a perceived broader responsibility to the profession and community, though they felt it had little impact on rural retention of doctors. While financial issues did not provide significant motivation to teach, the increasing financial inequity compared with providing direct patient care might impact negatively on the decision to be or to remain a supervisor in the future. The principal challenge for supervisors was finding time for teaching. Despite this, there was little evidence of supervisors adopting strategies to reduce teaching load. Teaching methods were reported in the majority to be case-based with styles extending from didactic to coach/facilitator. The two-way collegiate relationship with a registrar was valued, with supervisors taking an interest in the registrars beyond their development as a clinician. Supervisors report positively on their teaching and mentoring roles. Recruitment strategies that highlight the personal and professional benefits that supervision offers are needed. Practices need assistance to adopt models of supervision and teaching that will help supervisors productively manage the increasing

  6. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Language Training Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  7. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  8. Concept of the CMS Trigger Supervisor

    CERN Document Server

    Magrans de Abril, Ildefons; Varela, Joao

    2006-01-01

    The Trigger Supervisor is an online software system designed for the CMS experiment at CERN. Its purpose is to provide a framework to set up, test, operate and monitor the trigger components on one hand and to manage their interplay and the information exchange with the run control part of the data acquisition system on the other. The Trigger Supervisor is conceived to provide a simple and homogeneous client interface to the online software infrastructure of the trigger subsystems. This document specifies the functional and non-functional requirements, design and operational details, and the components that will be delivered in order to facilitate a smooth integration of the trigger software in the context of CMS.

  9. Hard-Nosed Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Norman, Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Training supervisor at Citibank accepts role as manager and considers aim to increase corporate earnings through cost-effective training. Based on an address delivered at the First Annual Training in Business and Industry Conference in New York, New York. (DS)

  10. Printing and Publishing Industry Training Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industrial Training International, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Accounted is the supervisory training program currently in operation in the printing and publishing industry. The purpose of the training program is to increase managerial efficiency and to better prepare new supervisors. (DS)

  11. The importance of provision and utilization of supervisor support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munc, Alec; Eschleman, Kevin; Donnelly, Janet

    2016-10-10

    Three cross-sectional studies examined the benefits of provision of supervisor support while controlling for subordinate utilization of supervisor support. Data were collected from workers in a subordinate role (Study 1 N = 355; Study 2 N = 229; Study 3 N = 109). Consistent with expectations, provision of supervisor support consistently explained unique variance in affective job criteria while controlling for utilization of supervisor support. The results indicate that supervisors should acknowledge that their workers experience the affective benefits of supervisor support even if the workers do not consistently use the support provided. Contrary to expectations, provision of supervisor support did not consistently explain unique variance in perceived job stressors while controlling for utilization of supervisor support. However, workers must utilize the supervisor support provided in order to perceive fewer job stressors. We recommend supervisors to take caution when relocating their support to different subordinates based solely on a lack of utilization of support, as this may cause higher perceived job stressors for their subordinates based on the lack of provision of that support.

  12. An Analysis of the Contribution of Participative Decision Making and Communication with Supervisor as Predictors of Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeless, Virginia Eman; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Nonprofessional employees in three administrative units at a comprehensive eastern university served as subjects in a study to examine the relationships of perceived participation in decision making, communication with supervisor, employee characteristics, and employee job satisfaction. Implications for personnel decisions and training, employee…

  13. A physical fitness follow-up in children with cerebral palsy receiving 12-week individualized exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Shiau-Chian; Yeh, Kuo-Kuang; Liu, Wen-Yu; Huang, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Wong, Alice M K; Lin, Yang-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Physical fitness in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is lower than in their peers. A 12-week individualized home-based exercise program completed by 11 children with CP 10 years earlier showed a favorable effect on physical fitness performance. We follow-up the physical fitness of those 11 children with CP, and compare their physical fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) to children with CP without exercise training matched with age and motor levels. Eleven children with CP in the 2003 program as a follow-up group (FUG) and 12 volunteers recruited as a control group (CG) participated in this study. Physical fitness measures, including cardiopulmonary endurance, muscle strength, body mass index (BMI), flexibility, agility, balance, and the SF-36 Taiwan version, were assessed in both groups. After 10 years, the FUG showed better physical fitness in cardiopulmonary endurance and muscle strength (pexercise training is beneficial for children with CP. Over 10 years, the FUG was more devoted to physical activity than was the CG. Physical exercise may not directly affect the HRQoL in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pygmalion effects among outreach supervisors and tutors: extending sex generalizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natanovich, Gloria; Eden, Dov

    2008-11-01

    Students who supervised other students who tutored grade-school pupils in a university-based outreach program were randomly assigned to Pygmalion and control conditions. Experimental supervisors were told that their tutors were ideally qualified for their tutoring role; control supervisors were told nothing about their tutors' qualifications. A manipulation check revealed that the experimental supervisors expected more of their tutors. Analysis of variance of tutorial success measures confirmed the Pygmalion effect among supervisors of both sexes. No main effect or interaction involving either supervisor sex or tutor sex was significant. As predicted, the experimental supervisors also provided better leadership and the experimental tutors increased their self-efficacy. This was the first demonstration of the Pygmalion effect among women leading men. Pygmalion effects may be produced without regard for sex.

  15. Correspondence of supervisor and subordinate perspectives during major organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, M P; Harvie, P

    1997-10-01

    Staff members (N = 2,605) and supervisors (N = 55) of 39 administrative units in 2 healthcare organizations completed a survey measuring confidence in the organization, engagement with their work, and occupational hazards. A correlational analysis determined correspondence between the perspectives of supervisors with those of staff reporting to them as their facilities adjusted to major organizational changes. Supervisors' scores were significantly and positively correlated with the corresponding scores of staff members on cynicism, meaningfulness, acceptance of change, goals, hospital reputation, and health risks. Regression analysis found that relationships were relatively domain specific: Supervisor engagement with work was positively related to that of their staff members, and supervisors evaluations of the organization were positively related to those of their staff members. Supervisor assessment of occupational hazards was related to all 3 areas of staff perception.

  16. A process evaluation of a return-to-work intervention to improve Cooperation between Sick-listed employees and their Supervisors (COSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefsmit, Nicole; Boumans, Nicolle; Houkes, Inge; Nijhuis, Frans

    2016-11-22

    This is a process evaluation of an intervention to improve Cooperation regarding return-to-work (RTW) between sick-listed employees and their supervisors (COSS, which consists of a conversation roadmap, monitoring of cooperation using questionnaires and, if necessary, extra support by an occupational physician (OP). Objectives were to study (1) the adoption of COSS by a banking organization and (2) its implementation among individual employees, supervisors and OPs. We used quantitative data (online questionnaire, project administration, conversation minutes, emails) and qualitative data (semi-structured interviews). We analyzed quantitative data descriptively (by calculating sum scores, percentages, mean scores and standard deviations). The coding system to analyze the qualitative data was data-driven. The organization's representatives reported positively (e.g. fit with existing policy) and negatively (e.g. high intensity) about COSS. At least one OP (out of five) used the monitoring information. Project administration data show a modest reach of COSS among employees and supervisors. The roadmap was used by a minority (35% of the employees and 25% of the supervisors). Relatively many (40% of the employees and 100% of the supervisors who used COSS to evaluate conversations) were satisfied with COSS as a  tool to evaluate conversations with the employee/supervisor afterwards. Interview results indicate that the roadmap was considered useful in specific situations (e.g. psychological complaints). All employees and supervisors participated in the monitoring. The majority of the responding employees and supervisors received OP support and was satisfied about this support. Despite the good adoption of COSS by the organisation, it was only partially implemented by professionals, employees and supervisors. We hypothesize that our implementation approach did not fit completely with the culture at the bank. Also, the results illustrate the need for other intervention

  17. Education and Training Needs in the Field of Visitors Receiving Structures and Tourism Services in the Lower Danube Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ţigu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the new realities and conditions for the development of tourism in the Lower Danube region in the context of the "Danube Strategy" of the EU, the state of the Bulgarian and Romanian tourist market, and the Romania market, as well as the possibilities for development of alternative tourism along the Danube. Special attention has been paid to the problems of education and training in the field of tourist facilities and services in Bulgaria and Romania and the need for their improvement. The reasons for this are that education and training are strategic factor for sustainable development trough contribution to human capital development, within the Romania- Bulgaria Cross-Border Cooperation Program 2007-2013. In relation to this the Academy of Economic Studies in Bucharest, Romania and D. Tsenov Academy of Economics in Svishtov, Bulgaria decided to collaborate in the field “Cooperation on human resources development – joint development of skills and knowledge”, through the development of cross-border liaisons and exchanges between the two universities. Both Bulgaria and Romania have represented and still represent important tourism destinations in Eastern Europe, promoting coastal tourism, spas, mountain resorts or heritage tourism. Comparing with the existent potential and with the other Central and East- European countries, including Bulgaria, Romania has modest economical performances in tourism industry. The last decade shows a relative decline of external demand for Romania, the main causes being the missing fund for investment in developing, modernization, and rehabilitation of specific infrastructure, the less diversification of the entertainment, the tourism services’ quality – lesser comparative with competitors. On other hand, in the same period, Bulgaria has improved the tourism services’ quality and economic performances. Training specialists in tourism is one of the ways of performance growth in this field

  18. A Comparison of Female Supervisors in Business and Government Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Nicholas; Whitsitt, Susan E.

    1975-01-01

    This exploratory study compared the life style and interpersonal need orientation, leadership style, and perception of the organization structure of female supervisors in business and government organizations. (Author)

  19. Supervisors' On-Script Feedback Comments on Drafts of Dissertations: Socialising Students into the Academic Discourse Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturkmen, Helen; East, Martin; Bitchener, John

    2014-01-01

    Supervising masters and doctoral dissertations is a key function of teaching in higher education and giving written feedback on draft sections is an essential component of this function. However, the specific types of response that supervisors give to their dissertation students' written work have received limited research interest to date.…

  20. Supervisors' On-Script Feedback Comments on Drafts of Dissertations: Socialising Students into the Academic Discourse Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturkmen, Helen; East, Martin; Bitchener, John

    2014-01-01

    Supervising masters and doctoral dissertations is a key function of teaching in higher education and giving written feedback on draft sections is an essential component of this function. However, the specific types of response that supervisors give to their dissertation students' written work have received limited research interest to date. The…

  1. What supervisors say in their feedback: construction of CanMEDS roles in workplace settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renting, Nienke; Dornan, Tim; Gans, Rijk O B; Borleffs, Jan C C; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Jaarsma, A Debbie C

    2016-05-01

    The CanMEDS framework has been widely adopted in residency education and feedback processes are guided by it. It is, however, only one of many influences on what is actually discussed in feedback. The sociohistorical culture of medicine and individual supervisors' contexts, experiences and beliefs are also influential. Our aim was to find how CanMEDS roles are constructed in feedback in a postgraduate curriculum-in-action. We applied a set of discourse analytic tools to written feedback from 591 feedback forms from 7 hospitals, including 3150 feedback comments in which 126 supervisors provided feedback to 120 residents after observing their performance in authentic settings. The role of Collaborator was constructed in two different ways: a cooperative discourse of equality with other workers and patients; and a discourse, which gave residents positions of power-delegating, asserting and 'taking a firm stance'. Efficiency-being fast and to the point emerged as an important attribute of physicians. Patients were seldom part of the discourses and, when they were, they were constructed as objects of communication and collaboration rather than partners. Although some of the discourses are in line with what might be expected, others were in striking contrast to the spirit of CanMEDS. This study's findings suggest that it takes more than a competency framework, evaluation instruments, and supervisor training to change the culture of workplaces. The impact on residents of training in such demanding, efficiency-focused clinical environments is an important topic for future research.

  2. Improving the retention of child welfare workers by strengthening skills and increasing support for supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lynette M; Porter, Rebecca L; Preister, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, effective supervision has been found to be critical in the retention of child welfare workers. In 2006 the State of Missouri Children's Division implemented a supervisory strategic plan to concentrate on supervisory training and effectiveness, with the expectation that emphasis on supervision would improve the retention of frontline workers. Using annual responses to the survey of organizational excellence and retention data, this study examines perceptions of child welfare workers and supervisors on three workplace constructs. Analyses support hypotheses that retention of workers improved in the year following the implementation of the supervisory plan, and measures of supervisor effectiveness, team effectiveness, and job satisfaction also increased. Explanations of primary findings are provided and implications for practice and policy are discussed.

  3. Developing skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace: a qualitative study of the experiences of trainees and clinical supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Geelen, Kristel; Muris, Jean; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-02-20

    To inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees' learning in the workplace. We conducted a qualitative study in a general practice training setting, triangulating various sources of data to obtain a rich understanding of trainees and supervisors' experiences: three focus group discussions, five discussions during training sessions and five individual interviews. Thematic network analysis was performed during an iterative process of data collection and analysis. We identified a communication learning cycle consisting of six phases: impactful experience, change in frame of reference, identification of communication strategies, experimentation with strategies, evaluation of strategies and incorporation into personal repertoire. Supervisors supported trainees throughout this process by creating challenges, confronting trainees with their behaviour and helping them reflect on its underlying mechanisms, exploring and demonstrating communication strategies, giving concrete practice assignments, creating safety, exploring the effect of strategies and facilitating repeated practice and reflection. Based on the experiences of trainees and supervisors, we conclude that skilled communication involves the development of a personal communication repertoire from which learners are able to apply strategies that fit the context and their personal style. After further validation of our findings, it may be recommended to give learners concrete examples, opportunities for repeated practise and reflection on personal frames of reference and the effect of strategies, as well as space for authenticity and flexibility. In the workplace, the clinical supervisor is able to facilitate all these essential conditions to support his/her trainee in becoming a skilled

  4. SIX IDEAS IN SEARCH OF SUPERVISORS OF ENGLISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROBERTSON, ROBERT T.

    AS ENGLISH SUPERVISORS SEEK TO IMPROVE THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH, THEY SHOULD CONSIDER THAT DEVELOPMENTS IN OTHER SCHOOLS DO NOT ALWAYS SUIT LOCAL CONDITIONS AND THAT PRESENT CHANGE IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH ALLOWS TEACHERS TO EXPERIMENT FREELY IN THEIR CLASSROOMS. IN LIGHT OF THIS FREEDOM TO INNOVATE, SUPERVISORS MAY FIND THE FOLLOWING SIX IDEAS…

  5. Development and Initial Psychometrics of Counseling Supervisor's Behavior Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahram; Park, Eun Hye; Byeon, Eunji; Lee, Sang Min

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and psychometric properties of the Counseling Supervisor's Behavior Questionnaire, designed to assess the specific behaviors of supervisors, which can be observed by supervisees during supervision sessions. Factor structure, construct and concurrent validity, and internal consistency reliability of the…

  6. Supervisor Use of Video as a Tool in Teacher Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura; McCormack, Bede; Kung, Shiao-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Supervisors play a critical role in fostering teacher candidates' reflective thinking on their practice, yet too often it is the supervisor, rather than the teacher, doing most of the observation work. Video-based supervision offers a promising alternative, as teachers have an opportunity to examine their own lesson and thus engage with the…

  7. The Role of Supervisors' and Supervisees' Mindfulness in Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Laura; Borders, L. DiAnne; Willse, John

    2015-01-01

    The authors explored whether supervisor and supervisee self-ratings of mindfulness (N = 72 supervision pairs) predicted perceptions of the supervisory relationship and session dynamics. Only supervisor self-ratings of mindfulness predicted their own ratings of the supervisory relationship and session dynamics.

  8. 42 CFR 493.1461 - Standard: General supervisor qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., oral pathology, dermatopathology, and ophthalmic pathology because all tests and examinations, must be... supervisor under §§ 493.1449(b) or 493.1449(l) or (2); (3) In ophthalmic pathology, by an individual who is qualified as a technical supervisor under §§ 493.1449(b) or 493.1449(1)(3); and (4) In oral pathology, by...

  9. A Good Supervisor--Ten Facts of Caring Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the elements of caring supervision of doctoral theses. The purpose was to describe the best practices as well as challenges of supervision especially from the supervisor's perspective. The analysis is based on the author's extensive experience as a supervisor and related data obtained for research and developmental purposes.…

  10. Impressed by impression management: Newcomer reactions to ingratiated supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulk, Trevor A; Long, David M

    2016-10-01

    Organizational newcomers are unfamiliar with many aspects of their workplace and look for information to help them reduce uncertainty and better understand their new environment. One aspect critical to newcomers is the disposition of their supervisor-the person who arguably can impact the newcomer's career the most. To form an impression of their new supervisor, newcomers look to social cues from coworkers who have interpersonal contact with the supervisor. In the present research, we investigate the ways newcomers use observed ingratiation-a common impression management strategy whereby coworkers try to appear likable (Schlenker, 1980)-to form impressions of a supervisor's warmth. Research on social influence cannot easily account for how third parties will interpret ingratiation, as the behaviors linked to ingratiation suggest something positive about the target, yet the unsavory aspects of the behavior imply it may not have the same effects as other positive behaviors. Our findings suggest that newcomers are unique in that they are motivated to learn about their new supervisor, and are prone to ignore those unsavory aspects and infer something positive about a supervisor targeted with ingratiation. Our findings also suggest that this effect can be weakened based on the supervisor's response. In other words, newcomers rely less on evidence from a coworker's ingratiation in the presence of direct behaviors from the supervisor. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. "In Loco Paedagogus:" The Pedagogy of a Novice University Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The peripherality of the university supervisor during the student teaching experience has often been considered extraneous to the work of preparing preservice teachers. Despite the supervisor's potential to support learning, the low status of supervision in the preparation of prospective teachers has led to a lack of commitment in preparing,…

  12. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  13. Counselors' and Supervisors' Perceptions of Professional Development Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Bill K.; Obermann, C. Esco

    This paper examines the perceptions of state agency vocational rehabilitation counselors and supervisors in regard to the values they attach to present inservice education programs and to supervision. Subjects were 282 rehabilitation counselors and 64 supervisors employed in state and federal vocational rehabilitation programs in Iowa, Illinois,…

  14. The Role of the Supervisor in the Supervisory Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Postgraduate supervision does not only require academic and research skills from the supervisors--they may also assume a variety of roles to support the postgraduate student from novice to experienced researcher. The role of supervisors in the supervisory process, as well as the views of a purposeful selection of lecturers on the role is the focus…

  15. Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John; McCaw, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships (SIMOR) integrates two models addressed in the leadership literature and then highlights the importance of relationships. The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships combines the modified Hersey and Blanchard model of situational leadership, the…

  16. Suicidal Clients and Supervisees: A Model for Considering Supervisor Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Jason M.; Rainey, Steve; Kindsvatter, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    It is likely that counselor trainees will be exposed to suicidal clients and subsequently face personal dilemmas, stress, and feelings of incompetence. Ethical guidelines mandate that supervisors have procedures to assist supervisors in such times. Currently, the literature does not provide a framework for providing such supervision. This article…

  17. Role of commitment to the supervisor, leader-member exchange, and supervisor-based self-esteem in employee-supervisor conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guylaine; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Using survey data from 240 employees working in a variety of organizations, the authors examined the relations among commitment to the supervisor, leader-member exchange, supervisor-based self-esteem (SBSE), and relationship and substantive supervisor-subordinate conflicts. They found affective commitment was negatively related to both types of conflicts; perceived lack of alternatives commitment was positively related to relationship conflicts; and leader-member exchange was negatively related to substantive conflicts. SBSE was negatively associated with both types of conflicts. In addition, when SBSE was low, affective commitment was more strongly related to both types of conflicts, and normative commitment more strongly and positively related to substantive conflicts. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for the understanding of employee-supervisor conflicts.

  18. Training Guide for Identifying, Meeting, and Evaluating Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. National Highway Inst.

    This manual is a guide for the training supervisor, specialist, or other official who has to plan, develop, and carry through a training program for improving the effectiveness of the employee development program, particularly in a governmental department of highways. The content is in three chapters: (1) Identifying Training Needs briefly…

  19. 9 CFR 318.310 - Personnel and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 318.310 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Canning and Canned Products § 318.310 Personnel and training. All operators of thermal processing systems... properly training supervisors of canning operations....

  20. Supervisor descriptions of veterinary student performance in the clinical workplace: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E J

    2017-06-10

    This qualitative study investigated the qualities of veterinary student performance that inform a supervisor's impression of their competency. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 supervisors from different veterinary subdisciplines, to elicit descriptions of excellent, weak and marginal students. Thematic analysis of transcriptions revealed 12 themes, of which engagement was frequently discussed and of stated importance, and trustworthiness was a differentiator of weak and marginal students from excellent students. Other themes were knowledge, application of knowledge, technical and animal handling skills, communication, social interaction, personal functioning, caring for animals, impact, prospects and the difficulty in judging competency. Patterns of association of themes were found, however themes were also used independently in unique combinations for most students described. The findings show the range of abilities, behaviours, attitudes and personal characteristics of students that are considered by supervisors and how these are weighted and balanced. The key contribution of engagement and trustworthiness to the overall impression aligns with research indicating their importance for success in clinical practice, as both contributors to competency and indicators of it. The findings may inform future design and investigation of workplace-based learning and in-training evaluation, as well as conceptions of veterinary competency. British Veterinary Association.

  1. A Sustainable Model for Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such…

  2. A Sustainable Model for Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such…

  3. Preparedness for clinical practice - Perceptions of graduates and their work supervisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, S.J. [School of Health Care Professions, Allerton Building, University of Salford, Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.mackay@salford.ac.uk; Anderson, A.C. [Tameside General Hospital, Fountain Street, Lancashire (United Kingdom); Hogg, P. [School of Health Care Professions, Allerton Building, University of Salford, Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: The standards of performance of healthcare professionals are now well defined and used to determine health professional curricula. Empirical research evidence exists in medicine and nursing which explores how well these curricula prepare their students for clinical practice but not in the radiography profession. This research aims to determine how well prepared newly qualified radiographers were for clinical practice and to identify strengths and weaknesses in their preparedness to inform curriculum development. Methods: A postal questionnaire and semi-structured interview were used to obtain data from newly qualified diagnostic radiographers and their work-based supervisors. The questionnaire assessed graduate preparedness against a number of items drawn from published documents which define UK radiographic practice. Statistical analysis, using ANOVA and Wilcoxon, examined differences between the groups' perception of preparedness. A sample of graduates and their work supervisors were interviewed to explore preparedness. Results: There were significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) between; the preparedness scores of the graduates and supervisors, with supervisors rating the graduates higher than the graduates themselves; subscales of teamwork (p {<=} 0.05), personal attributes (p {<=} 0.05) and digital skills (p {<=} 0.01). No significant differences were found between graduates employed in their training hospital and those employed elsewhere. Interview data revealed perceived areas of graduate strength, weaknesses and areas for curriculum development. Suggestions for improvement to the methodology were identified for exploring preparedness in other health professional programmes. Conclusion: The graduates were well prepared for their role as a diagnostic radiographer. Some curriculum development is needed in specific areas and advice on methodological improvement is offered.

  4. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  5. Adverse event reporting in Slovenia - the influence of safety culture, supervisors and communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Karin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The provision of safe healthcare is considered a priority in European Union (EU member states. Along with other preventative measures in healthcare, the EU also strives to eliminate the “causes of harm to human health”. The aim of this survey was to determine whether safety culture, supervisors and communication between co-workers influence the number of adverse event reports submitted to the heads of clinical departments and to the management of an institution. Methods. This survey is based on cross-sectional analysis. It was carried out in the largest Slovenian university hospital. We received 235 completed questionnaires. Respondents included professionals in the fields of nursingcare, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and radiological technology. Results. Safety culture influences the number of adverse event reports submitted to the head of a clinical department from the organizational point of view. Supervisors and communication between co-workers do not influence the number of adverse event reports. Conclusion. It can be concluded that neither supervisors nor the level of communication between co-workers influence the frequency of adverse event reporting, while safety culture does influence it from an organizational point of view. The presumed factors only partly influence the number of submitted adverse event reports, thus other causes of under-reporting must be sought elsewhere.

  6. Supervisors' perspective on medical thesis projects and dropout rates: survey among thesis supervisors at a large German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Elif; Richter, Felicitas; Valchanova, Ralitsa; Dewey, Marc

    2016-10-14

    To identify underlying causes for failure of medical thesis projects and the constantly high drop-out rate in Germany from the supervisors' perspective and to compare the results with the students' perspective. Cross-sectional survey. Online questionnaire for survey of medical thesis supervisors among the staff of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Published, earlier longitudinal survey among students for comparison. 1069 thesis supervisors participated. Data are presented using descriptive statistics, and the χ(2) test served to compare the results among supervisors with the earlier data from the longitudinal survey of doctoral students. Not applicable. This survey is an observational study. Of 3653 potential participants, 1069 (29.3%) supervising 3744 doctoral candidates participated in the study. Supervisors considered themselves to be highly motivated and to offer adequate supervision. On the other hand, 87% stated that they did not feel well prepared for thesis supervision. Supervisors gave lack of timeliness of doctoral students and personal differences (p=0.024 and p=0.001) as the main reasons for terminating thesis projects. Doctoral students predominantly mentioned methodological problems and difficult subjects as critical issues (p=0.001 and pthesis supervisors and medical students feel ill prepared for their roles in the process of a medical dissertation. Contradictory reasons for terminating medical thesis projects based on supervisors' and students' self-assessment suggest a lack of communication and true scientific collaboration between supervisors and doctoral students as the major underlying issue that requires resolution. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Automobile Starting and Lighting System Maintenance Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Automobile Starting and Lighting System Maintenance Training Manual for Effective Learning ... Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2015) > ... College Minna and Automobile Supervisors in automobile companies in Minna to establish its reliability.

  8. PENGARUH DUKUNGAN SUPERVISOR DAN PEMBERDAYAAN TERHADAP ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinjung Desy Nursanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Study aims to determine and obtain a clear picture of supportive supervisor, empowerment, and organizational citizenship behavior; and to determine the impact of supportive supervisor and empowerment towards organizational citizenship behavior of employees in PT Setia Makmur Cemerlang. Research used explanatory survey method, while the sample was taken from employees of the company. Research instrument (questionnaires was used as primary data collection to explain the causal relationship between supportive supervisor and empowerment on organizational citizenship behavior of employees in PT Setia Makmur Cemerlang. Analysis used simple linear regression and multiple linear regression method. Result of this study shows that there is significant influence between supportive supervisor and empowerment towards organizational citizenship behavior.

  9. Pengaruh Dukungan Supervisor dan Pemberdayaan Terhadap Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinjung Desy Nursanti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Study aims to determine and obtain a clear picture of supportive supervisor, empowerment, and organizational citizenship behavior; and to determine the impact of supportive supervisor and empowerment towards organizational citizenship behavior of employees in PT Setia Makmur Cemerlang. Research used explanatory survey method, while the sample was taken from employees of the company. Research instrument (questionnaires was used as primary data collection to explain the causal relationship between supportive supervisor and empowerment on organizational citizenship behavior of employees in PT Setia Makmur Cemerlang. Analysis used simple linear regression and multiple linear regression method. Result of this study shows that there is significant influence between supportive supervisor and empowerment towards organizational citizenship behavior.

  10. Supervisor behaviour and its associations with employees' health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Diego

    2016-02-01

    To estimate the magnitude of the associations between different facets of supervisor behaviour and several health-related outcomes, and to assess whether these associations are mediated by known occupational health factors. Cross-sectional data from the European Working Conditions Survey were analysed by generalised linear mixed models (n = 32,770). Six regression models were estimated. Dependent variables include musculoskeletal (upper body, lower limbs, backache) and psychosomatic symptoms (stress and self-assessed general health). Independent variables correspond to several facets of supervisor behaviours such as supervisor support, feedback on work, ability to solve conflicts, encouragement to participate in decisions, and known occupational risk and protective factors. Even though supervisor behaviour is mediated by several known occupational risk factors, it still accounts for a substantial proportion of explained variance. The order of magnitude of associations was comparable to the strength of associations of known occupational risk factors. Odds ratios vary from 0.79 95% CI [0.73-0.86] to 1.12 95% CI [0.97-1.29] for dichotomous dependent variables. Regression coefficients vary from -0.22 95% CI [-0.28 to -0.17] to 0.07 95% CI [0.04-0.10] for metric dependent variables. Results suggest that good conflict solving skills, supervisor's work-planning ability, and a participative leadership style have the strongest predictive power regarding all health-related outcomes considered. Supervisor behaviour seems to play a non-negligible role from an occupational health perspective concerning the prevalence of musculoskeletal and psychosomatic symptoms. Results suggest that supervisor behaviour should be routinely assessed and monitored, especially among occupational groups reporting a lower quality of supervisor behaviours.

  11. Administrative Supervisors: A Qualitative Exploration of Their Perceived Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Susan H; Lindgren, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The administrative supervisor, who is the nurse manager present on the night and weekend shifts, can be found in hospitals throughout the United States. Yet, very little research has been published about this role on weekend and night shifts in acute care hospitals. The objective of this qualitative research study was to gain a better understanding of the administrative supervisor role. In-depth interviews with administrative supervisors were conducted at acute care hospitals in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Thematic analysis was used to reduce the data and identify codes and themes. Administrative supervisors experience and described their role within a "different" hospital world on weekends and at night. The administrative supervisors consistently stated that they oversee and are responsible for staffing and patient flow, crisis management, and management support for the staff. That administrative supervision is a challenging position for nurses is particularly evident as researchers seek to obtain a better understanding of how nurse leaders make a difference. This research delineates these different supervisor role responsibilities to provide a better understanding of management during the "off-shift." Nurse leaders can utilize this information to assist in justifying the need for this shift management role at their institutions.

  12. Abilities for radiological protection supervisor in the ionizing radiation for industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sordi, G.M., E-mail: adelia@atomo.com.b [ATOMO Radioprotecao e Seguranca Nuclear S/C Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sahyun, A., E-mail: gian@atomo.b [ABENDI - Associacao Brasileira de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos e Inspecao, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andreucci, R., E-mail: zzricardo.zzandreucci@Voith.co [Voith Hydro Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, P.G. [Multiend Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The authors of this paper, has introduced an industrial training program for the R.P.E - Radiation Protection Expert to comply with contents of CNEN Standard NN 3.01 'Basic Guideline of Radiation Protection'. The 'training program' has been divided in four steps, based on: professional R.P.E work, knowledge level to perform his activities, education program and detailed basic bibliography. In the last congress we have presented a paper about the content of radiation protection training program. In this paper we will discuss the abilities that the supervisor need to obtain to perform the radiation protection report. We discuss the number of abilities for each one of the disciplines mentioned in the last paper and we provide some particular abilities. (author)

  13. The Impact of Support at the Workplace on Transfer of Training: A Study of an Indian Manufacturing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ragini; Ghosh, Piyali; Rai, Alka; Shukla, Divya

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the individual impacts of two components of support at the workplace, namely, support from peers and supervisor, on transfer of training in a post-training environment. Mediation by motivation to transfer in the relationship of supervisor and peer support with transfer of training has also been examined. Data on 149…

  14. The Impact of Support at the Workplace on Transfer of Training: A Study of an Indian Manufacturing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ragini; Ghosh, Piyali; Rai, Alka; Shukla, Divya

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the individual impacts of two components of support at the workplace, namely, support from peers and supervisor, on transfer of training in a post-training environment. Mediation by motivation to transfer in the relationship of supervisor and peer support with transfer of training has also been examined. Data on 149…

  15. Exploring Supervisor-Related Job Resources as Mediators between Supervisor Conflict and Job Attitudes in Hospital Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Elfering

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Conflicts with supervisors are likely to reduce job resources and in turn to lower job attitudes. Work design in hospitals should, therefore, address interpersonal working conditions and conflict management in leadership development.

  16. Knowledge and practices of supervisors on the performance management and development system at rural primary health care facilities in the Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashego, Rosemary H; Skaal, Linda

    2016-12-02

    The South African government has introduced Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) as a tool to monitor and manage the performances of health institutions, in order to improve service delivery within primary health care settings. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and practices of supervisors regarding PMDS in primary health institutions of the Limpopo Province. A cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study was used. A total of 117 participants were sampled using stratified random sampling technique and a questionnaire was used to collect data. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22.0 was used to analyse both descriptive and inferential statistics. Generally all the respondents had an average (65.8%) understanding of the PMDS processes including the purpose and their roles as supervisors. However, a gap exists between the theoretical knowledge and the actual ability to practise PMDS which was found to be at 52%. There are areas of weakness that still need attention, such as unavailability of PMDS guidelines and lack of training of both supervisors and employees on PMDS. This study highlights the problem of lack of knowledge and skills, unavailability of PMDS policy and poor induction into PMDS. To improve the knowledge and ability to supervise PMDS, proper induction of all PMDS supervisors and periodic in-service training should be done; reference materials, the PMDS policy manuals, are to be made available in the facility and all supervisors be orientated on how to use these manuals.

  17. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  18. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  19. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  20. The views of teachers about the ethical behaviors of Educational Supervisors and Ministry’s Supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat Çelebi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research has to find out primary and high school teachers’ perceptions of supervisors’ ethical behavior. The model of the research was descriptive survey. The sampling of research was formed by 112 teachers working in Avcılar, Istanbul. 52 of those teachers are working in primary schools and the rest (60 were working in high schools. The measurement tool used in this research was developed by Akyıldız (2007 to measure teachers’ perceptions of ethical behavior. The scale has 37 items and formed as 5 items Likert type. Internal consistency of the scale was found .95. Factorial sub-dimensions’ item total correlation coefficients were between .75 and .70. The methods used in analysis process are factorial analysis, independent samples t test, two-way ANOVA, independent samples non-parametric Kruskal Wallis H, Mann Whitney-U. According to the results of factorial analysis, teachers’ perceptions of ethical behaviors were formed within 5 groups. These dimensions are: “professional moral”, “common sense”, “honesty”, “objectivity”, “responsibility”. Teachers’ perceptions were found out meaningfully different considering school type but didn’t different according to gender. Also, each factorial sub-dimension was examined and “objectivity, honesty and discourse ethics” sub-dimensions were found different according to job experience and honesty according to educational level. According to the results of the research, teachers found ministry’s supervisors more positive than educational supervisors

  1. Abusive supervision and workload demands from supervisors: exploring two types of supervisor-related stressors and their association with strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Yu; Hu, Changya; Yang, Chun-Chi

    2013-08-01

    Our study aimed to identify two types of stressors from supervisors: abusive supervision (AS) and workload demands from supervisors (WDS). AS reflects the relationship dimension of supervisor-related stressors, and WDS reflects the task dimension of supervisor-related stressors. In Study 1, we attempted to distinguish between AS and WDS. The results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that AS and WDS are two distinct dimensions of supervisor-related stressors. In Study 2, we utilized job demands-resources model and investigated whether AS and WDS can uniquely predict subordinates' emotional exhaustion (EE). We also explored whether perceived job characteristics (PJCs) have differential moderating effects on the relationships between the two dimensions of supervisor-related stressors (AS and WDS) and EE. Consistent with our predictions, the results showed that both AS and WDS have incremental predictive effects on EE after controlling for the effect of the other. The results also revealed that PJCs weaken the WDS-EE relationship, not the AS-EE relationship. We discussed the theoretical and practical implications at the end.

  2. Tratamento supervisionado em pacientes portadores de tuberculose utilizando supervisores domiciliares em Vitória, Brasil Directly observed therapy using home-based supervisors for treating tuberculosis in Vitória, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel Leonor Noia Maciel

    2008-07-01

    in order to train the patient and their families. After the training, the patient was allowed to choose either a family member or a health care worker as a supervisor. Absolute and relative frequencies were used in descriptive data analysis. RESULTS: A family member supervisor was chosen by 94 patients (96%. The cure rate was 99%. The partner was chosen by 49% of the patients, and other family members were chosen by 28%. The heath care team needed to take over DOT in 3% of the cases. Regular attendance at follow-up appointments was 67%. It was observed that 24% of the problems in this DOT model referred to the family supervisor forgetting to administer the medication or to the patient forgetting to take it; 39% of the patients forgot to take the medication for one day, and 31% forgot to take it for two days. There was change of supervisor in 9% of the sample, medication was lost by the patient sometime during treatment in 9%, and patient drug intolerance occurred in 8%. CONCLUSIONS: DOT supervised by a family member has proven an effective and low-cost technique. However, compliance is not due to one single factor but to the combination of strategies adopted: bus passes; educational measures and especially the individualized approach.

  3. A framework to facilitate self-directed learning, assessment and supervision in midwifery practice: a qualitative study of supervisors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Driessen, E; Valcke, M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2014-08-01

    Self-directed learning is an educational concept that has received increasing attention. The recent workplace literature, however, reports problems with the facilitation of self-directed learning in clinical practice. We developed the Midwifery Assessment and Feedback Instrument (MAFI) as a framework to facilitate self-directed learning. In the present study, we sought clinical supervisors' perceptions of the usefulness of MAFI. Interviews with fifteen clinical supervisors were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using Atlas-Ti software for qualitative data analysis. Four themes emerged from the analysis. (1) The competency-based educational structure promotes the setting of realistic learning outcomes and a focus on competency development, (2) instructing students to write reflections facilitates student-centred supervision, (3) creating a feedback culture is necessary to achieve continuity in supervision and (4) integrating feedback and assessment might facilitate competency development under the condition that evidence is discussed during assessment meetings. Supervisors stressed the need for direct observation, and instruction how to facilitate a self-directed learning process. The MAFI appears to be a useful framework to promote self-directed learning in clinical practice. The effect can be advanced by creating a feedback and assessment culture where learners and supervisors share the responsibility for developing self-directed learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: a survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. A total of 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one's career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training.

  5. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  6. Language Training: English & French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from end of February to end of June 2006 (break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of March to May 2006 (break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skil...

  7. The Opinions of The Primary Education Supervisors in Relation With Strategic Management Approach in Continuing The Supervising Services About The Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdağı AKAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to reveal perception about the service regions of the primary education supervisors working in the five regions all around Turkey which are determined by the Ministry of Education, concidering the geographical situation, economical and social development level, transportation condition and service necessities. The primary education supervisors in the research, who were classified in accordance with the service regions they worked, were continuing thier “ guiding and on the job training, Inspecting and Evaluation, Investigating ind Inquisition” services, they put forward their opinions about the “strong and weak sides, opportunities and threats” which they confronted in their service regions.

  8. Enhancing nurses' empowerment: the role of supervisors' empowering management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Francesco; Courcy, François; Giorgi, Gabriele; Boilard, Amélie

    2015-09-01

    This study tests a theoretical model where: (a) nurses' dispositional resistance to change is indirectly negatively related to behavioural empowerment through the mediating role of psychological empowerment; and (b) supervisors' empowering management practices buffer both the negative relationship between dispositional resistance to change and psychological empowerment and the indirect negative relationship between resistance to change and behavioural empowerment via psychological empowerment. Promoting a high level of empowerment among nursing personnel is important to ensure their effectiveness in the context of organizational change. It is thus essential to advance our current understanding of the factors that hamper nurses' psychological and behavioural expressions of empowerment and to clarify supervisor practices that can overcome such barriers. A cross-sectional research design. We collected survey data during 2012 from a sample of 197 nurses from a Canadian hospital undergoing a major organizational change. Results from moderated mediation analyses provided evidence for an indirect negative relationship between dispositional resistance to change and behavioural empowerment through psychological empowerment, and for a moderating (buffering) effect of supervisors' empowering management practices on this mediated relationship. These findings provided support for our hypotheses. Supervisors' empowering management practices represent an important contextual buffer against the negative effects of dispositional resistance to change on nurses' empowerment. Organizations should develop empowering management skills among nurses' supervisors to counteract the detrimental effects of dispositional resistance to change and to sustain an empowered nursing workforce. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The views of teachers about the ethical behaviors of Educational Supervisors and Ministry’s Supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat Çelebi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false TR X-NONE X-NONE The aim of this research has to find out primary and high school teachers’ perceptions of supervisors’ ethical behaviour. The model of the research was descriptive survey. The sampling of research was formed by 112 teachers working in Avcılar, Istanbul. 52 of those teachers are working in primary schools and the rest (60 were working in high schools. The measurement tool used in this research was developed by Akyıldız (2007 to measure teachers’ perceptions of ethical behaviour. The scale has 37 items and formed as 5 items Likert type. Internal consistency of the scale was found .95. Factorial sub-dimensions’ item total correlation coefficients were between .75 and .70. The methods used in analysis process are factorial analysis, independent samples t test, two-way ANOVA, independent samples non-parametric Kruskal Wallis H, Mann Whitney-U. According to the results of factorial analysis, teachers’ perceptions of ethhical behaviours were formed within 5 groups. These dimensions are: “professional moral”, “common sense”, “honesty”, “objectivity”, “responsibility”. Teachers’ perceptions were found out meaningfully different considering school type but didn’t different according to gender. Also, each factorial sub-dimension was examined and “objectivity, honesty and discourse ethics” sub-dimensions were found different according to job experience, and honesty according to educational level. According to the results of the research, teachers found ministry’s supervisors more positive than educational supervisors.

  10. Supervision--growing and building a sustainable general practice supervisor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jennifer S; Anderson, Katrina J; Mara, Paul R; Stevenson, Alexander D

    2011-06-06

    This article explores various models and ideas for future sustainable general practice vocational training supervision in Australia. The general practitioner supervisor in the clinical practice setting is currently central to training the future general practice workforce. Finding ways to recruit, retain and motivate both new and experienced GP teachers is discussed, as is the creation of career paths for such teachers. Some of the newer methods of practice-based teaching are considered for further development, including vertically integrated teaching, e-learning, wave consulting and teaching on the run, teaching teams and remote teaching. Approaches to supporting and resourcing teaching and the required infrastructure are also considered. Further research into sustaining the practice-based general practice supervision model will be required.

  11. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  12. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Recreational Football Training in Men with Type 2 Diabetes, Untrained Elderly Men and in Men with Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jakob Friis

    Numerous people in the general population are not suffuciently physically active and the use of new exercise training modalities which could promote physically active lifestyles are important. The present PhD thesis includes studies , which investigated the effect of recreational football training...... by ultrasound (echocardiography) and in three studies football training was shown to have marked positive effects on the heart function. In addition cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, resting heart rate and peripheral microvascular function was evaluated and in men with type 2 diabetes, elderly...... untrained men and in veteran football players encouraging results were observed. In conclusion, the present PhD thesis revealed that football training is a feasible alternative exercise training modality, which is associated with improved cardiovascular health in the examined populations....

  13. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching.

  14. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational

  15. Supervisors' and residents' patient-education competency in challenging outpatient consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We compared supervisors' and residents' patient-education competency in challenging consultations in order to establish whether supervisors demonstrate sufficient patient-education competency to act credibly as role models and coaches for residents. Methods: All consultations conducted a

  16. The Relation Between Supervisors' Big Five Personality Traits and Employees' Experiences of Abusive Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jeroen; Stouten, Jeroen; Euwema, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between supervisors' personality traits and employees' experiences of supervisory abuse, an area that - to date - remained largely unexplored in previous research. Field data collected from 103 supervisor-subordinate dyads showed that contrary to our expectations supervisors' agreeableness and neuroticism were not significantly related to abusive supervision, nor were supervisors' extraversion or openness to experience. Interestingly, however, our findings revealed a positive relation between supervisors' conscientiousness and abusive supervision. That is, supervisors high in conscientiousness were more likely to be perceived as an abusive supervisor by their employees. Overall, our findings do suggest that supervisors' Big Five personality traits explain only a limited amount of the variability in employees' experiences of abusive supervision.

  17. SUPERVISORS' TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND BULLYING IN THE WORKPLACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Marc; Frenette, Éric

    2015-12-01

    The study tests the relationship between supervisors' transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership and perceived bullying in the workplace. Transformational and transactional leaders can create conditions that make bullying at work less frequent but laissez-faire leadership may cause conflict that can result in bullying. The participants were 288 adults (122 women, 164 men; M age = 38.9 yr., SD = 11.7; M tenure = 7.2 yr.) employed across several organizations. Of the participants, 53.2% were contacted during an evening class in organizational behavior, and the others were workers from a waterproofing company. Scales measuring perceived leadership of a supervisor and perceived bullying at work were administered. Supervisor's transformational and transactional leadership were negatively related to work-related bullying, person-related bullying, and physically intimidating bullying. Transactional leadership was also negatively related to Work-related bullying, perceived Person-related bullying, and perceived Physically intimidating bullying. Supervisor's laissez-faire leadership was positively related to Work-related bullying, perceived Person-related bullying, and perceived Physically intimidating bullying. The use of Bass's model of transformational leadership in relation with the three-factor structure of the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised is unique in research on leadership and bullying. The relationship between laissez-faire leadership and leadership support results from previous studies: transactional or transformational leadership is likely to provide an environment that makes bullying more rare than under a negative or passive leadership.

  18. Trends in Industry Supervisors' Feedback on Business Communication Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, David Alan; Zhang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study is to explore expectations of industry insiders and identify how student interns are performing in relation to those expectations as defined by 11 performance areas. The results of a survey of 238 industry supervisors were collected over a 5-year period in the departments of English and communication at a…

  19. TESL Degree Candidates' Perceptions of Trust in Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Carla R.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of how nonverbal cues during supervision affect Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) graduate students' impressions of the trustworthiness of supervisors. Particular features of nonverbal communication during supervision were staged in video materials constructed specifically for the research. Students evaluated the…

  20. Skills and Attributes of Instructional Supervisors: Experience from Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Wanzare O.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, instructional supervision has been given a great deal of attention in teacher education professional literature. However, few reported studies have specifically focused on desired qualities of instructional supervisors, especially in Third World countries. This paper reports the perceptions of teachers, headteachers and senior…

  1. Trends in Industry Supervisors' Feedback on Business Communication Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, David Alan; Zhang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study is to explore expectations of industry insiders and identify how student interns are performing in relation to those expectations as defined by 11 performance areas. The results of a survey of 238 industry supervisors were collected over a 5-year period in the departments of English and communication at a…

  2. 42 CFR 493.1449 - Standard; Technical supervisor qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1449 Standard; Technical supervisor qualifications. The laboratory must employ one or more individuals who are qualified by education and either... service in which the laboratory performs high complexity tests or procedures. The director of a laboratory...

  3. Style and Quality in Research Supervision: The Supervisor Dependency Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Booi Hon

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 250 graduate research students examined the extent of dependency on supervisors in a range of research-related tasks, and how that dependency affected the research supervision process. Results suggest appropriate research supervision has no set prescription, but interactions among quality and style of supervision, role expectations of…

  4. Teachers' Loyalty to Their Supervisors and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Nurhayat; Korumaz, Mithat

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies on teachers' organizational commitment based some findings of western context in Turkey. But some of the characteristics prove that organizational issues cannot be resulted with the terms in Western World. One of the new concepts in organizational issues for Eastern culture is loyalty to supervisor (in school context supervisor…

  5. Business Education University Supervisors' Perspectives of Mentor Teachers' Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of an expert panel of 31 business education university supervisors from the U.S. and Canada using a modified Delphi approach regarding the areas in which mentor teachers are typically most and least prepared. Findings indicated business education mentor teachers are most prepared in the areas of classroom…

  6. Exploring Supervisor and Supervisee Experiences of Triadic Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation research focused on supervisor and supervisee experiences within the triadic supervision triad. Triadic supervision is an emerging method of supervision within counselor education. It is fast becoming the preferred mode of supervision in counselor education programs. Unfortunately, there is very little research to support the…

  7. Cognitions of Expert Supervisors in Academe: A Concept Mapping Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemer, Gülsah; Borders, L. DiAnne; Willse, John

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen expert supervisors reported their thoughts while preparing for, conducting, and evaluating their supervision sessions. Concept mapping (Kane & Trochim, [Kane, M., 2007]) yielded 195 cognitions classified into 25 cognitive categories organized into 5 supervision areas: conceptualization of supervision, supervisee assessment,…

  8. A Supervisor's Roles for Successful Thesis and Dissertation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhunpiew, Nathara

    2013-01-01

    The success of a thesis or a dissertation for a graduate student relies upon the roles of their supervisor. The student not only needs to be equipped with the knowledge, but also be able to manage others and external factors at the same time. The journey during the period of conducting research is mixed with various tasks. Five supportive roles of…

  9. Adaptive Research Supervision: Exploring Expert Thesis Supervisors' Practical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as "adaptivity." In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing expert thesis supervisors about…

  10. Leadership Effectiveness : A Supervisor's Approach to Manage Return to Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, J. A. H.; Groothoff, J. W.; Jongsma, D.; van Zweeden, N. F.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Roelen, C. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate adaptive leadership in relation to personnel sickness absence (SA). In situational leadership, supervisors are effective if they adapt their leadership style appropriately to a given situation. Methods A managerial reorganization in a Dutch hospital with reassignment of superv

  11. Female Supervisors of Arab School Education in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid Husny

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the characteristics of women discipline supervisors in the Arab education system in Israel, through their professional development to their attainment of senior supervisory posts. It examines how they attain supervision posts and perform various managerial functions in what is considered a male role, in a patriarchal society,…

  12. Educational Supervisors' Metaphorical Roots of Beliefs about Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak

    2012-01-01

    Beliefs are a complex psychological construct that have potential to drive a person to make decisions and act. A person's metaphors can serve as roots of their beliefs. In this study, the metaphor construction task (MCT) was utilized to uncover beliefs about teaching and learning held by 216 educational supervisors from 10 provinces in the central…

  13. Investigating of Attitudes Concerning Supervisors of Administrators and Teachers in Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel GÜNDÜZ

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to determine the attitudes of administrators and teachers who work in primary schools towards counseling and supervision and positive feelings development of supervisors. The population of the study consists of 3440 administrators (n=268 andteachers (n=3172 in 54 primary schools in Bagcılar between 2008-2009 academic year. The sample includes 550 administrators (n=109 and teachers (n=396 chosen randomly by using “disproportionate subject sampling”. The data of this quantitative study were collected with a 20-item-scale developed by Sümbül and İnandı (2005. . The data obtained after having been applied to the administrators and teachers was analysed with percentage, means, frequence, standard deviation, t-test and single-sided variance (anova. The general attitudes of administrators and teachers towards counseling and supervision and positive feelings development of supervisors has been found as “I am not sure”. Meaningful differences were found between teachers’ and administrators’ attitudes in age, award and in-service training variables. No meaningful differences were found for gender, tenure and position variables. Cronbach Alfa internal integrity of the scale was found tobe 0.92.

  14. "Her energy kind of went into a different place": a qualitative study examining supervisors' experience of promoting reflexive learning in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, Robert; Eatough, Virginia

    2012-10-01

    For family therapists in training, a key learning outcome is the development of reflexive abilities. This study explores the experience of three experienced training supervisors as they address this learning outcome with students. Transcripts of semi-structured interviews were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The Supervisory Relationship emerged as a single overarching theme that contained and contextualized three further themes: Promoting Learning, Dimensions of Power, and The Self of the Supervisor. One theme is reported here, Promoting Learning, with an illustrative example of experiential learning in a student that demonstrates the overriding significance of The Supervisory Relationship. The findings are discussed in the context of current literature and research regarding supervision and training. This study adds richness and detail to material published on supervisory experience, and documents supervisory "micro-skills" relevant to the development of reflexive abilities in students. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  15. Nonverbal Behaviors and Initial Impressions of Trustworthiness in Teacher-Supervisor Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Carla R.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between nonverbal behaviors of immediacy and dominance on teachers' initial impressions of trust toward a supervisor. Notes that supervisor immediacy resulted in higher perceptions of trust than supervisor dominance, and immediacy also rated higher on measures of appropriateness and effectiveness than dominance.…

  16. Teacher Supervision Practices and Characteristics of In-School Supervisors in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalule, Lawrence; Bouchamma, Yamina

    2014-01-01

    We examined teacher supervision practices (supervision models, phases, and professional development guidelines) of in-school supervisors (principals, vice principals, and study program directors) in Uganda, the supervisors' efficacy perceptions regarding teacher supervision, and supervisor characteristics associated with the choice of supervisory…

  17. 30 CFR 250.175 - When may the Regional Supervisor grant an SOO?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may the Regional Supervisor grant an SOO... When may the Regional Supervisor grant an SOO? (a) The Regional Supervisor may grant an SOO when... your control, such as unexpected weather, unavoidable accidents, or drilling rig delays. (b) The...

  18. 30 CFR 250.173 - When may the Regional Supervisor direct an SOO or SOP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may the Regional Supervisor direct an SOO or SOP? 250.173 Section 250.173 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 250.173 When may the Regional Supervisor direct an SOO or SOP? The Regional Supervisor may direct...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification...

  20. Task shifting-perception of stake holders about adequacy of training and supervision for community mental health workers in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O; Osei, Akwasi; Mcloughlin, Declan M; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2016-06-01

    There is growing interest in the effectiveness of task shifting as a strategy for addressing expanding health care challenges in settings with shortages of qualified health personnel. The aim of this study is to examine the perception of stakeholders about the adequacy of training, supervision and support offered to community mental health workers (CMHWs) in Ghana. To address this aim we designed and administered self-completed, semi-structured questionnaires adapted to three specific stakeholder groups in Ghana. The questionnaires were administered to 11 psychiatrists, 29 health policy implementers/coordinators and 164 CMHWs, across Ghana, including 71 (43.3%) Community Psychiatric Nurses (CPNs), 19 (11.6%) Clinical Psychiatric Officers (CPOs) and 74 (45.1%) Community Mental Health Officers (CMHOs). Almost all the stakeholders believed CMHWs in Ghana receive adequate training for the role they are expected to play although many identify some gaps in the training of these mental health workers for the expanded roles they actually play. There were statistically significant differences between the different CMHW groups and the types of in-service training they said they had attended, the frequency with which their work was supervised, and the frequency with which they received feedback from supervisors. CPOs were more likely to attend all the different kinds of in-service training than CMHOs and CPNs, while CMHOs were more likely than CPOs and CPNs to report that their work is never supervised or that they rarely or never receive feedback from supervisors. There was disparity between what CMHWs said were their experiences and the perception of policy makers with respect to the types of in-service training that is available to CMHWs. There is a need to review the task shifting arrangements, perhaps with a view to expanding it to include more responsibilities, and therefore review the curriculum of the training institution for CMHWs and also to offer them regular in

  1. Studies of the relationship between employee`s safety consciousness, morale, and supervisor`s leadership in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misumi, Jyuji; Hiraki, Tadao; Sakurai, Yukihiro [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Kyoto (Japan); Yoshida, Michio; Misumi, Emiko; Tokudome, Eiji

    1996-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between employee`s safety consciousness, morale, and supervisor`s leadership using multiple regression analysis. Respondents were 2152 male employees who were working at nuclear power plants (operation division, maintenance division, and joint companies). Main results were as follows. (1) Individual morale variables, such as `work motivation` and `mental hygine`, were correlated with leadership M behavior rather than with P behavior. On the other hand, group morale variables, such as `teamwork` and `meeting quality`, were correlated with both P and M behavior. These results shows P and M leadership affect the employee`s morale. (2) With regard to safety consciousness variables, `communication` and `work place norm` to ensure safety were strongly correlated to leadership both P and M behavior. However, neither `sense of tension to ensure safety` nor `experiencing cold shiver` were related to leadership P or M behavior. It was suggested that practices for accidents prevention in workplace are related to supervisor`s P and M leadership behavior. (3) `Sense of tension` to ensure safety and `experiencing cold shiver` were negatively correlated with `mental hygine`, but positively correlated with `work motivation`. These results suggest that increase of the work motivation might improve employee`s awareness and ability for detecting human errors. (author)

  2. The Supervisor as a Catalyst for Change: A Comparative Study on the Role of the Foreign Language and Science Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony; Doran, Rodney L.

    This survey was designed to determine the academic background, extra salary, released time, duties, and responsibilities of the foreign language and science supervisors employed by the public secondary schools in Western New York and to identify the role they play in the improvement of instruction. More than 70 completed questionnaires serve as…

  3. Feedback and clinical practice improvement: A tool to assist workplace supervisors and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, P; Harvey, T; Fox, A; Carmichael, M

    2016-03-01

    In work integrated learning, students may report difficulties applying theory learned at university to clinical practice. One contributing factor may be students' inability to engage in meaningful reflection and self-correcting behaviours. This paper reports the evaluation of a tool, process and resources developed to assist students to reflect on feedback and engage in self-assessment. Students were assisted to develop self-assessment skills by reflecting on, and engaging with feedback from previous workplace experiences to develop goals, learning outcomes and strategies to improve performance with mostly positive results. A secondary aim was to identify common learning strategies or barriers that impacted on student outcomes. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data: 1) preparing for clinical learning, 2) relationships and engagement levels, 3) shared awareness and, 4) developing clinical practice. Overall students felt the tool assisted them to narrow their attention on what needed to be improved. While supervisors believed the tool helped them to focus on specific needs of each student. Common barriers to clinical practice improvement related to a lack of opportunity in some settings, and lack of staff willingness to support students to achieve identified goals. Students and supervisors found the use of the tools beneficial and assisted students to demonstrate a greater understanding of how to apply feedback received to support their learning in the clinical environment.

  4. Developing a systematic evaluation approach for training programs within a train-the-trainer model for youth cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Brad J; Selbo-Bruns, Alexandra; Okamura, Kelsie; Chang, Jaime; Slavin, Lesley; Shimabukuro, Scott

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this small pilot study was three-fold: (a) to begin development of a coding scheme for supervisor and therapist skill acquisition, (b) to preliminarily investigate a pilot train-the-trainer paradigm for skill development, and (c) to evaluate self-reported versus observed indicators of skill mastery in that pilot program. Participants included four supervisor-therapist dyads (N = 8) working with public mental health sector youth. Master trainers taught cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques to supervisors, who in turn trained therapists on these techniques. Supervisor and therapist skill acquisition and supervisor use of teaching strategies were repeatedly assessed through coding of scripted role-plays with a multiple-baseline across participants and behaviors design. The coding system, the Practice Element Train the Trainer - Supervisor/Therapist Versions of the Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy, was developed and evaluated though the course of the investigation. The coding scheme demonstrated excellent reliability (ICCs [1,2] = 0.81-0.91) across 168 video recordings. As calculated through within-subject effect sizes, supervisor and therapist participants, respectively, evidenced skill improvements related to teaching and performing therapy techniques. Self-reported indicators of skill mastery were inflated in comparison to observed skill mastery. Findings lend initial support for further developing an evaluative approach for a train-the-trainer effort focused on disseminating evidence-based practices.

  5. Using Communicative Action Theory to Analyse Relationships Between Supervisors and Phd Students in a Technical University in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Christie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors use the theory of communicative action (Habermas, 1984-6 to analyse problematic relationships that can occur between supervisors and PhD students, between co-supervisors and between the students themselves. In a situation where power is distributed unequally, instrumental and strategic action on the part of either party can complicate and disturb efficacious relationships. We use Flanagan’s critical incident technique (Flanagan, 1954 to analyse twenty-five incidents that are told from a supervisor perspective and twentyfive from a PhD student perspective. The analysis reveals that a large proportion of incidents involved power struggles. Other categories include lack of professional or emotional support and poor communication. Rational dialogue based on Habermasian principles might have avoided many of these problems. The analysis concludes with some practical suggestions as to how the use of communicative action theory and critical incident technique can improve supervision, supervision training and the PhD process.

  6. Exploring Supervisor-Related Job Resources as Mediators between Supervisor Conflict and Job Attitudes in Hospital Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Gerhardt, Christin; Grebner, Simone; Müller, Urs

    2017-03-01

    Conservation of resources theory assumes loss of resources as a cause of job strain. In hospital work, conflicts with supervisors are tested to predict lower resources, that is, supervisory social support, participation possibilities, and appreciation. All three resources are expected to predict, in turn, experienced stress (job strain) and lower job satisfaction, lower affective commitment, and a higher resigned attitude towards the job (job attitudes). The sample included 1,073 employees from 14 Swiss hospitals (n = 604 nurses, n = 81 physicians, n = 135 medical therapists, and n = 253 technical and administrative staff). Of the total sample, 83.1% were female and 38.9% worked full-time. The median tenure was between 7 years and 10 years. Constructs were assessed by online questionnaires. Structural equation modeling was used to test mediation. Structural equation modeling confirmed the negative association of conflict with supervisors and job resources. Tests of indirect paths to resources as a link between conflicts with supervisors and job attitudes were significant. For nurses, social support, participation and appreciation showed a significant indirect path, while among medical technicians the indirect paths included social support and appreciation, and among physicians only appreciation showed a significant indirect path. In medical therapists no indirect path was significant. Job resources did not mediate the link between conflict with supervisors and stress in any occupational group. Conflicts with supervisors are likely to reduce job resources and in turn to lower job attitudes. Work design in hospitals should, therefore, address interpersonal working conditions and conflict management in leadership development.

  7. CERN Technical Training 2006: ANSYS Course Sessions (August-September 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. The following ANSYS course sessions are currently scheduled in the framework of the CERN Technical Training Programme 2006, and in collaboration with CAD-FEM AG (CH): ANSYS DesignModeler (course in French): 29-30.8.2006 (2 days) ANSYS Workbench (course in French): 12-15.9.2006 (4 days, only 3 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please discuss with your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages that can be found at http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300 under 'Upcoming course sessions', with th...

  8. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  9. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  10. An Examination of Reading and Mathematic Achievement among Second Grade Students Who Have Received Instruction from Either Teachers Who Have Been Trained in Choice Theory/Reality Therapy Methods or Teachers Who Have Not Been Trained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Jane V.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if second grade students who were taught by teachers trained in choice theory/reality therapy (CT/RT) methods had higher achievement scores in mathematics/reading compared to students who were taught by teachers who were not trained. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model suggests that…

  11. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: employees' start times influence supervisor performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Kai Chi; Fehr, Ryan; Barnes, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we draw from the stereotyping literature to suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are affected by employees' start times-the time of day they first arrive at work. Even when accounting for total work hours, objective job performance, and employees' self-ratings of conscientiousness, we find that a later start time leads supervisors to perceive employees as less conscientious. These perceptions in turn cause supervisors to rate employees as lower performers. In addition, we show that supervisor chronotype acts as a boundary condition of the mediated model. Supervisors who prefer eveningness (i.e., owls) are less likely to hold negative stereotypes of employees with late start times than supervisors who prefer morningness (i.e., larks). Taken together, our results suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are susceptible to stereotypic beliefs based on employees' start times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Social constructionism and supervision: experiences of AAMFT supervisors and supervised therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Heather J; Fine, Marshall

    2012-10-01

    A phenomenological research process was used to investigate the supervision experience for supervisors and therapists when supervisors use a social constructionist perspective. Participants of the one-to-one interviews were six AAMFT Approved Supervisors and six therapists providing counseling to individuals, couples and families. The findings suggest supervisors were committed to their self-identified supervision philosophy and intentionally sought out congruence between epistemology and practice. The shared experience of therapists indicates they associated desirable supervision experiences with their supervisors' social constructionist perspective. Our findings also indicated that supervisors' and therapists' understanding of social constructionism included the more controversial concepts of agency and extra-discursiveness. This research has taken an empirical step in the direction of understanding what the social constructionist supervision experience is like for supervisors and therapists. Our findings suggest a linkage between epistemology and supervision practice and a satisfaction with the supervision process. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. LA REPRESENTACION DE LOS COLEGIOS SALESIANOS EN LOS SUPERVISORES NEUQUINOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA ANDREA NICOLETTI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nos proponemos analizar en este trabajo de qué manera la identidad entre las escuelas confesionales y los Salesianos, construida desde la época del territorio patagónico, ha marcado fuertemente el discurso de los supervisores escolares que las visitaban. Estos han proyectado una clara representación social sobre la «escuela salesiana», no sólo referencial, sino también prospectiva, en cuanto a que se manifiesta como una construcción inducida. Dentro del sistema educativo patagónico, la educación salesiana ha sido sinónimo de educación confesional, pues fue la única representación de la Iglesia católica en éste ámbito. A través del análisis de los informes de supervisores de las escuelas salesianas neuquinas del período provincial y entrevistas a estos agentes del Consejo, hemos advertido cómo la construcción identitaria (salesianos/escuelas confesionales jugó un rol fundamental en la representación social que los supervisores manifestaron sobre las escuelas de la Congregación, diferenciándolas de las escuelas estatales por su orden, su atención al alumnado y su disciplina. Desde esta perspectiva, la identidad entre las escuelas confesionales y los Salesianos se amplió hacia una analogía que fusionó moral y religión con orden y disciplina, constituyendo una representación social que los supervisores plasmaron en su discurso.

  14. Knowledge and practices of supervisors on the performance management and development system at rural primary health care facilities in the Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary H. Mashego

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The South African government has introduced Performance Management and Development System (PMDS as a tool to monitor and manage the performances of health institutions, in order to improve service delivery within primary health care settings. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and practices of supervisors regarding PMDS in primary health institutions of the Limpopo Province.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study was used. A total of 117 participants were sampled using stratified random sampling technique and a questionnaire was used to collect data. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 22.0 was used to analyse both descriptive and inferential statistics.Results: Generally all the respondents had an average (65.8% understanding of the PMDS processes including the purpose and their roles as supervisors. However, a gap exists between the theoretical knowledge and the actual ability to practise PMDS which was found to be at 52%. There are areas of weakness that still need attention, such as unavailability of PMDS guidelines and lack of training of both supervisors and employees on PMDS.Conclusion: This study highlights the problem of lack of knowledge and skills, unavailability of PMDS policy and poor induction into PMDS. To improve the knowledge and ability to supervise PMDS, proper induction of all PMDS supervisors and periodic in-service training should be done; reference materials, the PMDS policy manuals, are to be made available in the facility and all supervisors be orientated on how to use these manuals.

  15. Corporate Strategy and Industrial Training. Contract Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert R.

    Using a brief series of extended interviews, a study gathered information on how corporate competitive strategies affect, and are affected by, worker training requirements. It focused on training activities involving plant-level personnel and first-level supervisors. Interviews were conducted with general manufacturing executives and training…

  16. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in April

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in April. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Biocell Training 26-APR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 26-APR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) 28-APR-11 to 29-APR-11 (08.00 – 17.30) in French* Sécurité chimique – Introduction 29-APR-11 (09.00 – 11.30) in French (*) session in French with the possibility of receiving the documentation in English   By Isabelle Cusato (H...

  17. How Supervisor Experience Influences Trust, Supervision, and Trainee Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Leslie; Kogan, Jennifer R; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate trust and supervision facilitate trainees' growth toward unsupervised practice. The authors investigated how supervisor experience influences trust, supervision, and subsequently trainee learning. In a two-phase qualitative inductive content analysis, phase one entailed reviewing 44 internal medicine resident and attending supervisor interviews from two institutions (July 2013 to September 2014) for themes on how supervisor experience influences trust and supervision. Three supervisor exemplars (early, developing, experienced) were developed and shared in phase two focus groups at a single institution, wherein 23 trainees validated the exemplars and discussed how each impacted learning (November 2015). Phase one: Four domains of trust and supervision varying with experience emerged: data, approach, perspective, clinical. Early supervisors were detail oriented and determined trust depending on task completion (data), were rule based (approach), drew on their experiences as trainees to guide supervision (perspective), and felt less confident clinically compared with more experienced supervisors (clinical). Experienced supervisors determined trust holistically (data), checked key aspects of patient care selectively and covertly (approach), reflected on individual experiences supervising (perspective), and felt comfortable managing clinical problems and gauging trainee abilities (clinical). Phase two: Trainees felt the exemplars reflected their experiences, described their preferences and learning needs shifting over time, and emphasized the importance of supervisor flexibility to match their learning needs. With experience, supervisors differ in their approach to trust and supervision. Supervisors need to trust themselves before being able to trust others. Trainees perceive these differences and seek supervision approaches that align with their learning needs.

  18. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  19. The Training Process of the Organization Development and Training Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Melissa S.

    2004-01-01

    The Organization Development and Training Office provides training and development opportunities to employees at NASA Glenn Research Center, as a division of the Office of Human Resources and Workforce Planning. Center-wide required trainings, new employee trainings, workshops and career development programs are organized by the OD&TO staff. They also arrange all academic, non-academic, headquarters, fellowship and learning center sponsored courses. They also service organizations wishing to work more effectively by facilitating teambuilding exercises. Equal Opportunity programs and upward mobility programs such as the STEP and GO programs for administrative staff. In working with my mentor I am very involved with Cuyahoga Community College classes, mandatory supervisory training and administrative staff workshops. My largest tasks are in the secretarial training category. The Supporting Organizations And Relationships workshop for administrative personnel, commonly known as SOAR, began last year and continued this summer with follow-up workshops. Months before a workshop or class is brought to Glenn, a need has to be realized. In this case, administrative staff did not feel they had an opportunity to receive relevant training and develop skills through teambuilding, networking and communication. A Statement of work is then created as several companies are contacted about providing the training. After the company best suited to meet the target group s needs is selected, the course is announced with an outline of all pertinent information. A reservation for a facility is made and applications or nominations, depending on the announcement s guidelines, are received from interested employees. Confirmations are sent to participants and final preparations are made but there are still several concluding steps. A training office staff member also assists the facilitator with setting up the facility and introducing the class. After the class, participants evaluations are

  20. The Training Process of the Organization Development and Training Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Melissa S.

    2004-01-01

    The Organization Development and Training Office provides training and development opportunities to employees at NASA Glenn Research Center, as a division of the Office of Human Resources and Workforce Planning. Center-wide required trainings, new employee trainings, workshops and career development programs are organized by the OD&TO staff. They also arrange all academic, non-academic, headquarters, fellowship and learning center sponsored courses. They also service organizations wishing to work more effectively by facilitating teambuilding exercises. Equal Opportunity programs and upward mobility programs such as the STEP and GO programs for administrative staff. In working with my mentor I am very involved with Cuyahoga Community College classes, mandatory supervisory training and administrative staff workshops. My largest tasks are in the secretarial training category. The Supporting Organizations And Relationships workshop for administrative personnel, commonly known as SOAR, began last year and continued this summer with follow-up workshops. Months before a workshop or class is brought to Glenn, a need has to be realized. In this case, administrative staff did not feel they had an opportunity to receive relevant training and develop skills through teambuilding, networking and communication. A Statement of work is then created as several companies are contacted about providing the training. After the company best suited to meet the target group s needs is selected, the course is announced with an outline of all pertinent information. A reservation for a facility is made and applications or nominations, depending on the announcement s guidelines, are received from interested employees. Confirmations are sent to participants and final preparations are made but there are still several concluding steps. A training office staff member also assists the facilitator with setting up the facility and introducing the class. After the class, participants evaluations are

  1. Dimensionality and consequences of employee commitment to supervisors: a two-study examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guylaine; Panaccio, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Research on the 3-component model of organizational commitment--affective, normative, and continuance--has suggested that continuance commitment comprises 2 subcomponents, perceived lack of alternatives and sacrifice (e.g., S. J. Jaros, 1997; G. W. McGee & R. C. Ford, 1987). The authors aimed to extend that research in the context of employees' commitment to their immediate supervisors. Through two studies, they examined the validity and consequences of a 4-factor model of commitment to supervisors including affective, normative, continuance-alternatives, and continuance-sacrifice components. Study 1 (N = 317) revealed that the 4 components of commitment to supervisors were distinguishable from the corresponding components of organizational commitment. Study 2 (N = 240) further showed that the 4 components of commitment to supervisors differentially related to intention to leave the supervisor, supervisor-directed negative affect and emotional exhaustion. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for the management of employee commitment in organizations.

  2. A new role-and-feedback system for the supervisor and the organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R E

    1990-01-01

    Changes in industry in general and in health care are forcing changes in organizational structures and in people. A new role for supervisors is being demanded as layers of management are reduced to cut costs and simplify operations. The new supervisor will have to be a leader and decisionmaker. The feedback system suggested here provides a mechanism for ensuring that supervisors' leadership is going in the right direction and that their decisions are having the desired effects.

  3. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Relationships among supervisor feedback environment, work-related stressors, and employee deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jei-Chen; Tseng, Mei-Man; Lee, Yin-Ling

    2011-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the employee deviance imposes enormous costs on organizational performance and productivity. Similar research supports the positive effect of favorable supervisor feedback on employee job performance. In light of such, it is important to understand the interaction between supervisor feedback environment and employee deviant behavior to streamline organization operations. The purposes of this study were to explore how the supervisor feedback environment influences employee deviance and to examine the mediating role played by work-related stressors. Data were collected from 276 subordinate-supervisor dyads at a regional hospital in Yilan. Structural equation modeling analyses were conducted to test hypotheses. Structural equation modeling analysis results show that supervisor feedback environment negatively related to interpersonal and organizational deviance. Moreover, work-related stressors were found to partially mediate the relationship between supervisor feedback environment and employee deviance. Study findings suggest that when employees (nurses in this case) perceive an appropriate supervisor-provided feedback environment, their deviance is suppressed because of the related reduction in work-related stressors. Thus, to decrease deviant behavior, organizations may foster supervisor integration of disseminated knowledge such as (a) how to improve employees' actual performance, (b) how to effectively clarify expected performance, and (c) how to improve continuous performance feedback. If supervisors absorb this integrated feedback knowledge, they should be in a better position to enhance their own daily interactions with nurses and reduce nurses' work-related stress and, consequently, decrease deviant behavior.

  5. Teaching focus in psychotherapy: a training essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard F; Xuan, Yan; Tavakoli, Donald N

    2013-03-01

    Practical application of psychodynamic therapy technique requires that the therapist focus the treatment. The authors review the current evidence about focus in psychotherapy, which suggests that it has a beneficial impact on outcome and patient satisfaction. The core psychodynamic problem is proposed as a valuable conceptual model for providing focus for patient, psychotherapist, and supervisor. The authors narrate a case history from the perspective of both the psychotherapist and the supervisor to demonstrate the opportunities and challenges in using this concept. Finally, the authors suggest that a focus on focus is desirable in residency psychotherapy training programs, and they make suggestions for educational methods that enhance resident training in this area.

  6. ATLAS EventIndex Data Collection Supervisor and Web Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Montoro, Carlos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The EventIndex project consists in the development and deployment of a complete catalogue of events for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. In 2015 the ATLAS experiment has produced 12 billion real events in 1 million files, and 5 billion simulated events in 8 million files. The ATLAS EventIndex is running in production since mid- 2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database. These slides present two components of the ATLAS EventIndex: its data collection supervisor and its web interface partner.

  7. Academic Training: String Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 June from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8 & 10 June, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4, 3rd floor on 9 June String Theory by C. Johnson / Univ. of Southern California, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  8. Language Training: Anglais

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 2 hours a week between 26 April and 1 July 2004. Timetable: Thursdays 12.00 to 14.00 Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students and 20 hours) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  9. Upcoming training sessions (up to end October) - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please find below a list of training sessions scheduled to take place up to the end of October with places available.   Safety and Language courses are not included here, you will find an up-to-date list in the Training Catalogue. If you need a course which is not featured  in the catalogue, please contact one of the following: your supervisor, your Departmental Training Officer or the relevant learning specialist. Leadership Training           Training Course Title Next Session Language Duration Available places Needed to maintain the session Driving for Impact and Influence 13-Sep-2016 to 14-Sep-2016 French 2 days 4 0 Essentials of People Management for CERN Supervisors (Adapted from CDP for CERN Supervisors) 22-Sep-2016 to 23-Sep-2016, 18-Nov-2016, 17-Jan-2017 to 18-Jan-2017 English 5 days 5 0 Eléments essentiels de la gestion du personnel pour les superviseurs (adapt&a...

  10. The level and influencing factors of nursing competence among junior nurses receiving standardized training%规范化培训的低年资护士护理能力现状及影响因素调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凤姣; 李继平; 马芳; 方进博; 刘素珍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the level and influencing factors of nursing competence among junior nurses receiving standardized training,and provide evidence for the training. Method Totally 299 junior nurses receiving standardized training were investigated using the Six-Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance(6-D scale). Results The junior nurses rated higher scores on the dimensions of professional development and interpersonal communication,while lower scores on the dimensions of planning and evaluation and teaching and collaboration. Vocational interest, educational background, satisfaction with income and satisfaction with working atmosphere were influencing factors of their self-rating nursing competence. Conclusion The standardized training should focus on the training of junior nurses' planning, evaluation, teaching and collaboration competence, and take educational background into account. In addition,the administrators should pay attention to junior nurses' vocational interest, create a good working atmosphere and implement reasonable salary allocation.%目的 了解低年资规范化培训护士护理能力现状和影响因素,为培训实践提供依据.方法 利用护理能力六维评价量表(6-D量表)对299名规范化培训护士进行横断面调查.结果 调查对象的专业发展和人际沟通维度得分最高,计划评估和教学协作维度相对较低.职业兴趣、学历、工资收入满意度和工作氛围满意度对护理能力有影响.结论 规范化培训应加强计划评估和教学协作能力的培养,同时应考虑护士的学历,注重培养职业兴趣,创造良好工作氛围,合理进行薪酬分配.

  11. 192名规范化培训护士营养知识态度及行为的调查分析%Knowledge,Attitude and Behavior of Nutrition of Nurses Received Standard Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晶晶; 林征; 谢晓峰

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解规范化培训护士营养知识、态度、行为现状及培训需求,分析相关影响因素,为护士营养规范化培训提供理论依据.方法 采用自行设计调查问卷及一般自我效能感量表对192 名规范化培训护士进行营养知识、态度及行为的调查分析.结果 规范化培训护士的营养态度较好,营养知识水平一般,营养行为水平偏低;营养知识、态度及行为均与自我效能感呈正相关(P<0.05 或P<0.01).营养知识的主要影响因素是护龄(P<0.05)、学校是否开设营养课程(P<0.01)及自我效能感(P<0.05);营养态度的主要影响因素是所在科室开展优质护理的级别(P<0.05)及自我效能感(P<0.01);营养行为的主要影响因素是学历(P<0.05)及自我效能感(P<0.01).护士希望获得的培训内容是营养与健康、营养与疾病、食物的合理搭配和烹调等.结论 规范化培训护士的营养知信行现状不容乐观,应根据需求开展有效可行的营养规范化培训,提高规范化培训护士的自我效能感,改善其营养知识、态度和行为.%Objective To understand the status and training demands of the nutritional knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) in nurses received standardized training and to provide theoretic basis of nutrition training. Methods A self-designed questionnaire and General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale were used to survey 192 nurses received standardized training about their KAP of nutrition. Results The nutritional knowledge, attitude and practice scores were (73.6±9.7), (77.9±9.8), (65.5±11.7) respectively. A positive correlation was determined between nutritional KAP and nurses' self-efficacy (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that nursing age, nutritional course at school and self-efficacy were related to nutritional knowledge (P<0.05 or P< 0.01); the rank of quality nursing and self-efficacy were related to nutritional attitude (P<0.05 or P<0

  12. State liberalism, female supervisors, and the gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maume, David J; Ruppanner, Leah

    2015-03-01

    Whereas some are concerned that the gender revolution has stalled, others note the rapid increase in women's representation in the ranks of management, and the reduction of wage inequality in larger and more active welfare states. Although these latter trends portend an attenuation of gender inequality, their effects on the gender pay gap in the U.S. are understudied due to data limitations, or to the assumption that in the U.S. pay is determined by market forces. In this study we extend research on the determinants of the gender wage gap by examining sex-of-supervisor effects on subordinates' pay, and to what degree the state's commitment to equality conditions this relationship. We pooled the 1997 and 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce surveys to estimate hierarchical models of reporting to a female supervisor and wages, with theoretically important predictors at the individual level, and at the state of residence (an index composed of women's share of legislators, a measure of the liberal leanings of the state, and the size of the public sector relative to the labor force). We found that state effects on pay were mixed, with pay generally rising with state liberalism on the one hand. On the other hand, working for a female boss significantly reduced wages. We discussed the theoretical implications of our results, as well as the need for further study of the career effects on subordinates as women increasingly enter the ranks of management.

  13. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  14. Communication Training in Corporate Settings: Lessons and Opportunities for the Academe

    OpenAIRE

    Thaddeus McEwen

    1997-01-01

    Today, communication skills are among the most popular content areas in employee training. This survey of training managers examined the status of communication training in businesses and identified the lessons and opportunities for business communication faculty. Results indicated that communication training in businesses tend to focus on managerial and interpersonal communication including teamwork, problem solving, effective meetings, and motivating people. Supervisors and customer service...

  15. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  16. Outsourcing of Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GAMIN, J.E.

    1999-06-17

    Several lessons are covered that has been learned at Fluor Daniel Hanford during their outsourcing effort. We have overcome problems because of our joint commitment to success. We continue to work our way through issues as they arise. On the positive side, several good things have happened as a result of outsourcing. Our training provider (EXITECH) has proven to be very responsive to our many different customers. We have been able to establish and support a 6-month training schedule for the first time. This has allowed the different facilities who send workers to training with more flexibility in planning their workers' time away from their jobs. In addition to the master training schedule, each facility on the Hanford Site has its own special or emergent training needs, and EXITECH has been very responsive in meeting these individual facilities' needs. Student and supervisor feedback on the quality and effectiveness of environmental, safety and health training provided by EXITECH has been very positive. Worker and supervisor feedback indicates the ''hands-on'' training serves their needs, and focuses on what they need to know to be able to perform work safely and efficiently. EXITECH strives very hard at presenting training so students can become successful in their training efforts. The workforce has noticed EXITECH's training philosophy is based on shared success with the trainee, not failure. Along the way, FDH has saved money as a result of this outsourcing. During our first year of the contract, we estimated a $400,000 savings. The decision as to outsource training is likely the most important you will make for your organization. In our situation, it fit the business goals we had established in our bid for the Hanford contract. However, if we were to begin again, we would factor some of the valuable lessons learned experienced during the first 16 months of our current outsourcing.

  17. Study on the Transformation Measures of Chengdu North Railway Station Based on the Capacity of Receiving and Dispatching Trains%基于列车接发能力的成都北站改造措施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李薇

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the scale of China's passenger terminal is becoming larger and larger, which brings burden to the increasingly scarce urban land. Chengdu North Railway Station and tile ground yard of Tokyo Station occupy the same scale of land, therefore, the comprehensive overview of the two stations and their timetables are analyzed, obtaining that there is a huge gap on the capacity of receiving and dispatching trains between the two stations. The reasons for this gap are as follows: the differences of the yards' layout and station tracks' distribution, the occupancy situation of receiving and dispatching tracks, China's train management system and the current situation of China. In view of Chengdu North Railway Station on the occasion of the positive transformation, the capacity of receiving and dispatching trains under the premise that doesn't blindly expand the scale of the station needs improving, and then some suggestions on the transformation of Chengdu North Railway Station are put forward.%近年来,我国客运站的建设规模越来越大,给日益紧张的城市用地带来了负担。成都北站与东京火车站的地上站场具有同等的占地规模,将两站的综合概况和列车时刻表进行分析,得出两站的列车接发能力存在巨大差距。造成这种差距的原因是站场布局、站线分布和到发线占用情况不同,以及管理体制和国情现状不同。成都北站正值改造之际,力求在不盲目扩大车站规模的前提下提高列车接发能力,对成都北站的改造提出建议。

  18. Supervision in Language Teaching: A Supervisor's and Three Trainee Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyalar, Eda; Yazici, lkay Çelik

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from a study which investigated supervision in language teaching from a supervisor's and her three trainee teachers' perspectives. The data in the study were from three sources: 1) audio recordings of the supervisor's feedback sessions with each trainee teacher, 2) audio recording of an interview between the…

  19. Supervisor's Perceptions of the Work Attitudes of Two Groups of Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Paul E.; Azam, Md. Shafiqul

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates whether the type of job (i.e., information job versus noninformation job) had an effect on employee work attitudes as rated by their supervisors. In this study, the Occupational Work Ethic Inventory (OWEI), a self-reporting type instrument, was used to record supervisors' responses on the work attitudes of information and…

  20. Mutual assumptions and facts about nondisclosure among clinical supervisors and students in group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Geir Høstmark; Skjerve, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard;

    2009-01-01

    In the two preceding papers of this issue of Nordic Psychology the authors report findings from a study of nondisclosure among student therapists and clinical supervisors. The findings were reported separately for each group. In this article, the two sets of findings are held together and compared......, so as to draw a picture of mutual assumptions and facts about nondisclosure among students and supervisors....

  1. Supervisor Perspective on the Process and Outcome of Giving Easy, Difficult, or No Feedback to Supervisees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Mary Ann; Hill, Clara E.; Holmes, Stacey E.; Freitas, Gary F.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen counseling center supervisors were interviewed about 3 instances related to important feedback with an intern supervisee: in which the feedback was given easily, in which it was given reluctantly or with difficulty, and another in which it was not given. Supervisors indicated that easy feedback was most often about clinical problems, was…

  2. 25 CFR 47.5 - What is the school supervisor responsible for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the school supervisor responsible for? 47.5 Section 47.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION UNIFORM DIRECT FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR BUREAU-OPERATED SCHOOLS § 47.5 What is the school supervisor responsible for?...

  3. PhD students’ expectations from their supervisors: A qualitative content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Rimaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of research in PhD programs increases if supervisors become aware of students' expectations from them. This qualitative study aimed to explore expectations of PhD students from their supervisors was done.   Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was conducted on 22 graduated PhD students of Iran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. The samples were purposefully selected and interviewed. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim.   Results: After analyzing and coding data, it was found that PhD students have four main expectations from their supervisors. These expectations consist of scientific support including help with selection of subject, preparation and registration of proposal, data collection and support for writing and examination of the thesis. Developing scientific skills and help with preparing manuscripts were other expectations. Emotional-social support with five categories including relationship between supervisor-student, general expectations of supervisor, supervisor personality characteristics, needed emotional skills and social activities related to thesis and finally providing adequate resources including financial support and access to facilities inside and outside the university were among the other expectations.   Conclusion: PhD students need to scientific, emotional, social and material supports from their supervisors in the process of performing thesis. These expectations should be told to supervisors.

  4. Communication Competence, Leadership Behaviors, and Employee Outcomes in Supervisor-Employee Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelson, Alan C.; York, Joy A.; Arritola, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor communication competence and leadership style were used to predict specific employee outcomes. In the study, 276 participants working in various industries completed measures of communication competence and leadership styles about their direct supervisor along with measures of their job satisfaction, motivation, and organizational…

  5. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  6. Views of Educational Supervisors Concerning the Feasibility of Educational Supervision Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbasli, Sait; Ozbas, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the level in which educational supervisors who carry out the regulations concerning the feasibility conditions of educational supervision regulation views arise. The research was carried out in 2010 to 2011 academic year; the research population included 3150 educational supervisors and the research…

  7. Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs about the Roles of Thesis Supervisors: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia Carlín, Rebeca Elena

    2013-01-01

    Trainee beliefs about the roles of thesis supervisors can exert an important influence on timely and successful completion of theses. This research article explores pre-service teacher beliefs about the roles of thesis supervisors through the analysis of their learning diaries. The aim of this study is to identify ways to improve supervisory…

  8. Curricular Goals and Personal Goals in Master's Thesis Projects: Dutch Student-Supervisor Dyads

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2013-01-01

    To be effective, feedback should be goal-related. In order to better understand goal-related feedback in Master's thesis projects, the present study explores the goals of supervisors and students in supervision dyads and similarities and differences within and between these dyads. Twelve supervisors and students were interviewed, and their goals…

  9. Individual "and" Triadic "and" Group: Supervisee and Supervisor Perceptions of Each Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Welfare, Laura E.; Greason, Paige B.; Paladino, Derrick A.; Mobley, A. Keith; Villalba, Jose A.; Wester, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    In this consensual qualitative research study, the authors explored supervisors' (n= 11) and their supervisees' (n= 31) perceptions of individual, triadic, and group supervision sessions during practicum. Data from supervisor individual interviews and supervisee focus-group interviews revealed several themes regarding the advantages and…

  10. Supervisor-Subordinate Age Dissimilarity and Performance Ratings: The Buffering Effects of Supervisory Relationship and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Scholarios, Dora; Van der Schoot, Esther; Jedrzejowicz, Piotr; Bozionelos, Nikos; Epitropaki, Olga; Knauth, Peter; Marzec, Izabela; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Van der Heijde, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Using 394 pairs of employees and their immediate supervisors working in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in three northern European countries, this study examined the effect of workplace moderators on the link between relational demography and supervisor ratings of performance. Directional age differences between superior…

  11. Supervisor-subordinate age dissimilarity and performance ratings: the buffering effects of supervisory relationship and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.; Scholarios, D.; van der Schoot, E.; Jedrzejowicz, P.; Bozionelos, N.; Epitropaki, O.; Knauth, P.; Marzec, I.; Mikkelsen, A.; van der Heijde, C.

    2010-01-01

    Using 394 pairs of employees and their immediate supervisors working in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in three northern European countries, this study examined the effect of workplace moderators on the link between relational demography and supervisor ratings of performan

  12. Perceptions of Graduates and Their Supervisors Related to the Air and Space Basic Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraska, Marie F.; Bentley, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    The Air and Space Basic Course (ASBC) solicits feedback from field commanders and supervisors; however, it does not currently use any type of graduate or supervisor evaluation system. The ASBC has no mechanism in place to guarantee feedback about how the course has or has not prepared its graduates to function as military leaders. Consequently,…

  13. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational need

  14. Student and Supervisor Perceptions of the Ethical Environment of Retail Merchandising Internship Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V. Ann

    2001-01-01

    Senior retail merchandising students (n=37) and their internship supervisors (n=25) were surveyed about ethical practices. Perceptions of ethics did not vary by internship location. Supervisors perceived their organizations to be more ethical than students did on two of five questions. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  15. 30 CFR 250.174 - When may the Regional Supervisor grant or direct an SOP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... direct an SOP? 250.174 Section 250.174 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 250.174 When may the Regional Supervisor grant or direct an SOP? The Regional Supervisor may grant or direct an SOP when the suspension is in the national interest, and it is necessary because the...

  16. Communication Competence, Leadership Behaviors, and Employee Outcomes in Supervisor-Employee Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelson, Alan C.; York, Joy A.; Arritola, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor communication competence and leadership style were used to predict specific employee outcomes. In the study, 276 participants working in various industries completed measures of communication competence and leadership styles about their direct supervisor along with measures of their job satisfaction, motivation, and organizational…

  17. The Implications of Cognitive Style for the Management of Student-Supervisor Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Steven; Allinson, Christopher W.; Hayes, John

    1997-01-01

    Describes an innovative program of supervision that uses qualitative methods to match a student with a thesis supervisor. The program uses cognitive styles analysis to match students and supervisors whereas the supervision process focuses more on the student's research than the particular subject matter. Includes tabular and statistical data. (MJP)

  18. Supervisors and Teamwork. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 24. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses supervisors and teamwork. It is designed to teach about differences between supervision in different kinds of workplaces; getting along and ahead with mainstream supervisors; and…

  19. Student and Supervisor Perceptions of the Ethical Environment of Retail Merchandising Internship Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V. Ann

    2001-01-01

    Senior retail merchandising students (n=37) and their internship supervisors (n=25) were surveyed about ethical practices. Perceptions of ethics did not vary by internship location. Supervisors perceived their organizations to be more ethical than students did on two of five questions. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  20. Organizational work factors among workers and supervisors in export processing zones which support global markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prado-Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2008-10-01

    This is an investigation of the interaction between organizational and management factors at work for both workers and supervisors in the manufacturing sector. Survey was done in a sample consisted of 23 establishments, 630 workers, and 47 supervisors, meanwhile 10 focus group discussions (FGDs) for workers, and 5 FGDs for supervisors. Workers and supervisors alike reported illnesses and job dissatisfaction. Survey showed that the most prevalent issues among workers were: the need to upgrade skills (76.3%), pressured in doing work (60.5%), fast paced work (60.5%), repetitive work (63%), and that work is both physically and mentally tiring (59.7%). On the other hand, supervisors described their work as challenging and stimulating (66%), needed regular upgrading of skills (46.8%), and needed literacy on information technology (31.9%). Focus group discussions showed that workers and supervisors were confronted with stress, fast-paced work, the need to upgrade skills due to accommodation of information technology into the work production, fatigue, re-engineering and downsizing by management, low job control and difficult worker-supervisor relationship. This study was able to show that health of workers and supervisors were affected by both organizational and management factors at work.

  1. A New Supervisor with a New Agenda: A Principal Ponders Political Options and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Mary Lynne; Larsen, Donald

    2015-01-01

    A tenured respected principal learns that supervisory relationships with staff are only one side of the leadership coin. The other side turns up when a new assistant superintendent is assigned as his supervisor. Problems are imminent when the supervisor seems ready to usurp the principal's traditional decision-making authority. The principal, as…

  2. Ethics in the Supervisory Relationship: Supervisors' and Doctoral Students' Dilemmas in the Natural and Behavioural Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfström, Erika; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ethical issues in supervision among doctoral students and supervisors. The nature of ethical issues identified by doctoral students (n = 28) and their supervisors (n = 14) is explored and the degree of fit and misfit between their perceptions in two cases representing the natural and behavioural sciences is…

  3. Associations of Low-Income Working Mothers' Daily Interactions with Supervisors and Mother-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman-Pines, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated associations of low-income working mothers' daily interactions with supervisors and their interactions with children. Sixty-one mothers of preschool-aged children were asked to report on their interactions with their supervisors at work and their interactions with children for 2 weeks (N = 520 workdays). Results show…

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  5. Supervisors' perceptions of organizational policies are associated with their likelihood to accommodate back-injured workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Connor; Kristman, Vicki L; Shaw, William S; Loisel, Patrick; Reguly, Paula; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a major concern among North American workplaces and little is known regarding a supervisor's decision to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The extent to which supervisors are included in a company's effort to institute disability management policies and practices and workplace safety climate are two factors that may influence a supervisor's decision to accommodate workers with LBP. Objective Determine the association between supervisors' perceptions of disability management policies, corporate safety culture and their likelihood of supporting job accommodations for workers with LBP. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of supervisors (N=796) recruited from a non-random, convenience sample of 19 Canadian and US employers. The outcome was supervisors' likeliness to support job accommodation and the exposure was global work safety culture and disability management policies and practices. A multivariable generalized linear modelling strategy was used and final models for each exposure were obtained after assessing potential effect modifiers and confounders. Results In the study, 796 eligible supervisors from 19 employers participated. Disability management policies and practices were positively associated with supervisors' likeliness to accommodate (β=0.19; 95% CI: 0.13; 0.24) while no significant association was found between corporate safety culture (β= -0.084; 95% CI: -0.19; 0.027) and supervisors' likeliness to accommodate. Conclusions Employers should ensure that proactive disability management policies and practices are clearly communicated to supervisors in order to improve job modification and return to work efforts. Implications for Rehabilitation Low back pain (LBP) is a major workplace concern and little is known regarding what factors are associated with a supervisor's likelihood to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The objective of this article was to determine the association

  6. Establishing supervisor-students’ relationships through mutual expectation: A study from supervisors’ point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Alias

    2017-08-01

    The literature suggests that failure to establish a good relationship in communicating expectations of research supervision is one of the factors contributing to the slow pace of research progress. Moreover, it is not fully understood how students and a supervisor ‘pre-define’ their styles and communicate their expectations through a successful relationship. As a result, the students might lose motivation to do their research during the study period and are not able to complete their research on time. This will subsequently entail an extension of the study period. Without a good relationship between students and the supervisor, miscommunication occurs, leading to mismatched expectations from both parties. This research attempts to explore the establishment of a good supervisor-students’ relationship from supervisor point of views, so that supervision expectations can be clearly delivered and effectively communicated; guidelines will be drawn up for forging the supervisor-students’ relationship basing on mutual expectations of both parties.

  7. Accounting for subordinate perceptions of supervisor power: an identity-dependence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Steven M; Aguinis, Herman

    2005-11-01

    The authors present a model that explains how subordinates perceive the power of their supervisors and the causal mechanisms by which these perceptions translate into subordinate outcomes. Drawing on identity and resource-dependence theories, the authors propose that supervisors have power over their subordinates when they control resources needed for the subordinates' enactment and maintenance of current and desired identities. The joint effect of perceptions of supervisor power and supervisor intentions to provide such resources leads to 4 conditions ranging from highly functional to highly dysfunctional: confirmation, hope, apathy, and progressive withdrawal. Each of these conditions is associated with specific outcomes such as the quality of the supervisor-subordinate relationship, turnover, and changes in the type and centrality of various subordinate identities. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Developing skilled doctor–patient communication in the workplace: a qualitative study of the experiences of trainees and clinical supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Giroldi (Esther); I.K. Veldhuijzen (Irene); Geelen, K. (Kristel); J. Muris; F. Bareman (Frits); H.J. Bueving (Herman); T. van der Weijden (Trudy); C.P.M. van der Vleuten (Cees)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTo inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor–patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees’ learning

  9. The supervisor in the project-organized group work should participate in developing the students' project competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    The article demonstrates how the supervisor can facilitate development of competencies as an implicit part of supervising study projects.......The article demonstrates how the supervisor can facilitate development of competencies as an implicit part of supervising study projects....

  10. ATLAS EventIndex Data Collection Supervisor and Web Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Montoro, Carlos; The ATLAS collaboration; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The EventIndex project consists in the development and deployment of a complete catalogue of events for the ATLAS experiment [1][2] at the LHC accelerator at CERN. In 2015 the ATLAS experiment has produced 12 billion real events in 1 million files, and 5 billion simulated events in 8 million files. The ATLAS EventIndex is running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database. This paper presents two components of the ATLAS EventIndex [3]: its data collection supervisor and its web interface partner.

  11. Enhancing the skills of PhD supervisors facing internationalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgelund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    This research started out due to some institutional changes at a department at Aalborg University as regards supervision of PhD students. For various reasons the department suddenly got a large intake of PhD students in 2008, many of which came with an international background. After a period...... of time staff members of the department began to look very frustrated. Not only did they feel burdened with the large intake, they also struggled with the task of facilitating the transition of international students to become independent scholars. The situation led to the creation of a more general...... interview study within the faculty, and an inquiry into the field of cross-cultural supervision with the purpose of enhancing the skills of PhD supervisors. As is often the case with cross-cultural exchange and inquiry, the study ended up by being just as informative on the supervision cultures and settings...

  12. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within a common wellbore. The...

  13. Pushing too Little, Praising too Much? Intercultural Misunderstandings between a Chinese Doctoral Student and a Dutch Supervisor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yanjuan; van Veen, Klaas; Corda, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    To understand the challenges and their causes in interactions between Western supervisors and international doctoral students, we conducted a self-study of our experiences as a Chinese international student and her Dutch supervisor during her doctoral research project. We found the supervisor and th

  14. Pushing too Little, Praising too Much? Intercultural Misunderstandings between a Chinese Doctoral Student and a Dutch Supervisor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yanjuan; van Veen, Klaas; Corda, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    To understand the challenges and their causes in interactions between Western supervisors and international doctoral students, we conducted a self-study of our experiences as a Chinese international student and her Dutch supervisor during her doctoral research project. We found the supervisor and th

  15. Science supervisors' conceptions of biology and the field of science: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jean Radcliff

    1999-12-01

    This study examined the nature, source and formation of science supervisors' cognitive frameworks for biology and for the field of science and the impact of these frameworks on their work in school divisions. The design for this qualitative study was an emergent case study using ethnographic methods. The purposeful sample consisted of five science supervisors selected from different school divisions in three geographic regions of a middle-Atlantic state. Each participant had a background in biology, classroom teaching and full-time supervisory experience. To collect data for this study, an open-ended questionnaire was used to gain an understanding of the nature of the supervisors' conceptions of biology and for the field of science. Two semi-structured interviews, each lasting 1--2 hours in length, were designed to explore the source and formation of the supervisors' conceptual frameworks, and the impact of these frameworks on their work in school divisions. Data were inductively analyzed using a constant comparative approach. The major findings of this study were: (1) All of the supervisors in this study were remarkably cognizant of possessing a framework for biology and for the field of science. (2) The supervisors' frameworks were well-formed, relatively highly complex and showed a variety of organizational patterns. (3) All of the supervisors' diagrams showed evidence of coherent, integrated themes with emphasis on the importance of connections and interrelationships. (4) The supervisors were able to readily articulate sound rationales for construction of their diagrams. (5) Instead of seeing biology as an isolated discipline, the supervisors view biology in the context of science. Overall, the supervisors no longer see their frameworks as biology-content related, but as science-related. (6) Major influences on the source and formation of the supervisors' conceptual frameworks were a result of selected work-related experiences. (7) The supervisors' conceptual

  16. Recognition Stage for a Speed Supervisor Based on Road Sign Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Juan-Pablo; de la Escalera, Arturo; Armingol, José María

    2012-01-01

    Traffic accidents are still one of the main health problems in the World. A number of measures have been applied in order to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities in roads, i.e., implementation of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) based on image processing. In this paper, a real time speed supervisor based on road sign recognition that can work both in urban and non-urban environments is presented. The system is able to recognize 135 road signs, belonging to the danger, yield, prohibition obligation and indication types, and sends warning messages to the driver upon the combination of two pieces of information: the current speed of the car and the road sign symbol. The core of this paper is the comparison between the two main methods which have been traditionally used for detection and recognition of road signs: template matching (TM) and neural networks (NN). The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches will be shown and commented. Additionally we will show how the use of well-known algorithms to avoid illumination issues reduces the amount of images needed to train a neural network.

  17. Nurses' supervisors, learning options and organisational commitment: Australia, Brazil and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Yvonne; Shacklock, Kate; Teo, Stephen; Farr-Wharton, Rod; Nelson, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    To examine the relationships between leader-member exchange (LMX), workplace learning options (teamwork, training and development), empowerment and organisational commitment, for nurses in Australia, England and Brazil. The supervisor-employee relationship is fundamental to management theory and practice within the work context of Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Survey-based, self-report data were collected from 1350 nurses in 23 acute-care hospitals during 2011. Significant relationships were found between key Social Exchange Theory antecedents (LMX and teamwork) and outcomes (organisational commitment) for nurses in Australia and England, but not in Brazil. As expected, the path between teamwork and organisational commitment was significant in the three countries. The findings affirm the importance of LMX as a management tool affecting employee outcomes in OECD countries. In contrast, LMX cannot be assumed to play an important role within a context that operates a dual employment structure coupled with a culture accepting of 'Jeitinho' workplace relationships. Informal workplace relationships - 'Jeitinho' (similar to the Chinese 'guanxi') may be worthy of examination within BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) countries such as Brazil. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Recognition Stage for a Speed Supervisor Based on Road Sign Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Armingol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents are still one of the main health problems in the World. A number of measures have been applied in order to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities in roads, i.e., implementation of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS based on image processing. In this paper, a real time speed supervisor based on road sign recognition that can work both in urban and non-urban environments is presented. The system is able to recognize 135 road signs, belonging to the danger, yield, prohibition obligation and indication types, and sends warning messages to the driver upon the combination of two pieces of information: the current speed of the car and the road sign symbol. The core of this paper is the comparison between the two main methods which have been traditionally used for detection and recognition of road signs: template matching (TM and neural networks (NN. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches will be shown and commented. Additionally we will show how the use of well-known algorithms to avoid illumination issues reduces the amount of images needed to train a neural network.

  19. Attitudes towards disability management: A survey of employees returning to work and their supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Dolinschi, Roman; Clarke, Andrew; Scott, Liz; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Amick, Benjamin C; Rivilis, Irina; Cole, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Return to work after a leave on disability is a common phenomenon, but little is known about the attitudes of employees or their supervisors towards the disability management process. We report on employee and supervisor feedback from one disability management experience. 389 consecutive employees from the Ontario offices of a single private Canadian insurance company returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors. We surveyed employees and their supervisors about their experience with, and attitudes towards, the disability management process. Of those surveyed, 88 employees and 75 supervisors provided data (response rates of 22.6% and 19.3% respectively). The majority of respondents (79.1% of employees and supervisors) endorsed positive attitudes towards their disability management experience. More than 25% of employees disagreed with the following three items: case managers contributed to recovery, case managers removed barriers to recovery, and sufficient support was provided in the return to work process. More than 25% of employees and managers reported that a commitment to modify an unhelpful work situation was not followed through. The majority of participating employees returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors, reported a high level of satisfaction with the disability management process. Areas that may benefit from attention include some aspects of case manager-employee interaction and ensuring that support during the return to work process is provided, including modification to work situations when appropriate.

  20. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  1. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  2. How do social networks and faculty development courses affect clinical supervisors' adoption of a medical education innovation? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Erik; Steinert, Yvonne; Pols, Jan; Achterkamp, Marjolein C; van Engelen, Jo M L; Brand, Paul L P

    2013-03-01

    To examine the impact of social networks and a two-day faculty development course on clinical supervisors' adoption of an educational innovation. During 2007-2010, 571 residents and 613 clinical supervisors in four specialties in the Netherlands were invited to complete a Web-based questionnaire. Residents rated their clinical supervisors' adoption of an educational innovation, the use of structured and constructive (S&C) feedback. Clinical supervisors self-assessed their adoption of this innovation and rated their communication intensity with other clinical supervisors in their department. For each supervisor, a centrality score was calculated, representing the extent to which the supervisor was connected to departmental colleagues. The authors analyzed the effects of supervisor centrality and participation in a two-day Teach-the-Teacher course on the degree of innovation adoption using hierarchical linear modeling, adjusting for age, gender, and attitude toward the S&C feedback innovation. Respondents included 370 (60%) supervisors and 357 (63%) residents. Although Teach-the-Teacher course participation (n=172; 46.5%) was significantly related to supervisors' self-assessments of adoption (P=.001), it had no effect on residents' assessments of supervisors' adoption (P=.371). Supervisor centrality was significantly related to innovation adoption in both residents' assessments (P=.023) and supervisors' self-assessments (P=.024). A clinical supervisor's social network may be as important as faculty development course participation in determining whether the supervisor adopts an educational innovation. Faculty development initiatives should use faculty members' social networks to improve the adoption of educational innovations and help build and maintain communities of practice.

  3. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  4. Supervisor’s Role as an Antecedent of Training Transfer and Motivation to Learn in Training Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Suriawati Sabhi; Ahmad Zaidi Sulaiman; Hasan Al Banna Mohamed; Azman Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Training and development program literature highlights two major characteristics of supervisor’s role: support and communication. The ability of supervisors to provide adequate support and practice good communication style in relation to training programs may lead to increased training transfer and motivation to learn. Though the nature of this relationship is significant, little is known about the predictive properties of supervisor’s roles in training program literatures. Therefore, this st...

  5. RCRA Personnel Training, Course 7488

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Federal and state regulations require hazardous and mixed waste facility workers at treatment and storage facilities (TSFs) and <90-day accumulation areas to be trained in hazardous and mixed waste management. This course will refamiliarize and update <90-day accumulation area workers, TSF workers, and supervisors of TSF workers regarding waste identification, pollution prevention, storage area requirements, emergency response procedures, and record-keeping requirements.

  6. Operator training for the Yacyreta binational hydroelectric power plant; Formacion de operadores para la Central Hidroelectrica de Yacireta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, Francisco; Tachella, Heriberto [Entidad Binacional Yacyreta, Isla Yacireta (Paraguay). Central Hidroelectrica Yacyreta]. E-mail: yacyreta@internet.siscotel.com

    1998-07-01

    This work is oriented to the power plant operators, by exposing the criteria and methods adopted for operators selection, training and incorporation to the Yacyreta Hydroelectric Power Plant. The used criteria considered some aspects, as follows: the operation staff should be consisted of equal numbers of Argentine and Paraguayan nationalities, viewing the both systems operation; experience of the shift supervisors in operating a plant for a minimum of 10 years; the supervisors should participate training the auxiliary operators.

  7. A Proficiency Based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training (PROSPECT) Program Enhances Operative Performance in Real Life: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, H; Aggarwal, R; Moreels, N; Vermassen, F; Van Herzeele, I

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare evolution requires optimisation of surgical training to provide safe patient care. Operating room performance after completion of proficiency based training in vascular surgery has not been investigated. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the impact of a Proficiency based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training program (PROSPECT) on the acquisition of endovascular skills and the transferability of these skills to real life interventions. All subjects performed two endovascular interventions treating patients with symptomatic iliac and/or superficial femoral artery stenosis under supervision. Primary outcomes were technical performances (Global Rating Scale [GRS]; Examiner Checklist), operative metrics, and patient outcomes, adjusted for case difficulty and trainee experience. Secondary outcomes included knowledge and technical performance after 6 weeks and 3 months. Thirty-two general surgical trainees were randomised into three groups. Besides traditional training, the first group (n = 11) received e-learning and simulation training (PROSPECT), the second group (n = 10) only had access to e-learning, while controls (n = 11) did not receive supplementary training. Twenty-nine trainees (3 dropouts) performed 58 procedures. Trainees who completed PROSPECT showed superior technical performance (GRS 39.36 ± 2.05; Checklist 63.51 ± 3.18) in real life with significantly fewer supervisor takeovers compared with trainees receiving e-learning alone (GRS 28.42 ± 2.15; p = .001; Checklist 53.63 ± 3.34; p = .027) or traditional education (GRS 23.09 ± 2.18; p = .001; Checklist 38.72 ± 3.38; p = .001). Supervisors felt more confident in allowing PROSPECT trained physicians to perform basic (p = .006) and complex (p = .003) procedures. No differences were detected in procedural parameters (such as fluoroscopy time, DAP, procedure time, etc.) or complications. Proficiency levels were maintained up to 3 months. A structured

  8. Supervisor localization a top-down approach to distributed control of discrete-event systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic top-down approach to distributed control synthesis of discrete-event systems (DES). The approach is called supervisor localization; its essence is the allocation of external supervisory control action to individual component agents as their internal control strategies. The procedure is: first synthesize a monolithic supervisor, to achieve globally optimal and nonblocking controlled behavior, then decompose the monolithic supervisor into local controllers, one for each agent. The collective behavior of the resulting local controllers is identical to that achieved by the monolithic supervisor. The basic localization theory is first presented in the Ramadge–Wonham language-based supervisory control framework, then demonstrated with distributed control examples of multi-robot formations, manufacturing systems, and distributed algorithms. An architectural approach is adopted to apply localization to large-scale DES; this yields a heterarchical localization procedure, which is...

  9. Leader-member exchange and affective organizational commitment: the contribution of supervisor's organizational embodiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Robert; Karagonlar, Gokhan; Stinglhamber, Florence; Neves, Pedro; Becker, Thomas E; Gonzalez-Morales, M Gloria; Steiger-Mueller, Meta

    2010-11-01

    In order to account for wide variation in the relationship between leader-member exchange and employees' affective organizational commitment, we propose a concept termed supervisor's organizational embodiment (SOE), which involves the extent to which employees identify their supervisor with the organization. With samples of 251 social service employees in the United States (Study 1) and 346 employees in multiple Portuguese organizations (Study 2), we found that as SOE increased, the association between leader-member exchange and affective organizational commitment became greater. This interaction carried through to in-role and extra-role performance. With regard to antecedents, we found in Study 1 that supervisor's self-reported identification with the organization increased supervisor's expression of positive statements about the organization, which in turn increased subordinates' SOE.

  10. Report: EPA Managers Did Not Hold Supervisors and Project Officers Accountable for Grants Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2005-P-00027, September 27, 2005. Managers did not sufficiently hold supervisors and project officers accountable for grants management because there is no process to measure most grants management activity.

  11. How clinical supervisors develop trust in their trainees: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.; Oza, S.K.; Kogan, J.R.; Stankiewicz, C.A.; Stenfors-Hayes, T.; ten Cate, TJ; Batt, Joanne; O’Sullivan, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Clinical supervisors oversee trainees’ performance while granting them increasing opportunities to work independently. Although the factors contributing to supervisors’ trust in their trainees to conduct clinical work have been identified, how the development of trust is shaped by these

  12. The Relationship of Interpersonal Attraction, Experience, and Supervisor's Level of Functioning in Dyadic Counseling Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Lloyd M.; Feinberg, Lawrence B.

    1972-01-01

    Results revealed that interpersonal attraction differentially affects the three facilitative dimensions and that experience mediates attraction differentially depending on the type rather than the amount of experience the supervisor has had. (Author)

  13. She Pushed Me, and I Flew: A Duoethnographical Story From Supervisors in Flight

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacquie Kidd; Mary Patricia Finlayson

    2015-01-01

    .... In this article we use a duoethnographical approach to explore the supervisor-doctoral student dynamic that occurred during the production of a creative thesis from within a science-focused faculty...

  14. A Multitrait Multimethod Comparison of Job Reinforcer Ratings of Supervisors and Supervisees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Howard E. A.; Weiss, David J.

    1971-01-01

    This data suggests that supervisors and supervisees generally perceive reinforcer characteristics similarly, although the two groups of raters tended to disagree on the extrinsic reinforcers and on the reinforcer characteristics of lower level occupations. (Author)

  15. Retention preferences and the relationship between total rewards, perceived organisational support and perceived supervisor support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilmien Smit; Karel Stanz; Mark Bussin

    2015-01-01

    .... Total reward factors, perceived organisational support and perceived supervisor support are distinct but related concepts, all of which appear to influence an employee's decision to stay at an organisation...

  16. Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors and Organizational Culture: Effects on Work Engagement and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofcanin, Yasin; Las Heras, Mireia; Bakker, Arnold B

    2016-04-21

    Informed by social information processing (SIP) theory, in this study, we assessed the associations among family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSBs) as perceived by subordinates, subordinate work engagement, and supervisor-rated work performance. Moreover, we explored the role of family supportive organizational culture as a contextual variable influencing our proposed associations. Our findings using matched supervisor-subordinate data collected from a financial credit company in Mexico (654 subordinates; 134 supervisors) showed that FSSBs influenced work performance through subordinate work engagement. Moreover, the positive association between subordinates' perceptions of FSSBs and work engagement was moderated by family supportive organizational culture. Our results contribute to emerging theories on flexible work arrangements, particularly on family supportive work policies. Moreover, our findings carry practical implications for improving employee work engagement and work performance. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. A Model of Supervisor Decision-Making in the Accommodation of Workers with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Kristman, Vicki; Shaw, William S; Soklaridis, Sophie; Reguly, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To explore supervisors' perspectives and decision-making processes in the accommodation of back injured workers. Methods Twenty-three semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with supervisors from eleven Canadian organizations about their role in providing job accommodations. Supervisors were identified through an on-line survey and interviews were recorded, transcribed and entered into NVivo software. The initial analyses identified common units of meaning, which were used to develop a coding guide. Interviews were coded, and a model of supervisor decision-making was developed based on the themes, categories and connecting ideas identified in the data. Results The decision-making model includes a process element that is described as iterative "trial and error" decision-making. Medical restrictions are compared to job demands, employee abilities and available alternatives. A feasible modification is identified through brainstorming and then implemented by the supervisor. Resources used for brainstorming include information, supervisor experience and autonomy, and organizational supports. The model also incorporates the experience of accommodation as a job demand that causes strain for the supervisor. Accommodation demands affect the supervisor's attitude, brainstorming and monitoring effort, and communication with returning employees. Resources and demands have a combined effect on accommodation decision complexity, which in turn affects the quality of the accommodation option selected. If the employee is unable to complete the tasks or is reinjured during the accommodation, the decision cycle repeats. More frequent iteration through the trial and error process reduces the likelihood of return to work success. Conclusion A series of propositions is developed to illustrate the relationships among categories in the model. The model and propositions show: (a) the iterative, problem solving nature of the RTW process; (b) decision resources necessary

  18. Clinical teaching in restorative dentistry and the variation between students' and supervisors' perceptions of its effectiveness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, I

    2010-05-01

    To investigate if there was an agreement between the students and supervisors on the quality of clinical teaching in Restorative Dentistry in the Dublin Dental School and Hospital and to identify differences on how effective clinical teaching is perceived between three academic years. In addition it aimed to identify the existence of any similarities between students\\' and supervisors\\' perceptions of specific teaching behaviours that are most and least helpful in learning.

  19. Group training with healthy computing practices to prevent repetitive strain injury (RSI): a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Erik; Gibney, Katherine H; Wilson, Vietta E

    2004-12-01

    This pilot study investigated whether group training, in which participants become role models and coaches, would reduce discomfort as compared to a nontreatment Control Group. Sixteen experimental participants participated in 6 weekly 2-hr group sessions of a Healthy Computing program whereas 12 control participants received no training. None of the participants reported symptoms to their supervisors nor were they receiving medical treatment for repetitive strain injury prior to the program. The program included training in ergonomic principles, psychophysiological awareness and control, sEMG practice at the workstation, and coaching coworkers. Using two-tailed t tests to analyze the data, the Experimental Group reported (1) a significant overall reduction in most body symptoms as compared to the Control Group and (2) a significant increase in positive work-style habits, such as taking breaks at the computer, as compared to the Control Group. This study suggests that employees could possibly improve health and work style patterns based on a holistic training program delivered in a group format followed by individual practice.

  20. 49 CFR 236.788 - Receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.788 Receiver. A device on a locomotive, so placed that it is in position to be influenced inductively or actuated by...

  1. Maximizing work integration in job placement of individuals facing mental health problems: Supervisor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarpaas, Lisebet Skeie; Ramvi, Ellen; Løvereide, Lise; Aas, Randi Wågø

    2015-01-01

    Many people confronting mental health problems are excluded from participation in paid work. Supervisor engagement is essential for successful job placement. To elicit supervisor perspectives on the challenges involved in fostering integration to support individuals with mental health problems (trainees) in their job placement at ordinary companies. Explorative, qualitative designed study with a phenomenological approach, based on semi-structured interviews with 15 supervisors involved in job placements for a total of 105 trainees (mean 7, min-max. 1-30, SD 8). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Superviors experience two interrelated dilemmas concerning knowledge of the trainee and degree of preferential treatment. Challenges to obtaining successful integration were; motivational: 1) Supervisors previous experience with trainees encourages future engagement, 2) Developing a realistic picture of the situation, and 3) Disclosure and knowledge of mental health problems, and continuity challenges: 4) Sustaining trainee cooperation throughout the placement process, 5) Building and maintaining a good relationship between supervisor and trainee, and 6) Ensuring continuous cooperation with the social security system and other stakeholders. Supervisors experience relational dilemmas regarding pre-judgment, privacy and equality. Job placement seem to be maximized when the stakeholders are motivated and recognize that cooperation must be a continuous process.

  2. Quality assessment and comparison of grading between examiners and supervisors of Bachelor theses in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Solveig M; Halvarsson, Maud; Robertsson, Barbro

    2008-01-01

    This study compares supervisors' and examiners' grading of quality of theses at Bachelor level in nursing. An instrument developed to asses the quality of theses was used. Eight aspects of quality were rated. One hundred and fifteen theses were rated by both examiner and supervisor. Significant correlations were found between examiners' and supervisors' ratings of all aspects of quality. Good agreement was found in 89-96% of the ratings on individual aspects of quality. The means of differences between ratings were small but significantly differed from zero in four out of eight aspects. In theses rated low for quality of language and formality, differences between examiners' and supervisors' ratings on all aspects of quality were significantly larger than in theses rated high for quality of language and formality. The general conclusion is that the evaluations made by examiners and by supervisors corresponded well. Differences found indicates that examiners in general give lower scores than supervisors especially on quality aspects that are most closely related to research methods and experiences. This study is part of a larger project that is investigating quality of theses and the student's attitudes and learning experiences of writing theses.

  3. Effects of second language usage on genetic counseling training and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Rachel; Chiu, Sui Mei; Russell, Laura; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    We conducted an exploratory study of the experiences of genetic counselors who have either trained or supervised in a second language to assess the relevance of this issue to genetic counseling training and supervision. Two hundred-thirty NSGC members, CAGC members and genetic counseling students completed the online questionnaire. Many of the respondents reported that training and supervision differed when another language was involved. Supervisors reported difficulty in assessing students' counseling skills and discomfort with an incomplete understanding of session content. Students described a greater focus on vocabulary at the expense of psychosocial dimensions. Despite this, most felt that using another language enhanced their training experience. As such, training programs might consider increasing support to these learners and supervisors by explicitly acknowledging the challenges they face, providing students with language tools to aid in their acquisition of basic skills and providing supervisors with new methods for assessing student counseling skills when using other languages.

  4. Exploring the Relationship between Ethical Leadership and Job Satisfaction with the Mediating Role of the Level of Loyalty to Supervisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarhan Okan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of ethical leadership behaviour on employees’ both intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction and also to find out a possible mediator effect of loyalty to supervisor in this relationship. A total of 223 academic and administrative staff who worked in Gümüşhane University in Turkey constituted the sample of the study. Mediation analysis was used to test the research model. Findings of our analysis have confirmed that ethical leadership is effective on loyalty to supervisor and also loyalty to supervisor increases employees’ job satisfaction. It was understood that from the intrinsic dimension side of job satisfaction, indirect effect had been defined over “Extra Effort for Supervisor, Identification with Supervisor and Internalization of Supervisor’s Values” dimensions of loyalty to supervisor. On the extrinsic dimension side of job satisfaction, “Dedication and Attachment to Supervisor (Ded*Attach, Identification with Supervisor and Internalization Supervisor’s Values” dimensions of loyalty to supervisor variable had mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and job satisfaction. Briefly, as a result of mediator analysis we confirmed that a certain part of the relationship between ethical leadership and job satisfaction came out over loyalty to supervisor.

  5. The Professional Needs of Clinical Practice Supervisors Necesidades de desarrollo profesional de supervisores de prácticas clínicas Necessidades de desenvolvimento profissional de supervisores de prática clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Amador-Watson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the principal findings of a study intended fundamentally to research the needs of clinical practice supervisors in terms of their professional development. An online survey was designed and sent to more than 400 supervisors who were asked to supply information on the type of support provided to candidates. The initial results of the study suggest there are three fundamental types of effective support: 1 classroom management; 2 design of classes; and 3 individualized study programs for students with disabilities. Three challenges were identified: 1 gathering comments and observations from school supervisors; 2 not enough time for comments and observations; and 3 insufficient time for conversing with the candidate. The findings of this study suggest the need to develop a systematic approach to counseling and guidance, in addition to having support teams with different functions.Se presentan los principales hallazgos de una investigación cuyo objetivo central fue investigar las necesidades de desarrollo profesional de los supervisores de prácticas clínicas. Se diseñó una encuesta en línea, que se envío a más de 400 supervisores, en la cual se proporcionaba información sobre el tipo de apoyo que brindan a los candidatos. Los resultados iniciales sugieren que hay tres tipos fundamentales de apoyo efectivo: 1. Manejo del salón de clase; 2. Diseño de clases, y 3. Programa individualizado de educación para estudiantes con discapacidades. Se identifican tres desafíos: 1. Recolección de observaciones de supervisores de escuelas; 2. Escasez de tiempo para las observaciones, y 3. Escasez de tiempo para conversar con el candidato. Los hallazgos del estudio señalan la necesidad de desarrollar un enfoque sistémico para proporcionar la asesoría, al igual que contar con equipos de apoyo que tengan funciones diferenciadas.Este artigo apresenta os principáis resultados de um estudo cujo principal objetivo foi pesquisar as

  6. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  7. The impact of supervision training on genetic counselor supervisory identity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Carrie L; Lewis, Kimberly; Martin, Lisa J; Yager, Geoffrey; Ramstetter, Catherine; Wusik, Katie

    2014-12-01

    Supervision is critical to the training of genetic counselors. Limited research exists on the influence of supervision training and experience on the development of genetic counseling supervisors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of supervision training in addition to supervisory and clinical experience on supervisory identity development, and the perceived confidence and competence supervisors have in their own supervisory skills. In addition, we explored genetic counselors' (N = 291) interest in and barriers to training as well as perspectives on requirements for supervisors. Results indicated clinical experience, supervision experience, and formal supervision training are positively associated with genetic counselors' supervisory identity development as measured by the Psychotherapy Supervisory Development Scale (PSDS) (p supervision experience and formal training (ρ = 0.42, p supervision training but noted lack of available training as a barrier. The majority of participants indicated that supervisors should be certified as genetic counselors, but there was no consensus on training requirements. Development of additional supervision training opportunities for genetic counselors should be considered.

  8. A Vajrayana Buddhist perspective on ministry training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilts, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This article about ministry training in Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is written from the perspective of a Vajrayana Buddhist Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) Supervisor. It presents basic concepts of the Vajrayana Buddhist tradition that apply to the training process of students in CPE and beyond. The author posits that like the Vajrayana spiritual path, ministry training is something that continues on in a person's ministry, and that ministers should attend to this process as long as they are helping others. The author presents the concept of mandala and the Five Buddha Families to illustrate a Vajrayana perspective on ministry training.

  9. Cultural competency and communication skills of dental students: clinical supervisors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, R; Ghanim, A; Morgan, M; Barrow, S

    2016-07-15

    This study explored clinical supervisor's (CS) views and experiences of dental students' cultural competence (CC) at the Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, Australia. Additionally, this study explored CS insights into how CC could be taught. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were organised with consenting CS. Interview topics included the following: the importance of CC, communication and rapport, the role of culture in oral health and the need for curriculum enhancement. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to identify key areas using NVivo software. A total of 12 CS participated in this study. CS acknowledged the importance of CC and felt that it was important for good patient management. CS's definition of CC focused primarily on language and communication skills. CS felt that dental students were generally able to manage culturally diverse patients. However, CS indicated that additional training in this area would be beneficial. Concerns were raised about the students' ability to establish good rapport and communication, with CS highlighting areas such as misuse of interpreters and use of jargon. CS felt that clinical experience, confidence and a positive attitude are effective tools for overcoming cultural barriers. Furthermore, some CS also felt that cultural competency was a skill that is learnt through experience. For most CS, cultural competence was an important part of the clinician-patient exchange which would benefit from enhanced curriculum. They also highlighted areas where transcultural education could be improved. The majority of CS believed dental students managed culturally diverse patients well. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Petri Net Approach of Collision Prevention Supervisor Design in Port Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Kezić

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern port terminals are equipped with various localtransport systems, which have the main task to transport cargobetween local storehouses and transport resources (ships,trains, trucks in the fastest and most efficient way, and at thelowest possible cost. These local transport systems consist offully automated transport units (AGV- automatic guided vehiclewhich are controlled by the computer system. The portcomputer system controls the fully automated transport units inthe way to avoid possible deadlocks and collisions betweenthem. However, beside the fully automated local transportunits, there are human operated transport units (fork-lifttrucks, cranes etc. which cross the path oftheAGVfrom timeto time. The collision of human operated transp011 unit andA GV is possible due to human inattention. To solve this problem,it is necesswy to design a supe1vismy control system thatcoordinates and controls both human driven transport unit andA G V In other words, the human-machine interactions need tobe supen·ised. The supen•ising system can be realized in the waythat the port terminal is divided into zones. Vehicle movementsare supen•ised by a video system which detects the moving ofparticular l'ehicles as a discrete event. Based on detected events,dangerous moving of certain vehicles is blocked by the supe1visi11gsystem. The paper considers the design of collision preventionsupen•isor by using discrete event dynamic themy. The portterminal is modeled by using ordi1za1y Petri nets. The design ofcollision prevention supe1visor is cmTied out by using the P-inl'ariantmethod. The verification of the supervisor is done bycomputer simulation.

  11. A model of supervisor decision-making in the accommodation of workers with low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Kristman, Vicki; Shaw, William S.; Soklaridis, Sophie; Reguly, Paula

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To explore supervisors’ perspectives and decision-making processes in the accommodation of back injured workers. METHODS Twenty-three semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with supervisors from eleven Canadian organizations about their role in providing job accommodations. Supervisors were identified through an on-line survey and interviews were recorded, transcribed and entered into NVivo software. The initial analyses identified common units of meaning, which were used to develop a coding guide. Interviews were coded, and a model of supervisor decision-making was developed based on the themes, categories and connecting ideas identified in the data. RESULTS The decision-making model includes a process element that is described as iterative “trial and error” decision-making. Medical restrictions are compared to job demands, employee abilities and available alternatives. A feasible modification is identified through brainstorming and then implemented by the supervisor. Resources used for brainstorming include information, supervisor experience and autonomy, and organizational supports. The model also incorporates the experience of accommodation as a job demand that causes strain for the supervisor. Accommodation demands affect the supervisor’s attitude, brainstorming and monitoring effort and communication with returning employees. Resources and demands have a combined effect on accommodation decision complexity, which in turn affects the quality of the accommodation option selected. If the employee is unable to complete the tasks or is reinjured during the accommodation, the decision cycle repeats. More frequent iteration through the trial and error process reduces the likelihood of return to work success. CONCLUSIONS A series of propositions is developed to illustrate the relationships among categories in the model. The model and propositions show: a) the iterative, problem solving nature of the RTW process; b) decision resources

  12. Clarifying the role of the mental health peer specialist in Massachusetts, USA: insights from peer specialists, supervisors and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Linda; Strother, Heather; Muhr, Kathy; Sefton, Laura; Savageau, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mental health peer specialists develop peer-to-peer relationships of trust with clients to improve their health and well-being, functioning in ways similar to community health workers. Although the number of peer specialists in use has been increasing, their role in care teams is less defined than that of the community health worker. This qualitative study explored how the peer specialist role is defined across different stakeholder groups, the expectations for this role and how the peer specialist is utilised and integrated across different types of mental health services. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups conducted in Massachusetts with peer specialists (N = 44), their supervisors (N = 14) and clients (N = 10) between September 2009 and January 2011. A consensus coding approach was used and all data outputs were reviewed by the entire team to identify themes. Peer specialists reported that their most important role is to develop relationships with clients and that having lived mental health experience is a key element in creating that bond. They also indicated that educating staff about the recovery model and peer role is another important function. However, they often felt a lack of clarity about their role within their organisation and care team. Supervisors valued the unique experience that peer specialists bring to an organisation. However, without a defined set of expectations for this role, they struggled with training, guiding and evaluating their peer specialist staff. Clients reported that the shared lived experience is important for the relationship and that working with a peer specialist has improved their mental health. With increasing support for person-centred integrated healthcare delivery models, the demand for mental health peer specialist services will probably increase. Therefore, clearer role definition, as well as workforce development focused on team orientation, is necessary for peer specialists to be fully integrated

  13. Upcoming training sessions (up to end October) - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please find below a list of training sessions scheduled to take place up to the end of October with places available.   Safety and Language courses are not included here, you will find an up-to-date list in the Training Catalogue. If you need a course which is not featured  in the catalogue, please contact one of the following: your supervisor, your Departmental Training Officer or the relevant learning specialist.  

  14. Forgotten but not gone: an examination of fit between leader consideration and initiating structure needed and received.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lisa Schurer; Tepper, Bennett J; Carr, Jon C; Holt, Daniel T; Barelka, Alex J

    2012-09-01

    We examined the effects of fit between leader consideration and initiating structure needed and received on employees' work-related attitudes (i.e., trust in the supervisor, job satisfaction, and affective commitment to the organization). Consistent with predictions that derive from the person-environment fit research tradition, results from Study 1 suggested that deficient amounts of both leadership behaviors were associated with unfavorable attitudinal outcomes. However, while excess levels of consideration were associated with favorable attitudinal outcomes, excess levels of initiating structure were associated with unfavorable attitudes, and for both forms of leadership, higher levels of absolute fit were associated with more favorable outcomes. Results from Study 2 suggested that attitudes generated by the fit between leadership needed and received influence employees' organizational citizenship behavior as reported by their supervisors. The relationship between consideration needed and received and subordinates' organizational citizenship behavior relating to individuals (OCBI) and organizational citizenship behavior relating to the organization itself (OCBO) was partially mediated by employees' trust in the supervisor, while the relationship between initiating structure needed and received and OCBI was fully mediated by trust in the supervisor, and for OCBO was partially mediated.

  15. Supervisors' attitudes and skills for active listening with regard to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinate workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineyama, Sachiko; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Takao, Soshi; Nishiuchi, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito

    2007-03-01

    We investigated whether supervisors' listening attitudes and skills were related to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among their subordinates. The subjects included 41 male supervisors and their immediate subordinates (n=203). The supervisors completed a short version of the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS) consisting of two subscales: Listening Attitude and Listening Skill for Active Listening. The subordinates rated working conditions and their psychological stress reactions using selected scales of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill reported a more favorable psychological stress reaction than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Skill reported higher worksite support than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude reported higher job control than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude. A supervisor's listening attitude and skill appeared to affect psychological stress reactions predominantly among male subordinates than among female subordinates. Psychological stress reactions were lower among younger subordinates who worked under supervisors with high listening skill, while no statistically difference was observed among older subordinates. These findings suggest that a supervisor's listening attitude and skill have an effect on working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinates and that the effects vary according to the subordinates' sex and age.

  16. A Navy Diving Supervisor’s Guide to the Nontechnical Skills Required for Safe and Productive Diving Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    from other high-risk industries (e.g., aviation, nuclear power production, offshore oil production) relevant to Navy dive teams. Furthermore, real...the helmet and was almost out of air. He tried to climb up the umbilical ; however, his attempts were futile. The Diving Supervisor heard gurgling over...most effective offshore oil production supervisors use interpersonal skills more often than less effective supervisors do. When less effective

  17. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  18. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  19. developing skills of giving and receiving feedbacks between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    One of the strategies to improve quality of teaching and learning at training institutes could be by developing the skill of giving and receiving feedbacks among the individuals involved in the training .... the two groups; one group of students and.

  20. Effect of ingratiation on supervisor satisfaction through helping behavior: A moderated mediation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Asadullah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research intends to investigate the mediating role of helping behavior in relationship between employee ingratiation and supervisor satisfaction across high and low levels of ingratiation behavior, and answers the questions: how, when and why ingratiation is effective. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected through questionnaire surveys in hotel industry, and structural equation modelling was applied to analyze these data by using hypothetical-deductive approach. Findings: The results indicate that helping behavior is an important mediator of the relationship between ingratiation and supervisor satisfaction. Moreover, ingratiation is also a strong moderator of the relationship between helping behavior and supervisor satisfaction. This research concludes that employee ingratiation positively predicts helping behaviors, and consequently the supervisor satisfaction. Research limitations/implications: This study is not experimental in nature, but a cross-sectional design has been followed. Future research can focus on an experimental design by incorporating a time element, and the design and analysis should be nested since this study did not use multilevel analysis. Moreover, this study used only two forms of ingratiation for measuring employee ingratiation behavior. We suggest researchers to consider all four dimensions of ingratiation by using some distinct scales. Practical implications: This research explains mechanisms underlying supervisor-subordinate relationship, and contributes to organizational behavior research by answering the question; 'when and how ingratiation could be effective?' The findings of this study have important managerial implications, and provide future lines of research.  Social implications: The findings of this research demonstrate that ingratiation is an important tool for satisfying superiors if employees exhibit helping behaviors towards coworkers and supervisors. Particularly, new employees

  1. An examining the relationship between the trust in supervisors and interactional justice among the tourism employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Çelik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a great increase in the number of researches dealing with trust in different disciplines.  The reason of this increase is as modern societies become more and more complicated and disciplines pay more attention to reasons of human behaviour. One of the sectors that human behaviour has a vital and important role is tourism industry.  Knowing the level of trust that employees have for their supervisors in tourism industry will help the enterprises to increase the level of their service quality and their effort to survive for along time in this competitive environment.  When employees trust their supervisors, their added value to the enterprise will increase and they will contribute more to enterprise to reach its pre-set goals. In this study it is aimed to determine the level of trust that tourism employees have for their supervisors and possible results of trust level for the enterprise.  In regression test made between trust in supervisor and interactional justice perception, trust in supervisor can be explained by interactional justice with 63%.

  2. Improving Doctoral Success by Matching PhD Students with Supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antònia Darder

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of the effective supervision of PhD research is the supervisor-student relationship. This interaction is affected by the characteristics and needs of students and institutional conditions, as well as the skills, attitudes, and roles of supervisors and their supervisory styles. When supervision is carried out at a distance, it entails an additional challenge, mainly concerning interaction. The purpose of this study is to improve the research process, supervision, and design of virtual environments in order to support this supervision. The study identifies the supervisory relationships that affect doctoral research conducted at a distance from the student’s academic institution. It also describes how students and their supervisors perceived the characteristics of supervision and the skills and attitudes students perceived in and expected from their supervisors. For data collection, semistructured interviews were used. The results indicate important differences between supervisors’ perceptions concerning their own role and students’ needs regarding supervision, and they demonstrate the importance of attending to student needs and, on the part of supervisors, exercising responsibility in the development of research competencies in students, as is the case of independence of criteria and autonomy.

  3. AIDS in the Workplace: A Training for Managers and Supervisors. District of Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Jimmy L.

    This document provides a summary of "AIDS in the Workplace for Court Managers," a 3-hour seminar that was presented to the District of Oregon. The document begins with a summary of the seminar goals and objectives, which included the following: reduce fears and anxieties about HIV/AIDS in the workplace; provide information about the…

  4. 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2005-06 programme of lectures by filling in the 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire which can be found at: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  5. 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2005-06 programme of lectures by filling in the 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire which can be found at: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  6. Practical advice to support mid-career doctoral students in nursing: some considerations for academic supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Cleary, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Mid-career students who undertake doctoral studies have often achieved standing and success in their careers and may already hold quite senior leadership positions in the profession. In view of this, mid-career students may struggle with the transition to student, particularly if they have not studied for a number of years and have multiple pressures on their time. Supervisors on the other hand, operate within cultures of performance based indicators, and are under pressure to facilitate timely student completions. While students must take ultimate responsibility for their doctoral work, it is possible for supervisors to identify problems early, and offer practical solutions to assist mid-career students overcome their problems, and facilitate optimal engagement. In this paper we highlight some of the challenges this vulnerable student group can present, and identify some practical strategies supervisors can suggest to assist in the timely and successful completion of doctorate degrees.

  7. A Multiple Source Approach to Organisational Justice: The Role of the Organisation, Supervisors, Coworkers, and Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Molina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vast research on organisational justice has focused on the organisation and the supervisor. This study aims to further this line of research by integrating two trends within organisational justice research: the overall approach to justice perceptions and the multifoci perspective of justice judgments. Specifically, this study aims to explore the effects of two additional sources of justice, coworker-focused justice and customer-focused justice, on relevant employees’ outcomes—burnout, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, and workplace deviance— while controlling the effect of organisation-focused justice and supervisor-focused justice. Given the increased importance attributed to coworkers and customers, we expect coworker-focused justice and customer-focused justice to explain incremental variance in the measured outcomes, above and beyond the effects of organisation-focused justice and supervisor-focused justice. Participants will be university students from Austria and Germany employed by service organisations. Data analysis will be conducted using structural equation modeling.

  8. Perceived supervisor support: contributions to perceived organizational support and employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Robert; Stinglhamber, Florence; Vandenberghe, Christian; Sucharski, Ivan L; Rhoades, Linda

    2002-06-01

    Three studies investigated the relationships among employees' perception of supervisor support (PSS), perceived organizational support (POS), and employee turnover. Study 1 found, with 314 employees drawn from a variety of organizations, that PSS was positively related to temporal change in POS, suggesting that PSS leads to POS. Study 2 established, with 300 retail sales employees, that the PSS-POS relationship increased with perceived supervisor status in the organization. Study 3 found, with 493 retail sales employees, evidence consistent with the view that POS completely mediated a negative relationship between PSS and employee turnover. These studies suggest that supervisors, to the extent that they are identified with the organization, contribute to POS and, ultimately, to job retention.

  9. Supervisors' upward exchange relationships and subordinate outcomes: testing the multilevel mediation role of empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Le; Wang, Mo; Chen, Gilad; Shi, Junqi

    2012-05-01

    This study empirically examined the proposition that supervisors' exchange relationships with their own supervisors (i.e., leader-leader exchange, or LLX) are related to their subordinates' work-related outcomes through 3 mechanisms: (a) leaders modeling their LLX to develop and maintain their exchange relationships with their subordinates (i.e., leader-member exchange, or LMX), (b) motivating the team and its members, captured by team and individual empowerment, and (c) facilitating the relationships between LMX and individual outcomes. Analyses of multisource and lagged data from 104 team supervisors and 577 subordinates showed that LMX mediated the positive relationship of LLX on subordinates' individual empowerment. Furthermore, team empowerment and individual empowerment sequentially mediated the positive relationships between LLX and subordinates' job satisfaction and job performance. The authors also found that the indirect relationships of LMX with job satisfaction and job performance via individual empowerment were stronger when LLX was higher. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Organizational safety climate and supervisor safety enforcement: Multilevel explorations of the causes of accident underreporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Tahira M

    2015-11-01

    According to national surveillance statistics, over 3 million employees are injured each year; yet, research indicates that these may be substantial underestimates of the true prevalence. The purpose of the current project was to empirically test the hypothesis that organizational safety climate and transactional supervisor safety leadership would predict the extent to which accidents go unreported by employees. Using hierarchical linear modeling and survey data collected from 1,238 employees in 33 organizations, employee-level supervisor safety enforcement behaviors (and to a less consistent extent, organizational-level safety climate) predicted employee accident underreporting. There was also a significant cross-level interaction, such that the effect of supervisor enforcement on underreporting was attenuated in organizations with a positive safety climate. These results may benefit human resources and safety professionals by pinpointing methods of increasing the accuracy of accident reporting, reducing actual safety incidents, and reducing the costs to individuals and organizations that result from underreporting.

  11. Supervisor leadership in relation to resident job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der Martha; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Scheele, Fedde; Schripsema, Nienke R.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research from outside the medical field shows that leadership behaviours influence job satisfaction. Whether the same is true for the medical training setting needs to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residents' overall appreciation of their

  12. Supervisor leadership in relation to resident job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martha A; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Scheele, Fedde; Schripsema, Nienke R; Jaarsma, A Debbie C; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research from outside the medical field shows that leadership behaviours influence job satisfaction. Whether the same is true for the medical training setting needs to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residents' overall appreciation of their supervis

  13. Supervisor leadership in relation to resident job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martha A.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Scheele, Fedde; Schripsema, Nienke R.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research from outside the medical field shows that leadership behaviours influence job satisfaction. Whether the same is true for the medical training setting needs to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residents' overall appreciation of their supervis

  14. Spaced cognitive training promotes training transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuowei eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training studies yield wildly inconsistent results. One dimension on which studies vary is the scheduling of training sessions (Morrison & Chein, 2011. In this study, we systematically address whether or not spacing of practice influences training and transfer. We randomly assigned 115 fifth grade children to an active control group or one of four training groups who received working memory training based on a running span task (Zhao et al., 2011. All groups received the same total amount of training: 20 sessions of training with 60 trials for an average of 20 minutes per session. The training was spread across 2 days, 5 days, 10 days, or 20 days. The active control group received 20-minute sessions of math instruction for 20 sessions. Before and after training participants in all five groups performed a single transfer test that assessed fluid intelligence, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test. Overall, participants in all four training groups improved significantly on the training task (at least partially, as reflected by increased speed. More importantly, the only training group to show significant improvement on the Raven's was the group who had the greatest amount of spacing (20 days group during training and improvement in this group was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  15. Spaced cognitive training promotes training transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuowei; Zhou, Renlai; Shah, Priti

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive training studies yield wildly inconsistent results. One dimension on which studies vary is the scheduling of training sessions (Morrison and Chein, 2011). In this study, we systematically address whether or not spacing of practice influences training and transfer. We randomly assigned 115 fifth grade children to an active control group or one of four training groups who received working memory training based on a "running span" task (Zhao et al., 2011). All groups received the same total amount of training: 20 sessions of training with 60 trials for an average of 20 min per session. The training was spread across 2, 5, 10, or 20 days. The active control group received 20-min sessions of math instruction for 20 sessions. Before and after training participants in all five groups performed a single transfer test that assessed fluid intelligence, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test. Overall, participants in all four training groups improved significantly on the training task (at least partially), as reflected by increased speed. More importantly, the only training group to show significant improvement on the Raven's was the group who had the greatest amount of spacing (20 days group) during training and improvement in this group was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  16. On the abuses by the thesis supervisor in the light of the academic ethos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Świtalska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper will attempt to provide an ethical reflection upon abuses by a thesis supervisor that may occur in interpersonal relationships between a student and his or her supervisor. The abuses will be considered from the perspective of the academic ethos. In this the author will focus upon the actual notion of ethos and values which are considered as constituent for the ethos of scholars. In the second part of the paper the author will reflect on which of the thesis supervisor’s attitudes constitute a betrayal of these values.

  17. [Assessments during Medical Specialists Training: quantity or quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamming, J F

    2017-01-01

    Structured assessments form a mandatory part of Dutch Medical Specialist Training, but create administrative workload for both the staff and supervisors. One could argue that the quality of the narrative feedback is more important than the extensive reporting in learning portfolios, and that the focus should be on continuous on-the-job coaching.

  18. Cutting Tools. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in teaching students to compare the performance of two different types of engineering cutting tools and to determine their cost-effectiveness and efficiency. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination…

  19. UNITE and Management Training Program for Workplace Communication & Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Sanda

    This curriculum provides materials for a training program designed to enable front-line supervisors and union stewards to minimize production disruptions stemming from ongoing, unresolved conflicts among production workers. The program accomplishes this goal by giving participants the tools and confidence to design, implement, and run a process…

  20. Safety Training for the Developmentally Disabled in Icon Recognition for the Safe Use of Hazardous Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This unique document is a training manual for individuals such as job coaches and janitorial crew supervisors who train and work with Developmentally Disabled (DD) workers in vocational classrooms and on job sites. These workers need to be taught the importance of safety in the workplace using methods appropriate to their developmental needs. The…

  1. LIDERAZGO TRANSFORMADOR Y SATISFACCIÓN LABORAL: EL ROL DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL SUPERVISOR / TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND JOB SATISFACTION: THE ROLE OF TRUSTING IN THE SUPERVISOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Omar*

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEl objetivo de la presente investigación fue analizar las posibles relaciones entre la satisfacción laboral y las percepcionesdel supervisor como un líder transformador, así como verificar el papel de la confianza sobre tales relaciones. Se estudió unamuestra de 218 trabajadores argentinos, de empresas públicas y privadas de la zona centro del país. Análisis de correlacionesmostraron importantes asociaciones entre las diferentes facetas del liderazgo transformador (consideración individualizada,motivación inspiradora, influencia idealizada y estimulación intelectual, la confianza en el supervisor, la satisfacción laboraly la satisfacción con la vida en general. Un análisis de regresión mediada mostró el papel modulador de la confianza en elsupervisor en las relaciones entre percepciones de liderazgo transformador y satisfacción laboral. Se enumeran las debilidadesy fortalezas del trabajo y se ofrecen sugerencias para futuros estudios.ABSTRACTThe objective of this study was analyzing the possible relationships between job satisfaction and perceptions ofsupervisor as a transformational leader, as well as, verifies the role of trust on such relationships. We studied a sample of 218Argentine workers of public and private organizations of the central zone of the country. Correlation analysis showedsignificant associations between the different facets of transformational leadership (individualized consideration, inspirationalmotivation, idealized influence, and intellectual stimulation, trust in supervisor, job satisfaction, and satisfaction with life ingeneral. Mediated regression analysis demonstrated the moderating role of trust in the supervisor in the relations betweenperceptions of transformational leadership and job satisfaction. The strengths and weaknesses of the work are presented,and suggestions for future studies are provided.

  2. Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers primarily treats the circuit design of optical receivers with external photodiodes. Continuous-mode and burst-mode receivers are compared. The monograph first summarizes the basics of III/V photodetectors, transistor and noise models, bit-error rate, sensitivity and analog circuit design, thus enabling readers to understand the circuits described in the main part of the book. In order to cover the topic comprehensively, detailed descriptions of receivers for optical data communication in general and, in particular, optical burst-mode receivers in deep-sub-µm CMOS are presented. Numerous detailed and elaborate illustrations facilitate better understanding.

  3. How Do Social Networks and Faculty Development Courses Affect Clinical Supervisors' Adoption of a Medical Education Innovation? An Exploratory Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, Erik; Steinert, Yvonne; Pols, Jan; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.; van Engelen, Jo M. L.; Brand, Paul L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of social networks and a two-day faculty development course on clinical supervisors' adoption of an educational innovation. Method During 2007-2010, 571 residents and 613 clinical supervisors in four specialties in the Netherlands were invited to complete a Web-based qu

  4. The Teacher's Roles in Light of Knowledge Economy from the Perspective of the Educational Supervisors' in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Suhair Sulaiman Mohammed; Naser, Inas Aref Saleh; Awajneh, Ahlam Mustafa Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the teacher's roles in light of knowledge economy from the perspective of the educational supervisors in Palestine. To achieve the study's objective, a questionnaire consisted of 35 items was developed and applied on 50 male and female supervisors in the Directorate of Education in governorate of Ramallah, al-Bireh…

  5. A critical evaluation of the validity and the reliability of global competency constructs for supervisor assessment of junior medical trainees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGill, D.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Clarke, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Supervisor assessments are critical for both formative and summative assessment in the workplace. Supervisor ratings remain an important source of such assessment in many educational jurisdictions even though there is ambiguity about their validity and reliability. The aims of this evaluation is to

  6. 30 CFR 250.172 - When may the Regional Supervisor grant or direct an SOO or SOP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... direct an SOO or SOP? 250.172 Section 250.172 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Suspensions § 250.172 When may the Regional Supervisor grant or direct an SOO or SOP? The Regional Supervisor may grant or direct an SOO or SOP under any of the following circumstances: (a) When necessary...

  7. The Relation between Supervisor Self-Disclosure and the Working Alliance among Social Work Students in Field Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The author examined supervisor self-disclosure and the supervisory working alliance with the hope of adding to research-supported techniques in field work supervision. Students enrolled in an MSW program at a large urban university were asked to complete a survey on the frequency and content of their supervisor's self-disclosures and on their…

  8. Perceived Punishment and Reward Values Assigned to Supervisor Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    dimension generally received the most negative ratings. the third factor--" Negative Reinforcement " reflected a general withholding of recognition or...obscured. Especially actions which involve negative reinforcement convey primarily information that the employee’s actions have not produced a reward or

  9. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  10. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new "blended learning" course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on April 1st, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while ...

  11. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new "blended learning" course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on April 1st, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while ...

  12. Low complexity MIMO receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Lin; Yu, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems can increase the spectral efficiency in wireless communications. However, the interference becomes the major drawback that leads to high computational complexity at both transmitter and receiver. In particular, the complexity of MIMO receivers can be prohibitively high. As an efficient mathematical tool to devise low complexity approaches that mitigate the interference in MIMO systems, lattice reduction (LR) has been widely studied and employed over the last decade. The co-authors of this book are world's leading experts on MIMO receivers, and here they share the key findings of their research over years. They detail a range of key techniques for receiver design as multiple transmitted and received signals are available. The authors first introduce the principle of signal detection and the LR in mathematical aspects. They then move on to discuss the use of LR in low complexity MIMO receiver design with respect to different aspects, including uncoded MIMO detection...

  13. A Study of Supervisor and Employee Perceptions of Work Attitudes in Information Age Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Md. Shafiqul; Brauchle, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    The self-perceived work ethic of industrial employees in information jobs (N=304) and non-information jobs (N=277), and employees' work ethic as assessed by their supervisors, were examined using the Occupational Work Ethic Inventory (OWEI). A Principle Components Analysis yielded four factors (Teamwork, Dependability, Ambition and Self-Control)…

  14. The relation between feedback perceptions and the supervisor-student relationship in master's thesis projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Pilot, Albert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Research supervision can be investigated from social-emotional and cognitive perspectives, but most studies include only one perspective. This study aims to understand the interplay between a social-emotional (supervisor-student relationship) and cognitive (feedback) perspective on the outcomes of m

  15. Protean and Boundaryless Career Attitudes and Organizational Commitment: The Effects of Perceived Supervisor Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak-Otluoglu, K. Ovgu

    2012-01-01

    Despite the traditional sentiment that protean and boundaryless career attitudes indicate a decline in organizational commitment, little empirical evidence is available. The present study examined the relation of protean and boundaryless career attitudes to organizational commitment and whether the perceived supervisor support moderated these…

  16. The Focus of Supervisor Written Feedback to Thesis/Dissertation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Basturkmen, Helen; East, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Written feedback on drafts of a thesis or dissertation is arguably the most important source of input on what is required or expected of thesis-writing students by the academic community. Despite its importance, relatively little is known about what type of information supervisors focus on when giving feedback. This article presents the findings…

  17. The Ignorant Supervisor: About Common Worlds, Epistemological Modesty and Distributed Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr.

    2015-01-01

    When postgraduate researchers' interests lie outside the body(ies) of knowledge with which their supervisors are familiar, different supervisory approaches are called for. In such situations, questions concerning the appropriateness of traditional models arise, which almost invariably involve a budding candidate's relationship with a…

  18. Creating a "Third Space" in Student Teaching: Implications for the University Supervisor's Status as Outsider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alexander; Schmeichel, Mardi; Butler, Brandon M.; Dinkelman, Todd; Nichols, Joseph R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The work of teacher education during student teaching typically takes place in two distinct "spaces": placement sites and college/university settings. The program featured in this article is structured in ways that clearly mark out those two spaces. Yet this configuration led our university supervisors, whose work primarily took place in the…

  19. Fairness perceptions of supervisor feedback, LMX, and employee well-being at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, J.L.; Sonnentag, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    In a field study we examined employees' fairness perceptions of supervisor feedback and their relationships with employee well-being (job depression, job anxiety, job satisfaction, turnover intentions) and perceived control at work. We hypothesized quality of leader - member exchange (LMX) to partia

  20. Instructiveness of feedback during clerkships : Influence of supervisor, observation and student initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Kuks, Jan B.M.; Raat, A.N.; van Lohuizen, M.T.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several authors assume that the supervisor's role, observation of behaviour and students' active participation are important factors in the instructiveness of feedback. Aim: This study aims to provide empirical evidence for these expectations. Methods: For two weeks, 142 clerks from eigh

  1. What Supervisors Say in Their Feedback: Construction of CanMEDS Roles in Workplace Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renting, Nienke; Dornan, Tim; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.

    2016-01-01

    The CanMEDS framework has been widely adopted in residency education and feedback processes are guided by it. It is, however, only one of many influences on what is actually discussed in feedback. The sociohistorical culture of medicine and individual supervisors' contexts, experiences and beliefs are also influential. Our aim was to find how…

  2. Balancing Feedback and Inquiry: How Novice Observers (Supervisors) Learn from Inquiry into Their Own Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, Brent; Keating, Catherine; Murray, Karen; Ross, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Giving constructive feedback to a teacher is a complex process. This article addresses the difficulty of giving feedback by discussing three different cases, each of which illustrates a dimension of the complexity of learning the process. It argues that an attitude of inquiry increases the likelihood that a novice observer (supervisor) will become…

  3. Manifestación del Liderazgo Transformacional en un Grupo de Supervisores de Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Armando Pérez Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación se realizó con el propósito de identificar el estilo de liderazgo que mayormente se atribuye utilizar un grupo de supervisores puertorriqueños. De igual forma, deseamos comparar si estas atribuciones presentaban diferencias significativas entre mujeres y hombres. Un total de 200 supervisores/ as participaron en este estudio, 112 mujeres y 88 hombres. Los resultados apoyan la aplicabilidad de la teoría de rango completo de liderazgo en los líderes puertorriqueños. Se identificaron diferencias significativas al comparar las atribuciones de los supervisores/as, presentando las mujeres niveles de liderazgo transformacional y transaccional superiores al compararlas con los hombres. No se encontraron diferencias significativas al considerar otras variables demográficas relevantes, como tampoco una interacción de éstas con el género del supervisor. Estos resultados se discuten de acuerdo a los hallazgos en otros estudios fuera de Puerto Rico y sus implicaciones para el manejo de este tema en nuestro país.

  4. Validation of the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS) with Supervisors' Self-Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Elisa M; Ehrhart, Mark G; Beidas, Rinad S; Farahnak, Lauren R; Finn, Natalie K; Aarons, Gregory A

    2017-02-08

    Although often discussed, there is a lack of empirical research on the role of leadership in the management and delivery of health services. The implementation leadership scale (ILS) assesses the degree to which leaders are knowledgeable, proactive, perseverant, and supportive during evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the ILS for leaders' self-ratings using a sample of mental health clinic supervisors (N = 119). Supervisors (i.e., leaders) completed surveys including self-ratings of their implementation leadership. Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability, and validity of the ILS were evaluated. The ILS factor structure was supported in the sample of supervisors. Results demonstrated internal consistency reliability and validity. Cronbach alpha's ranged from 0.92 to 0.96 for the ILS subscales and 0.95 for the ILS overall scale. The factor structure replication and reliability of the ILS in a sample of supervisors demonstrates its applicability with employees across organizational levels.

  5. What supervisors say in their feedback : construction of CanMEDS roles in workplace settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renting, Nienke; Dornan, Tim; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.

    The CanMEDS framework has been widely adopted in residency education and feedback processes are guided by it. It is, however, only one of many influences on what is actually discussed in feedback. The sociohistorical culture of medicine and individual supervisors' contexts, experiences and beliefs

  6. The Stories of Expert and Novice Student Teachers' Supervisors: Perspectives on Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer-Hayon, Lya

    1991-01-01

    Three expert and three novice student teacher supervisors were interviewed on the ways in which they perceived their professional development, focusing on knowledge and change, reflection and criticism, theory and research, ideology and values, human relations, and difficulties. Results indicated substantial differences in the developmental stages…

  7. Rights and Responsibilities. Supervisory Skills Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is designed to consolidate the work covered in a 1-day course. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. The following topics are covered: (1) the law and personnel procedures; (2) consultation and negotiation; (3)…

  8. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  9. Getting the Right Staff. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Tessa; Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry contains information on all the important stages in the process of recruiting staff. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1) the cost of employment; (2) planning for…

  10. TALK NERDY TO ME: THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL STIMULATION IN THE SUPERVISOR-EMPLOYEE RELATIONSHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smothers, Jack; Doleh, Randa; Celuch, Kevin; Peluchette, Joy; Valadares, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates (1) if communication with one's supervisor is related to empowerment through establishing perceptions of leader integrity, and (2) the extent to which the relationship between leader integrity and empowerment is moderated by intellectual stimulation. Due to the dynamic nature of today's organizational environment, understanding the nuances among these variables is vital to effective performance at the individual and organizational level. Hierarchical multiple regression tests were performed with a sample of 259 nurses in two regional healthcare facilities in the Midwestern United States. The results support a moderated-mediation relationship such that open communication with one's supervisor is positively related to empowerment through perceptions of leader integrity, but the relationship between leader integrity and empowerment varies across levels of intellectual stimulation. Specifically, while supervisor integrity mediates the relationship between patient safety communication and empowerment, this mediated relationship is only significant for followers who experience high intellectual stimulation, and is not significant for followers who report low intellectual stimulation. Thus, open communication and leader integrity will only empower followers if the leader is intellectually stimulating. This research clarifies how leaders in health care environments should communicate with their followers to empower them to think and act by their own initiative. Specifically, followers who communicate openly with their supervisor will feel more empowered, but only if they experience high intellectual stimulation which can improve their job performance and patient safety overall.

  11. Regulating regulators through liability The case for applying normal tort rules to supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    This article claims that liability of supervisors, given the arguments in favour and against liability, should be treated as a regular form of civil law liability (either in tort or contract). The rules regarding the existence and content of the duty of care are well equipped to deal with that topic

  12. The client’s ideas and fantasies of the supervisor in video recorded psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    2010-01-01

    by two independent researchers and a third auditor. Furthermore, clients rated the overall influence of video recording and the influence across time on Likert scales. Results: This paper only focus on the results concerning the clients’ fantasy relationship to the supervisor. In general the clients...

  13. The Relation between Feedback Perceptions and the Supervisor-Student Relationship in Master's Thesis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Pilot, Albert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Research supervision can be investigated from social-emotional and cognitive perspectives, but most studies include only one perspective. This study aims to understand the interplay between a social-emotional (supervisor-student relationship) and cognitive (feedback) perspective on the outcomes of master's thesis supervision in specific, by…

  14. Supervisors' Responses to Subordinate Performance: Effect of Personal-Control Orientation and Situational Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkanasy, Neal M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a study extending a model of leadership response based on attribution theories to include measures of locus of control and situational control. Describes a procedure by which subjects responded to descriptions of subordinate performance. Concludes that supervisors with an external locus of control were less sensitive to subordinate…

  15. How clinical supervisors develop trust in their trainees: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.; Oza, S.K.; Kogan, J.R.; Stankiewicz, C.A.; Stenfors-Hayes, T.; ten Cate, TJ; Batt, Joanne; O’Sullivan, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Clinical supervisors oversee trainees’ performance while granting them increasing opportunities to work independently. Although the factors contributing to supervisors’ trust in their trainees to conduct clinical work have been identified, how the development of trust is shaped by these fact

  16. Feedback on Student Performance in the Workplace: The Role of Workplace Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Deborah; Ruinard, Deborah; Webb, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    This chapter highlights the importance of feedback in work-integrated learning (WIL), the key role of workplace supervisors, and the importance of continuous improvement in systems to support feedback processes. The paper proposes a definition of feedback and formative feedback, as well as approaches for providing industry feedback in WIL. It…

  17. Fostering a Career Development Culture: Reflections on the Roles of Managers, Employees and Supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    An organizational culture supportive of career development fosters productivity, competitiveness, and realization of potential. However, there are flaws in the system in which supervisors play a key role in career development. A systematic mentoring program could result in a managed career development culture that benefits employees and…

  18. Impact of Internal Population Movements on the Schooling Process in Turkey: Supervisors' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Hanife; Sen, Derya

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to examine the impact of interregional and urban--rural population movements on schools located in areas subjected to high in-migration and outmigration flows in Turkey based on data collected from primary school supervisors (N = 150). A cross-sectional survey design was utilized to examine the most pressing problems…

  19. When Supervision Is Conflated with Evaluation: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Their Novice Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rebecca West; Badiali, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    Preparing teachers in clinically rich contexts requires teacher educators who are skilled and knowledgeable about university coursework as well as the complexities of classrooms. Retired teachers or principals have often assumed the role of field supervisor, bringing to their work extensive practitioner knowledge but often lacking theoretical…

  20. The Issue of Education Supervision in Turkey in the Views of Teachers, Administrators, Supervisors and Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memduhoglu, Hasan Basri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the views of teachers, administrators, supervisors and lecturers that are experts in their fields as people having roles in education regarding the aim, structure, process, strong sides and main problems of the education supervision in Turkey. In this research, the scanning model research was employed through…

  1. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... based on well tests and any limitations imposed by well and surface equipment, sand production... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Gas Production Requirements Production Rates § 250.1159 May the Regional Supervisor limit my well...

  2. The Relation between Feedback Perceptions and the Supervisor-Student Relationship in Master's Thesis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Pilot, Albert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Research supervision can be investigated from social-emotional and cognitive perspectives, but most studies include only one perspective. This study aims to understand the interplay between a social-emotional (supervisor-student relationship) and cognitive (feedback) perspective on the outcomes of master's thesis supervision in specific, by…

  3. Colleague Supervision--"Ignored and Undervalued"? The Views of Students and Supervisors in a New University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Colleague supervision is increasingly used in UK modern (post-92) universities to support the progress of academic staff to doctoral qualifications. Denicolo (2004) argues that it is a "role relationship that has been largely ignored or undervalued by administration" (p. 693) and colleague students and supervisors "felt more…

  4. Teaching Practice: University Supervisors' Experiences and Perceptions of a Cooperating Physical Education Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Sarah; Dunning, Carol; Belton, Sarahjane; Woods, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine university supervisors' experiences and perceptions of a cooperating physical education teacher education (COPET) programme while on teaching practice. Teaching practice is a central tenet of physical education teacher education (PETE) preparation. The COPET programme was designed to support the triad…

  5. Live Counselor Supervision: Focus on Trainee, Acculturation and Supervisor Intervention Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenzer, Donald L.; And Others

    Supervision of the counselor trainee by a supervisor during an actual counseling session is the topic of this presentation. The first page, presented in outline form, lists six types of live supervision: bug-in-the-ear, monitoring, in vivo, phone-in, consultation, and walk-in. Also listed are differences between individual and family live…

  6. Action Learning--A Learning and Teaching Method in the Preparation Programme for Supervisors of Midwives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Marianne; Yearley, Carole; Lawrence, Chris; Rogers, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    Supervision of midwives is a statutory responsibility, which provides a mechanism for support and guidance to every practising midwife in the United Kingdom. To be eligible for appointment as a supervisor, midwives are required to undertake a preparation programme successfully. Because of the changing nature of the professional role and education,…

  7. Postgraduate Research Success: Communities of Practice Involving Cohorts, Guardian Supervisors and Online Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gillian; Shacham, Miri

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, supervisors work with students on an individual basis and postgraduate development programmes are run on site. However, with increasing numbers of part-time and international students, supervisory relationships are likely to be conducted at a distance as students study alongside other commitments. Isolation can often be a key…

  8. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership Behaviors of Faculty Supervisors and Self-Efficacies of Graduate Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Bass's transformational leadership theory is one of the most frequently applied theories of leadership in leadership research in education. However, the dyadic relationship between graduate assistants and the faculty as their immediate supervisors have not been investigated from a leader-follower perspective. In addition, self-efficacy…

  9. Coach, Consultant or Mother: Supervisors' Views on Quality in the Supervision of Bachelor Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Leif

    2006-01-01

    This study is about what supervisors perceive as crucial aspects of quality in supervising students writing their bachelor theses. The questions on quality are related to a scientific perspective, a learning perspective, a societal perspective and a social perspective. The study demonstrates that the criteria on science varied considerably,…

  10. EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF MANAGERS AND SUPERVISORS IN CITIES, BOROUGHS, AND TOWNSHIPS IN PENNSYLVANIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUBIN, SAMUEL S.; AND OTHERS

    THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING STUDIES, CONTINUING EDUCATION, THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, (A) TO DETERMINE THE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION NEEDS OF MANAGERS IN MUNICIPALITIES AND SUPERVISORS IN CITIES IN PENNSYLVANIA, (B) TO SUGGEST METHODS OF MEETING THESE NEEDS, AND (C) TO INDICATE THE ROLE OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES…

  11. The Older-Worker-Younger-Supervisor Dyad: A Test of the Reverse Pygmalion Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Mary Hair; Hair, Joseph F., Jr.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging phenomenon, the older worker reporting to a much younger supervisor, is reversing the tradition that managers are older and more experienced than subordinates. These age-related demographic changes are bringing about a role reversal in the workplace that violates established age norms, creating status incongruence in the…

  12. Supervisor-Clerical Agreement on Competency Importance as It Relates to Satisfactoriness and Job Satsifaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B. June

    This study examined the concept that extent of agreement between clerical employees and their respective supervisors on competency importance would relate to satisfactoriness and job satisfaction. Data for competency agreement, satisfactoriness, and job satisfaction were analyzed and interpreted for fifty-five clerical employees who responded to a…

  13. The Ignorant Supervisor: About Common Worlds, Epistemological Modesty and Distributed Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr.

    2015-01-01

    When postgraduate researchers' interests lie outside the body(ies) of knowledge with which their supervisors are familiar, different supervisory approaches are called for. In such situations, questions concerning the appropriateness of traditional models arise, which almost invariably involve a budding candidate's relationship with a…

  14. What supervisors say in their feedback : construction of CanMEDS roles in workplace settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renting, Nienke; Dornan, Tim; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.

    2016-01-01

    The CanMEDS framework has been widely adopted in residency education and feedback processes are guided by it. It is, however, only one of many influences on what is actually discussed in feedback. The sociohistorical culture of medicine and individual supervisors' contexts, experiences and beliefs a

  15. Hierarchical Supervisor and Agent Routing Algorithm in LEO/MEO Double-layered Optical Satellite Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Zhao, Shanghong

    2016-09-01

    A novel routing algorithm (Hierarchical Supervisor and Agent Routing Algorithm, HSARA) for LEO/MEO (low earth orbit/medium earth orbit) double-layered optical satellite network is brought forward. The so-called supervisor (MEO satellite) is designed for failure recovery and network management. LEO satellites are grouped according to the virtual managed field of MEO which is different from coverage area of MEO satellite in RF satellite network. In each LEO group, one LEO satellite which has maximal persistent link with its supervisor is called the agent. A LEO group is updated when this optical inter-orbit links between agent LEO satellite and the corresponding MEO satellite supervisor cuts off. In this way, computations of topology changes and LEO group updating can be decreased. Expense of routing is integration of delay and wavelength utilization. HSARA algorithm simulations are implemented and the results are as follows: average network delay of HSARA can reduce 21 ms and 31.2 ms compared with traditional multilayered satellite routing and single-layer LEO satellite respectively; LEO/MEO double-layered optical satellite network can cover polar region which cannot be covered by single-layered LEO satellite and throughput is 1% more than that of single-layered LEO satellite averagely. Therefore, exact global coverage can be achieved with this double-layered optical satellite network.

  16. Rights and Responsibilities. Supervisory Skills Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is designed to consolidate the work covered in a 1-day course. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. The following topics are covered: (1) the law and personnel procedures; (2) consultation and negotiation; (3)…

  17. Predicting Supervisor Capacities to Foster Higher Forms of Learning through Undergraduate Medical Student Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The credibility of short-term undergraduate research as a paradigm for effective learning within Medicine has been recognized. With a view to strengthening this paradigm and enhancing research-teaching linkages, this study explores whether particular types of research supervisor are pre-disposed to providing supportive learning environments.…

  18. How busy is my supervisor? Detecting the visits in the office of my supervisor using a sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nait Aicha, A.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.

    2012-01-01

    Existing research on the recognition of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) from simple sensor networks assumes that only a single person is present in the home. In real life there will be situations where the inhabitant receives visits from family members or professional health care givers. In such ca

  19. Delphi Accounts Receivable Module -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Delphi accounts receivable module contains the following data elements, but are not limited to customer information, cash receipts, line of accounting details, bill...

  20. Does Negotiation Training Improve Negotiators' Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShenawy, Eman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper's objective is to test the main effect of negotiation training-level on acquiring negotiation skills. Training level refers to the time a trainee spends in a negotiation training course receiving the standard style and methods of training. Negotiation skills are manifested through trainees' performance after receiving training.…

  1. Perceptions of medical graduates and their workplace supervisors towards a medical school clinical audit program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ferrall, Ilse; Hoare, Samuel; Caroline, Bulsara; Mak, Donna B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study explores how medical graduates and their workplace supervisors perceive the value of a structured clinical audit program (CAP) undertaken during medical school. Methods Medical students at the University of Notre Dame Fremantle complete a structured clinical audit program in their final year of medical school.  Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 Notre Dame graduates (who had all completed the CAP), and seven workplace supervisors (quality and safety staff and clinical supervisors).  Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants and data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Both graduates and workplace supervisors perceived the CAP to be valuable. A major theme was that the CAP made a contribution to individual graduate’s medical practice, including improved knowledge in some areas of patient care as well as awareness of healthcare systems issues and preparedness to undertake scientifically rigorous quality improvement activities. Graduates perceived that as a result of the CAP, they were confident in undertaking a clinical audit after graduation.  Workplace supervisors perceived the value of the CAP beyond an educational experience and felt that the audits undertaken by students improved quality and safety of patient care. Conclusions It is vital that health professionals, including medical graduates, be able to carry out quality and safety activities in the workplace. This study provides evidence that completing a structured clinical audit during medical school prepares graduates to undertake quality and safety activities upon workplace entry. Other health professional faculties may be interested in incorporating a similar program in their curricula.  PMID:28692425

  2. The impact of supervisors' cognitive styles on the quality of research supervision in management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Steven J

    2004-12-01

    An aspect of teaching and learning that has been seriously overlooked in higher education is the process of research supervision. High failure rates for research dissertations in the social sciences have been partly attributed to student dissatisfaction with supervision and poor student-supervisor relationships. One personality variable that has been shown to be partly responsible for shaping the effectiveness of supervisory relationships is cognitive style. The study examined the effects of supervisor cognitive style on the quality of supervision for students undertaking a research project in the field of management education. Both parties in each of 118 supervisor-student dyads within a university business school in the UK participated in the study. Data were collected using the Cognitive Style Index to measure subjects on the analytic-intuitive dimension of cognitive style. A self-developed Thurstone attitude scale was used to measure students' perceptions of the quality of supervision. The scale's validity was assured by making extensive use of subjects' (N = 100) judgments from the population of interest in the scale's development. A second parallel scale was developed to test the instrument's reliability characteristics. Findings revealed that students perceived the quality of supervision to increase significantly with the degree to which supervisors were analytic in their cognitive style. Students whose supervisors were more analytic also achieved significantly higher grades for their dissertations. Whilst there may be many factors influencing interpersonal relationships of this nature, this study demonstrated the potential relevance of cognitive style, which may prove to be a fertile area for further investigation.

  3. Technical Training: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) 16.3...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004(3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) : 16.3.2004 (afternoon) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.2004 ...

  5. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Pa...

  6. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 - 14.11.03(3 days) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 - 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - niveau 2 : 18 - 21.11.03 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project  (free of charg...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 1.4.2004 (morning) FrontPage XP - niveau 1 : 5 & 6.4.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 day...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 - 30.4.2004 (5 days) Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Pla...

  9. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) : 28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 – Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to PSpice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS ...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study for Microsoft applications :12.2.2004 (morning) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 ...

  11. Technical Training: Places Available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Oracle 9i: SQL: 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9i : New f...

  12. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW hands-on (E):...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project :6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1: 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1 : 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL : 2 - 4.6.2...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) VisualEliteHDL : 25 & 26.5.2004 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 10 - 12.5.2004 (3...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 days) LabVIEW Hands-on : 20.4.2004 (half-day, p.m.) FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 -...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW...

  18. A Survey of American and Canadian Psychiatry Residents on Their Training, Teaching Practices, and Attitudes Toward Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Weiss, Andrea; Blackmore, Michelle A; Shen, Megan Johnson; Abrams, Madeleine Seifter; Woesner, Mary E

    2016-10-01

    Formal training for residents-as-teachers in psychiatry is increasingly emphasized. However, little is known about the quantity and content of residents' teaching, their attitudes toward teaching, or the training received on how to teach. An online survey was disseminated to American and Canadian psychiatry residents. Three hundred eighty-two residents from all postgraduate years (PGY) responded, representing about 7 % of all trainees. About half of PGY-1 have not received residents-as-teachers training, but by PGY-3 most have. The majority of respondents reported teaching, most commonly 1-5 h. Most found teaching enjoyable or rewarding (n = 304; 87 %); however, 40 % (n = 138) found teaching burdensome, 43 % (n = 151) lacked sufficient time to teach, and many (n = 226; 64 %) reported insufficient feedback from supervisors. Although the sampling methodology and low response rate limit the generalizability of findings, respondents typically seemed to value teaching, though the majority felt that they lacked feedback on their teaching skills.

  19. Language Training: French course for beginners

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. A French course for beginners (level 0) will take place from 12 July to 27 August. Timetable: not yet fixed Duration: 54 hours / 2 hours a day Price: CHF 702 Please enrol as soon as possible through the Web: http://cern.ch/Training FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  20. Language Training: French course for beginners

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. A French course for beginners (level 0) will take place from 12 July to 27 August. Timetable: not yet fixed Duration: 54 hours / 2 hours a day Price: 702 SF Please enrol as soon as possible through the Web: http://cern.ch/Training FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  1. Interações supervisor-professor: diálogos de proteção da face Supervisor-teacher interactions: dialogues for face protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Correia Tostes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Partindo de uma perspectiva funcional do uso da língua, investigamos as estratégias linguísticas do supervisor escolar e sua aceitação pelos docentes. Tal estudo visa a oferecer insights sobre a modalização da linguagem em interações profissionais. Assim, utilizamos princípios da Teoria da Polidez (1978 aliados à Teoria dos Atos de Fala (1962 para chegar à relação inversamente proporcional entre o grau de polidez e o conteúdo positivo dos comentários: quanto mais polidos os comentários, menos positivo seu conteúdo, e vice-versa. Testes de atitude aplicados aos professores revelam alto grau de aceitação dos comentários tecidos pelo supervisor, o que pode indicar que alto grau de polidez e modalização da linguagem em situações de supervisão escolar são altamente desejáveis para se alcançar atuações profissionais mais eficazes.Departing from a functional perspective of language use, we have investigated linguistic strategies of a school supervisor and their acceptance by teachers. Such study tries to offer insights on the modalization of language in professional interactions. Thus, we have applied principles of Politeness (1978 allied to the Speech Acts Theory (1962 to come to the conclusion there is an inverse proportion between the level of politeness and the quality of comments made: the more politeness strategies used, the less positive the comments made and vice-versa. Attitude tests reveal high level of acceptance of comments by teachers, what might indicate that more politeness and modalization of language in situations of supervision are highly desirable for more effective professional actions.

  2. Communication Skills Training for Divorcees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Arthur W.; Thiessen, Jake D.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the effects of a weekend communication skills training program for divorced persons. Subjects in the experimental group (N=13) received interpersonal skills training, while the control group (N=14) received no training. Results indicated experimentals significantly increased their perceived level of social support, self-disclosure and…

  3. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' orientation to occupational safety in DOE'' taught at Rocky Flats, Colorado, April 23--May 2, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted twice at the Rocky Flats facility between April 23, 1991 and May 2, 1991. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendices A and B. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  4. Perfil dos Supervisores de Psicologia em Serviços-Escola Brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Vieira Gauy

    Full Text Available Perfil dos supervisores de psicologia em Serviços-Escola Brasileiros (treino/atendimento Este trabalho teve como objetivo descrever o perfil demográfico dos supervisores dos cursos de graduação em Psicologia, obtidos pelo projeto de pesquisa intitulado "Serviços-Escola de Psicologia no Brasil", que tinha entre seus objetivos a caracterização dos serviços-escola de psicologia brasileiros. A pesquisa foi disponibilizada on-line em umsite da internet específico para a pesquisa, divulgado através de vários meios de comunicação, no qual, o participante em potencial da pesquisa (supervisor, estagiário ou gestor de uma das clinica escolas de Psicologia do Brasil, depois de acessar a pagina e o seu campo específico, informava dados pessoais (sexo e idade, dados institucionais (vínculo de trabalho, tipo de instituição e localização e dados profissionais (abordagem teórica e tempo de experiência/área. Do total de 846 participantes potenciais apenas 147 eram supervisores de cursos de Psicologia que haviam completado totalmente o questionário e foram, por isso, considerados para presente análise. Os dados coletados, no período de 2008 a 2010, apontaram que a maioria dos respondentes era do sexo feminino (77,6%, tinha idade entre 38 a 45 anos (45,5%, possuía vínculo formal de trabalho (90% com instituições de ensino privado (56%, localizadas nas Regiões Sul e Sudeste (78%. A Psicanálise figurou como abordagem mais referida (24% e aqueles que referiam ter mais de 10 anos de experiência em Psicodiagnóstico/Psicoterapia (64,4%. Apesar do tamanho da amostra não ser representativa do perfil dos supervisores brasileiros, os dados obtidos forneceram informações importantes sobre o perfil dos supervisores, peça chave na formação do aluno de graduação.

  5. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www...

  6. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l’électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l’Enseignement Technique qui s’adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l’ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie p...

  7. A sustainable model for training teachers to use pivotal response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such as pivotal response training, as evidence-based, dissemination to school environments has been problematic. This study assessed the benefits of using the train-the-trainer model to disseminate pivotal response training to school settings. A multiple-baseline design was conducted across three training groups, each consisting of one school staff member (trainer), three special education teachers, and six students. Trainers conducted the teacher-training workshop with high adherence to training protocol and met mastery criteria in their ability to implement pivotal response training, assess implementation of pivotal response training, and provide feedback to teachers. Six of the nine teachers mastered all components of pivotal response training. The remaining three teachers implemented 89% of the pivotal response training components correctly. The majority of trainers and teachers maintained their abilities at follow-up. These results support the use of the train-the-trainer model as an effective method of disseminating evidence-based practices in school settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Does gender impact on female doctors'experiences in the training and practice of surgery? A single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoetok, F; Van Wyk, J M; Madiba, T E

    2017-09-01

    Surgery has been identified as a male-dominated specialty in South Africa and abroad. This study explored how female registrars perceived the impact of gender on their training and practice of surgery. A self-administered questionnaire was used to explore whether females perceived any benefits to training in a male-dominated specialty, their choice of mentors and the challenges that they encountered during surgical training. Thirty-two female registrars participated in the study. The respondents were mainly South African (91%) and enrolled in seven surgical specialties. Twenty-seven (84%) respondents were satisfied with their training and skills development. Twenty-four (75%) respondents had a mentor from the department. Seventeen (53%) respondents perceived having received differential treatment due to their gender and 25 (78.2%) thought that the gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of the guidance received in surgery. Challenges included physical threats to female respondents from patients and disrespect, emotional threats and defaming statements from male registrars. Additional challenges included time-constraints for family and academic work, poor work-life balance and being treated differently due to their gender. Seventeen (53%) respondents would consider teaching in the Department of Surgery. Generally, females had positive perceptions of their training in Surgery. They expressed concern about finding and maintaining a work-life balance. The gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of the training but 'bullying' from male peers and selected supervisors occurred. Respondents will continue to recommend the specialty as a satisfying career to young female students.

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.09.2004 (4 jours) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 22.6.2004 (1 day) The CERN EDMS for local administrators : 23 & 24.6.2004 (2 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 - 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING...

  10. Language Training: French

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registra...

  11. Learning of each other--online: on the division of labour between technology and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar; Eikli, Gjermund

    2010-01-01

    The article discuss challenges and solutions when an existing course programme, in which contributions from the group form an integral part, is to be converted into an online programme. The focus is on division of labour between technology and supervisors. The case is the Norwegian online version of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program from Stanford University. The interplay between humans and technology is discussed from a theoretical framework developed from the works of Latour and Nonaka. In special difference between human modelling and a technological systematic and rule-based approach is emphasised. By delegating parts of the role in classroom courses to the e-learning solution, it has been possible to create a solution where participants are learning from each other. This demands knowledge on the part of the supervisors so that they help to increase the effect of the technology and not work against it.

  12. Impact of the Supervisor Feedback Environment on Creative Performance: A Moderated Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Gong, Zhenxing; Zhang, Shuangyu; Zhao, Yujia

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between feedback and creative performance have only focused on the feedback-self and have underestimated the value of the feedback environment. Building on Self Determined Theory, the purpose of this article is to examine the relationship among feedback environment, creative personality, goal self-concordance and creative performance. Hierarchical regression analysis of a sample of 162 supervisor–employee dyads from nine industry firms. The results indicate that supervisor feedback environment is positively related to creative performance, the relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and creative performance is mediated by goal self-concordance perfectly and moderated by creative personality significantly. The mediation effort of goal self-concordance is significantly influenced by creative personality. The implication of improving employees’ creative performance is further discussed. The present study advances several perspectives of previous studies, echoes recent suggestions that organizations interested in stimulating employee creativity might profitably focus on developing work contexts that support it. PMID:28275362

  13. The client’s ideas and fantasies of the supervisor in video recorded psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    2010-01-01

    on three related topics; a) the clients’ experience of the video recordings’ influence on therapy; b) the therapeutic relationship and c) fantasy relationship with supervisor. The answers were analyzed in accordance to Hill et al.’s (1997; 2005) guidelines for conducting Consensual Qualitative Research...... of the results will be discussed along with the validity, reliability and limitations of the study. Furthermore, the study’s contribution to clinical practice will be reflected upon.......Aim: Despite the current relatively widespread use of video as a supervisory tool, there are few empirical studies on how recordings influence the relationship between client and supervisor. This paper presents a qualitative, explorative study of clients’ experience of having their psychotherapy...

  14. Employee Training: An International Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kapsalis, Constantine

    1997-01-01

    Canada’s training effort relative to the rest of the IALS countries, measured in terms of hours of training per employee, was found to be average. The average employee in Canada received 44 hours of training in 1994, similar to the hours of training per employee in Switzerland, the United States and Germany. However, Canada’s training effort was considerably less than the Netherlands (74 hours per employee). One finding of particular interest to Canada is the virtual equality of training ...

  15. When the presence of creative coworkers is related to creativity: role of supervisor close monitoring, developmental feedback, and creative personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing

    2003-06-01

    Study 1 was conducted to examine the contribution of the joint condition of supervisor close monitoring and the presence of creative coworkers to employees' creativity. In addition to replicating Study 1's results, Study 2 examined (a) the joint condition of supervisor developmental feedback and presence of creative coworkers and (b) whether creative personality moderated the contributions of the 2 joint conditions. Converging results from the 2 field studies demonstrated that when creative coworkers were present, the less supervisors engaged in close monitoring, the more employees exhibited creativity. Study 2 also found that the contribution of this joint condition was stronger for employees with less creative personalities and that when creative coworkers were present, the more supervisors provided developmental feedback, the more employees exhibited creativity.

  16. 杭州大剧院舞台监督系统%Stage supervisor system in Hangzhou Grand Theater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟国淼

    2004-01-01

    This paper mainly introduces the stage supervisor system in Hangzhou Grand Theater. The stage master console, internal comunication technique, digital calling system, video camera matrix in this system are discussed in detail.

  17. REGLAMENTACIÓN DE LAS FUNCIONES DEL SUPERVISOR DE EDUCACIÓN SUPERIOR EN PUEBLA, MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hortensia Cházaro Arellano

    2009-11-01

    With an origin in the laws in force and from an administrative and epistemological point of view, this article sets up the basis for a draft document in order to regulate the functions of Supervisors.

  18. Articulating Expectations for PhD Candidature upon Commencement: Ensuring Supervisor/Student "Best Fit"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    The journey towards completion of a PhD is a bumpy one for many. One of the major factors that influence successful and on-time thesis completion is the relationship that the PhD candidate has with her or his supervisor. This paper presents results from research undertaken using a 12-item survey to collect data from a purposive sample: PhD…

  19. Implementation of a terminal switching network supervisor: SAURON, an interactive extension of PACX IV control techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahle, M O; Tolendino, L F

    1982-04-01

    The rapidly growing number of interactive terminals at Sandia National Laboratories which compete for a limited number of computer ports has given rise to the development of a Terminal Switching Network. This paper describes a minicomputer-based supervisory node which interacts with the switches comprising the network and the operators. The supervisor amplifies the control capabilities of the operators, provides a realtime display of the system status, and records usage statistics.

  20. Supervisors' perceptions of productivity of employees with preschool children in workplace on-site child care

    OpenAIRE

    Marickovich, Patricia Pesut

    1989-01-01

    Corporate leaders at Dominion Bankshares Corporation established an on-site child care facility at its operations center for its Roanoke, Virginia employees. The immediate supervisors of parents of children enrolled in the Dominion Child Development Center were surveyed to determine the factors they believed affected worker productivity and their perceptions of how employees' work habits had changed as a result of the opening of the child care center. A description of ...