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Sample records for supervision training careful

  1. [Nursing fundamentals: critical incidents related to care provided in supervised training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Elizabeth Amâncio de Souza da Silva; Nogueira, Maria Suely

    2002-01-01

    The course of Nursing fundamentals introduces the students to supervised training and can result in anxiety and tension. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify positive/negative aspects related to the care provided during the supervised training, based on the critical incidents technique. The subjects were students of the 2 degrees, 3 degrees and 4 degrees years of the Nursing Undergraduate Program offered by the State University of Maringá-PR. Authors identified 95 reports: 48(50.5%) positive and 47(49.5) negative. The positive aspects were related to the faculty's presence mediating the teaching-learning process; and the negative ones were related to the professionals insensibility regarding pain and death.

  2. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Swedberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers’ 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19 and field observations in patients’ homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants’ strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues’ and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs

  3. Supervised progressive cross-continuum strength training compared with usual care in older medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina;

    2016-01-01

    on the model), combined with post-training protein supplementation initiated during hospitalization and continued at home for 4 weeks, is superior to usual care on change in mobility 4 weeks after discharge in older medical patients. Methods: Eighty older medical patients (65 years or older) acutely admitted...... hospitalization and continued after discharge. We conducted a feasibility study prior to this trial and found a progression model for loaded sit-to-stands feasible in older medical patients. This study aims to determine whether a simple supervised strength training program for the lower extremities (based...... hospitalization and three times per week for 4 weeks after discharge. Both exercises follow pre-defined models for progression and will be performed for three sets of 8–12 repetitions maximum in each training session. Thereafter, the patient will be asked to consume a protein supplement given orally containing 18...

  4. Care to pregnant women in primary care: report of activities in supervised training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayckel da Silva Barreto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This is an experience report that describes an academic activity during Interdisciplinary In-training course, which is part of curricular program of the 4th year of the Nursing undergraduate course at a public university of the Paraná Northwest. As evaluation of the internship was elaborated an Action Plan based on the Altadir Method of Popular Planning, about prenatal care, focusing on the most common pregnancy complications. After researching the literature, observations during the internship, study in documents and reports of the health team, revealed was that anemia, followed by urinary complications, gastric and gynecological were pregnancy complications more frequent at the health unit. As a result of acquired knowledge together, several actions were undertaken, with professionals and pregnant women. The activities evidenced the relevance of Interdisciplinary In-training as an agent of the competences consolidation and technical abilities, providing the academic identify problems, develop intervention strategies and operational demands of the action.

  5. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  6. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  7. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bosch–Capblanch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes

  8. Clinical supervision training across contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joanna; Bearman, Margaret; Edouard, Vicki; Kent, Fiona; Nestel, Debra; Molloy, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians require specific skills to teach or supervise students in the workplace; however, there are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. The Clinical Supervision Support Across Contexts (ClinSSAC) programme was designed to provide accessible interprofessional educator training to clinical supervisors across a wide range of clinical settings. In Australia there are increasing numbers of health care students, creating pressure on existing placements. Students are now increasingly learning in community settings, where clinicians have traditionally had less access to faculty member development. An interprofessional team collaborated in the development and implementation of ClinSSAC. A total of 978 clinicians participated in a face-to-face, interactive, introductory module to clinical supervision; 672 people accessed the equivalent online core module, with 23 per cent completing all activities. Additional profession-and discipline-specific modules were also developed. Formal project evaluation found that most participants rated the workshops as helpful or very helpful for their roles as clinical supervisors. Interdisciplinary learning from the workshops was reported to enable cross-discipline supervision. Large participant numbers and favourable ratings indicate a continuing need for basic training in education. Key factors to workshop success included expert facilitators, the interprofessional context and interactive model. The online modules were an important adjunct, and provided context-specific resources, but the low online completion rate suggests protected face-to-face time for faculty member development is still required. Programmes such as ClinSSAC have the capacity to promote interprofessional education and practice. There are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nursing supervision for care comprehensiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Alves, Larissa Roberta; Silva, Maria Ferreira da; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques

    2017-01-01

    To reflect on nursing supervision as a management tool for care comprehensiveness by nurses, considering its potential and limits in the current scenario. A reflective study based on discourse about nursing supervision, presenting theoretical and practical concepts and approaches. Limits on the exercise of supervision are related to the organization of healthcare services based on the functional and clinical model of care, in addition to possible gaps in the nurse training process and work overload. Regarding the potential, researchers emphasize that supervision is a tool for coordinating care and management actions, which may favor care comprehensiveness, and stimulate positive attitudes toward cooperation and contribution within teams, co-responsibility, and educational development at work. Nursing supervision may help enhance care comprehensiveness by implying continuous reflection on including the dynamics of the healthcare work process and user needs in care networks. refletir a supervisão de enfermagem como instrumento gerencial do enfermeiro para integralidade do cuidado, considerando suas potencialidades e limitações no cenário atual. estudo reflexivo baseado na formulação discursiva sobre a supervisão de enfermagem, apresentando conceitos e enfoques teóricos e/ou práticos. limitações no exercício da supervisão estão relacionadas à organização dos serviços de saúde embasada no modelo funcional e clínico de atenção, assim como possíveis lacunas no processo de formação do enfermeiro e sobrecarga de trabalho. Quanto às potencialidades, destaca-se a supervisão como instrumento de articulação de ações assistenciais e gerenciais, que pode favorecer integralidade da atenção, estimular atitudes de cooperação e colaboração em equipe, além da corresponsabilização e promoção da educação no trabalho. supervisão de enfermagem pode contribuir para fortalecimento da integralidade do cuidado, pressupondo reflexão cont

  10. Training And Supervision Did Not Meaningfully Improve Quality Of Care For Pregnant Women Or Sick Children In Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Hannah H; Gage, Anna; Nsona, Humphreys; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Kruk, Margaret E

    2016-09-01

    In-service training courses and supportive supervision of health workers are among the most common interventions to improve the quality of health care in low- and middle-income countries. Despite extensive investment from donors, evaluations of the long-term effect of these two interventions are scarce. We used nationally representative surveys of health systems in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa to examine the association of in-service training and supervision with provider quality in antenatal and sick child care. The results of our analysis showed that observed quality of care was poor, with fewer than half of evidence-based actions completed by health workers, on average. In-service training and supervision were associated with quality of sick child care; they were associated with quality of antenatal care only when provided jointly. All associations were modest-at most, improvements related to interventions were equivalent to 2 additional provider actions out of the 18-40 actions expected per visit. In-service training and supportive supervision as delivered were not sufficient to meaningfully improve the quality of care in these countries. Greater attention to the quality of health professional education and national health system performance will be required to provide the standard of health care that patients deserve.

  11. Counselor-in-Training Perceptions of Supervision Practices Related to Self-Care and Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. Heather; Frick, Melodie H.; Trice-Black, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Counselors-in-training face the challenges of balancing academic, professional, and personal obligations. Many counselors-in-training, however, report a lack of instruction regarding personal wellness and prevention of personal counselor burnout. The present study used CQR methodology with 14 counseling graduate students to investigate…

  12. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers' 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included...

  13. Barriers to providing quality emergency obstetric care in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Healthcare providers' perspectives on training, referrals and supervision, a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Anne; Gulema, Hanna; Belizan, Maria; Colaci, Daniela S; Kendall, Tamil; Tebeka, Mahlet; Hailemariam, Mengistu; Bekele, Delayehu; Tadesse, Lia; Berhane, Yemane; Langer, Ana

    2015-03-29

    Increasing women's access to and use of facilities for childbirth is a critical national strategy to improve maternal health outcomes in Ethiopia; however coverage alone is not enough as the quality of emergency obstetric services affects maternal mortality and morbidity. Addis Ababa has a much higher proportion of facility-based births (82%) than the national average (11%), but timely provision of quality emergency obstetric care remains a significant challenge for reducing maternal mortality and improving maternal health. The purpose of this study was to assess barriers to the provision of emergency obstetric care in Addis Ababa from the perspective of healthcare providers by analyzing three factors: implementation of national referral guidelines, staff training, and staff supervision. A mixed methods approach was used to assess barriers to quality emergency obstetric care. Qualitative analyses included twenty-nine, semi-structured, key informant interviews with providers from an urban referral network consisting of a hospital and seven health centers. Quantitative survey data were collected from 111 providers, 80% (111/138) of those providing maternal health services in the same referral network. Respondents identified a lack of transportation and communication infrastructure, overcrowding at the referral hospital, insufficient pre-service and in-service training, and absence of supportive supervision as key barriers to provision of quality emergency obstetric care. Dedicated transportation and communication infrastructure, improvements in pre-service and in-service training, and supportive supervision are needed to maximize the effective use of existing human resources and infrastructure, thus increasing access to and the provision of timely, high quality emergency obstetric care in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

  14. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM) programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch–Capblanch, Xavier; Marceau, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes. Methods Scoping review of reports from 29 selected iCCM programmes purposively provided by stakeholders containing any information relevant to understand quality of care issues. Results The number of people reached by iCCM programmes varied from the tens of thousands to more than a million. All programmes aimed at improving access of vulnerable populations to health care, focusing on the main childhood illnesses, managed by Community Health Workers (CHW), often selected bycommunities. Training and supervision were widely implemented, in different ways and intensities, and often complemented with tools (eg, guides, job aids), supplies, equipment and incentives. Quality of care was measured using many outcomes (eg, access or appropriate treatment). Overall, there seemed to be positive effects for those strategies that involved policy change, organisational change, standardisation of clinical practices and alignment with other programmes. Positive effects were mostly achieved in large multi–component programmes. Mild or no effects have been described on mortality reduction amongst the few programmes for which data on this outcome was available to us. Promising strategies included teaming–up of CHW, micro–franchising or social franchising. On–site training and supervision of CHW have been shown to improve clinical practices. Effects on caregivers seemed positive, with increases in knowledge, care seeking behaviour, or caregivers’ basic disease management. Evidence on iCCM is often of low quality, cannot relate specific interventions or the ways they are implemented with outcomes and lacks standardisation; this limits the capacity to identify promising strategies to improve quality of care. Conclusion Large, multi–faceted, iCCM programmes, with strong

  15. On Training Targets for Supervised Speech Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuxuan; Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2014-01-01

    Formulation of speech separation as a supervised learning problem has shown considerable promise. In its simplest form, a supervised learning algorithm, typically a deep neural network, is trained to learn a mapping from noisy features to a time-frequency representation of the target of interest. Traditionally, the ideal binary mask (IBM) is used as the target because of its simplicity and large speech intelligibility gains. The supervised learning framework, however, is not restricted to the...

  16. On Training Targets for Supervised Speech Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2014-01-01

    Formulation of speech separation as a supervised learning problem has shown considerable promise. In its simplest form, a supervised learning algorithm, typically a deep neural network, is trained to learn a mapping from noisy features to a time-frequency representation of the target of interest. Traditionally, the ideal binary mask (IBM) is used as the target because of its simplicity and large speech intelligibility gains. The supervised learning framework, however, is not restricted to the use of binary targets. In this study, we evaluate and compare separation results by using different training targets, including the IBM, the target binary mask, the ideal ratio mask (IRM), the short-time Fourier transform spectral magnitude and its corresponding mask (FFT-MASK), and the Gammatone frequency power spectrum. Our results in various test conditions reveal that the two ratio mask targets, the IRM and the FFT-MASK, outperform the other targets in terms of objective intelligibility and quality metrics. In addition, we find that masking based targets, in general, are significantly better than spectral envelope based targets. We also present comparisons with recent methods in non-negative matrix factorization and speech enhancement, which show clear performance advantages of supervised speech separation. PMID:25599083

  17. 30 CFR 250.1616 - Supervision, surveillance, and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision, surveillance, and training. 250.1616 Section 250.1616 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Supervision, surveillance, and training. (a) The lessee shall provide onsite supervision of...

  18. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  19. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  20. The proposal for supervision training in Palestine/Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haans, Ton

    2007-01-01

    Clinical supervision has been known for decades. However, only in the past decade have training courses for supervision been developed and offered for health professionals working with a severely traumatized client population. Health professionals working as supervisors in this field are faced with specific problems. Together with Johan Lansen and Ton Haans, the Berlin Treatment Center for Torture Victims (bzfo) adapted the training method developed by Lansen/Haans in 1999, which offers participants a structural framework. In cooperation with the German Society for Supervision (DGSv), the bzfo offers this training course in Germany where it takes one and a half years to complete. To meet the vast need for supervision in countries where health professionals work under difficult and adverse conditions, the bzfo is now in contact with colleagues in the Gaza region with a proposal for supervision tailored to their specific needs.

  1. An Empirical Approach to Supervision and Training of Relationship Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Eugene; Crane, D. Russell

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical approach to supervision and training of marriage and family therapists. Advantages from the use of the empirical approach include a systematic investigation of the skills and competencies of the therapists, and establishing the basis for the scientific study of supervision. Two case studies are given. (Author)

  2. A Grounded Theory Study of Supervision of Preservice Consultation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore a university-based supervision process for consultants-in-training (CITs) engaged in a preservice level consultation course with applied practicum experience. The study was approached from a constructivist worldview using a grounded theory methodology. Data consisted of supervision session transcripts,…

  3. Design of the multicenter standardized supervised exercise training intervention for the claudication: exercise vs endoluminal revascularization (CLEVER) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronas, Ulf G; Hirsch, Alan T; Murphy, Timothy; Badenhop, Dalynn; Collins, Tracie C; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Ershow, Abby G; Lewis, Beth; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Walsh, M Eileen; Oldenburg, Niki; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2009-11-01

    The CLaudication: Exercise Vs Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) study is the first randomized, controlled, clinical, multicenter trial that is evaluating a supervised exercise program compared with revascularization procedures to treat claudication. In this report, the methods and dissemination techniques of the supervised exercise training intervention are described. A total of 217 participants are being recruited and randomized to one of three arms: (1) optimal medical care; (2) aortoiliac revascularization with stent; or (3) supervised exercise training. Of the enrolled patients, 84 will receive supervised exercise therapy. Supervised exercise will be administered according to a protocol designed by a central CLEVER exercise training committee based on validated methods previously used in single center randomized control trials. The protocol will be implemented at each site by an exercise committee member using training methods developed and standardized by the exercise training committee. The exercise training committee reviews progress and compliance with the protocol of each participant weekly. In conclusion, a multicenter approach to disseminate the supervised exercise training technique and to evaluate its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness for patients with claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is being evaluated for the first time in CLEVER. The CLEVER study will further establish the role of supervised exercise training in the treatment of claudication resulting from PAD and provide standardized methods for use of supervised exercise training in future PAD clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  4. Nurses’ perceptions on nursing supervision in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Francisco Farah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the perceptions of nurses on nursing supervision in the work process. Methods: this is a qualitative research, with a semi-structured interview, performed with 16 nurses. Data analysis was performed through content analysis. Results: two meanings topics emerged from the speeches of the participants: Nurses´ activities in Primary Health Care Units and Nurses´ perceptions about nursing supervision. In the first category, the actions listed were filling out forms and reports under the supervision of the nursing service. In the second category, supervision was perceived as a function of management and follow-up of the activities planned by the team, in opposition to the classical supervision concept, which is inspecting. Conclusion: nursing supervision has been configured for primary care nurses as an administrative function that involves planning, organization, coordination, evaluation, follow-up and support for the health team.

  5. Peer Supervision: Toward More Effective Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carol A.; Smith, James P., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses peer supervision as a vehicle for increasing student responsibility for self-assessment and peer assessment, and increasing independence and interdependence among students for professional and personal growth. The article also explains a model of a master's degree program in counseling and includes rationale, definition, implementation,…

  6. A Good Supervisor--Ten Facts of Caring Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the elements of caring supervision of doctoral theses. The purpose was to describe the best practices as well as challenges of supervision especially from the supervisor's perspective. The analysis is based on the author's extensive experience as a supervisor and related data obtained for research and developmental purposes.…

  7. International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education: Coping Strategies in Supervision Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Jang, Yoo Jin; Henfield, Malik S.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores 8 international doctoral students' perceptions of coping strategies used in supervision training in counselor education programs. Using human agency as a conceptual framework, the authors found 3 categories: (a) personal and professional self-directed strategies as personal agency, (b) support and care from mentors as proxy…

  8. [Practice report: Structured training to improve quality of care in emergency medical service. On-scene supervision: A new approach to emergency medical service training in Wiesbaden and Rheingau-Taunus-Kreis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häske, David; Kreinest, Michael; Wölfl, Christoph G; Frank, Christian; Brodermann, Götz; Horter, Johannes; Suda, Arnold J; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Beckers, Stefan K; Stöckle, Ulrich; Münzberg, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the emergency medical services in Wiesbaden and the Rheingau-Taunus district made great efforts to standardise structures. Since there are only few established procedures in the annual examinations for paramedics, there is reason to assume that treatment procedures for patients have not been standardised either. Materials and equipment are not handled uniformly, and employee satisfaction has significantly decreased over the last few years. To solve these problems, all paramedics undergo standardised and structured trainings. These training courses make use of the internationally accepted PHTLS (Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support) and AMLS (Advanced Life Support Medial) programmes. In addition, practising skills and handling the equipment as well as on-scene supervision is to be established in practical training sessions.

  9. Measuring the Effectiveness of a Genetic Counseling Supervision Training Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Carrie L; He, Hua; Wusik, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Genetic counselors who receive formal training report increased confidence and competence in their supervisory roles. The effectiveness of specific formal supervision training has not been assessed previously. A day-long GC supervision conference was designed based on published supervision competencies and was attended by 37 genetic counselors. Linear Mixed Model and post-hoc paired t-test was used to compare Psychotherapy Supervisor Development Scale (PSDS) scores among/between individuals pre and post conference. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model and post-hoc McNemar's test was used to determine if the conference had an effect on GC supervision competencies. PSDS scores were significantly increased 1 week (p competencies, attendees were more likely to agree they were able to perform them after the conference than before. These effects remained significant 6 months later. For the three remaining competencies, the majority of supervisors agreed they could perform these before the conference; therefore, no change was found. This exploratory study showed this conference increased the perceived confidence and competence of the supervisors who attended and increased their self-reported ability to perform certain supervision competencies. While still preliminary, this supports the idea that a one day conference on supervision has the potential to impact supervisor development.

  10. Drivers of Prenatal Care Quality and Uptake of Supervised Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of supervised delivery services continues to be low due partly to poor quality of antenatal care (ANC). Aim: The .... At the time of conducting the study, average ... equipment and logistics are nominally available, it offers minimal confidence for ...

  11. Using clinical supervision to improve the quality and safety of patient care: a response to Berwick and Francis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jonathon

    2015-06-11

    After widely publicised investigations into excess patient deaths at Mid Staffordshire hospital the UK government commissioned reports from Robert Francis QC and Professor Don Berwick. Among their recommendations to improve the quality and safety of patient care were lifelong learning, professional support and 'just culture'. Clinical supervision is in an excellent position to support these activities but opportunities are in danger of being squeezed out by regulatory and managerial demands. Doctors who have completed their training are responsible for complex professional judgements for which narrative supervision is particularly helpful. With reference to the literature and my own practice I propose that all practicing clinicians should have regular clinical supervision. Clinical supervision has patient-safety and the quality of patient care as its primary purposes. After training is completed, doctors may practice for the rest of their career without any clinical supervision, the implication being that the difficulties dealt with in clinical supervision are no longer difficulties, or are better dealt with some other way. Clinical supervision is sufficiently flexible to be adapted to the needs of experienced clinicians as its forms can be varied, though its functions remain focused on patient safety, good quality clinical care and professional wellbeing. The evidence linking clinical supervision to the quality and safety of patient care reveals that supervision is most effective when its educational and supportive functions are separated from its managerial and evaluative functions. Among supervision's different forms, narrative-based-supervision is particularly useful as it has been developed for clinicians who have completed their training. It provides ways to explore the complexity of clinical judgements and encourages doctors to question one another's authority in a supportive culture. To be successful, supervision should also be professionally led and

  12. Proposed Guidelines for Operating Counselor Education and Supervision Training Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauka, Justin D.; McCarthy, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to justify and present a set of guidelines for the effective and ethical administration of counselor education and supervision training clinics. Responding directly to a call for creating guidelines, the authors address core issues surrounding their development. Benefits for clear and accessible guidelines and risks…

  13. The role of supervision in the training of behavior therapists: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martins Sartori

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic process therapist requires skills that go beyond the theoretical and technical knowledge, the therapeutic relationship is a prerequisite for the success of behavioral psychotherapy variable. Supervision of clinical care is a fundamental skill development of the future therapist educational resource as well as to increase the supply conditions of a more appropriate psychotherapeutic customer service. The article reports on supervisory experience in the first client of a therapist in training showed behavioral patterns of aggression. The default client produced in therapist behaviors and feelings that hindered progress and therapeutic success. Supervision thus occupied a role in analyzing and modeling the behavior therapist as a strategy to increase the chances of success of the case. As a result of the strategies adopted in supervision, there were changes in the pattern of interaction between therapist and client training with his progress in the case.

  14. Towards remote monitoring and remotely supervised training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussmann, J.B.J; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Horemans, H.L.D.; Hurkmans, H.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    The growing number of elderly and people with chronic disorders in our western society puts such pressure on our healthcare system that innovative approaches are demanded to make our health care more effective and more efficient. One way of innovation of healthcare can be obtained by introducing new

  15. Towards remote monitoring and remotely supervised training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2008-01-01

    The growing number of elderly and people with chronic disorders in our western society puts such a pressure on our healthcare system that innovative approaches are required to make our health care more effective and more efficient. One way of innovating healthcare can be obtained by introducing new

  16. Role-playing as a tool for hiring, training, and supervising peer providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hans; Solomon, Phyllis

    2014-04-01

    This article presents role-playing as an activity that can help managers in hiring, evaluating, and supervising peer providers. With the increasing employment of peers in mental health care systems, supervisors have had to face dilemmas related to peer employment more frequently and with little guidance and direction. In response, this article presents role-playing as a practical tool to hire, train, and supervise peer providers. The effectiveness of role-playing depends largely on context and execution, and so this article also offers direction on how to maximize the utility and benefits of role-playing to enhance the performance of peer providers.

  17. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self- care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods : analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results : it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion : there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  18. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self-care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods: analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results: it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion: there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  19. 20 CFR 702.407 - Supervision of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... furnished or to be furnished the employee, including whether the charges made by any medical care provider... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervision of medical care. 702.407 Section... AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical...

  20. Supervision in neuropsychological assessment: a survey of training, practices, and perspectives of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Laura A Schwent; Pedersen, Heather A; Roper, Brad L; Rey-Casserly, Celiane

    2014-01-01

    Within the psychology supervision literature, most theoretical models and practices pertain to general clinical or counseling psychology. Supervision specific to clinical neuropsychology has garnered little attention. This survey study explores supervision training, practices, and perspectives of neuropsychology supervisors. Practicing neuropsychologists were invited to participate in an online survey via listservs and email lists. Of 451 respondents, 382 provided supervision to students, interns, and/or fellows in settings such as VA medical centers (37%), university medical centers (35%), and private practice (15%). Most supervisors (84%) reported supervision was discussed in graduate school "minimally" or "not at all." Although 67% completed informal didactics or received continuing education in supervision, only 27% reported receiving training specific to neuropsychology supervision. Notably, only 39% were satisfied with their training in providing supervision and 77% indicated they would likely participate in training in providing supervision, if available at professional conferences. Results indicate that clinical neuropsychology as a specialty has paid scant attention to developing supervision models and explicit training in supervision skills. We recommend that the specialty develop models of supervision for neuropsychological practice, supervision standards and competencies, training methods in provision of supervision, and benchmark measures for supervision competencies.

  1. Reflections on the supervised relationship and interaction in nursing clinical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Alves da Rocha e Silva Rocha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This reflection fits into the area of Clinical Supervision in Nursing focusing on relationships that the student develops during clinical training. It seems that in clinical training the student not only learns but also consolidates verbal, procedural and attitudinal contents. The relationship established with peers, teachers and tutors will contribute to their professional identity. It is underlined the importance of the contribution of clinical supervision for the development of a reflective thinking in students in Portugal, as highlighted here, which influences the changes in nursing practices, as well as ensuring the quality and safety of the care provided. The characteristics that the tutor must have to improve the development of the students are also explained as well as the possible solutions for the existing limitations of clinical training contexts.

  2. Using Optimal Ratio Mask as Training Target for Supervised Speech Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Shasha; Li, Hao; ZHANG Xueliang

    2017-01-01

    Supervised speech separation uses supervised learning algorithms to learn a mapping from an input noisy signal to an output target. With the fast development of deep learning, supervised separation has become the most important direction in speech separation area in recent years. For the supervised algorithm, training target has a significant impact on the performance. Ideal ratio mask is a commonly used training target, which can improve the speech intelligibility and quality of the separate...

  3. Critical thinking in health care supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, L

    1992-06-01

    Henry Ford is reputed to have said that thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably why so few people engage in it. Perhaps many people have felt this way sometimes, especially when they viewed the foibles of the human race displayed prominently on the evening television news. Some people do stupid things; some people seem to be mindless in what they do. This applies also to some in managerial and supervisory positions in health care organizations. The percentage of these thoughtless managers and supervisors is probably comparable to the percentage of the thoughtless people in the general population. Fortunately every normal functioning human being is capable of becoming a more critical thinker. Of course, no amount of effort is adequate to the development of critical thinking when a person lacks fundamental good sense. On the other hand, no amount of genius suffices when someone does not put forth adequate effort to become a more critical thinker.

  4. Improving quality of reproductive health care in Senegal through formative supervision: results from four districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Philippe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Senegal, traditional supervision often focuses more on collection of service statistics than on evaluation of service quality. This approach yields limited information on quality of care and does little to improve providers' competence. In response to this challenge, Management Sciences for Health (MSH has implemented a program of formative supervision. This multifaceted, problem-solving approach collects data on quality of care, improves technical competence, and engages the community in improving reproductive health care. Methods This study evaluated changes in service quality and community involvement after two rounds of supervision in 45 health facilities in four districts of Senegal. We used checklists to assess quality in four areas of service delivery: infrastructure, staff and services management, record-keeping, and technical competence. We also measured community involvement in improving service quality using the completion rates of action plans. Results The most notable improvement across regions was in infection prevention. Management of staff, services, and logistics also consistently improved across the four districts. Record-keeping skills showed variable but lower improvement by region. The completion rates of action plans suggest that communities are engaged in improving service quality in all four districts. Conclusion Formative supervision can improve the quality of reproductive health services, especially in areas where there is on-site skill building and refresher training. This approach can also mobilize communities to participate in improving service quality.

  5. Improving quality of reproductive health care in Senegal through formative supervision: results from four districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Siri; Moreira, Philippe; Ly, Moussa

    2007-11-29

    In Senegal, traditional supervision often focuses more on collection of service statistics than on evaluation of service quality. This approach yields limited information on quality of care and does little to improve providers' competence. In response to this challenge, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has implemented a program of formative supervision. This multifaceted, problem-solving approach collects data on quality of care, improves technical competence, and engages the community in improving reproductive health care. This study evaluated changes in service quality and community involvement after two rounds of supervision in 45 health facilities in four districts of Senegal. We used checklists to assess quality in four areas of service delivery: infrastructure, staff and services management, record-keeping, and technical competence. We also measured community involvement in improving service quality using the completion rates of action plans. The most notable improvement across regions was in infection prevention.Management of staff, services, and logistics also consistently improved across the four districts. Record-keeping skills showed variable but lower improvement by region. The completion rates of action plans suggest that communities are engaged in improving service quality in all four districts. Formative supervision can improve the quality of reproductive health services, especially in areas where there is on-site skill building and refresher training. This approach can also mobilize communities to participate in improving service quality.

  6. The impact of supervision training on genetic counselor supervisory identity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Carrie L; Lewis, Kimberly; Martin, Lisa J; Yager, Geoffrey; Ramstetter, Catherine; Wusik, Katie

    2014-12-01

    Supervision is critical to the training of genetic counselors. Limited research exists on the influence of supervision training and experience on the development of genetic counseling supervisors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of supervision training in addition to supervisory and clinical experience on supervisory identity development, and the perceived confidence and competence supervisors have in their own supervisory skills. In addition, we explored genetic counselors' (N = 291) interest in and barriers to training as well as perspectives on requirements for supervisors. Results indicated clinical experience, supervision experience, and formal supervision training are positively associated with genetic counselors' supervisory identity development as measured by the Psychotherapy Supervisory Development Scale (PSDS) (p supervision experience and formal training (ρ = 0.42, p supervision training but noted lack of available training as a barrier. The majority of participants indicated that supervisors should be certified as genetic counselors, but there was no consensus on training requirements. Development of additional supervision training opportunities for genetic counselors should be considered.

  7. Is Direct Supervision in Clinical Education for Athletic Training Students Always Necessary to Enhance Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriber, Kent; Trowbridge, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present an alternative model of supervision within clinical education experiences. Background: Several years ago direct supervision was defined more clearly in the accreditation standards for athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Currently, athletic training students may not gain any clinical experience without their clinical…

  8. The Relationship of Supervisory Experience, Counseling Experience, and Training in Supervision to Supervisory Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelling, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between supervisory identity development and supervisory experience, counseling experience, and training in supervision was examined for Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) members. Analyses indicated that supervisory experience and training were related to supervisory identity development, whilst counseling…

  9. Effective Yard Supervision: From Needs Assessment to Customized Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Jill D.; Hunnicutt, Kayleigh L.; Mayworm, Ashley M.; Schiedel, K. Chris; Calcagnotto, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Most educational scholars agree that appropriate supervision of children is critical for positive youth development. Supervision is especially important during situations where children have a large degree of freedom and unstructured interaction, such as during recess. Despite the apparent importance of supervision of children at recess, there is…

  10. Primary eye care skills scores for health workers in routine and enhanced supervision settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwen, M; Lewallen, S; Courtright, P

    2014-01-01

    Primary health care in Tanzania is provided at two types of health units, the dispensary and the health centre. Theoretically, primary health workers (with knowledge of primary eye care [PEC]) are ideally placed to identify people in need of eye care services. In Tanzania, they are expected to be able to identify, treat, or correctly refer a number of eye conditions including cataract, trauma, presbyopia, and the 'red eye'. They are also expected to be able to measure visual acuity correctly and to educate the community about prevention. The objective was to determine the effect of enhanced supervision of health workers on PEC knowledge and skills in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. This was a quasi-experimental, cluster randomized intervention study of an enhanced supervisory method compared to a routine supervisory method; 36 dispensaries were randomly allocated into the two groups. Health workers based at government dispensaries in Mwanga District. Participants were interviewed pre and post intervention and the information was recorded using a standardized pretested questionnaire. Mean scores of knowledge in healthcare workers was higher in the intervention group (score = 6.43, 80.4% improvement) compared to the non-intervention group (score = 4.71, 58.9% improvement). The ability to describe and demonstrate vision testing was better (score = 1.8) in the enhanced supervision group compared to the routine supervision group (score = 0.88, P = 0.03). There was a high level of attrition (24%) within one year from the time of baseline survey, especially amongst clinical officers (44%). During the pilot study, enhanced supervision improved PEC knowledge and skills of health workers compared to health workers with routine supervision. Training in PEC needs revision to become more practicum-based. There is need to revise supervision guidelines (to be skills-based) and the supervision skills of district eye coordinators (DECs) need to be enhanced. There is a huge need to

  11. Effect evaluation of a supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in nursing homes: a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Schols, J.; Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Vanobbergen, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in Flanders (Belgium). BACKGROUND: The key factor in realising good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. In 2007, the Dutch guideline 'Oral health care in care homes for elderly people' was

  12. Task shifting-perception of stake holders about adequacy of training and supervision for community mental health workers in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O; Osei, Akwasi; Mcloughlin, Declan M; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2016-06-01

    There is growing interest in the effectiveness of task shifting as a strategy for addressing expanding health care challenges in settings with shortages of qualified health personnel. The aim of this study is to examine the perception of stakeholders about the adequacy of training, supervision and support offered to community mental health workers (CMHWs) in Ghana. To address this aim we designed and administered self-completed, semi-structured questionnaires adapted to three specific stakeholder groups in Ghana. The questionnaires were administered to 11 psychiatrists, 29 health policy implementers/coordinators and 164 CMHWs, across Ghana, including 71 (43.3%) Community Psychiatric Nurses (CPNs), 19 (11.6%) Clinical Psychiatric Officers (CPOs) and 74 (45.1%) Community Mental Health Officers (CMHOs). Almost all the stakeholders believed CMHWs in Ghana receive adequate training for the role they are expected to play although many identify some gaps in the training of these mental health workers for the expanded roles they actually play. There were statistically significant differences between the different CMHW groups and the types of in-service training they said they had attended, the frequency with which their work was supervised, and the frequency with which they received feedback from supervisors. CPOs were more likely to attend all the different kinds of in-service training than CMHOs and CPNs, while CMHOs were more likely than CPOs and CPNs to report that their work is never supervised or that they rarely or never receive feedback from supervisors. There was disparity between what CMHWs said were their experiences and the perception of policy makers with respect to the types of in-service training that is available to CMHWs. There is a need to review the task shifting arrangements, perhaps with a view to expanding it to include more responsibilities, and therefore review the curriculum of the training institution for CMHWs and also to offer them regular in

  13. Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt;

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two...... training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0...

  14. Effect of training supervision on effectiveness of strength training for reducing neck/shoulder pain and headache in office workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two...... training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0...

  15. Effects of second language usage on genetic counseling training and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Rachel; Chiu, Sui Mei; Russell, Laura; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    We conducted an exploratory study of the experiences of genetic counselors who have either trained or supervised in a second language to assess the relevance of this issue to genetic counseling training and supervision. Two hundred-thirty NSGC members, CAGC members and genetic counseling students completed the online questionnaire. Many of the respondents reported that training and supervision differed when another language was involved. Supervisors reported difficulty in assessing students' counseling skills and discomfort with an incomplete understanding of session content. Students described a greater focus on vocabulary at the expense of psychosocial dimensions. Despite this, most felt that using another language enhanced their training experience. As such, training programs might consider increasing support to these learners and supervisors by explicitly acknowledging the challenges they face, providing students with language tools to aid in their acquisition of basic skills and providing supervisors with new methods for assessing student counseling skills when using other languages.

  16. Sprint conditioning of junior soccer players: effects of training intensity and technique supervision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Haugen

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to compare the effects of 1 training at 90 and 100% sprint velocity and 2 supervised versus unsupervised sprint training on soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players. Young, male soccer players (17 ± 1 yr, 71 ± 10 kg, 180 ± 6 cm were randomly assigned to four different treatment conditions over a 7-week intervention period. A control group (CON, n = 9 completed regular soccer training according to their teams' original training plans. Three training groups performed a weekly repeated-sprint training session in addition to their regular soccer training sessions performed at A 100% intensity without supervision (100UNSUP, n = 13, B 90% of maximal sprint velocity with supervision (90SUP, n = 10 or C 90% of maximal sprint velocity without supervision (90UNSUP, n=13. Repetitions x distance for the sprint-training sessions were 15 x 20 m for 100UNSUP and 30 x 20 m for 90SUP and 90UNSUP. Single-sprint performance (best time from 15 x 20 m sprints, repeated-sprint performance (mean time over 15 x 20 m sprints, countermovement jump and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1 were assessed during pre-training and post-training tests. No significant differences in performance outcomes were observed across groups. 90SUP improved Yo-Yo IR1 by a moderate margin compared to controls, while all other effect magnitudes were trivial or small. In conclusion, neither weekly sprint training at 90 or 100% velocity, nor supervised sprint training enhanced soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players.

  17. Sprint conditioning of junior soccer players: effects of training intensity and technique supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Thomas; Tønnessen, Espen; Øksenholt, Øyvind; Haugen, Fredrik Lie; Paulsen, Gøran; Enoksen, Eystein; Seiler, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare the effects of 1) training at 90 and 100% sprint velocity and 2) supervised versus unsupervised sprint training on soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players. Young, male soccer players (17 ± 1 yr, 71 ± 10 kg, 180 ± 6 cm) were randomly assigned to four different treatment conditions over a 7-week intervention period. A control group (CON, n = 9) completed regular soccer training according to their teams' original training plans. Three training groups performed a weekly repeated-sprint training session in addition to their regular soccer training sessions performed at A) 100% intensity without supervision (100UNSUP, n = 13), B) 90% of maximal sprint velocity with supervision (90SUP, n = 10) or C) 90% of maximal sprint velocity without supervision (90UNSUP, n=13). Repetitions x distance for the sprint-training sessions were 15 x 20 m for 100UNSUP and 30 x 20 m for 90SUP and 90UNSUP. Single-sprint performance (best time from 15 x 20 m sprints), repeated-sprint performance (mean time over 15 x 20 m sprints), countermovement jump and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) were assessed during pre-training and post-training tests. No significant differences in performance outcomes were observed across groups. 90SUP improved Yo-Yo IR1 by a moderate margin compared to controls, while all other effect magnitudes were trivial or small. In conclusion, neither weekly sprint training at 90 or 100% velocity, nor supervised sprint training enhanced soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players.

  18. Supervised training and physical education in elementary school: contributions to the professional formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrielle Lopes Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to reflect on the importance of supervised internship in Physical Education in the context of elementary education; establishing, therefore, a path of definitions of concepts ranging from the disquieting comprehension regarding the association between theory and practice to the most intricate details of the content to be treated in Physical Education classes, as well as the formative process of the learners who perform the supervised training. Thus, it was possible to build a vigorous dialogue with the different theorists and scholars of both Education and Physical Education. Since then, various thematic issues that punctuate the supervised internship in all its dimensions have aroused.

  19. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  20. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  1. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  2. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  3. A Novel Semi-Supervised Electronic Nose Learning Technique: M-Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Jia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When an electronic nose (E-nose is used to distinguish different kinds of gases, the label information of the target gas could be lost due to some fault of the operators or some other reason, although this is not expected. Another fact is that the cost of getting the labeled samples is usually higher than for unlabeled ones. In most cases, the classification accuracy of an E-nose trained using labeled samples is higher than that of the E-nose trained by unlabeled ones, so gases without label information should not be used to train an E-nose, however, this wastes resources and can even delay the progress of research. In this work a novel multi-class semi-supervised learning technique called M-training is proposed to train E-noses with both labeled and unlabeled samples. We employ M-training to train the E-nose which is used to distinguish three indoor pollutant gases (benzene, toluene and formaldehyde. Data processing results prove that the classification accuracy of E-nose trained by semi-supervised techniques (tri-training and M-training is higher than that of an E-nose trained only with labeled samples, and the performance of M-training is better than that of tri-training because more base classifiers can be employed by M-training.

  4. Improving quality of reproductive health care in Senegal through formative supervision: results from four districts

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Philippe; Suh Siri; Ly Moussa

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In Senegal, traditional supervision often focuses more on collection of service statistics than on evaluation of service quality. This approach yields limited information on quality of care and does little to improve providers' competence. In response to this challenge, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has implemented a program of formative supervision. This multifaceted, problem-solving approach collects data on quality of care, improves technical competence, and enga...

  5. On-line Supervised Adaptive Training Using Radial Basis Function Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wan; Billings, Steve A.; Fung, Chi F.

    1996-12-01

    A new recursive supervised training algorithm is derived for the radial basis neural network architecture. The new algorithm combines the procedures of on-line candidate regressor selection with the conventional Givens QR based recursive parameter estimator to provide efficient adaptive supervised network training. A new concise on-line correlation based performance monitoring scheme is also introduced as an auxiliary device to detect structural changes in temporal data processing applications. Practical and simulated examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new procedures. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Developing a Peer Mentorship Program to Increase Competence in Clinical Supervision in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Aleksandra A; Kennard, Beth D; Rodgers, Cynthia; Wolfe, Kristin L; Cassedy, Hannah F; Thomas, Anna

    2017-05-03

    Supervision has recently been recognized as a core competency for clinical psychologists. This recognition of supervision as a distinct competency has evolved in the context of an overall focus on competency-based education and training in health service psychology, and has recently gained momentum. Few clinical psychology doctoral programs offer formal training experiences in providing supervision. A pilot peer mentorship program (PMP) where graduate students were trained in the knowledge and practice of supervision was developed. The focus of the PMP was to develop basic supervision skills in advanced clinical psychology graduate students, as well as to train junior doctoral students in fundamental clinical and practical skills. Advanced doctoral students were matched to junior doctoral students to gain experience in and increase knowledge base in best practices of supervision skills. The 9-month program consisted of monthly mentorship meetings and three training sessions. The results suggested that mentors reported a 30% or more shift from the category of not competent to needs improvement or competent, in the following supervision competencies: theories of supervision, improved skill in supervision modalities, acquired knowledge in supervision, and supervision experience. Furthermore, 50% of the mentors reported that they were not competent in supervision experience at baseline and only 10% reported that they were not competent at the end of the program. Satisfaction data suggested that satisfaction with the program was high, with 75% of participants indicating increased knowledge base in supervision, and 90% indicating that it was a positive addition to their training program. This program was feasible and acceptable and appears to have had a positive impact on the graduate students who participated. Students reported both high satisfaction with the program as well as an increase in knowledge base and experience in supervision skills.

  7. Supervised Learning of Logical Operations in Layered Spiking Neural Networks with Spike Train Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Grüning, André

    2011-01-01

    Few algorithms for supervised training of spiking neural networks exist that can deal with patterns of multiple spikes, and their computational properties are largely unexplored. We demonstrate in a set of simulations that the ReSuMe learning algorithm can be successfully applied to layered neural networks. Input and output patterns are encoded as spike trains of multiple precisely timed spikes, and the network learns to transform the input trains into target output trains. This is done by combining the ReSuMe learning algorithm with multiplicative scaling of the connections of downstream neurons. We show in particular that layered networks with one hidden layer can learn the basic logical operations, including Exclusive-Or, while networks without hidden layer cannot, mirroring an analogous result for layered networks of rate neurons. While supervised learning in spiking neural networks is not yet fit for technical purposes, exploring computational properties of spiking neural networks advances our understand...

  8. Providing Competency Training to Clinical Supervisors through an Interactional Supervision Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer; Matlin, Samantha L.; Migdole, Scott J.; Farkas, Melanie S.; Money, Roy W.; Shulman, Lawrence; Hoge, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Training in supervisory competencies is essential to effective clinical practice and helps address the current national crisis in the behavioral health workforce. Interactional supervision, the approach used in the current study, is well established in clinical social work and focuses the task of the supervisee on the interpersonal exchanges…

  9. Semi-supervised adaptation in ssvep-based brain-computer interface using tri-training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Thomas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and computationally simple tri-training based semi-supervised steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). It is implemented with autocorrelation-based features and a Naïve-Bayes classifier (NBC). The system uses nine characters...

  10. Cultivating Self-Awareness in Counselors-in-Training through Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moro, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated processes, strategies, and frameworks that took place during group supervision classes, which best cultivate the self-awareness of Mental Health and Marriage and Family Counselors-in-Training (CITs). It was designed to explore factors across multiple theoretical models, which contributed to the cultivation of self-awareness…

  11. An Integrative Spiritual Development Model of Supervision for Substance Abuse Counselors-in-Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss Ogden, Karen R.; Sias, Shari M.

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse counselors who address clients' spiritual development may provide more comprehensive counseling. This article presents an integrative supervision model designed to promote the spiritual development of substance abuse counselors-in-training, reviews the model, and discusses the implications for counselor education.

  12. Exploring the Use of Poetry in Counselor Training and Supervision: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Christine D.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the use poetry in counselor training and supervision. Over the course of a semester, counseling students enrolled in either a practicum or internship class were taken through a series of poetry-based activities. Ten students volunteered to participate in the study. Using a qualitative research design rooted in phenomenology and…

  13. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  14. Self-Trained Supervised Segmentation of Subcortical Brain Structures Using Multispectral Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Larobina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is investigate the feasibility of automatically training supervised methods, such as k-nearest neighbor (kNN and principal component discriminant analysis (PCDA, and to segment the four subcortical brain structures: caudate, thalamus, pallidum, and putamen. The adoption of supervised classification methods so far has been limited by the need to define a representative training dataset, operation that usually requires the intervention of an operator. In this work the selection of the training data was performed on the subject to be segmented in a fully automated manner by registering probabilistic atlases. Evaluation of automatically trained kNN and PCDA classifiers that combine voxel intensities and spatial coordinates was performed on 20 real datasets selected from two publicly available sources of multispectral magnetic resonance studies. The results demonstrate that atlas-guided training is an effective way to automatically define a representative and reliable training dataset, thus giving supervised methods the chance to successfully segment magnetic resonance brain images without the need for user interaction.

  15. Self-Trained Supervised Segmentation of Subcortical Brain Structures Using Multispectral Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana; Cervo, Amedeo; Alfano, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is investigate the feasibility of automatically training supervised methods, such as k-nearest neighbor (kNN) and principal component discriminant analysis (PCDA), and to segment the four subcortical brain structures: caudate, thalamus, pallidum, and putamen. The adoption of supervised classification methods so far has been limited by the need to define a representative training dataset, operation that usually requires the intervention of an operator. In this work the selection of the training data was performed on the subject to be segmented in a fully automated manner by registering probabilistic atlases. Evaluation of automatically trained kNN and PCDA classifiers that combine voxel intensities and spatial coordinates was performed on 20 real datasets selected from two publicly available sources of multispectral magnetic resonance studies. The results demonstrate that atlas-guided training is an effective way to automatically define a representative and reliable training dataset, thus giving supervised methods the chance to successfully segment magnetic resonance brain images without the need for user interaction. PMID:26583131

  16. Weighting training images by maximizing distribution similarity for supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M.Arfan;

    2015-01-01

    and the PDF of the voxels of the target image. The voxels and weights of the training images are then used to train a weighted classifier. We tested our method on three segmentation tasks: brain-tissue segmentation, skull stripping, and white-matter-lesion segmentation. For all three applications......Many automatic segmentation methods are based on supervised machine learning. Such methods have proven to perform well, on the condition that they are trained on a sufficiently large manually labeled training set that is representative of the images to segment. However, due to differences between...... scanners, scanning parameters, and patients such a training set may be difficult to obtain. We present a transfer-learning approach to segmentation by multi-feature voxelwise classification. The presented method can be trained using a heterogeneous set of training images that may be obtained with different...

  17. Semi-supervised adaptation in ssvep-based brain-computer interface using tri-training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Thomas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and computationally simple tri-training based semi-supervised steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). It is implemented with autocorrelation-based features and a Naïve-Bayes classifier (NBC). The system uses nine characters...... presented on a 100 Hz CRT-monitor, three scalp electrodes for signal acquisition, a gUSB-amp for preamplification and two PCs for data-processing and stimulus control respectively. Preliminary test results of the system on nine healthy subjects, with and without tri-training, indicates that the accuracy...... improves as a result of tri-training....

  18. Supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in (residential care homes: a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Baat Cees

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase of the proportion of elderly people has implications for health care services. Advances in oral health care and treatment have resulted in a reduced number of edentulous individuals. An increasing number of dentate elderly people have tooth wear, periodontal disease, oral implants, and sophisticated restorations and prostheses. Hence, they are in need of both preventive and curative oral health care continuously. Weakened oral health due to neglect of self care and professional care and due to reduced oral health care utilization is already present when elderly people are still community-dwelling. At the moment of (residential care home admittance, many elderly people are in need of oral health care urgently. The key factor in realizing and maintaining good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. For proper daily oral hygiene care, many residents are dependent on nurses and nurse aides. In 2007, the Dutch guideline "Oral health care in (residential care homes for elderly people" was developed. Previous implementation research studies have revealed that implementation of a guideline is very complicated. The overall aim of this study is to compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of the guideline in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium. Methods/Design The study is a cluster randomized intervention trial with an institution as unit of randomization. A random sample of 12 (residential care homes accommodating somatic as well as psycho-geriatric residents in The Netherlands as well as in Flanders (Belgium are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. Representative samples of 30 residents in each of the 24 (residential care homes are monitored during a 6-months period. The intervention consists of supervised implementation of the guideline and a daily oral health care protocol. Primary outcome variable is the oral hygiene level of the participating residents. To determine the

  19. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA DEHGHANI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results: There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation, patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety, infection prevention and nursing process (p<0.005. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable.

  20. Developing a supervised training algorithm for limited precision feed-forward spiking neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stromatias, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    Spiking neural networks have been referred to as the third generation of artificial neural networks where the information is coded as time of the spikes. There are a number of different spiking neuron models available and they are categorized based on their level of abstraction. In addition, there are two known learning methods, unsupervised and supervised learning. This thesis focuses on supervised learning where a new algorithm is proposed, based on genetic algorithms. The proposed algorithm is able to train both synaptic weights and delays and also allow each neuron to emit multiple spikes thus taking full advantage of the spatial-temporal coding power of the spiking neurons. In addition, limited synaptic precision is applied; only six bits are used to describe and train a synapse, three bits for the weights and three bits for the delays. Two limited precision schemes are investigated. The proposed algorithm is tested on the XOR classification problem where it produces better results for even smaller netwo...

  1. Safety in High School Supervised Agricultural Experiences: Teachers' Training and Students' Injury Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, M L; Lawver, R G; Sorensen, T J

    2016-01-01

    This research study sought to gather evidence of school-based agriculture teachers' hazard perceptions, safety practices, training experiences, and awareness of student injuries related to supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs. Teachers agreed that students should follow safety guidelines developed by the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Safety and Health during SAE work. Approximately 66% (f = 153) of teachers reported having general training in first aid, CPR, and AED. Twenty participants (8.6%) indicated having no safety certifications or training. Abrasions, lacerations, bites/stings, and burns accounted for a majority of the student SAE-related injuries that were reported. There were 82 participants (35.5%) who stated that no injuries had been reported or they were not aware of any injuries that occurred. The majority of teachers (66%) had received some form offirst aid or first response training, but fewer teachers had received safety training for ATVs (f = 25, 10.8%), tractors (f = 48, 20.7%), and livestock (f = 39, 16.8%). Results indicated a disparity between required safe work habits and the types of hazardous tasks students should be allowed to complete alone while participating in SAE activities. It appears most responding teachers in this study agreed to allow students to operate equipment and machinery alone. Recommendations for teachers include attending professional development training specific to SAE safety and keeping records of any risk assessments conducted during SAE supervision. Further development of best practices for SAE supervision and safety are needed to assist agricultural education professionals in protecting and shaping our future leaders in agriculture.

  2. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome: an open label randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Linschoten (Robbart); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); E.M. Heintjes (Edith); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. DESIGN: Open label randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practice and sport physician practic

  3. SUPPORTIVE SUPERVISION AS A TECHNOLOGY OF IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Mukhortova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of medical care is a priority in countries with developed and developing health care system. There are various approaches to improve the quality and safety of patient’s care, as well as various strategies to encourage hospitals to achieve this goal. The purpose of the presented literature review was to analyze existing experience of the implementation of technology of supportive supervision in health care facilities to improve the quality of hospital care delivery. The data sources for publication were obtained from the following medical databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medscape, e-library, and books on the topic of the review written by experts. The article discusses the results of the research studies demonstrating the successes and failures of supportive supervision technology application. Implementation of supportive supervision in medical facilities based on generalized experience of different countries is a promising direction in improving the quality of medical care delivery. This technology opens up opportunities to improve skills and work quality of the staff at pediatric hospitals in the Russian Federation.

  4. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a patent-pending device capable of automatically recording and supervising the urine output of a critical care patient. A high precision scale is used to measure the weight of a commercial urine meter. On the scale’s pan there is a support frame made up of Bosch profiles that isolates the scale from force transmission from the patient’s bed, and guarantees that the urine flows properly through the urine meter input tube. The scale’s readings are sent to a PC via Bluetooth where an application supervises the achievement of the therapeutic goals. The device is currently undergoing tests at a research unit associated with the University Hospital of Getafe in Spain.

  5. Training the Millennial learner through experiential evolutionary scaffolding: implications for clinical supervision in graduate education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venne, Vickie L; Coleman, Darrell

    2010-12-01

    They are the Millennials--Generation Y. Over the next few decades, they will be entering genetic counseling graduate training programs and the workforce. As a group, they are unlike previous youth generations in many ways, including the way they learn. Therefore, genetic counselors who teach and supervise need to understand the Millennials and explore new ways of teaching to ensure that the next cohort of genetic counselors has both skills and knowledge to represent our profession well. This paper will summarize the distinguishing traits of the Millennial generation as well as authentic learning and evolutionary scaffolding theories of learning that can enhance teaching and supervision. We will then use specific aspects of case preparation during clinical rotations to demonstrate how incorporating authentic learning theory into evolutionary scaffolding results in experiential evolutionary scaffolding, a method that potentially offers a more effective approach when teaching Millennials. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

  6. Whole body vibration: unsupervised training or combined with a supervised multi-purpose exercise for fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of an unsupervised whole body vibration (WBV) training and two different supervised multi-purpose exercise programmes, with and without WBV, on body composition, functional fitness and self-reported well-being in middle-aged adults. Fifty-four healthy participants (age 48.6 ± 6.7 years) were randomly assigned to a vibration group (VG), a multi-purpose exercise group (MG) and a multi-purpose exercise with vibration group (VMG) and trained 3 days a week for 4 months. VG performed a standardised unsupervised WBV protocol, MG a supervised multi-purpose exercise and VMG a multi-purpose exercise including vibration. After training, drop out was significantly higher in VG group (P = 0.016) when compared to VMG group. In both MG and VMG, body composition, sit-up, push-up, sit and reach, agility test, hopping test and self-reported general health significantly improved (P fitness and the best results in adherence could be achieved integrating WBV practice into a multi-purpose exercise training.

  7. Artificial neural network classification using a minimal training set - Comparison to conventional supervised classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, George F.; Logan, Thomas; Ritter, Niles; Bryant, Nevin

    1990-01-01

    Recent research has shown an artificial neural network (ANN) to be capable of pattern recognition and the classification of image data. This paper examines the potential for the application of neural network computing to satellite image processing. A second objective is to provide a preliminary comparison and ANN classification. An artificial neural network can be trained to do land-cover classification of satellite imagery using selected sites representative of each class in a manner similar to conventional supervised classification. One of the major problems associated with recognition and classifications of pattern from remotely sensed data is the time and cost of developing a set of training sites. This reseach compares the use of an ANN back propagation classification procedure with a conventional supervised maximum likelihood classification procedure using a minimal training set. When using a minimal training set, the neural network is able to provide a land-cover classification superior to the classification derived from the conventional classification procedure. This research is the foundation for developing application parameters for further prototyping of software and hardware implementations for artificial neural networks in satellite image and geographic information processing.

  8. Semi-supervised hyperspectral classification from a small number of training samples using a co-training approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaszewski, Michał; Głomb, Przemysław; Cholewa, Michał

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel semi-supervised algorithm for classification of hyperspectral data from remote sensors. Our method is inspired by the Tracking-Learning-Detection (TLD) framework, originally applied for tracking objects in a video stream. TLD introduced the co-training approach called P-N learning, making use of two independent 'experts' (or learners) that scored samples in different feature spaces. In a similar fashion, we formulated the hyperspectral classification task as a co-training problem, that can be solved with the P-N learning scheme. Our method uses both spatial and spectral features of data, extending a small set of initial labelled samples during the process of region growing. We show that this approach is stable and achieves very good accuracy even for small training sets. We analyse the algorithm's performance on several publicly available hyperspectral data sets.

  9. Extended apprenticeship learning in doctoral training and supervision - moving beyond 'cookbook recipes'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene; Wegener, Charlotte

    An apprenticeship perspective on learning in academia sheds light on the potential for mutual learning and production, and also reveals the diverse range of learning resources beyond the formal novice-–expert relationship. Although apprenticeship is a well-known concept in educational research......, in this case apprenticeship offers an innovative perspective on future practice and research in academia allowing more students access to high high-quality research training and giving supervisors a chance to combine their own research with their supervision obligations....

  10. Drivers of Prenatal Care Quality and Uptake of Supervised Delivery Services in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Atinga, RA; Baku, AA; Adongo, PB

    2014-01-01

    Background: In spite of the introduction of free maternal healthcare in Ghana, utilization of supervised delivery services continues to be low due partly to poor quality of antenatal care (ANC). Aim: The study sought to identify the determinants of perceived quality of ANC and uptake of skilled delivery services. Subjects and Methods: A total of 363 expectant mothers were randomly selected in urban health facilities for interview. Logistic regression models were computed to examine the relati...

  11. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  12. The Completeness of Intervention Descriptions in Randomised Trials of Supervised Exercise Training in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry A Tew

    Full Text Available Research supports the use of supervised exercise training as a primary therapy for improving the functional status of people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Several reviews have focused on reporting the outcomes of exercise interventions, but none have critically examined the quality of intervention reporting. Adequate reporting of the exercise protocols used in randomised controlled trials (RCTs is central to interpreting study findings and translating effective interventions into practice. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the completeness of intervention descriptions in RCTs of supervised exercise training in people with PAD. A systematic search strategy was used to identify relevant trials published until June 2015. Intervention description completeness in the main trial publication was assessed using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication checklist. Missing intervention details were then sought from additional published material and by emailing authors. Fifty-eight trials were included, reporting on 76 interventions. Within publications, none of the interventions were sufficiently described for all of the items required for replication; this increased to 24 (32% after contacting authors. Although programme duration, and session frequency and duration were well-reported in publications, complete descriptions of the equipment used, intervention provider, and number of participants per session were missing for three quarters or more of interventions (missing for 75%, 93% and 80% of interventions, respectively. Furthermore, 20%, 24% and 26% of interventions were not sufficiently described for the mode of exercise, intensity of exercise, and tailoring/progression, respectively. Information on intervention adherence/fidelity was also frequently missing: attendance rates were adequately described for 29 (38% interventions, whereas sufficient detail about the intensity of exercise performed was presented for only

  13. Tablets as a digital tool in supervision of student teachers’ practical training

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the project “Tablets in Practicum Supervision”, the tablet has been tested as a tool for observation and supervision in Norwegian teacher education. The study incorporates 14 practicum supervision groups and focuses on how the use of tablets can influence the quality of the supervision and the coherence between teaching, observation and supervision. Throughout the supervision process, the groups have used tablets to produce and share texts, pictures and video recordings. The use of tablets...

  14. Medical-pedagogical supervisions for sportsmen short-trek in a period of еducational and trainings employments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaycev V.P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of inspection of sportsmen are generalized. 8 highly skilled sportsmen were inspected. A method is presented medical-pedagogical supervisions. Age of sportsmen: 16-18 years - 2 sportsmen, 19-20 years - 3 sportsmen, 22-25 years - 3 sportsmen. The results of the use of clinical inspection and visual supervisions are rotined. Frequency of heart-throbs and arteriotony is certain. Information of pulsator is resulted, functional tests and tests, dynamometer. For renewal of organism after educational and training employment employment it is recommended to accept water procedures, vitaminized food, autogenic training, active and passive rest.

  15. Teacher training: challenges and possibilities of teaching of reproduction and sexuality in supervised curricular stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Lustosa de Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This work has its origins in a survey conducted during the supervised curricular stage of Biological Sciences course at Federal University of Goiás. The article describes critically and analytically every step of the curricular stage, especially the classes with the themes: reproduction and sexuality. The classes were taught to elementary students in State College St. Bernadete in Goiânia-GO. To facilitate the process of teaching and learning the trainees divided the themes into subtopics, and several teaching resources were developed for each subtopic. The research was descriptive and exploratory, using interviews with school students, teachers, supervisors and college students to collect data that allowed assessing the success of the teaching methodologies applied by the teachers in training. The field diaries of the trainees were also used to compose the analysis. Through the statements of the participants, it is considered that the methods achieved their goal in clarifying the issues. The resources used not only brought understanding, but encouraged the participation of the students. The article has been organized according to the steps of the curricular stage and it exposes all the impressions of the supervising teachers, school students and undergraduates during the internship, highlighting, comments, concerns, planning and execution process of the activities.

  16. Training and supervision of residential staff in Community-based Treatment Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axer, Andrzej

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Oregon’s Public Mental Health System employs a large number of unlicensed personnel with limited formal mental health training, both in state hospitals and in residential treatment programs. These mentalhealth paraprofessionals often have the most frequent and direct contact with seriously mentally ill individuals, and therefore have significant impact on their lives. The authors describe organization as well as clinical and administrative supervision of a mostly paraprofessional team working with severely and persistently mentally ill (SPMI criminal offenders. The purpose of this article is to delineate the most important factors allowing for effective and safe utilization of the fairy unsophisticated personnel in the community based-secure treatment facility for individuals under criminal commitment, conditionally released from Oregon State Hospital.

  17. Home care workers: interstate differences in training requirements and their implications for quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher M; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Jason, Kendra Jeanel

    2013-10-01

    Home care workers, the fastest growing segment of the U.S. direct care workforce, provide nonmedical services that are not reimbursed by Medicare; consequently, requirements for training and supervision are left to the states. The purposes of this study are to compare these state requirements and to identify core competencies for home care workers. Our content analysis of relevant state laws determined that 29 states require a license for home care providers. Of these 29 states, 26 require orientation and 15 require in-service training for home care workers; the duration and content of these programs vary widely across the states. Fifteen states require on-site supervision of home care workers. We believe that in addition to current state training requirements (e.g., activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) assistance; infection control), other core competencies (e.g., basic medication information; behavioral management) should also be mandatory. More frequent on-site supervision is also necessary to improve home care quality.

  18. Nutrition Risk in Home-Bound Older Adults: Using Dietician-Trained and Supervised Nutrition Volunteers for Screening and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Sophie; Goldin, Benita; Nour, Kareen; Roy, Marie-Andree; Payette, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Nutrition screening and early intervention in home-bound older adults are key to preventing unfavourable health outcomes and functional decline. This pilot study's objectives were (a) to test the reliability of the Elderly Nutrition Screening Tool (ENS [C]) when administered by dietician-trained and supervised nutrition volunteers, and (b) to…

  19. Learning outcomes using video in supervision and peer feedback during clinical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    supervision of clinical skills (formative assessment). Demonstrations of these principles will be presented as video podcasts during the session. The learning outcomes of video supervision and peer-feedback were assessed in an online questionnaire survey. Results Results of the supervision showed large self...

  20. A Model for Art Therapy-Based Supervision for End-of-Life Care Workers in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S; Chan, Faye; Ho, Andy H Y; Wang, Xiao Lu; Cheng, Carol

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life care workers and volunteers are particularly prone to burnout given the intense emotional and existential nature of their work. Supervision is one important way to provide adequate support that focuses on both professional and personal competencies. The inclusion of art therapy principles and practices within supervision further creates a dynamic platform for sustained self-reflection. A 6-week art therapy-based supervision group provided opportunities for developing emotional awareness, recognizing professional strengths, securing collegial relationships, and reflecting on death-related memories. The structure, rationale, and feedback are discussed.

  1. The Effects of Simulation-based Transvaginal Ultrasound Training on Quality and Efficiency of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    xgz472, xgz472; Ringsted, Charlotte; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of adding simulation-based transvaginal ultrasound training to trainees' clinical training compared with only clinical training on quality of and efficiency of care. BACKGROUND: Simulation-based ultrasound training may be an effective adjunct to clinical training,......, 33.5-55.1) and 19.8% (95% CI, 4.1-32.9) in the intervention and control group, respectively (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Simulation-based ultrasound training improved quality of care and reduced the need for repeated patient examination and trainee supervision.......OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of adding simulation-based transvaginal ultrasound training to trainees' clinical training compared with only clinical training on quality of and efficiency of care. BACKGROUND: Simulation-based ultrasound training may be an effective adjunct to clinical training......, but no studies have examined its effects on quality and efficiency of care. METHODS: Trainees from 4 University Hospitals in East Denmark were included (N = 54). Participants were randomized to either simulation-based ultrasound training and clinical training (intervention group, n = 28), or to clinical training...

  2. Introduction to the Special Section on Teaching, Training, and Supervision in Personality and Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D

    2017-01-01

    This special section contains empirical and conceptual articles pertaining to the broad topic of teaching, training, and supervision of assessment. Despite some evidence of a decline in recent decades, assessment remains a defining practice of professional psychologists in many subfields, including clinical, counseling, school, and neuropsychology, that consumes a consequential proportion of their time. To restore assessment to its rightful place of prominence, a clear agenda needs to be developed for advancing teaching and training methods, increasing instruction to state-of-the-art methods, and defining aims that could be elucidated through empirical inquiry. The 7 articles in this special section provide a developmental perspective of these issues that collectively provide practical tools for instructors and begin to set the stage for a research agenda in this somewhat neglected area of study that is vital to the identity of professional psychology. Additionally, 2 comments are provided by distinguished figures in the field concerning the implications of the articles in the special section to health services psychology and the competencies-based movement in applied psychology.

  3. Effect of high- versus low-intensity supervised aerobic and resistance training on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes; the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Stefano; Zanuso, Silvano; Cardelli, Patrizia; Salvi, Laura; Bazuro, Alessandra; Pugliese, Luca; Maccora, Carla; Iacobini, Carla; Conti, Francesco G; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    While current recommendations on exercise type and volume have strong experimental bases, there is no clear evidence from large-sized studies indicating whether increasing training intensity provides additional benefits to subjects with type 2 diabetes. To compare the effects of moderate-to-high intensity (HI) versus low-to-moderate intensity (LI) training of equal energy cost, i.e. exercise volume, on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Pre-specified sub-analysis of the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES), a randomized multicenter prospective trial comparing a supervised exercise intervention with standard care for 12 months (2005-2006). Twenty-two outpatient diabetes clinics across Italy. Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to twice-a-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling (n = 303). Subjects were randomized by center to LI (n = 142, 136 completed) or HI (n = 161, 152 completed) progressive aerobic and resistance training, i.e. at 55% or 70% of predicted maximal oxygen consumption and at 60% or 80% of predicted 1-Repetition Maximum, respectively, of equal volume. Hemoglobin (Hb) A(1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors; 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores. Volume of physical activity, both supervised and non-supervised, was similar in LI and HI participants. Compared with LI training, HI training produced only clinically marginal, though statistically significant, improvements in HbA(1c) (mean difference -0.17% [95% confidence interval -0.44,0.10], P = 0.03), triglycerides (-0.12 mmol/l [-0.34,0.10], P = 0.02) and total cholesterol (-0.24 mmol/l [-0.46, -0.01], P = 0.04), but not in other risk factors and CHD risk scores. However, intensity was not an independent predictor of reduction of any of these parameters. Adverse event rate was similar in HI and LI subjects. Data from the large IDES cohort indicate that, in low-fitness individuals such as sedentary subjects with type 2

  4. Effect of high- versus low-intensity supervised aerobic and resistance training on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes; the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Balducci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While current recommendations on exercise type and volume have strong experimental bases, there is no clear evidence from large-sized studies indicating whether increasing training intensity provides additional benefits to subjects with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of moderate-to-high intensity (HI versus low-to-moderate intensity (LI training of equal energy cost, i.e. exercise volume, on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. DESIGN: Pre-specified sub-analysis of the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES, a randomized multicenter prospective trial comparing a supervised exercise intervention with standard care for 12 months (2005-2006. SETTING: Twenty-two outpatient diabetes clinics across Italy. PATIENTS: Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to twice-a-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling (n = 303. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomized by center to LI (n = 142, 136 completed or HI (n = 161, 152 completed progressive aerobic and resistance training, i.e. at 55% or 70% of predicted maximal oxygen consumption and at 60% or 80% of predicted 1-Repetition Maximum, respectively, of equal volume. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: Hemoglobin (Hb A(1c and other cardiovascular risk factors; 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD risk scores. RESULTS: Volume of physical activity, both supervised and non-supervised, was similar in LI and HI participants. Compared with LI training, HI training produced only clinically marginal, though statistically significant, improvements in HbA(1c (mean difference -0.17% [95% confidence interval -0.44,0.10], P = 0.03, triglycerides (-0.12 mmol/l [-0.34,0.10], P = 0.02 and total cholesterol (-0.24 mmol/l [-0.46, -0.01], P = 0.04, but not in other risk factors and CHD risk scores. However, intensity was not an independent predictor of reduction of any of these parameters. Adverse event rate was similar in HI and LI subjects

  5. Processos clínicos em Núcleos de Apoio à Saúde da Família / NASF: estágio supervisionado Procesos clínicos en Núcleos de Apoyo a la Salud de la Familia (NASF: pasantía supervisionada Clinical processes in Family Health Care Center: supervised training course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Vilela Santeiro

    2012-01-01

    intervención supervisada, en trámite desde 2011. En la realidad retratada, actividades de enseñanza y aprendizaje en Psicología clínica en sus interfaces con la salud pública han ocurrido entre distintas demandas: las de los usuarios, comprendidos como singulares y representantes del entorno social, y las de la formación en Psicología, comprimidas entre imperativos vinculados a las políticas públicas de enseñanza superior y de salud pública. Hay ponderaciones sobre el costo emocional que se les impone a los practicantes en busca de identidad profesional en ese contexto. Articular distintas necesidades permanece como un desafío a ser vivido y constantemente reflexionado por profesionales y estudiantes de Psicología clínica.The connection between psychology and public health has become narrowed in recent years, aiming at the consolidation of the profession in its commitments to the Brazilian reality. This article discusses the role of the integration of clinical psychology to Family Health Care Centers (NASFs, equipments of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Focused discussions result from supervised training courses developed by students from a public university in a small town in the interior of the Midwest. The activities take place on 5 NASFs and account for 16 weeks of theoretical and supervised intervention per semester, which have been ongoing since 2011. In the reality portrayed, teaching and learning in clinical psychology interfaced with public health have occurred between different demands: the users', understood as individuals and social environment representatives, and those of training in Psychology, compressed into imperatives linked to public policies on higher education and public health. There are considerations about the emotional cost that arises for the trainees who seek professional identity in this context. Articulating distinct needs remains a challenge to be faced and constantly reflected by professionals and clinical psychology

  6. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-08-30

    The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team development intervention. The intervention consisted of two profiling activities and associated workshops spread six months apart. These activities focused on individual work preferences and overall team performance with the aim of improving the functioning of the clinic as a learning environment for dental students. Evaluation data consisted of 20 participant interviews, fourteen hours of workplace observation and six sets of field notes. Following initial thematic analysis, project outcomes were re-analysed using activity theory and expansive learning as a theoretical framework. At project commencement students were not well integrated into the day-to-day clinic functioning. Staff expressed a general view that greater attention to student supervision would compromise patient care. Following the intervention greater clinical team cohesion and workflow changes delivered efficiencies in practice, enhanced relationships among team members, and more positive attitudes towards students. The physical layout of the clinic and clinical workloads were changed to achieve greater involvement of all team members in supporting student learning. Unexpectedly, these changes also improved clinic functioning and increased the number of student placements available. In navigating the sequential stages of the expansive learning cycle, the clinical team ultimately redefined the 'object' of their activity and crossed previously impervious boundaries between healthcare delivery and student supervision with benefits to

  7. A Study of Clinical Supervision Techniques and Training in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Paul L.; Hamm, Terri

    2012-01-01

    Data from 57 clinical supervisors in licensed substance abuse treatment programs indicate that 28% had completed formal graduate course work in clinical supervision and 33% were professionally licensed or certified. Findings raise concerns about the scope and quality of clinical supervision available to substance abuse counselors. (Contains 3…

  8. Self-supervised, mobile-application based cognitive training of auditory attention: A behavioral and fMRI evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef J. Bless

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence of the validity of collecting data in natural settings using smartphone applications has opened new possibilities for psychological assessment, treatment, and research. In this study we explored the feasibility and effectiveness of using a mobile application for self-supervised training of auditory attention. In addition, we investigated the neural underpinnings of the training procedure with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, as well as possible transfer effects to untrained cognitive interference tasks. Subjects in the training group performed the training task on an iPod touch two times a day (morning/evening for three weeks; subjects in the control group received no training, but were tested at the same time interval as the training group. Behavioral responses were measured before and after the training period in both groups, together with measures of task-related neural activations by fMRI. The results showed an expected performance increase after training that corresponded to activation decreases in brain regions associated with selective auditory processing (left posterior temporal gyrus and executive functions (right middle frontal gyrus, indicating more efficient processing in task-related neural networks after training. Our study suggests that cognitive training delivered via mobile applications is feasible and improves the ability to focus attention with corresponding effects on neural plasticity. Future research should focus on the clinical benefits of mobile cognitive training. Limitations of the study are discussed including reduced experimental control and lack of transfer effects.

  9. Gymnasium-based unsupervised exercise maintains benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained following supervised training in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macananey, Oscar; O'Shea, Donal; Warmington, Stuart A; Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel

    2012-08-01

    Supervised exercise (SE) in patients with type 2 diabetes improves oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. Maintenance of these improvements, however, has not been examined when supervision is removed. We explored if potential improvements in oxygen uptake kinetics following a 12-week SE that combined aerobic and resistance training were maintained after a subsequent 12-week unsupervised exercise (UE). The involvement of cardiac output (CO) in these improvements was also tested. Nineteen volunteers with type 2 diabetes were recruited. Oxygen uptake kinetics and CO (inert gas rebreathing) responses to constant-load cycling at 50% ventilatory threshold (V(T)), 80% V(T), and mid-point between V(T) and peak workload (50% Δ) were examined at baseline (on 2 occasions) and following each 12-week training period. Participants decided to exercise at a local gymnasium during the UE. Thirteen subjects completed all the interventions. The time constant of phase 2 of oxygen uptake was significantly faster (p heart rate kinetics at all 3 intensities and a larger increase in CO at 30 s in relation to 240 s at 80% V(T); and these responses were maintained post-UE. Unsupervised exercise maintained benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained during a supervised exercise in subjects with diabetes, and these benefits were associated with a faster dynamic response of heart rate after training.

  10. Supervised practice in occupational therapy in a psychosocial care center: Challenges for the assistance and the teaching and learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Carlos Mariotti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric reform in Brazil has replaced the hospital-centered model by the reintegration of users to their respective communities. The Center of Psychosocial Care (CAPS has been the main equipment in that scope. Objectives: To report the development of Supervised Practice in Occupational Therapy in a CAPS II unit in Curitiba, Parana state, Brazil. Methods: This is an experience report. It features the training field and describes the stages of the teaching and learning process which involved institutional observation, reporting and intervention proposal, collecting data about the users’ profile and attendances. The work focused the non-intensive users because they are close to hospital discharge. Results: We found that users of the non-intensive system, rather than crave the discharge, would like to return to the semi-intensive or intensive systems, aiming to regain sickness and transportation benefits, which are lost as users make progress. This fact denotes great contradictions in the system. We also attended intensive and semi-intensive systems users. Conclusions: The students’ learning included aspects such as direct contact with the institutional reality; knowledge about the health system, its limitations and contradictions; approach to users, their families, realities, socioeconomic conditions, desires, aspirations, or lack thereof; difficulties in engaging in meaningful occupations in their territories, limitations, and social stigma; working with frustrations, reflecting about ways to change the reality; in addition to expanded clinical practice, participating in the discussions and formulation of public policies on mental healthcare and social control.

  11. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., plan of care, and medical supervision. 484.18 Section 484.18 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... status, types of services and equipment required, frequency of visits, prognosis, rehabilitation... to the original plan. Orders for therapy services include the specific procedures and modalities to...

  12. Therapeutic validity and effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooijs, M.; Siemonsma, P.C.; Heus, I.; Sont, J.K.; Rövekamp, T.A.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease taken into consideration indices such as therapeutic validity of interventions, methodological quality of studies, and exercise v

  13. Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Gram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1 with supervision (3WS throughout the intervention period, (2 with minimal supervision (3MS only initially, and (3 a reference group (REF. Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0–9 and headache (scale 0–10. Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: −0.5 ± 0.2 (P<0.02 and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: −0.4 ± 0.2 (P<0.07. Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: −1.1 ± 0.2 (P<0.001 and 3MS versus REF: −1.1 ± 0.2 (P<0.001. Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.

  14. Communication training improves sense of performance expectancy of public health nurses engaged in long-term elderly prevention care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Motoko; Suzukamo, Yoshimi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Izumi, Sin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a communication skill training based on a coaching theory for public health nurses (PHNs) who are engaged in Japan's long-term care prevention program. The participants in this study included 112 PHNs and 266 service users who met with these PHNs in order to create a customized care plan within one month after the PHNs' training. The participants were divided into three groups: a supervised group in which the PHNs attended the 1-day training seminar and the follow-up supervision; a seminar group attended only the 1-day training seminar; a control group. The PHNs' sense of performance expectancy, and user's satisfaction, user's spontaneous behavior were evaluated at the baseline (T1), at one month (T2), and at three months (T3) after the PHNs' training. At T3, the PHNs performed a recalled evaluation (RE) of their communication skills before the training. The PHNs' sense of performance expectancy increased significantly over time in the supervised group and the control group (F = 11.28, P < 0.001; F = 4.03, P < 0.05, resp.). The difference score between T3-RE was significantly higher in the supervised group than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant differences in the users' outcomes were found.

  15. Supervision of care networks for frail community dwelling adults aged 75 years and older: protocol of a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, Didi; Merten, Hanneke; Robben, Paul; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-08-25

    The Dutch healthcare inspectorate (IGZ) supervises the quality and safety of healthcare in the Netherlands. Owing to the growing population of (community dwelling) older adults and changes in the Dutch healthcare system, the IGZ is exploring new methods to effectively supervise care networks that exist around frail older adults. The composition of these networks, where formal and informal care takes place, and the lack of guidelines and quality and risk indicators make supervision complicated in the current situation. This study consists of four phases. The first phase identifies risks for community dwelling frail older adults in the existing literature. In the second phase, a qualitative pilot study will be conducted to assess the needs and wishes of the frail older adults concerning care and well-being, perception of risks, and the composition of their networks, collaboration and coordination between care providers involved in the network. In the third phase, questionnaires based on the results of phase II will be sent to a larger group of frail older adults (n=200) and their care providers. The results will describe the composition of their care networks and prioritise risks concerning community dwelling older adults. Also, it will provide input for the development of a new supervision framework by the IGZ. During phase IV, a second questionnaire will be sent to the participants of phase III to establish changes of perception in risks and possible changes in the care networks. The framework will be tested by the IGZ in pilots, and the researchers will evaluate these pilots and provide feedback to the IGZ. The study protocol was approved by the Scientific Committee of the EMGO+institute and the Medical Ethical review committee of the VU University Medical Centre. Results will be presented in scientific articles and reports and at meetings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  16. Implementing the supportive supervision intervention for registered nurses in a long-term care home: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Robinson, Angela

    2013-11-01

    This pilot study was conducted in response to the call in 2009 by the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics to focus on effective leadership structures in nursing homes and to develop leadership capacity. Few researchers have evaluated interventions aimed at enhancing the leadership ability of registered nurses in long-term care. The aim of the pilot study was to test the feasibility of a three-part supportive supervisory intervention to improve supervisory skills of registered nurses in long-term care. A repeated measures group design was used. Quantitative data were collected from healthcare aides, licensed practical nurses (i.e., supervised staff), and registered nurses (i.e., supervisors). Focus groups with care managers and supervisors examined perceptions of the intervention. There were nonsignificant changes in both the registered nurse supervisors' job satisfaction and the supervised staff's perception of their supervisors' support. Supervised staff scores indicated an increase in the use of research utilization but did not reflect an increase in job satisfaction. Focus group discussions revealed that the supervisors and care managers perceived the workshop to be valuable; however, the weekly self-reflection, coaching, and mentoring components of the intervention were rare and inconsistent. While the primary outcomes were not influenced by the Supportive Supervision Intervention, further effort is required to understand how best to enhance the supportive supervisory skills of RNs. Examples of how to improve the possibility of a successful intervention are advanced. Effective supervisory skills among registered nurses are crucial for improving the quality of care in long-term care homes. Registered nurses are receptive to interventions that will enhance their roles as supervisors. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Clinical supervision by consultants in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hore, Craig T; Lancashire, William; Fassett, Robert G

    2009-08-17

    Clinical supervision is a vital part of postgraduate medical education. Without it, trainees may not learn effectively from their experiences; this may lead to acceptance by registrars and junior doctors of lower standards of care. Currently, supervision is provided by consultants to registrars and junior doctors, and by registrars to junior doctors. Evidence suggests that the clinical supervision provided to postgraduate doctors is inadequate. Registrars and juniors doctors have the right to expect supervision in the workplace. Impediments to the provision of clinical supervision include competing demands of hospital service provision on trainees and supervisors, lack of clarity of job descriptions, private versus public commitments of supervisors and lack of interest. Supervisors should be trained in the process of supervision and provided with the time and resources to conduct it. Those being supervised should be provided with clear expectations of the process. We need to create and develop systems, environments and cultures that support high standards of conduct and effective clinical supervision. These systems must ensure the right to supervision, feedback, support, decent working conditions and respect for both trainees and their supervisors.

  18. Napa County Entrepreneurial Child Care Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napa County Employment Training Office, CA.

    A multiagency project designed a program to train participants to become licensed family day care home operators. Participant recruitment was conducted by means of a flyer, advertisements in the help wanted section, community service announcements, press releases, and notices to the high schools. The program recruited 43 potential family day care…

  19. Academic Writing in Reflexive Professional Writing: Citations of Scientific Literature in Supervised Pre-Service Training Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Chaves de Melo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate citation practices of scientific literature in reflexive writing from the genre of supervised pre-service training report produced by pre-service teachers enrolled in the mandatory pre-service training subject of English Language Teaching, at an undergraduate language teaching course. The aim of this research is to analyze how these pre-services teacher represent themselves based on citation practices of scientific literature, and characterize some of the functions deployed by the citations in the reflexive writing emerging in the academic sphere. We use the dialogic approach to language from Bakhtinian studies as a theoretical base, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions regarding types of sequences and of discourse proposed by Adam and Bronckart. The results of this research show that the practice of citation of scientific literature is an invocation of authority as a form of erudition, amplification and ornamentation of the discourse produced. This practice can also guide pedagogical action developed by pre-service teachers in their supervised training.

  20. Linking quality of care and training costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Tabor, Ann; Madsen, Mette E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a model for conducting cost-effectiveness analyses in medical education. The model was based on a randomised trial examining the effects of training midwives to perform cervical length measurement (CLM) as compared with obstetricians on patients' waiting times. (CLM......-performed CLM was the most cost-effective strategy, whereas midwife-performed CLM was cost-effective for WTP values above EUR 0.73 minute(-1) . CONCLUSION: Cost-effectiveness models can be used to link quality of care to training costs. The example used in the present study demonstrated that different training......), as compared with obstetricians. METHODS: The model included four steps: (i) gathering data on training outcomes, (ii) assessing total costs and effects, (iii) calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and (iv) estimating cost-effectiveness probability for different willingness to pay (WTP...

  1. Pre-trained Convolutional Networks and generative statiscial models: a study in semi-supervised learning

    OpenAIRE

    John Michael Salgado Cebola

    2016-01-01

    Comparative study between the performance of Convolutional Networks using pretrained models and statistical generative models on tasks of image classification in semi-supervised enviroments.Study of multiple ensembles using these techniques and generated data from estimated pdfs.Pretrained Convents, LDA, pLSA, Fisher Vectors, Sparse-coded SPMs, TSVMs being the key models worked upon.

  2. Does training frequency and supervision affect compliance, performance and muscular health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Bredahl, Thomas G V; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2015-01-01

    and supervision, similar degrees of compliance were shown together with reduced musculoskeletal pain and improved muscle performance. These findings provide evidence that a great degree of flexibility is legitimate for companies in planning future implementation of physical exercise programs at the workplace...

  3. Supervised Versus Home Exercise Training Programs on Functional Balance in Older Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Enas Fawzy; Shanb, Alsayed Abd elhameed

    2016-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with a progressive decline in physical capabilities and a disturbance of both postural control and daily living activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supervised versus home exercise programs on muscle strength, balance and functional activities in older participants. Methods Forty older participants were equally assigned to a supervised exercise program (group-I) or a home exercise program (group-II). Each participant performed the exercise program for 35–45 minutes, two times per week for four months. Balance indices and isometric muscle strength were measured with the Biodex Balance System and Hand-Held Dynamometer. Functional activities were evaluated by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the timed get-up-and-go test (TUG). Results The mean values of the Biodex balance indices and the BBS improved significantly after both the supervised and home exercise programs (P balance performance. The supervised program was superior to the home program in restoring functional activities and isometric muscle strength in older participants. PMID:28090182

  4. Effects of Supervised vs. Unsupervised Training Programs on Balance and Muscle Strength in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, André; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Beurskens, Rainer; Granacher, Urs

    2017-06-01

    Balance and resistance training can improve healthy older adults' balance and muscle strength. Delivering such exercise programs at home without supervision may facilitate participation for older adults because they do not have to leave their homes. To date, no systematic literature analysis has been conducted to determine if supervision affects the effectiveness of these programs to improve healthy older adults' balance and muscle strength/power. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to quantify the effectiveness of supervised vs. unsupervised balance and/or resistance training programs on measures of balance and muscle strength/power in healthy older adults. In addition, the impact of supervision on training-induced adaptive processes was evaluated in the form of dose-response relationships by analyzing randomized controlled trials that compared supervised with unsupervised trials. A computerized systematic literature search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and SportDiscus to detect articles examining the role of supervision in balance and/or resistance training in older adults. The initially identified 6041 articles were systematically screened. Studies were included if they examined balance and/or resistance training in adults aged ≥65 years with no relevant diseases and registered at least one behavioral balance (e.g., time during single leg stance) and/or muscle strength/power outcome (e.g., time for 5-Times-Chair-Rise-Test). Finally, 11 studies were eligible for inclusion in this meta-analysis. Weighted mean standardized mean differences between subjects (SMDbs) of supervised vs. unsupervised balance/resistance training studies were calculated. The included studies were coded for the following variables: number of participants, sex, age, number and type of interventions, type of balance/strength tests, and change (%) from pre- to post-intervention values. Additionally, we coded training according to

  5. A Bayesian supervised dual-dimensionality reduction model for simultaneous decoding of LFP and spike train signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Andrew; Vandenberg-Rodes, Alexander; Fortin, Norbert; Shahbaba, Babak

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscientists are increasingly collecting multimodal data during experiments and observational studies. Different data modalities-such as EEG, fMRI, LFP, and spike trains-offer different views of the complex systems contributing to neural phenomena. Here, we focus on joint modeling of LFP and spike train data, and present a novel Bayesian method for neural decoding to infer behavioral and experimental conditions. This model performs supervised dual-dimensionality reduction: it learns low-dimensional representations of two different sources of information that not only explain variation in the input data itself, but also predict extra-neuronal outcomes. Despite being one probabilistic unit, the model consists of multiple modules: exponential PCA and wavelet PCA are used for dimensionality reduction in the spike train and LFP modules, respectively; these modules simultaneously interface with a Bayesian binary regression module. We demonstrate how this model may be used for prediction, parametric inference, and identification of influential predictors. In prediction, the hierarchical model outperforms other models trained on LFP alone, spike train alone, and combined LFP and spike train data. We compare two methods for modeling the loading matrix and find them to perform similarly. Finally, model parameters and their posterior distributions yield scientific insights.

  6. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period.

  7. Supervised exercise training reduces oxidative stress and cardiometabolic risk in adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinetti, Giovanni; Mozzini, Chiara; Desenzani, Paolo; Boni, Enrico; Bulla, Laura; Lorenzetti, Isabella; Romano, Claudia; Pasini, Andrea; Cominacini, Luciano; Assanelli, Deodato

    2015-03-18

    To evaluate the effects of supervised exercise training (SET) on cardiometabolic risk, cardiorespiratory fitness and oxidative stress status in 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), twenty male subjects with T2DM were randomly assigned to an intervention group, which performed SET in a hospital-based setting, and to a control group. SET consisted of a 12-month supervised aerobic, resistance and flexibility training. A reference group of ten healthy male subjects was also recruited for baseline evaluation only. Participants underwent medical examination, biochemical analyses and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Oxidative stress markers (1-palmitoyl-2-[5-oxovaleroyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine [POVPC]; 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine [PGPC]) were measured in plasma and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All investigations were carried out at baseline and after 12 months. SET yielded a significant modification (p < 0.05) in the following parameters: V'O₂max (+14.4%), gas exchange threshold (+23.4%), waist circumference (-1.4%), total cholesterol (-14.6%), LDL cholesterol (-20.2%), fasting insulinemia (-48.5%), HOMA-IR (-52.5%), plasma POVPC (-27.9%) and PGPC (-31.6%). After 12 months, the control group presented a V'O₂max and a gas exchange threshold significantly lower than the intervention group. Plasma POVC and PGPC were significantly different from healthy subjects before the intervention, but not after. In conclusion, SET was effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiometabolic risk and oxidative stress status in T2DM.

  8. [Perceptions about continuous training of Chilean health care teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez V, Cristhian; Fasce H, Eduardo; Coloma N, Katherine; Vaccarezza G, Giulietta; Ortega B, Javiera

    2013-06-01

    Continuous training of teachers, in discipline and pedagogical topics, is a key step to improve the quality of educational processes. To report the perception of Chilean teachers of undergraduate health care programs, about continuous training activities. Twenty teachers working at different undergraduate health care programs in Chile were interviewed. Maximum variation and theoretical sampling methods were used to select the sample. Data was analyzed by open coding, according to the Grounded Theory guidelines. Nine categories emerged from data analysis: Access to continuous training, meaning of training in discipline, activities of continuous training in discipline, meaning of continuous training in pedagogy, kinds of continuous training in pedagogy, quality of continuous training in pedagogy, ideal of continuous training in pedagogy, outcomes of continuous training in pedagogy and needs for continuous training in pedagogy. Teachers of health care programs prefer to participate in contextualized training activities. Also, they emphasize their need of training in evaluation and teaching strategies.

  9. Supervised domain adaptation of decision forests: Transfer of models trained in vitro for in vivo intravascular ultrasound tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conjeti, Sailesh; Katouzian, Amin; Roy, Abhijit Guha; Peter, Loïc; Sheet, Debdoot; Carlier, Stéphane; Laine, Andrew; Navab, Nassir

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a supervised domain adaptation (DA) framework for adapting decision forests in the presence of distribution shift between training (source) and testing (target) domains, given few labeled examples. We introduce a novel method for DA through an error-correcting hierarchical transfer relaxation scheme with domain alignment, feature normalization, and leaf posterior reweighting to correct for the distribution shift between the domains. For the first time we apply DA to the challenging problem of extending in vitro trained forests (source domain) for in vivo applications (target domain). The proof-of-concept is provided for in vivo characterization of atherosclerotic tissues using intravascular ultrasound signals, where presence of flowing blood is a source of distribution shift between the two domains. This potentially leads to misclassification upon direct deployment of in vitro trained classifier, thus motivating the need for DA as obtaining reliable in vivo training labels is often challenging if not infeasible. Exhaustive validations and parameter sensitivity analysis substantiate the reliability of the proposed DA framework and demonstrates improved tissue characterization performance for scenarios where adaptation is conducted in presence of only a few examples. The proposed method can thus be leveraged to reduce annotation costs and improve computational efficiency over conventional retraining approaches.

  10. Training with o (observing) and T (treatment) teams in live supervision: reflections in the looking glass*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J; Matthews, W J; Bodin, N A; Cohen, D; Lewandowski, L; Novo, J; Pumilia, J; Willis, C

    1989-10-01

    Working with a treatment and observing team at the same time, behind the oneway mirror, offers a variety of ways to: (a) generate multiple realities; (b) work with two different models of family therapy simultaneously; and (c) provide feedback on the teams' own roles, rules and group process. The process that 6 trainees and two supervisors used with T and O teams to examine their own coevolution as a therapeutic system using the Milan model of family therapy and Ericksonian hypnotherapy is described. The article concludes with a discussion of the advantages and pitfalls of this type of dual supervision.

  11. Is physician supervision of the capsaicin 8% patch administration procedure really necessary? An opinion from health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kern KU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kai-Uwe Kern,1 Janice England,2 Andrea Roth-Daniek,3 Till Wagner3 1Institute for Pain Medicine/Pain Practice, Wiesbaden, Germany; 2Pain Medicine and Anaesthesia, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; 3Pain Therapy and Palliative Care Department, Medizinisches Zentrum Städteregion Aachen, Aachen, Germany Abstract: Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and can have a severe effect on quality of life. The capsaicin 8% patch is a novel treatment option that directly targets the source of peripheral neuropathic pain. It can provide pain relief for up to 12 weeks in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain. Treatment with the capsaicin 8% patch follows a clearly defined procedure, and patch application must be carried out by a physician or a health care professional under the supervision of a physician. Nonetheless, in our experience, nurses often take the lead role in capsaicin 8% patch application without the involvement of a physician. We believe that the nurse's key role is of benefit to the patients, as he or she may be better placed, because of time constraints and patient relationships, to support the patient through the application procedure than a physician. Moreover, a number of frequently prescribed drugs, including botulinum toxin and infliximab, can be administered by health care professionals without the requirement for physician supervision. Here we argue that current guidance should be amended to remove the requirement for physician supervision during application of the capsaicin 8% patch. Keywords: capsaicin, neuropathic pain, topical, health care professional, physician, nurse

  12. A Break-Even Analysis of Optimum Faculty Assignment for Ambulatory Primary Care Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xakellis, George C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation was developed to estimate the number of medical residents one or two faculty teachers could supervise in a university-based primary medical care teaching clinic. With no non-teaching tasks, it was shown that two teachers could supervise 11 residents, while one teacher was able to supervise only three residents under similar…

  13. Factors affecting frontline workers' satisfaction with supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noelker, Linda S; Ejaz, Farida K; Menne, Heather L; Bagaka's, Joshua G

    2009-02-01

    Objective. This research was guided by a stress and support model to examine the effects of frontline workers' background characteristics, personal stressors, job-related stressors, and workplace support on satisfaction with supervision. Method. Survey data were collected from 644 workers in 49 long-term-care settings that employed them. Regression analysis were used to determine the effects of worker level and then Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) and organizational factors on the outcome. Results. Although all four variable categories made significant contributions to explaining satisfaction with supervision, the most powerful were personal stressors and job-related stressors. Results from HLM analysis showed frontline workers in nursing homes and those employed in for-profit organizations had lower levels of satisfaction with supervision. Discussion. Findings suggest organizational interventions to address workers' financial and health issues and management practices such as better training programs and peer mentoring could enhance workers' satisfaction with supervision.

  14. Stereoscopic Augmented Reality System for Supervised Training on Minimal Invasive Surgery Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matu, Florin-Octavian; Thøgersen, Mikkel; Galsgaard, Bo

    2014-01-01

    the need for efficient training. When training with the robot, the communication between the trainer and the trainee is limited, since the trainee often cannot see the trainer. To overcome this issue, this paper proposes an Augmented Reality (AR) system where the trainer is controlling two virtual robotic...

  15. A systematic review of professional supervision experiences and effects for allied health practitioners working in non-metropolitan health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducat WH

    2015-08-01

    of an agreed upon definition and functions of supervision when supervisors from diverse allied health disciplines were surveyed. While methodologically weak, all studies reported positive perceptions of supervision across professionals, supervisors, and managers. This is in accordance with previous research in the wider supervision literature. Discussion: Considering the large pool of studies retrieved for further investigation, few of these met inclusion criteria demonstrating the paucity of primary research in this area. Increased training, policies, and implementation frameworks to ensure the definition and functions of supervision are agreed upon across the allied health disciplines in non-metropolitan areas is needed. Furthermore, systematic evaluation of supervision implementation in non-metropolitan settings, investigation of the experience and effects of distance based supervision (versus face-to-face, and increased rigor in research studies investigating non-metropolitan allied health profession supervision is needed. Keywords: clinical supervision, allied health, professional development

  16. How Well Do Randomized Controlled Trials Reflect Standard Care: A Comparison between Scientific Research Data and Standard Care Data in Patients with Intermittent Claudication undergoing Supervised Exercise Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dörenkamp

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the degree and impact of patient selection of patients with intermittent claudication undergoing supervised exercise therapy in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs by describing commonly used exclusion criteria, and by comparing baseline characteristics and treatment response measured as improvement in maximum walking distance of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care.We compared data from RCTs with unselected standard care data. First, we systematically reviewed RCTs that investigated the effect of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication. For each of the RCTs, we extracted and categorized the eligibility criteria and their justifications. To assess whether people in RCTs (n = 1,440 differed from patients treated in daily practice (n = 3,513, in terms of demographics, comorbidity and walking capacity, we assessed between group-differences using t-tests. To assess differences in treatment response, we compared walking distances at three and six months between groups using t-tests. Differences of ≥15% were set as a marker for a clinically relevant difference.All 20 included RCTs excluded large segments of patients with intermittent claudication. One-third of the RCTs eligibility criteria were justified. Despite, the numerous eligibility criteria, we found that baseline characteristics were largely comparable. A statistically significant and (borderline clinically relevant difference in treatment response after three and six months between trial participants and standard care patients was found. Improvements in maximum walking distance after three and six months were significantly and clinically less in trial participants.The finding that baseline characteristics of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care were comparable, may indicate that RCT eligibility criteria are used implicitly by professionals when referring patients to

  17. Kollegial supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Dibbern; Petersson, Erling

    Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution......Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution...

  18. Stereoscopic Augmented Reality System for Supervised Training on Minimal Invasive Surgery Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matu, Florin-Octavian; Thøgersen, Mikkel; Galsgaard, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Training in the use of robot-assisted surgery systems is necessary before a surgeon is able to perform procedures using these systems because the setup is very different from manual procedures. In addition, surgery robots are highly expensive to both acquire and maintain --- thereby entailing...... the need for efficient training. When training with the robot, the communication between the trainer and the trainee is limited, since the trainee often cannot see the trainer. To overcome this issue, this paper proposes an Augmented Reality (AR) system where the trainer is controlling two virtual robotic...

  19. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-01-20

    alongside ongoing support and supervision. Mental health nurses (and other health professionals) will be better able to involve service users and carers in care planning. Service users and carers may feel more involved in care planning in future.

  20. Levo-propionyl-carnitine improves the effectiveness of supervised physical training on the absolute claudication distance in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Giuseppe Maria; Leone, Alfredo; Laudani, Rita; Martin, Romeo; Deinit, Gregorio; Cataldi, Valentina

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which supervised physical training improves walking ability in patients with intermittent claudication (IC) are microcirculatory, rheological, and metabolic. The main mechanism of levo-propionylcarnitine (LPC) is metabolic; it increases the walking ability in claudicants, providing an additional energy to the ischemic muscle by an anaplerotic activity. Therefore, the current study was carried out to ascertain whether the combined treatment has a synergistic effect. The results confirm the effectiveness of supervised physical training in patients with IC, and we recommend the use of LPC during the exercise training program, at least in patients with severe claudication. Finally, underlining the similar mechanisms of physical training and LPC treatment, the study suggests that a cycle of LPC infusions could be advised in patients with severe claudication who cannot be included, for various reasons, in an exercise rehabilitation program.

  1. On the Construction of Training Quality Supervising System of the Staff Training Base in Railway Companies%铁路企业职工培训基地培训质量督导体系建设研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐世建

    2015-01-01

    Building reasonable quality supervising system of training in order to improve the quality of talents training has practical significance to strengthen and improve the education and training work of the staff in railway companies.The paper analyzes the current situation of the construction of training quality supervising system of the staff training base in railway companies and takes wide example by construction mode of teaching quality supervision system in universities and vocational colleges .It explores a construction mode to meet the practical demand of training base in railway companies by setting up training quality supervising organization , organizing a supervisor team by classification , constructing a supervision system scientifically and establishing a benignant operation mechanism of training quality supervising system .%以提高人才培养质量为目标,合理构建培训质量督导体系,对加强和改进铁路企业职工教育培训工作具有重要的现实意义。在分析铁路企业职工培训基地培训质量督导体系建设现状和广泛借鉴高校、职业院校教学质量督导体系建设模式的基础上,本文提出通过建立培训质量督导组织机构、分类组建督导员队伍、科学建设督导制度体系、建立良性运行机制等措施,探索一种满足铁路企业职工培训基地实际需求的培训质量督导体系建设模式。

  2. Does team training work? Principles for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; DiazGranados, Deborah; Weaver, Sallie J; King, Heidi

    2008-11-01

    Teamwork is integral to a working environment conducive to patient safety and care. Team training is one methodology designed to equip team members with the competencies necessary for optimizing teamwork. There is evidence of team training's effectiveness in highly complex and dynamic work environments, such as aviation and health care. However, most quantitative evaluations of training do not offer any insight into the actual reasons why, how, and when team training is effective. To address this gap in understanding, and to provide guidance for members of the health care community interested in implementing team training programs, this article presents both quantitative results and a specific qualitative review and content analysis of team training implemented in health care. Based on this review, we offer eight evidence-based principles for effective planning, implementation, and evaluation of team training programs specific to health care.

  3. Pointing with a One-Eyed Cursor for Supervised Training in Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kibsgaard, Martin; Kraus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Pointing in the endoscopic view of a surgical robot is a natural and effcient way for instructors to communicate with trainees in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. However, pointing in a stereo-endoscopic view can be limited by problems such as video delay, double vision, arm fatigue......-day training units in robot- assisted minimally invasive surgery on anaesthetised pigs....

  4. Applying Self-Efficacy Theory to Counselor Training and Supervision: A Comparison of Two Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kristin L.

    2004-01-01

    Counseling self-efficacy, an individual's perception of his or her competence to conduct counseling, is an important component of understanding how counselor trainees subjectively construct their counseling and training experiences and subsequently develop into competent counseling professionals. The author describes 2 approaches to using…

  5. Emotion Regulation: Processes, Strategies, and Applications to Group Work Training and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    The complex group work environment can be overwhelming and anxiety provoking, particularly for novice group leaders. Effectively accessing and managing one's own emotions are tasks central to effective group leadership and should be primary learning objectives of group workers in training. This article provides an overview of Gross's…

  6. The iOSC3 System: Using Ontologies and SWRL Rules for Intelligent Supervision and Care of Patients with Acute Cardiac Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martínez-Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU are specially trained to deal constantly with very large and complex quantities of clinical data and make quick decisions as they face complications. However, the amount of information generated and the way the data are presented may overload the cognitive skills of even experienced professionals and lead to inaccurate or erroneous actions that put patients’ lives at risk. In this paper, we present the design, development, and validation of iOSC3, an ontology-based system for intelligent supervision and treatment of critical patients with acute cardiac disorders. The system analyzes the patient’s condition and provides a recommendation about the treatment that should be administered to achieve the fastest possible recovery. If the recommendation is accepted by the doctor, the system automatically modifies the quantity of drugs that are being delivered to the patient. The knowledge base is constituted by an OWL ontology and a set of SWRL rules that represent the expert’s knowledge. iOSC3 has been developed in collaboration with experts from the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU of the Meixoeiro Hospital, one of the most significant hospitals in the northwest region of Spain.

  7. Semi-Supervised Single- and Multi-Domain Regression with Multi-Domain Training

    CERN Document Server

    Michaeli, Tomer; Sapiro, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    We address the problems of multi-domain and single-domain regression based on distinct and unpaired labeled training sets for each of the domains and a large unlabeled training set from all domains. We formulate these problems as a Bayesian estimation with partial knowledge of statistical relations. We propose a worst-case design strategy and study the resulting estimators. Our analysis explicitly accounts for the cardinality of the labeled sets and includes the special cases in which one of the labeled sets is very large or, in the other extreme, completely missing. We demonstrate our estimators in the context of removing expressions from facial images and in the context of audio-visual word recognition, and provide comparisons to several recently proposed multi-modal learning algorithms.

  8. A training course for experts in diabetology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, Huberta E.; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands so-called Diabetes Care Groups organize the primary diabetes care centrally with delegation to different health care providers. A training course for general practitioners who would like to become experts in diabetology in the primary care setting meets the need to guide the quali

  9. An Integrative Psychological Developmental Model of Supervision for Professional School Counselors-in-Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Sias, Shari M.

    2009-01-01

    Professional school counselors (PSCs) at higher levels of psychological development negotiate complex situations and perform counselor-related tasks with empathy, flexibility, tolerance for ambiguity, boundary setting, personal and interpersonal awareness, and self-care more effectively than do individuals at lower levels of development. This…

  10. Using patient experiences on Dutch social media to supervise health care services: exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.L.P.G.; Verhoef, L.M.; Weide, M.J. van der; Schoonhoven, L.; Kool, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users' experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by ci

  11. Training the Internist for Primary Care: A View From Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Kenneth J.

    1982-01-01

    The recent establishment of primary care residencies at the University of Nevada School of Medicine has raised important questions about local priorities in the training of physicians to provide primary care for adults. Because the amount of money available for health care training is decreasing, these questions also have national importance. Primary care internal medicine, not synonymous with general internal medicine, offers distinct advantages to patients over family practice adult care and primary care offered by internist subspecialists. The University of Nevada has a singular opportunity to organize a strong primary care internal medicine residency, but national problems of internal medicine emphasis exist. Nationwide changes in internal medicine residency programs (ongoing) and American Board of Internal Medicine nationalization of the fledgling primary care internal medicine fellowship movement are suggested. Specifically proposed is an extra year for primary care training with a single examination after four years, producing general internists with a primary care “minor.” Alternately, and ideally, there would be a full two-year primary care fellowship with a separate internal medicine primary care subspecialty board examination. Either of the above options would provide necessary training and academic credibility for primary care internists, and would redirect internal medicine certification and training. PMID:7072246

  12. Pointing with a One-Eyed Cursor for Supervised Training in Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kibsgaard, Martin; Kraus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Pointing in the endoscopic view of a surgical robot is a natural and effcient way for instructors to communicate with trainees in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. However, pointing in a stereo-endoscopic view can be limited by problems such as video delay, double vision, arm fatigue......, and reachability of the pointer controls. We address these problems by hardware-based overlaying the stereo-endoscopic view with a one-eyed cursor, which can be comfortably controlled by a wireless, gyroscopic air mouse. The proposed system was positively evaluated by five experienced instructors in four full......-day training units in robot- assisted minimally invasive surgery on anaesthetised pigs....

  13. "The effect of supervised exercise training on psychological characteristics and physical fitness after myocardial infarction "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Boshtam M

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD especially myocardial infarction (MI, and the insufficiency of information in the field of physical rehabilitation, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a course of physical rehabilitation on the psychological status and physical characteristics f cardiac patients. In this study, the effect of 8 weeks exercise training, 3 sessions of 45 minutes duration per week, on the physical and psychological function of MI patients was evaluated. Eighty patients who were referred to the rehabilitation unit of Isfahan cardiovascular Research Center were randomly divided into two groups of exercise and non-exercise. The data of pre and post exercise course were analyzed with the SPSS software using the two-sample t-test and multiple liner regression. The comparison of the mean changes of functional capacity. Weight, body mass index (BMI, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures between exercise and non-exercise groups after 8 weeks showed significant difference for all studied factors (P<0.05. Also, investigating the psychological characteristics such as depression, anxiety and hostility scores indicated a significant change after exercise training (P<0.05. Personality and behavior showed no significant difference. This study suggests the functional has a significant effect on improving the function capacity and psychological behavior in post MI patients.

  14. Clinical supervision of psychotherapy: essential ethics issues for supervisors and supervisees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E; Molzon, Corey H

    2014-11-01

    Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of every mental health professional's training. The importance of ensuring that supervision is provided competently, ethically, and legally is explained. The elements of the ethical practice of supervision are described and explained. Specific issues addressed include informed consent and the supervision contract, supervisor and supervisee competence, attention to issues of diversity and multicultural competence, boundaries and multiple relationships in the supervision relationship, documentation and record keeping by both supervisor and supervisee, evaluation and feedback, self-care and the ongoing promotion of wellness, emergency coverage, and the ending of the supervision relationship. Additionally, the role of clinical supervisor as mentor, professional role model, and gatekeeper for the profession are discussed. Specific recommendations are provided for ethically and effectively conducting the supervision relationship and for addressing commonly arising dilemmas that supervisors and supervisees may confront.

  15. Classification models for clear cell renal carcinoma stage progression, based on tumor RNAseq expression trained supervised machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagga, Zeenia; Gupta, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most- prevalent, chemotherapy resistant and lethal adult kidney cancer. There is a need for novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for ccRCC, due to its heterogeneous molecular profiles and asymptomatic early stage. This study aims to develop classification models to distinguish early stage and late stage of ccRCC based on gene expression profiles. We employed supervised learning algorithms- J48, Random Forest, SMO and Naïve Bayes; with enriched model learning by fast correlation based feature selection to develop classification models trained on sequencing based gene expression data of RNAseq experiments, obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Different models developed in the study were evaluated on the basis of 10 fold cross validations and independent dataset testing. Random Forest based prediction model performed best amongst the models developed in the study, with a sensitivity of 89%, accuracy of 77% and area under Receivers Operating Curve of 0.8. We anticipate that the prioritized subset of 62 genes and prediction models developed in this study will aid experimental oncologists to expedite understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stage progression and discovery of prognostic factors for ccRCC tumors.

  16. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  17. Further evaluation of the Dutch supervision system for suicides of mental health care users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Huisman (Annemiek); P.B.M. Robben (Paul); A.J.F.M. Kerkhof (Ad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently, suicides of mental health care users in the Netherlands had to be reported to the Health Care Inspectorate by treating clinicians and medical directors. Interview data from 38 clinicians who reported a suicide and directors of the 28 facilities where they worked indicated

  18. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 3.a: Levels of supervision for medical physicists in clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony; Clements, Jessica B; Halvorsen, Per H; Herman, Michael G; Martin, Melissa C; Palta, Jatinder; Pfeiffer, Douglas E; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Schueler, Beth A; Shepard, S Jeff; Fairobrent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  19. Clinical supervision in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol; Marcroft, Emma

    Clinical supervision is a formal process of professional support, reflection and learning that contributes to individual development. First Community Health and Care is committed to providing clinical supervision to nurses and allied healthcare professionals to support the provision and maintenance of high-quality care. In 2012, we developed new guidelines for nurses and AHPs on supervision, incorporating a clinical supervision framework. This offers a range of options to staff so supervision accommodates variations in work settings and individual learning needs and styles.

  20. Avoidable iatrogenic complications of urethral catheterization and inadequate intern training in a tertiary-care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Arun Z; Giri, Subhasis K; Meagher, David; Creagh, Tom

    2009-10-01

    To examine the magnitude of potentially avoidable iatrogenic complications of male urethral catheterization (UC) within a tertiary-care supra-regional teaching hospital, and to evaluate risk factors and subjective feeling of interns in our institution on the adequacy of training on UC. Male UC-related morbidities were retrospectively identified from our computerized inpatient urology consultation system over a 1-year period from July 2006 to June 2007. Relevant medical records were also reviewed. An anonymous questionnaire was used for the subjective assessment of interns about their training on UC. The primary outcome measures were the prevalence of urethral trauma secondary to UC by a non-urological team member in non-urological departments, risk factors and intern-perceived adequacy of practical and theoretical training on UC during their intern year, and finally the supervision of interns during first UC. Of 864 urological consultations, 51 (6%) were related to complications arising from male UC during the 1-year period. The most common indication for UC was monitoring urinary output for acute medical illness (34/51, 67%). The most common complication was urethral trauma (35/51, 67%). The balloon was accidentally inflated in the urethra in six patients (12%). Of the 51 cases of UC-related morbidity, 38 (74%) resulted from interns performing UC, and of these 28 (73%) occurred during the first 6 months of internship. Overall, 76% of interns felt that their practical training was none or inadequate; 52% (26/50) did not receive any supervision during their first UC. UC-related iatrogenic morbidity is not uncommon even in a tertiary-care teaching hospital. This study identified that interns receive inadequate training on UC. Finally, most of the complications are potentially avoidable and can be prevented by adopting a proper technique of catheterization. Adequate training and supervision of medical students and interns can achieve this.

  1. Student experiences in learning person-centred care of patients with Alzheimer's disease as perceived by nursing students and supervising nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Mari W; Normann, Hans Ketil; Henriksen, Nils

    2010-09-01

    The aims and objectives of this paper are to illuminate and discuss the experiences and perceptions of nursing students and supervising nurses regarding the students' learning of person- centred care of patients with Alzheimer's disease in a teaching nursing home. This information is then used to develop recommendations as to how student learning could be improved. The clinical experiences of nursing students are an important part of learning person-centred care. Caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease may cause frustration, sadness, fear and empathy. Person-centred care can be learned in clinical practice. A qualitative study. The study was performed in 2006 using field work with field notes and qualitative interviews with seven-fifth-semester nursing students and six supervising nurses. This study determined the variation in the perceptions of nursing students and supervising nurses with regards to the students' expertise in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The nursing students experienced limited learning regarding person-centred approaches in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, the supervising nurses perceived the teaching nursing home as a site representing multiple learning opportunities in this area. Nursing students perceived limited learning outcomes because they did not observe or experience systematic person-centred approaches in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is important that measures of quality improvements in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease are communicated and demonstrated for nursing students working in clinical practices in a teaching nursing home. Introduction of person-centred approaches is vital regarding learning outcomes for nursing students caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Should critical care nurses be ACLS-trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagyard-Wiebe, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of resuscitation is to sustain life with intact neurological functioning and the same quality of life previously experienced by the patient. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) was designed to achieve this aim. However the requirement for ACLS training for critical care nurses working in Canadian critical care units is inconsistent across the country. The purposes of this article are to explore the evidence surrounding ACLS training for critical care nurses and its impact on resuscitation outcomes, and to review the evidence surrounding ACLS knowledge and skill degradation with strategies to support code blue team efficiency for an effective resuscitation. Using the search terms ACLS training, resuscitation, critical care, and nursing, two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were used. The evidence supports the need for ACLS training for critical care nurses. The evidence also supports organized ongoing refresher courses, multidisciplinary mock code blue practice using technologically advanced simulator mannequins, and videotaped reviews to prevent knowledge and skill degradation for effective resuscitation efforts.

  3. The impact of supervision on stock management and adherence to treatment guidelines: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trap, B; Todd, C H; Moore, H; Laing, R

    2001-09-01

    Ensuring the availability of essential drugs and using them appropriately are crucial if limited resources for health care are to be used optimally. While training of health workers throughout Zimbabwe in drug management (including stock management and rational drug use) resulted in significant improvements in a variety of drug use indicators, these achievements could not be sustained, and a new strategy was introduced based on the supervision of primary health care providers. This was launched in 1995 with a training course in supervisory skills for district pharmacy staff. In order to evaluate the impact of the supervision and the effectiveness of the training programme, adherence to standard treatment guidelines (STG) and stock management protocols was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. The study compared three different groups of health facilities: those that received supervision for either use of STG (n = 23) or stock management (n = 21) - each facility acting as control for the other area of supervision - and a comparison group of facilities which received no supervision (n = 18). On-the-spot supervision by a specially trained pharmacy staff, based around identified deficiencies, took place at the start of the study and 3 months later. The evaluation compared performance on a variety of drug management indicators at baseline and 6-8 months after the second supervisory visit. The results of the study showed that, following supervision, overall stock management improved significantly when compared with the control and comparison groups. Similar improvements were demonstrated for adherence to STG, although the effect was confounded by other interventions. The study also showed that supervision has a positive effect on improving performance in areas other than those supervised, and demonstrated that pharmacy technicians with limited clinical skills can be trained to influence primary health care workers to positively improve prescribing practices

  4. A Semi-Supervised Learning Approach to Enhance Health Care Community–Based Question Answering: A Case Study in Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabjan, Diego; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Background Community-based question answering (CQA) sites play an important role in addressing health information needs. However, a significant number of posted questions remain unanswered. Automatically answering the posted questions can provide a useful source of information for Web-based health communities. Objective In this study, we developed an algorithm to automatically answer health-related questions based on past questions and answers (QA). We also aimed to understand information embedded within Web-based health content that are good features in identifying valid answers. Methods Our proposed algorithm uses information retrieval techniques to identify candidate answers from resolved QA. To rank these candidates, we implemented a semi-supervised leaning algorithm that extracts the best answer to a question. We assessed this approach on a curated corpus from Yahoo! Answers and compared against a rule-based string similarity baseline. Results On our dataset, the semi-supervised learning algorithm has an accuracy of 86.2%. Unified medical language system–based (health related) features used in the model enhance the algorithm’s performance by proximately 8%. A reasonably high rate of accuracy is obtained given that the data are considerably noisy. Important features distinguishing a valid answer from an invalid answer include text length, number of stop words contained in a test question, a distance between the test question and other questions in the corpus, and a number of overlapping health-related terms between questions. Conclusions Overall, our automated QA system based on historical QA pairs is shown to be effective according to the dataset in this case study. It is developed for general use in the health care domain, which can also be applied to other CQA sites. PMID:27485666

  5. Administrative clinical supervision as evaluated by the first-line managers in one health care organization district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirola-Karvinen, Pirjo; Hyrkäs, Kristiina

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this article is to increase knowledge and understanding of administrative clinical supervision. Administrative clinical supervision is a learning process for leaders that is based on experiences. Only a few studies have focused on administrative clinical supervision. The materials for this study were evaluations collected in 2002-2005 using a clinical supervision evaluation scale (MCSS). The respondents (n = 126) in the study were nursing leaders representing different specialties. The data were analysed statistically. The findings showed that the supervision succeeded very well. The contents of the sessions differed depending on the nurse leader's position. Significant differences were found in the evaluations between specialties and within years of work experience. Clinical supervision was utilized best in the psychiatric and mental health sector. The supervisees' who had long work experience scored the importance and value of clinical supervision as high. Clinical supervision is beneficial for nursing leaders. The experiences were positive and the nursing leaders appreciated the importance and value of clinical supervision. It is important to plan and coordinate a longitudinal evaluation so that clinical supervision for nursing leaders is systematically implemented and continuously developed.

  6. A Guide for Foodservice Education; Health Care; Community Care and School Feeding in California. Dietetic Service Supervision Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Clarice; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to help California community college educators understand and develop a vocational program in health care, community care, and school food service. It establishes the general need for such a program, and provides guidelines to help educators determine if there is a need for such a program in their geographic…

  7. Skærpet bevidsthed om supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a historical survey of the initiatives which have taken place in european music therapy towards developing a deeper consciousness about supervision. Supervision as a disciplin in music therapy training, as a maintenance of music therapy profession and as a postgraduate...... training for examined music therapists. Definitions are presented and methods developed by working groups in european music therapy supervision are presented....

  8. Improving HIV/STD Prevention in the Care of Persons Living with HIV Through a National Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Helen; Hsu, Katherine; Smock, Laura; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Hall, Christopher; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Nagendra, Gowri; Rietmeijer, Cornelis; Rompalo, Ann; Thrun, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Persons living with HIV (PLWH) are living longer, remaining sexually active, and may continue risky sexual behaviors. As such, it is crucial for providers to ask all HIV-positive patients about behaviors related to HIV transmission and STD acquisition. The “Ask, Screen, Intervene” (ASI) curriculum was developed to increase provider knowledge, skills, and motivation to incorporate risk assessment and prevention services into the care of PLWH. The ASI curriculum was delivered to 2558 HIV-care providers at 137 sites between September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2010. Immediately post-training, participants self-reported significant gains in perceived confidence to demonstrate ASI knowledge and skills (p<0.001) and 89% agreed they would update practices as a result of the training. Three to six months post-training, 320 participants who served PLWH or supervised HIV-care providers self-reported more frequently performing ASI skills (p<0.001), and 71% self-reported greater perceived confidence than before training to perform those skills (p<0.001). Limitations include self-reported measures and a 30% response rate to the 3–6 month follow-up survey. Our findings suggest that a well-coordinated training program can reach a national audience of HIV-care providers, significantly increase self-reported capacity to incorporate HIV/STD prevention into the care of PLWH, and increase implementation of national recommendations. PMID:24428796

  9. Medical Team Training Programs in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    DOM, renamed LifewingsTM), and Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training ( GITT )—from a comprehensive review of the literature (refer to Baker et al...response checklist,” which trainees are required to use in the OR. Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training ( GITT ) The primary purpose of GITT is to... GITT provides interdisciplinary team training for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, social workers, pharmacists, therapists, and

  10. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  11. 75 FR 69686 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry AGENCY: Health Resources and... the cancellation of the Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and...

  12. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  13. Clinical supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda: an initial qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer; Kasujja, Rosco; Oakes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Burn out in clinical psychologists working in low income countries has been reported. Clinical supervisory structures do not yet exist in Uganda. A way to decrease levels of burn out and increase quality of care for people with mental illness is through clinical supervision. The aim of this study was to explore the initial experiences of supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda to ascertain whether or not clinical supervision is culturally appropriate, and what aspects of supervision had been helpful and unhelpful. A qualitative design with thematic analysis was utilized. A focus group was held with 12 second year clinical psychology students to ask their experiences of receiving supervision. Data analysis created five themes. Firstly, the negative emotions that resulted from the training processed were discussed, and how supervision helped and did not help the students to manage these. Secondly, the students voiced that supervision helped them to learn through observational experiences, co-therapist roles and parallel processes within the supervisory relationship. Thirdly, supervision had taught the clinical psychology students their role as a clinical psychology student, how to act within the Ugandan mental health system and skills to conduct therapy. Fourthly, suggestions for the future of supervision were given, with the students requesting for it to start earlier in the training, for supervisors who can meet with the students on a regular basis to be selected and for the training the students receive at university to match the skills required on their placements, with a request for more practical techniques rather than theory. The final theme related to left over miscellaneous data, such as the students agreeing with each other. The students stated that supervision was helpful overall, implying that clinical supervision is culturally appropriate for clinical psychology students in Uganda. Suggestions for future supervision were given. In order to

  14. Neurosciences intensive care medicine in initial neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E A C; Madder, H; Millo, J; Kearns, C F

    2009-04-01

    The authors describe a novel 4-month clinical placement in neurosciences intensive care medicine (NICM) undertaken in the first specialty registrar (ST1) year of neurosurgical training as part of a clinical neurosciences themed training year. Neurosurgery is unique among British surgical specialties in having pioneered themed early years in run-through training to replace basic surgical training in general surgical specialties as part of Modernising Medical Careers. After describing events leading to the new neurosurgical training, the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired in NICM are highlighted alongside discussion of logistic aspects and future directions from an inaugural experience.

  15. Few Military Doctors Well-Trained in Transgender Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164063.html Few Military Doctors Well-Trained in Transgender Care: Study Many feel unable to prescribe cross- ... 13, 2017 MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender people serving in the U.S. military may be ...

  16. Clinical supervision: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falender, Carol A; Shafranske, Edward P

    2014-11-01

    Since the recognition of clinical supervision as a distinct professional competence and a core competence, attention has turned to ensuring supervisor competence and effective supervision practice. In this article, we highlight recent developments and the state of the art in supervision, with particular emphasis on the competency-based approach. We present effective clinical supervision strategies, providing an integrated snapshot of the current status. We close with consideration of current training practices in supervision and challenges.

  17. Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Eva; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Kaila, Päivi; Hult, Håkan; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Salminen, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care. In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument. The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency. CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of

  18. Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Öhman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students’ clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students’ perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care. Methods In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument. Results The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach’s alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency. Conclusion CLES, in its adapted form, appears

  19. [Consultation-liaison psychiatry: strategy for care, opportunity for training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogliani, Andrea; Canuto, Alessandra; Zeppegno, Patrizia; Torre, Eugenio

    2014-02-12

    The liaison psychiatry defines itself as way to comprehend the psychological aspects in any situation of care, and in particular in the context of somatic care. The identification of the psychic processes, which can influence the diagnosis and the outcome of a somatic disease, is essential to adequately and globally take care of the individual. At the same time, training in the Help relationship allows to identify the difficulties of nursing, which is very often source of exhaustion and burn-out.

  20. Implementing clinical supervision: Part 1: laying the ground work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Lisa; Happell, Brenda

    2008-02-01

    Australia, like other countries, is experiencing a crisis in the recruitment and retention of nurses. Clinical supervision has been suggested as a potential strategy to enhance retention. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding the successful implementation of clinical supervision. The aim of this study is to explore and evaluate ways of implementing clinical supervision as undertaken in a rural health-care organization in Victoria. Qualitative methodology was used including a documentation audit and individual interviews with the staff responsible for implementation. The findings demonstrate that the successful implementation had occurred in five interrelated stages. This paper, one in a series of three, focuses on the preimplementation phase leading up to initial implementation. The main themes identified during these stages were: organizational culture, exploring the possibilities, leadership and education and training which will be examined. These issues were essential in laying the foundation for the systematic introduction of clinical supervision.

  1. The supervised curricular internship in the initial training for teaching: the meanings of trainees as actors in the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rinaldi Bisconsini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze the role of supervised curricular internship in initial teacher education, in the trainees perspective. The research is descriptive and qualitative characteristic. Had as a tool for data collection a questionnaire with closed and open questions. 130 trainees participated in six degree courses of an institution of Paraná Public Higher Education. The results indicate a process of high complexity on the structure and development of supervised curricular internship. The trainees hoped that the curriculum components establish closer to the requirements for the exercise of the teaching profession. There was no evidence is sufficient interaction between the actors involved.

  2. Supervision af psykoterapi via Skype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Grünbaum, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    clinical experience of Skype™ in supervision, mainly of psychoanalytic child psychotherapy, is presented and reflected upon. Finally, the reluctance of the Danish Board for Psychologists’s to recognize audiovisual distance supervision as part of the required training demands is discussed. It is concluded...

  3. Supervised training and home-based rehabilitation in patients with stabilized ankylosing spondylitis on TNF inhibitor treatment: a controlled clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Poli, Patrizia; Bonaldo, Lara; Pigatto, Maurizia; Ramonda, Roberta; Lubrano, Ennio; Punzi, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    To assess the 12-month's follow-up effects on pain, mobility, and physical function outcomes of a supervised training and home-based rehabilitation for ankylosing spondylitis patients stabilized with TNF-inhibitor therapy. Controlled clinical trial (sequentially determined allocation) with 12-months' follow-up. Patients' homes. A total of 69 subjects were allocated to either a rehabilitation programme (rehabilitation group, n = 22), an educational-behavioural programme (educational group, n = 24), and to neither programme (control group, n = 23). Rehabilitation programme included supervised training and home exercises (stretching, strengthening, aerobic, chest, and spine/hip joint flexibility exercises); educational-behavioural programme included information on ankylosing spondylitis, pain and stress mechanisms, and control. Spinal pain intensity, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, chest expansion, and cervical and lumbar spine active range of motion measured by a pocket goniometer. At baseline, the three groups exhibited comparable demographic characteristics and basal evaluations. Intra-group changes in the rehabilitation group from baseline to 12 months yielded statistically significant gains (p Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (p = 0.012 and p = 0.050), and in some goniometric measurements as cervical rotation (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014), toraco-lumbar rotation (p = 0.009 and p = 0.050), and total cervical movements (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001). In comparison with the educational-behavioural programme or no intervention, supervised training and home exercises improved long-term outcome in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. A UK wide survey on attitudes to point of care ultrasound training amongst clinicians working on the Acute Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Matsa, Ramprasad; Lawrenson, Philip; Messenger, Jenny; Walden, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The use of point of care ultrasound (POCU) is increasing across a number of specialties, becoming mandatory within some specialist training programmes (for example respiratory and emergency medicine). Despite this, there are few data looking at the prevalence of use or the training clinicians have undertaken; this survey sought to address this. It shows that the majority of POCU undertaken on the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) is without formal accreditation, with significant arriers to training highlighted including a lack of supervision, time and equipment. For those who undertook POCU, it was shown to regularly speed up clinical decision making, while 76.3% respondents believed a lack of access to POCU out of hours may affect patient safety. The data provide support to the concept of developing AMU specific POCU accreditation, to ensure robust and safe use of this modality on the AMU.

  5. Improving health care quality through culturally competent physicians: leadership and organizational diversity training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin B Horwitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Irwin B Horwitz1, Marilyn Sonilal2, Sujin K Horwitz31Cameron School of Business, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA; 2School of Public Health, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: The growing diversity of the population has resulted in substantial challenges for the US health care system. A substantial body of evidence has identified significant disparities in health care among culturally and ethnically diverse patients, irrespective of income, that negatively affects such factors as diagnostic precision, quality of care, adherence to healing protocols, and overall treatment outcomes. Diversity has also been shown to compromise the functionality of health care teams that are increasingly comprised of members with culturally different backgrounds, in which diversity produces misunderstanding and conflict. Many of the problems stem from a lack of cultural competence among both physicians and teams under their supervision. To reduce the numerous problems resulting from inadequate cultural competence among health care professionals, this article examines ways in which the issues of diversity can be effectively addressed in health care institutions. It is advocated that physicians adopt a proactive transformational leadership style to manage diversity because of its emphasis on understanding and aligning follower values which lie at the heart of diversity-related misunderstandings. It is also held that for leadership training among physicians to be fully effective, it should be integrated with organizational-wide diversity programs. By doing so, the complimentary effect could result in comprehensive change, resulting in substantial improvements in the quality of health care for all patients.Keywords: leadership, diversity, health care, disparities, medical education

  6. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  7. The efficacy of early initiated, supervised, progressive resistance training compared to unsupervised, home-based exercise after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter B; Bogh, Søren B; Kierkegaard, Signe; Sørensen, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2017-01-01

    To examine if supervised progressive resistance training was superior to home-based exercise in rehabilitation after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Single blinded, randomized clinical trial. Surgery, progressive resistance training and testing was carried out at Aarhus University Hospital and home-based exercise was carried out in the home of the patient. Fifty five patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training or home-based exercise. Patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training (home based exercise five days/week and progressive resistance training two days/week) or control group (home based exercise seven days/week). Preoperative assessment, 10-week (primary endpoint) and one-year follow-up were performed for leg extension power, spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). Forty patients (73%) completed 1-year follow-up. Patients in the progressive resistance training group participated in average 11 of 16 training sessions. Leg extension power increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in progressive resistance training group (progressive resistance training: 0.28 W/kg, P= 0.01, control group: 0.01 W/kg, P=0.93) with no between-group difference. Walking speed and KOOS scores increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in both groups with no between-group difference (six minutes walk test P=0.63, KOOS P>0.29). Progressive resistance training two days/week combined with home based exercise five days/week was not superior to home based exercise seven days/week in improving leg extension power of the operated leg.

  8. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnino RE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Roberta E Sonnino1,2 1Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA; 2RES Coaching LLC, Locust Hill, VA, USA Abstract: Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies” must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make

  9. Implementation of emergency obstetric care training in Bangladesh: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Haque, Yasmin Ali; Waxman, Rachel; Bhuiyan, Abdul Bayes

    2006-05-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health project aimed to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh through provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in the country's district and sub-district hospitals. Human resources development was one of the project's major activities. This paper describes the project in 2000-2004 and lessons learned. Project documents, the training database, reports and training protocols were reviewed. Medical officers, nurses, facility managers and laboratory technicians received training in the country's eight medical college hospitals, using nationally accepted curricula. A 17-week competency-based training course for teams of medical officers and nurses was introduced in 2003. At baseline in 1999, only three sub-district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC and 33 basic EmOC, mostly due to lack of trained staff and necessary equipment. In 2004, 105 of the 120 sub-district hospitals had become functional for EmOC, 70 with comprehensive EmOC and 35 with basic EmOC, while 53 of 59 of the district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC compared to 35 in 1999. The scaling up of competency-based training, innovative incentives to retain trained staff, evidence-based protocols to standardise practice and improve quality of care and the continuing involvement of key stakeholders, especially trainers, will all be needed to reach training targets in future.

  10. The changing nature of ICU charge nurses' decision making: from supervision of care delivery to unit resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anne; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings that variations in nursing workload may affect inpatient outcomes now highlight nurse workload management and the need for an updated analysis of the role of the charge nurse (CN). Observational data for eight CNs, each at one of eight ICUs in a not-for-profit Level 1 Trauma Center, coded to capture interprofessional interactions, decision making, team coordination phases, and support tools. A researcher shadowed each participant for 12 hours. Each shift began and ended with a face-to-face handoff that included summaries of each patient's condition; the current bed census; anticipated admissions, discharges, and transfers; and the number of nurses available to work the current and coming two shifts. The researcher, using a notebook, recorded the substantive content of all work conversations initiated by or directed to the CN from physicians, staff nurses, allied health workers, other employees, and patients/families. The tools used to support conversations were collected as blank forms or computer screen prints and annotated to describe how they were used, when, and for what purpose. Statistically significant three-way interactions suggest that CNs' conversations with colleagues depend on the team coordination phase and the decision-making level, and that the support tools that CNs use when talking to colleagues depend on the decision-making level and the team coordination phase. The role of ICU CNs appears to be continuing to evolve, now encompassing unit resource management in addition to supervising care delivery. Effective support tools, together with education that would enhance communication and resource management skills, will be essential to CNs' ability to support unit resilience and adaptability in an increasingly complex environment.

  11. Clinical supervision using video-conferencing technology: a reflective account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrow, Carol E; Hollyoake, Kim; Hamer, Dorothy; Kenrick, Catherine

    2002-09-01

    This paper discusses three nursing practitioners' experiences of clinical supervision using video-conferencing (VC) technology. The study, based on supportive action research, involved 40 practising community and hospital nurses from a variety of specialties and took place over an 18-month period. The research was collaborative, educational and applied and focused on the effects of remote clinical supervision on the development of professional practice. Data were obtained through pre- and post-study questionnaires, repertory grids, focus group interviews and written narratives. The three research participants found that clinical supervision, as a mediator of learning, was vital in enabling them to develop their reflective and problem-solving skills. Through critical conversations with either a supervisor or within peer group supervision, the participants increased both their confidence and self-awareness and gained more insight into the practices and needs of other practitioners. They also examined critically patient care issues resulting in attention to existing or the development of new care protocols. They did, however, experience some impediments to the process of clinical supervision, mainly lack of peer and management support and ongoing education. The participants had mixed perceptions with regards to using VC technology for clinical supervision. They experienced technical and accessibility problems and communication problems, suggesting the need for clear protocols for both technical support and applied training.

  12. Clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorapah, D

    1997-05-01

    The introduction of clinical supervision to a wider sphere of nursing is being considered from a professional and organizational point of view. Positive views are being expressed about adopting this concept, although there are indications to suggest that there are also strong reservations. This paper examines the potential for its success amidst the scepticism that exists. One important question raised is whether clinical supervision will replace or run alongside other support systems.

  13. Training the eye care team: Principles and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. But for it to be effective, a team must possess four attributes - availability, competency, productivity, and responsiveness. Therefore, training of all team members and training the team to work together as a unit are crucial components in the success of this concept. Some of the critical attributes include: Training across the health spectrum through quality and responsive curricula administered by motivated teachers; accreditation of programs or institutions by national or international bodies; certification and recertification of team members; and training in working together as a team through inter- and intra- disciplinary workshops both during training and as a part of the job activity.

  14. Training the eye care team: principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Prashant; Reddy, Snigdha; Nelluri, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. But for it to be effective, a team must possess four attributes - availability, competency, productivity, and responsiveness. Therefore, training of all team members and training the team to work together as a unit are crucial components in the success of this concept. Some of the critical attributes include: Training across the health spectrum through quality and responsive curricula administered by motivated teachers; accreditation of programs or institutions by national or international bodies; certification and recertification of team members; and training in working together as a team through inter- and intra- disciplinary workshops both during training and as a part of the job activity.

  15. Supervised Mineral Classification with Semi-automatic Training and Validation Set Generation in Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Images of Thin Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesche, Harald; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of classifying minerals common in siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Twelve chemical elements are mapped from thin sections by energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Extensions to traditional multivariate statistical methods...... are applied to perform the classification. First, training and validation sets are grown from one or a few seed points by a method that ensures spatial and spectral closeness of observations. Spectral closeness is obtained by excluding observations that have high Mahalanobis distances to the training class......–Matusita distance and the posterior probability of a class mean being classified as another class. Fourth, the actual classification is carried out based on four supervised classifiers all assuming multinormal distributions: simple quadratic, a contextual quadratic, and two hierarchical quadratic classifiers...

  16. 管制学员带培教学法浅谈%Discussion on Combination of Teaching Methods and ATC Supervision Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席明春

    2012-01-01

    带培管制学员是一个需要耗费教员大量心力的工作,缺乏经验和技能的学员是工作中主要的风险源。管制教员一方面需要严密监控学员,及时制止学员的失误;另一方面又要掌握合适的教学方式来指导学员,使其尽快掌握正确的工作技巧,养成良好的习惯。因此,带培方法的研究是每一个管制教员必须研究的课题。%ATC supervision training is a very laborious and tough job. The trainees who are lack of experience and skills may lead to the unpredictable risks on controlling aircraft. Thus, on the one hand, the trainers should supervise trainees recklessly in order to prevent from making serious mis- takes. On the other hand, the trainers should master the right teaching techniques to conduct trainees so that they can seize proper working skills and get into good habits. The research on methods of training controllers is necessary for each controller trainer. The paper focuses on introducing teaching instructions which have been applied in practical work to enlighten and support trainers.

  17. Multicultural Supervision: What Difference Does Difference Make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Aros-O'Malley, Megan; Murrieta, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural sensitivity and competency represent critical components to contemporary practice and supervision in school psychology. Internship and supervision experiences are a capstone experience for many new school psychologists; however, few receive formal training and supervision in multicultural competencies. As an increased number of…

  18. The impact of emergency obstetric care training in Somaliland, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Charles; Adegoke, Adetoro; Hofman, Jan; Ismail, Fouzia M; Ahmed, Fatuma M; van den Broek, Nynke

    2012-06-01

    To provide and evaluate in-service training in "Life Saving Skills - Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care" in order to improve the availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Somaliland. In total, 222 healthcare providers (HCPs) were trained between January 2007 and December 2009. A before-after study was conducted using quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate trainee reaction and change in knowledge, skills, and behavior, in addition to functionality of healthcare facilities, during and immediately after training, and at 3 and 6 months post-training. The HCPs reacted positively to the training, with a significant improvement in 50% of knowledge and 100% of skills modules assessed. The HCPs reported improved confidence in providing EmOC. Basic and comprehensive EmOC healthcare facilities provided 100% of expected signal functions-compared with 43% and 56%, respectively, at baseline-with trained midwives performing skills usually performed by medical doctors. Lack of drugs, supplies, medical equipment, and supportive policy were identified as barriers that could contribute to nonuse of new skills and knowledge acquired. The training impacted positively on the availability and quality of EmOC and resulted in "up-skilling" of midwives. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  20. Training a system-literate care coordination workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Osborne, Richard H; Brooks, Peter M

    2016-04-01

    People with chronic complex conditions continue to experience increasing health system fragmentation and poor coordination. To reverse these trends, one solution has been an investment in effective models of care coordination that use a care coordinator workforce. Care coordinators are not a homogenous workforce - but an applied professional role, providing direct and indirect care, and is often undertaken by nurses, allied health professionals, social workers or general practitioners. In Australia, there is no training curriculum nor courses, nor nationally recognised professional quality standards for the care coordinator workforce. With the growing complexity and fragmentation of the health care system, health system literacy - shared understanding of the roles and contributions of the different workforce professions, organisations and systems, among patients and indeed the health workforce is required. Efforts to improve health system literacy among the health workforce are increasing at a policy, practice and research level. However, insufficient evidence exists about what are the health system literacy needs of care coordinators, and what is required for them to be most effective. Key areas to build a health system literate care coordination workforce are presented. Care coordination is more than an optional extra, but one of the only ways we are going to be able to provide equitable health services for people with chronic complex conditions. People with low health literacy require more support with the coordination of their care, therefore we need to build a high performing care coordinator workforce that upholds professional quality standards, and is health literacy responsive.

  1. Assessing the assessment in emergency care training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E W Dankbaar

    Full Text Available Each year over 1.5 million health care professionals attend emergency care courses. Despite high stakes for patients and extensive resources involved, little evidence exists on the quality of assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of commonly used formats in assessing emergency care skills.Residents were assessed at the end of a 2-week emergency course; a subgroup was videotaped. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess the validity and inter-rater reliability of the assessment instrument, which included a checklist, a 9-item competency scale and a global performance scale.A group of 144 residents and 12 raters participated in the study; 22 residents were videotaped and re-assessed by 8 raters. The checklists showed limited validity and poor inter-rater reliability for the dimensions "correct" and "timely" (ICC = .30 and.39 resp.. The competency scale had good construct validity, consisting of a clinical and a communication subscale. The internal consistency of the (subscales was high (α = .93/.91/.86. The inter-rater reliability was moderate for the clinical competency subscale (.49 and the global performance scale (.50, but poor for the communication subscale (.27. A generalizability study showed that for a reliable assessment 5-13 raters are needed when using checklists, and four when using the clinical competency scale or the global performance scale.This study shows poor validity and reliability for assessing emergency skills with checklists but good validity and moderate reliability with clinical competency or global performance scales. Involving more raters can improve the reliability substantially. Recommendations are made to improve this high stakes skill assessment.

  2. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morphet J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Morphet,1 Kerry Hood,2 Robyn Cant,2 Julie Baulch,3 Alana Gilbee,3 Kate Sandry4 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 3Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 4Dandenong Emergency Department, Monash Health, David St, Dandenong, Victoria, Australia Abstract: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38, students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice

  3. Training the Primary Care Internist to Provide Care in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of California, Davis, that incorporated skilled nursing facility training into the required curriculum of their primary care internal medicine residency is described. The goal was to increase the residents' knowledge in the care of geriatric patients. (MLW)

  4. Spiritual Care Training Provided to Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Piret; Helo, Yousef; Frick, Eckhard

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review was conducted to assess the outcomes of spiritual care training. It outlines the training outcomes based on participants' oral/written feedback, course evaluation and performance assessment. Intervention was defined as any form of spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals studying/working in an academic and/or clinical setting. An online search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CSA, ATLA and CENTRAL up to Week 27 of 2013 by two independent investigators to reduce errors in inclusion. Only peer-reviewed journal articles reporting on training outcomes were included. A primary keyword-driven search found 4912 articles; 46 articles were identified as relevant for final analysis. The narrative synthesis of findings outlines the following outcomes: (1) acknowledging spirituality on an individual level, (2) success in integrating spirituality in clinical practice, (3) positive changes in communication with patients. This study examines primarily pre/post-effects within a single cohort. Due to an average study quality, the reported findings in this review are to be seen as indicators at most. Nevertheless, this review makes evident that without attending to one'the repeliefs and needs, addressing spirituality in patients will not be forthcoming. It also demonstrates that spiritual care training may help to challenge the spiritual vacuum in healthcare institutions.

  5. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  6. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  7. Training in data definitions improves quality of intensive care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, DGT; Bosman, RJ; de Jonge, E; Joore, JCA; de Keizer, NF

    2003-01-01

    Background Our aim was to assess the contribution of training in data definitions and data extraction guidelines to improving quality of data for use in intensive care scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)

  8. Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, My-Linh

    2009-01-01

    The role of medical anthropology in tackling the problems and challenges at the intersections of public health, medicine, and technology was addressed during the 2009 Society for Medical Anthropology Conference at Yale University in an interdisciplinary panel session entitled Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals. PMID:20027287

  9. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  10. Twelve best practices for team training evaluation in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi B

    2011-08-01

    Evaluation and measurement are the building blocks of effective skill development, transfer of training, maintenance and sustainment of effective team performance, and continuous improvement. Evaluation efforts have varied in their methods, time frame, measures, and design. On the basis of the existing body of work, 12 best practice principles were extrapolated from the science of evaluation and measurement into the practice of team training evaluation. Team training evaluation refers to efforts dedicated to enumerating the impact of training (1) across multiple dimensions, (2) across multiple settings, and (3) over time. Evaluations of efforts to optimize teamwork are often afterthoughts in an industry that is grounded in evidence-based practice. The best practices regarding team training evaluation are provided as practical reminders and guidance for continuing to build a balanced and robust body of evidence regarding the impact of team training in health care. THE 12 BEST PRACTICES: The best practices are organized around three phases of training: planning, implementation, and follow-up. Rooted in the science of team training evaluation and performance measurement, they range from Best Practice 1: Before designing training, start backwards: think about traditional frameworks for evaluation in reverse to Best Practice 7: Consider organizational, team, or other factors that may help (or hinder) the effects of training and then to Best Practice 12: Report evaluation results in a meaningful way, both internally and externally. Although the 12 best practices may be perceived as intuitive, they are intended to serve as reminders that the notion of evidence-based practice applies to quality improvement initiatives such as team training and team development as equally as it does to clinical intervention and improvement efforts.

  11. Training in intensive care medicine. A challenge within reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Ortega, A; Rothen, H U; Franco, N; Rayo, L A; Martín-Loeches, I; Ramírez, P; Cuñat de la Hoz, J

    2014-01-01

    The medical training model is currently immersed in a process of change. The new paradigm is intended to be more effective, more integrated within the healthcare system, and strongly oriented towards the direct application of knowledge to clinical practice. Compared with the established training system based on certification of the completion of a series or rotations and stays in certain healthcare units, the new model proposes a more structured training process based on the gradual acquisition of specific competences, in which residents must play an active role in designing their own training program. Training based on competences guarantees more transparent, updated and homogeneous learning of objective quality, and which can be homologated internationally. The tutors play a key role as the main directors of the process, and institutional commitment to their work is crucial. In this context, tutors should receive time and specific formation to allow the evaluation of training as the cornerstone of the new model. New forms of objective summative and training evaluation should be introduced to guarantee that the predefined competences and skills are effectively acquired. The free movement of specialists within Europe is very desirable and implies that training quality must be high and amenable to homologation among the different countries. The Competency Based training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe program is our main reference for achieving this goal. Scientific societies in turn must impulse and facilitate all those initiatives destined to improve healthcare quality and therefore specialist training. They have the mission of designing strategies and processes that favor training, accreditation and advisory activities with the government authorities.

  12. Whither Supervision?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Waite

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires if the school supervision is in decadence. Dr. Waite responds that the answer will depend on which perspective you look at it. Dr. Waite suggests taking in consideration three elements that are related: the field itself, the expert in the field (the professor, the theorist, the student and the administrator, and the context. When these three elements are revised, it emphasizes that there is not a consensus about the field of supervision, but there are coincidences related to its importance and that it is related to the improvement of the practice of the students in the school for their benefit. Dr. Waite suggests that the practice on this field is not always in harmony with what the theorists affirm. When referring to the supervisor or the skilled person, the author indicates that his or her perspective depends on his or her epistemological believes or in the way he or she conceives the learning; that is why supervision can be understood in different ways. About the context, Waite suggests that there have to be taken in consideration the social or external forces that influent the people and the society, because through them the education is affected. Dr. Waite concludes that the way to understand the supervision depends on the performer’s perspective. He responds to the initial question saying that the supervision authorities, the knowledge on this field, the performers, and its practice, are maybe spread but not extinct because the supervision will always be part of the great enterprise that we called education.

  13. Return on Investment for Essential Obstetric Care Training in Ghana: Do Trained Public Sector Midwives Deliver Postabortion Care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Clark; E.H.M. Mitchell; P.K. Aboagye

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In Ghana, the provision of postabortion care (PAC) by trained midwives is critical to the efficient and cost-effective reduction of unsafe abortion morbidity and mortality. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of provider data from a representative sample of Ghanaian health facil

  14. The Impact of Supervision on Internal Medicine Residents' Attitudes and Management of Depression in Primary Care: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Jennifer M.; Gottumukkala, Aruna; Ward, Christopher P.; York, Kaki M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effect of supervision on internal medicine residents' attitudes toward and management of depression. Method: Internal medicine residents completed a survey during preclinical conferences. The survey included a published, validated questionnaire, the Depression Attitude Questionnaire, and items developed by the…

  15. Experiences of family medicine residents in primary care obstetrics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith Belle; Jordan, John M

    2012-03-01

    Obstetrical practice by family physicians has been declining rapidly for many reasons over the past number of decades. One reason for this trend is family medicine residents not considering intrapartum care as part of their future careers. Decisions such as this may be related to experiences during obstetrical training. This study explored the experiences of family medicine residents in core primary care obstetrics training. Using qualitative approaches, focus groups of family medicine residents were conducted. The resulting data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was both iterative and interpretive. Data obtained from the focus groups revealed findings relating to the following categories: (1) perceived facilitators to practicing primary care obstetrics, (2) perceived barriers to practicing primary care obstetrics, and (3) learner experiences at the fulcrum of career decision making. Family medicine residents were encouraged by favorable learning experiences and group shared-call arrangements by their primary care obstetrics preceptors. Some concerns about a career including obstetrics persisted; however, positive experiences, including influential fulcrum points, may inspire family medicine residents to pursue a career involving primary care obstetrics.

  16. Trauma Care Training for National Police Nurses in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiano, Andrés M.; Sánchez, Álvaro I.; Guyette, Francis; Puyana, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In response to a requirement for advanced trauma care nurses to provide combat tactical medical support, the antinarcotics arm of the Colombian National Police (CNP) requested the Colombian National Prehospital Care Association to develop a Combat Tactical Medicine Course (MEDTAC course). Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of this course in imparting knowledge and skills to the students. Methods We trained 374 combat nurses using the novel MEDTAC course. We evaluated students using pre-and postcourse performance with a 45-question examination. Field simulations and live tissue exercises were evaluated by instructors using a Likert scale with possible choices of 1 to 4. Interval estimation of proportions was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Differences in didactic test scores were assessed using a t-test at 0.05 level of statistical significance. Results Between March 2006 and July 2007, 374 combat nursing students of the CNP were trained. The difference between examination scores before and after the didactic part of the course was statistically significant (p combat nurses serving in the CNP. MEDTAC represents a customized approach for military trauma care training in Colombia. This course is an example of specialized training available for groups that operate in austere environments with limited resources. PMID:19947877

  17. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  18. Nem tudo é estágio: contribuições para o debate Not everything is supervised training: contributions for the debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Azeredo Furquim Werneck

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo versa sobre o estágio supervisionado, tratando-o como uma oportunidade fundamental de consolidação do espaço pedagógico, capaz de enfrentar, positivamente, os desafios lançados pelas Diretrizes Curriculares para os Cursos de Graduação em Odontologia. Não se trata de uma proposta nova, mas de uma luta pela transformação das práticas de ensino que tem origem nos anos setenta, no movimento de integração docente assistencial, até os dias atuais. Aborda o espaço dos serviços públicos de saúde e o mundo do trabalho como aspectos centrais de uma nova prática pedagógica, com potencial para se alcançar um perfil profissional com consciência crítica e capacidade de compreender a realidade e intervir sobre ela. Aponta para os riscos de se compreender e confundir estágio com prática intramuros, reproduzindo, sob o nome de estágio curricular supervisionado, práticas tradicionais, com ênfase em aspectos tecnicistas e biologicistas sem potência para alcançar as mudanças propostas pelas Diretrizes Curriculares. Ao ressaltar a importância do estágio curricular supervisionado na formação profissional, fica estabelecido um diálogo com a ABENO, contestando algumas de suas posições. Neste sentido, o artigo mostra a necessidade de uma discussão que agregue o maior número possível de faculdades de odontologia.This paper discusses supervised training as a fundamental opportunity for the consolidation of the teaching space and also as means of facing the challenges posed by the guidelines for dental courses. It is not a new proposal. It is in fact a fight for changes in dental practicing which began in the 70s with the movement for the integration between dental teaching and dental services. It approaches public health services spaces and the world of work as central for a new teaching strategy. That would generate the opportunity to graduate professionals with a more critical profile, also capable of understanding

  19. Evaluation of a PBL strategy in clinical supervision of nursing students: patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staun, Margaretha; Bergström, Berit; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-10-01

    The present study aimed at investigating staff members' and nursing students' perception of and satisfaction with an intervention involving patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms during clinical supervision. It is well known that clinical education is important and that the clinical learning environment influences the development of nursing students' ability to solve clinical problems. In the present study, an intervention using a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy was introduced and evaluated in clinical education. The PBL strategy is called 'Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms'. Descriptive; both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used. Most participants found the PBL strategy to be highly satisfactory, both for staff and for students. The students seemed to feel that their time in clinical education had been used efficiently. Integration of theory and practice during clinical training has been emphasized as a necessary component, and the new strategy, which involves a method of promoting students' reflection, represents one way of facilitating such integration, in that it may bridge the gap between theory and practice. More extensive and more specific research is need in the future. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring outcomes of communication partner training of health care professionals:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jytte; Jensen, Lise Randrup

    are best measured in research and in clinical practice in a valid, reliable and feasible manner. Rationale: Research studies have used a variety of outcome measures, including blind ratings of videotaped interactions or self-rating questionnaires for staff [8]. Video rating does not seem feasible...... different needs? Implications for clinical practice: There is a need to develop different types of outcome measures for communication partner training in the health care context, including questionnaires for health care staff, which address generally agreed-upon problem areas in patient...... of the available questionnaires. However, it is important in order to lay the groundwork for future studies, which compare the efficacy and outcome of different methods of implementing conversation partner training in clinical practice. Aims: The overall purpose of this round table is to: 1. provide an overview...

  1. Medical students' views and ideas about palliative care communication training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine M; Goldsmith, Joy; Ragan, Sandra L; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate medical student to identify views and ideas held toward palliative care communication training, pedagogical approaches to this training, and its perceived effectiveness and use in the medical field. Two focus groups consisting of fourth-year medical students were conducted, and their responses were analyzed using grounded theory categorization. Results indicated that students: (a) prefer to learn nonverbal communication techniques, (b) believe that natural ability and experience outweigh communication curriculum, (c) view the skill of breaking bad news as largely dependent on knowledge and expertise, and (d) prefer curriculum on palliative care and hospice to consist of information (eg, advance directives) rather than communication skills. Implications for these interpretive themes are discussed as well as future research and practice.

  2. First, do no harm: less training ≠ quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael H; Simpson, Steven Q; Stahl, Mary; Raoof, Suhail; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Gutterman, David D

    2012-07-01

    In an attempt to transform the health care system in the United States to improve upon the inadequacies and deficiencies of our current model, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine created a collaborative partnership to spell out what aspects of our health care system need to be remodeled. They envisioned that "interprofessional collaboration and coordination would be the 'norm,'"(1) because no discipline functions in isolation of others, certainly not in our intensive care units. In this spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration, the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)-physician and nursing societies, respectively, with combined memberships totaling more than 110 000 practicing critical care practitioners-have spoken with one voice in the editorial that follows about how and how not to address the shortage of critical care physicians. Because our critical care nurses work side by side with our intensivists, shouldn't they have a say in how intensivists are trained? The ACCP and AACN think so, and we agree. Richard S. Irwin, MD, Master FCCP Editor in Chief, CHEST.

  3. Introducing a Primary Health Care nurse training course at the University of Limpopo: Experiences and views of trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Delobelle

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new post-basic Primary Health Care (PHC nurse training was piloted at the University of Limpopo in rural South Africa in order to reinforce PHC services and to address the backlog of trained PHC nurses. The training comprised residential and decentralised training modules based on the principles of problem based learning and community based education, and a patient-centred care approach developed in the field of family medicine was applied for acquiring consultation skills. Clinical reasoning was improved through on-site supervision by individual preceptors. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe the satisfaction, experiences and views of trainees in the first year of implementing the new PHC nurse training programme.Method: The study had a descriptive, exploratory and cross-sectional design, and used quantitative and qualitative methods for data collection that included a semi-structured survey questionnaire and focus group discussion. A purposive sample of trainees enrolled in the pilot programme (n = 15 was recruited for this study. Results were analysed quantitatively for the survey questionnaire and content analysis was used for qualitative data.Results: Results revealed trainee satisfaction with the quality of community based visits and classroom lectures and dissatisfaction with on-site supervision and training material. Qualitative findings indicated a need to improve information and communication of supervisors and preceptors, and to provide more training material. Factors related to the work environment were identified as barriers to implement learning, but the use of tools developed in family medicine curricula was perceived as beneficial. Lessons learnt included the need for strong programme coordination and stakeholder commitment, as well as the need to develop a competence framework for PHC nursing.Conclusion: The implementation of a pilot programme for PHC nurse training had the outcomes of trainee

  4. Effects of self-management training and reinforcement on the transfer of improved conduct in the absence of supervision.

    OpenAIRE

    Ninness, H A; Fuerst, J.; Rutherford, R D; Glenn, S S

    1991-01-01

    The instruction, maintenance, and transfer of training of social skills of 3 seriously emotionally disturbed adolescents were accomplished by a self-management training and reinforcement package. During baseline sessions these students, who were covertly filmed in their classroom, averaged over 90% off-task or socially inappropriate behavior while their teacher was out of the room. They showed similar behaviors when walking between classes, unattended by their teacher. Treatment was introduce...

  5. Effect of supervised, periodized exercise training vs. self-directed training on lean body mass and other fitness variables in health club members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Thomas W; Dolezal, Brett A; Berenc, Matthew N; Timmins, John E; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-07-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that exercise training with a personal trainer (PTr) is more beneficial for improving health-related fitness than training alone. However, there are no published data that confirm whether fitness club members who exercise with a PTr in the fitness club setting obtain superior results compared with self-directed training. We hypothesized that club members randomized to receive an evidence-based training program would accrue greater improvements in lean body mass (LBM) and other fitness measures than members randomized to self-training. Men, aged 30-44 years, who were members of a single Southern California fitness club were randomized to exercise with a PTr administering a nonlinear periodized training program (TRAINED, N = 17) or to self-directed training (SELF, N = 17); both groups trained 3 days per week for 12 weeks. Lean body mass was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcomes included muscle strength 1 repetition maximum (1RM), leg power (vertical jump), and aerobic capacity (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). TRAINED individuals increased LBM by 1.3 (0.4) kg, mean (SEM) vs. no change in SELF, p = 0.029. Similarly, significantly greater improvements were seen for TRAINED vs. SELF in chest press strength (42 vs. 19%; p = 0.003), peak leg power (6 vs. 0.6%; p members whose training is directed by well-qualified PTrs administering evidence-based training regimens achieve significantly greater improvements in LBM and other dimensions of fitness than members who direct their own training.

  6. Treatment essentials and training for health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil M Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of awareness among health care providers (HCPs is one of the biggest challenges for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in India. Major challenges faced by HCPs include lack of awareness about the disease among general physicians and inadequately trained staff to deal with children with T1DM. The changing diabetes in children (CDiC program is helping in overcoming these barriers faced by HCPs. CDiC provides treatment, monitoring tools, and education to children affected with T1DM and has been instrumental is developing various education and awareness tools.

  7. Effects of online palliative care training on knowledge, attitude and satisfaction of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, Marta; Cebrián, Diego; Areosa, Almudena; Agra, Yolanda; Izquierdo, Juan Vicente; Buendía, Félix

    2011-05-23

    The Spanish Palliative Care Strategy recommends an intermediate level of training for primary care physicians in order to provide them with knowledge and skills. Most of the training involves face-to-face courses but increasing pressures on physicians have resulted in fewer opportunities for provision of and attendance to this type of training. The effectiveness of on-line continuing medical education in terms of its impact on clinical practice has been scarcely studied. Its effect in relation to palliative care for primary care physicians is currently unknown, in terms of improvement in patient's quality of life and main caregiver's satisfaction. There is uncertainty too in terms of any potential benefits of asynchronous communication and interaction among on-line education participants, as well as of the effect of the learning process.The authors have developed an on-line educational model for palliative care which has been applied to primary care physicians in order to measure its effectiveness regarding knowledge, attitude towards palliative care, and physician's satisfaction in comparison with a control group.The effectiveness evaluation at 18 months and the impact on the quality of life of patients managed by the physicians, and the main caregiver's satisfaction will be addressed in a different paper. Randomized controlled educational trial to compared, on a first stage, the knowledge and attitude of primary care physicians regarding palliative care for advanced cancer patients, as well as satisfaction in those who followed an on-line palliative care training program with tutorship, using a Moodle Platform vs. traditional education. 169 physicians were included, 85 in the intervention group and 84 in the control group, of which five were excluded. Finally 82 participants per group were analyzed. There were significant differences in favor of the intervention group, in terms of knowledge (mean 4.6; CI 95%: 2.8 to 6.5 (p = 0.0001), scale range 0-33), confidence

  8. Effects of online palliative care training on knowledge, attitude and satisfaction of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agra Yolanda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spanish Palliative Care Strategy recommends an intermediate level of training for primary care physicians in order to provide them with knowledge and skills. Most of the training involves face-to-face courses but increasing pressures on physicians have resulted in fewer opportunities for provision of and attendance to this type of training. The effectiveness of on-line continuing medical education in terms of its impact on clinical practice has been scarcely studied. Its effect in relation to palliative care for primary care physicians is currently unknown, in terms of improvement in patient's quality of life and main caregiver's satisfaction. There is uncertainty too in terms of any potential benefits of asynchronous communication and interaction among on-line education participants, as well as of the effect of the learning process. The authors have developed an on-line educational model for palliative care which has been applied to primary care physicians in order to measure its effectiveness regarding knowledge, attitude towards palliative care, and physician's satisfaction in comparison with a control group. The effectiveness evaluation at 18 months and the impact on the quality of life of patients managed by the physicians, and the main caregiver's satisfaction will be addressed in a different paper. Methods Randomized controlled educational trial to compared, on a first stage, the knowledge and attitude of primary care physicians regarding palliative care for advanced cancer patients, as well as satisfaction in those who followed an on-line palliative care training program with tutorship, using a Moodle Platform vs. traditional education. Results 169 physicians were included, 85 in the intervention group and 84 in the control group, of which five were excluded. Finally 82 participants per group were analyzed. There were significant differences in favor of the intervention group, in terms of knowledge (mean 4.6; CI

  9. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  10. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed.

  11. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  12. Staffing and training issues in critical care hyperbaric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Jacek

    2015-03-01

    The integrated chain of treatment of the most severe clinical cases that require hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) assumes that intensive care is continued while inside the hyperbaric chamber. Such an approach needs to take into account all the risks associated with transportation of the critically ill patient from the ICU to the chamber and back, changing of ventilator circuits and intravascular lines, using different medical devices in a hyperbaric environment, advanced invasive physiological monitoring as well as medical procedures (infusions, drainage, etc) during long or frequently repeated HBOT sessions. Any medical staff who take care of critically ill patients during HBOT should be certified and trained according to both emergency/intensive care and hyperbaric requirements. For any HBOT session, the number of staff needed for any HBOT session depends on both the type of chamber and the patient's status--stable, demanding or critically ill. For a critically ill patient, the standard procedure is a one-to-one patient-staff ratio inside the chamber; however, the final decision whether this is enough is taken after careful risk assessment based on the patient's condition, clinical indication for HBOT, experience of the personnel involved in that treatment and the available equipment.

  13. Predictors of supervised exercise adherence during breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Gelmon, Karen; Reid, Robert D; Mackey, John R; Friedenreich, Christine M; Proulx, Caroline; Lane, Kirstin; Ladha, Aliya B; Vallance, Jeffrey K; McKenzie, Donald C

    2008-06-01

    Exercise adherence is difficult during cancer treatments, but few studies have examined the predictors of such exercise. Here, we report the predictors of adherence to supervised exercise training during breast cancer chemotherapy. Breast cancer patients (N = 242) initiating adjuvant chemotherapy in Edmonton, Ottawa, and Vancouver were randomly assigned to usual care (n = 82), supervised resistance exercise (n = 82), or supervised aerobic exercise (n = 78) for the duration of their chemotherapy. Baseline data on standard demographic, medical, behavioral, fitness, and psychosocial variables as well as motivational variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior were collected. Adherence was assessed by objective attendance records. Adherence to supervised exercise was 70.2%. Univariate analyses indicated significant or borderline significant associations between exercise adherence and location/center (r = 0.30; P strength (r = 0.21; P = 0.008), percent body fat (r = -0.21; P = 0.012), disease stage (r = 0.17; P = 0.031), education (r = 0.15; P = 0.053), depression (r = -0.14; P = 0.073), and smoking (r = -0.14; P = 0.081). In multivariate analysis, location/center (beta = 0.28; P = 0.001), V[spacing dot above]O2peak ([beta] = 0.19; P = 0.016), disease stage (beta = 0.18; P = 0.015), and depression (beta = -0.16; P = 0.033) remained significant and explained 21% of the variance in exercise adherence. Participants in Vancouver, with higher aerobic fitness, more advanced disease stage, and lower depression, achieved better adherence. Adherence to supervised exercise training was predicted by unique aspects of the location/center, disease stage, aerobic fitness, and depression but not motivational variables. Location/center in our trial may have been a proxy for the amount of one-on-one attention received during supervised exercise. These findings may have implications for improving adherence during breast cancer chemotherapy.

  14. 76 FR 64952 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry . Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.... Purpose: The Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (``Advisory...

  15. Supervised Classification in the Presence of Misclassified Training Data: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study in the Three Group Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn E Bolin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical classification of phenomena into observed groups is very common in the social and behavioral sciences. Statistical classification methods, however, are affected by the characteristics of the data under study. Statistical classification can be further complicated by initial misclassification of the observed groups. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of initial training data misclassification on several statistical classification and data mining techniques. Misclassification conditions in the three-group case will be simulated and results will be presented in terms of overall as well as subgroup classification accuracy. Results show decreased classification accuracy as sample size, group separation and group size ratio decrease and as misclassification percentage increases with random forests demonstrating the highest accuracy across conditions.

  16. Guidelines for clinical supervision in health service psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This document outlines guidelines for supervision of students in health service psychology education and training programs. The goal was to capture optimal performance expectations for psychologists who supervise. It is based on the premises that supervisors (a) strive to achieve competence in the provision of supervision and (b) employ a competency-based, meta-theoretical approach to the supervision process. The Guidelines on Supervision were developed as a resource to inform education and training regarding the implementation of competency-based supervision. The Guidelines on Supervision build on the robust literatures on competency-based education and clinical supervision. They are organized around seven domains: supervisor competence; diversity; relationships; professionalism; assessment/evaluation/feedback; problems of professional competence, and ethical, legal, and regulatory considerations. The Guidelines on Supervision represent the collective effort of a task force convened by the American Psychological Association (APA) Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. The change in motivating factors influencing commencement, adherence and retention to a supervised resistance training programme in previously sedentary post-menopausal women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Janet Erica; Christie, Candice Jo-Anne

    2015-03-12

    Understanding motivators for exercise participation in post-menopausal women may impact retention to exercise programmes and inform intervention trial designs. The purpose of this investigation was to assess self-reported motivational factors influencing adherence and retention to a 24-week progressive resistance training programme. Post-menopausal females (n = 34) were passively recruited to undertake a 24-week progressive resistance training protocol, in small-group sessions, on three non-consecutive days of the week. Attendance was recorded by the researcher. Qualitative reports were sourced from the sample for four phases of the study: pre-study (prior to week 1), recruitment (week 1), during study (weeks 2 - 24), and post-intervention (beyond week 24). Responses were categorised according to ten descriptors: specific health index improvement, education, flexibility of time, social contact, conscience (loyalty to the researcher), wellness, weight management, organisation parameters (pertaining to the study programme) and enjoyment of the exercises. Of the initial sample, 76.5% (n = 26) met the specified ≥80% attendance criterion. The primary findings were that motivation to volunteer for the study was driven by a perceived need for a structured exercise programme (50% of respondents). A commitment to the researcher was the primary motivator for continued adherence to the study for 50% of participants. Social contact with other participants was cited by 60% of the sample as the primary reason for adherence for the full duration of 24 weeks. A desire to maintain the "wellness" derived from the programme was cited by 60% as a reason for continuing an exercise routine post-study. This study identified that routine and supervision initially attract women to exercise programmes, while social cohesion of the group setting contributes to retention over time. Understanding the changing nature of motivating factors may contribute to better overall adherence

  18. [Training in emergency procedures and care and management of elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahr, Amaël

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of skills-based training reference frameworks for the training of nursing assistants and student nurses, certification in training in emergency procedures and care is an integral part of the initial training of future healthcare professionals. The elderly person is a great example for learning rightgestures.

  19. Health care delivery and the training of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, L D

    1993-09-01

    Most countries have mastered the art of cost containment by global budgeting for public expenditure. It is not as yet clear whether the other option, managed care, or managed competition will accomplish cost control in America. Robert Evans, a Canadian health care expert, remains skeptical. He says, "HMO's are the future, always have been and always will be." With few exceptions, the amount spent on health care is not a function of the system but of the gross domestic product per person. Great Britain is below the line expected for expenditure, which may be due to truly impressive waiting lists. The United States is above the line, which is probably related to the overhead costs to administer the system and the strong demand by patients for prompt and highly sophisticated diagnostic measures and treatments. Canada is on the line, but no other country has subscribed to the Canadian veto on private insurance. Reform or changes are occurring in all countries and will continue to do so. For example, we are as terrified of managed care in Canada as you are of our brand of socialized insurance. We distrust practice by protocol just as you abhor waiting lists. From my perspective as a surgeon, I envision an ideal system that would cover all citizens, would maintain choice of surgeon by patients, would provide mechanisms for cost containment that would have the active and continuous participation of the medical profession, and would provide for research and development. Any alteration in health care delivery in the United States that compromises biomedical research and development will be a retrogressive, expensive step that could adversely affect the health of nations everywhere. Finally, a continuing priority of our training programs must be to ensure that the surgeon participating in this system continues to treat each patient as an individual with concern for his or her own needs.

  20. Concepts of nurses on supervised treatment of tuberculosis in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cristina Zago Ferreira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the conception of the primary care nurses about the viability of supervised treatment for tuberculosis. Methods: This was an exploratory descriptive study with 11 nurses. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and the data were organized in facilitators and hindering for supervised treatment. The Ethics Committee on Research in Human Beings, opinion No. 112.520, approved the study. Results: The nurses considered the small number of professionals, the lack of community healthcare agents, lack of in-service education and communication problems with the reference center as complicating the viability of supervised treatment and identify that the bond facilitates the adherence to treatment as well as the flexibilization in time of taking the medicine, the care incentives such as basic food, vouchers, milk donation in addition to medication availability. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that high demand and diversity of actions on the responsibility of the nurse, associated with reduced number of professionals, hamper the attention to supervised treatment, and suggest adjustments to increase their effectiveness, as more training and space for professionals to exchange experiences, acknowledge the effectiveness of a treatment modality for tuberculosis.

  1. Clinical Supervision Strategies for School Counselors Working with Twice-Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, SaDohl K.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical supervision is a way for counselors in training to develop needed skills (Bernard & Goodyear, 1998). Best practices indicate that counselors trained in the application of supervision theory should provide clinical supervision. However, many school counselors receive administrative supervision by non-counseling professionals who may…

  2. Triadic Supervision in CACREP Accredited Counselor Education Programs: Current Practices and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Steve R.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 the Counsel for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) approved the use of triadic supervision as an adjunct or alternative to individual supervision in the clinical training of counselors-in-training. In so doing they sanctioned triadic supervision as equal to individual supervision without the benefit…

  3. Triadic Supervision in CACREP Accredited Counselor Education Programs: Current Practices and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Steve R.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 the Counsel for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) approved the use of triadic supervision as an adjunct or alternative to individual supervision in the clinical training of counselors-in-training. In so doing they sanctioned triadic supervision as equal to individual supervision without the benefit…

  4. Mental Illness Training for Licensed Staff in Long-Term Care

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, A. Blair; Billow, Molly B.; Eberhage, Mark G.; Seeley, John R.; McMahon, Edward; Bourgeois, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Licensed care staff working in long-term care facilities may be poorly prepared to work with residents with mental illness. This research reports on the program evaluation of Caring Skills: Working with Mental Illness, a training program delivered on the Internet. It was tested with a randomized treatment-control design, with an eight-week follow-up. The training provided video-based behavioral skills and knowledge training. Measures included video situations testing and assessment of psycho-...

  5. Commentary on the required skills for ambulatory cardiac care in the young: is training necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-01

    Extensive supplemental training exists for many subspecialty disciplines within fellowship training for paediatric cardiology in the United States of America. These disciplines, or domains, such as echocardiography, cardiac intensive care, interventional cardiology, and electrophysiology, allow for initial exposure and training during the basic 3 years of fellowship, plus mandate a 4th year of advanced training; however, ambulatory cardiology has no in-depth or additional training beyond the basic clinical exposure during fellowship training. Ambulatory cardiology is not included in the recommended scheduling of the various domains of cardiology training. This document reviews the reasons to consider augmenting the depth and breadth of training in ambulatory paediatric cardiology.

  6. 78 FR 26053 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: May 20, 2013...

  7. 78 FR 48440 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: August 29, 2013,...

  8. Antenatal and delivery care in rural western Kenya: the effect of training health care workers to provide "focused antenatal care"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odhiambo Frank O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality remains high in developing countries and data to monitor indicators of progress in maternal care is needed. We examined the status of maternal care before and after health care worker (HCW training in WHO recommended Focused Antenatal Care. Methods An initial cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2002 in Asembo and Gem in western Kenya among a representative sample of women with a recent birth. HCW training was performed in 2003 in Asembo, and a repeat survey was conducted in 2005 in both areas. Results Antenatal clinic (ANC attendance was similar in both areas (86% in 2005 and not significantly different from 2002 (90%. There was no difference in place of delivery between the areas or over time. However, in 2005, more women in Asembo were delivered by a skilled assistant compared to Gem (30% vs.23%, P = 0.04, and this proportion increased compared to 2002 (17.6% and 16.1%, respectively. Provision of iron (82.4%, folic acid (72.0%, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (61.7%, and anthelminths (12.7% had increased in Asembo compared to 2002 (2002: 53.3%, 52.8%, 20.3%, and 4.6%, respectively, and was significantly higher than in Gem in 2005 (Gem 2005: 69.7%, 47.8%, 19.8%, and 4.1%, respectively (P Conclusions We observed improvements in some ANC services in the area where HCWs were trained. However, since our evaluation was carried out 2 years after three-day training, we consider any significant, sustained improvement to be remarkable.

  9. Inductive Supervised Quantum Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monràs, Alex; Sentís, Gael; Wittek, Peter

    2017-05-01

    In supervised learning, an inductive learning algorithm extracts general rules from observed training instances, then the rules are applied to test instances. We show that this splitting of training and application arises naturally, in the classical setting, from a simple independence requirement with a physical interpretation of being nonsignaling. Thus, two seemingly different definitions of inductive learning happen to coincide. This follows from the properties of classical information that break down in the quantum setup. We prove a quantum de Finetti theorem for quantum channels, which shows that in the quantum case, the equivalence holds in the asymptotic setting, that is, for large numbers of test instances. This reveals a natural analogy between classical learning protocols and their quantum counterparts, justifying a similar treatment, and allowing us to inquire about standard elements in computational learning theory, such as structural risk minimization and sample complexity.

  10. Supervised Transfer Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2014-07-27

    A combination of the sparse coding and transfer learn- ing techniques was shown to be accurate and robust in classification tasks where training and testing objects have a shared feature space but are sampled from differ- ent underlying distributions, i.e., belong to different do- mains. The key assumption in such case is that in spite of the domain disparity, samples from different domains share some common hidden factors. Previous methods often assumed that all the objects in the target domain are unlabeled, and thus the training set solely comprised objects from the source domain. However, in real world applications, the target domain often has some labeled objects, or one can always manually label a small num- ber of them. In this paper, we explore such possibil- ity and show how a small number of labeled data in the target domain can significantly leverage classifica- tion accuracy of the state-of-the-art transfer sparse cod- ing methods. We further propose a unified framework named supervised transfer sparse coding (STSC) which simultaneously optimizes sparse representation, domain transfer and classification. Experimental results on three applications demonstrate that a little manual labeling and then learning the model in a supervised fashion can significantly improve classification accuracy.

  11. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  12. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  13. Clients' Views of Live Supervision and Satisfaction with Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Lisa D.; McCollum, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    Examines clients' perceptions of live supervision and their satisfaction with therapy in a university-based training clinic for marriage and family therapists. Results indicate that clients were generally satisfied with therapy and found the live-supervision process satisfactory as long as the perceived helpfulness of live supervision outweighed…

  14. Does Live Supervision Make a Difference? A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Brandon C.; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Meyer, Kevin; Toviessi, Paula

    2009-01-01

    While the benefit of live supervision on clinical training is largely unquestioned, research that examines how live supervision affects the therapeutic process is lacking. Although marriage and family therapy has embraced this method of supervision, there is little empirical evidence suggesting it "works." This study uses hierarchical linear…

  15. A Delphi Study and Initial Validation of Counselor Supervision Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuer Colburn, Anita A.; Grothaus, Tim; Hays, Danica G.; Milliken, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    The authors addressed the lack of supervision training standards for doctoral counseling graduates by developing and validating an initial list of supervision competencies. They used content analysis, Delphi polling, and content validity methods to generate a list, vetted by 2 different panels of supervision experts, of 33 competencies grouped…

  16. Educational Technology and Distance Supervision in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Robert Milton; Hays, Danica G.; Pribesh, Shana L.; Wood, Chris T.

    2017-01-01

    The authors used a nonexperimental descriptive design to examine the prevalence of distance supervision in counselor education programs, educational technology used in supervision, training on technology in supervision, and participants' (N = 673) perceptions of legal and ethical compliance. Program policies are recommended to guide the training…

  17. Caregivers' attitudes to education and supervision in work with the older people in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Elisabeth; Bruhn, Sa

    2009-11-01

    Community-based care in Sweden has problems recruiting and keeping staff with formal competence and education. Both the caregiver's well-being and the receiver's care improve when the personnel receive support in the form of continuing supervision and education. Yet the caregivers in this study did not participate in a training and supervision programme during working hours. The aim of this study was to describe the attitudes towards education, support and supervision in the care of older people in municipal care in Sweden. The study used a qualitative approach with a descriptive design. Twelve caregivers, nine enrolled nurses and three nurses' aides from four wards in a nursing home were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The main findings showed that all of the caregivers were positive towards the idea of participating in training and asked for education and supervision but felt that the management did not create conditions that made it possible to participate during working hours. According to the findings there is a need for developing new forms and methods for learning that can be integrated into working life.

  18. A Community Needs Assessment for the Development of an Interprofessional Palliative Care Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Heather; Paganelli, Tia; Starks, Helene; Lindhorst, Taryn; Starks Acosta, Anne; Mauksch, Larry; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2017-03-01

    There is a known shortage of trained palliative care professionals, and an even greater shortage of professionals who have been trained through interprofessional curricula. As part of an institutional Palliative Care Training Center grant, a core team of interprofessional palliative care academic faculty and staff completed a state-wide palliative care educational assessment to determine the needs for an interprofessional palliative care training program. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and results of our community needs assessment of interprofessional palliative care educational needs in Washington state. We approached the needs assessment through a cross-sectional descriptive design by using mixed-method inquiry. Each phase incorporated a variety of settings and subjects. The assessment incorporated multiple phases with diverse methodological approaches: a preparatory phase-identifying key informants; Phase I-key informant interviews; Phase II-survey; and Phase III-steering committee endorsement. The multiple phases of the needs assessment helped create a conceptual framework for the Palliative Care Training Center and developed an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. The input from key informants at multiple phases also allowed us to define priority needs and to refine an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. This curriculum will provide an interprofessional palliative care educational program that crosses disciplinary boundaries to integrate knowledge that is beneficial for all palliative care clinicians. The input from a range of palliative care clinicians and professionals at every phase of the needs assessment was critical for creating an interprofessional palliative care curriculum.

  19. Providing effective supervision in clinical neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Kirk J; Bush, Shane; Donders, Jacobus

    2010-01-01

    A specialty like clinical neuropsychology is shaped by its selection of trainees, educational standards, expected competencies, and the structure of its training programs. The development of individual competency in this specialty is dependent to a considerable degree on the provision of competent supervision to its trainees. In clinical neuropsychology, as in other areas of professional health-service psychology, supervision is the most frequently used method for teaching a variety of skills, including assessment, report writing, differential diagnosis, and treatment. Although much has been written about the provision of quality supervision in clinical and counseling psychology, very little published guidance is available regarding the teaching and provision of supervision in clinical neuropsychology. The primary focus of this article is to provide a framework and guidance for the development of suggested competency standards for training of neuropsychological supervisors, particularly at the residency level. In this paper we outline important components of supervision for neuropsychology trainees and suggest ways in which clinicians can prepare for supervisory roles. Similar to Falender and Shafranske (2004), we propose a competency-based approach to supervision that advocates for a science-informed, formalized, and objective process that clearly delineates the competencies required for good supervisory practice. As much as possible, supervisory competencies are related to foundational and functional competencies in professional psychology, as well as recent legislative initiatives mandating training in supervision. It is our hope that this article will foster further discussion regarding this complex topic, and eventually enhance training in clinical neuropsychology.

  20. Meeting the milestones. Strategies for including high-value care education in pulmonary and critical care fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Weinberger, Steven E; Wagner, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Physician decision making is partially responsible for the roughly 30% of U.S. healthcare expenditures that are wasted annually on low-value care. In response to both the widespread public demand for higher-quality care and the cost crisis, payers are transitioning toward value-based payment models whereby physicians are rewarded for high-value, cost-conscious care. Furthermore, to target physicians in training to practice with cost awareness, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has created both individual objective milestones and institutional requirements to incorporate quality improvement and cost awareness into fellowship training. Subsequently, some professional medical societies have initiated high-value care educational campaigns, but the overwhelming majority target either medical students or residents in training. Currently, there are few resources available to help guide subspecialty fellowship programs to successfully design durable high-value care curricula. The resource-intensive nature of pulmonary and critical care medicine offers unique opportunities for the specialty to lead in modeling and teaching high-value care. To ensure that fellows graduate with the capability to practice high-value care, we recommend that fellowship programs focus on four major educational domains. These include fostering a value-based culture, providing a robust didactic experience, engaging trainees in process improvement projects, and encouraging scholarship. In doing so, pulmonary and critical care educators can strive to train future physicians who are prepared to provide care that is both high quality and informed by cost awareness.

  1. Capacity building for critical care training delivery: Development and evaluation of the Network for Improving Critical care Skills Training (NICST) programme in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Tim; De Silva, A Pubudu; Beane, Abi; Welch, John; Sigera, Chathurani; De Alwis, Sunil; Athapattu, Priyantha; Dharmagunawardene, Dilantha; Peiris, Lalitha; Siriwardana, Somalatha; Abeynayaka, Ashoka; Jayasinghe, Kosala Saroj Amarasena; Mahipala, Palitha G; Dondorp, Arjen; Haniffa, Rashan

    2017-04-01

    To deliver and evaluate a short critical care nurse training course whilst simultaneously building local training capacity. A multi-modal short course for critical care nursing skills was delivered in seven training blocks, from 06/2013-11/2014. Each training block included a Train the Trainer programme. The project was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's Hierarchy of Learning. There was a graded hand over of responsibility for course delivery from overseas to local faculty between 2013 and 2014. Sri Lanka. Participant learning assessed through pre/post course Multi-Choice Questionnaires. A total of 584 nurses and 29 faculty were trained. Participant feedback was consistently positive and each course demonstrated a significant increase (p≤0.0001) in MCQ scores. There was no significant difference MCQ scores (p=0.186) between overseas faculty led and local faculty led courses. In a relatively short period, training with good educational outcomes was delivered to nearly 25% of the critical care nursing population in Sri Lanka whilst simultaneously building a local faculty of trainers. Through use of a structured Train the Trainer programme, course outcomes were maintained following the handover of training responsibility to Sri Lankan faculty. The focus on local capacity building increases the possibility of long term course sustainability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of communication skills training on parents perceptions of care: intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Laulund, Lone W

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the effects of communication-skills training for healthcare professionals on parents' perceptions of information, care and continuity.......This paper is a report of a study of the effects of communication-skills training for healthcare professionals on parents' perceptions of information, care and continuity....

  3. Learning dementia care in three contexts: practical training in day-care, group dwelling and nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, M; Negussie, B; Grafström, M

    2000-07-01

    During the period 1996-1999, 18 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) received specialized training to become caregivers and mentors in the field of dementia care at the Silvia Home Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of the study was to illuminate how the trainees utilized their practical training to learn about dementia care. The trainees gained practical training within three care models for elderly persons with dementia. The three forms of care and the context for practical training included the school's integrated day-care, a group dwelling and a nursing home. The findings show that the trainees made use of each training context in a similar fashion but there were differences between the contexts. A perspective of human dignity characterized the day-care. This was an opportunity for the nursing philosophy taught by the programme to be put to practical use, and for reflection and experiences pertaining to the individual patient to be developed. In the group dwelling, the trainees encountered patients with different forms of dementia and studied how the care-giving could be adapted to the individual patient's symptoms - the disease perspective. In the nursing home, the trainees chose a staff perspective in which they focused on organization, management and working conditions as well as staff attitudes and the effects of these factors on patient care.

  4. Making Meaningful Improvements to Direct Care Worker Training Through Informed Policy: Understanding How Care Setting Structure and Culture Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, M Elizabeth; Mabry, J Beth

    2015-10-09

    Well-intentioned policy governing the training of direct care workers (DCWs) who serve older persons, in practice, may become merely a compliance issue for organizations rather than a meaningful way to improve quality of care. This study investigates the relationships between best practices in DCW training and the structure and culture of long term support service (LTSS) organizations. Using a mixed-methods approach to analyzing data from 328 licensed LTSS organizations in Pennsylvania, the findings suggest that public policy should address methods of training, not just content, and consider organizational variations in size, training evaluation practices, DCW integration, and DCW input into care planning. Effective training also incorporates support for organizations and supervisors as key aspects of DCWs' learning and working environment.

  5. Challenges for Better thesis supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, Laleh; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Conduction of thesis by the students is one of their major academic activities. Thesis quality and acquired experiences are highly dependent on the supervision. Our study is aimed at identifing the challenges in thesis supervision from both students and faculty members point of view. This study was conducted using individual in-depth interviews and Focus Group Discussions (FGD). The participants were 43 students and faculty members selected by purposive sampling. It was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Data analysis was done concurrently with data gathering using content analysis method. Our data analysis resulted in 162 codes, 17 subcategories and 4 major categories, "supervisory knowledge and skills", "atmosphere", "bylaws and regulations relating to supervision" and "monitoring and evaluation". This study showed that more attention and planning in needed for modifying related rules and regulations, qualitative and quantitative improvement in mentorship training, research atmosphere improvement and effective monitoring and evaluation in supervisory area.

  6. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism.

  7. From PALSA PLUS to PALM PLUS: adapting and developing a South African guideline and training intervention to better integrate HIV/AIDS care with primary care in rural health centers in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draper Beverley

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only about one-third of eligible HIV/AIDS patients receive anti-retroviral treatment (ART. Decentralizing treatment is crucial to wider and more equitable access, but key obstacles are a shortage of trained healthcare workers (HCW and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with other primary care. This report describes the development of a guideline and training program (PALM PLUS designed to integrate HIV/AIDS care with other primary care in Malawi. PALM PLUS was adapted from PALSA PLUS, developed in South Africa, and targets middle-cadre HCWs (clinical officers, nurses, and medical assistants. We adapted it to align with Malawi's national treatment protocols, more varied healthcare workforce, and weaker health system infrastructure. Methods/Design The international research team included the developers of the PALSA PLUS program, key Malawi-based team members and personnel from national and district level Ministry of Health (MoH, professional associations, and an international non-governmental organization. The PALSA PLUS guideline was extensively revised based on Malawi national disease-specific guidelines. Advice and input was sought from local clinical experts, including middle-cadre personnel, as well as Malawi MoH personnel and representatives of Malawian professional associations. Results An integrated guideline adapted to Malawian protocols for adults with respiratory conditions, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and other primary care conditions was developed. The training program was adapted to Malawi's health system and district-level supervision structure. PALM PLUS is currently being piloted in a cluster-randomized trial in health centers in Malawi (ISRCTN47805230. Discussion The PALM PLUS guideline and training intervention targets primary care middle-cadre HCWs with the objective of improving HCW satisfaction and retention, and the quality of patient care. Successful adaptations are feasible, even across health systems as

  8. Management of obesity: improvement of health-care training and systems for prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, William H; Baur, Louise A; Hall, Kevin; Puhl, Rebecca M; Taveras, Elsie M; Uauy, Ricardo; Kopelman, Peter

    2015-06-20

    Although the caloric deficits achieved by increased awareness, policy, and environmental approaches have begun to achieve reductions in the prevalence of obesity in some countries, these approaches are insufficient to achieve weight loss in patients with severe obesity. Because the prevalence of obesity poses an enormous clinical burden, innovative treatment and care-delivery strategies are needed. Nonetheless, health professionals are poorly prepared to address obesity. In addition to biases and unfounded assumptions about patients with obesity, absence of training in behaviour-change strategies and scarce experience working within interprofessional teams impairs care of patients with obesity. Modalities available for the treatment of adult obesity include clinical counselling focused on diet, physical activity, and behaviour change, pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery. Few options, few published reports of treatment, and no large randomised trials are available for paediatric patients. Improved care for patients with obesity will need alignment of the intensity of therapy with the severity of disease and integration of therapy with environmental changes that reinforce clinical strategies. New treatment strategies, such as the use of technology and innovative means of health-care delivery that rely on health professionals other than physicians, represent promising options, particularly for patients with overweight and patients with mild to moderate obesity. The co-occurrence of undernutrition and obesity in low-income and middle-income countries poses unique challenges that might not be amenable to the same strategies as those that can be used in high-income countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of supervising students of Healthy and social faculty to mentor´s nurse attitude at offer nursing care.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis is focused on the influence of teaching students of the Faculty of Health and Social Studies of the University of South Bohemia in Czech Budejovice on a mentor nurse´s attitude to nursing care provision. In the first chapter of the theoretical section the term nurse is introduced, and it is dealt with her duties, roles, attitudes, it is explained who a mentor nurse is and what topics a pilot certified course contains. The next four chapters are focused on a supervisor´s pe...

  10. 77 FR 36550 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary... create a national faculty development initiative. The purpose of this HRSA-supported program is to train... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: July 19, 2012, 8...

  11. Effect of new training technique on affinity of cynomolgus monkeys for animal care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Ai; Tachibana, Yuki; Takaura, Kaoru; Ochi, Takehiro; Koyama, Hironari

    2015-01-01

    To confirm our hypothesis that the sex and age of cynomolgus monkeys influences the effect of training, we employed a new training technique designed to increase the animal's affinity for animal care personnel. During 151 days of training, monkeys aged 2 to 10 years accepted each 3 raisins/3 times/day, and communicated with animal care personnel (5 times/day). Behavior was scored using integers between -1 and 5. Before training, 35 of the 61 monkeys refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (Score -1, 0 and 1). After training, 28 of these 35 monkeys (80%) accepted raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (>Score 2). The mean score of monkeys increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 4.3 ± 0.2. The minimum training period required for monkeys to reach Score 2 was longer for females than for males. After 151 days, 6 of the 31 females and 1 of the 30 males still refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel. Beneficial effects of training were obtained in both young and adult monkeys. These results indicate that our new training technique markedly improves the affinity of monkeys for animal care personnel, and that these effects tend to vary by sex but not age. In addition, abnormal behavior and symptoms of monkeys were improved by this training.

  12. Deployment of an in-house designed training process in a quaternary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Bhatia, Saurabh; Chiang, I-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare providers, such as doctors and nurses, have been famous for high resistance to change. A careful change management plan, particularly training process, is utmost necessary. A quaternary care hospital in India changed its system, from manual to Electronic Medical Record/Health Information System (EMR/HIS). The hospital management wanted to train its 4000 diverse end-users on the EMR/HIS in two months' time. This paper describes an in-house designed training process and its deployment in the given healthcare organizational settings. We designed a training process named DRIPDA. The training process was deployed to train 4000 end-users of EMR/HIS, in the quaternary care hospital. Various factors, such as methods and tools of training, constraints of trainees, trainers, and organization were considered while deploying the training process. The effectiveness of the DRIPDA was assessed using the Kirkpatrick model. End-users received training on the new system only in 25% of estimated time and 28% of the projected expense, without having any distraction in their usual workflow, or any productivity loss. We found that the DRIPDA training process could train all employees effectively and efficiently. A decent training process can help in managing the change, thereby reduce the training time and cost.

  13. Perspectives on enhancing international practical training of students in health and social care study programs - A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Hopia, Hanna; Sihvonen, Sanna; Diwan, Sadhna; Sen, Soma; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs. A qualitative descriptive case study design was used. The study was conducted at six higher education institutions-two in Finland and one in Croatia, Estonia, the Netherlands and Slovenia. A convenience sample of 14 mentors, 15 teachers and 14 students with international experiences from six higher education institutions which are part of the Bologna Process was recruited. The data were collected from six focus groups using a semi-structured questionnaire based on a literature review. Each higher education institution conducted one group interview that was tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed for themes. Participants made several recommendations for enhancing the practical placement experience of students, teachers, and mentors. Most recommendations dealt with practical supervision of students. Three major themes noted were: 'Attitudes towards internationalization of practical placements', 'Factors impacting the international placement experience', and 'Pedagogical methods used and structural support available for internationalization.' The study highlights the need for strengthening the multicultural knowledge and skills of mentors and teachers. The findings provide practical guidelines for improving the international placement experience across health and social care fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of supervised drug consumption services on access to and engagement with care at a palliative and supportive care facility for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McNeil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improvements in the availability and effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART have prolonged the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, mortality rates have remained high among populations that encounter barriers to accessing and adhering to HAART, notably people who use drugs. This population consequently has a high burden of illness and complex palliative and supportive care needs, but is often unable to access these services due to anti-drug policies and discrimination. In Vancouver, Canada, the Dr. Peter Centre (DPC, which operates a 24-bed residential HIV/AIDS care facility, has sought to improve access to palliative and supportive care services by adopting a comprehensive harm reduction strategy, including supervised injection services. We undertook this study to explore how the integration of comprehensive harm reduction services into this setting shapes access to and engagement with care. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 DPC residents between November 2010 and August 2011. Interviews made use of a semistructured interview guide which facilitated discussion regarding how the DPC Residence's model of care (a shaped healthcare access, (b influenced healthcare interactions and (c impacted drug use practices and overall health. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results: Participant accounts highlight how the harm reduction policy altered the structural-environmental context of healthcare services and thus mediated access to palliative and supportive care services. Furthermore, this approach fostered an atmosphere in which drug use could be discussed without the risk of punitive action, and thus increased openness between residents and staff. Finally, participants reported that the environmental supports provided by the DPC Residence decreased drug-related risks and improved health outcomes, including HAART adherence and survival. Conclusions: This study highlights

  15. Improvements in the delivery of resuscitation and newborn care after Helping Babies Breathe training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, B D; Josyula, S; Rule, A R L; Vasquez, J C

    2017-07-20

    To evaluate changes in neonatal resuscitation and postnatal care following Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) training at a community hospital in rural Honduras. We hypothesized that HBB training would improve resuscitation and essential newborn care interventions. Direct observation and video recording of delivery room care spanned before and after an initial HBB workshop held in August 2013. Rates of essential newborn care interventions were compared in resuscitations performed by individuals who had and had not received HBB training, and run charts recording performance of newborn care practices over time were developed. Ten percent of deliveries (N=250) were observed over the study period, with 156 newborn resuscitations performed by individuals without HBB training, compared to 94 resuscitations performed by HBB trainees. After HBB training, significant improvements were seen in skin-to-skin care, breastfeeding within 60 min of age, and delayed cord clamping after 1 min (all Ptraining that were sustained during the study period, but remained below ideal goals. With improvement in drying/stimulation practices, fewer babies required bag/mask ventilation. In a rural Honduran community hospital, improvements in basic neonatal resuscitation and postnatal essential newborn care practices can be seen after HBB training. Further improvements in newborn care practices may require focused quality improvement initiatives for hospitals to sustain high quality care.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 20 July 2017; doi:10.1038/jp.2017.110.

  16. A walking programme and a supervised exercise class versus usual physiotherapy for chronic low back pain: a single-blinded randomised controlled trial. (The Supervised Walking In comparison to Fitness Training for Back Pain (SWIFT) Trial).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a persistent disabling condition with rising significant healthcare, social and economic costs. Current research supports the use of exercise-based treatment approaches that encourage people with CLBP to assume a physically active role in their recovery. While international clinical guidelines and systematic reviews for CLBP support supervised group exercise as an attractive first-line option for treating large numbers of CLBP patients at low cost, barriers to their delivery include space and time restrictions in healthcare settings and poor patient attendance. The European Clinical Guidelines have identified the need for research in the use of brief\\/minimal contact self-activation interventions that encourage participation in physical activity for CLBP. Walking may be an ideally suited form of individualized exercise prescription as it is easy to do, requires no special skills or facilities, and is achievable by virtually all ages with little risk of injury, but its effectiveness for LBP is unproven. METHODS AND DESIGN: This study will be an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial that will investigate the difference in clinical effectiveness and costs of an individualized walking programme and a supervised general exercise programme compared to usual physiotherapy, which will act as the control group, in people with chronic low back pain. A sample of 246 patients will be recruited in Dublin, Ireland through acute general hospital outpatient physiotherapy departments that provide treatment for people with CLBP. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, back beliefs, physical activity, satisfaction and costs, which will be evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months [follow-up by pre-paid postage]. Qualitative telephone interviews and focus groups will be embedded in the research

  17. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    .... This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community...

  18. A blended design in acute care training: similar learning results, less training costs compared with a traditional format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Mary E W; Storm, Diana J; Teeuwen, Irene C; Schuit, Stephanie C E

    2014-09-01

    Introduction There is a demand for more attractive and efficient training programmes in postgraduate health care training. This retrospective study aims to show the effectiveness of a blended versus traditional face-to-face training design. For nurses in postgraduate Acute and Intensive Care training, the effectiveness of a blended course design was compared with a traditional design. Methods In a first pilot study 57 students took a traditional course (2-h lecture and 2-h workshop) and 46 students took a blended course (2-h lecture and 2-h online self-study material). Test results were compared for both groups. After positive results in the pilot study, the design was replicated for the complete programme in Acute and Intensive Care. Now 16 students followed the traditional programme (11 days face-to-face education) and 31 students did the blended programme (7 days face-to-face and 40 h online self-study). An evaluation was done after the pilot and course costs were calculated. Results Results show that the traditional and blended groups were similar regarding the main characteristics and did not differ in learning results for both the pilot and the complete programme. Student evaluations of both designs were positive; however, the blended group were more confident that they had achieved the learning objectives. Training costs were reduced substantially. Conclusion The blended training design offers an effective and attractive training solution, leading to a significant reduction in costs.

  19. Communication Skills Training Increases Self-Efficacy of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting…

  20. Diversity Training for Community Aged Care Workers: An Interdisciplinary Meta-Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Claudia; Ogrin, Rajna; Al-Zubaidi, Hamzah; Appannah, Arti; McMillan, Sally; Barrett, Elizabeth; Browning, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Population ageing signals the need for a responsive community aged care workforce respectful of older people's diverse healthcare needs. Person-centered care premises individual needs and preferences to enhance participation in health care. Training for diversity does not yet exist for this workforce, but is necessary to ensure appropriate care…

  1. [Consensus document on ultrasound training in Intensive Care Medicine. Care process, use of the technique and acquisition of professional skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuela Azcárate, J M; Clau-Terré, F; Vicho Pereira, R; Guerrero de Mier, M; Carrillo López, A; Ochagavia, A; López Pérez, J M; Trenado Alvarez, J; Pérez, L; Llompart-Pou, J A; González de Molina, F J; Fojón, S; Rodríguez Salgado, A; Martínez Díaz, M C; Royo Villa, C; Romero Bermejo, F J; Ruíz Bailén, M; Arroyo Díez, M; Argueso García, M; Fernández Fernández, J L

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has become an essential tool in assisting critically ill patients. His knowledge, use and instruction requires a statement by scientific societies involved in its development and implementation. Our aim are to determine the use of the technique in intensive care medicine, clinical situations where its application is recommended, levels of knowledge, associated responsibility and learning process also implement the ultrasound technique as a common tool in all intensive care units, similar to the rest of european countries. The SEMICYUC's Working Group Cardiac Intensive Care and CPR establishes after literature review and scientific evidence, a consensus document which sets out the requirements for accreditation in ultrasound applied to the critically ill patient and how to acquire the necessary skills. Training and learning requires a structured process within the specialty. The SEMICYUC must agree to disclose this document, build relationships with other scientific societies and give legal cover through accreditation of the training units, training courses and different levels of training.

  2. Ethical Analysis on Supervision and Management System of "Universal Free Medical Care" in Shenmu%神木县“全民免费医疗”监管体系的伦理学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈诗浩; 蔡荘; 刘春阳; 刘演

    2012-01-01

    Universal free medical care" in Shenmu county was successful because it carried out a set of effective supervision and management system, which consisted of supervision and management organization, supervision and management rules, supervision and management content and supervision and management methods, with specific provision on each part. The medical reform in Shenmu rely on the supervision and management rules, led by supervision and management organization, through kinds of supervision and management methods on medical institutions and their services, can effectively regulate the hospital behavior, avoid the waste of resources; reasonable distribute the power, ensure the medical reform go smoothly; control diagnosis and treatment in hospital, improve the service quality; take serving patients as the center, fulfill the humanitarian principle. This can be a reference model for the medical security system reform in China.%神木县“全民免费医疗”的成功运行,在于其推行了一套行之有效的监管体系.这套体系主要由监管机构、监管规章、监管内容及监管手段四部分构成,并且每部分内容都有明确规定.神木县的医改以监管规章为依托,监管机构为先导,通过多样的监管方式对医疗机构及其服务进行监管,能够有效地规范医院行为,避免资源浪费;合理分配权力,保证医改的平稳进行;控制诊疗环节,提高服务质量;以服务患者为中心,践行人道主义原则,这为全国医疗保障体系的改革提供了可以借鉴的范例.

  3. Supervision as Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    This article takes up the question of the language within which discussion of research degree supervision is couched and framed, and the consequences of such framings for supervision as a field of pedagogical practice. It examines the proliferation and intensity of metaphor, allegory and allusion in the language of candidature and supervision,…

  4. A Supervision of Solidarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vikki

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates an approach to therapeutic supervision informed by a philosophy of solidarity and social justice activism. Called a "Supervision of Solidarity", this approach addresses the particular challenges in the supervision of therapists who work alongside clients who are subjected to social injustice and extreme marginalization. It…

  5. What are the critical success factors for team training in health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; Almeida, Sandra A; Salisbury, Mary; King, Heidi; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Lyons, Rebecca; Wilson, Katherine A; Almeida, Paula A; McQuillan, Robert

    2009-08-01

    Ineffective communication among medical teams is a leading cause of preventable patient harm throughout the health care system. A growing body of literature indicates that medical teamwork improves the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of health care delivery, and expectations for teamwork in health care have increased. Yet few health care professions' curricula include teamwork training, and few medical practices integrate teamwork principles. Because of this knowledge gap, growing numbers of health care systems are requiring staff to participate in formal teamwork training programs. Seven evidence-based, practical, systematic success factors for preparing, implementing, and sustaining a team training and performance improvement initiative were identified. Each success factor is accompanied by tips for deployment and a real-world example of application. (1) Align team training objectives and safety aims with organizational goals, (2) provide organizational support for the team training initiative, (3) get frontline care leaders on board, (4) prepare the environment and trainees for team training, (5) determine required resources and time commitment and ensure their availability, (6) facilitate application of trained teamwork skills on the job; and (7) measure the effectiveness of the team training program. Although decades of research in other high-risk organizations have clearly demonstrated that properly designed team training programs can improve team performance, success is highly dependent on organizational factors such as leadership support, learning climate, and commitment to data-driven change. Before engaging in a teamwork training initiative, health care organizations should have a clear understanding of these factors and the strategies for their establishment.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of supervised exercise, stenting, and optimal medical care for claudication: results from the Claudication: Exercise Versus Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Apruzzese, Patricia; Galper, Benjamin Z; Murphy, Timothy P; Hirsch, Alan T; Cutlip, Donald E; Mohler, Emile R; Regensteiner, Judith G; Cohen, David J

    2014-11-11

    Both supervised exercise (SE) and stenting (ST) improve functional status, symptoms, and quality of life compared with optimal medical care (OMC) in patients with claudication. The relative cost-effectiveness of these strategies is not well defined. The Claudication: Exercise Versus Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) study randomized patients with claudication due to aortoiliac stenosis to a 6-month SE program, to ST, or to OMC. Participants who completed 6-month follow-up (n=98) were included in a health economic analysis through 18 months. Costs were assessed using resource-based methods and hospital billing data. Quality-adjusted life-years were estimated using the EQ-5D. Markov modeling based on the in-trial results was used to explore the impact of assumptions about the longer term durability of observed differences in quality of life. Through 18 months, mean healthcare costs were $5178, $9804, and $14 590 per patient for OMC, SE, and ST, respectively. Measured quality-adjusted life-years through 18 months were 1.04, 1.16, and 1.20. In our base case analysis, which assumed that observed differences in quality of life would dissipate after 5 years, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $24 070 per quality-adjusted life-year gained for SE versus OMC, $41 376 for ST versus OMC, and $122 600 for ST versus SE. If the treatment effect of ST was assumed to be more durable than that of SE, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for ST versus SE became more favorable. Both SE and ST are economically attractive by US standards relative to OMC for the treatment of claudication in patients with aortoiliac disease. ST is more expensive than SE, with uncertain incremental benefit. www.clinicaltrials.gov, Unique identifier: NCT00132743. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. A survey of formal training in the care of children in family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Luckmann, R

    1992-08-01

    Declining hospitalization rates for children and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care may be affecting the way family practice residency programs train their residents in the care of children. We surveyed all US family practice residency program directors to determine the nature of the child care training that programs currently provide to residents. Responses were received from 78% of the programs. Residencies required a mean of 5.2 months of formal pediatric training (range: 1 to 11 months). Thirty percent of programs noted a declining inpatient census on inpatient pediatric teaching services, but since 1978, the mean duration of inpatient pediatric training increased by 0.4 months to a required mean of 2.7 months of general pediatric inpatient training (range: 0 to 6 months). The mean time devoted to structured outpatient pediatric training was only 1.6 months (range: 0 to 6 months). Nine percent of responding programs required no formal pediatric outpatient training other than family health center experience. Despite declining inpatient census and increased emphasis on comprehensive ambulatory care, family practice residencies require more formal inpatient pediatric training than formal outpatient training.

  8. A new corps of trained Grand-Aides has the potential to extend reach of primary care workforce and save money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Arthur; Green, Donna M; Rodriguez, Lia; Beech, Richard; Nye, Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Because the Affordable Care Act will expand health insurance to cover an estimated thirty-two million additional people, new approaches are needed to expand the primary care workforce. One possible solution is Grand-Aides®, who are health care professionals operating under the direct supervision of nurses, and who are trained and equipped to conduct telephone consultations or make primary care home visits to patients who might otherwise be seen in emergency departments and clinics. We conducted pilot tests with Grand-Aides in two pediatric Medicaid settings: an urban federally qualified health center in Houston, Texas, and a semi-rural emergency department in Harrisonburg, Virginia. We estimated that Grand-Aides and their supervisors averted 62 percent of drop-in visits at the Houston clinic and would have eliminated 74 percent of emergency department visits at the Virginia test site. We calculated the cost of the Grand-Aides program to be $16.88 per encounter. That compares with current Medicaid payments of $200 per clinic visit in Houston and $175 per emergency department visit in Harrisonburg. In addition to reducing health care costs, Grand-Aides have the potential to make a substantial impact in reducing congestion in primary care practices and emergency departments.

  9. Abortion care training framework for nurses within the context of higher education in the Western Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, I; Bitzer, E M; Boshoff, E L D; Steyn, D W

    2009-09-01

    The high morbidity and mortality rate due to illegal abortions in South Africa necessitated the implementation of abortion legislation in February 1997. Abortion legislation stipulates that registered nurses who had undergone the proposed abortion care training--certified nurses--may carry out abortions within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Currently it seems that an inadequate number of nurses are being trained in the Western Cape to provide pregnant women with counselling, to perform abortions and/or refer problem cases. No real attempts have since been made by higher education institutions in the Western Cape to offer abortion care training for nurses. This case study explores the situation of certified nurses and the context in which they provide abortion care in different regions of the Western Cape. The sampling included a random, stratified (non-proportional) number of designated state health care facilities in the Western Cape, a non-probability purposive sampling of nurses who provided abortion care, a non-probability convenience sample of women who had received abortion care, and a non-probability purposive sampling of final-year pre-registration nursing students. Data was generated by means of questionnaires, a checklist and semi-structured interviews. The main findings of this study indicate that the necessary infrastructure required for legal abortion is in place. However, the ongoing shortage of trained health care practitioners hampers abortion care services. Deficiencies were identified in the existing provincial protocol as some of the guidelines were either not in use or had become obsolete. Certified midwives who had been trained by the regional offices of the Department of Health: Western Cape were skilled in carrying out the abortion procedure, but other aspects of abortion care mainly carried out by other categories of nurses required more attention. This article suggests a training framework that should provide focus for the development of

  10. Culturally Competent Palliative and Hospice Care Training for Ethnically Diverse Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Koijane, Jeannette; Li, Dongmei

    2016-03-29

    Between 2013 and 2030, older adults 65 years and older of racial/ethnic populations in the U.S. is projected to increase by 123% in comparison to the Whites (Non-Hispanics). To meet this demand, training of ethnically diverse health staff in long-term care facilities in palliative and hospice care is imperative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a palliative and hospice care training of staff in two nursing homes in Hawaii - (a) to evaluate knowledge and confidence over three time periods, and (b) to compare staff and family caregiver satisfaction at end of program. The educational frameworks were based on cultural and communication theories. Fifty-two ethnically diverse staff, a majority being Asian (89%), participated in a 10-week module training and one 4 hour communication skills workshop. Staff evaluation included knowledge and confidence surveys, pre- and post-test knowledge tests, and FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. There were nine Asian (89%) and Pacific Islander (11%) family caregivers who completed the FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. The overall staff knowledge and confidence results were promising. The staff rated overall satisfaction of palliative care services lower than the family caregivers. Implications for future research, practice, and education with palliative and hospice care training of ethnically diverse nursing home staff is to include patient and family caregiver satisfaction of palliative and hospice care services, evaluation of effectiveness of cross-cultural communication theories in palliative and hospice care staff training, and support from administration for mentorship and development of these services in long term care facilities.

  11. Khoa Trinh Huan Luyen Giu Tre Ban Ngay Tai Gia (Family Day Care Training Curriculum--Vietnamese).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses and licensing requirements for family day care, licensing…

  12. Good supervision and PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    This field study was conducted at the Faculty of Social Sciences at Aalborg University with the intention to investigate how students reflect on their experiences with supervision in a PBL environment. The overall aim of this study was to inform about the continued work in strengthening supervision...... at this faculty. This particular study invited Master level students to discuss: • How a typical supervision process proceeds • How they experienced and what they expected of PBL in the supervision process • What makes a good supervision process...

  13. Supervision of Standardized Training of General Physician Based on Electronic Medical Record%基于电子病历的全科医师规范化培训监管

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹战宇; 马力; 马军

    2016-01-01

    Standardized training of general physician is main way to train the general practitioner in our country, which is largely invisible, the ability of residency is weak on different levels. There have many different characteristics with the standardized training of specialist in the training base and teachers. The electronic medical record system can strengthen the training and supervision to participants in standardized training of general practitioner, can ensure the quantity and quality of managing patients and clinical skills, and ensure the rotation in accordance with the arrangement. Achieving the remote monitoring of community training base through the cloud platforms. By taking a series of safeguard measures, the whole training process was supervised using the electronic medical record, which can improve and ensure the effectiveness of standardized training.%全科医师规范化培训是我国培养高质量全科医师的主要途径,目前普遍存在受重视的程度不高、接受规范化培训住院医水平参差不齐等问题,培训基地和师资也存在着与专科医师规范化培训不同的特点,电子病历系统可加强对参加全科医师规范化培训住院医的培养和监管,对住院医完成管理患者和临床技能操作数量和质量、确保按照轮转安排进行轮转和考核、带教教师进行考核等功能,并通过云平台实现对社区基地培训的远程监控。通过采取一系列的保障措施,用电子病历对规范化培训全程进行监管,有助于提高和保证培训效果。

  14. Fire Service Training. Immediate Care of the Burn Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    Part of a series of instructional outlines intended for use in a training program for firemen with no previous formal training, this curriculum guide discusses the emergency treatment of thermal, chemical, and electrical burns. The topics covered are as follow: (1) evaluation of the degree and extent of the burn; (2) shock, its signs and…

  15. Effects of supervised structured aerobic exercise training program on fasting blood glucose level, plasma insulin level, glycemic control, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakil-Ur-Rehman, Syed; Karimi, Hossein; Gillani, Syed Amir

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of supervised structured aerobic exercise training (SSAET) program on fasting blood glucose level (FBGL), plasma insulin level (PIL), glycemic control (GC), and insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Riphah Rehabilitation and Research Centre (RRRC) was the clinical setting for this randomized controlled trial, located at Pakistan Railways General Hospital (PRGH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Study duration was 18 months from January 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016. Patients of both genders ranging 40-70 years of age with at least one year of history of T2DM were considered eligible according to WHO criteria, while patients with other chronic diseases, history of smoking, regular exercise and diet plan were excluded. Cohorts of 195 patients were screened out of whom 120 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Amongst them 102 agreed to participate and were assigned to experimental (n=51) and control (n=51) groups. Experimental group underwent SSAET program, routine medication and dietary plan, whereas the control group received routine medication and dietary plan, while both group received treatment for 25 weeks. The blood samples were taken at baseline and on the completion of 25 weeks. The investigation of fasting blood glucose level, plasma insulin level, and glycemic control was conducted to calculate IR. Patients with T2DM in experimental group (n=51) treated with SSAET program, routine medication and dietary plan significantly improved FBGL (pre-mean= 276.41±25.31, post-mean=250.07±28.23), PIL (pre-mean=13.66±5.31, post-mean=8.91±3.83), GC (pre-mean=8.31±1.79, post-mean 7.28±1.43), and IR (pre-mean=64.95±27.26, post-mean 37.97±15.58), as compared with patients in control group treated with routine medication and dietary plan in whom deteriorations were noted in FBGL (pre-mean=268.19±22.48, post-mean=281.41±31.30), PIL(pre-mean=14.14±5.48, post-mean=14.85±5.27) GC (pre-mean=8.15±1.74, post-mean=8.20±1.44, and IR (pre

  16. The effect of physical fitness and physical exercise training on work productivity among health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Malte Bue; Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL FITNESS AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE TRAINING ON WORK PRODUCTIVITY AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS Kongstad, M. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Christensen, JR. 1 1: SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Workplace health promotion involving physical exercise training may negate lifestyle...

  17. The Effects of Training Community Leaders in Prevention Science: Communities that Care in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Osgood, D. Wayne; Anderson, Amy; Babinski, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of training community leaders in prevention science in the context of the Communities That Care (CTC) model fo community empowerment. Data from an evaluation of CTC in 21 Pennsylvania communities and interviews with 203 community leaders show that training is positively, although modestly, associated with participant attitudes…

  18. The impact of staff training on staff outcomes in dementia care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aimee; Revolta, Catherine; Orrell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Caring for people with dementia can be emotionally challenging and is often linked to low job satisfaction and burnout in care staff. Staff training within care settings is potentially valuable in improving well-being and quality of care. This review aimed to (i) establish the impact of training on staff outcomes; (ii) compare the impact of different training approaches; (iii) explore the influence of training intensity; and (iv) explore potential barriers to success. A database search of staff training interventions revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were excluded based on prespecified criteria. Nineteen studies were included and appraised using a quality rating tool. Overall, the studies were found to be of variable quality; however, 16 studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain, with knowledge improving most frequently. Approaches focusing on managing challenging behaviours appeared to be the most effective. Training staff can be an effective method of improving well-being, and programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. Most studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Training a system-literate care coordination workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Osborne, Richard H.; Brooks, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    People with chronic complex conditions continue to experience increasing health system fragmentation and poor coordination. To reverse these trends, one solution has been an investment in effective models of care coordination that use a care coordinator workforce. Care coordinators...... standards for the care coordinator workforce. With the growing complexity and fragmentation of the health care system, health system literacy - shared understanding of the roles and contributions of the different workforce professions, organisations and systems, among patients and indeed the health...... workforce is required. Efforts to improve health system literacy among the health workforce are increasing at a policy, practice and research level. However, insufficient evidence exists about what are the health system literacy needs of care coordinators, and what is required for them to be most effective...

  20. The Problem and Countermeasures in the Supervision of Health Care Serviece%医疗服务监管中的问题与对策--以郴州市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小衡

    2014-01-01

    Since the initiation of universal health care insurance, the supervision of health care service in hospitals is a challenge of health care insurance agency. The author enumerates the problems occurring in health care service in public and private hospitals, analyzes the cause of these problems and proposes the ways to solve these problems.%全民医保启动后,加强医院医疗服务监管是医保经办机构遇到的一个难题。作者列举了公立医院、民营医院在医疗服务中存在的问题,分析了出现问题的原因,提出了解决办法。

  1. Effectiveness of an Oral Health Care Training Workshop for School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... countries like Nigeria have poor knowledge and motivation about oral health ... intervention study was conducted among 40 school teachers who attended a ... Training methods included lectures and demonstrations on aetiology, clinical ...

  2. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2)…

  3. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2) "Family Day…

  4. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2)…

  5. 76 FR 30951 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: June 13, 2011, 1 p.m... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  6. 77 FR 64116 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 1, 2012, 10... Jerilyn K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions,...

  7. 75 FR 14446 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary CareMedicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: April 22, 2010, 8 a.m... of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In the plenary session, the...

  8. 75 FR 64318 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 15, 2010, 8... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  9. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  10. Training of occupational therapists for Primary Health Care (PHC: contributions to the debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Nicolau

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein presented are the topics debated at the research group meeting on Training of OccupationalTherapists for Primary Health Care (PHC that took place during the First National Seminar on OccupationalTherapy in PHC, at the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy inOctober 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. In addition, the field of vocational training for PHC is situated within the context of the Unified Health System (UHS and its importance for the training of occupational therapists. Wepresent relevant aspects of specific National Curriculum Guidelines suggested for the professional training atthis level of care, which have also been addressed by the Reorientation of Vocational Training in Health Policy(PRO Health. Experiences gained by the authors’ educational institutions when training at this level of care arealso presented. It was possible to conclude that undergraduate studies at this level of care enables students andteachers to come into close contact with health demands and needs, health-disease process and its determinants,within a scenario closer to the everyday life of the people being cared and the service they receive. The teachingof Occupational Therapy (OT at PHC further allows the debate of its contributions in promoting health andpreventing disease, early diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation, which may facilitate the access to populationspreviously not considered priority by the PHC. This seminar was important for discussing the challenges oflinking the OT profession to the UHS.

  11. Qualitative evaluation of a Positive Prevention training for health care providers in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Sarah A; Cummings, Beverley; Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Johnson, Kelly; Mbofana, Francisco; Dawson Rose, Carol

    2014-04-01

    The rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment in Mozambique has provided an opportunity to reach people living with HIV (PLHIV) with prevention interventions in HIV care and treatment settings. A three-day Positive Prevention (PP) training intervention for health care providers that focused on pressing issues for PLHIV in Mozambique was adapted and delivered at sites in three provinces. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 providers trained in the PP curriculum. Qualitative data were used to assess the appropriateness of the training materials and approach, which lessons providers learned and were able to implement and which PP messages were still difficult to deliver. Providers reported gaining numerous insights from the training, including how to conduct a risk assessment and client-centered counseling, negotiating disclosure, partner testing, condom use, PMTCT, treatment adherence and approaches for positive living. Training topics not commonly mentioned included discordance counseling, STIs, family planning, alcohol and drug use, and frank sexual risk discussions. While areas for improvement exist, the PP training was useful in transferring skills to providers and is a viable component of HIV care. This evaluation helps identify areas where future PP trainings and specific strategies and messages can be refined for the Mozambican context.

  12. Mental illness training for licensed staff in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair Irvine, A; Billow, Molly B; Eberhage, Mark G; Seeley, John R; McMahon, Edward; Bourgeois, Michelle

    2012-03-01

    Licensed care staff working in long-term care facilities may be poorly prepared to work with residents with mental illness. This research reports on the program evaluation of Caring Skills: Working with Mental Illness, a training program delivered on the Internet. It was tested with a randomized treatment-control design, with an eight-week follow-up. The training provided video-based behavioral skills and knowledge training. Measures included video situations testing and assessment of psycho-social constructs including empathy and stigmatization. ANCOVA analysis at 4-weeks posttest showed significant positive effects with medium-large effect sizes, which were largely maintained at the 8-week follow-up. The training was well-received by the users.

  13. Communication skills training increases self-efficacy of health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training...... course for all staff members expecting an increase in patient-centeredness in communication and more respectful intercollegial communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of this training course on participants' self-efficacy with a focus on communication with both colleagues...

  14. The roles and training of primary care doctors: China, India, Brazil and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mash, Robert; Almeida, Magda; Wong, William C W; Kumar, Raman; von Pressentin, Klaus B.

    2015-01-01

    China, India, Brazil and South Africa contain 40% of the global population and are key emerging economies. All these countries have a policy commitment to universal health coverage with an emphasis on primary health care. The primary care doctor is a key part of the health workforce, and this article, which is based on two workshops at the 2014 Towards Unity For Health Conference in Fortaleza, Brazil, compares and reflects on the roles and training of primary care doctors in these four countr...

  15. Fundamental training for individuals involved in the care and use of laboratory animals: a review and update of the 1991 NRC Core Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Leticia V; Hrapkiewicz, Karen; Tear, Marianne; Anderson, Lynn C

    2007-01-01

    Public trust demands that individuals who do research, testing, or teaching with animals use humane, ethical, and scientifically sound methods. Furthermore, the Animal Welfare Act and the Public Health Service Policy require research institutions to provide basic training and to ensure that anyone who cares for and/or works with laboratory animals has the appropriate training or experience relevant to their job responsibilities. Institutions accredited by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International must also provide training programs and ensure the qualifications of personnel. The primary goal of this training is to provide individuals with basic knowledge and to reinforce attitudes and behaviors that help to ensure humane animal care and use. This article provides an overview of the core training module outline and content from the 1991 report of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research, Education and Training in the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals: A Guide for Developing Institutional Programs, as well as pertinent updates for introducing personnel to information regarding the care and use of laboratory animals. Both mandatory and suggested training topics are reviewed, including relevant regulations and standards, ethical considerations, humane methods of animal experimentation and maintenance, and other pertinent topics. Although the fundamental training course content and delivery will vary depending on the nature and complexity of an institution's animal care and use program, this basic training provides the foundation for more in-depth training programs and supports humane and ethical animal care and use.

  16. Differences between rural and urban primary care units in Turkey: Implications on residents′ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Yikilkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Family practice training takes place at primary care based training centers linked to Education and Research State Hospitals in Turkey. There is a discussion if these units are adequate to train primary care staff and if the patients of these units reflect the applicants of primary care. Aims: The aim of our study is to investigate the demographic characteristics, the effect of distance on primary care utilization, and most common diagnosis of the patients who applied to two different outpatient clinics: One urban and one rural. Settings and Design: Study was conducted from the electronic health records of the patients applied to outpatient clinics of Ankara Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Training and Research Hospital Department of Family Medicine between 1 January and 31 December 2009. Results: Total number of patients applied to both of the outpatient clinics was 34,632 [urban clinic: 16.506 (47.7%, rural clinic: 18.126 (52.3%]. Leading three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (URTI, general medical examination (GME, and hypertension (HT in the most common 10 diagnosis. Conclusion: In our study, the rural outpatient clinic is regarded as a primary care unit in the neighborhood of living area and the urban clinic as close to working environment. We found statistically meaningful differences in most common diagnosis, gender, age, and consultation time between the rural and urban clinics. According to our results, family practitioners′ field training should take place at different primary care units according to sociodemographic characteristics of each country.

  17. Professional care providers in dementia care in eight European countries; their training and involvement in early dementia stage and in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Cabrera, Ester; Jolley, David; Raamat, Katrin; Renom-Guiteras, Anna; Verbeek, Hilde; Soto, Maria; Stolt, Minna; Karlsson, Staffan

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge concerning professionals involved in dementia care throughout its trajectory is sparse; the focus has mainly been on nursing-home care and less on home care, diagnosis and treatment of the disease and its complications despite the fact that home care is the most prominent type of care. The aim of this study was to explore and describe professional care providers involved in dementia care and their educational level applying the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) and further to investigate practice in the RightTimePlaceCare-countries with regard to screening, diagnostic procedures and treatment of dementia and home care. The findings demonstrate more similarities than differences in terms of type of professionals involved among the countries although untrained staff were more common in some countries. Findings also show that many types of professionals are involved, who to turn to may not be clear, for instance in terms of medical specialities and it may be unclear who bears the ultimate responsibility. The professionals involved in diagnosis, treatment and care are educated to bachelor's level or above whilst everyday care is provided by people trained at a lower ISCED level or with no formal training. Registered nurses as well as occupational therapists have bachelor's degrees in most countries, but not in Germany or Estonia. Professionals specifically trained in dementia care are not so common. Further research is needed to reveal not only who provides the diagnostics and treatment, but also how home care is organised and quality assured. Many different types of professionals serve as providers along the trajectory of the disease which may be difficult for the patient and the informal caregiver to cope with.

  18. [What is the choice of training in neonatal intensive care? Analysis of wishes from 106 neonatologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriot, D; Nasimi, A; Berthier, M; Cardona, J; Van Ditzhuyzen, O; Gambert, C

    1996-03-01

    Improvement of the care to the neonate relys on an increased number of pediatricians in nurseries and adequate neonatal resuscitation training. A questionaire about the optimal modes of neonatal resuscitation training was sent to 132 pediatricians in charge of a neonatal unit or a neonatal intensive care unit. Response rate was 80.3%. The training program was targeted to be regional for the organization and for the evaluation. Nevertheless, 41% of answers also favored local evaluation. Duties in neonatal intensive care unit or transportation system, with differences among areas, were the proposed training choices. The pediatrician was considered to be the first person as an instructor and also as a learner in a multidisciplinary training program. Cooperation between primary and tertiary centers physicians was proposed as the best way for training. Proposed criteria for evaluating training efficacy included neonatal mortality and meconium aspiration syndrome rates. Government funding was suggested in 92% of answers. It seems necessary to perform a wide neonatal resuscitation training program. This multidisciplinary approach should be regional and follow the guidelines of the neonatal study group.

  19. TRAINING IN MALE SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH FOR A PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAIFUL BI

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, I was awarded a scholarship from Universiti Sains Malaysia for Fellowship training at Monash University (MU for one year. The objective of the training programme was to develop knowledge and skills in several areas, including androgen deficiency, male infertility, prostate disease, testicular tumours, sexual dysfunction and sexually transmitted diseases. The training programme consisted of attachments with clinical specialists, completion of a course work module and a research project. After completion of the training programme, I believe that Primary Care Physicians (PCPs will benefit from undertaking the training programme that I had completed. It will enable PCPs to assume leadership roles in this multidisciplinary area. The ability of PCPs in handling sexual and reproductive health issues in men will definitely be a more cost effective form of care for patients, particularly as the number of specialists is limited, and even more importantly, it will be satisfying for the patient and the physician.

  20. Enhancing nonhuman primate care and welfare through the use of positive reinforcement training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laule, Gail; Whittaker, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are excellent subjects for the enhancement of care and welfare through training. The broad range of species offers tremendous behavioral diversity, and individual primates show varying abilities to cope with the stressors of captivity, which differ depending on the venue. Biomedical facilities include small single cages, pair housing, and breeding corrals with large social groups. Zoos have social groupings of differing sizes, emphasizing public display and breeding. Sanctuaries have nonbreeding groups of varying sizes and often of mixed species. In every venue, the primary objective is to provide good quality care, with minimal stress. Positive reinforcement training improves care and reduces stress by enlisting a primate's voluntary cooperation with targeted activities, including both husbandry and medical procedures. It can also improve socialization, reduce abnormal behaviors, and increase species-typical behaviors. This article reviews the results already achieved with positive reinforcement training and suggests further possibilities for enhancing primate care and welfare.

  1. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-08-01

    Community engagement and planning (CEP) could improve dissemination of depression care quality improvement in underresourced communities, but whether its effects on provider training participation differ from those of standard technical assistance, or resources for services (RS), is unknown. This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community agencies jointly, and RS, which provided technical support to individual programs. Matched programs from health care and social-community service sectors in two communities were randomly assigned to RS or CEP. Data were from 1,622 eligible staff members from 95 enrolled programs. Primary outcomes were any staff trained (for programs) and total hours of training (for staff). Secondary staff-level outcomes were hours of training in specific depression collaborative care components. CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in any training (p=.006). Within health care sectors, CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in training (p=.016), but within social-community sectors, there was no difference in training by intervention. Among staff who participated in training, mean training hours were greater among CEP programs versus RS programs for any type of training (ptraining related to each component of depression care (pstaff participation in depression care improvement efforts in underresourced communities.

  2. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Disciplinary supervision following ethics complaints: goals, tasks, and ethical dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Janet T

    2014-11-01

    Clinical supervision is considered an integral component of the training of psychologists, and most of the professional literature is focused on this type of supervision. But psychologists also may supervise fully credentialed colleagues in other circumstances. One such context occurs when licensing boards mandate supervision as part of a disciplinary order. When supervision is provided in disciplinary cases, there are significant implications for the ethical dimensions of the supervisory relationship and concomitant ethical challenges for supervisors. Not only are the goals, objectives, and supervisory tasks of disciplinary supervision distinct from other types of supervision, but the supervisor's ethical responsibilities also encompass unique dimensions. Competence, informed consent, boundaries, confidentiality, and documentation are examined. Recommendations for reports to licensing boards include a statement of the clinical or ethical problems instigating discipline, description of how these problems have been addressed, and an assessment of the supervisee's current practices and ability to perform competently.

  4. Projected estimators for robust semi-supervised classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krijthe, Jesse H.; Loog, Marco

    2017-01-01

    For semi-supervised techniques to be applied safely in practice we at least want methods to outperform their supervised counterparts. We study this question for classification using the well-known quadratic surrogate loss function. Unlike other approaches to semi-supervised learning, the procedure...... proposed in this work does not rely on assumptions that are not intrinsic to the classifier at hand. Using a projection of the supervised estimate onto a set of constraints imposed by the unlabeled data, we find we can safely improve over the supervised solution in terms of this quadratic loss. More...... specifically, we prove that, measured on the labeled and unlabeled training data, this semi-supervised procedure never gives a lower quadratic loss than the supervised alternative. To our knowledge this is the first approach that offers such strong, albeit conservative, guarantees for improvement over...

  5. The roles and training of primary care doctors: China, India, Brazil and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert; Almeida, Magda; Wong, William C W; Kumar, Raman; von Pressentin, Klaus B

    2015-12-04

    China, India, Brazil and South Africa contain 40% of the global population and are key emerging economies. All these countries have a policy commitment to universal health coverage with an emphasis on primary health care. The primary care doctor is a key part of the health workforce, and this article, which is based on two workshops at the 2014 Towards Unity For Health Conference in Fortaleza, Brazil, compares and reflects on the roles and training of primary care doctors in these four countries. Key themes to emerge were the need for the primary care doctor to function in support of a primary care team that provides community-orientated and first-contact care. This necessitates task-shifting and an openness to adapt one's role in line with the needs of the team and community. Beyond clinical competence, the primary care doctor may need to be a change agent, critical thinker, capability builder, collaborator and community advocate. Postgraduate training is important as well as up-skilling the existing workforce. There is a tension between training doctors to be community-orientated versus filling the procedural skills gaps at the facility level. In training, there is a need to plan postgraduate education at scale and reform the system to provide suitable incentives for doctors to choose this as a career path. Exposure should start at the undergraduate level. Learning outcomes should be socially accountable to the needs of the country and local communities, and graduates should be person-centred comprehensive generalists.

  6. 导师制对本科生培养的作用和意义%The Role and Significance of Supervision System in the Training of Undergraduates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符水龙

    2001-01-01

    In modern universities, graduates are all directed by theirsupervisors. But it is very rare for undergraduates to be supervised as graduates. Based on the experience obtained from directing juniors in the secondary lab-class, the significance and influence of this kind of education is investigated. It shows that supervision system of undergraduates is the main constituent of mental education and management system; it develops the teaching method effectively as well as enhancing the secondary practice-class. Supervision system of undergraduates shows advanced approach in improving the qualities of the university undergraduates.%在高等院校,硕士生、博士生的培养一般实行导师制,而本科生的培养采用导师制的比较鲜见。在本科生导师制试点的基础上,重点对导师制在本科生培养中的作用和意义进行了论述:导师制是学生思想政治教育和管理体制的重要组成部分;导师制能有效促进当前习惯的教学模式的改革和完善;导师制是开展第二课堂活动的好制度。高等学校在本科生培养中有条件广泛实行导师制,应重视推广这一制度。

  7. Online PTSD Diagnosis and Treatment Training for Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    care capacity,9 there are also other well-described patient-level barriers to mental health care such as stigma , cultural attitudes, negative...including hypothesized underlying mechanisms, their knowledge and understanding of these psychotherapies were not maintained after 30 days. Having...a trusted PCP explain in plain language the rationale for evidence-based trauma-focused psychotherapies to a patient suffering from PTSD can be

  8. Improving Nursing Home Care through Training and Job Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyer, Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Short-term longitudinal study assessed single and combined effects of two interventions designed to affect nursing assistants' (n=193) performance by increasing knowledge and motivation. Four sites included skills training only, job redesign only, both interventions, and control. Significant differences were found in knowledge in comparisons…

  9. 关系抽取中基于本体的远监督样本扩充%Extending Training Set in Distant Supervision by Ontology for Relation Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳丹彤; 瞿剑峰; 叶育鑫

    2014-01-01

    Distant supervision is a suitable method for relation extraction in big data. It provides a large amount of sample data by aligning relation instances in knowledge base with nature sentences in corpus. In this paper, a new method of distant supervision with expansion of ontology-based sampling is investigated to address the difficulty of extracting relations from sparse training data. First, an ontology which has a deep link with relation extraction is sought through the definition of cover ratio and volume ratio. Second, some relation instances are added by ontology reasoning and examples of queries. Finally, the expansion of training sets is completed by aligning the new relation instances and nature sentences in corpus. The experiment shows that the presented method is capable of extracting some relations whose training sets are weak, a task impossible by the normal distant supervision method.%远监督学习是适合大数据下关系抽取任务的一种学习算法。它通过对齐知识库中的关系实例和文本集中的自然语句,为学习算法提供大规模样本数据。利用本体进行关系实例的自动扩充,用于解决基于远监督学习的关系抽取任务中部分待抽取关系的实例匮乏问题。该方法首先通过定义关系覆盖率和公理容积率,来寻找与关系抽取任务关联性大的本体;然后,借助本体推理中的实例查询增加待抽取关系下的关系实例;最后,通过对齐新增关系实例和文本集中的自然语句,达到扩充样本的效果。实验结果表明:基于本体的远监督学习样本扩充方法能够有效完成样本匮乏的关系抽取任务,进一步提升远监督学习方法在大数据环境下的关系抽取能力。

  10. The Effect of Emotion Regulation Training on Occupational Stress of Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedpanah, Darya; Salehi, Shiva; Moghaddam, Ladan Fattah

    2016-12-01

    Occupational stress is a common, serious and costly health problem in work environment. Nursing is a very stressful job high level of stress in this job affects nurses' physical and mental health. To investigate the effect of emotion regulation training of occupational stress on critical care nurses in two teaching hospitals in Sanandaj, Iran. This interventional study was conducted on 60 nurses working in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Critical Care Unit (CCU) in two teaching hospitals in Sanandaj, Iran. Data were collected using Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) questionnaire. The questionnaire in both intervention and control groups before and after the training sessions of emotion regulation training were completed. Data were analysed using SPSS Version 20. Statistical indices such as frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation and also t-test, Chi-square test and paired t-test were used. Mean occupation stress score in the intervention group before emotion regulation training was 136.6±24.6 and after training was 113.02±16.2 (p = 0.001). Occupational stress dimensions including; conflict with physicians, problems with peers, workload, uncertainty concerning treatment and problems related to patients and their families in the intervention group compared with the control group was statistically significant (p <0.05). Emotion regulation training is effective in reducing occupation stress of critical care nurses.

  11. Cluster randomized trial of a mHealth intervention "ImTeCHO" to improve delivery of proven maternal, neonatal, and child care interventions through community-based Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) by enhancing their motivation and strengthening supervision in tribal areas of Gujarat, India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Dhiren; Desai, Shrey; Dave, Kapilkumar; Shah, Shobha; Desai, Gayatri; Dholakia, Nishith; Gopalan, Ravi; Shah, Pankaj

    2017-06-09

    To facilitate the delivery of proven maternal, neonatal, and child health (MNCH) services, a new cadre of village-based frontline workers, called the Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs), was created in 2005 under the aegis of the National Rural Health Mission in India. Evaluations have noted that coverage of selected MNCH services to be delivered by the ASHAs is low. Reasons for low coverage are inadequate supervision and support to ASHAs apart from insufficient skills, poor quality of training, and complexity of tasks to be performed. The proposed study aims to implement and evaluate an innovative intervention based on mobile phone technology (mHealth) to improve the performance of ASHAs through better supervision and support in predominantly tribal and rural communities of Gujarat, India. This is a two-arm, stratified, cluster randomized trial of 36 months in which the units of randomization will be Primary Health Centers (PHCs). There are 11 PHCs in each arm. The intervention is a newly built mobile phone application used in the public health system and evaluated in three ways: (1) mobile phone as a job aid to ASHAs to increase coverage of MNCH services; (2) mobile phone as a job aid to ASHAs and Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs) to increase coverage of care among complicated cases by facilitating referrals, if indicated and home-based care; (3) web interface as a job aid for medical officers and PHC staff to improve supervision and support to the ASHA program. Participants of the study are pregnant women, mothers, infants, ASHAs, and PHC staff. Primary outcome measures are a composite index made of critical, proven MNCH services and the proportion of neonates who were visited by ASHAs at home within the first week of birth. Secondary outcomes include coverage of selected MNCH services and care sought by complicated cases. Outcomes will be measured by conducting household surveys at baseline and post-intervention which will be compared with usual practice

  12. The Effects of Staff Training on the Types of Interactions Observed at Two Group Homes for Foster Care Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosland, Kimberly A.; Dunlap, Glen; Sager, Wayne; Neff, Bryon; Wilcox, Catherine; Blanco, Alfredo; Giddings, Tamela

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: An extensive literature base exists for behavioral parent training; however, few studies have focused on training direct care staff at group home and residential facilities for children. This study was conducted to determine whether a behavioral staff training program consisting of classroom training and in-home feedback would improve…

  13. Mandatory communication skills training for cancer and palliative care staff: does one size fit all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mary; Payne, Sheila; O'Brien, Terri

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of good communication between healthcare professionals and patients facing cancer or end of life. In England, a new national 3-day training programme called 'Connected' has been developed and is now mandatory for all cancer and palliative care professionals. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of staff in one region to undertaking this training. A survey questionnaire was developed through a series of discussions with experts and semi-structured interviews with five healthcare professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to 200 cancer and palliative care staff; 109 were completed and returned. There were significant differences between doctors' and nurses' attitudes to communication skills training, with doctors demonstrating more negative attitudes. More nurses than doctors felt that communication skills training should be mandatory for cancer and palliative care professionals (p ≤ 0.001), whilst more doctors felt that these staff should already be skilled communicators and not require further training (p ≤ 0.001). Nurses also self-rated their communication skills more highly than doctors. The current 'one size fits all' approach being taken nationally to advanced communication skills training does not meet the training preferences of all healthcare professionals, and it is recommended that tailoring courses to individuals' needs should be considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Newborn Care Training and Perinatal Mortality in Communities in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; Goudar, Shivaprasad S.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Chomba, Elwyn; Tshefu, Antoinette; Garces, Ana; Parida, Sailajanandan; Althabe, Fernando; McClure, Elizabeth M.; Derman, Richard J.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Bose, Carl; Krebs, Nancy F.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Buekens, Pierre; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Hartwell, Tyler D.; Wright, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ninety-eight percent of the 3.7 million neonatal deaths and 3.3 million stillbirths per year occur in developing countries, and evaluation of community-based interventions is needed. Methods Using a train-the-trainer model, local instructors trained birth attendants from rural communities in six countries (Argentina, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, India, Pakistan, and Zambia) in the World Health Organization Essential Newborn Care course (routine neonatal care, resuscitation, thermoregulation, breastfeeding, kangaroo care, care of the small baby, and common illnesses), and in a modified version of the American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program (in depth basic resuscitation), except in Argentina. The Essential Newborn Care intervention was assessed with a before and after design (N=57, 643). The Neonatal Resuscitation Program intervention was assessed as a cluster randomized controlled trial (N=62,366). The primary outcome was 7-day neonatal mortality. Results The 7-day follow-up rate was 99.2%. Following Essential Newborn Care training, there was no significant reduction from baseline in all-cause 7-day neonatal (RR 0.99; CI 0.81, 1.22) or perinatal mortality; there was a significant reduction in the stillbirth rate (RR 0.69; CI 0.54, 0.88; p<0.01). Seven-day neonatal mortality, stillbirth, and perinatal mortality were not reduced in clusters randomized to Neonatal Resuscitation Program training as compared with control clusters. Conclusions Seven-day neonatal mortality did not decrease following the introduction of Essential Newborn Care training of community-based birth attendants, although the rate of stillbirths was reduced following this intervention. Subsequent training in the Neonatal Resuscitation Program did not significantly reduce the mortality rates. (clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00136708). PMID:20164485

  15. Recruiting Quarterbacks: Strategies for Revitalizing Training in Primary Care Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H

    2016-02-01

    Current U.S. primary care workforce shortages and trainees' declining interest in primary care residency training, especially regarding primary care internal medicine, have many parallels with circumstances in the early 1970s, when modern adult primary care first emerged. Rediscovery of the lessons learned and the solutions developed at that time and applying them to the current situation have the potential to help engage a new generation of young physicians in the primary care mission.The author compares the internal medicine residency primary care track at the University of New Mexico, described by Brislen and colleagues in this issue, with the nation's first three-year primary care internal medicine residency track introduced at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1973. Strategies for addressing the challenges of primary care practice and improving learner attitudes toward the field are discussed. The author suggests that primary care physicians should be likened to "quarterbacks" rather than "gatekeepers" or "providers" to underscore the intensity of training, level of responsibility, degree of professionalism, and amount of compensation required for this profession. The advent of multidisciplinary team practice, modern health information technology, and fundamental payment reform promises to dramatically alter the picture of primary care, restoring its standing as one of the best job descriptions in medicine.

  16. Perceptions of substance use, treatment options and training needs among Iranian primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan Kate A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to be optimally effective, continuing training programmes for health-care professionals need to be tailored so that they target specific knowledge deficits, both in terms of topic content and appropriate intervention strategies. A first step in designing tailored treatment programmes is to identify the characteristics of the relevant health-care professional group, their current levels of content and treatment knowledge, the estimated prevalence of drug and alcohol problems among their patients and their preferred options for receiving continuing education and training. This study reports the results of a survey of 53 primary care physicians working in Iran. The majority were male, had a mean age of 44 years and saw approximately 94 patients per week. In terms of their patients' drug use, primary care physicians thought most patients with a substance use problem were male, women were most likely to use tobacco (52%, opium (32% and marijuana/hashish and young people were most likely to use tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and heroin. Counselling and nicotine patches were the treatments most commonly provided. Although the majority (55% reported referring patients to other services, more than a third did not. Most primary care physicians reported being interested in attending further training on substance abuse issues. The implications of these data for ongoing education and training of primary care physicians in Iran are discussed.

  17. Train-the-trainer intervention to increase nursing teamwork and decrease missed nursing care in acute care patient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Xie, Boqin; Ronis, David L

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for patient safety and results in less missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to test the impact of a train-the-trainer intervention on the level of satisfaction with nursing teamwork and the amount of missed nursing care. This study used a quasiexperimental design with repeated measures taken at pretest, posttest, and 2 months after completion of the intervention. The sample for this study was the nursing staff on three medical-surgical units in three separate acute care hospitals (one unit in each hospital). Three nurses from each unit underwent a training program and then taught the skills and knowledge they acquired to the staff members on their units in three-hour-long sessions. The training involved staff role-playing scenarios based on teamwork problems that occur regularly on inpatient units in acute care hospitals followed by debriefing, which focused on teamwork behaviors (e.g., leadership, team orientation, backup, performance monitoring) and missed nursing care. Four measures were used to test the efficacy of this intervention: The Nursing Teamwork Survey, the MISSCARE Survey, and questions about the knowledge of and satisfaction with teamwork. Return rates for the surveys ranged from 73% to 84%. Follow-up tests individually comparing pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest were conducted within the mixed model and used the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Teamwork increased (F = 6.91, df = 259.01, p = .001) and missed care decreased (F = 3.59, df = 251.29, p = .03) over time. Nursing staff also reported a higher level of satisfaction with teamwork and an increase of teamwork knowledge after the intervention. The intervention tested in this study shows promise of being an effective and efficient approach to increase nursing teamwork and decrease missed nursing care.

  18. Measuring progressive independence with the resident supervision index: empirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashner, T Michael; Byrne, John M; Chang, Barbara K; Henley, Steven S; Golden, Richard M; Aron, David C; Cannon, Grant W; Gilman, Stuart C; Holland, Gloria J; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Keitz, Sheri A; Muchmore, Elaine A; Kashner, Tetyana K; Wicker, Annie B

    2010-03-01

    A Resident Supervision Index (RSI) developed by our research team quantifies the intensity of resident supervision in graduate medical education, with the goal of testing for progressive independence. The 4-part RSI method includes a survey instrument for staff and residents (RSI Inventory), a strategy to score survey responses, a theoretical framework (patient centered optimal supervision), and a statistical model that accounts for the presence or absence of supervision and the intensity of patient care. The RSI Inventory data came from 140 outpatient encounters involving 57 residents and 37 attending physicians during a 3-month period at a Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinic. Responses are scored to quantitatively measure the intensity of resident supervision across 10 levels of patient services (staff is absent, is present, participated, or provided care with or without a resident), case discussion (resident-staff interaction), and oversight (staff reviewed case, reviewed medical chart, consulted with staff, or assessed patient). Scores are analyzed by level and for patient care using a 2-part model (supervision initiated [yes or no] versus intensity once supervision was initiated). All resident encounters had patient care supervision, resident oversight, or both. Consistent with the progressive independence hypothesis, residents were 1.72 (P  =  .019) times more likely to be fully responsible for patient care with each additional postgraduate year. Decreasing case complexity, increasing clinic workload, and advanced nonmedical degrees among attending staff were negatively associated with supervision intensity, although associations varied by supervision level. These data are consistent with the progressive independence hypothesis in graduate medical education and offer empirical support for the 4-part RSI method to quantify the intensity of resident supervision for research, program evaluation, and resident assessment purposes. Before

  19. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p values. The behavior category 'interactions with others' in DCM also demonstrated a significant increase in the third round compared to the first round (p = 0.041). Staff training based on PCC and DCM could effectively improve the QOL of residents with dementia.

  20. Networks of Professional Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Ryba, Ken

    2013-01-01

    An ecological analysis of the supervisory activity of 31 New Zealand school psychologists examined simultaneously the theories of school psychology, supervision practices, and the contextual qualities that mediated participants' supervisory actions. The findings indicated that the school psychologists worked to achieve the supervision goals of…

  1. Forskellighed i supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Birgitte; Beck, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Indtryk og tendenser fra den anden danske konference om supervision, som blev holdt på Københavns Universitet i oktober 2008......Indtryk og tendenser fra den anden danske konference om supervision, som blev holdt på Københavns Universitet i oktober 2008...

  2. Experiments in Virtual Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rob

    This paper examines the use of First Class conferencing software to create a virtual culture among research students and as a vehicle for supervision and advising. Topics discussed include: computer-mediated communication and research; entry to cyberculture, i.e., research students' induction into the research community; supervision and the…

  3. The relationship between drivers and policy in the implementation of cultural competency training in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Nisha; Betancourt, Joseph R; Park, Elyse R; Sprague-Martinez, Linda

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, cultural competence has appeared on the agendas of the medical profession as well as other health care providers. Through semistructured interviews with staff at different types of health care institutions, we explored the motivation for and barriers against the implementation of cultural competence training. The findings show that while some progress has been made, there is still work to be done in making cultural competency an integral part of the organizational fabric of health care. National organizations need to consider their leadership role in helping health care organizations translate broad statements of cultural competence into meaningful action.

  4. Smile Train: The ascendancy of cleft care in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Subodh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Though India has an estimated population of one million untreated cleft patients, facilities for its treatment have been limited and are not evenly distributed across the country. Furthermore, a paucity of committed cleft surgeons in fewer hospitals to provide quality surgical treatment to these patients, poverty, illiteracy, superstitions and poor connectivity in some remote regions severely limit the chances of an average cleft lip patient born in India from receiving rational and effective comprehensive treatment for his/her malady. The Smile Train Project with its singular focus on cleft patients started its philanthropic activities in India in the year 2000. It made hospitals and included clefts surgeon equal partners in this programme and helped them treat as many cleft patients as they possibly could. The Project encouraged improvement of the training and infrastructure in various centres across the length and breadth of the region. The Project received an unprecedented success in terms of growth of number of centres, cleft surgeons and quantum of cleft patients reporting for treatment. The G S Memorial Hospital is one such partner hospital. It started innovative outreach programmes and took a holistic view of the needs of these patients and their families. With the support of the Smile Train, it has not only succeeded in providing treatment to more than 14,500 patients in 5 years, but has also devised innovative outreach programmes and seamlessly incorporated salient changes in the hospital system to suit the needs of the target population.

  5. A comparison of how behavioral health organizations utilize training to prepare for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Barrenger, Stacey; Manuel, Jennifer; Mercado, Micaela; McKay, Mary; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-02-14

    Under the Affordable Care Act, States have obtained Medicaid waivers to overhaul their behavioral health service systems to improve quality and reduce costs. Critical to implementation of broad service delivery reforms has been the preparation of organizations responsible for service delivery. This study focused on one large-scale initiative to overhaul its service system with the goal of improving service quality and reducing costs. The study examined the participation of behavioral health organizations in technical assistance efforts and the extent to which organizational factors related to their participation. This study matched two datasets to examine the organizational characteristics and training participation for 196 behavioral health organizations. Organizational characteristics were drawn from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS). Training variables were drawn from the Clinical Technical Assistance Center's master training database. Chi-square analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the proportion of organizations that participated in training, the organizational characteristics (size, population served, service quality, infrastructure) that predicted participation in training, and for those who participated, the type (clinical or business) and intensity of training (webinar, learning collaborative, in-person) they received. Overall 142 (72. 4%) of the sample participated in training. Organizations who pursued training were more likely to be large in size (p = .02), serve children in addition to adults (p organizational readiness for health care reform initiatives among behavioral health organizations.

  6. Semi-supervised sparse coding

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-07-06

    Sparse coding approximates the data sample as a sparse linear combination of some basic codewords and uses the sparse codes as new presentations. In this paper, we investigate learning discriminative sparse codes by sparse coding in a semi-supervised manner, where only a few training samples are labeled. By using the manifold structure spanned by the data set of both labeled and unlabeled samples and the constraints provided by the labels of the labeled samples, we learn the variable class labels for all the samples. Furthermore, to improve the discriminative ability of the learned sparse codes, we assume that the class labels could be predicted from the sparse codes directly using a linear classifier. By solving the codebook, sparse codes, class labels and classifier parameters simultaneously in a unified objective function, we develop a semi-supervised sparse coding algorithm. Experiments on two real-world pattern recognition problems demonstrate the advantage of the proposed methods over supervised sparse coding methods on partially labeled data sets.

  7. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs.

  8. The effect of formal, neonatal communication-intervention training on mothers in kangaroo care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alta Kritzinger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to low-birth-weight, preterm birth, HIV and/or AIDS and poverty-related factors, South Africa presents with an increased prevalence of infants at risk of language delay. A Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC unit offers unique opportunities for training.Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine if formal, neonatal communication-intervention training had an effect on mothers’ knowledge and communication interaction with their high-risk infants.Methods: Three groups of mothers participated: Group 1 was trained whilst practicing KMC; Group 2 was not trained but practiced KMC; and Group 3 was also not trained but practiced sporadic KMC. Ten mothers per group were matched for age, education level and birth order of their infants. The individual training was based on graded sensory stimulation and responsive mother-infant communication interaction, which emphasised talking and singing by the mother.Results: Significant differences were found in mother-infant communication interaction between all three groups, which indicated a positive effect on Group 1 with training. Group 2, KMC without training, also had a positive effect on interaction. However, Group 1 mothers with training demonstrated better knowledge of their infants and were more responsive during interaction than the other two groups.Conclusion: The present study suggests that neonatal communication-intervention training adds value to a KMC programme. Normal 0 false false false EN-ZA X-NONE X-NONE

  9. A Systematic Review of Serious Games in Training Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ryan; DeMaria, Samuel; Goldberg, Andrew; Katz, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Serious games are computer-based games designed for training purposes. They are poised to expand their role in medical education. This systematic review, conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines, aimed to synthesize current serious gaming trends in health care training, especially those pertaining to developmental methodologies and game evaluation. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were queried for relevant documents published through December 2014. Of the 3737 publications identified, 48 of them, covering 42 serious games, were included. From 2007 to 2014, they demonstrate a growth from 2 games and 2 genres to 42 games and 8 genres. Overall, study design was heterogeneous and methodological quality by MERQSI score averaged 10.5/18, which is modest. Seventy-nine percent of serious games were evaluated for training outcomes. As the number of serious games for health care training continues to grow, having schemas that organize how educators approach their development and evaluation is essential for their success.

  10. Abortion care training framework for nurses within the context of higher education in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Smit

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The high morbidity and mortality rate due to illegal abortions in South Africa necessitated the implementation of abortion legislation in February 1997. Abortion legislation stipulates that registered nurses who had undergone the proposed abortion care training — certified nurses — may carry out abortions within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Currently it seems that an inadequate number of nurses are being trained in the Western Cape to provide pregnant women with counselling, to perform abortions and/or refer problem cases. No real attempts have since been made by higher education institutions in the Western Cape to offer abortion care training for nurses. This case study explores the situation of certified nurses and the context in which they provide abortion care in different regions of the Western Cape. The sampling included a random, stratified (non-proportional number of designated state health care facilities in the Western Cape, a non-probability purposive sampling of nurses who provided abortion care, a non-probability convenience sample of women who had received abortion care, and a non-probability purposive sampling of final-year pre-registration nursing students. Data was generated by means of questionnaires, a checklist and semi-structured interviews. The main findings of this study indicate that the necessary infrastructure required for legal abortion is in place. However, the ongoing shortage of trained health care practitioners hampers abortion care services. Deficiencies were identified in the existing provincial protocol as some of the guidelines were either not in use or had become obsolete. Certified midwives who had been trained by the regional offices of the Department of Health: Western Cape were skilled in carrying out the abortion procedure, but other aspects of abortion care mainly carried out by other categories of nurses required more attention. This article suggests a training framework that should provide

  11. The necessity analysis of supervision and administration on waste from Beijing -Kowloon through train%京九直通列车(T98次)废弃物监督管理必要性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹永斌; 刘振春; 朱家林; 许匡

    2015-01-01

    京九直通车是来往于北京和香港九龙之间的国际列车,全程距离2475公里,约需运行24小时。近年来,京九直通车(T98次)废弃物发生量呈持续增长趋势,主要包括厨余垃圾、生活垃圾等种类。京九直通车(T98次)废弃物的检疫监管工作总体情况良好,但也存在着终末处置不规范、从业人员操作不严格、协作机制不成熟、监管模式不统一等问题。这些问题增加了国际间传染病的传播风险和控制难度,导致动物传染病、寄生虫病和植物危险性病、虫、杂草以及其他有害生物传入,影响我国农、林、牧、渔业生产和人民身体健康,阻碍了我国对外经济贸易的健康发展。因此,出入境检验检疫机构对此应特别予以重视,采取有效措施改善现存废弃物检疫监管问题,建立详实具体、科学有效的入境列车废弃物监督管理模式。%Abtract Beijing -Kowloon through train is operated for about 24 hours between Beijing and Hongkong,with a to-tal distance of 2475km.The waste produced by the incoming passengers in the Beijing -Kowloon through train (T98)has increased continually in recent years,including garbage such as kitchen garbage and household gar-bage.The quarantine,supervision and administration of the waste from Beijing -Kowloon through train are worked very well in general,but there are also some problems such as de -normalized terminal disposal,less -stringent manual operation,immature coordination mechanism and inconsistent supervision patterns.The above problems raise a risk and heighten the control difficulty of infectious diseases from spreading into or out of the country,resul-ting in parasitic diseases of animals,insect pests and weeds dangerous to plants,and other harmful organisms from spreading into or out of the country,having an effect on the production of agriculture,forestry,animal husbandry and fishery as well as human health

  12. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. A situational analysis of training for behaviour change counselling for primary care providers, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelra Malan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet are a major contributor to primary care morbidity and the burden of disease. The need for healthcare-provider training in evidence-based lifestyle interventions has been acknowledged by the National Department of Health. However, local studies suggest that counselling on lifestyle modification from healthcare providers is inadequate and this may, in part, be attributable to a lack of training.Aim: This study aimed to assess the current training courses for primary healthcare providers in the Western Cape.Setting: Stellenbosch University and University of Cape Town.Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informants (trainers of primary care nurses and registrars in family medicine and two focus groups (nine nurses and eight doctors from both Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town.Results: Trainers lack confidence in the effectiveness of behaviour change counselling and in current approaches to training. Current training is limited by time constraints and is not integrated throughout the curriculum – there is a focus on theory rather than modelling and practice, as well as a lack of both formative and summative assessment. Implementation of training is limited by a lack of patient education materials, poor continuity of care and record keeping, conflicting lifestyle messages and an unsupportive organisational culture.Conclusion: Revising the approach to current training is necessary in order to improve primary care providers’ behaviour change counselling skills. Primary care facilities need to create a more conducive environment that is supportive of behaviour change counselling.

  14. Supervision to Enhance Educational and Vocational Guidance Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Hazel L.

    2010-01-01

    Supervision to support the work of career practitioners is evident in many countries, but is not universal. This author presents a literature review, intending to emphasise the prime importance of developing supervision for guidance work. The author also considers the issues facing those training to develop the role of supervisors in southeast…

  15. Some reflections on clinical supervision: an existential-phenomenological paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A

    1998-03-01

    This paper reviews psychotherapy, counselling, and nursing literature related to ideas of clinical supervision and attempts to illuminate areas important to effective health related practice and specifically palliative care. Included are explorations of existentialism, phenomenology, existential phenomenology and psychoanalytical concepts. The phenomenological idea of lived experience is outlined and the Heideggerian notion of authenticity is explored in context. The paper also examines dynamic forces such as hope, trust and personal values that might influence clinical supervision design and so inform a framework for practice. An existential-phenomenological method of supervision is offered as one basis for professional practice. The central recommendation of this paper is, however, to identify relevant value and belief systems to direct clinical supervision. Nursing models might appropriately instruct approaches to supervision. The writer considers the phenomenological idea of the lived experiences as a means by which to at once capture the essence of palliative care nursing and guide the supervision towards the existential idea of authenticity.

  16. 地方政府购买社区居家养老服务监督机制探析%Analysis on the Operational Supervision Mechanisms of Home-Based Care Service for/he Aged Purchased by the Government

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡光景

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the family care and institution care, Home-based Care is the most advisable choice for the aged. With the development of home-based care service, it is necessary for the government to supervise the operation of the service. Take England and Hong Kong as the examples, and refer to the abroad supervision experience of home-based care service. It not only supervises the Service Providers, but alse supervises the government agencies in the operational supervision mechanisms in foreign. On these foundations, the article devises the supervision indexes, and structures the operational supervision system of home-based care service for the aged in the urban areas of China.%同家庭养老、机构养老相比,社区居家养老是一种更适合老年人的理想养老模式。随着城市社区居家养老服务的发展,对政府购买社区居家养老服务运作监督显得更为重要。介绍英国和我国香港地区的社区居家养老服务监督经验。英国和香港社区居家养老服务的运作监督不仅表现为对服务提供机构的监督,还表现为对政府主管部门的监督。在此基础之上,对我国地方政府购买社区居家服务的运作监督指标进行设计,构建我国地方政府购买社区居家养老服务运作监督体系。

  17. Do I Buy It? How AIDET? Training Changes Residents' Values about Patient Care

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Mechanick Braverman PhD; Elisabeth J. Kunkel MD; Leo Katz MD; Austin Katona BS; Teresa Heavens BA, CLSS; Andrew Miller MD, MPH; Jennifer Jasmine Arfaa PhD

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Acquiring communication and interpersonal skills is an important part of providing patient-centered care and improving patient satisfaction. This study explores whether residents' own values about patient communication can be influenced by training. Methods: As part of service excellence, a three-hour communication skills training in AIDET™ (Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You) was delivered to first and second Post-Graduate Year (PGY) residents (n = 123). A s...

  18. Palliative care training and research: The development in Europe and the Bologna experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Bolognesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of palliative care (PC culture spur the need of proper and formal training. Palliative medicine is not fully recognized as an academic medical discipline due to its humanistic influences, and studies show that physicians declare to be not prepared to provide care and pain management to dying patients. Nowadays, despite leading countries in PC being considered more innovative than other countries,such as Italy, facts show that the achievement of acknowledged discipline went through a long process. In Italy,professionals from about 450 PC units and organizations need to receive a proper and homogeneous training. In Italy, palliative medicine official certification is an undergoing process advocated by a few organizations and in Bologna the Academy of the Sciences of Palliative Medicine operates since 2007 with the defined mission of developing PC culture, also within the University. In order to be as much effective in pursuing its mission, the Academy has strengthened several international cooperation programs and today is leader in PC professional training and research in Italy. The recent law and its feasibility is fastening the process of development of Palliative Care Culture in Italy even if training is not properly regulated and official certification for physician is under evaluation. In Europe, the European Association of Palliative Care is stressing the need for training programs in palliative medicine and the outcomes of the dedicated task force on official certification and specialty in Palliative Medicine will remarkably force policy makers and national councils to officially recognize the discipline.

  19. A sustainable training strategy for improving health care following a catastrophic radiological or nuclear incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J; Bader, Judith L; Christensen, Doran; Koerner, John; Cuellar, John; Hinds, Sidney; Crapo, John; Glassman, Erik; Potter, A Bradley; Singletary, Lynda

    2014-02-01

    The detonation of a nuclear device in a US city would be catastrophic. Enormous loss of life and injuries would characterize an incident with profound human, political, social, and economic implications. Nevertheless, most responders have not received sufficient training about ionizing radiation, principles of radiation safety, or managing, diagnosing, and treating radiation-related injuries and illnesses. Members throughout the health care delivery system, including medical first responders, hospital first receivers, and health care institution support personnel such as janitors, hospital administrators, and security personnel, lack radiation-related training. This lack of knowledge can lead to failure of these groups to respond appropriately after a nuclear detonation or other major radiation incident and limit the effectiveness of the medical response and recovery effort. Efficacy of the response can be improved by getting each group the information it needs to do its job. This paper proposes a sustainable training strategy for spreading curricula throughout the necessary communities. It classifies the members of the health care delivery system into four tiers and identifies tasks for each tier and the radiation-relevant knowledge needed to perform these tasks. By providing education through additional modules to existing training structures, connecting radioactive contamination control to daily professional practices, and augmenting these systems with just-in-time training, the strategy creates a sustainable mechanism for giving members of the health care community improved ability to respond during a radiological or nuclear crisis, reducing fatalities, mitigating injuries, and improving the resiliency of the community.

  20. Supportive supervision for volunteers to deliver reproductive health education: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Debra; Negin, Joel; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Cumming, Robert

    2016-10-03

    Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) can be effective in improving pregnancy and newborn outcomes through community education. Inadequate supervision of CHVs, whether due to poor planning, irregular visits, or ineffective supervisory methods, is, however, recognized as a weakness in many programs. There has been little research on best practice supervisory or accompaniment models. From March 2014 to February 2015 a proof of concept study was conducted to compare training alone versus training and supportive supervision by paid CHWs (n = 4) on the effectiveness of CHVs (n = 82) to deliver education about pregnancy, newborn care, family planning and hygiene. The pair-matched cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight villages (four intervention and four control) in Budondo sub-county in Jinja, Uganda. Increases in desired behaviors were seen in both the intervention and control arms over the study period. Both arms showed high retention rates of CHVs (95 %). At 1 year follow-up there was a significantly higher prevalence of installed and functioning tippy taps for hand washing (p reproductive health care by addressing cultural norms and scientific misconceptions. Having a team of 2 CHWs to 40 CHVs enables close to community access to information, conversation and services. Supportive supervision involves creating a non-threatening, empowering environment in which both the CHV and the supervising CHW learn together and overcome obstacles that might otherwise demotivate the CHV. While the results seem promising for added value with supportive supervision for CHVs undertaking reproductive health activities, further research on a larger scale will be needed to substantiate the effect.

  1. Versões de sentido: um instrumento fenomenológico-existencial para a supervisão de psicoterapeutas iniciantes Sense's versions: a phenomenological-existential tool for the supervision of psychotherapists in training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Daniel Janja Bloc Boris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto discute, num primeiro momento, os dilemas e conflitos do psicoterapeuta iniciante, propondo estratégias de solução para a sua superação. A formação do psicoterapeuta é contínua e sistemática, persistindo ao longo de sua vida profissional. Assim, não é um treinamento pontual e circunstancial, realizado num único momento, mesmo que determinante, como os últimos semestres do curso de psicologia. Em seguida, o texto discute os diversos instrumentos comumente utilizados na formação do psicoterapeuta, especialmente a fundamentação teórica, a própria psicoterapia do psicoterapeuta, bem como a supervisão por parte de um profissional experiente. Neste sentido, destaca a importância da supervisão e, finalmente, aponta os benefícios da adoção das "versões de sentido" (Amatuzzi, 1989, 1995, 2001 como instrumento de consolidação dos primeiros passos do psicoterapeuta iniciante. Por meio de tal método, o psicoterapeuta iniciante registra suas impressões sobre si mesmo, sobre o cliente e/ou sobre a sua relação com ele, expressando a experiência imediata como pessoa a respeito daquela situação. Desta forma, as versões de sentido constituem um instrumento tanto objetivo quanto subjetivo, que facilita o trabalho de supervisão, pois pode revelar diversos sentidos da expressão do psicoterapeuta iniciante.The paper discusses, as a first step, dilemmas and conflicts of psychotherapists in training, proposing solution strategies for their overcoming. Psychotherapist's training is continuous and systematic, persisting along his/her professional lifetime. So, it is not a punctual and circumstantial training, made in an unique moment, even so in a significant one, as the last year of Psychology undergraduate degree. As a second step, the text discusses some tools usually used for the psychotherapist's training, specially the theoretical foundation, his/her own psychotherapy, as well the supervision of an experienced

  2. Cost-effectiveness and benefit of alternatives to improve training for prehospital trauma care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Herrera-Escamilla, Alejandro J; Contreras, Ismael; Vargas, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    In Latin America, there is a preponderance of prehospital trauma deaths. However, scarce resources mandate that any improvements in prehospital medical care must be cost-effective. This study sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of several approaches to improving training for personnel in three ambulance services in Mexico. In Monterrey, training was augmented with PreHospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) at a cost of [US] dollar 150 per medic trained. In San Pedro, training was augmented with Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and a locally designed airway management course, at a cost of dollar 400 per medic. Process and outcome of trauma care were assessed before and after the training of these medics and at a control site. The training was effective for both intervention services, with increases in basic airway maneuvers for patients in respiratory distress in Monterrey (16% before versus 39% after) and San Pedro (14% versus 64%). The role of endotrachal intubation for patients with respiratory distress increased only in San Pedro (5% versus 46%), in which the most intensive Advanced Life Support (ALS) training had been provided. However, mortality decreased only in Monterrey, where it had been the highest (8.2% before versus 4.7% after) and where the simplest and lowest cost interventions were implemented. There was no change in process or outcome in the control site. This study highlights the importance of assuring uniform, basic training for all prehospital providers. This is a more cost-effective approach than is higher-cost ALS training for improving prehospital trauma care in environments such as Latin America.

  3. Post-abortion adjustment of health care professionals in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkau, J P

    1991-01-01

    Sixty-three women students of the health care professions were surveyed about their abortion and post-abortion experiences, feelings, and attitudes. Variables predictive of short- and long-term adjustment, belief in the wisdom of the choice, and right to choose were analysed, as were effects on emotional and attitudinal responses of passage of time and pressure to abort. Most reported mild, transient, short-term negative effects, and generally benign long-term effects. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  4. Quality of Supervision as an Independent Contributor to an Anesthesiologist’s Individual Clinical Value

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dexter, Franklin; Hindman, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    ...., hours of direct clinical care), the same is not true for the quality of that effort. In our study, we consider the quality of clinical supervision provided by anesthesiologists who are supervising anesthesia residents and nurse anesthetists...

  5. Quality of Supervision as an Independent Contributor to an Anesthesiologist's Individual Clinical Value

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dexter, Franklin; Hindman, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    ...., hours of direct clinical care), the same is not true for the quality of that effort. In our study, we consider the quality of clinical supervision provided by anesthesiologists who are supervising anesthesia residents and nurse anesthetists...

  6. Magazine Picture Collage in Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Blythe C.; Guenette, Francis L.

    2010-01-01

    A magazine picture collage activity was used with three female counsellor education students as a vehicle to support them in processing their experience as counsellors in training. The use of magazine picture collage in group supervision is described, and the benefits and challenges are presented. The collages served as jumping-off points for…

  7. Enhancing Adult Learning in Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective/Background: For decades, across almost every training site, clinical supervision has been considered "central to the development of skills" in psychiatry. The crucial supervisor/supervisee relationship has been described extensively in the literature, most often framed as a clinical apprenticeship of the novice to the master craftsman.…

  8. Analysis of trauma care education in the South Sudan community health worker training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adedamola; Clark, Melissa; Donaldson, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Allied health workers are often on the front lines of caring for trauma patients; this is the case in South Sudan, where a system of community health workers (CHWs) and clinical officers (COs) form an essential part of the health care structure. However, curricula for these workers vary, and it is unclear how much these training programs include trauma education. HYPOTHESIS/METHODS: The CHW training curriculum in South Sudan was reviewed to evaluate the degree to which it incorporates trauma education, according to established guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first formal comparison of a CHW curriculum with established WHO trauma guidelines. The curriculum incorporated a number of essential components of the WHO guidelines; however, the concepts taught were limited in scope. The curriculum only covered about 50% of the content required for basic providers, with major deficiencies being in the management of head and spinal injuries, safety protocols for health care personnel, and in the management of pediatric patients. The CHW training curriculum lacks the requisite content to provide adequately a basic level of trauma care and requires amending to ensure that all South Sudan citizens receive appropriate treatment. It is recommended that other LMICs review their existing training curricula in order to improve their ability to provide adequate trauma care and to ensure they meet the basic WHO guidelines.

  9. NURSING CARE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT BASED TRAINING DECREASE NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION INCIDEN IN POST SECTIO CESAREA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Model of nursing care based on knowledge management can reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections through the performance of nurses in the prevention of infection. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identi fi cation knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post caesarean section. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasy experimental design. The population were all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation and a number of patients who is treated in hospitals A and B post sectio caesarea. Sample is comparised a total population all the nursing staff who worked in obstetrics installation according to criteria of the sample, and most of patients were taken care by nursing staff post caesarean section which is taken by random sampling 15 patients. Data was collected through observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data analysis which is used the t test. Result: The result was showed that there was signi fi cant difference in the incidence of nosocomial infection in patients with post sesctio caesarea in hospital before and after nursing care training based on knowledge management (tvalue = 2.316 and p = 0.028 < α = 0.05 level, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was lower after training than before training. Discussion: It can be concluded that training knowledge management based on nursing care effectives to reduce Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in Patients after Sectio Caesarea.

  10. Teacher education policies in conflict with the official curriculum: supervised training and “PIBID”(Institutional Program Initiation to teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rubens Lima Jardilino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of government policies designed to teacher training, this article aims to understand the relationship between the curricular training and Institutional program initiation to teaching profession (PIBID both performed at the School. The reflection is the result of observation and ethnography in the field and interviews with education professionals who work at schools where they develop the curricular training and PIBID. The research findings suggest a tenuous relationship, sometimes conflicting between curricular component and government program considering that both have similarities, have differentiated purposes, divided into objectives, legislation and separate funding. We can see a overlap of these activities that take place within the school.

  11. Autonomic function change following a supervised exercise program in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhani, Diana; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sadeghi, Masoumeh

    2013-03-01

    Few studies have investigated changes in autonomic function after training in patients with cardiovascular diseases, particularly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Heart rate recovery (HRR) is a strong predictor of mortality in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 8 weeks of supervised exercise training on autonomic function, which were assessed by heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and rate-pressure product (RPP) in CHF patients. 65 patients aged 57-82 years with CHF were assigned to two groups randomly. The first group received a supervised 8-week aerobic training program of 30-45 min sessions, 3 days per week on alternate days, while controls received standard medical care and were followed up. Body weight, body mass index, functional capacity, resting heart rate, HRR, resting systolic blood pressure, peak heart rate, peak systolic blood pressure, and RPP were measured before and after the study period. Medications and diet recommendations remained unchanged in both groups during the study period. The exercise group consisted of 33 patients with mean age of 61.54 ± 5.89 years and the controls were 32 patients with mean age of 60.94 ± 5.03 years. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures revealed a statistically significant difference in the exercise group compared to the control group regarding body mass index, resting heart rate, heart rate recover, functional capacity, peak heart rate, peak systolic blood pressure, peak RPP after 8 weeks (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, a multidisciplinary CR program with supervised exercise training support significantly improves functional capacity and autonomic function in CHF patients. Therefore, a supervised and guided exercise training program is safe and beneficial for patients with CHF with different etiologies.

  12. Impact of "+Contigo" training on the knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals about suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the results of "+Contigo" training, developed by nurses and directed at 66 health professionals of integrated school health teams in Primary Health Care.METHOD: quantitative with data collection through the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire, administered before and after the training.RESULTS: significant increases were observed in suicide prevention knowledge and in changing attitudes of health professionals towards individuals with suicidal behavior.CONCLUSION: these results allow us to affirm that nurses hold scientific and pedagogical knowledge that grant them a privileged position in the health teams, to develop training aimed at health professionals involved in suicide prevention.

  13. Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, René

    2000-01-01

    Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen. Procesarbejde i undervisning af voksne.......Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen. Procesarbejde i undervisning af voksne....

  14. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    and competences to engage in fruitful interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training program on students’ self-efficacy in interprofessional collaboration. Methods: The study was designed as a quasi-experiment with an intervention group (239 students......Background: Interprofessional collaboration potentially enhances patient safety and satisfaction, and reduces tensions and conflicts among health care professionals. Such collaboration is challenging, however, because health care professionals lack sufficient knowledge of other professional roles...

  15. A survey of the Queensland healthcare workforce: attitudes towards dementia care and training

    OpenAIRE

    Travers, Catherine M; Beattie, Elizabeth; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Fielding, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive attitudes of healthcare staff towards people with dementia promote higher quality care, although little is known about important factors that underlie positive attitudes. Key aims of this project were to explore the relationships between staff attitudes towards dementia, self-confidence in caring for people with dementia, experience and dementia education and training. Methods A brief online survey was developed and widely distributed to registered nurses and allied health...

  16. The use of simulation for training teamwork skills in health care: how low can you go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, J M; Baker, D P

    2004-10-01

    High fidelity simulation has become a popular technique for training teamwork skills in high risk industries such as aviation, health care, and nuclear power production. Simulation is a powerful training tool because it allows the trainer to systematically control the schedule of practice, presentation of feedback, and introduction (or suppression) of environmental distractions within a safe, controlled learning environment. Unfortunately, many within the training community have begun to use the terms simulation and high fidelity simulation almost synonymously. This is unfortunate because doing so overemphasises the instructional technology to the detriment of more substantive issues, such as the training's goals, content, and design. It also perpetuates several myths: simulation fidelity is unidimensional, or higher levels of simulation fidelity lead to increased training effectiveness. The authors propose a typology of simulation fidelity and provide examples of how the different classes of simulation have been successfully used to train teamwork skills in high risk industries. Guidelines are also provided to maximise the usefulness of simulation for training teamwork skills in health care.

  17. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiang; Yaoyun Zhang; Xiaolong Wang; Yang Qin; Wenying Han

    2015-01-01

    Distant supervision (DS) automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs), providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP). However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce...

  18. Mechanical muscle function and lean body mass during supervised strength training and testosterone therapy in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Thue; Christensen, Louise L; Madsen, Klavs

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study.......To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study....

  19. Commentary: Recommendations and remaining questions for health care leadership training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty's professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered.

  20. Training direct care staff to increase positive interactions with individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoder-Martell, Kimberly A; Dufrene, Brad A; Tingstrom, Daniel H; Olmi, D Joe; Jordan, Sara S; Biskie, Erika M; Sherman, Julie C

    2014-09-01

    This study tested the effects of direct training on direct care staff's initiation of positive interactions with individuals with developmental disabilities who resided in an intermediate care facility. Participants included four direct care staff and their residents. Direct training included real-time prompts delivered via a one-way radio, and data were collected for immediate and sustained increases in rates of direct care staff's positive interactions. Additionally, this study evaluated the link between increased rates of positive interactions and concomitant decreases in residents' challenging behaviors. A multiple baseline design across participants was used and results indicated that all direct care staff increased their rates of positive interactions during direct training. Moreover, all but one participant continued to engage residents in positive interactions at levels above the criterion during the maintenance phase and follow-up phases. The direct care staff member who did not initially meet the criterion improved to adequate levels following one brief performance feedback session. With regard to residents' challenging behaviors, across phases, residents engaged in low levels of challenging behaviors making those results difficult to evaluate. However, improvements in residents' rate of positive interactions were noted.

  1. Are future medical oncologists sufficiently trained to communicate about palliative care? The medical oncology curriculum in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlait, M; Van Belle, S; Leys, M

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care is considered an integral part of oncology and communicating this with patients is an unavoidable task for oncologists. This contribution investigated to what extent communication skills for communicating palliative care with patients are trained in the formal academic training program in medical oncology in Flanders, Belgium. The programme is based on the recommendations for a Global Core Curriculum in Medical Oncology, developed by The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) together with the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO). For this qualitative study, data were collected using document analysis from the ESMO/ASCO recommendations and the documents of the Flanders' medical oncology programme complemented with interviews with Flemish medical oncology trainees. Few recommendations for training communication skills to communicate about palliative care were found in the ASMO/ASCO recommendations and even less in the Flanders' programme documents. Trainees are mainly exposed to palliative care communication during the clinical practice of their training. Only very few lectures or seminars are devoted to palliative care and even less on communication about palliative care. They reported several barriers to communicate about palliative care. This study revealed promising developments for the training of Flemish medical oncologists to discuss palliative care. However, there is still a need for more theoretical training on palliative care complemented with communication skills trainings. Communication training in general needs to be fully integrated as a core skill within the medical curriculum at large and should be promoted as lifelong learning and competency development.

  2. Nephrology training curriculum and implications for optimal kidney care in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okel, Julius; Okpechi, Ike G; Qarni, Bilal; Olanrewaju, Timothy; Courtney, Mark J; Luyckx, Valerie; Naicker, Sarala; Bello, Aminu K

    An effective workforce is essential for delivery of high-quality chronic disease care. Low-income nations are challenged by a dearth and/or maldistribution of an essential workforce required for all chronic disease care including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nephrology education and training in developed countries have grown at pace with the technological advancement in the practice of medicine in order to meet the standards required of kidney health professionals towards high-quality, patient-centered medical care. The standards designed by institutions and/or professional societies, such as Royal Colleges and Medical Councils in high-income nations with well-developed health systems and infrastructures, are often not easily translatable to issues critical to nephrology practice in low-income nations. Little or no guidance is provided on common nephrological issues of regional nature or pertaining to ethnic minorities and disadvantaged groups living in those countries. There is an emergent need for a training curriculum that meets the needs and peculiarities of the developing nations, and this needs to leverage on the existing and well-validated systems of training across the globe. We evaluated nephrology training programs across 25 upper-middle and high-income nations to identify best practices and opportunities for adoption in low-income nations. We reviewed training guidelines from major professional societies on content and process of training. There are similarities and differences in structure, content, and process of training programs across countries, and there are clearly adoptable concepts/frameworks for application in low-income nations. We provide recommendations and a strategic plan for the future focus of nephrology training in the developing world to align with current trends in technological advancement and development as well as the need for emphasis on prevention of CKD. The essential competencies (patient- and population--based) required of a

  3. Learning by doing. Training health care professionals to become facilitator of moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, Margreet; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an (external) ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: 'learning by doing', 'reflection instead of ready made knowledge', and 'dialogue on dialogue'. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions.

  4. Effect of healing touch training on self-care awareness in nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Pegi

    Nursing focuses on supporting clients' health and health behaviors; however, they tend to exhibit unproductive behaviors when it comes to caring for themselves. As nurses' self-neglect can undermine client care, supporting nurses' self-care practices are expected to translate into clients' self-care. Healing Touch (HT) is one option for supporting nurses' self-care, as it is an accepted nursing practice and studies suggest that HT may have beneficial effects for those delivering it. This study examined the impact of a 2-day HT training on awareness of the need for self-care in nurses. HT training was offered as continuing education for 45 nurses at a Veteran's Administration hospital in Long Beach, CA. This mixed-methods study used a pre/post-test design to measure the effects of HT Level 1 training on nurses' self-care self-awareness. Independent samples t-tests and analyses of variance were used to detect whether any significant differences emerged based on participant demographic data. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests to determine whether participants' self-awareness changed over the study period. Effect size for any differences were calculated using Cohen's d. Open-ended responses were reviewed and common themes were identified related to what participants believed they learned and how it affected their care for themselves and their clients. Two increases were found to be significant and of sufficient power when comparing pre- to delayed post-test scores: physical self-care awareness (mean difference = 0.956, t(44) = 5.085, p = .000, r = .61) and professional self-care awareness (mean difference = .955, t(43) = 5.277, p = .000, r = .63). Qualitative findings suggested that changes in their awareness, self-directed practices, and patient care practices are anticipated, evident, and sustained based upon themes across the three tests. Nurses are advised to take a course that teaches specific self-care techniques and strategies and continue practicing

  5. Core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Ingela; Barbosa da Silva, António; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2005-03-01

    Clinical nursing supervision enables supervisees to reflect on ethically difficult caring situations, thereby strengthening their professional identity, integrating nursing theory and practice, and leading to the development of ethical competence. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision, using previous research as well as philosophical analysis of the theories of three moral philosophers: Harald Ofstad, Richard Hare and Carol Gilligan. The ultimate aim of this study was to develop a general model for ethical decision-making and to establish its relevance for clinical nursing supervision. The findings highlight four important values for the development of a basis for ethical decision-making. These values are caring, dignity, responsibility and virtue.

  6. Training for health care in developing countries: the work of the Tropical Health and Education Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, E; Parry, V

    1998-11-01

    The Tropical Health and Education Trust (THET) was established to strengthen medical education and training for health care in developing countries. The Trust responds to requests from training institutions with a wide range of activities and programmes. Projects to meet specific needs are planned in outline with the Deans or Directors of institutions, as a basis for a long-term link with a similar institution in the United Kingdom. These links are now the preferred method for meeting requests to develop skills, strengthen services and promote staff development. However, funding is always necessary for their support. THET has promoted students' community-based training by enabling students in a team-training programme in Ethiopia to make interventions in primary health care. A prize for the best students' community, clinical or laboratory projects in six African countries encourages enquiry by the students, promotes independent learning, and relates academic work to problems in health care. Work with Ministries of Health includes a continuing medical education programme for rural medical officers in Uganda, courses in basic and life-saving surgery for Ethiopian health and medical officers, and a programme to update the skills of laboratory technologists in rural hospitals in Ghana. The range of projects that THET supports is wide because the needs, defined by those who are working in, and responsible for, training in the health service are diverse.

  7. Ending neglect: providing effective childhood tuberculosis training for health care workers in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, R.; Talbot, E. A.; Cronin, B. J.; Christopher, R.; Mkomwa, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Health care facilities in Dar es Salaam, Pwani, and Arusha, Tanzania. Objective: To assess health care worker (HCW) knowledge and practices 1 year after specialized training in childhood tuberculosis (TB). Design: Using a standardized survey, we interviewed a convenience sample of HCWs providing both general and specialized care to children. Results: We interviewed 117 HCWs in TB clinics, maternal and child health clinics, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, out-patient departments, and pediatric in-patient wards at 12 facilities. A total of 81 HCWs (62% of nurses, 74% of clinicians) reported having attended the national childhood TB training course. Most HCWs responded correctly to questions on childhood TB diagnosis, treatment, and TB-HIV co-management, regardless of training history. Most HCWs reported that they routinely obtain chest radiographs, HIV testing, and a TB contact history when evaluating children for TB. Less than half of HCWs reported routinely obtaining sputum for mycobacterial culture or performing a tuberculin skin test. Three times as many trained as untrained HCWs reported having ever prescribed isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to a child (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In general, levels of childhood TB knowledge were high and practices were in accordance with national guidance. Specific gaps in diagnosis, treatment and use of IPT were identified for future focused training. PMID:26400701

  8. Clinical Supervision in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    Data fra den danske undersøgelse af psykoterapeuters faglige udvikling indsamlet ved hjælp af DPCCQ. Oplægget fokuserer på supervision (modtaget, givet, uddannelse i) blandt danske psykoterapeutiske arbejdende psykologer....

  9. Supervision af psykoterapi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SUPERVISION AF PSYKOTERAPI indtager en central position i uddannelsen og udviklingen af psykoterapeuter. Trods flere lighedspunkter med psykoterapi, undervisning og konsultation er psykoterapisupervision et selvstændigt virksomhedsområde. Supervisor må foruden at være en trænet psykoterapeut kende...... supervisionens rammer og indplacering i forhold til organisation og samfund. En række kapitler drejer sig om supervisors opgaver, roller og kontrolfunktion, supervision set fra supervisandens perspektiv samt betragtninger over relationer og processer i supervision. Der drøftes fordele og ulemper ved de...... forskellige måder, hvorpå en sag kan fremlægges. Bogens første del afsluttes med refleksioner over de etiske aspekter ved psykoterapisupervision. Bogens anden del handler om de særlige forhold, der gør sig gældende ved supervision af en række specialiserede behandlingsformer eller af psykoterapi med bestemte...

  10. Psykoterapi og supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet beskriver supervisionen funktioner i forhold til psykoterapi. Supervision af psykoterapi henviser i almindelighed til, at en psykoterapeut konsulterer en ofte mere erfaren kollega (supervisor) med henblik på drøftelse af et konkret igangværende psykoterapeutisk behandlingsforløb. Formålet...... er at fremme denne fagpersons (psykoterapeutens) faglige udvikling samt sikre kvaliteten af behandlingen.kan defineres som i. Der redegøres for, hvorfor supervision er vigtig del af psykoterapeutens profession samt vises, hvorledes supervision foruden den faglige udvikling også er vigtigt redskab i...... psykoterapiens kvalitetssikring. Efter at have drøftet nogle etiske forhold ved supervision, fremlægges endelig nogle få forskningsresultater vedr. psykoterapisupervision af danske psykologer....

  11. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...... An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  12. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: a multisite controlled before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; So, R.L.; Tangkau, P.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these non

  13. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  14. Disseminating educational innovations in health care practice : Training versus social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, Erik; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Kiewiet, Derk Jan; Pols, Jan; van Engelen, Jo M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Improvements and innovation in health service organization and delivery have become more and more important due to the gap between knowledge and practice, rising costs, medical errors, and the organization of health care systems. Since training and education is widely used to convey and distribute i

  15. Security, Dignity, Caring Relationships, and Meaningful Work: Needs Motivating Participation in a Job-Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Miller-Dyce, Cherrel; Carlone, David

    2008-01-01

    Researchers asked 17 participants in a job-training program to describe their personal struggles following an economic restructuring. Examined through a critical theoretical lens, findings indicate that the learners enrolled in the program to reclaim security, dignity, meaningful work, and caring relationships. Program planners at community…

  16. Geriatrician Training in the Care of Elders with Intellectual and Other Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Carl V., Jr.; Rader, Erin; Campbell, James W.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Panaite, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDD) are now living to late life. Whether geriatricians are being trained to provide care for this clinically complex subpopulation of elders has not been examined. Two thirds of all geriatric fellowship directors in the United States responded to a Web-based survey of curriculum and…

  17. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  18. Dignity Versus Dehumanization in Long-Term Care Settings for Older Persons: A Training Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampfe, Charlene M.

    This paper describes the types of attitudes and behaviors that might be destructive to an individual's sense of self-worth, and suggests that counselors in long-term care settings face the challenge of changing these. One strategy for counteracting potential dehumanization, offering in-service training to all levels of staff and administrators, is…

  19. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  20. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly - Randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, AMH; Kluiter, H; Jongenelis, K; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J

    2005-01-01

    Background. Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims. To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents often homes. Method. We conducte

  1. Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training. Methods Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed. Results In total, 25% of residents (128/505 and 28% of faculty (118/413 responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58% and faculty (63% were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9% and faculty (11% assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55 of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58 of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46 would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health. Conclusion Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

  2. Diabetes Care as an Active Learning Model of Postgraduate Education and Training for Pharmaceutical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda-Kimble, Mary Anne; Batz, Forrest R.

    1994-01-01

    In a University of California continuing pharmacy education course in diabetes care, practicing pharmacists lived as patients with diabetes for two days and role-played in small groups. One year later, participants reported making changes in their diabetes care-related practice, suggesting its effectiveness in improving practitioners' skill…

  3. Training US health care professionals on human trafficking: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Clydette; Dickins, Kirsten; Stoklosa, Hanni

    2017-01-01

    Some 21 million adults and children are labor-trafficked or sex-trafficked through force, fraud, or coercion. In recognition of the interface between trafficking victims and the healthcare setting, over the last 10 years there has been a notable increase in training of health care professionals (HCPs) on human trafficking (HT) and its health implications. Many organizations have developed curricula and offered training in various clinical settings. However, methods and content of this education on trafficking vary widely, and there is little evaluation of the impact of the training. The goal of this study was to assess the gaps and strengths in HT education of HCPs in the US. This mixed-method study had two components. The first component consisted of structured interviews with experts in human trafficking HCP education. The second portion of the study involved an analysis of data from HCP calls to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC). The interviews captured trainer-specific data on types of HT training, duration and frequency, key content areas, presence of evaluation approaches and indicators, as well as an assessment of barriers and strengths in HT training for HCP. NHTRC call database analysis demonstrated increasing trends since 2008 in calls by HCPs. Overall findings revealed the need for standardization of HT training content to assure correct information, trauma-informed and patient-centered care, and consistent messaging for HCPs. Evaluation metrics for HT training need to be developed to demonstrate behavior change and impact on service delivery and patient-centered outcomes for HT victims, according to our proposed adapted Kirkpatrick's Pyramid model. HT training and evaluation would benefit from an agency or institution at the national level to provide consistency and standardization of HT training content as well as to guide a process that would develop metrics for evaluation and the building of an evidence base.

  4. Training intervention for health care staff in the provision of existential support to patients with cancer: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Danielson, Ella; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-12-01

    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Training primary care physicians in community eye health. Experiences from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sanjeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the impact of training on primary-care physicians in community eye health through a series of workshops. 865 trainees completed three evaluation formats anonymously. The questions tested knowledge on magnitude of blindness, the most common causes of blindness, and district level functioning of the National Programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB. Knowledge of the trainers significantly improved immediately after the course (chi 2 300.16; p < 0.00001. This was independent of the timing of workshops and number of trainees per batch. Presentation, content and relevance to job responsibilities were most appreciated. There is immense value addition from training primary-care physicians in community eye health. Despite a long series of training sessions, trainer fatigue was minimal; therefore, such capsules can be replicated with great success.

  6. The need for multidisciplinarity in specialist training to optimize future patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree, Alison C; Harding, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh; Morton, Dion; Stebbing, Justin; Wood, Bradford J; Sharma, Ricky A

    2016-11-29

    Harmonious interactions between radiation, medical, interventional and surgical oncologists, as well as other members of multidisciplinary teams, are essential for the optimization of patient care in oncology. This multidisciplinary approach is particularly important in the current landscape, in which standard-of-care approaches to cancer treatment are evolving towards highly targeted treatments, precise image guidance and personalized cancer therapy. Herein, we highlight the importance of multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity at all levels of clinical oncology training. Potential deficits in the current career development pathways and suggested strategies to broaden clinical training and research are presented, with specific emphasis on the merits of trainee involvement in functional multidisciplinary teams. Finally, the importance of training in multidisciplinary research is discussed, with the expectation that this awareness will yield the most fertile ground for future discoveries. Our key message is for cancer professionals to fulfil their duty in ensuring that trainees appreciate the importance of multidisciplinary research and practice.

  7. Ethical considerations in clinical training, care and research in psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D

    2011-04-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful tool in psychiatry; however, it is one that demands responsibility in order to deal with the ethical complexities that accompany advances in the field. It is important that questions are asked and that ethical mindfulness and sensitivity are developed along with clinical skills. In order to cultivate and deepen ethical awareness and subsequently solve issues in optimal fashion, investment should be made in the development of an ethical decision-making process as well as in education in the ethics of psychopharmacology to trainees in the field at all stages of their educational development. A clear approach to identifying ethical problems, engaging various ethical concepts in considering solutions and then applying these principles in problem resolution is demanded. An openness in identifying and exploring issues has become crucial to the future development and maturation of psychopharmacologists, both research and clinical. Consideration must be given to the social implications of psychopharmacological practice, with the best interests of patients always paramount. From both a research and clinical perspective, psychopharmacology has to be practised with fairness, sensitivity and ethical relevance to all. While ethical issues related to psychopharmacological practice are varied and plentiful, this review focuses on advances in technology and biological sciences, personal integrity, special populations, and education and training.

  8. Miles Apart: Two Art Therapists' Experience of Distance Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandoff, Rachel; Lombardi, Reina

    2012-01-01

    Distance supervision (or "telesupervision") is a significant and growing trend in health care professions, but it requires advanced planning, ongoing discussion, and investment in technology by both parties in order to be an effective and ethical alternative to traditional face-to-face supervision. This viewpoint presents the perspectives of two…

  9. Supervised Learning in Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sporea, Ioana

    2012-01-01

    The current article introduces a supervised learning algorithm for multilayer spiking neural networks. The algorithm presented here overcomes some limitations of existing learning algorithms as it can be applied to neurons firing multiple spikes and it can in principle be applied to any linearisable neuron model. The algorithm is applied successfully to various benchmarks, such as the XOR problem and the Iris data set, as well as complex classifications problems. The simulations also show the flexibility of this supervised learning algorithm which permits different encodings of the spike timing patterns, including precise spike trains encoding.

  10. Supervised Mineral Classification with Semi-automatic Training and Validation Set Generation in Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Images of Thin Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesche, Harald; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of classifying minerals common in siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Twelve chemical elements are mapped from thin sections by energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Extensions to traditional multivariate statistical methods...... are applied to perform the classification. First, training and validation sets are grown from one or a few seed points by a method that ensures spatial and spectral closeness of observations. Spectral closeness is obtained by excluding observations that have high Mahalanobis distances to the training class...

  11. A systematic review of the effectiveness of training in emergency obstetric care in low-resource environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lonkhuijzen, L.; Dijkman, A.; van Roosmalen, J.; Zeeman, G.; Scherpbier, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Training of healthcare workers can play an important role in improving quality of care, and reducing maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of training programmes aimed at improving emergency obstetric care in low-resource environments. Sear

  12. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  13. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  14. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilish McAuliffe

    Full Text Available Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential

  15. Two Approaches to Clinical Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eugene M.

    Criteria are established for a definition of "clinical supervision" and the effectiveness of such supervisory programs in a student teaching context are considered. Two differing genres of clinical supervision are constructed: "supervision by pattern analysis" is contrasted with "supervision by performance objectives." An outline of procedural…

  16. Counselor Supervision: A Consumer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Geoffrey G.; Littrell, John M.

    This guide attempts to solve problems caused when a certain designated "brand" of supervision is forced on the counselor trainee with neither choice nor checklist of important criteria. As a tentative start on a guide to supervision the paper offers the following: a definition of supervision; a summary of the various types of supervision; a…

  17. Comparison of severe trauma care effect before and after advanced trauma life support training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng; LI Neng-ping; GU Yong-feng; LU Xiao-bing; CONG Jian-nong; YANG Xin; LING Yun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the emergency care effect of in-hospital severe trauma patients with the injury severity score (ISS)≥ 16 after medical staff received advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training.Methods: ATLS training was implemented by lectures,scenarios, field practices, and examinations. The clinical effect of in-hospital severe trauma care was compared 2 years before and after ATLS training.Results: During 2 years (from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2005) before ATLS training, 438 cases of severe trauma were admitted and treated emergently in our department. Among them, ISS score was 28.6±7.8 on average, and 87 cases died with the mortality of 19.9%. The duration in emergency department and from admission to operation were 69.5 min±l 1.5 min and 89.6 min±9.3 min respectively. Two years (from January 1,2007, to December 31, 2008) after ATLS training, 382 cases of severe trauma were admitted and treated. The ISS was 25.3 ±6.1 on average and 62 cases died with the mortality of 15.1%. The duration in emergency department and from admission to operation were 47.8 min±10.7 min and 61.5 min±9.9 min respectively. The ISS score showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05), but the mortality, the duration in emergency department and from admission to operation were markedly decreased after ATLS training and showed significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05).Conclusion: ATLS course training can improve the emergency care effect of in-hospital severe trauma patients,and should be put into practice as soon as possible in China.

  18. Co-Training Semi-Supervised Active Learning Algorithm with Noise Filter%具有噪声过滤功能的协同训练半监督主动学习算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹永照; 陈亚必

    2009-01-01

    针对基于半监督学习的分类器利用未标记样本训练会引入噪声而使得分类性能下降的情形,文中提出一种具有噪声过滤功能的协同训练半监督主动学习算法.该算法以3个模糊深隐马尔可夫模型进行协同半监督学习,在适当的时候主动引入一些人机交互来补充类别标记,避免判决类别不相同时的拒判和初始时判决一致即认为正确的误判情形.同时加入噪声过滤机制,用以过滤南机器自动标记的可能是噪声的样本.将该算法应用于人脸表情识别.实验结果表明,该算法能有效提高未标记样本的利用率并降低半监督学习而引入的噪声,提高表情识别的准确率.%The classification performance of the classifier based on semi-supervised learning is weakened when the noise samples are introduced. An algorithm called co-training semi-supervised active learning with noise filter is presented to overcome this disadvantage. In this algorithm, three fuzzy buried Markov models are used to perform semi-supervised learning cooperatively. Some human-computer interactions are actively introduced into labelling the unlabeled sample at certain time in order to avoid the rejective judgment when the classifiers do not agree with each other and the inaccurate judgment when the initial weak classifiers all agree. Meanwhile, the noise filter is used to filter the possible noise samples which are labeled automatically by the computer. The proposed algorithm is applied to facial expression recognition. The experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively improve the utilization of unlabeled samples, reduce the introduction of noise samples and raise the accuracy of expression recognition.

  19. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus on the experi......This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus...... on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  20. Prehospital Pediatric Care: Opportunities for Training, Treatment, and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Patrick C; Browne, Lorin R; Guse, Clare E; Brousseau, David C; Lerner, E Brooke

    2015-01-01

    . Prehospital providers infrequently perform pediatric interventions. Describing EMS providers' interaction with children provides the opportunity to target improvements in pediatric prehospital treatment, training, and research.

  1. Semi-supervised detection of intracranial pressure alarms using waveform dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hu, Xiao

    2013-04-01

    Patient monitoring systems in intensive care units (ICU) are usually set to trigger alarms when abnormal values are detected. Alarms are generated by threshold-crossing rules that lead to high false alarm rates. This is a recognized issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. Recently developed smart alarm models require alarms to be validated by experts during the training phase. The manual annotation process involved is time-consuming and virtually impossible to achieve for the thousands of alarms recorded in the ICU every week. To tackle this problem, we investigate in this study if the use of semi-supervised learning methods, that can naturally integrate unlabeled data samples in the model, can be used to improve the accuracy of the alarm detection. As a proof of concept, the detection system is evaluated on intracranial pressure (ICP) signal alarms. Specific morphological and trending features are extracted from the ICP signal waveform to capture the dynamic of the signal prior to alarms. This study is based on a comprehensive dataset of 4791 manually labeled alarms recorded from 108 neurosurgical patients. A comparative analysis is provided between kernel spectral regression (SR-KDA) and support vector machine (SVM) both modified for the semi-supervised setting. Results obtained during the experimental evaluations indicate that the two models can significantly reduce false alarms using unlabeled samples; especially in the presence of a restrained number of labeled examples. At a true alarm recognition rate of 99%, the false alarm reduction rates improved from 9% (supervised) to 27% (semi-supervised) for SR-KDA, and from 3% (supervised) to 16% (semi-supervised) for SVM.

  2. Primary care emergency team training in situ means learning in real context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstorp, Helen; Halvorsen, Peder A.; Sterud, Birgitte; Haugland, Bjørgun; Kirkengen, Anna Luise

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of our study was to explore the local learning processes and to improve in situ team training in the primary care emergency teams with a focus on interaction. Design, setting and subjects As participating observers, we investigated locally organised trainings of teams constituted ad hoc, involving nurses, paramedics and general practitioners, in rural Norway. Subsequently, we facilitated focus discussions with local participants. We investigated what kinds of issues the participants chose to elaborate in these learning situations, why they did so, and whether and how local conditions improved during the course of three and a half years. In addition, we applied learning theories to explore and challenge our own and the local participants’ understanding of team training. Results In situ team training was experienced as challenging, engaging, and enabling. In the training sessions and later focus groups, the participants discussed a wide range of topics constitutive for learning in a sociocultural perspective, and topics constitutive for patient safety culture. The participants expanded the types of training sites, themes and the structures for participation, improved their understanding of communication and developed local procedures. The flexible structure of the model mirrors the complexity of medicine and provides space for the participants’ own sense of responsibility. Conclusion Challenging, monthly in situ team trainings organised by local health personnel facilitate many types of learning. The flexible training model provides space for the participants’ own sense of responsibility and priorities. Outcomes involve social and structural improvements, including a sustainable culture of patient safety. Key Points Challenging, monthly in situ team trainings, organised by local health personnel, facilitate many types of learning.The flexible structure of the training model mirrors the complexity of medicine and the realism of the

  3. Multi-Instance Learning from Supervised View

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Zhou

    2006-01-01

    In multi-instance learning, the training set comprises labeled bags that are composed of unlabeled instances,and the task is to predict the labels of unseen bags. This paper studies multi-instance learning from the view of supervised learning. First, by analyzing some representative learning algorithms, this paper shows that multi-instance learners can be derived from supervised learners by shifting their focuses from the discrimination on the instances to the discrimination on the bags. Second, considering that ensemble learning paradigms can effectively enhance supervised learners, this paper proposes to build multi-instance ensembles to solve multi-instance problems. Experiments on a real-world benchmark test show that ensemble learning paradigms can significantly enhance multi-instance learners.

  4. Training US health care professionals on human trafficking: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Clydette; Dickins, Kirsten; Stoklosa, Hanni

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some 21 million adults and children are labor-trafficked or sex-trafficked through force, fraud, or coercion. In recognition of the interface between trafficking victims and the healthcare setting, over the last 10 years there has been a notable increase in training of health care professionals (HCPs) on human trafficking (HT) and its health implications. Many organizations have developed curricula and offered training in various clinical settings. However, methods and content of this education on trafficking vary widely, and there is little evaluation of the impact of the training. The goal of this study was to assess the gaps and strengths in HT education of HCPs in the US. This mixed-method study had two components. The first component consisted of structured interviews with experts in human trafficking HCP education. The second portion of the study involved an analysis of data from HCP calls to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC). The interviews captured trainer-specific data on types of HT training, duration and frequency, key content areas, presence of evaluation approaches and indicators, as well as an assessment of barriers and strengths in HT training for HCP. NHTRC call database analysis demonstrated increasing trends since 2008 in calls by HCPs. Overall findings revealed the need for standardization of HT training content to assure correct information, trauma-informed and patient-centered care, and consistent messaging for HCPs. Evaluation metrics for HT training need to be developed to demonstrate behavior change and impact on service delivery and patient-centered outcomes for HT victims, according to our proposed adapted Kirkpatrick’s Pyramid model. HT training and evaluation would benefit from an agency or institution at the national level to provide consistency and standardization of HT training content as well as to guide a process that would develop metrics for evaluation and the building of an evidence base

  5. Communication skills training for dialysis decision-making and end-of-life care in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Jane O; Green, Jamie A; Tulsky, James A; Arnold, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Nephrology fellows often face difficult conversations about dialysis initiation or withdrawal but are frequently unprepared for these discussions. Despite evidence that communication skills are teachable, few fellowship programs include such training. A communication skills workshop for nephrology fellows (NephroTalk) focused on delivering bad news and helping patients define care goals, including end-of-life preferences. This 4-hour workshop, held in October and November 2011, included didactics and practice sessions with standardized patients. Participants were nephrology fellows at Duke University and the University of Pittsburgh (n=22). Pre- and post-workshop surveys evaluated efficacy of the curriculum and measured changes in perceived preparedness on the basis on workshop training. Overall, 14% of fellows were white and 50% were male. Less than one-third (6 of 22) reported prior palliative care training. Survey response rate varied between 86% and 100%. Only 36% (8 of 22) and 38% (8 of 21) of respondents had received structured training in discussions for dialysis initiation or withdrawal. Respondents (19 of 19) felt that communication skills were important to being a "great nephrologist." Mean level of preparedness as measured with a five-point Likert scale significantly increased for all skills (range, 0.5-1.14; Pnephrology fellows for having difficult conversations about dialysis decision-making and end-of-life care.

  6. Evaluation of palliative care training and skills retention by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Priti P; White, Mary T; Buckingham, Lynne; Tchorz, Kathryn M

    2017-05-01

    Training in palliative and end-of-life care has been introduced in medical education; however, the impact of such training and the retention of skills and knowledge have not been studied in detail. This survey study examines long-term follow-up on end-of-life communication skills training, evaluation, and skills retention in medical students. During the surgical clerkship, all third-year medical students received communication skills training in palliative care using simulated patients. The training involved three scenarios involving diverse surgical patients with conditions commonly encountered during the surgical clerkship. The students used web-based best practice guidelines to prepare for the patient encounters. The following communication abilities were evaluated: (1) giving bad news clearly and with empathy, (2) initiating death and dying conversations with patients and/or their family members, (3) discussing do not resuscitate status and exploring preferences for end-of-life care, and (4) initiating conversations regarding religious or spiritual values and practices. All students were surveyed after 1 year (12-24 mo) to ascertain: (1) the retention of skills and/or knowledge gained during this training, (2) application of these skills during subsequent clinical rotations, and (3) overall perception of the value added by the training to their undergraduate medical education. These results were correlated with residency specialty choice. The survey was sent to all graduating fourth-year medical students (n = 105) in our program, of which 69 students responded to the survey (66% response rate). All respondents agreed that palliative care training is essential in medical school training. Seventy percent of the respondents agreed that the simulated encounters allowed development of crucial conversation skills needed for palliative/end-of-life care communications. The most useful part of the training was the deliberate practice of "giving bad news" (85%). Most

  7. Implementing a community-based self care training initiative: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Jane; Darby, Frances; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; White, Alan

    2010-11-01

    Within the UK, there is growing recognition that individuals will need to take increased responsibility for managing their own health for there to be improvements in population health. The current evidence base on self care interventions reflects an interest in enhancing self care knowledge, skills and behaviour in relation to the management of long-term conditions. In contrast, this paper reports on a community-based self care initiative that was designed to promote self care approaches in the general population. The principal component was a self care skills training course delivered to groups of lay people in community and workplace settings. Self Care for People was piloted in three primary care trusts and a process evaluation was undertaken. The aim of this paper is to examine the feasibility, relevance and acceptability of the initiative. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a sample of stakeholders involved in implementation including coordinators, trainers and key informants from organisations hosting the course. In total 40 interviews and two focus groups were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and the data were analysed thematically. The evaluation found that implementation was relatively straightforward with few major barriers reported. Recruitment to the self care skills training course took place in both workplace and community group settings, including in organisations supporting socially excluded groups. The course was seen to provide a valuable space for contemplation on personal health, however, participation could raise sensitive issues that needed to be dealt with by skilled facilitators. Motivations for involvement differed markedly in host organisations and different strategies for marketing were adopted. The paper concludes by suggesting that while Self Care for People was both feasible and relevant to different stakeholder groups, there needs to be flexibility in responding to the needs of participants in different settings.

  8. Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of French physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Bonnevie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Questions: How common is inspiratory muscle training by physiotherapists in the intensive care unit (ICU? Which patients receive the training? What methods are used to administer the training? Is maximal inspiratory pressure used to evaluate the need for the training and the patient's outcome after training? Design: Cross-sectional survey of all ICUs in France. Participants: Two hundred and sixty-five senior physiotherapists. Results: The response rate was 99% among eligible units. Therapist experience in ICU was significantly associated with the use of inspiratory muscle training (p = 0.02. Therapists mainly used inspiratory muscle training either systematically or specifically in patients who failed to wean from mechanical ventilation. The training was used significantly more in non-sedated patients (p < 0.0001. The most commonly nominated technique that respondents claimed to use to apply the training was controlled diaphragmatic breathing (83% of respondents, whereas 13% used evidence-based methods. Among those who applied some form of inspiratory muscle training, 16% assessed maximal inspiratory pressure. Six respondents (2%, 95% CI 1 to 5 used both an evidence-based method to administer inspiratory muscle training and the recommended technique for assessment of inspiratory muscle strength. Conclusion: Most physiotherapists in French ICUs who apply inspiratory muscle training use methods of uncertain efficacy without assessment of maximal inspiratory pressure. Further efforts need to be made in France to disseminate information regarding evidence-based assessment and techniques for inspiratory muscle training in the ICU. The alignment of inspiratory muscle training practice with evidence could be investigated in other regions. [Bonnevie T, Villiot-Danger J-C, Gravier F-E, Dupuis J, Prieur G, Médrinal C (2015 Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of

  9. The Effects of Collaborative Care Training on Case Managers' Perceived Depression-Related Services Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Craig M; Jackson, Aurora P; Tang, Lingqi; Miranda, Jeanne; Chung, Bowen; Jones, Felica; Ong, Michael K; Wells, Kenneth

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effects of a depression care quality improvement (QI) intervention implemented by using Community Engagement and Planning (CEP), which supports collaboration across health and community-based agencies, or Resources for Services (RS), which provides technical assistance, on training participation and service delivery by primarily unlicensed, racially and ethnically diverse case managers in two low-income communities in Los Angeles. The study was a cluster-randomized trial with program-level assignment to CEP or RS for implementation of a QI initiative for providing training for depression care. Staff with patient contact in 84 health and community-based programs that were eligible for the provider outcomes substudy were invited to participate in training and to complete baseline and one-year follow-up surveys; 117 case managers (N=59, RS; N=58, CEP) from 52 programs completed follow-up. Primary outcomes were time spent providing services in community settings and use of depression case management and problem-solving practices. Secondary outcomes were depression knowledge and attitudes and perceived system barriers. CEP case managers had greater participation in depression training, spent more time providing services in community settings, and used more problem-solving therapeutic approaches compared with RS case managers (pTraining participation, time spent providing services in community settings, and use of problem-solving skills among primarily unlicensed, racially and ethnically diverse case managers were greater in programs that used CEP rather than RS to implement depression care QI, suggesting that CEP offers a model for including case managers in communitywide depression care improvement efforts.

  10. Simulation team training for improved teamwork in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Christer; Gustafsson, Helena; Wallin, Carl-Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to describe implementation of simulator-based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter-professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU). Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n = 152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter-professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme. In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians. The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

  11. Networking and training in palliative care - Challenging values and changing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhoira EF Leng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What make a good doctor is a question posed by the public and profession and is key when designing training programmes. The goal of training is to change practice not simply acquire knowledge yet too often curriculums and assessment focuses on knowledge and skills. Professional practice is underpinned by beliefs and values and therefore training may need to challenge deeply held values in order to result in a change in practice. Palliative care offers an opportunity to challenge values at a deeply personal level as it brings experiences of pain and suffering alongside clinical knowledge and skills. Palliative care is holistic and so real scenarios where physical, psychological, social and spiritual issues are evident can be presented in an interactive, learner centered environment. Training in ethics alongside clinical skills will assist the development of judgment which should also be assessed. Communication skills enable the clinician to hear and understand the needs and wishes of those facing life limiting illness. Training should include aspects of modeling and mentorship to demonstrate and integrate the learning with the realities of clinical practice and include those who lead and influence policy and advocacy.

  12. The impact of university provided nurse electronic medical record training on health care organizations: an exploratory simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W; Malovec, Shannon; Espejo, Angela; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Training providers appropriately, particularly early in their caregiving careers, is an important aspect of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation. Considerable time and resources are needed to bring the newly hired providers 'up to speed' with the actual use practices of the organization. Similarly, universities lose valuable clinical training hours when students are required to spend those hours learning organization-specific EMR systems in order to participate in care during clinical rotations. Although there are multiple real-world barriers to university/health care organization training partnerships, the investment these entities share in training care providers, specifically nurses, to use and understand EMR technology encourages a question: What would be the cumulative effect of integrating a mutually agreed upon EMR system training program in to nursing classroom training on downstream hospital costs in terms of hours of direct caregiving lost, and benefits in terms of number of overall EMR trained nurses hired? In order to inform the development of a large scale study, we employed a dynamic systems modeling approach to simulate the theoretical relationships between key model variables and determine the possible effect of integrating EMR training into nursing classrooms on hospital outcomes. The analysis indicated that integrating EMR training into the nursing classroom curriculum results in more available time for nurse bedside care. Also, the simulation suggests that efficiency of clinical training can be potentially improved by centralizing EMR training within the nursing curriculum.

  13. The health care needs of the physically disabled patient in a home-based care environment: Implications for the training of ancillary health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Springe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available According to existing literature, ancillary health care workers (AHCWs often do not meet the health care needs of patients with physical disabilities (physically disabled patients in a homebased environment, because of inadequate training programmes. The purpose of this research study was to explore the health care needs of physically disabled patients in long-term, home-based care in the northern suburbs of Johannesburg and, based on results, to offer recommendations for the training of AHCWs. Qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual means were employed in data collection and analysis. The population consisted of eight physically disabled participants who employed an AHCW to assist them with their long-term home care. Purposive sampling was used with subsequent snowballing to identify further participants for the study. Individual interviews were conducted, where participants had to answer the questions (1‘What are your health care needs?’ and(2 ‘How should these be met?’ Data saturation was ensured, after which Tesch’s method of data analysis was followed. Three categories of health care needs were identified (1 physical health care needs, (2 interpersonal relationship needs and (3 social needs, and 12 themes were derived from these categories. These categories of health care needs should be addressed in the training of AHCWs.From the themes, recommendations were described for the training of AHCWs on the health care needs of the home-based physically disabled patients. The AHCW should assist in the adaptation of the environment to the patient’s individual needs, and should use knowledge and critical thinking skills to ensure a patient-centred care setting.

    Opsomming

    Volgens die literatuur kan assistentgesondheidsorgwerkers (AGWs, as gevolg van ontoereikende opleiding, nie altyd aan die behoeftes van fisies gestremde pasiënte in 'n tuisopset voldoen nie.Die doel van hierdie navorsingstudie was

  14. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-06-27

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.

  15. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Jennifer A; Kuntz, Gretchen M; Edwards, Mary E; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n = 21), interviews (n = 2), and an online survey (n = 167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly affective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians' perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics.

  16. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations.

  17. A Novel Co-training Ob ject Tracking Algorithm Based on Online Semi-supervised Boosting%基于在线半监督boosting的协同训练目标跟踪算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈思; 苏松志; 李绍滋; 吕艳萍; 曹冬林

    2014-01-01

    The self-training based discriminative tracking methods use the classification results to update the classifier itself. However, these methods easily suffer from the drifting issue because the classification errors are accumulated during tracking. To overcome the disadvantages of self-training based tracking methods, a novel co-training tracking algorithm, termed Co-SemiBoost, is proposed based on online semi-supervised boosting. The proposed algorithm employs a new online co-training framework, where unlabeled samples are used to collaboratively train the classifiers respectively built on two feature views. Moreover, the pseudo-labels and weights of unlabeled samples are iteratively predicted by combining the decisions of a prior model and an online classifier. The proposed algorithm can effectively improve the discriminative ability of the classifier, and is robust to occlusions, illumination changes, etc. Thus the algorithm can better adapt to object appearance changes. Experimental results on several challenging video sequences show that the proposed algorithm achieves promising tracking performance.%基于自训练的判别式目标跟踪算法使用分类器的预测结果更新分类器自身,容易累积分类错误,从而导致漂移问题。为了克服自训练跟踪算法的不足,该文提出一种基于在线半监督boosting的协同训练目标跟踪算法(简称Co-SemiBoost),其采用一种新的在线协同训练框架,利用未标记样本协同训练两个特征视图中的分类器,同时结合先验模型和在线分类器迭代预测未标记样本的类标记和权重。该算法能够有效提高分类器的判别能力,鲁棒地处理遮挡、光照变化等问题,从而较好地适应目标外观的变化。在若干个视频序列的实验结果表明,该算法具有良好的跟踪性能。

  18. Resistance to group clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has traditiona......This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has...... traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24...

  19. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  20. Do I Buy It? How AIDET™ Training Changes Residents' Values about Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Andrea Mechanick; Kunkel, Elisabeth J; Katz, Leo; Katona, Austin; Heavens, Teresa; Miller, Andrew; Arfaa, Jennifer Jasmine

    2015-05-01

    Acquiring communication and interpersonal skills is an important part of providing patient-centered care and improving patient satisfaction. This study explores whether residents' own values about patient communication can be influenced by training. As part of service excellence, a three-hour communication skills training in AIDET™ (Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You) was delivered to first and second Post-Graduate Year (PGY) residents (n = 123). A survey was designed to measure the value of patient communication and administered pre/post communication skills training. Residents' scores about communication values improved significantly for all areas pre- to post-training for patient communication skills (ptraining, there was little difference by medical specialty, other than surgical specialties, which showed the greatest increase in valuing requesting permission (p=0.034). Gender was also not associated with differences in values, except men showed a greater increase in valuing sitting down (p=0.021) and introductions (p=0.005) than women who already valued these specific behaviors prior to training. Residents value communication, and AIDET™ training is a useful tool to increase the values of good communication and interpersonal skills to enhance service excellence.

  1. Effects of Hospital Systems on Medical Home Transformation in Primary Care Residency Training Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Kyle; Hall, Tristen; Fernald, Douglas; Staff, Thomas J; Buscaj, Emilie; Allen, Jessica Cornett; Onysko, Mary; Dickinson, W Perry

    2016-11-23

    Most primary care residency training practices have close financial and administrative relationships with teaching hospitals and health systems. Many residency practices have begun integrating the core principles of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) into clinical workflows and educational experiences. Little is known about how the relationships with hospitals and health systems affect these transformation efforts. Data from the Colorado Residency PCMH Project were analyzed. Results show that teaching hospitals and health systems have significant opportunities to influence residency practices' transformation, particularly in the areas of supporting team-based care, value-based payment reforms, and health information technology.

  2. An intensive self care training programme reduces admissions for the treatment of plantar ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, H; Newcombe, L

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes, in detail, an intensive 14 day Self Care Training Programme that is conducted at Lalgadh Leprosy Services Centre in Nepal. An evaluation of the programme was undertaken in which hospital admission for infected plantar ulceration was the outcome measure. It was found that those who had undertaken the programme were less likely to have been admitted for hospital treatment in a 3-month follow-up period (chi 2 = 5.1, P = 0.02). An odds ratio of 1:1.8 (95% CI = 0.15-0.01) was also calculated. This paper presents an overview of the issues related to impairment, a description of the Self Care Training Programme, an analysis of the evaluation results and a discussion of the findings.

  3. Understanding and motivating health care employees: integrating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, training and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Suzanne G; Dundis, Stephen P

    2003-09-01

    This paper applies Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model to the challenges of understanding and motivating employees in a rapidly changing health care industry. The perspective that Maslow's Model brings is an essential element that should be considered as the health care arena is faced with reorganization, re-engineering, mergers, acquisitions, increases in learning demands, and the escalating role of technology in training. This paper offers a new perspective related to how Maslow's Model, as used in business/organizational settings, can be directly related to current workforce concerns: the need for security and freedom from stress, social belongingness, self-esteem, self-actualization, altered work/social environments, and new opportunities for learning and self-definition. Changes in health care will continue at an accelerated pace and with these changes will come the need for more and more training. The use of technology in training has heightened access, faster distribution, innovation and increased collaboration. However, with this technology come attendant challenges including keeping up with the technology, the increased pace of training, depersonalization, and fear of the unknown. The Maslow model provides a means for understanding these challenges in terms of universal individual needs. How does one motivate employees in the face of increased demands, particularly when they are being asked to meet these demands with fewer resources? The answer is, in large part, to make the employee feel secure, needed, and appreciated. This is not at all easy, but if leaders take into consideration the needs of the individual, the new technology that provides challenges and opportunities for meeting those needs, and provides the training to meet both sets of needs, enhanced employee motivation and commitment is possible.

  4. Nurse training in primary care: educational actions with people living with Diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Aparecida Pinheiro Landim Almeida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Educational actionswith people living with chronic conditions, especially Diabetes mellitus, are a challenge and a necessary strategy in Primary Care, in view of the glycemic balance, the prevention of complications and the improvement of the quality of life. This study aimed to analyze nurse training in educational actions developed in Primary Care with people living with Diabetes mellitus. A qualitative research was conducted with 28 nurses of Primary Care, in Teresina, state of Piauí, Brazil. Data were collected from April to June 2015 through interviews and analyzed by the collective subject discourse technique. The construction of the results was based on four sequential questions made in the interviews, from which emerged 15 central ideas: lectures, group orientation, nursing consultation and home care; theoretical knowledge, practical knowledge, technical knowledge and expertise knowledge; few materials and infrastructure in the basic unit, lack of professional teamwork, reduced workload and little awareness of teachers; and promotion of care and and self-care, family support and prevention of complications. In the analysis of the discourses, it was possible to conclude about the need for Permanent Health Education in Primary Care.

  5. Haemophilia Laboratory diagnosis training and care in Rural communities in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathelrahman M. Hassan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixty nine per cent of people with hemophilia symptoms in rural areas were accessed to laboratory diagnosis and care support in Sudan, where technical expertise and health care facilities was less than optimal. There were many reasons for the inadequate care of hemophilic patients: the perception of rarity of the disease; lacked of laboratory facilities to diagnose the disorder; lacked of understanding of the disorder by patients, their relatives, and even healthcare providers; poorly developed blood bank facilities; and lacked of adequate factor supply were just some examples. The Sudanese Hemophilia Care Association (SHCA was attempted to address many of these issues by establishing hemophilia care programs and by educating and training healthcare practitioners so that a healthcare team could be organized that attempts to ameliorate these problems and provides treatment options. However, it was possible to manage hemophiliac’s patients with limited resources. Strategies for conserving factor concentrates were included education of doctors and patients, prenatal diagnosis, increasing the use of anti fibrinolytic agents, physiotherapy, the use of fibrin glue, and simple orthotics and prosthetic measures. An outreach program would be initiated to ensure that hemophilia care and diagnosis was available outside the capital city. Official recognition of hemophilia laboratory diagnosis and treatment centers and designated centers by the government could also be very beneficial in ensuring adequate care in rural areas in Sudan.

  6. Shared decision making in ante- & postnatal care – focus on communication skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Yding, Annika; Skovsted, Katrine Brander

    2016-01-01

    . A project where a group of midwives and nurses worked together in a serial of workshops training communication skills suitable for involving women in decisions in ante- and postnatal care was conducted in 2015. Communication skills training involved group analysis of videos of real consultations...... and a variety of roleplays and rehearsals of communication situations. Besides training communication skills the project aimed at documenting institutional practices obstructive to the purpose of sharing decisions.......In recent years political focus has increasingly been on patient involvement in decisions in healthcare. One challenge in implementing the principles of shared decision making is to develop suitable communication practice in the clinical encounters between patients and healthcare providers...

  7. The development of postgraduate anaesthesia and intensive care training at the University of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, M D; Crawford-Sykes, A; Harding, H E; Chen, D R

    2012-07-01

    The one-year Diploma in Anaesthetics (DA) was the first postgraduate programme offered by the then Faculty of Medicine of The University of the West Indies (UWI). It was instituted in 1966, when the need for trained physician anaesthetists became paramount. Over 200 physicians have been awarded the DA which was discontinued in 1994. The four-year Doctor of Medicine in Anaesthetics [DM (Anaesthetics)] was commenced in 1974 and continues to train most of the region's physician anaesthetists. The majority of the 119 graduates (as of December 2011) are providing invaluable services to the people of the Caribbean. The time has come for the establishment of a regional certifying body, the Caribbean College of Anaesthetists. This college would determine the standards for the training and clinical practice of anaesthetists as perioperative physicians including: the conduct of anaesthesia, critical care, acute and chronic pain management. It would also facilitate continuing medical education and recertification of all practising anaesthetists within the region.

  8. [Prehospital trauma care training course. Integration of emergency physician and rescue services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopschina, C; Stangl, R

    2008-08-01

    With the emergence of a trauma network in the metropolitan area of Nuremberg, Germany, the question arose whether prehospital trauma management and emergency department management could be better integrated. A training scheme was designed for prehospital trauma care by the rescue services of the Workers' Samaritan Federation Germany (ASB), the Bavarian Red Cross, Maltese Ambulance, St. Johns Ambulance, representatives of the emergency physicians, and physicians of Rummelsberg Hospital. A detailed search of the international literature was done for all subjects regarding prehospital trauma management, and the American training systems (ITLS, PHTLS) were studied. The review was followed by a critical evaluation of the reality of on site-care, and the German and American systems were compared. A 2-day course with 6 sessions (accident place and kinetics, trauma investigation, pathologies, resuscitation, practical training, and evaluation) was developed, adapted from the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) algorithm. Special attention was given to the integration and position of the emergency physician in Germany, as well as to the defined authority of the rescue services. Conversion into practice was facilitated by teamwork. The course is free of charge to all rescue services and members of the concept group. With a qualified prehospital system that works smoothly with the ATLS concepts, improved prehospital care for trauma patients seems possible.

  9. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  10. Consensus development of core competencies in intensive and critical care medicine training in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Xiuming; Ma, Penglin; Qiu, Haibo; Yu, Kaijiang; Tang, Yaoqing; Qian, Chuanyun; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Yushan; Yu, Xiangyou; Xu, Yuan; Du, Bin

    2016-10-16

    The aim of this study is to develop consensus on core competencies required for postgraduate training in intensive care medicine. We used a combination of a modified Delphi method and a nominal group technique to create and modify the list of core competencies to ensure maximum consensus. Ideas were generated modified from Competency Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe collaboration (CoBaTrICE) core competencies. An online survey invited healthcare professionals, educators, and trainees to rate and comment on these competencies. The output from the online survey was edited and then reviewed by a nominal group of 13 intensive care professionals to identify each competence for importance. The resulting list was then recirculated in the nominal group for iterative rating. The online survey yielded a list of 199 competencies for nominal group reviewing. After five rounds of rating, 129 competencies entered the final set defined as core competencies. We have generated a set of core competencies using a consensus technique which can serve as an indicator for training program development.

  11. Teleconsultation and Training of VHA Providers on Transgender Care: Implementation of a Multisite Hub System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Lindsay, Jan A; Kirsh, Susan; Knapp, Herschel; Matza, Lexi

    2015-12-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is piloting a national program providing teleconsultation and training to clinicians to increase knowledge and comfort with treating transgender veterans and to expand clinical capacity. This program is based on Project ECHO and uses specialist expertise to train and educate front-line clinicians. Over time, the front-line clinicians increase knowledge and skills, enabling them to provide care locally and obviate need for patient travel. This program is innovative in its national scope, interdisciplinary team model, and multihub structure. This article describes development of the program and initial results for the first cohort of learners. Five interdisciplinary clinical teams participated in the 14-session, 7-month program. Most teams had some experience treating transgender veterans prior to participation. The teams completed at least 12 of 14 sessions. Thirteen of 33 participants completed an evaluation. In general, respondents found the teleconsultation program very helpful and credited the experience with improving their team functioning. Furthermore, respondents reported a significant increase in confidence to treat transgender veterans by the end of the program (59% versus 83%). We explored whether it is possible to recruit VHA clinical teams to participate in lengthy training on a low prevalence but complex condition. Early results support the feasibility and effectiveness of this national VHA teleconsultation and training program for transgender care. Lessons learned from the first group of learners have been applied to two concurrent groups with positive results.

  12. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork.

  13. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  14. The Supervised Learning Gaussian Mixture Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马继涌; 高文

    1998-01-01

    The traditional Gaussian Mixture Model(GMM)for pattern recognition is an unsupervised learning method.The parameters in the model are derived only by the training samples in one class without taking into account the effect of sample distributions of other classes,hence,its recognition accuracy is not ideal sometimes.This paper introduces an approach for estimating the parameters in GMM in a supervising way.The Supervised Learning Gaussian Mixture Model(SLGMM)improves the recognition accuracy of the GMM.An experimental example has shown its effectiveness.The experimental results have shown that the recognition accuracy derived by the approach is higher than those obtained by the Vector Quantization(VQ)approach,the Radial Basis Function (RBF) network model,the Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) approach and the GMM.In addition,the training time of the approach is less than that of Multilayer Perceptrom(MLP).

  15. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    are interconnected. Collective Academic Supervision provides possibilities for systematic interaction between individual master students in their writing process. In this process they learn core academic competencies, such as the ability to assess theoretical and practical problems in their practice and present them...

  16. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...

  17. Clinical Supervision in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2011-01-01

    on giving and receiving clinical supervision as reported by therapists in Denmark. Method: Currently, the Danish sample consists of 350 clinical psychologist doing psychotherapy who completed DPCCQ. Data are currently being prepared for statistical analysis. Results: This paper will focus primarily...

  18. Kontraktetablering i supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Karen Vibeke; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet behandler kontraktetablering i supervision, et element, der ofte er blevet negligeret eller endog helt forbigået ved indledningen af supervisionsforløb. Sikre aftaler om emner som tid, sted, procedurer for fremlæggelse, fortrolighed, ansvarsfordeling og evaluering skaber imidlertid tryghed...

  19. Etiske betragtninger ved supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Agerskov, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet præsenterer nogle etiske betragtninger ved supervision. Mens der længe har eksisteret etiske retningslinjer for psykoterapeutisk arbejde, har der overraskende nok manglet tilsvarende vejledninger på supervisionsområdet. Det betyder imidlertid ikke, at de ikke er relevante. I kapitlet gøres...

  20. Service innovation in glaucoma management: using a Web-based electronic patient record to facilitate virtual specialist supervision of a shared care glaucoma programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heathcote R; Diamond, Jeremy P

    2015-03-01

    To assess the importance of specialist supervision in a new model of glaucoma service delivery. An optometrist supported by three technicians managed each glaucoma clinic. Patients underwent testing and clinical examination before the optometrist triaged them into one of five groups: 'normal', 'stable', 'low risk', 'unstable' and 'high risk'. Patient data were uploaded to an electronic medical record to facilitate virtual review by a glaucoma specialist. 24 257 glaucoma reviews at three glaucoma clinics during a 31-month period were analysed. The clinic optometrists and glaucoma specialists had substantial agreement (κ 0.69). 13 patients were identified to be high risk by the glaucoma specialist that had not been identified as such by the optometrist. Glaucoma specialists amended 13% of the optometrists' interim decisions resulting in an overall reduction in review appointments by 2.4%. Employing technicians and optometrists to triage glaucoma patients into groups defined by risk of blindness allows higher risk patients to be directed to a glaucoma specialist. Virtual review allows the glaucoma specialist to remain in overall control while reducing the risk that patients are treated or followed-up unnecessarily. Demand for glaucoma appointments can be reduced allowing scarce medical resources to be directed to patients most in need. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Document Classification Using Expectation Maximization with Semi Supervised Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Nigam, Bhawna; Salve, Sonal; Vamney, Swati

    2011-01-01

    As the amount of online document increases, the demand for document classification to aid the analysis and management of document is increasing. Text is cheap, but information, in the form of knowing what classes a document belongs to, is expensive. The main purpose of this paper is to explain the expectation maximization technique of data mining to classify the document and to learn how to improve the accuracy while using semi-supervised approach. Expectation maximization algorithm is applied with both supervised and semi-supervised approach. It is found that semi-supervised approach is more accurate and effective. The main advantage of semi supervised approach is "Dynamically Generation of New Class". The algorithm first trains a classifier using the labeled document and probabilistically classifies the unlabeled documents. The car dataset for the evaluation purpose is collected from UCI repository dataset in which some changes have been done from our side.

  2. Training potential in minimally invasive surgery in a tertiary care, paediatric urology centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R P J; Chrzan, R J; Klijn, A J; Kuijper, C F; Dik, P; de Jong, T P V M

    2015-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is being utilized more frequently as a surgical technique in general surgery and in paediatric urology. It is associated with a steep learning curve. Currently, the centre does not offer a MIS training programme. It is hypothesized that the number of MIS procedures performed in the low-volume specialty of paediatric urology will offer insufficient training potential for surgeons. To assess the MIS training potential of a highly specialized, tertiary care, paediatric urology training centre that has been accredited by the Joint Committee of Paediatric Urology (JCPU). The clinical activity of the department was retrospectively reviewed by extracting the annual number of admissions, outpatient consultations and operative procedures. The operations were divided into open procedures and MIS. Major ablative procedures (nephrectomy) and reconstructive procedures (pyeloplasty) were analysed with reference to the patients' ages. The centre policy is not to perform major MIS in children who are under 2 years old or who weigh less than 12 kg. Every year, this institution provides approximately 4300 out-patient consultations, 600 admissions, and 1300 procedures under general anaesthesia for children with urological problems. In 2012, 35 patients underwent major intricate MIS: 16 pyeloplasties, eight nephrectomies and 11 operations for incontinence (seven Burch, and four bladder neck procedures). In children ≥2 years of age, 16/21 of the pyeloplasties and 8/12 of the nephrectomies were performed laparoscopically. The remaining MIS procedures included 25 orchidopexies and one intravesical ureteral reimplantation. There is no consensus on how to assess laparoscopic training. It would be valuable to reach a consensus on a standardized laparoscopic training programme in paediatric urology. Often training potential is based on operation numbers only. In paediatric urology no minimum requirement has been specified. The number of procedures quoted

  3. Training health care workers to promote HIV services for patients with tuberculosis in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behets Frieda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV counseling and testing, HIV prevention and provision of HIV care and support are essential activities to reduce the burden of HIV among patients with TB, and should be integrated into routine TB care. Methods The development of training materials to promote HIV services for TB patients involved the definition of target health care workers (HCWs; identification of required tasks, skills and knowledge; review of international guidelines; and adaptation of existing training materials for voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Training effectiveness was assessed by means of questionnaires administered pre- and post-training, by correlating post-training results of HCWs with the centre's HIV testing acceptance rates, and through participatory observations at the time of on-site supervisory visits and monthly meetings. Results Pre-training assessment identified gaps in basic knowledge of HIV epidemiology, the link between TB and HIV, interpretation of CD4 counts, prevention and management of OIs, and occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Opinions on patients' rights and confidentiality varied. Mean test results increased from 72% pre-training to 87% post-training (p Conclusion Many HCWs did not possess the knowledge or skills necessary to integrate HIV activities into routine care for patients with TB. A participatory approach resulted in training materials that fulfilled local needs.

  4. Implementation of preventive strength training in residential geriatric care: a multi-centre study protocol with one year of interventions on multiple levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieder Ulrike

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is scientific evidence that preventive physical exercise is effective even in high age. In contrast, there are few opportunities of preventive exercise for highly aged people endangered by or actually in need of care. For example, they would not be able to easily go to training facilities; standard exercises may be too intensive and therefore be harmful to them; orientation disorders like dementia would exacerbate individuals and groups in following instructions and keeping exercises going. In order to develop appropriate interventions, these and other issues were assigned to different levels: the individual-social level (ISL, the organisational-institutional level (OIL and the political-cultural level (PCL. Consequently, this conceptional framework was utilised for development, implementation and evaluation of a new strength and balance exercise programme for old people endangered by or actually in need of daily care. The present paper contains the development of this programme labeled "fit for 100", and a study protocol of an interventional single-arm multi-centre trial. Methods The intervention consisted of (a two group training sessions every week over one year, mainly resistance exercises, accompanied by sensorimotor and communicative group exercises and games (ISL, (b a sustainable implementation concept, starting new groups by instructors belonging to the project, followed by training and supervision of local staff, who stepwise take over the group (OIL, (c informing and convincing activities in professional, administrative and governmental contexts, public relation activities, and establishing an advisory council with renowned experts and public figures (PCL. Participating institutions of geriatric care were selected through several steps of quality criteria assessment. Primary outcome measures were continuous documentation of individual participation (ISL, number of groups continued without external financial

  5. Missing Data Imputation for Supervised Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Poulos, Jason; Valle, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares methods for imputing missing categorical data for supervised learning tasks. The ability of researchers to accurately fit a model and yield unbiased estimates may be compromised by missing data, which are prevalent in survey-based social science research. We experiment on two machine learning benchmark datasets with missing categorical data, comparing classifiers trained on non-imputed (i.e., one-hot encoded) or imputed data with different degrees of missing-data perturbat...

  6. An evaluation of experiences and views of Scottish leadership training opportunities amongst primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ailsa; Allbutt, Helen; Munro, Lucy; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; Cameron, Donald; Scoular, Ken; Orr, Graham; Gillies, John

    2017-05-01

    To determine experiences of leadership training of six primary care professions in Scotland and consider future development. A questionnaire on previous leadership course attendance and future intentions was distributed to community pharmacists, general dental practitioners, general practitioners, practice nurses, practice managers and optometrists. Analysis comprised descriptive statistics for closed questions and management of textual data. Formal leadership training participation was fairly low except for practice managers. Leadership was perceived to facilitate development of staff, problem-solving and team working. Preference for future delivery was similar across the six professions with e-modules and small group learning being preferred. Time and financial pressures to undertake courses were common barriers for professionals. Leadership is key to improve quality, safety and efficiency of care and help deliver innovative services and transformative change. To date, leadership provision for primary care professionals has typically been patchy, uni-disciplinary in focus and undertaken outwith work environments. Future development must reflect needs of busy primary care professionals and the reality of team working to deliver integrated services at local level.

  7. Caring for older people with dementia: an exploratory study of staff knowledge and perception of training in three Australian dementia care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cindy; Moyle, Wendy; Stockwell-Smith, Gillian

    2013-03-01

    To ascertain care staff's knowledge of dementia relating to aetiology and/or pathology, symptoms and care/treatment; and explore their perceptions of the importance and adequacy of dementia education and training opportunities. Thirty-five care staff working in three secure dementia care facilities were recruited. Dementia knowledge was surveyed using the Staff Knowledge of Dementia Test (SKDT). Perceptions of dementia education and training were examined via semi-structured individual interviews. An average of 21 out of 33 SKDT questions (SD = 4.0) was correctly answered. Knowledge discrepancy was attributed to participants' cultural and ethnic origin and the length of residency in Australia of migrant care staff. Participants acknowledged the importance of dementia education and training but were critical of the content relevancy to direct care practices. There is a need to improve care staff knowledge of dementia, and dementia education and training should include direct practical competencies required for effective care delivery. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Crack and AIDS Babies. Fostering Families. A Specialized Training Program Designed for Foster Care Workers & Foster Care Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; Mallea, Evelyn

    This module is part of a training program for foster parents and foster care workers offered at Colorado State University. The module examines the effects of maternal alcohol and crack use during the prenatal period on infants, and the transmission of AIDS to infants. The module's learning objectives address: (1) foster care concerns for medically…

  9. Management training of physician executives, their leadership style, and care management performance: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Curtin, Thomas F

    2006-02-01

    To examine associations between management training of physician executives and their leadership styles, as well as effectiveness in achieving disease management goals. Cross-sectional national survey. Executive directors of community health centers (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9%) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the medical director's leadership, and for quantitative information on the center's achievement of clinical (mostly disease management) goals. The dependent variables were the medical director's scores (as perceived by the executive director) on transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership, effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items; 5-point Likert scale). The independent variable was the medical director's management training status. Compared with medical directors with or =30 days of in-service training, had 0.32, 0.35, 0.30, 0.36, and 0.37 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, satisfaction, and subordinate extra effort, respectively, and 0.31 lower score on laissez-faire leadership (all P management degrees but with > or =30 days of in-service training had 0.34, 0.36, 0.50, and 0.47 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, and satisfaction with the leader (all P leadership significantly influences achievement of disease management goals. Training may enable physician executives to develop leadership styles that are effective in influencing clinical providers' adoption of disease management guidelines under managed care.

  10. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  11. Practicing End-of-Life Conversations: Physician Communication Training Program in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Bronwyn; Browning, David M

    2015-01-01

    A Physician Communication Training Program (PCTP) utilizing scripts based on actual family conferences with patients, families, and the health care team was developed at one medical center in the Northeast. The program was designed, adapted, and directed by a palliative care social worker. The primary goal of the program is to help residents and attending physicians build better communication skills in establishing goals of care and in end-of-life planning. The scripts focus on improving physicians' basic skills in conducting family meetings, discussing advance directives, prognosis, brain death, and withdrawal of life support. Excerpts from the scripts utilized in the program are included. Feedback from participants has been positive, with all respondents indicating improvement in their capacity to take part in these challenging conversations.

  12. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretos Michael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary Health Care (PHC is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8 primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p Conclusion The primary health care course achieved the objectives of introducing students to comprehensive, community oriented care, although there was variation between the PCUs. The assessment scale that was developed to analyse the case-write ups of the students provided data that can be used to evaluate the course.

  13. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...

  14. Knowledge and skills of primary health care workers trained on integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness: Follow-up assessment 3 years after the training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary health care workers of a district in northern India were trained in the year 2006 for Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI using two different training methods: conventional 8-day training and new interrupted 5-day training. Knowledge and skills may decline over a period of time. Rate of decline may be associated with the type of training. A study was thus conducted to see the retention of knowledge and skills in the two training groups, 3 years after the initial training. Materials and Methods: This study was done in the Panchkula district of Haryana state in northern India. In the year 2006, 50 primary health care workers were given new interrupted 5-day training and another 35 workers were given conventional 8-day training on IMNCI. Knowledge and skills of the same workers were evaluated in the year 2009, using the same methodology and tools as were used in the year 2006. Data analysis was done to see the extent of decline in knowledge and skills in these 3 years and whether decline was more in any particular training group. Results: Compared to post-training score in the year 2006, composite knowledge and skill scores for Auxilliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs and Anganwari workers (AWWs together declined significantly in the year 2009 from 74.6 to 58.0 in 8-day training group and from 73.2 to 57.0 in 5-day training group (P < 0.001. Follow-up composite scores in the two training groups were similar. Whereas the decline was more for knowledge scores in 8-day training group and for skill score in 5-day training group, the pattern of decline was inconsistent for different health conditions and among ANMs and AWWs. Conclusion: Long-term retention of knowledge and skills in 5-day group was equivalent to that in 8-day training group. Refresher trainings may boost up the decline in the knowledge and skills.

  15. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers’ Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbro, Éimhín M.; Gill, Michelle M.; Reynolds, Joanna; Shelley, Katharine D.; Strasser, Susan; Sripipatana, Tabitha; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Mabey, David

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST) allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW) acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We illustrate that new

  16. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers' Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éimhín M Ansbro

    Full Text Available Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We

  17. Family Medicine Maternity Care Call to Action: Moving Toward National Standards for Training and Competency Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Susanna R; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Leeman, Larry; Tuggy, Michael; Kim, Thomas O; Nothnagle, Melissa; Breuner, Joseph; Loafman, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Maternity care is an integral part of family medicine, and the quality and cost-effectiveness of maternity care provided by family physicians is well documented. Considering the population health perspective, increasing the number of family physicians competent to provide maternity care is imperative, as is working to overcome the barriers discouraging maternity care practice. A standard that clearly defines maternity care competency and a systematic set of tools to assess competency levels could help overcome these barriers. National discussions between 2012 and 2014 revealed that tools for competency assessment varied widely. These discussions resulted in the formation of a workgroup, culminating in a Family Medicine Maternity Care Summit in October 2014. This summit allowed for expert consensus to describe three scopes of maternity practice, draft procedural and competency assessment tools for each scope, and then revise the tools, guided by the Family Medicine and OB/GYN Milestones documents from the respective residency review committees. The summit group proposed that achievement of a specified number of procedures completed should not determine competency; instead, a standardized competency assessment should take place after a minimum number is performed. The traditionally held required numbers for core procedures were reassessed at the summit, and the resulting consensus opinion is proposed here. Several ways in which these evaluation tools can be disseminated and refined through the creation of a learning collaborative across residency programs is described. The summit group believed that standardization in training will more clearly define the competencies of family medicine maternity care providers and begin to reduce one of the barriers that may discourage family physicians from providing maternity care.

  18. Perception of nursing students face clinical supervision: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Certo, Ana; Galvão, Ana Maria; Louçano, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Currently, without theoretical clinical training is not possible for the nursing student adequately meet their clinical practices.In this regard, clinical supervision plays a key role monitoring and development of the same. However,so that the student can be supervised, requires evidence of nurse supervisor competence in this context. In contemporary literature, this issue has been much debated, as the target of numerous different scientific studies. Aim of the study was, under...

  19. Semi-supervised Adapted HMMs for Unusual Event Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dong; Gatica-Perez, Daniel; Bengio, Samy

    2004-01-01

    We address the problem of temporal unusual event detection. Unusual events are characterized by a number of features (rarity, unexpectedness, and relevance) that limit the application of traditional supervised model-based approaches. We propose a semi-supervised adapted Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework, in which usual event models are first learned from a large amount of (commonly available) training data, while unusual event models are learned by Bayesian adaptation in an unsupervised man...

  20. Semi-supervised Adapted HMMs for Unusual Event Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dong; Gatica-Perez, Daniel; Bengio, Samy; McCowan, Iain A.

    2005-01-01

    We address the problem of temporal unusual event detection. Unusual events are characterized by a number of features (rarity, unexpectedness, and relevance) that limit the application of traditional supervised model-based approaches. We propose a semi-supervised adapted Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework, in which usual event models are first learned from a large amount of (commonly available) training data, while unusual event models are learned by Bayesian adaptation in an unsupervised man...

  1. Supervised Speech Separation Based on Deep Learning: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, DeLiang; Chen, Jitong

    2017-01-01

    Speech separation is the task of separating target speech from background interference. Traditionally, speech separation is studied as a signal processing problem. A more recent approach formulates speech separation as a supervised learning problem, where the discriminative patterns of speech, speakers, and background noise are learned from training data. Over the past decade, many supervised separation algorithms have been put forward. In particular, the recent introduction of deep learning ...

  2. A home-based training programme improves family caregivers' oral care practices with stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Y-W; Yen, M; Fetzer, S; Chiang, L-C; Shyu, Y-Il; Lee, T-H; Ma, H-I

    2016-05-01

    Stroke survivors experience poor oral health when discharged from the hospital to the community. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based oral care training programme on knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy and practice behaviour of family caregivers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. The experimental group consisted of 48 family caregivers who received the home-based oral care training programme, and the control group consisted of 46 family caregivers who received routine oral care education. The outcomes were measured by the Knowledge of Oral Care, Attitude towards Oral Care, Self-Efficacy of Oral Care and Behaviour of Oral Care before the training programme, and at one and two months afterwards. The data were analysed using mixed model anova to determine differences in the outcomes between the two groups. The findings demonstrated that the intervention group had more knowledge (t = 8.80, P caregivers' behaviour of oral care at one and two months of the intervention for both groups. Our individualized home-based oral care education can achieve significant improvements in oral care knowledge and self-efficacy among family caregivers of stroke survivors, and it can sufficiently empower them to modify their oral care practices in a home-based healthcare environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of video interaction analysis training on nurse-patient communication in the care of the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Bensing, J.M.; Grypdonck, M.H.F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical evaluation of communication skills training for nurses in elderly care. The training programme was based on Video Interaction Analysis and aimed to improve nurses' communication skills such that they pay attention to patients' physical, social and emotional needs an

  4. Effects of Video Interaction Analysis Training on Nurse-Patient Communication in the Care of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caris-Verhallen, Wilma M. C. M.; Kerkstra, Ada; Bensing, Jozien M.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an empirical evaluation of training based on Video Interaction Analysis. The training aimed to improve nurses' (N=40) communication skills such that they pay attention to patients' physical, social, and emotional needs and support self care in elderly people. Limitations of this study and topics for further research are discussed.…

  5. Effects of video interaction analysis training on nurse–patient communication in the care of the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Bensing, J.; Grypdonck, M.H.F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical evaluation of communication skills training for nurses in elderly care. The training programme was based on Video Interaction Analysis and aimed to improve nurses’ communication skills such that they pay attention to patients’ physical, social and emotional needs an

  6. QUEST: Eliminating Online Supervised Learning for Efficient Classification Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardjan Zwartjes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce QUEST (QUantile Estimation after Supervised Training, an adaptive classification algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs that eliminates the necessity for online supervised learning. Online processing is important for many sensor network applications. Transmitting raw sensor data puts high demands on the battery, reducing network life time. By merely transmitting partial results or classifications based on the sampled data, the amount of traffic on the network can be significantly reduced. Such classifications can be made by learning based algorithms using sampled data. An important issue, however, is the training phase of these learning based algorithms. Training a deployed sensor network requires a lot of communication and an impractical amount of human involvement. QUEST is a hybrid algorithm that combines supervised learning in a controlled environment with unsupervised learning on the location of deployment. Using the SITEX02 dataset, we demonstrate that the presented solution works with a performance penalty of less than 10% in 90% of the tests. Under some circumstances, it even outperforms a network of classifiers completely trained with supervised learning. As a result, the need for on-site supervised learning and communication for training is completely eliminated by our solution.

  7. Importance of Gait Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amputation exercises done under the supervision of a physical therapist, the initial training is provided by the prosthetist ... this stage, it is best to involve a physical therapist for regular gait training sessions. Once it is ...

  8. Feasibility and acceptability of a resilience training program for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Conrad, David; Evans, John; Jooste, Karen; Solyntjes, Janet; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The critical nursing shortage is particularly apparent in specialty areas such as intensive care units (ICUs). Some nurses develop resilient coping strategies and adapt to stressful work experiences, mitigating the development of common maladaptive psychological symptoms. To determine if a multimodal resilience training program for ICU nurses was feasible to perform and acceptable to the study participants. In a randomized and controlled 12-week intervention study, treatment and control groups completed demographic questions and measures of resilience, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and burnout syndrome before and after the intervention. The intervention included a 2-day educational workshop, written exposure sessions, event-triggered counseling sessions, mindfulness-based stress reduction exercises, and a protocolized aerobic exercise regimen. Nurses in the intervention arm also completed satisfaction surveys for each component of the intervention. This mulitmodal resilience training program was feasible to conduct and acceptable to ICU nurses. Both nurses randomized to the treatment group and nurses randomized to the control group showed a significant decrease in PTSD symptom score after the intervention. A multifaceted resilience training program for ICU nurses was both feasible and acceptable. A sufficiently powered, randomized clinical trial is needed to assess the effect of the intervention on improving individuals' level of resilience and improving psychological outcomes such as symptoms of anxiety, depression, burnout syndrome, and PTSD. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Grainne; Corlett, Jo; Dowling, Maura

    The aim of this study was to explore adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care (FCC). A qualitative research design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adult-trained perioperative nurses. Data analysis was guided by Colaizzi's seven-step framework, resulting in a composite description of perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. While participants supported the principle of family involvement in care, they found its implementation in practice difficult and stressful. They reported that families often appeared inadequately prepared for the surgical experience, and subsequent poor experiences for families caused feelings of upset and inadequacy for nurses. While some of these findings are similar to those in previous studies of paediatric nurses' practice of FCC, this is the first known study to examine adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. Participants articulated an awareness of what constitutes effective FCC and showed the motivation to accomplish the task of improving family-centered practice in their practice area.

  10. Multiprofessional training for breastfeeding management in primary care in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Jennifer

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing breastfeeding initiation and duration rates is one of the UK Department of Health national targets for improving the health of the population. One reason contributing to the high rates of breastfeeding discontinuation may be that primary care teams may not have sufficient knowledge to help mothers overcome problems experienced in the early days and may also give conflicting advice. Previous studies have shown that general practitioners are happy to participate in practice-based educational sessions and have expressed a need for breastfeeding education. This study was carried out as part of the training to achieve 'UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative in a community health care setting' status. It aimed to improve the breastfeeding expertise and advice about the management of breastfeeding problems within the primary care team using a CD-ROM breastfeeding learning package, and to assess the usefulness and acceptability of this educational intervention. Methods Six UK general practitioner (GP practices were involved in a questionnaire survey of multiprofessional groups before and after an interactive training session. This focussed on managing and solving problems, particularly mastitis and nipple thrush. The questionnaire included 20 questions on attitudes to and knowledge of breastfeeding, and eight multiple-choice questions on breastfeeding management. Non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the groups and to explore changes in knowledge after training. Results Fifty primary care health professionals (29 GPs, 18 health visitors, 3 midwives attended the sessions. There was an increase in scores relating to knowledge about breastfeeding after training, especially for the GPs and for those who did not have their own children. Health visitors improved their scores on recognition of the symptoms of poor attachment at the breast, and GPs showed greatest improvement

  11. Social networks in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    and practice have focused on conceptual frameworks and practical techniques of promoting reflection through conversation in general and questioning in particular. However, in recent years, supervision research has started to focus on the social and technological aspects of supervision. This calls...... is constituted by the relationality of the actors, not by the actors themselves. In other words, no one acts in a vacuum but rather always under the influence of a wide range of surrounding and interconnected factors. Actors are actors because they are in a networked relationship. Thus, focusing on social...... and space. That involves mobilised an denrolled actos, both animate and inanimate (e.g. books, computers, etc. Actor-network theory defines a symmetry between animate and inanimate, i.e. subjects and objects, because ”human powers increasingly derive from the complex interconnections if human with material...

  12. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  13. Introducing structured caregiver training in stroke care: findings from the TRACS process evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Hawkins, R; Sadler, E; Harding, G; McKevitt, C; Godfrey, M; Dickerson, J; Farrin, A J; Kalra, L; Smithard, D; Forster, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the process of implementation of the modified London Stroke Carers Training Course (LSCTC) in the Training Caregivers After Stroke (TRACS) cluster randomised trial and contribute to the interpretation of the TRACS trial results. The LSCTC was a structured competency-based training programme designed to help develop the knowledge and skills (eg, patient handling or transfer skills) essential for the day-to-day management of disabled survivors of stroke. The LSCTC comprised 14 components, 6 were mandatory (and delivered to all) and 8 non-mandatory, to be delivered based on individual assessment of caregiver need. Design Process evaluation using non-participant observation, documentary analysis and semistructured interviews. Participants Patients with stroke (n=38), caregivers (n=38), stroke unit staff (n=53). Settings 10 of the 36 stroke units participating in the TRACS trial in four English regions (Yorkshire, North West, South East and South West, Peninsula). Results Preparatory cascade training on delivery of the LSCTC did not reach all staff and did not lead to multidisciplinary team (MDT) wide understanding of, engagement with or commitment to the LSCTC. Although senior therapists in most intervention units observed developed ownership of the LSCTC, MDT working led to separation rather than integration of delivery of LSCTC elements. Organisational features of stroke units and professionals’ patient-focused practices limited the involvement of caregivers. Caregivers were often invited to observe therapy or care being provided by professionals but had few opportunities to make sense of, or to develop knowledge and stroke-specific skills provided by the LSCTC. Where provided, caregiver training came very late in the inpatient stay. Assessment and development of caregiver competence was not commonly observed. Conclusions Contextual factors including service improvement pressures and staff perceptions of the necessity for and work required in

  14. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  15. Ethics in education supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ÖZMEN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Supervision in education plays a crucial role in attaining educational goals. In addition to determining the present situation, it has a theoretical and practical function regarding the actions to be taken in general and the achievement of teacher development in particular to meet the educational goals in the most effective way. For the education supervisors to act ethically in their tasks while achieving this vital mission shall facilitate them to build up trust, to enhance the level of collaboration and sharing, thus it shall contribute to organizational effectiveness. Ethics is an essential component of educational supervision. Yet, it demonstrates rather vague quality due to the conditions, persons, and situations. Therefore, it is a difficult process to develop the ethical standards in institutions. This study aims to clarify the concept of ethics, to bring up its importance, and to make recommendations for more effective supervisions from the aspect of ethics, based on the literature review, some research results, and sample cases reported by teachers and supervisors.

  16. Let's Talk Critical. Development and Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Critical Care Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Aluko A; Hsieh, S Jean; Howes, Jennifer M; Keene, Adam B; Fausto, James A; Pinto, Priya A; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2015-04-01

    Although expert communication between intensive care unit clinicians with patients or surrogates improves patient- and family-centered outcomes, fellows in critical care medicine do not feel adequately trained to conduct family meetings. We aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate a communication skills program that could be easily integrated into a U.S. critical care fellowship. We developed four simulation cases that provided communication challenges that critical care fellows commonly face. For each case, we developed a list of directly observable tasks that could be used by faculty to evaluate fellows during each simulation. We developed a didactic curriculum of lectures/case discussions on topics related to palliative care, end-of-life care, communication skills, and bioethics; this month-long curriculum began and ended with the fellows leading family meetings in up to two simulated cases with direct observation by faculty who were not blinded to the timing of the simulation. Our primary measures of effectiveness were the fellows' self-reported change in comfort with leading family meetings after the program was completed and the quality of the communication as measured by the faculty evaluators during the family meeting simulations at the end of the month. Over 3 years, 31 critical care fellows participated in the program, 28 of whom participated in 101 family meeting simulations with direct feedback by faculty facilitators. Our trainees showed high rates of information disclosure during the simulated family meetings. During the simulations done at the end of the month compared with those done at the beginning, our fellows showed significantly improved rates in: (1) verbalizing an agenda for the meeting (64 vs. 41%; Chi-square, 5.27; P = 0.02), (2) summarizing what will be done for the patient (64 vs. 39%; Chi-square, 6.21; P = 0.01), and (3) providing a follow-up plan (60 vs. 37%; Chi-square, 5.2; P = 0.02). More than 95% of our participants (n = 27

  17. Effect of a spiritual care training program for staff on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Grace Meijuan; Tan, Yung Ying; Cheung, Yin Bun; Lye, Weng Kit; Lim, Sock Hui Amy; Ng, Wan Ru; Puchalski, Christina; Neo, Patricia Soek Hui

    2017-08-01

    Physicians and nurses do not assess spirituality routinely, even though spiritual care is a vital part of palliative care for patients with an advanced serious illness. The aim of our study was to determine whether a training program for healthcare professionals on spirituality and the taking of a spiritual history would result in improved patient quality of life (QoL) and spiritual well-being. This was a cluster-controlled trial of a spiritual care training program for palliative care doctors and nurses. Three of seven clinical teams (clusters) received the intervention, while the other four served as controls. Included patients were newly referred to the palliative care service, had an estimated survival of more than one month, and were aware of their diagnosis and prognosis. The primary outcome measure was the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp) patient-reported questionnaire, which patients completed at two timepoints. Total FACIT-Sp score includes the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire, which measures overall quality of life, as well as a spiritual well-being score. Some 144 patients completed the FACIT-Sp at both timepoints-74 in the control group and 70 in the intervention group. The change in overall quality of life, measured by change in FACT-G scores, was 3.89 points (95% confidence interval [CI 95%] = -0.42 to 8.19, p = 0.076) higher in the intervention group than in the control group. The difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of change in spiritual well-being was 0.32 (CI 95% = -2.23 to 2.88, p = 0.804). A brief spiritual care training program can possibly help bring about enhanced improvement of global patient QoL, but the effect on patients' spiritual well-being was not as evident in our participants. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to allow for more definite conclusions to be drawn.

  18. The 2BFit study: is an unsupervised proprioceptive balance board training programme, given in addition to usual care, effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences? Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence that athletes have a twofold risk for re-injury after a previous ankle sprain, especially during the first year post-injury. These ankle sprain recurrences could result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability in 20 to 50% of these cases. When looking at the high rate of ankle sprain recurrences and the associated chronic results, ankle sprain recurrence prevention is important. Objective To evaluate the effect of a proprioceptive balance board training programme on ankle sprain recurrences, that was applied to individual athletes after rehabilitation and treatment by usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of one year. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion in the study. The intervention programme was compared to usual care. The intervention programme consisted of an eight-week proprioceptive training, which started after finishing usual care and from the moment that sports participation was again possible. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months. The primary outcome of this study was the incidence of recurrent ankle injuries in both groups within one year after the initial sprain. Secondary outcomes were severity and etiology of re-injury and medical care. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from a societal perspective. A process evaluation was conducted for the intervention programme. Discussion The 2BFit trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the effect of a non-supervised home-based proprioceptive balance board training programme in addition to usual care, on the recurrence of ankle sprains in sports. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in practical guidelines on the treatment of ankle sprains. Results will

  19. After-school supervision and adolescent cigarette smoking: contributions of the setting and intensity of after-school self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, J A; Crowe, P A; Richardson, J; Flay, B

    1999-02-01

    This paper looks at the independent contributions of the setting and the intensity of after-school self-care to the cigarette smoking behaviors of 2352 ninth graders. We controlled for a variety of correlates of adolescent cigarette smoking that have not been accounted for in existing research. Results indicated that the intensity of the self-care experience was significantly associated with adolescent smoking behavior irrespective of the typical setting of the adolescents' after-school activities. Our findings also indicated that a nonpermissive parenting style, family rule-setting about cigarettes, and especially, in absentia parental monitoring may reduce the likelihood of cigarette smoking among latchkey and nonlatchkey adolescents alike. However, latchkey youth were not any more sensitive to these aspects of parenting than other adolescents. This is consistent with the notion that targeting these aspects of the home lives of all adolescents has the potential to reduce smoking behaviors among latchkey as well as nonlatchkey children.

  20. The essence of cancer care: the impact of training on nurses' ability to communicate effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Susie M; Gambles, Maureen; Roberts, Anita

    2002-12-01

    The importance of effective communication between health professionals and patients with cancer is widely recognized. Training programmes aimed at improving key communication skills are becoming increasingly available. To evaluate a communication skills programme delivered to 308 cancer nurses as part of degree/diploma courses. Based on previous work, it was hypothesized that a statistically significant improvement between pre- and postintervention scores would be observed. Audiotaped nursing assessments with patients were undertaken before and after the course. These were evaluated according to coverage of nine previously identified key areas of communication. Mean postcourse scores rose by 5.9 points (P communication skills training has the potential to improve nurses' skills, particularly in emotionally laden areas across the spectrum of roles in cancer care.