WorldWideScience

Sample records for superstructure ice protection

  1. 76 FR 52241 - Activation of Ice Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... thought it not significant enough to require activating the ice protection system. This rule is meant to... access to information that will give them the knowledge and skills to safely and strategically fly in... that the commenter thinks automatic activation should be mandatory, but with features that allow...

  2. Assessment of Superstructure Ice Protection as Applied to Offshore Oil Operations Safety: Ice Protection Technologies, Safety Enhancements, and Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    ocean surface, they are susceptible to snow, rime, glaze, or frost accumulation (courtesy VIH /Cougar Helicopters Inc). 5. Helicopter landing pad (8...than on a platform. ERDC/CRRELTR-09-4 18 L id y > • Figure 8. Supply vessel climbing a swell. Note that the fantail is submerged (courtesy VIH

  3. 14 CFR 23.929 - Engine installation ice protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.929 Engine installation ice protection. Propellers (except wooden propellers) and...

  4. Evaluation of Alternative Altitude Scaling Methods for Thermal Ice Protection System in NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sam; Addy, Harold E. Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Orchard, David M.

    2017-01-01

    A test was conducted at NASA Icing Research Tunnel to evaluate altitude scaling methods for thermal ice protection system. Two new scaling methods based on Weber number were compared against a method based on Reynolds number. The results generally agreed with the previous set of tests conducted in NRCC Altitude Icing Wind Tunnel where the three methods of scaling were also tested and compared along with reference (altitude) icing conditions. In those tests, the Weber number-based scaling methods yielded results much closer to those observed at the reference icing conditions than the Reynolds number-based icing conditions. The test in the NASA IRT used a much larger, asymmetric airfoil with an ice protection system that more closely resembled designs used in commercial aircraft. Following the trends observed during the AIWT tests, the Weber number based scaling methods resulted in smaller runback ice than the Reynolds number based scaling, and the ice formed farther upstream. The results show that the new Weber number based scaling methods, particularly the Weber number with water loading scaling, continue to show promise for ice protection system development and evaluation in atmospheric icing tunnels.

  5. An Alternative Ice Protection System for Turbine Engine Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal presents a dual approach to the development and certification of an alternative system for ice protection of turbine engine inlets. It combines a new...

  6. An Alternative Ice Protection System for Turbine Engine Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation combines a new generation low power ice protection system with a novel path to certification that is based upon requirements that turbine engines be...

  7. Envelope Protection for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  8. Assessment of Superstructure Ice Protection as Applied to Offshore Oil Operations Safety: Problems, Hazards, Needs, and Potential Transfer Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    thermostats, or materials such as carbon layers, which vary in thickness with location and are self- healing and self- regulating. Ships commonly use heating...back down to the substrate after deicing. Aftermarket sup- pliers argue that ozone , sunlight, weathering, oxidation, and pollution at- tack both natural

  9. An Ice Protection and Detection Systems Manufacturer's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Dave

    2009-01-01

    Accomplishments include: World Class Aircraft Icing Research Center and Facility. Primary Sponsor/Partner - Aircraft Icing Consortia/Meetings. Icing Research Tunnel. Icing Test Aircraft. Icing Codes - LEWICE/Scaling, et al. Development of New Technologies (SBIR, STTR, et al). Example: Look Ahead Ice Detection. Pilot Training Materials. Full Cooperation with Academia, Government and Industry.

  10. 40 CFR 745.228 - Accreditation of training programs: public and commercial buildings, bridges and superstructures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accreditation of training programs: public and commercial buildings, bridges and superstructures. 745.228 Section 745.228 Protection of... of training programs: public and commercial buildings, bridges and superstructures....

  11. Significance analysis of the regional differences on icing time of water onto fire protective clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Jing, L. S.; Zhang, X. Z.; Xia, J. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Hu, C.; Bao, Z. M.; Fu, X. C.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. J.

    2017-09-01

    The object of this work was to determine the icing temperature in icing experiment. Firstly, a questionnaire investigation was carried out on 38 fire detachments in different regions. These Statistical percentage results were divided into northern east group and northern west group. Secondly, a significance analysis between these two results was made using Mann-Whitney U test. Then the icing temperature was determined in different regions. Thirdly, the icing experiment was made in the environment of -20°C in Daxing’an Mountain. The anti-icing effect of new fire protective clothing was verified in this icing.

  12. Ice encapsulation protects rather than disturbs the freezing lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, J W

    2009-03-01

    Arctic and alpine terricolous lichens are adapted to harsh environments and are tolerant to extremely low temperatures when metabolically inactive. However, there are reports indicating that freezing can be lethal to metabolically active lichens. With a projected warmer and more unstable climate, winter precipitation at high latitudes will fall more frequently as rain, causing snowmelt and encapsulating terricolous lichens in ice or exposing them to large temperature fluctuations. Lichens are a major winter food source for reindeer in most parts of the circumpolar region. A laboratory experiment tested how three hydrated reindeer forage lichen species covered by snow, encapsulated in ice, or uncovered responded to storage at freezing temperatures and subsequent warming. Photosynthetic performance (maximal fluorescence of dark-adapted samples and net photosynthetic rates) was significantly lower in lichens not insulated by snow or ice, whereas there were few differences between the snow and ice treatments. It is suggested that snow and ice provide sufficiently moist environments to improve extracellular and reduce intracellular ice nucleation activity. Ice encapsulation, which is often lethal to vascular plants, did not have any negative effects on the studied lichens. The results indicate that complete snow and ice melt followed by refreezing can be detrimental to terricolous lichen ecosystems. Reduced lichen biomass will have a negative effect both on reindeer winter survival and the indigenous peoples who herd reindeer.

  13. Topological Insulators from Electronic Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Yusuke; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of realizing topological insulators by the spontaneous formation of electronic superstructures is theoretically investigated in a minimal two-orbital model including both the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations on a triangular lattice. Using the mean-field approximation, we show that the model exhibits several different types of charge-ordered insulators, where the charge disproportionation forms a honeycomb or kagome superstructure. We find that the charge-ordered insulators in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling can be topological insulators showing quantized spin Hall conductivity. Their band gap is dependent on electron correlations as well as the spin-orbit coupling, and even vanishes while showing the massless Dirac dispersion at the transition to a trivial charge-ordered insulator. Our results suggest a new route to realize and control topological states of quantum matter by the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations.

  14. 14 CFR 25.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... percent of maximum continuous power. (b) Turbine engines. (1) Each turbine engine must operate throughout... turbine engine must idle for 30 minutes on the ground, with the air bleed available for engine icing... between 15° and 30 °F (between −9° and −1 °C) and has a liquid water content not less than 0.3 grams...

  15. Ultrasonic ice protection systems: analytical and numerical models for architecture trade-off

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Protection systems against ice conventionally use thermal, pneumatic or electro-thermal solutions. However, they are characterized by high energy consumption. This article focuses on low-consumption electromechanical deicing solutions based on piezoelectric transducers. After a review of the state of the art to identify the main features of electromechanical de-icing devices, piezoelectric transducer-based architectures are studied. Analytical models validated by numerical simulations allow t...

  16. Implementing Composite Superstructures in Large Passenger Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karatzas, Vasileios; Berggreen, Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher;

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the structural response of the part of the superstructure of a RoPax ferry that has been redesigned using composite materials. The composite superstructure is presented and subsequently compared to the existing steel design considering different loading conditions by the use...... of FE modelling.Results indicate that it is not the structural response of the superstructure that inhibits the implementation of composites in the superstructures of large passenger ships but the complicated design procedure and the acceptance of such solutions by the regulatory bodies....

  17. Actions from landfast Ice on coastal Erosion Protection in the van Mijenfjord, Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Østerås, Espen S.

    2010-01-01

    The geobag embankment constructed at Kapp Amsterdam is part of an ongoing research by SINTEF related to exploration of suitability for use of geobags for coastal erosion protection in the Arctic.Erosion rates in the Arctic are often high and the lack of proper local masses for erosion protection creates the need for alternative solutions.The actions on the embankment caused by the surrounding ice need to be mapped whereas theyc onstitute one of the important features related to Arctic environ...

  18. Results of a low power ice protection system test and a new method of imaging data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Bond, Thomas H.; Mesander, Geert A.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a BF Goodrich De-Icing System's Pneumatic Impulse Ice Protection (PIIP) system in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Characterization studies were done on shed ice particle size by changing the input pressure and cycling time of the PIIP de-icer. The shed ice particle size was quantified using a newly developed image software package. The tests were conducted on a 1.83 m (6 ft) span, 0.53 m (221 in) chord NACA 0012 airfoil operated at a 4 degree angle of attack. The IRT test conditions were a -6.7 C (20 F) glaze ice, and a -20 C (-4 F) rime ice. The ice shedding events were recorded with a high speed video system. A detailed description of the image processing package and the results generated from this analytical tool are presented.

  19. Superstructures: First Cold Test and Future Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Sekutowicz; C Albrecht; V Ayvazyan; R Bandelmann; T Buttner; P Castro; S Choroba; J Eschke; B Faatz; A Gossel; K Honkavaara; B Horst; J Iverson; K Jensch; H Kaiser; R Kammering; G Kreps; D Kostin; J Lorkiewicz; R Lange; A Matheisen; W -D Moller; H -B Peters; D Proch; K Rehlich; H Schlarb; S Schrieber; D Reschke; S Simrock; W Singer; X Singer; K Twarowski; T Weichert; M Wojtkiewicz; G Wendt; K Zapfe; M Liepe; M Huening; M Ferrario; E Plawski; C Pagani; P Kneisel; G Wu; N Baboi; C Thomas; H Chen; W Huang; C Tang; S Zheng

    2003-09-01

    Superstructures, chains of superconducting multi-cell cavities (subunits) connected by e/2 long tube(s) have been proposed as an alternative layout for the TESLA main accelerator [1]. After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two weakly coupled superconducting 7-cell subunits driven by a single Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), have been installed in the Tesla Test Facility linac for beam tests. Energy stability, HOM damping, frequency and field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmeSuperstructures, chains of superconducting multi-cell cavities (subunits) connected by e/2 long tube(s) have been proposed as an alternative layout for the TESLA main accelerator [1]. After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two weakly coupled superconducting 7-cell subunits driven by a single Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), have been installed in the Tesla Test Facility linac for beam tests. Energy stability, HOM damping, frequency and field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that an alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results. The tests confirmed very good damping of HOMs in superstructures and thus has opened a possible new application of this concept to high current energy recovery machines. We have built two 1.5 GHz copper models of two superstructures: 2x5-cells and 2x2-cells to prove further improvement of HOM damping. This contribution presents also measured results on these models. d expectations on the superstructure performance and proved that an alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results.

  20. Development and Implementation of a Model-Driven Envelope Protection System for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Martos, Borja; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  1. Development of nanostructured coatings for protecting the surface of aluminum alloys against corrosion and ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Shahram

    Ice and wet snow accretion on outdoor structures is a severe challenge for cold climate countries. A variety of de-icing and anti-icing techniques have been developed so far to counter this problem. Passive approaches such as anti-icing or icephobic coatings that inhibit or retard ice accumulation on the surfaces are gaining in popularity. Metal corrosion should also be taken into account as metallic substrates are subject to corrosion problems when placed in humid or aggressive environments. Development of any ice-releasing coatings on aluminum structures, as they must be durable enough, is therefore closely related to anti-corrosive protection of that metal. Accordingly, series of experiments have been carried out to combine reduced ice adhesion and improved corrosion resistance on flat AA2024 substrates via thin films of single and double layer alkyl-terminated SAMs coatings. More precisely, alkyl-terminated aluminum substrates were prepared by depositing layer(s) of 18C-SAMs on BTSE-grafted AA2024 or mirror-polished AA2024 surfaces. This alloy is among the most widely used aluminum alloys in transportation systems (including aircraft), the military, etc. The stability of the coatings in an aggressive environment, their overall ice-repellent performance as well as their corrosion resistance was systematically studied. The stability of one-layer and two-layer coatings in different media was tested by means of CA measurements, demonstrating gradual loss of the hydrophobic property after ~1100-h-long immersion in water, associated by decrease in water CA. Surface corrosion was observed in all cases, except that the double-layer coating system provided improved anti-corrosive protection. All single layer coatings showed initial shear stress of ice detachment values of ~1.68 to 2 times lower than as-received aluminum surfaces and about ~1.22 to 1.5 times lower than those observed on mirror-polished surfaces. These values gradually increased after as many as 5 to 9

  2. Biofilm, ice recrystallization inhibition and freeze-thaw protection in an epiphyte community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Kan, F W K; She, Y-M; Walker, V K

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities found on the surface of overwintering plants may be exposed to low temperatures as well as multiple freeze-thaw events. To explore the adaptive mechanisms of these epiphytes, with the objective of identifying products for freeze-protection, enrichment libraries were made from frost-exposed leaves. Of 15 identified bacteria from 60 individual clones, approximately half had ice-association activities, with the great majority showing high freeze-thaw resistance. Isolates with ice nucleation activity and ice recrystallization inhibition activity were recovered. Of the latter, two (Erwinia billingiae J10, and Sphingobacterium kitahiroshimense Y2) showed culture and electron microscopic evidence of motility and/or biofilm production. Mass spectrometric characterization of the E. billingiae extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) identified the major proteins as 35 kDa outer membrane protein A and F, supporting its biofilm character. The addition of the EPS preparation increased the freeze-thaw survival of the more susceptible bacteria 1000-10000 times, and protection was at least partially dependent on the protein component.

  3. Determination of Acreage Thermal Protection Foam Loss From Ice and Foam Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Lawrence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to establish Thermal Protection System (TPS) loss from foam and ice impact conditions similar to what might occur on the Space Launch System. This study was based upon the large amount of testing and analysis that was conducted with both ice and foam debris impacts on TPS acreage foam for the Space Shuttle Project External Tank. Test verified material models and modeling techniques that resulted from Space Shuttle related testing were utilized for this parametric study. Parameters varied include projectile mass, impact velocity and impact angle (5 degree and 10 degree impacts). The amount of TPS acreage foam loss as a result of the various impact conditions is presented.

  4. Tetrahedral Units: For Dodecahedral Super-Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Y; Liebman, J F

    2016-01-01

    Different novel organic-chemical possibilities for tetrahedral building units are considered, with attention to their utility in constructing different super-structures. As a representative construction we consider the use of sets of 20 such identical tetrahedral units to form a super-dodecahedron.

  5. Superstructure of stapes. An analysis by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Yasuharu; Hunai, Hiroaki; Ichimura; Keiiti; Iinuma, Toshitaka; Oyama, Kazuyuki

    1989-03-01

    High-resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone has now become a routine test for the diagnosis of various temporal bone lesions. Correct assessment of such minute structures as ossicles, especially stapes, is important in the pre-operative HRCT evaluation. On the other hand, analysis for the reliability of HRCT findings has not been done, including the superstructure of the stapes. A retrospectively study was done in order to assess the availability of HRCT findings in axial overlapping scans in 226 ears, with respect to the superstructures of stapes. The study was concerned with the analysis of HRCTs of 148 normal ears, 71 ears of chronic otitis media and 7 ears of ossicular abnormalities. HRCT findings were compared to those of surgeries in pathological cases. The present study revealed that the superstructures of stapes are noted in 70% when the stapes is surrounded by air. The major limitations in the proper analysis of stapes by HRCT are partial volume averaging and effects of soft tissue silhouetting, this is especially so when the stapes is surrounded by soft tissue density.

  6. Dental implant superstructures by superplastic forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, R.V.; Garriga-Majo, D.; Soo, S.; Pagliaria, D. [Kings Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dental Biomaterials Science; Juszczyk, A.S.; Walter, J.D. [Kings Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry

    2001-07-01

    A novel application of superplastic forming is described for the production of fixed-bridge dental implant superstructures. Finite element analysis (FEA) has shown that Ti-6Al-4V sheet would be a suitable candidate material for the design of a fixed-bridge dental implant superstructure. Traditionally superstructures are cast in gold alloy onto pre-machined gold alloy cylinders but castings are often quite bulky and 25% of castings do not fit accurately (1) which means that sectioning and soldering is required to obtain a fit that is clinically acceptable and will not prejudice the integrity of the commercially pure cp-titanium implants osseointegrated with the bone. Superplastic forming is shown to be a forming technique that would allow the production of strong, light-weight components of thin section with low residual stress that could be suitable for such applications. Considerable cost savings over traditional dental techniques can be achieved using a low-cost ceramic die material. The properties of these die materials are optimised so that suitable components can be produced. Satisfactory hot strength is demonstrated and thermal properties are matched to those of the titanium alloy for accurate fit of the prosthesis. (orig.)

  7. Modular assembly of superstructures from polyphenol-functionalized building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junling; Tardy, Blaise L.; Christofferson, Andrew J.; Dai, Yunlu; Richardson, Joseph J.; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming; Ju, Yi; Cui, Jiwei; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Yarovsky, Irene; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-01

    The organized assembly of particles into superstructures is typically governed by specific molecular interactions or external directing factors associated with the particle building blocks, both of which are particle-dependent. These superstructures are of interest to a variety of fields because of their distinct mechanical, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Here, we establish a facile route to a diverse range of superstructures based on the polyphenol surface-functionalization of micro- and nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, nanocubes and even cells. This strategy can be used to access a large number of modularly assembled superstructures, including core-satellite, hollow and hierarchically organized supraparticles. Colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations provide detailed insights into the role of surface functionalization and how this facilitates superstructure construction. Our work provides a platform for the rapid generation of superstructured assemblies across a wide range of length scales, from nanometres to centimetres.

  8. The route to protein aggregate superstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetri, Valeria; Foderà, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Depending on external conditions, native proteins may change their structure and undergo different association routes leading to a large scale polymorphism of the aggregates. This feature has been widely observed but is not fully understood yet. This review focuses on morphologies, physico......-chemical properties and mechanisms of formation of amyloid structures and protein superstructures. In particular, the main focus will be on protein particulates and amyloid-like spherulites, briefly summarizing possible experimental methods of analysis. Moreover, we will highlight the role of protein conformational...

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoluminescent properties of stacked indium sulfide superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Lei, Yongqian; Zhao, Lijun; Li, Meiye

    2008-03-28

    Unusual hierarchical stacked superstructures of cubic beta-In2S3 were fabricated via a facile hydrothermal process in the presence of a surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide CTAB; the 3D superstructures were developed by helical propagation of surface steps from microflakes of 10-20 nm thickness.

  10. Non covalent assembly of coordination superstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Khlobystov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The main topic of this work is the design of discrete and polymeric multi-component coordination structures using non-covalent interactions between organic and inorganic molecular components. All of the structures described herein are based on transition metal cations and N-donor heterocyclic bis-exodentate ligands with different geometries and various spacer functionalities. The predominant method used for the structural characterisation of the complexes was single crystal X-ray crystallography. X-ray powder diffraction, IR and NMR spectroscopies and TEM and AFM imaging were used to characterise the bulk products from the reactions. Chapter 1 is a comparative review of non-covalent interactions relevant to coordination superstructures and covers the latest developments in the area of crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry. The nature, geometry and relative energy of the non-covalent interactions are considered in detail in order to reveal their influence on the structure and properties of complexes...

  11. Enhanced thermophysical properties via PAO superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournorouz, Zahra; Mostafavi, Amirhossein; Pinto, Aditya; Bokka, Apparao; Jeon, Junha; Shin, Donghyun

    2017-01-01

    For the last few years, molten salt nanomaterials have attracted many scientists for their enhanced specific heat by doping a minute concentration of nanoparticles (up to 1% by weight). Likewise, enhancing the specific heat of liquid media is important in many aspects of engineering such as engine oil, coolant, and lubricant. However, such enhancement in specific heat was only observed for molten salts, yet other engineering fluids such as water, ethylene glycol, and oil have shown a decrease of specific heat with doped nanoparticles. Recent studies have shown that the observed specific heat enhancement resulted from unique nanostructures that were formed by molten salt molecules when interacting with nanoparticles. Thus, such enhancement in specific heat is only possible for molten salts because other fluids may not naturally form such nanostructures. In this study, we hypothesized such nanostructures can be mimicked through in situ formation of fabricated nano-additives, which are putative nanoparticles coated with useful organic materials (e.g., polar-group-ended organic molecules) leading to superstructures, and thus can be directly used for other engineering fluids. We first applied this approach to polyalphaolefin (PAO). A differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), a rheometer, and a customized setup were employed to characterize the heat capacity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity of PAO and PAO with fabricated nano-additives. Results showed 44.5% enhanced heat capacity and 19.8 and 22.98% enhancement for thermal conductivity and viscosity, respectively, by an addition of only 2% of fabricated nanostructures in comparison with pure PAO. Moreover, a partial melting of the polar-group-ended organic molecules was observed in the first thermal cycle and the peak disappeared in the following cycles. This indicates that the in situ formation of fabricated nano-additives spontaneously occurs in the thermal cycle to form nanostructures. Figure of merit analyses have

  12. ELABORATION OF THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE BULGARIAN HOTEL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Dabeva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to suggest some terms of reference for the elaboration of the superstructure of the Bulgarian hotel industry. The suggestions are based on the analysis of the superstructure at present. Its capacity, main types of accommodation establishments and their distribution by categories and territory are examined. An analysis is made of some resulting indices such as overnight stays and average stay. The main positive, respectively negative features of the superstructure have been analyzed. Concrete terms of reference have been given in order to overcome the problems specified.

  13. Robust Slippery Coating with Superior Corrosion Resistance and Anti-Icing Performance for AZ31B Mg Alloy Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialei; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2017-03-29

    Biomimetic slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) are developed as a potential alternative to superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) to resolve the issues of poor durability in corrosion protection and susceptibility to frosting. Herein, we fabricated a double-layered SLIPS coating on the AZ31 Mg alloy for corrosion protection and anti-icing application. The porous top layer was infused by lubricant, and the compact underlayer was utilized as a corrosion barrier. The water-repellent SLIPS coating exhibits a small sliding angle and durable corrosion resistance compared with the SHS coating. Moreover, the SLIPS coating delivers durable anti-icing performance for the Mg alloy substrate, which is obviously superior to the SHS coating. Multiple barriers in the SLIPS coating, including the infused water-repellent lubricant, the self-assembled monolayers coated porous top layer, and the compact layered double hydroxide-carbonate composite underlayer, are suggested as being responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance and anti-icing performance. The robust double-layered SLIPS coating should be of great importance to expanding the potential applications of light metals and their alloys.

  14. A Generic Methodology for Superstructure Optimization of Different Processing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Frauzem, Rebecca; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a generic computer-aided methodology for synthesis of different processing networks using superstructure optimization. The methodology can handle different network optimization problems of various application fields. It integrates databases with a common data architectur...

  15. A Generic Methodology for Superstructure Optimization of Different Processing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Frauzem, Rebecca; Zhang, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a generic computer-aided methodology for synthesis of different processing networks using superstructure optimization. The methodology can handle different network optimization problems of various application fields. It integrates databases with a common data architecture...

  16. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  17. Superstructures in Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    We study the heat transfer and the flow structures in Rayleigh-Bénard convection as function of the Rayleigh number Ra and the aspect ratio. We consider three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) in a laterally periodic geometry with aspect ratios up to Γ =Lx /Lz =Ly /Lz = 64 at Ra =108 , where Lx and Ly indicate the horizontal domain sizes and Lz the height. We find that the heat transport convergences relatively quickly with increasing aspect ratio. In contrast, we find that the large scale flow structures change significantly with increasing aspect ratio due to the formation of superstructures. For example, at Ra =108 we find the formation of basically only one large scale circulation roll in boxes with an aspect ratio up to 8. For larger boxes we find the formation of multiple of these extremely large convection rolls. We illustrate this by movies of horizontal cross-section of the bulk and the boundary layer and analyze them by using spectra in the boundary layer and the bulk. In addition, we study the effect of the large scale flow structures on the mean and higher order temperature and velocity statistics in the boundary layer and the bulk by comparing the simulation results obtained in different aspect ratio boxes. Foundation for fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), Netherlands Center for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion (MCEC), SURFsara, Gauss Large Scale project.

  18. Protective Effect of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Ischemic Neurons and Expression of Bcl-2 and ICE Genes in Rat Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To study the protective effect of volatile anesthetics, isoflurane and sevoflurane, on ischemic neurons after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats and its possible molecular mechanism. Methods Rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion model was developed by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and bilateral common carotid arteries (CCAs) 1 h after reperfusion. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and Northern blot hybridization, we calculated the number of apoptotic bodies and detected the expression of bcl-2 mRNA and interleukin-1 β converting enzyme (ICE) mRNA. Results The apoptotic bodies in hippocampus analyzed by FCM peaked at appeared 24 h after reperfusion, and decreased about 54% and 40%, respectively,after treatment with isoflurane and sevoflurane, as compared with ischemic group. There was no significant difference in the expression of bcl-2 mRNA and ICE mRNA between the inhaled anesthetic groups and ischemic group in hippocampus 24 hafter MCA/CCAs occlusion. Conclusion Isoflurane and sevoflurane partially inhibit apoptosis but have no significant effect on the expression of bcl-2 and ICE genes.

  19. Variable wind, pack ice, and prey dispersion affect the long-term adequacy of protected areas for an Arctic sea duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovvorn, James R; Anderson, Eric M; Rocha, Aariel R; Larned, William W; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M; Cooper, Lee W; Kolts, Jason M; North, Christopher A

    2014-03-01

    With changing climate, delineation of protected areas for sensitive species must account for long-term variability and geographic shifts of key habitat elements. Projecting the future adequacy of protected areas requires knowing major factors that drive such changes, and how readily the animals adjust to altered resources. In the Arctic, the viability of habitats for marine birds and mammals often depends on sea ice to dissipate storm waves and provide platforms for resting. However, some wind conditions (including weak winds during extreme cold) can consolidate pack ice into cover so dense that air-breathing divers are excluded from the better feeding areas. Spectacled Eiders (Somateria fischeri) winter among leads (openings) in pack ice in areas where densities of their bivalve prey are quite high. During winter 2009, however, prevailing winds created a large region of continuous ice with inadequate leads to allow access to areas of dense preferred prey. Stable isotope and fatty acid biomarkers indicated that, under these conditions, the eiders did not diversify their diet to include abundant non-bivalve taxa but did add a smaller, less preferred, bivalve species. Consistent with a computer model of eider energy balance, the body fat of adult eiders in 2009 was 33-35% lower than on the same date (19 March) in 2001 when ice conditions allowed access to higher bivalve densities. Ice cover data suggest that the eiders were mostly excluded from areas of high bivalve density from January to March in about 30% of 14 winters from 1998 to 2011. Thus, even without change in total extent of ice, shifts in prevailing winds can alter the areal density of ice to reduce access to important habitats. Because changes in wind-driven currents can also rearrange the dispersion of prey, the potential for altered wind patterns should be an important concern in projecting effects of climate change on the adequacy of marine protected areas for diving endotherms in the Arctic.

  20. Modifications of the superstructure for the staple implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, L R; Larsen, H D; Finger, I M; Jaen, F

    1984-12-01

    Two techniques have been described to expedite fabrication and reduce the cost of prostheses made for staple implants. The techniques permit placement of a simulated transosseous pin within the master cast. At the time of denture placement in technique No. 1, the coping-bar attachment assembly is cemented (Fig. 12). In technique No. 2 the superstructure is placed over the transosteal pins and secured between the locknuts to maintain the base of the lower locknut 1.5 mm from the crest of the alveolar ridge (Fig. 13). Technique No. 2 permits removal of the superstructure as desired. Patients should be instructed in proper oral hygiene and denture care.

  1. Textile protection of snow and ice: Measured and simulated effects on the energy- and mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefs, Marc; Lehning, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Measurements and simulations of the energy fluxes and mass changes of an artificially covered snow and ice surface (geotextile material) and a reference plot within an Austrian glacier ski resort are presented and compared. A modified version of the snow cover model SNOWPACK is used to successfully reproduce the artificially compacted and the additionally covered snow cover in a physically based way. Supplementary measurements of crucial material properties of the 0.0045 m thin geotextile serve as model input as well. Results indicate that the shortwave reflectivity of the covers is responsible for half the performance (47%). Thermal insulation of the material (14%) and a negative latent heat flux due to evaporation of precipitation from the cover surface (10%) have almost the same contribution. An assumed layer of air between the cover and the snow and ice surface (thickness 0.075 m to 0.12 m) adds the rest, which is at the upper limit of observations and may therefore also compensate for model errors. This generally explains the high performance of the method in glacier skiing resorts and, most importantly, an altitude dependant application limit of the method: the method becomes less effective at lower altitudes, where sensible heat fluxes become more important compared to short wave radiation.

  2. Superstructure-based optimization of biorefinery networks: Production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    through a practical case study for the production biodiesel from a variety of feedstock. The different biorefinery processing alternatives are represented in a superstructure and the associated data is collected and stored in a database. Once a specific biorefinery synthesis problem is formulated...

  3. Pegasus Airfield Repair and Protection: Laboratory Trials of White Ice Paint to Improve the Energy Reflectance Properties of the Glacial-Ice Runway Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory Trials of White Ice Paint to Improve the Energy Reflectance Properties of the Glacial-Ice Runway Surface Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h...Division, and Kevin Knut was Technical Director for Earth Sciences and Engineering. The Deputy Director of ERDC-CRREL was Dr. Lance Hansen , and the...Director was Dr. Robert Davis. The author thanks Dr. Don Perovich for his assistance in collecting and interpreting the spectroradiograph data and

  4. THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF ICE-MINUS BACTERIA AS A FROST PROTECTANT IN NEW YORK TREE FRUIT PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    John M. Love; Lesser, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Ice-nucleating bacteria, which are known to occur naturally on many crops and have been associated with frost damage, may be subject to control with genetically engineered bacteria, dubbed "ice-minus" bacteria. Ice-minus technology is designed to depress the critical temperature at which frost damage begins by displacing the natural population of ice-nucleating organisms. A trial product has been tested in the field with strawberries. Although tests with bacteriacidal compounds have suggested...

  5. Templated and template-free fabrication strategies for zero-dimensional hollow MOF superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyehyun; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2017-03-23

    Various fabrication strategies for hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) superstructures are reviewed and classified using various types of external templates and their properties. Hollow MOF superstructures have also been prepared without external templates, wherein unstable intermediates obtained during reactions convert to the final hollow MOF superstructures. Many hollow MOF superstructures have been fabricated using hard templates. After the core-shell core@MOF structure was prepared using a hard template, the core was selectively etched to generate a hollow MOF superstructure. Another approach for generating hollow superstructures is to use a solid reactant as a sacrificial template; this method requires no additional etching process. Soft templates such as discontinuous liquid/emulsion droplets and gas bubbles in a continuous soft phase have also been employed to prepare hollow MOF superstructures.

  6. Comparative analysis of cogeneration power plants optimization based on stochastic method using superstructure and process simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Leonardo Rodrigues de [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)], E-mail: leoaraujo@ifes.edu.br; Donatelli, Joao Luiz Marcon [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)], E-mail: joaoluiz@npd.ufes.br; Silva, Edmar Alino da Cruz [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Azevedo, Joao Luiz F. [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (CTA/IAE/ALA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Thermal systems are essential in facilities such as thermoelectric plants, cogeneration plants, refrigeration systems and air conditioning, among others, in which much of the energy consumed by humanity is processed. In a world with finite natural sources of fuels and growing energy demand, issues related with thermal system design, such as cost estimative, design complexity, environmental protection and optimization are becoming increasingly important. Therefore the need to understand the mechanisms that degrade energy, improve energy sources use, reduce environmental impacts and also reduce project, operation and maintenance costs. In recent years, a consistent development of procedures and techniques for computational design of thermal systems has occurred. In this context, the fundamental objective of this study is a performance comparative analysis of structural and parametric optimization of a cogeneration system using stochastic methods: genetic algorithm and simulated annealing. This research work uses a superstructure, modelled in a process simulator, IPSEpro of SimTech, in which the appropriate design case studied options are included. Accordingly, the cogeneration system optimal configuration is determined as a consequence of the optimization process, restricted within the configuration options included in the superstructure. The optimization routines are written in MsExcel Visual Basic, in order to work perfectly coupled to the simulator process. At the end of the optimization process, the system optimal configuration, given the characteristics of each specific problem, should be defined. (author)

  7. Antipulverization Electrode Based on Low-Carbon Triple-Shelled Superstructures for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Lianhai; Su, Qingmei; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Bingjie; Lu, Huanhuan; Peng, Chengxin; He, Ting; Du, Gaohui; He, Pengfei; Chen, Kai; Yang, Shihe; Yang, Jinhu; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-09-01

    The realization of antipulverization electrode structures, especially using low-carbon-content anode materials, is crucial for developing high-energy and long-life lithium-ion batteries (LIBs); however, this technology remains challenging. This study shows that SnO2 triple-shelled hollow superstructures (TSHSs) with a low carbon content (4.83%) constructed by layer-by-layer assembly of various nanostructure units can withstand a huge volume expansion of ≈231.8% and deliver a high reversible capacity of 1099 mAh g(-1) even after 1450 cycles. These values represent the best comprehensive performance in SnO2 -based anodes to date. Mechanics simulations and in situ transmission electron microscopy suggest that the TSHSs enable a self-synergistic structure-preservation behavior upon lithiation/delithiation, protecting the superstructures from collapse and guaranteeing the electrode structural integrity during long-term cycling. Specifically, the outer shells during lithiation processes are fully lithiated, preventing the overlithiation and the collapse of the inner shells; in turn, in delithiation processes, the underlithiated inner shells work as robust cores to support the huge volume contraction of the outer shells; meanwhile, the middle shells with abundant pores offer sufficient space to accommodate the volume change from the outer shell during both lithiation and delithiation. This study opens a new avenue in the development of high-performance LIBs for practical energy applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Generic Methodology for Superstructure Optimization of Different Processing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Frauzem, Rebecca; Zhang, Lei

    , biorefineries, and carbon dioxide utilization are considered.In the synthesis stage, the processing alternatives are represented in a superstructure and the associated data is collected and stored in a database. Once a specific process synthesis problem is formulated, the existing superstructure is retrieved...... of processing networks. This is illustrated through case studies from two applications: the synthesis of biorefinery networks and the synthesis of sustainable carbon dioxide utilization processes.......A large focus is placed on sustainability and sustainable practices as a result of the arising environmental issues. As an element of this, sustainable process synthesis and design becomes important. A generic, systematic methodology is proposed for solving the problem of optimal design...

  9. The impact of superstructures in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Stéphane; Langer, Mathieu; Douspis, Marian

    2016-10-01

    In 2008, Granett et al. claimed a direct detection of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect, through the stacking of CMB patches at the positions of identified superstructures. Additionally, the high amplitude of their measured signal was reported to be at odds with predictions from the standard model of cosmology. However, a closer inspection of these results prompts multiple questions, more specifically about the amplitude and significance of the expected signal. We propose here an original theoretical prediction of the iSW effect produced by such superstructures. We use simulations based on GR and the LTB metric to reproduce cosmic structures and predict their exact theoretical iSW effect on the CMB. The amplitudes predicted with this method are consistent with the signal measured when properly accounting the contribution of the non-negligible (and fortuitous) primordial CMB fluctuations to the total signal. It also highlights the tricky nature of stacking measurements and their interpretation.

  10. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications—that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications.

  11. Superstructure Strategy: Do Indonesian EFL Learners Use It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evy C Ridwan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper reports on a study conducted among Indonesian undergraduate students majoring in English as a Foreign Language (EFL. One strategy that learners generally use to understand the main ideas of an expository text is the superstructure strategy (i.e., utilizing the text structure to understand the main ideas. While research in English as First Language reading has demonstrated the benefit of using this strategy, little do we know whether Indonesian EFL learners use this strategy in reading and whether this strategy is beneficial to them or not. Two versions of an expository text were developed: One version had an explicit text structure, with the inclusion of discourse markers, to elicit learners to use the superstructure strategy; the other was without discourse markers. It was hypothesized that learners who read the version with an explicit text structure would utilize the superstructure strategy thereby comprehending main ideas better than those who read the other version. Additionally, to confirm the hypothesis learners were also asked to answer a questionnaire developed from O'Malley and Chamot (1993 followed by an interview to find out if EFL learners used other strategies to comprehend main ideas.

  12. SELF-ORGANIZATION OF LEAD SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS INTO SUPERSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Ushakova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The method of X-ray structural analysis (X-ray scattering at small angles is used to show that the structures obtained by self-organization on a substrate of lead sulfide (PbS quantum dots are ordered arrays. Self-organization of quantum dots occurs at slow evaporation of solvent from a cuvette. The cuvette is a thin layer of mica with teflon ring on it. The positions of peaks in SAXS pattern are used to calculate crystal lattice of obtained ordered structures. Such structures have a primitive orthorhombic crystal lattice. Calculated lattice parameters are: a = 21,1 (nm; b = 36,2 (nm; c = 62,5 (nm. Dimensions of structures are tens of micrometers. The spectral properties of PbS QDs superstructures and kinetic parameters of their luminescence are investigated. Absorption band of superstructures is broadened as compared to the absorption band of the quantum dots in solution; the luminescence band is slightly shifted to the red region of the spectrum, while its bandwidth is not changed much. Luminescence lifetime of obtained structures has been significantly decreased in comparison with the isolated quantum dots in solution, but remained the same for the lead sulfide quantum dots close-packed ensembles. Such superstructures can be used to produce solar cells with improved characteristics.

  13. Fabrication of luminescent Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, V. G.; Calderon-Moreno, J. M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    2010-01-01

    This Letter demonstrates a solvent-free efficient synthesis process to prepare self-assembled two-dimensional Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} luminescent nanoplates to yield a superstructure. In the first step, Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}CO{sub 3} superstructures are fabricated by the thermolysis [700C] of a single precursor, europium acetate, in a closed reactor under autogenic pressure. The as-prepared Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}CO{sub 3} superstructures are further heated in air to 750C to facilitate the fabrication of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructures. A systematic morphological, structural, and compositional characterization of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructures is carried out. The photoluminescent properties and mechanism for the strong red emission of the photoexcited Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructures is proposed.

  14. Determination of the Minimum Use Level of Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII) in JP-8 That Will Provide Adquate Icing Inhibition and Biostatic Protection for Air Force Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    of PFA-55MB)) in aviation kerosene . The advisory stated that data indicated that 0.015% by volume of FSII would prevent ice formation in fuel...and Anderson, S., “Investigation of the Anti-Microbial Characteristics of Di-Ethylene Glycol Mono Methyl Ether (DiEGME) in Relation to its Use...Detailed Specification, Turbine Fuel, Aviation, Kerosene Type, JP-8 (NATO F-34), NATO F-35, and JP-8+100 (NATO F-37),” released 14 September 2012. MIL

  15. Garden-like perovskite superstructures with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meidan; Wang, Mengye; Zheng, Dajiang; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-04-07

    By subjecting amorphous flower-like TiO2 to a facile hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of Sr(2+), garden-like perovskite SrTiO3 superstructures were achieved. The amorphous TiO2 was preformed using ZnO flowers as templates. Different three-dimensional SrTiO3 architectures were coexisted in the garden, including SrTiO3 flowers composed of several hollow sword-shaped petals, many sheet-shaped petals or numerous flake-shaped petals, and SrTiO3 grass consisting of a number of long blades. These SrTiO3 superstructures were simultaneously grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. On the basis of a comprehensive study on the effects of growth time, temperature, initial concentrations of precursor, and pH, the formation of these various hierarchical architectures was attributed primarily to the dissolution of amorphous TiO2 and precipitation of perovskite crystals, followed by the Ostwald ripening process of perovskite nanocrystals and self-organization of perovskite building blocks. Interestingly, this approach can be readily extended to create other perovskite structures, including dendritic BaTiO3 and nest-like CaTiO3, as well as PbTiO3 transformed from plate-like pyrochlore Pb2Ti2O6 after post-thermal treatment. Garden-like SrTiO3 superstructures showed a superior photocatalytic performance when compared to other as-prepared semiconductors and perovskite materials (i.e., ZnO, TiO2, BaTiO3, CaTiO3 and PbTiO3), probably due to their intrinsic photocatalytic activity and special garden-like features with a coexistence of various structures that significantly facilitated the adsorption and diffusion of methyl blue (MB) molecules and oxygen species in the photochemical reaction of MB degradation.

  16. Imprint of DES superstructures on the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, A.; Sánchez, C.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Crittenden, R.; Gruen, D.; Huterer, D.; Bacon, D.; Clampitt, J.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Gaztañaga, E.; Jain, B.; Kirk, D.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Naidoo, K.; Peacock, J. A.; Soergel, B.; Whiteway, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Small temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be sourced by density perturbations via the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. Large voids and superclusters are excellent environments to make a localized measurement of this tiny imprint. In some cases excess signals have been reported. We probed these claims with an independent data set, using the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) in a different footprint, and using a different superstructure finding strategy. We identified 52 large voids and 102 superclusters at redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.65. We used the Jubilee simulation to a priori evaluate the optimal ISW measurement configuration for our compensated top-hat filtering technique, and then performed a stacking measurement of the CMB temperature field based on the DES data. For optimal configurations, we detected a cumulative cold imprint of voids with ΔTf ≈ -5.0 ± 3.7 μK and a hot imprint of superclusters ΔTf ≈ 5.1 ± 3.2 μK; this is ∼1.2σ higher than the expected |ΔTf| ≈ 0.6 μK imprint of such superstructures in Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM). If we instead use an a posteriori selected filter size (R/Rv = 0.6), we can find a temperature decrement as large as ΔTf ≈ -9.8 ± 4.7 μK for voids, which is ∼2σ above ΛCDM expectations and is comparable to previous measurements made using Sloan Digital Sky Survey superstructure data.

  17. Imprint of DES superstructures on the cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovács, A.; Sánchez, C.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Crittenden, R.; Gruen, D.; Huterer, D.; Bacon, D.; Clampitt, J.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Gaztañaga, E.; Jain, B.; Kirk, D.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Naidoo, K.; Peacock, J. A.; Soergel, B.; Whiteway, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-11-17

    Small temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background can be sourced by density perturbations via the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Large voids and superclusters are excellent environments to make a localized measurement of this tiny imprint. In some cases excess signals have been reported. We probed these claims with an independent data set, using the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey in a different footprint, and using a different super-structure finding strategy. We identified 52 large voids and 102 superclusters at redshifts $0.2 < z < 0.65$. We used the Jubilee simulation to a priori evaluate the optimal ISW measurement configuration for our compensated top-hat filtering technique, and then performed a stacking measurement of the CMB temperature field based on the DES data. For optimal configurations, we detected a cumulative cold imprint of voids with $\\Delta T_{f} \\approx -5.0\\pm3.7~\\mu K$ and a hot imprint of superclusters $\\Delta T_{f} \\approx 5.1\\pm3.2~\\mu K$ ; this is $\\sim1.2\\sigma$ higher than the expected $|\\Delta T_{f}| \\approx 0.6~\\mu K$ imprint of such super-structures in $\\Lambda$CDM. If we instead use an a posteriori selected filter size ($R/R_{v}=0.6$), we can find a temperature decrement as large as $\\Delta T_{f} \\approx -9.8\\pm4.7~\\mu K$ for voids, which is $\\sim2\\sigma$ above $\\Lambda$CDM expectations and is comparable to previous measurements made using SDSS super-structure data.

  18. Thermal drilling in planetary ices: an analytic solution with application to planetary protection problems of radioisotope power sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D

    2012-08-01

    Thermal drilling has been applied to studies of glaciers on Earth and proposed for study of the martian ice caps and the crust of Europa. Additionally, inadvertent thermal drilling by radioisotope sources released from the breakup of a space vehicle is of astrobiological concern in that this process may form a downward-propagating "warm little pond" that could convey terrestrial biota to a habitable environment. A simple analytic solution to the asymptotic slow-speed case of thermal drilling is noted and used to show that the high thermal conductivity of the low-temperature ice on Europa and Titan makes thermal drilling qualitatively more difficult than at Mars. It is shown that an isolated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) "brick" can drill effectively on Earth or Mars, whereas on Titan or Europa with ice at 100 K, the source would stall and become stuck in the ice with a surface temperature of <200 K.

  19. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W T

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications.

  20. Voids and superstructures: correlations and induced large-scale velocity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares, Marcelo; Luparello, Heliana E.; Maldonado, Victoria; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Paz, Dante J.; Ceccarelli, Laura; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The expanding complex pattern of filaments, walls and voids build the evolving cosmic web with material flowing from underdense on to high density regions. Here, we explore the dynamical behaviour of voids and galaxies in void shells relative to neighbouring overdense superstructures, using the Millenium simulation and the main galaxy catalogue in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. We define a correlation measure to estimate the tendency of voids to be located at a given distance from a superstructure. We find voids-in-clouds (S-types) preferentially located closer to superstructures than voids-in-voids (R-types) although we obtain that voids within ∼40 h-1 Mpc of superstructures are infalling in a similar fashion independently of void type. Galaxies residing in void shells show infall towards the closest superstructure, along with the void global motion, with a differential velocity component depending on their relative position in the shell with respect to the direction to the superstructure. This effect is produced by void expansion and therefore is stronger for R-types. We also find that galaxies in void shells facing the superstructure flow towards the overdensities faster than galaxies elsewhere at the same relative distance to the superstructure. The results obtained for the simulation are also reproduced for the Sky Survey Data Release data with a linearized velocity field implementation.

  1. Cation ordering and superstructures in natural layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivovichev, Sergey V; Yakovenchuk, Victor N; Zolotarev, Andrey A; Ivanyuk, Gregory N; Pakhomovsky, Yakov A

    2010-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) constitute an important group of materials with many applications ranging from catalysis and absorption to carriers for drug delivery, DNA intercalation and carbon dioxide sequestration. The structures of LDHs are based upon double brucite-like hydroxide layers [M(2+)(n)M(3+)(m)(OH)(2(m+n)](m+), where M(2+) = Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), etc.; M(3+) = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Mn(3+), etc. Structural features of LDHs such as cation ordering, charge distribution and polytypism have an immediate influence upon their properties. However, all the structural studies on synthetic LDHs deal with powder samples that prevent elucidation of such fine details of structure architecture as formation of superstructures due to cation ordering. In contrast to synthetic materials, natural LDHs are known to form single crystals accessible to single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which provides a unique possibility to investigate 3D cation ordering in LDHs that results in formation of complex superstructures, where 2D cation order is combined with a specific order of layer stacking (polytypism). Therefore LDH minerals provide an indispensable source of structural information for modeling of structures and processes happening in LDHs at the molecular and nanoscale levels.

  2. Collapse Mechanism Analysis in the Design of Superstructure Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nor, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    The EU directive 2001/85/EC is an official European text which describes the specifications for “single deck class II and III vehicles” required to be approved by the regulation UN/ECE no.66 (R66). To prevent the catastrophic consequences by occupant during an accident, the Malaysian government has reinforced the same regulation upon superstructure construction. This paper discusses collapse mechanism analysis of a superstructure vehicle using a Crash D nonlinear analysis computer program based on this regulation. The analysis starts by hand calculation to define the required energy absorption by the chosen structure. Simple calculations were then performed to define the weakest collapse mechanism after undesirable collapse modes are eliminated. There are few factors highlighted in this work to pass the regulation. Using the selected cross section, Crash D simulation showed a good result. Generally, the deformation is linearly correlates to the energy absorption for the structure with low stiffness. Failure of critical members such as vertical lower side wall must be avoided to sustain safety of the passenger compartment and prevent from severe and fatal injuries to the trapped occupant.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of collapse mechanism in superstructure vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, M. K. Mohd; Ho, C. S.; Ma'at, N.

    2017-04-01

    The EU directive 2001/85/EC is an official European text which describes the specifications for "single deck class II and III vehicles" required to be approved by the regulation UN/ECE no.66 (R66). To prevent the catastrophic consequences by occupant during an accident, the Malaysian government has reinforced the same regulation upon superstructure construction. This paper discusses collapse mechanism analysis of a superstructure vehicle using a Crash D nonlinear analysis computer program based on this regulation. The analysis starts by hand calculation to define the required energy absorption by the chosen structure. Simple calculations were then performed to define the weakest collapse mechanism after undesirable collapse modes are eliminated. There are few factors highlighted in this work to pass the regulation. Using the selected cross section, Crash D simulation showed a good result. Generally, the deformation is linearly correlates to the energy absorption for the structure with low stiffness. Failure of critical members such as vertical lower side wall must be avoided to sustain safety of the passenger compartment and prevent from severe and fatal injuries to the trapped occupant.

  4. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology.

  5. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    is not shut down for its protection. We also found that there is a a large spread across the various turbines within a wind park, in the amount of icing. This is currently not taken into account by our model. Evaluating and adding these small scale differences to the model will be undertaken as future work....... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine......In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...

  6. 77 FR 75066 - Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; Flight Envelope Protection (Icing and Non...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... pitching occurs. 5. Handling Characteristics at High Incidence In lieu of both Sec. 25.201 and Sec. 25.203... techniques; (3) Maneuvers with increased deceleration rates; (i) In non icing conditions, the requirements... characteristics shall be as follows: (1) There shall not be any abnormal nose-up pitching. (2) There shall not...

  7. Final restoration of implants with a hybrid ceramic superstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbad, Andreas

    The use of materials with elastic properties for the fabrication of dental implant superstructures seems to be a promising way to reduce the functional occlusal forces on implants. Vita Enamic (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen), a hybrid ceramic material for CAD/CAM technology, is available in a special form that can be relatively easily combined with titanium (Ti) base connectors for the fabrication of abutment crowns and mesostructures. Thus, an easily manageable method is available for reducing peak loads on dental implant fixtures. Representative cases are presented to demonstrate the clinical workflows for a single- element solution (Ti base) and two-element solution (Ti base with mesostructure) for implant-supported crowns.

  8. Abnormal Congenital Location of Stapes’ Superstructure: Clinical and Embryological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Henriques

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital middle ear malformations are rare. Most part of them are usually associated with other malformations, such as aural atresia, microtia, and dysmorphic craniofacial features. A clinical case of a 24-year-old male with a right-sided conductive hearing loss since his childhood, without craniofacial malformation, is presented. He was proposed for exploratory tympanotomy under the suspicious diagnosis of otosclerosis. The surgery revealed an abnormal location of stapes’ superstructure, which was attached to the promontory and had an isolated and mobile osseous footplate in the oval window. A stapes prosthesis was inserted and resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 25 dB. A review of the literature was also performed using MEDLINE. Two theories diverge on the embryologic origin of the stapes. Our findings seem to be in favour of the theory that defines two different embryologic origins to the stapes.

  9. Abnormal Congenital Location of Stapes' Superstructure: Clinical and Embryological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Rafaela; Sousa, Ana; Estevão, Roberto; Rodrigues, Jorge; Gomes, Alexandra; Silva, Francisco; Fernandes, Ângelo; Fernandes, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Congenital middle ear malformations are rare. Most part of them are usually associated with other malformations, such as aural atresia, microtia, and dysmorphic craniofacial features. A clinical case of a 24-year-old male with a right-sided conductive hearing loss since his childhood, without craniofacial malformation, is presented. He was proposed for exploratory tympanotomy under the suspicious diagnosis of otosclerosis. The surgery revealed an abnormal location of stapes' superstructure, which was attached to the promontory and had an isolated and mobile osseous footplate in the oval window. A stapes prosthesis was inserted and resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 25 dB. A review of the literature was also performed using MEDLINE. Two theories diverge on the embryologic origin of the stapes. Our findings seem to be in favour of the theory that defines two different embryologic origins to the stapes. PMID:27648330

  10. Development, Implementation, and Pilot Evaluation of a Model-Driven Envelope Protection System to Mitigate the Hazard of In-Flight Ice Contamination on a Twin-Engine Commuter Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Borja; Ranaudo, Richard; Norton, Billy; Gingras, David; Barnhart, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this report directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combination of prior information and real-time aerodynamic parameter estimations are shown to provide sufficient information for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during inflight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system was designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. The utility of the ICEPro system for mitigating a potentially hazardous icing condition was evaluated by 29 pilots using the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device. Results showed that real time assessment cues were effective in reducing the number of potentially hazardous upset events and in lessening exposure to loss of control following an incipient upset condition. Pilot workload with the added ICEPro displays was not measurably affected, but pilot opinion surveys showed that real time cueing greatly improved their awareness of a hazardous aircraft state. The performance of ICEPro system was further evaluated by various levels of sensor noise and atmospheric turbulence.

  11. Garden-like perovskite superstructures with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meidan; Wang, Mengye; Zheng, Dajiang; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-03-01

    By subjecting amorphous flower-like TiO2 to a facile hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of Sr2+, garden-like perovskite SrTiO3 superstructures were achieved. The amorphous TiO2 was preformed using ZnO flowers as templates. Different three-dimensional SrTiO3 architectures were coexisted in the garden, including SrTiO3 flowers composed of several hollow sword-shaped petals, many sheet-shaped petals or numerous flake-shaped petals, and SrTiO3 grass consisting of a number of long blades. These SrTiO3 superstructures were simultaneously grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. On the basis of a comprehensive study on the effects of growth time, temperature, initial concentrations of precursor, and pH, the formation of these various hierarchical architectures was attributed primarily to the dissolution of amorphous TiO2 and precipitation of perovskite crystals, followed by the Ostwald ripening process of perovskite nanocrystals and self-organization of perovskite building blocks. Interestingly, this approach can be readily extended to create other perovskite structures, including dendritic BaTiO3 and nest-like CaTiO3, as well as PbTiO3 transformed from plate-like pyrochlore Pb2Ti2O6 after post-thermal treatment. Garden-like SrTiO3 superstructures showed a superior photocatalytic performance when compared to other as-prepared semiconductors and perovskite materials (i.e., ZnO, TiO2, BaTiO3, CaTiO3 and PbTiO3), probably due to their intrinsic photocatalytic activity and special garden-like features with a coexistence of various structures that significantly facilitated the adsorption and diffusion of methyl blue (MB) molecules and oxygen species in the photochemical reaction of MB degradation.By subjecting amorphous flower-like TiO2 to a facile hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of Sr2+, garden-like perovskite SrTiO3 superstructures were achieved. The amorphous TiO2 was preformed using ZnO flowers as templates. Different three-dimensional SrTiO3

  12. Recrystallization-induced self-assembly for the growth of Cu₂O superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yang; Shao, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Feng; Guo, Lin

    2014-10-20

    The assembly of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into 3D superstructures with defined morphologies is of particular interest. A novel strategy that is based on recrystallization-induced self-assembly (RISA) for the construction of 3D Cu2O superstructures and employs Cu2O mesoporous spheres with diameters of approximately 300 nm as the building blocks has now been developed. Balancing the hydrolysis and recrystallization rates of the CuCl precursors through precisely adjusting the experimental parameters was key to success. Furthermore, the geometry of the superstructures can be tuned to obtain either cubes or tetrahedra and was shown to be dependent on the growth behavior of bulk CuCl. The overall strategy extends the applicability of recrystallization-based processes for the guided construction of assemblies and offers unique insights for assembling larger particles into complicated 3D superstructures.

  13. Design and application of inorganic nanoparticle superstructures: current status and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2011-08-08

    Self-assembly of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into superstructures, which is used as a general way to integrate functional inorganic NPs into macroscale devices, has attracted much research interest. This review will summarize the recent progress and discuss future challenges of the inorganic NP superstructures. Examples include both DNA-based and polymer-based NP assemblies with controlled positioning and geometries, and quasicrystalline ordered structures from the self-assembly of binary or ternary NPs. Different from their individual NP counterparts, these self-assembled superstructures possess unique properties, such as optical chirality and dynamic structural change under an external stimulus. Due to their diversified structures and functionalities, inorganic NP superstructures have shown a wide range of promise for applications in electronic and photonic devices, such as field-effect transistors, magnetoresistive components, optical information recording, and solar cells.

  14. Joint Simultaneous Reconstruction of Regularized Building Superstructures from Low-Density LIDAR Data Using Icp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Andreas; Kada, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There are many applications for 3D city models, e.g., in visualizations, analysis, and simulations; each one requiring a certain level of detail to be effective. The overall trend goes towards including various kinds of anthropogenic and natural objects therein with ever increasing geometric and semantic details. A few years back, the featured 3D building models had only coarse roof geometry. But nowadays, they are expected to include detailed roof superstructures like dormers and chimneys. Several methods have been proposed for the automatic reconstruction of 3D building models from airborne based point clouds. However, they are usually unable to reliably recognize and reconstruct small roof superstructures as these objects are often represented by only few point measurements, especially in low-density point clouds. In this paper, we propose a recognition and reconstruction approach that overcomes this problem by identifying and simultaneously reconstructing regularized superstructures of similar shape. For this purpose, candidate areas for superstructures are detected by taking into account virtual sub-surface points that are assumed to lie on the main roof faces below the measured points. The areas with similar superstructures are detected, extracted, grouped together, and registered to one another with the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. As an outcome, the joint point density of each detected group is increased, which helps to recognize the shape of the superstructure more reliably and in more detail. Finally, all instances of each group of superstructures are modeled at once and transformed back to their original position. Because superstructures are reconstructed in groups, symmetries, alignments, and regularities can be enforced in a straight-forward way. The validity of the approach is presented on a number of example buildings from the Vaihingen test data set.

  15. Anatomopathology of the Superstructure of the Stapes in Patients with Otosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Bettina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Otosclerosis is a disease that causes bone resorption and deposition in the auditory structures, leading to deafness. Many studies have evaluated the histopathology of the stapes footplate in this disease (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, vascular proliferation, fibroblasts, and histiocytes, but we found no studies in the literature involving the histology of the superstructure of the stapes. Objectives To perform an analysis under optical microscopy of histopathologic findings of the superstructure of the stapes from patients with otosclerosis. Methods A contemporary cross-sectional cohort study of pathology analysis of superstructures of the stapes of patients with otosclerosis. Results Fifteen superstructures of stapes in patients with otosclerosis operated in our service and four stapes of cadavers used for dissection (controls were evaluated. No areas of bone resorption or deposition or presence of osteoclasts and osteoblasts in the superstructure of the stapes were found. However, we found in the more distal portions of the crura areas with prominent cementitious lines and woven bone, which was different than the mature trabecular bone found in the head of the stapes or in the controls. Conclusion There were histologic changes in the superstructure of the stapes in patients with otosclerosis operated in our service.

  16. Antisolvent crystallization approach to construction of CuI superstructures with defined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhummal, Rajeevan; Yang, Yang; Güder, Firat; Küçükbayrak, Umut M; Zacharias, Margit

    2013-03-26

    A facile high-yield production of cuprous iodide (CuI) superstructures is reported by antisolvent crystallization using acetonitrile/water as a solvent/antisolvent couple under ambient conditions. In the presence of trace water, the metastable water droplets act as templates to induce the precipitation of hollow spherical CuI superstructures consisting of orderly aligned building blocks after drop coating. With water in excess in the mixed solution, an instant precipitation of CuI random aggregates takes place due to rapid crystal growth via ion-by-ion attachment induced by a strong antisolvent effect. However, this uncontrolled process can be modified by adding polymer polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in water to restrict the size of initially formed CuI crystal nuclei through the effective coordination effect of PVP. As a result, CuI superstructures with a cuboid geometry are constructed by gradual self-assembly of the small CuI crystals via oriented attachment. The precipitated CuI superstructures have been used as competent adsorbents to remove organic dyes from the water due to their mesocrystal feature. Besides, the CuI superstructures have been applied either as a self-sacrificial template or only as a structuring template for the flexible design of other porous materials such as CuO and TiO2. This system provides an ideal platform to simultaneously investigate the superstructure formation enforced by antisolvent crystallization with and without organic additives.

  17. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  18. Light-harvesting superstructures of green plant chloroplasts lacking photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Ungerer, Petra; Ruban, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II (LHCII) is the major photosynthetic membrane component encoded by an entire family of homologous nuclear genes. On the contrary, the great majority of proteins of photosystems and electron transport components are encoded by the chloroplast genome. In this work, we succeeded in gradually inhibiting the expression of the chloroplast genes that led to the disappearance of the photosystem complexes, mimicking almost total photoinhibition. The treated plants, despite displaying only some early signs of senescence, sustained their metabolism and growth for several weeks. The only major remaining membrane component was LHCII antenna that formed superstructures - stacks of dozens of thylakoids or supergrana. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed specific organization, directly displaying frequently bifurcated membranes with reduced or totally absent photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre complexes. Our findings show that it is possible to accumulate large amounts of light-harvesting membranes, organized into three-dimensional structures, in the absence of reaction centre complexes. This points to the reciprocal role of LHCII and PSII in self-assembly of the three-dimensional matrix of the photosynthetic membrane, dictating its size and flexible adaptation to the light environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bilateral Congenital Absence of the Stapes Superstructure in Two Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabeitia, Jose Ignacio; Undabeitia, José; Cianci, Laura; Padilla, Luis; Petreñas, Eduardo; Municio, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Middle ear ossicle malformations are an uncommon event. Among them, the congenital absence of the stapes is a very rare condition that is seldom described in the literature. We report the cases of two women, aged 19 and 22 , who presented with a long history of conductive deafness. An exploratory tympanotomy was performed and the absence of the stapes superstructure and an abnormal position of the facial nerve could be observed. A bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) was implanted in both patients with good results. It is believed that stapes agenesis is related to an abnormal development of the facial nerve, which by the 5th to 6th week of gestation would interpose between the otic capsule and the stapes blastema, preventing these structures from contacting. A long history of nonprogressive hearing loss from birth or early childhood is the key to reach a diagnosis. Several treatment options have been described. The authors opted for a hearing aid due to the high risk of facial nerve lesion, with good functional results. PMID:25045568

  20. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  1. Crystallographic superstructure in R2PdSi3 compounds (R=heavy rare earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fei; Frontzek, Matthias; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Leisegang, Tilmann; Zschornak, Matthias; Mietrach, Robert; Hoffmann, Jens-Uwe; Löser, Wolfgang; Gemming, Sibylle; Meyer, Dirk C.; Loewenhaupt, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The R2PdSi3 intermetallic compounds have been reported to crystallize in a hexagonal AlB2-derived structure, with the rare earth atoms on the Al sites and Pd and Si atoms randomly distributed on the B sites. However, the intricate magnetic properties observed in the series of compounds have always suggested complications to the assumed structure. To clarify the situation, x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements were performed on the heavy rare earth compounds with R=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, which revealed the existence of a crystallographic superstructure. The superstructure features a doubled unit cell in the hexagonal basal plane and an octuplication along the perpendicular c direction with respect to the primitive cell. No structural transition was observed between 300 and 1.5 K. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations were utilized to investigate the local environments of the respective atoms. In this paper the various experimental results will be presented and it will be shown that the superstructure is mainly due to the Pd-Si order on the B sites. A structure model will be proposed to fully describe the superstructure of Pd-Si order in R2PdSi3. The connection between the crystallographic superstructure and the magnetic properties will be discussed in the framework of the presented model.

  2. Light-Directed Dynamic Chirality Inversion in Functional Self-Organized Helical Superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-02-24

    Helical superstructures are widely observed in nature, in synthetic polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies. Controlling the chirality (the handedness) of dynamic helical superstructures of molecular and macromolecular systems by external stimuli is a challenging task, but is of great fundamental significance with appealing morphology-dependent applications. Light-driven chirality inversion in self-organized helical superstructures (i.e. cholesteric, chiral nematic liquid crystals) is currently in the limelight because inversion of the handedness alters the chirality of the circularly polarized light that they selectively reflect, which has wide potential for application. Here we discuss the recent developments toward inversion of the handedness of cholesteric liquid crystals enabled by photoisomerizable chiral molecular switches or motors. Different classes of chiral photoresponsive dopants (guests) capable of conferring light-driven reversible chirality inversion of helical superstructures fabricated from different nematic hosts are discussed. Rational molecular designs of chiral molecular switches toward endowing handedness inversion to the induced helical superstructures of cholesteric liquid crystals are highlighted. This Review is concluded by throwing light on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging frontier, and it is expected to provide useful guidelines toward the development of self-organized soft materials with stimuli-directed chirality inversion capability and multifunctional host-guest systems.

  3. Influence of superstructure geometry on the mechanical behavior of zirconia implant abutments: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringer, Alexander; Diebels, Stefan; Nothdurft, Frank P

    2014-12-01

    To predict the clinical performance of zirconia abutments, it is crucial to examine the mechanical behavior of different dental implant-abutment connection configurations. The international standard protocol for dynamic fatigue tests of dental implants (ISO 14801) allows comparing these configurations using standardized superstructure geometries. However, from a mechanical point of view, the geometry of clinical crowns causes modified boundary conditions. The purpose of this finite element (FE) study was to evaluate the influence of the superstructure geometry on the maximum stress values of zirconia abutments with a conical implant-abutment connection. Geometry models of the experimental setup described in ISO 14801 were generated using CAD software following the reconstruction of computerized tomography scans from all relevant components. These models served as a basis for an FE simulation. To reduce the numerical complexity of the FE model, the interaction between loading stamp and superstructure geometry was taken into account by defining the boundary conditions with regard to the frictional force. The results of the FE simulations performed on standardized superstructure geometry and anatomically shaped crowns showed a strong influence of the superstructure geometry and related surface orientations on the mechanical behavior of the underlying zirconia abutments. In conclusion, ISO testing of zirconia abutments should be accompanied by load-bearing capacity testing under simulated clinical conditions to predict clinical performance.

  4. THE AIRPORT DE-ICING OF AIRCRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert KONIECZKA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of the issues involved in de-icing several kinds of aircrafts before flight. The basic risks of an iced aircraft and the factors that can influence its intensity are stated. It discusses the methods for de-icing and protecting against ice formation on small aircrafts, helicopters, and large aircrafts. It also classifies the fluids and other methods used for these de-icing operations, and explains the characteristics and limitations of their use.

  5. Linking experiment and theory for three-dimensional networked binary metal nanoparticle–triblock terpolymer superstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zihui

    2014-02-21

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Controlling superstructure of binary nanoparticle mixtures in three dimensions from self-assembly opens enormous opportunities for the design of materials with unique properties. Here we report on how the intimate coupling of synthesis, in-depth electron tomographic characterization and theory enables exquisite control of superstructure in highly ordered porous three-dimensional continuous networks from single and binary mixtures of metal nanoparticles with a triblock terpolymer. Poly(isoprene-block-styrene-block-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) is synthesized and used as structure-directing agent for ligand-stabilized platinum and gold nanoparticles. Quantitative analysis provides insights into short-and long-range nanoparticle-nanoparticle correlations, and local and global contributions to structural chirality in the networks. Results provide synthesis criteria for next-generation mesoporous network superstructures from binary nanoparticle mixtures for potential applications in areas including catalysis.

  6. Abstraction Super-structuring Normal Forms: Towards a Theory of Structural Induction

    CERN Document Server

    Silvescu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Induction is the process by which we obtain predictive laws or theories or models of the world. We consider the structural aspect of induction. We answer the question as to whether we can find a finite and minmalistic set of operations on structural elements in terms of which any theory can be expressed. We identify abstraction (grouping similar entities) and super-structuring (combining topologically e.g., spatio-temporally close entities) as the essential structural operations in the induction process. We show that only two more structural operations, namely, reverse abstraction and reverse super-structuring (the duals of abstraction and super-structuring respectively) suffice in order to exploit the full power of Turing-equivalent generative grammars in induction. We explore the implications of this theorem with respect to the nature of hidden variables, radical positivism and the 2-century old claim of David Hume about the principles of connexion among ideas.

  7. Large Number, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Superstructures in the Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wu-Liang; HUANG Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Since there may exist dark matter particles v and 5 with mass ~ 10-1 eV in the universe, the superstructures with a scale of 1019 solar masses (large number A ~ 1019) appeared during the era near and before the hydrogen recombination. Since there are superstructures in the universe, there may be no necessity for the existence of dark energy. For checking the superstructure in the universe by CMB anisotropy, we need to measure CMB angular power spectrum -especially around ten degrees across the sky - in more details. While neutrino v is related to electroweak unification, the fourth stable elementary particle δ may be related to strong-gravity unification, which suggests p + p →, n + δ and that some new baryons appeared in the TeV region.

  8. A 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure synthesized by a wet chemical oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zaizhu; Huang, Baibiao; Ma, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zeyan; Dai, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-07

    A novel 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure, with fast growth along the 〈111〉 directions of cubic seeds, is synthesized by using a wet chemical oxidation method. The morphological structures and the growth process are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures are analyzed by their crystallographic orientations. The surface energy of AgCl facets {100}, {110}, and {111} with absorbance of Cl(-) ions is studied by density functional theory calculations. Based on the experimental and computational results, a plausible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures. With more active sites, the photocatalytic activity of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures is better than those of concave and cubic ones in oxygen evolution under irradiation by visible light.

  9. Superstructured Carbon Nanotube/Porous Silicon Hybrid Materials for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ki; Kang, Shin-Hyun; Choi, Sung-Min

    2015-03-01

    High energy Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are in great demand for electronics, electric-vehicles, and grid-scale energy storage. To further increase the energy and power densities of LIBs, Si anodes have been intensively explored due to their high capacity, and high abundance compared with traditional carbon anodes. However, the poor cycle-life caused by large volume expansion during charge/discharge process has been an impediment to its applications. Recently, superstructured Si materials were received attentions to solve above mentioned problem in excellent mechanical properties, large surface area, and fast Li and electron transportation aspects, but applying superstructures to anode is in early stage yet. Here, we synthesized superstructured carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/porous Si hybrid materials and its particular electrochemical properties will be presented. Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering

  10. Linking experiment and theory for three-dimensional networked binary metal nanoparticle-triblock terpolymer superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihui; Hur, Kahyun; Sai, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Gruner, Sol M.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Controlling superstructure of binary nanoparticle mixtures in three dimensions from self-assembly opens enormous opportunities for the design of materials with unique properties. Here we report on how the intimate coupling of synthesis, in-depth electron tomographic characterization and theory enables exquisite control of superstructure in highly ordered porous three-dimensional continuous networks from single and binary mixtures of metal nanoparticles with a triblock terpolymer. Poly(isoprene-block-styrene-block-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) is synthesized and used as structure-directing agent for ligand-stabilized platinum and gold nanoparticles. Quantitative analysis provides insights into short- and long-range nanoparticle-nanoparticle correlations, and local and global contributions to structural chirality in the networks. Results provide synthesis criteria for next-generation mesoporous network superstructures from binary nanoparticle mixtures for potential applications in areas including catalysis.

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of {Pb}/{Cu (100) } surface superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J.-C. S.

    1997-04-01

    Three surface superstructures of {Pb}/{Cu (100) } at low lead coverage are well known experimentally: c(4 × 4),c(2 × 2) and c(5√2×√2)R45°. The present study consists in (i) using generalized Lennard-Jones pair potentials for lead-lead and copper-copper interactions fitted on structural and elastic bulk properties, (ii) deriving an effective potential for lead-copper and (iii) developing a Monte-Carlo extensive relaxation of superstructure models. The MC simulations reveal the stability of these approximate superstructures and yield structural details that are all observed in STM and LEED experiments: the adlayer corrugation, surface alloying, structural modulations as well as PbPb and PbCu spacings. The simulated results on structures and on melting temperatures are in close agreement with experimental data.

  12. Pb/Cu (100) surface superstructures: Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; L´vy, J. C. S.

    1997-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations with simple pair potentials of the Lennard-Jones type enable us to show the stability of the three experimentally known superstructures of Pb/Cu (100) at different lead submonolayer coverages: c(4 × 4)atθ = 3/8,c(2 × 2)atθ = 0.5 and c(5√2 × √2)R45° at θ = 0.6. In addition, numerous details of these superstructures, including interatomic distances, surface alloying, corrugation and weak modulation are obtained numerically in quantitative and qualitative accord with the experimentally observed and measured data. By molecular dynamics the melting of these structures is studied from the temperature dependence of the Pb-atom average energy and diffusion coefficient, with evidence for a first-order transition for every superstructure. The dispersion of surface phonons is also derived.

  13. A superstructure-based electrochemical assay for signal-amplified detection of DNA methyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Yin; Dong, Huilei; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-12-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity is highly correlated with the occurrence and development of cancer. This work reports a superstructure-based electrochemical assay for signal-amplified detection of DNA MTase activity using M.SssI as an example. First, low-density coverage of DNA duplexes on the surface of the gold electrode was achieved by immobilized mercaptohexanol, followed by immobilization of DNA duplexes. The duplex can be cleaved by BstUI endonuclease in the absence of DNA superstructures. However, the cleavage is blocked after the DNA is methylated by M.SssI. The DNA superstructures are formed with the addition of helper DNA. By using an electroactive complex, RuHex, which can bind to DNA double strands, the activity of M.SssI can be quantitatively detected by differential pulse voltammetry. Due to the high site-specific cleavage by BstUI and signal amplification by the DNA superstructure, the biosensor can achieve ultrasensitive detection of DNA MTase activity down to 0.025U/mL. The method can be used for evaluation and screening of the inhibitors of MTase, and thus has potential in the discovery of methylation-related anticancer drugs.

  14. Ab initio study of long-period superstructures in close-packed A3B compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengaard, N. M.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations of the stability of one-dimensional long-period superstructures in Cu3Pd, Cu3Al, and Ag3Mg by means of an interface Green's function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding and atomic-sphere approximations. The ene...

  15. A generic methodology for processing route synthesis and design based on superstructure optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Frauzem, Rebecca; Sanchez-Arcilla, Ana Sofia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a systematic framework for novel and sustainable synthesis-design of processing routes is presented along with the associated computer-aided methods and tools. In Stage 1, superstructure optimization is used to determine the optimal processing route(s). In Stage 2, the design issue...

  16. Optical scan analysis to detect minor misfit on implant-supported superstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahmaseb, A.; Mercelis, P.; de Clerck, R.; Wismeijer, D.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the development of novel and more precise fabrication methods, absolute passive fit of implant-supported superstructures has yet to be consistently achieved. In the past, several laboratory techniques have been described to analyze fit. The purpose of this study was to assess two me

  17. Assembling Synthesis of Barium Chromate Nano-superstructures Using Eggshell Membrane as Template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinku; Wu, Qingsheng; Yi, Yu [Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Ding, Yaping [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China)

    2004-12-15

    The branch-like, feather-like BaCrO{sub 4} nano-superstructures were synthesized with bioactive eggshell membrane as directing and assembly template. Studies on the two products revealed that they formed through the self-assembly of nanoparticles, and that the optical properties of the products were different from BaCrO{sub 4} bulk materials.

  18. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  19. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  20. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  1. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which

  2. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which res

  3. Unknown Aspects of Self-Assembly of PbS Microscale Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Hernández-Garrido, Juan C.; Yang, Hengxi; Zhou, Yunlong; Varela, Aurea; Parras, Marina; Calvino-Gámez, José J.; González-Calbet, Jose M.; Green, Peter F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    A lot of interesting and sophisticated examples of nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly (SA) are known. From both fundamental and technological standpoints this field requires advancements in three principle directions: a) understanding the mechanism and driving forces of three-dimensional (3D) SA with both nano- and micro-levels of organization; b) understanding of disassembly/deconstruction processes; and c) finding synthetic methods of assembly into continuous superstructures without insulating barriers. From this perspective, we investigated the formation of well-known star-like PbS superstructures and found a number of previously unknown or overlooked aspects that can advance the knowledge of NP self-assembly in these three directions. The primary one is that the formation of large seemingly monocrystalline PbS superstructures with multiple levels of octahedral symmetry can be explained only by SA of small octahedral NPs. We found five distinct periods in the formation PbS hyperbranched stars: 1) nucleation of early PbS NPs with an average diameter of 31 nm; 2) assembly into 100–500 nm octahedral mesocrystals; 3) assembly into 1000–2500 nm hyperbranched stars; 4) assembly and ionic recrystallization into six-arm rods accompanied by disappearance of fine nanoscale structure; 5) deconstruction into rods and cubooctahedral NPs. The switches in assembly patterns between the periods occur due to variable dominance of pattern–determining forces that include vander Waals and electrostatic (charge-charge, dipole-dipole, and polarization) interactions. The superstructure deconstruction is triggered by chemical changes in the deep eutectic solvent (DES) used as the media. PbS superstructures can be excellent models for fundamental studies of nanoscale organization and SA manufacturing of (opto)electronics and energy harvesting devices which require organization of PbS components at multiple scales. PMID:22515512

  4. Boreal pollen contain ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding ‘antifreeze’ polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischmeier, Katharina; Budke, Carsten; Wiehemeier, Lars; Kottke, Tilman; Koop, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ice nucleation and growth is an important and widespread environmental process. Accordingly, nature has developed means to either promote or inhibit ice crystal formation, for example ice-nucleating proteins in bacteria or ice-binding antifreeze proteins in polar fish. Recently, it was found that birch pollen release ice-nucleating macromolecules when suspended in water. Here we show that birch pollen washing water exhibits also ice-binding properties such as ice shaping and ice recrystallization inhibition, similar to antifreeze proteins. We present spectroscopic evidence that both the ice-nucleating as well as the ice-binding molecules are polysaccharides bearing carboxylate groups. The spectra suggest that both polysaccharides consist of very similar chemical moieties, but centrifugal filtration indicates differences in molecular size: ice nucleation occurs only in the supernatant of a 100 kDa filter, while ice shaping is strongly enhanced in the filtrate. This finding may suggest that the larger ice-nucleating polysaccharides consist of clusters of the smaller ice-binding polysaccharides, or that the latter are fragments of the ice-nucleating polysaccharides. Finally, similar polysaccharides released from pine and alder pollen also display both ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding ability, suggesting a common mechanism of interaction with ice among several boreal pollen with implications for atmospheric processes and antifreeze protection. PMID:28157236

  5. Boreal pollen contain ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding ‘antifreeze’ polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischmeier, Katharina; Budke, Carsten; Wiehemeier, Lars; Kottke, Tilman; Koop, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Ice nucleation and growth is an important and widespread environmental process. Accordingly, nature has developed means to either promote or inhibit ice crystal formation, for example ice-nucleating proteins in bacteria or ice-binding antifreeze proteins in polar fish. Recently, it was found that birch pollen release ice-nucleating macromolecules when suspended in water. Here we show that birch pollen washing water exhibits also ice-binding properties such as ice shaping and ice recrystallization inhibition, similar to antifreeze proteins. We present spectroscopic evidence that both the ice-nucleating as well as the ice-binding molecules are polysaccharides bearing carboxylate groups. The spectra suggest that both polysaccharides consist of very similar chemical moieties, but centrifugal filtration indicates differences in molecular size: ice nucleation occurs only in the supernatant of a 100 kDa filter, while ice shaping is strongly enhanced in the filtrate. This finding may suggest that the larger ice-nucleating polysaccharides consist of clusters of the smaller ice-binding polysaccharides, or that the latter are fragments of the ice-nucleating polysaccharides. Finally, similar polysaccharides released from pine and alder pollen also display both ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding ability, suggesting a common mechanism of interaction with ice among several boreal pollen with implications for atmospheric processes and antifreeze protection.

  6. Deicing and Anti-Icing Unite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    With funding from Glenn's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, Cox & Company, Inc., built an ice protection system that combines thermal anti-icing and mechanical deicing to keep airfoils (wings and other lifting surfaces) clear of ice. Cox's concept was to combine an anti-icing system with NASA's Electro-Mechanical Expulsion Deicing System, a mechanical deicer. The anti-icing element of this hybrid would reduce the aerodynamic losses associated with deicing systems. The Cox Low Power Ice Protection System is the first new aircraft ice protection system that has been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration for use on a business jet in 40 years. While the system is currently sized for Premier class aircraft, there are no apparent constraints prohibiting its use on aircraft of any size. The company is investigating further applications, such as adapting the system for unmanned aerial vehicles and other military aircraft.

  7. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  8. Direct Fabrication of Free-Standing MOF Superstructures with Desired Shapes by Micro-Confined Interfacial Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Oh; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Noh, Hyunwoo; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-06-13

    Recently, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with multifunctional pore chemistry have been intensively investigated for positioning the desired morphology at specific locations onto substrates for manufacturing devices. Herein, we develop a micro-confined interfacial synthesis (MIS) approach for fabrication of a variety of free-standing MOF superstructures with desired shapes. This approach for engineering MOFs provides three key features: 1) in situ synthesis of various free-standing MOF superstructures with controlled compositions, shape, and thickness using a mold membrane; 2) adding magnetic functionality into MOF superstructures by loading with Fe3 O4 nanoparticles; 3) transferring the synthesized MOF superstructural array on to flat or curved surface of various substrates. The MIS route with versatile potential opens the door for a number of new perspectives in various applications.

  9. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to all...... the interesting conversations during the workshop, however, made me think that much of the concern with the Polar Regions in general, and the presence of ice in particular, reverberates around the question of how to accommodate various geographical presences and practices within the regulatory framework that we...

  10. Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  11. Analysis of raft foundation design based on considering influence of superstructure stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; QIU Jianhui; ZHAO Dong; YANG Xi; DAI Shuai

    2009-01-01

    The finite element method was used for analysis of raft foundation design in high-rise building. Compared with other conventional methods, this method is more adapted to the practical condition since both superstructure stiffness and soil conditions were considered in calculation. The calculation results by example show that the base reaction is more uniform and the maximum reaction decreases obviously. Accordingly, the raft foundation design is more economic without any loss of security for high-rise building.

  12. Vibrational properties of the Pt(111)- p(2 × 2)-K surface superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-08-01

    The vibrational spectra of the Pt(111)- p(2 × 2)-K ordered surface superstructure formed on the platinum surface upon adsorption of 0.25 potassium monolayer are calculated using the interatomic interaction potentials obtained within the tight-binding approximation. The surface relaxation, the dispersion of surface phonons, the local density of surface vibrational states, and the polarization of vibrational modes of adatoms and substrate atoms are discussed. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the recently obtained experimental data.

  13. Superstructure-based Design and Optimization of Batch Biodiesel Production Using Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuh, M. Z.; Nasir, N. F.

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel as a fuel comprised of mono alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable lipid feedstock, such as vegetable oil and animal fat. Biodiesel production is complex process which need systematic design and optimization. However, no case study using the process system engineering (PSE) elements which are superstructure optimization of batch process, it involves complex problems and uses mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP). The PSE offers a solution to complex engineering system by enabling the use of viable tools and techniques to better manage and comprehend the complexity of the system. This study is aimed to apply the PSE tools for the simulation of biodiesel process and optimization and to develop mathematical models for component of the plant for case A, B, C by using published kinetic data. Secondly, to determine economic analysis for biodiesel production, focusing on heterogeneous catalyst. Finally, the objective of this study is to develop the superstructure for biodiesel production by using heterogeneous catalyst. The mathematical models are developed by the superstructure and solving the resulting mixed integer non-linear model and estimation economic analysis by using MATLAB software. The results of the optimization process with the objective function of minimizing the annual production cost by batch process from case C is 23.2587 million USD. Overall, the implementation a study of process system engineering (PSE) has optimized the process of modelling, design and cost estimation. By optimizing the process, it results in solving the complex production and processing of biodiesel by batch.

  14. Automatic recognition of ship types from infrared images using superstructure moment invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Wang, Xinyu

    2007-11-01

    Automatic object recognition is an active area of interest for military and commercial applications. In this paper, a system addressing autonomous recognition of ship types in infrared images is proposed. Firstly, an approach of segmentation based on detection of salient features of the target with subsequent shadow removing is proposed, as is the base of the subsequent object recognition. Considering the differences between the shapes of various ships mainly lie in their superstructures, we then use superstructure moment functions invariant to translation, rotation and scale differences in input patterns and develop a robust algorithm of obtaining ship superstructure. Subsequently a back-propagation neural network is used as a classifier in the recognition stage and projection images of simulated three-dimensional ship models are used as the training sets. Our recognition model was implemented and experimentally validated using both simulated three-dimensional ship model images and real images derived from video of an AN/AAS-44V Forward Looking Infrared(FLIR) sensor.

  15. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Cu7Te5 Nanorods into Superstructures with Enhanced SERS Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiaojiao; Dai, Baosong; Liu, Jia; Liu, Jialong; Ji, Muwei; Liu, Jiajia; Zhou, Yuanmin; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Jiatao

    2016-12-28

    This paper reports a strategy to get self-assembly of Cu7Te5 nanorods into hierarchical superstructures: the side-by-side self-assembly of nanorods into microscale one-dimensional (1D) nanowires (primary structure), the side-by-side alignments of the 1D nanowires into two-dimensional (2D) nanowire bundles (secondary structure), and the further rolling up of the 2D bundles into three-dimensional (3D) microtubes (tertiary structure). It was found that the oleylamine (OLA)/n-dodecanethiol (DDT) mixture as a binary capping agent was key to produce Cu7Te5 nanorods in the quantum size regime with high monodispersity, and this was a prerequisite for their hierarchical self-assembly based on elaborate control of the solvent evaporation process. The obtained Cu7Te5 microtube superstructures were used as SERS substrate and showed much stronger SERS enhancement than the as-prepared Cu7Te5 nanorods before assembly. This was probably ascribed to the remarkably enhanced local electromagnetic field arising from the plasmon coupling of Cu7Te5 nanorods in the well-assembled superstructures.

  16. Evolution of Moiré Profiles from van der Waals Superstructures of Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Cao, Wei; Connell, John W.; Chen, Zhongfang; Lin, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) superstructures, or vdW solids, are formed by the precise restacking of 2D nanosheet lattices, which can lead to unique physical and electronic properties that are not available in the parent nanosheets. Moiré patterns formed by the crystalline mismatch between adjacent nanosheets are the most direct features for vdW superstructures under microscopic imaging. In this article, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of hexagonal Moiré patterns with unusually large micrometer-sized lateral areas (up to ~1 μm2) and periodicities (up to ~50 nm) from restacking of liquid exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is reported. This observation was attributed to the long range crystallinity and the contaminant-free surfaces of these chemically inert nanosheets. Parallel-line-like Moiré fringes with similarly large periodicities were also observed. The simulations and experiments unambiguously revealed that the hexagonal patterns and the parallel fringes originated from the same rotationally mismatched vdW stacking of BNNSs and can be inter-converted by simply tilting the TEM specimen following designated directions. This finding may pave the way for further structural decoding of other 2D vdW superstructure systems with more complex Moiré images.

  17. Z-contrast imaging and ab initio study on "d" superstructure in sedimentary dolomite

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Szlufarska, Izabela; Brown, Philip E; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-precipitates with tripled periodicity along the c-axis are observed in a Ca-rich dolomite sample from Proterozoic carbonate rocks with "molar tooth" structure. This observation is consistent with previous description of d reflections. High-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging (or Z-contrast imaging) that avoids dynamic diffraction as seen in electron diffraction and high-resolution TEM imaging modes, confirms that d reflections correspond to nanoscale precipitates aligned parallel to (001) of the host dolomite. The lamellae precipitates have a cation ordering sequence of Ca-Ca-Mg-Ca-Ca- Mg along the c direction resulting in a chemical composition of Ca0.67Mg0.33CO3. This superstructure is attributed to the extra or d reflections, thus is referred to as the d superstructure in this study. The structure can be simply described as interstratified calcite/dolomite. The crystal structure of the d superstructure calculated from density functional theory (DFT) has a space group of P31c and has a and c unit-cel...

  18. Superstructure formation and variation in Ni-GDC cermet anodes in SOFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Auchterlonie, Graeme John; Zou, Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-05-28

    The microstructures and spatial distributions of constituent elements at the anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution TEM observations demonstrate two different types of superstructure formation in grain interiors and at grain boundaries. Energy-filtered TEM elemental imaging qualitatively reveals that mixture zones exist at metal-ceramic grain boundaries, which is also quantitatively verified by STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was apparent that both metallic Ni and the rare-earth elements Ce/Gd in gadolinium-doped ceria can diffuse into each other with equal diffusion lengths (about 100 nm). This will lead to the existence of mutual diffusion zones at grain boundaries, accompanied by a change in the valence state of the diffusing ions, as identified by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Such mutual diffusion is believed to be the dominant factor that gives rise to superstructure formation at grain boundaries, while a different superstructure is formed at grain interiors, as a consequence solely of the reduction of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) during H(2) treatment. This work will enhance the fundamental understanding of microstructural evolution at the anode, correlating with advancements in sample preparation in order to improve the performance of SOFC anodes.

  19. Silver-colloid-nucleated cytochrome c superstructures encapsulated in silica nanoarchitectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jean Marie; Dening, Brett M; Eden, Kristin B; Stroud, Rhonda M; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2004-10-12

    We recently discovered that self-organized superstructures of the heme protein cytochrome c (cyt. c) are nucleated in buffer by gold nanoparticles. The protein molecules within the superstructure survive both silica sol-gel encapsulation and drying from supercritical carbon dioxide to form air-filled biocomposite aerogels that exhibit gas-phase binding activity for nitric oxide. In this investigation, we report that viable proteins are present in biocomposite aerogels when the nucleating metal nanoparticle is silver rather than gold. Silver colloids were synthesized via reduction of an aqueous solution of Ag+ using either citrate or borohydride reductants. As determined by transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, the silver nanoparticles vary in size and shape depending on the synthetic route, which affects the fraction of cyt. c that survives the processing necessary to form a biocomposite aerogel. Silver colloids synthesized via the citrate preparation are polydisperse, with sizes ranging from 1 to 100 nm, and lead to low cyt. c viability in the dried bioaerogels (approximately 15%). Protein superstructures nucleated at approximately 10-nm Ag colloids prepared via the borohydride route, including citrate stabilization of the borohydride-reduced metal, retain significant protein viability within the bioaerogels (approximately 45%).

  20. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-08-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow.

  1. Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  2. The PRICE study (Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation: design of a randomised controlled trial comparing standard versus cryokinetic ice applications in the management of acute ankle sprain [ISRCTN13903946

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocke Laurence G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryotherapy (the application of ice for therapeutic purposes is one of the most common treatment modalities employed in the immediate management of acute soft tissue injury. Despite its widespread clinical use, the precise physiological responses to therapeutic cooling have not been fully elucidated, and effective evidence-based treatment protocols are yet to be established. Intermittent ice applications are thought to exert a significant analgesic effect. This could facilitate earlier therapeutic exercise after injury, potentially allowing for a quicker return to activity. The primary aim of the forthcoming study is therefore to examine the safety and effectiveness of combining intermittent ice applications with periods of therapeutic exercise in the first week after an acute ankle sprain. Methods/Design The study is a randomised controlled trial. 120 subjects with an acute grade I or grade II ankle sprain will be recruited from Accident & Emergency and a University based Sports Injury Clinic. Subjects will be randomised under strict double-blind conditions to either a standard cryotherapy (intermittent ice applications with compression or cryokinetic treatment group (intermittent ice applications with compression and therapeutic exercise. After the first week, treatment will be standardised across groups. Assessor blinding will be maintained throughout the trial. Primary outcome will be function, assessed using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS. Additional outcomes will include pain (10 cm Visual Analogue Scale, swelling (modified figure-of-eight method and activity levels (activPAL™ physical activity monitor, PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK. Diagnostic Ultrasound (Episcan-1-200 high frequency ultrasound scanning system, Longport International Ltd, PA will also be used to assess the degree of soft tissue injury. After baseline assessment subjects will be followed up at 1, 2, 3 & 4 weeks post injury. All data will

  3. Modulated structures of Cs2HgCl4: the 5a superstructure at 185 K and the 3c superstructure at 176 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagautdinov; Pilz; Ludecke; van Smaalen S

    1999-12-01

    Crystalline dicaesium mercury tetrachloride (Cs(2)HgCl(4)) is isomorphous with beta-K(2)SO(4) (space group Pnma, Z = 4) in its normal phase at room temperature. On cooling a sequence of incommensurate and commensurate superstructures occurs, below T = 221 K with modulations parallel to a*, and below 184 K with modulations along c*. The commensurately modulated structures at T = 185 K with q = (1/5)a* and at T = 176 K with q = (1/3)c* were determined using X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation. The structure at T = 185 K has superspace group Pnma(alpha,0,0)0ss with alpha = 0.2. Lattice parameters were determined as a = 5 x 9.7729 (1), b = 7.5276 (4) and c = 13.3727 (7) Å. Structure refinements converged to R = 0.050 (R = 0.042 for 939 main reflections and R = 0.220 for 307 satellites) for the section t = 0.05 of superspace. The fivefold supercell has space group Pn2(1)a. The structure at T = 176 K has superspace group Pnma(0,0,gamma)0s0 with gamma = 1/3. Lattice parameters were determined as a = 9.789 (3), b = 7.541 (3) and c = 3 x 13.418 (4) Å. Structure refinements converged to R = 0.067 (R = 0.048 for 2130 main reflections, and R = 0.135 for 2382 satellite reflections) for the section t = 0. The threefold supercell has space group P112(1)/a. It is shown that the structures of both low-temperature phases can be characterized as different superstructures of the periodic room-temperature structure. The superstructure of the 5a-modulated phase is analysed in terms of displacements of the Cs atoms, and rotations and distortions of HgCl(4) tetrahedral groups. In the 3c-modulated phase the distortions of the tetrahedra are relaxed, but they are replaced by translations of the tetrahedral groups in addition to rotations.

  4. Archimedean Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Eloranta, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

  5. Helicopter Icing Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    c CD 4- Z~L ~ ~L)~ u)z ~ ~ -4 z 4~ - -Ia. LnCD 9- CD C. Ln -i L.. L. c0 000 - -4 0000 0 0 o 00 CL -4- CD CDC CDUz 9- V) ) -cc C oL CD r 0LiDr- uDI L...protection system involved. o Icing conditions frequently occur in very moist air masses blowing inland from warmer seas, such as the Gulf of Mexico , the

  6. Acquisition of the linearization process in text composition in third to ninth graders: effects of textual superstructure and macrostructural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favart, Monik; Coirier, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Two complementary experiments analyzed the acquisition of text content linearization in writing, in French-speaking participants from third to ninth grades. In both experiments, a scrambled text paradigm was used: eleven ideas presented in random order had to be rearranged coherently so as to compose a text. Linearization was analyzed on the basis of the conceptual ordering of ideas and writing fluency. The first experiment focused on the effect of superstructural facilitation (in decreasing order: 1--instructional, 2--narrative, 3--argumentative), while the second experiment studied the effect of prewriting conditions: 1-scrambled presentation, 2--macrostructural facilitation, 3--ideas given in optimal order (control condition). As expected, scores in conceptual ordering and writing fluency improved through the grade levels. Students were most successful with respect to conceptual ordering in the instructional superstructure, followed by the narrative and finally the argumentative superstructures. The prewriting assignment also had the expected effect (control better than macrostructural presentation which, in turn, was better than the random order) but only with the argumentative superstructure. Contrary to conceptual ordering, writing fluency was not affected by the type of superstructure, although we did record an effect of the prewriting condition. The results are discussed in light of Bereiter and Scardamalia's knowledge transforming strategy (1987) taking into account cognitive development and French language curriculum.

  7. A spray-drying strategy for synthesis of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks and their assembly into hollow superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Imaz, Inhar; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are among the most attractive porous materials known today. Their miniaturization to the nanoscale—into nanoMOFs—is expected to serve myriad applications from drug delivery to membranes, to open up novel avenues to more traditional storage and catalysis applications, and to enable the creation of sophisticated superstructures. Here, we report the use of spray-drying as a versatile methodology to assemble nanoMOFs, yielding spherical hollow superstructures with diameters smaller than 5 µm. This strategy conceptually mimics the emulsions used by chemists to confine the synthesis of materials, but does not require secondary immiscible solvents or surfactants. We demonstrate that the resulting spherical, hollow superstructures can be processed into stable colloids, whose disassembly by sonication affords discrete, homogeneous nanoMOFs. This spray-drying strategy enables the construction of multicomponent MOF superstructures, and the encapsulation of guest species within these superstructures. We anticipate that this will provide new routes to capsules, reactors and composite materials.

  8. Preparation of flowerlike BiOBr/Bi2MoO6 composite superstructures and the adsorption behavior to dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Ni, Yonghong; Ye, Shiyong

    2017-05-01

    Flowerlike BiOBr/Bi2MoO6 composite superstructures were synthesized by a simple solvothermal route with subsequent direct precipitation at room temperature, employing bismuth nitrate, sodium molybdate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the raw materials. The phase and the morphology of the as-prepared products were characterized by SEM, TEM, SAED, XRD and EDS. BET investigation proved the mesoporous structure of flowerlike BiOBr/Bi2MoO6 composite superstructures. It was found that the composite superstructures exhibited higher adsorption ability to methylene blue (MB) and pyronine B (PB) dyes from their solutions than single component (BiOBr or Bi2MoO6). As a case, the adsorption behavior of MB aqueous solution on BiOBr/Bi2MoO6 composite superstructures was detailedly studied, including the adsorption isotherm, kinetics and thermodynamic parameters. The results indicated that flowerlike BiOBr/Bi2MoO6 composite superstructures have potential applications in the field of wastewater treatment.

  9. A spray-drying strategy for synthesis of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks and their assembly into hollow superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Imaz, Inhar; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are among the most attractive porous materials known today. Their miniaturization to the nanoscale--into nanoMOFs--is expected to serve myriad applications from drug delivery to membranes, to open up novel avenues to more traditional storage and catalysis applications, and to enable the creation of sophisticated superstructures. Here, we report the use of spray-drying as a versatile methodology to assemble nanoMOFs, yielding spherical hollow superstructures with diameters smaller than 5 µm. This strategy conceptually mimics the emulsions used by chemists to confine the synthesis of materials, but does not require secondary immiscible solvents or surfactants. We demonstrate that the resulting spherical, hollow superstructures can be processed into stable colloids, whose disassembly by sonication affords discrete, homogeneous nanoMOFs. This spray-drying strategy enables the construction of multicomponent MOF superstructures, and the encapsulation of guest species within these superstructures. We anticipate that this will provide new routes to capsules, reactors and composite materials.

  10. Azobenzene mesogen-passivated gold nanoparticles: Controlled preparation, self-organized superstructures, thermal behavior and photoisomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Junfei [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410076 (China); Wang, Meng; Bian, Huafeng; Zhou, Yang; Ma, Jie; Liu, Chengjie [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Dongzhong, E-mail: cdz@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Liquid crystal nanoscience has aroused intensive interests mainly due to their unique and collective properties and a variety of potential applications. In this paper, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) coated with alkoxy azobenzene mesogenic thiol ligands of different length polymethylene spacer and linear alkyl thiol co-ligands have been prepared. The thermal properties, phase behavior of thus obtained hybrid GNPs and photophysical properties of their solid-state films have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), variable-temperature small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The hybrid GNPs exclusively passivated with azobenzene mesogenic ligands showed lamellar structure while those with mixed ligands exhibited hexagonal columnar superstructure, and the latter complex hybrid GNPs exhibited noticeably improved thermolysis resistance. Moreover, it is very interesting that the solid-state films of the hybrid GNPs displayed reversible photoresponse owing to the trans–cis transformation of azobenzene mesogenic ligands, and compared with the hybrid GNPs coated with mesogenic ligands only, those with mixed ligands exhibited faster photoisomerization rate upon alternate UV and visible light irradiation, which may have some promising applications. - Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) coated with azobenzene mesogenic thiol ligands and linear alkyl thiol co-ligands have been prepared showing lamellar or hexagonal columnar superstructures. The complex hybrid GNPs with co-ligands exhibit much improved thermolysis resistance and the solid-state films of the hybrid GNPs display interesting reversible photoisomerization. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) coated with azobenzene thiol ligands have been prepared. • The hybrid GNPs with alkyl thiol co-ligands show enhanced thermolysis resistance. • The hybrid GNPs exhibit lamellar or hexagonal columnar superstructures. • The solid-state films of the hybrid

  11. A microwave promoted continuous flow approach to self-assembled hierarchical hematite superstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Bayazit, M.K.; Cao, E; Gavriilidis, A; Tang, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a microwave promoted flow (MWPF) system to reproducibly synthesize self-assembled hierarchical hematite superstructures (Hem-SSs) using the sole precursor (Fe(NO3)3·9H2O) and single mode microwave under aqueous conditions was developed. The functional characterisation by XRD, (HR)TEM, XPS, UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy proved that highly crystalline ellipsoid Hem-SSs (∼180 nm × 140 nm) were produced, built from primary hematite nanoparticles, 5–10 nm in size using 0.05 mol L−1 p...

  12. Incommensurate superstructure in heavily doped fullerene layer on Bi/Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Matetskiy, A. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Cs adsorption onto the C60-covered Si(111)-β- √{ 3 } × √{ 3 } -Bi reconstruction has been studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy. Unexpected increase in apparent size of every second C60 molecule has been detected, hereupon the close packed molecular array almost doubles its periodicity. The change affects only the fullerenes that are in direct contact with the metal-induced reconstruction and takes no place already in the second layer. Photoelectron studies have revealed that this incommensurate "2 × 2" superstructure of a heavily doped C60 monolayer remains in an insulating state regardless of doping level.

  13. System design optimization for stand-alone photovoltaic systems sizing by using superstructure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azau, M. A. M.; Jaafar, S.; Samsudin, K.

    2013-06-01

    Although the photovoltaic (PV) systems have been increasingly installed as an alternative and renewable green power generation, the initial set up cost, maintenance cost and equipment mismatch are some of the key issues that slows down the installation in small household. This paper presents the design optimization of stand-alone photovoltaic systems using superstructure model where all possible types of technology of the equipment are captured and life cycle cost analysis is formulated as a mixed integer programming (MIP). A model for investment planning of power generation and long-term decision model are developed in order to help the system engineer to build a cost effective system.

  14. Low temperature synthesis of flower-like ZnMn 2O 4 superstructures with enhanced electrochemical lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lifen; Yang, Yanyan; Yin, Jia; Li, Qiao; Zhang, Lizhi

    In this communication, flower-like tetragonal ZnMn 2O 4 superstructures are synthesized by a facile low temperature solvothermal process. Characterizations show that these ZnMn 2O 4 superstructures are well crystallized and of high purity. The product exhibits an initial electrochemical capacity of 763 mAh g -1 and retains stable capacity of 626 mAh g -1 after 50 cycles. Its stable capacity is significantly higher than that of nanocrystalline ZnMn 2O 4 synthesized by a polymer-pyrolysis method. It is found that the higher capacity retention can be attributed to three-dimensional superstructural nature of the as-prepared flower-like ZnMn 2O 4 material. This study suggests that the solvothermally synthesized flower-like ZnMn 2O 4 is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Evolution of Dislocation Subsystem Components During Plastic Deformation Depending on Parameters of Strengthening Phase with L12 Superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneyko, O. I.; Kovalevskaya, T. A.; Kulaeva, N. A.; Kolupaeva, S. N.; Shalygina, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents results of mathematical modelling of plastic deformation in dispersion-hardened materials with FCC crystal system and L12 superstructure particles. Research results show that the size and the distance between particles of the strengthening phase affect the strain hardening and the evolution of the dislocation subsystem of the FCC alloy hardened with coherent L12 superstructure particles. It is found that increased size of ordered particles or decreased distance between them enhances the abnormal growth in the flow stress and the density of the dislocation subsystem components. Investigations show that prismatic dislocation loops predominate in the dislocation subsystem of materials having a nano-dispersion strengthening phase.

  16. Superstructures formed by orientationally ordered tetrahedra in the bcc lattice: new diffusionless order-disorder transition in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryuji

    2015-03-04

    We investigated and clarified the superstructures formed by tetrahedra in the bcc lattice within the framework of second-order transitions. Compliance with both the Landau and Lifshitz conditions was investigated for all possible superstructures and, based on this, we demonstrate that bcc crystals that contain tetrahedra at an inversion center can exhibit a variety of second-order transitions, which are regarded as a new type of diffusionless order-disorder transition with antiferroic orientational orders. Finally, we show that the transition gives rise to a new glassy state. Breaking of the local inversion symmetry may lead to a new orientational glass, which is reminiscent of spin glasses in magnetism.

  17. The Effects on the Operating Condition of a Passenger Ship Retro-fitted with a Composite Superstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karatzas, Vasileios; Hjørnet, N. K.; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard

    2016-01-01

    the stability of the ship. In this work, the superstructure of a RoPax ferry has been redesigned using composite materials emphasizing the effects on the ship from an operational per-spective. The weight reduction has been calculated for a real-istic average operating condition quantifying the effects......As sustainability and climate change have come on the politi-cal agenda, the shipping industry will have to be operating energy efficient ships. An appealing step to achieve this goal is by designing superstructures made out of Fiber Reinforced Plastics (FRP) aiming at the reduction of the ship...

  18. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Bai Junqiang; Hua Jun; Wang Kun; Zhang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when enter-ing clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes:rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  19. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  20. Anomalous hexagonal superstructure of aluminum oxide layer grown on NiAl(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Pawel; Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Minagawa, Yuto; Yajima, Nami; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    A modified method for the fabrication of a highly crystallized layer of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface is reported. The fabrication method involves the multistep selective oxidation of aluminum atoms on a NiAl(110) surface resulting from successive oxygen deposition and annealing. The surface morphology and local electronic structure of the novel aluminum oxide layer were investigated by high-resolution imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy. In contrast to the standard fabrication method of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface, the proposed method produces an atomically flat surface exhibiting a hexagonal superstructure. The superstructure exhibits a slightly distorted hexagonal array of close-packed bright protrusions with a periodicity of 4.5 ± 0.2 nm. Atomically resolved STM imaging of the aluminum oxide layer reveals a hexagonal arrangement of dark contrast spots with a periodicity of 0.27 ± 0.02 nm. On the basis of the atomic structure of the fabricated layer, the formation of α-Al2O3(0001) on the NiAl(110) surface is suggested.

  1. Solving a superstructure from two-wavelength x-ray powder diffraction data- a simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建荣; 古元新; 范海福

    2003-01-01

    Two different kinds of phase ambiguities are intrinsic in two-wavelength x-ray powder diffraction from acentric crystal structures having pseudo-translation symmetry. In a test calculation we have solved the problem for the first time by two different phasing procedures developed originally in single-crystal structure analysis. They are the direct method of breaking enantiomorphous phase ambiguity in protein crystallography and that of breaking translational phase ambiguity for superstructures. An artificial structure was used in the test, which is based on atomic coordinates of the known structure, SHAS (C5H6O5N3K), with the atom K replaced by Rb. The arrangement of Rb atoms possesses a subperiodicity of t = (a + b + c)/2. Two-wavelength synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction data were simulated with λ1 =0.0816nm and λ2=0.1319nm. Overlapped reflections were uniformly decomposed at the beginning and redecomposed afterward when the partial-structure information became available. The enantiomorphous phase ambiguity was resolved only for reflections with h + k + l even. Phases of reflections with h + k + l odd were derived by the direct method of solving superstructures. A fragment was then obtained, which led to the complete structure in five cycles of Fourier iteration.

  2. Solving a superstructure from two—wavelength x—ray powder diffraction data—a simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建荣; 古元新; 等

    2003-01-01

    Two different kinds of phase ambiguities are intrinsic in two-wavelength x-ray powder diffraction from acentric crystal structures having pseudo-translation symmetry.In a test calculation we have solved the problem for the first time by two different phasing procedures developed originally in single-crystal structure analysis.They are the direct method of breaking enantiomorphous phase ambiguity in protein crystallography and that of breaking translational phase ambiguity for superstructures.An artificial structure was used in the test,which is based on atomic coordinates of the known structure,SHAS(C5H6O5N3K),with the atom K replaced by Rb.The arrangement of Rb atoms possesses a subperiodicity of t =(a+b+c)/2.Two -wavelength synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction data were simulated with λ1=0.0816nm and λ2=0.1319nm.Overlapped reflections were uniformly decomposed at the beginning and rdedcomposed afterward when the partial-structure in formation became available.The enantiomorphous phase ambiguity was resolved only for reflections with h+k+l even.Phases of reflections with h+k+l odd were derived by the direct method of solving superstructures.A fragment was then obtained.which led to the the complete structure in five cycles of Fourier iteration.

  3. The Effect of Superstructures Connected to Implants with Different Surface Properties on the Surrounding Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Koretake

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate how the connection of superstructures to implants with different surface properties affects the surrounding bone. The right and left mandibular premolars and molars of 5 dogs were extracted. After 12 weeks, a machined implant was placed mesially and an anodized implant was placed distally on one side of the edentulous jaw, with the positions reversed on the opposite side. Twelve weeks after implantation, splinted superstructures were set to the implants. At 24 weeks after implantation, the implant stability quotient (ISQ was measured, radiographs were obtained. Removal torque values were measured and histologic observation was performed. The ISQ values at 24 weeks after implantation were not significantly different between the groups. The removal torque values were significantly different between the distal anodized and distal machined implants (p < 0.05. From 12 to 24 weeks, marginal bone losses were not significantly different between the groups. Fluorescent observation of tissue samples revealed bone-remodeling activity around all of the implants. The results of this study suggest that when implants with different surface properties are connected, machined implants at the most distal sites might be a potential risk factor for implant-bone binding.

  4. Combined mass and heat exchange network synthesis based on stage-wise superstructure model☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linlin Liu; Jian Du; Fenglin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Integrating multiple systems into one has become an important trend in Process Systems Engineering research field since there is strong demand from the modern industries. In this study, a stage-wise superstructure-based method is proposed to synthesize a combined mass and heat exchange network (CM&HEN) which has two parts as the mass exchange network (MEN) and heat exchange network (HEN) involved. To express the pos-sible heat exchange requirements resulted from mass exchange operations, a so cal ed“indistinct HEN super-structure (IHS)”, which can contain the all potential matches between streams, is constructed at first. Then, a non-linear programming (NLP) mathematical model is established for the simultaneous synthesis and optimiza-tion of networks. Therein, the interaction between mass exchange and heat exchange is modeling formulated. The NLP model has later been examined using an example from literature, and the effectiveness of the proposed method has been demonstrated with the results.

  5. Protection against murine leukemia virus-induced spongiform myeloencephalopathy in mice overexpressing Bcl-2 but not in mice deficient for interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthetase, ICE, Fas, Fas ligand, or TNF-R1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolicoeur, Paul; Hu, Chunyan; Mak, Tak W; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Kay, Denis G

    2003-12-01

    Some murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs), among them Cas-Br-E and ts-1 MuLVs, are neurovirulent, inducing spongiform myeloencephalopathy and hind limb paralysis in susceptible mice. It has been shown that the env gene of these viruses harbors the determinant of neurovirulence. It appears that neuronal loss occurs by an indirect mechanism, since the target motor neurons have not been found to be infected. However, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. Several lymphokines, cytokines, and other cellular effectors have been found to be aberrantly expressed in the brains of infected mice, but whether these are required for the development of the neurodegenerative lesions is not known. In an effort to identify the specific effectors which are indeed required for the initiation and/or development of spongiform myeloencephalopathy, we inoculated gene-deficient (knockout [KO]) mice with ts-1 MuLV. We show here that interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), ICE, Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), and TNF-R1 KO mice still develop signs of disease. However, transgenic mice overexpressing Bcl-2 in neurons (NSE/Bcl-2) were largely protected from hind limb paralysis and had less-severe spongiform lesions. These results indicate that motor neuron death occurs in this disease at least in part by a Bcl-2-inhibitable pathway not requiring the ICE, iNOS, Fas/FasL, TNF-R1, and IL-6 gene products.

  6. The line shape of the Ortho-II superstructure reflection in YBa2Cu3O6.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleger, P.; Hadfield, R.; Casalta, H.;

    1994-01-01

    Neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements of the Ortho-II superstructure reflections on a high quality single crystal of YBa2Cu3O6.5 revealed that the intrinsic line shape is a Lorentzian to the power 5/2. It is argued that such a line shape implies late-stage domain coarsening of a quenched...

  7. A Critical Reassessment of Marxian Base-Superstructure Explanations of the Role of Education in Social Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyung-Kap

    1986-01-01

    Examines how four major versions of neo-Marxism (i.e., Hegelian, Phenomenological, Structuralist Marxism, and the Frankfurt School) attempt to overcome the base-superstructure thesis of the political economists of education. Considers the implicit social ontological and epistemological assumptions and the related theory of education of each.…

  8. Nanoscale superstructures assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): programmable construction, structural diversity, and emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Hua; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-11-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an essential tool in biotechnology laboratories and is becoming increasingly important in other areas of research. Extensive data obtained over the last 12 years has shown that the combination of PCR with nanoscale dispersions can resolve issues in the preparation DNA-based materials that include both inorganic and organic nanoscale components. Unlike conventional DNA hybridization and antibody-antigen complexes, PCR provides a new, effective assembly platform that both increases the yield of DNA-based nanomaterials and allows researchers to program and control assembly with predesigned parameters including those assisted and automated by computers. As a result, this method allows researchers to optimize to the combinatorial selection of the DNA strands for their nanoparticle conjugates. We have developed a PCR approach for producing various nanoscale assemblies including organic motifs such as small molecules, macromolecules, and inorganic building blocks, such as nanorods (NRs), metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). We start with a nanoscale primer and then modify that building block using the automated steps of PCR-based assembly including initialization, denaturation, annealing, extension, final elongation, and final hold. The intermediate steps of denaturation, annealing, and extension are cyclic, and we use computer control so that the assembled superstructures reach their predetermined complexity. The structures assembled using a small number of PCR cycles show a lower polydispersity than similar discrete structures obtained by direct hybridization between the nanoscale building blocks. Using different building blocks, we assembled the following structural motifs by PCR: (1) discrete nanostructures (NP dimers, NP multimers including trimers, pyramids, tetramers or hexamers, etc.), (2) branched NP superstructures and heterochains, (3) NP satellite-like superstructures, (4) Y-shaped nanostructures and DNA

  9. Piloted Flight Simulator Developed for Icing Effects Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to expand pilot training methods to avoid icing-related accidents, the NASA Glenn Research Center and Bihrle Applied Research Inc. have developed the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). ICEFTD simulates the flight characteristics of the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft in a no-ice baseline and in two ice configurations simulating ice-protection-system failures. Key features of the training device are the force feedback in the yoke, the instrument panel and out-the-window graphics, the instructor s workstation, and the portability of the unit.

  10. POLAR ICE: Integrating, Distributing and Visualising Ice Information Products for Operators in Polar Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nick; Fleming, Andrew; Cziferszky, Andreas; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Rasmussen, Till; Makynen, Marko; Berglund, Robin; Seitsonen, Lauri; Rudjord, Oystein; Solberg, Rune; Tangen, Helge; Axell, Lars; Saldo, Roberto; Melsheimer, Christian; Larsen, Hans Eilif; Puestow, Thomas; Arhturs, David; Flach, Dominie

    2016-08-01

    The POLAR ICE project has developed a system for integrating and delivering satellite derived ice information products to operators working in the economically and environmentally important Arctic and Antarctic regions. POLAR ICE has been supported by the European Commission's FP7 programme and undertaken by European and Canadian companies and institutes, who are all partners in the Polar View Earth Observation Limited (PVEO) company. It is the aim of PVEO to commercialise the service that has been developed and demonstrated as a part of POLAR ICE.Access to sea ice information derived from satellite earth observation data is critical to support the increasing numbers of Arctic and Antarctic shipping and off-shore operations and to protect the rapidly changing polar environment.To-date the development of sea ice information capabilities has addressed separate elements of complete service chains. In contrast POLAR ICE has linked these separate elements together, filled in known gaps and built a robust integrated service chain.

  11. River Ice Data Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    edge in the field of ice engineering expands. For example, ice concentration and freezeup stage are not considered by the survey respondents to...im- pacts both freezeup and breakup jam formation Table 2. Ice parameters currently monitored, by Divisions (as of 1995). Ice parameters currently...V V V V Date of ice in V V V V Ice concentration V V V V Freezeup stage V V V V V Note: Southwestern Division does not currently monitor ice

  12. Windows in Arctic sea ice: Light transmission and ice algae in a refrozen lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauko, Hanna M.; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Assmy, Philipp; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Mundy, C. J.; Duarte, Pedro; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Olsen, Lasse M.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Johnsen, Geir; Elliott, Ashley; Wang, Feiyue; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-06-01

    The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing from thicker multiyear to thinner first-year ice cover, with significant consequences for radiative transfer through the ice pack and light availability for algal growth. A thinner, more dynamic ice cover will possibly result in more frequent leads, covered by newly formed ice with little snow cover. We studied a refrozen lead (≤0.27 m ice) in drifting pack ice north of Svalbard (80.5-81.8°N) in May-June 2015 during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition (N-ICE2015). We measured downwelling incident and ice-transmitted spectral irradiance, and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), particle absorption, ultraviolet (UV)-protecting mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in melted sea ice samples. We found occasionally very high MAA concentrations (up to 39 mg m-3, mean 4.5 ± 7.8 mg m-3) and MAA to Chl a ratios (up to 6.3, mean 1.2 ± 1.3). Disagreement in modeled and observed transmittance in the UV range let us conclude that MAA signatures in CDOM absorption spectra may be artifacts due to osmotic shock during ice melting. Although observed PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) transmittance through the thin ice was significantly higher than that of the adjacent thicker ice with deep snow cover, ice algal standing stocks were low (≤2.31 mg Chl a m-2) and similar to the adjacent ice. Ice algal accumulation in the lead was possibly delayed by the low inoculum and the time needed for photoacclimation to the high-light environment. However, leads are important for phytoplankton growth by acting like windows into the water column.

  13. Systematic network synthesis and design: Problem formulation, superstructure generation, data management and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaglia, Alberto; Gargalo, Carina L.; Chairakwongsa, Siwanat;

    2015-01-01

    The developments obtained in recent years in the field of mathematical programming considerably reduced the computational time and resources needed to solve large and complex Mixed Integer Non Linear Programming (MINLP) problems. Nevertheless, the application of these methods in industrial practice...... when large problems are considered. In an earlier work, we proposed a computer-aided framework for synthesis and design of process networks. In this contribution, we expand the framework by including methods and tools developed to structure, automate and simplify the mathematical formulation...... is still limited by the complexity associated with the mathematical formulation of some problems. In particular, the tasks of design space definition and representation as superstructure, as well as the data collection, validation and handling may become too complex and cumbersome to execute, especially...

  14. Template-free synthesis of beta-In2S3 superstructures and their photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amutha, R; Akilandeswari, S; Ahmmad, Bashir; Muruganandham, M; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we have successfully fabricated various morphological beta-Indium sulfide (In2S3) superstructures by using indium thiocyanate complex at acidic pH. All the synthesis has been performed by a template-free, hydrothermal method at 195 degrees C for 3 h. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized In2S3 have been investigated by using UV-B (lamda = 365 nm) light with Methyl Orange dye as a model pollutant. The synthesized photocatalyst was characterized by using XRD, FE-SEM, HR-TEM, DRS spectra and nitrogen adsorption analysis. The influence of indium precursors and solvents on the morphology as well as the surface properties has also been discussed. The XRD result shows that cubic phase beta-In2S3 formed under all experimental conditions. A plausible mechanism of the In2S3 microsphere formation has been discussed based on experimental observations.

  15. Growth and Transfer of Monolithic Horizontal ZnO Nanowire Superstructures onto Flexible Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Sheng

    2010-04-28

    A method of fabricating horizontally aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with full control over the width and length is demonstrated. A cross-sectional view of the NWs by transmission electron microscopy shows a "mushroom-like" structure. Novel monolithic multisegment superstructures are fabricated by making use of the lateral overgrowth. Ultralong horizontal ZnO NWs of an aspect ratio on the order often thousand are also demonstrated. These horizontal NWs are lifted off and transferred onto a flexible polymer substrate, which may have many great applications in horizontal ZnO NW-based nanosensor arrays, light-emitting diodes, optical gratings, integrated circuit interconnects, and high-output-power alternating-current nanogenerators. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles and their superstructures; Darstellung von Edelmetallnanopartikeln und deren Ueberstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigall, Nadja-Carola

    2009-08-18

    A modified synthesis procedure for citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution is transferred under application of equal concentrations to the systems silver, platinum, and palladium. The nanoparticles are analyzed by means of absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Ordered superstructures of the noble-metal nanoparticles can be synthesized by infiltration of templates of block-copolymer films with aqueous nanoparticle solution. In dependence on the pre-treatment of the polymer films either two-dimensional periodical arrangements with a periodicity of less than 30 nm or fingerprint-like arrangements with a groove distance in the same order of magnitude. By removal of the polymer one- respectively two-dimensional arrangements of platinum nanowires respectively nanoparticles on a silicon waver arise.

  17. Application of x-ray direct methods to surface reconstructions: The solution of projected superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelles, X.; Rius, J.; Boscherini, F.; Heun, S.; Mueller, B. H.; Ferrer, S.; Alvarez, J.; Miravitlles, C.

    1998-02-01

    The projections of surface reconstructions are normally solved from the interatomic vectors found in two-dimensional Patterson maps computed with the intensities of the in-plane superstructure reflections. Since for difficult reconstructions this procedure is not trivial, an alternative automated one based on the ``direct methods'' sum function [Rius, Miravitlles, and Allmann, Acta Crystallogr. A52, 634 (1996)] is shown. It has been applied successfully to the known c(4×2) reconstruction of Ge(001) and to the so-far unresolved In0.04Ga0.96As (001) p(4×2) surface reconstruction. For this last system we propose a modification of one of the models previously proposed for GaAs(001) whose characteristic feature is the presence of dimers along the fourfold direction.

  18. Plasma oscillations in two-dimensional semiconductor superstructures in the presence of a high electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Glazov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the high permanent electric field on plasma oscillations in the two-dimensional electron gas with the superstructure and taking into account the transfer processes is investigated. The dispersions omega(k) is obtained for the case of high temperature T (DELTA << T, where DELTA is the width of the conductivity miniband). It is shown that the frequency of plasmons in the high electric field depends on the value of the electric field intensity and the wave number k as the oscillating function. The spectrum is periodic with the period equal to 2 pi/d for arbitrary values of k. The numerical estimation shown that the oscillations can be manifested at the electric field intensity more than 3 x 10 sup 3 V/cm

  19. Extended and quasi-continuous tuning of quantum cascade lasers using superstructure gratings and integrated heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidaux, Yves, E-mail: yves.bidaux@alpeslasers.ch [Alpes Lasers SA, 1-3 Passsage Max Meuron, CH-2001 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bismuto, Alfredo, E-mail: alfredo.bismuto@alpeslasers.ch; Tardy, Camille; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Blaser, Stéphane; Muller, Antoine [Alpes Lasers SA, 1-3 Passsage Max Meuron, CH-2001 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Faist, Jerome [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-11-30

    In this work, we demonstrate broad electrical tuning of quantum cascade lasers at 9.25 μm, 8.5 μm, and 4.4 μm in continuous wave operation using Vernier-effect distributed Bragg reflectors based on superstructure gratings. Integrated micro-heaters allow to switch from one Vernier channel to the other, while predictable and mode-hop free tuning can be obtained in each channel modulating the laser current with a side mode suppression ratio as high as 30 dB. The resulting device behaves effectively as a switchable multicolour tunable source. Tuning up to 6.5% of the central wavelength is observed. To prove the importance of the developed devices for high resolution molecular spectroscopy, a N{sub 2}O absorption spectrum has been measured.

  20. Chemical ordering beyond the superstructure in long-range ordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stana, Markus; Kozubski, Rafal; Leitner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To describe chemical ordering in solid solutions systems Warren-Cowley short-range parameters are ordinarily used. However, they are not directly suited for application to long-range ordered systems, as they do not converge to zero for large separations. It is the aim of this paper to generalize the theory to long-range ordered systems and quantitatively discuss chemical short-range order beyond the superstructure arrangements. This is demonstrated on the example of a non-stoichiometric B2-ordered intermetallic alloy. Parameters of interatomic potentials are taken from an embedded atom method (EAM) calculations and the degree of order is simulated by the Monte Carlo method. Both on-lattice and off-lattice methods, where the latter allows individual atoms to deviate from their regular lattice sites, were used, and the resulting effects are discussed.

  1. Construction and control technology of the main bridge superstructure of Sutong Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong; Luo Chenbin; Zhang Yongtao; You Xinpeng

    2009-01-01

    The Sutong Yangtze River Bridge (short as Sutong Bridge) is now the largest span cable-stayed bridge in the world. The construction of the superstructure of the middle bridge covered several stages including erection of the big block girders for the side span, assistant span and tower area, erection of standard girders and closure of the middle span. The big block girders were hoisted by a floating crane, and the standard girders were hoisted by a double crane system on the deck. The pushing assistant method was adopted for the middle span closure construction. Furthermore, key technologies and innovative methods used in the processes of girder erection and cable assemblage in all stages were expatiated systematically. An all-stage self- adaptive geometry control method was used in the construction process. By accurately controlling the unstressed dimensions and shape of all structural components in each step, and realization that the control system and the controlled system adapt to each other, the goal was to make control of the final line shape and inner force of the bridge structure achievable. Two solutions, including GPS based and total station based dynamic geometry monitoring systems, were used to resolve the measure problem under the wide-range of wind-induced vibrations in the long cantilever state. Finally, research on the wind-induced vibration of the superstructure during the construction period was executed. Buffeting response analysis to the longest single and double cantilever states were carried out. The analysis and evaluation of wind resistance safety of the main girders under the longest single cantilever state was made, and corresponding wind resistance measures were suggested. The as-built geometric error and cable force error were controlled in a required design range, and this whole technological achievement can be a benchmark for construction of other large span cable-stayed bridges in the future.

  2. Prevention of Cutaneous Tissue Contracture During Removal of Craniofacial Implant Superstructures for CT and MRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Sullivan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Head and neck cancer patients who have lost facial parts following surgical intervention frequently require craniofacial implant retained facial prostheses for restoration. Many craniofacial implant patients require computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of their long-term follow-up care. Consequently removal of implant superstructures and peri-abutment tissue management is required for those studies. The purpose of the present paper was to describe a method for eliminating cranial imaging artifacts in patients with craniofacial implants.Material and Methods: Three patients wearing extraoral implant retained facial prostheses needing either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies were discussed. Peri-implant soft tissues contracture after removal of percutaneous craniofacial implant abutments during computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies was prevented using a method proposed by authors. The procedure involves temporary removal of the supra-implant components prior to imaging and filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material.Results: Immediately after filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material patients were sent for the imaging studies, and were asked to return for removal of the silicone plugs and reconnection of all superstructure hardware after imaging procedures were complete. The silicone plugs were easily removed with a dental explorer. The percutaneous abutments were immediately replaced and screwed into the implants which were at the bone level.Conclusions: Presented herein method eliminates the source of artifacts and prevents contracture of percutaneous tissues upon removal of the implant abutments during imaging.

  3. Life in Ice: Implications to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    possible natural phenomenon of the solar system that may have played a profoundly important role in the Origin of Life on Earth and the Distribution of Life in the Cosmos. The paper concludes with a consideration of the protective properties of ice by absorption of UV-B, UV-C, h-rays, gamma-rays and the high energy proton environment of the Jupiter Radiation Belt. A proposed instrument that may provide additional data on the potential survivability of microbial extremophiles encased in ice and subjected to the simulated space environment will be briefly described.

  4. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...

  5. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  6. Electrochemiluminescence induced photoelectrochemistry for sensing of the DNA based on DNA-linked CdS NPs superstructure with intercalator molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingshu; Sun, Yuanshun; Zhang, Shusheng

    2011-02-07

    A novel detection protocol of DNA was developed using electrochemiluminescence (ECL) induced photoelectrochemistry (PEC) synthesis based on DNA-linked CdS NPs superstructure with methylene blue as the intercalator molecule.

  7. A detection of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe imprint of cosmic superstructures using a matched-filter approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, Seshadri

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for detection of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) imprints of cosmic superstructures on the cosmic microwave background, based on a matched filtering approach. The expected signal-to-noise ratio for this method is comparable to that obtained from the full cross-correlation, and unlike other stacked filtering techniques it is not subject to an a posteriori bias. We apply this method to Planck CMB data using voids and superclusters identified in the CMASS galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12, and measure the ISW amplitude to be $A_\\mathrm{ISW}=1.64\\pm0.53$ relative to the $\\Lambda$CDM expectation, corresponding to a $3.1\\sigma$ detection. In contrast to some previous measurements of the ISW effect of superstructures, our result is in agreement with the $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  8. Analysis on the Superstructure of Russian Advertising Text%俄语广告语篇超结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志欣

    2012-01-01

    本文把俄语广告语篇视为特殊的语篇类型,以超结构图式理论为基础分析了俄语广告语篇的超结构图式及其组成范畴,并从实义切分角度描写了俄语广告语篇的优控述位和主位的主要特征。%This paper regards Russian advertising text as a special textual type, and analyses the superstructure of Russian advertising text and its component categories on the basis of the theory of superstructure. It also describes some main features of the theme domination and themes of Russian advertising text according to theory of actual division of the sentence.

  9. A Detection of the Integrated Sachs–Wolfe Imprint of Cosmic Superstructures Using a Matched-filter Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Crittenden, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We present a new method for detection of the integrated Sachs–Wolfe (ISW) imprints of cosmic superstructures on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), based on a matched-filtering approach. The expected signal-to-noise ratio for this method is comparable to that obtained from the full cross-correlation, and unlike other stacked filtering techniques it is not subject to an a posteriori bias. We apply this method to Planck CMB data using voids and superclusters identified in the CMASS galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12, and measure the ISW amplitude to be {A}{ISW}=1.64+/- 0.53 relative to the ΛCDM expectation, corresponding to a 3.1σ detection. In contrast to some previous measurements of the ISW effect of superstructures, our result is in agreement with the ΛCDM model.

  10. Pressure-Induced Oriented Attachment Growth of Large-Size Crystals for Constructing 3D Ordered Superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Si, Haibin; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-26

    Oriented attachment (OA), a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism, provides a powerful bottom-up approach to obtain ordered superstructures, which also demonstrate exciting charge transmission characteristic. However, there is little work observably pronouncing the achievement of 3D OA growth of crystallites with large size (e.g., submicrometer crystals). Here, we report that SnO2 3D ordered superstructures can be synthesized by means of a self-limited assembly assisted by OA in a designed high-pressure solvothermal system. The size of primary building blocks is 200-250 nm, which is significantly larger than that in previous results (normally pressure plays the key role in the formation of 3D configuration and fusion of adjacent crystals. Furthermore, this high-pressure strategy can be readily expanded to additional materials. We anticipate that the welded structures will constitute an ideal system with relevance to applications in optical responses, lithium ion battery, solar cells, and chemical sensing.

  11. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  12. Ice Crystal Icing Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2017-01-01

    Ice crystals found at high altitude near convective clouds are known to cause jet engine power-loss events. These events occur due to ice crystals entering a propulsion systems core flowpath and accreting ice resulting in events such as uncommanded loss of thrust (rollback), engine stall, surge, and damage due to ice shedding. As part of a community with a growing need to understand the underlying physics of ice crystal icing, NASA has been performing experimental efforts aimed at providing datasets that can be used to generate models to predict the ice accretion inside current and future engine designs. Fundamental icing physics studies on particle impacts, accretion on a single airfoil, and ice accretions observed during a rollback event inside a full-scale engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory are summarized. Low fidelity code development using the results from the engine tests which identify key parameters for ice accretion risk and the development of high fidelity codes are described. These activities have been conducted internal to NASA and through collaboration efforts with industry, academia, and other government agencies. The details of the research activities and progress made to date in addressing ice crystal icing research challenges are discussed.

  13. Rotational superstructure in van der Waals heterostructure of self-assembled C60 monolayer on the WSe2 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Elton J.G.; Sullion, Declan; Chu, Ximo S.; Li, Duo O.; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Wang, Qing Hua

    2017-09-21

    Hybrid van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures composed of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials and self-assembled organic molecules are promising systems for electronic and optoelectronic applications with enhanced properties and performance. Control of molecular assembly is therefore paramount to fundamentally understand the nucleation, ordering, alignment, and electronic interaction of organic molecules with 2D materials. Here, we report the formation and detailed study of highly ordered, crystalline monolayers of C60 molecules self-assembled on the surface of WSe2 in well-ordered arrays with large grain sizes (∼5 μm). Using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we observe a periodic 2 × 2 superstructure in the C60 monolayer and identify four distinct molecular appearances. Using vdW-corrected ab initio density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we determine that the interplay between vdW and Coulomb interactions as well as adsorbate–adsorbate and adsorbate–substrate interactions results in specific rotational arrangements of the molecules forming the superstructure. The orbital ordering through the relative positions of bonds in adjacent molecules creates a charge redistribution that links the molecule units in a long-range network. This rotational superstructure extends throughout the self-assembled monolayer and opens a pathway towards engineering aligned hybrid organic/inorganic vdW heterostructures with 2D layered materials in a precise and controlled way.

  14. "Dual-template" synthesis of one-dimensional conductive nanoparticle superstructures from coordination metal-peptide polymer crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Martínez, Marta; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Imaz, Inhar; Dittrich, Petra S; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-12-20

    Bottom-up fabrication of self-assembled structures made of nanoparticles may lead to new materials, arrays and devices with great promise for myriad applications. Here a new class of metal-peptide scaffolds is reported: coordination polymer Ag(I)-DLL belt-like crystals, which enable the dual-template synthesis of more sophisticated nanoparticle superstructures. In these biorelated scaffolds, the self-assembly and recognition capacities of peptides and the selective reduction of Ag(I) ions to Ag are simultaneously exploited to control the growth and assembly of inorganic nanoparticles: first on their surfaces, and then inside the structures themselves. The templated internal Ag nanoparticles are well confined and closely packed, conditions that favour electrical conductivity in the superstructures. It is anticipated that these Ag(I)-DLL belts could be applied to create long (>100 μm) conductive Ag@Ag nanoparticle superstructures and polymetallic, multifunctional Fe3 O4 @Ag nanoparticle composites that marry the magnetic and conductive properties of the two nanoparticle types.

  15. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  16. X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy of photoinduced ferroic superstructures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Vladimir A.; Wen, Haidan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Zhan; Freeland, John W.; Martin, Lane; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-10-01

    Complex oxides and strongly correlated electron systems are at the forefront of science due to their exquisite potential for optical, spintronic, transducing/actuating, multiferroic, electrochemical, and superconducting property enhancements. Accordingly, at the nanoscale, engineering of complex oxide compounds is a promising route for discovery of novel quantum functionalities in a vast space of synthesis technique, calling for high-resolution control and visualization of physical properties and their structural basis. The advent of optical pulse techniques and related instrumentation advances is used to access dynamical separation of correlated orders that hide at equilibrium and also to create novel phases, not available via mainstream synthesis techniques. In this this talk, I will discuss resonant and non-resonant spectroscopic manipulation of phase transitions in nanoferroic oxides, focusing on ultrafast optical creation of artificial supercrystals in epitaxial superlattices. While table top nonlinear optical techniques are used to access the ferroic properties, synchrotron based time-resolved structural techniques, including diffraction and spectroscopy are decisive tools for revealing the nature of orderings in superstructures, their symmetries, phase quantification and spatial distribution with sub-micron resolution.

  17. Presenting a Multi-level Superstructure Optimization Approach for Mechatronic System Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole; Bech, Michael Møller

    2010-01-01

    Synergism and integration in the design process is what sets apart a Mechatronic System from a traditional, multidisciplinary system. However the typical design approach has been to divide the design problem into sub problems for each technology area (mechanics, electronics and control) and descr......Synergism and integration in the design process is what sets apart a Mechatronic System from a traditional, multidisciplinary system. However the typical design approach has been to divide the design problem into sub problems for each technology area (mechanics, electronics and control......) and describe the interface between the technologies, whereas the lack of well-established, systematic engineering methods to form the basic set-off in analysis and design of complete mechatronic systems has been obvious. The focus of the current paper is therefore to present an integrated design approach...... for mechatronic system design, utilizing a multi-level superstructure optimization based approach. Finally two design examples are presented and the possibilities and limitations of the approach are outlined....

  18. Influence of plasma-treatments on the structure, superstructure, and function of membrane lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Malte U.; Forbrig, Enrico; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    Every cell, eu- or prokaryotic, has a membrane as an interface to the environment. Every substance that is applied from outside the cell has to interact with it. This includes plasma-generated reactive species in the liquid cell environment created by plasma-treatment. By the Singer and Nicolson model, proteins are embedded in a lipid bilayer. Proteins are the functional elements, lipids are the structural elements. Due to the amphiphilic nature of the lipids, they form (super-) structures in an aqueous environment. The exact superstructure is determined by a structural parameter of the lipid, its shape. Here, we show experiments on lipids by fluorophore-based liposome assays and raman spectroscopy. The results show a membrane-activity of plasma-born reactive species against lipids and lipid structures. Based on this results and literature, we propose a model for a lesion-forming mechanism in membranes of some reactive species created by plasma-treatment. It is based on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic mismatch due to lipid peroxidization induced by reactive species generated in liquids by plasma-treatment.

  19. Efficient exciton funneling in cascaded PbS quantum dot superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Xin; Haughn, Chelsea R; Benavides, Jamie; Doty, Matthew F; Cloutier, Sylvain G

    2011-12-27

    Benzenedithiol (BDT) and ethanedithiol (EDT) ligand-exchange treatments can be used to cross-link colloidal PbS quantum dots into nanocrystalline film structures with distinct optoelectronic properties. Such structures can provide a unique platform to study the energy transfer between layers of quantum dots with different sizes. In this report, efficient exciton funneling and recycling of surface state-bound excitons is observed in cascaded PbS quantum dot-based multilayered superstructures, where the excitons transfer from the larger band gap or donor layers to the smallest band gap or acceptor layers. In this system, both the BDT- and EDT-treated cascaded structures exhibit dramatically enhanced photoluminescence from the acceptor layers. As we show, the energy transfer mechanisms involved and their efficiencies are significantly different depending on the ligand-exchange treatment. In the future, we believe these efficient exciton recycling and funneling mechanisms could be used to improve significantly the photocurrent, charge-transport, and conversion efficiencies in low-cost nanocrystalline and hybrid solar cells and the emission efficiencies in hybrid light-emitting devices.

  20. Study of superstructure Ⅱ in multiferroic BiMnO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Bing-Hui; Li Fang-Hua; Li Xue-Ming; Wang Yu-Mei; Chi Zhen-Hua; Jin Chang-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the minor phase,named superstructure Ⅱ,existing in multiferroic compound BiMnO3 has been studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.Domains of major and minor phases coexisting in BiMnO3 were observed in high-resolution electron microscope images.The unit cell of minor phase Was determined to be triclinic with the size 4×4×4 times as large as the distorted perovskitc subcell.The[111] and [101]projected structure maps of the minor phase have been derived from the corresponding images by means of the image processing.A possible rough three-dimensional(3D)structure model was proposed based on the 3D structural information extracted from the two projected structure maps.Since there is no inversion centre in the proposed model,the minor phase may contribute to the ferroelectric property of BiMnO3.

  1. Imprint of DES super-structures on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, A; García-Bellido, J; Nadathur, S; Crittenden, R; Gruen, D; Huterer, D; Bacon, D; DeRose, J; Dodelson, S; Gaztañaga, E; Kirk, D; Lahav, O; Miquel, R; Naidoo, K; Soergel, B; Whiteway, L; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Eifler, T F; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Giannantonio, T; Goldstein, D A; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Menanteau, F; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    Small temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background can be sourced by density perturbations via the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Large voids and superclusters are excellent environments to make a localized measurement of this tiny imprint. In some cases excess signals have been reported. We probed these claims with an independent data set, using the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey in a different footprint, and using a different super-structure finding strategy. We identified 52 large voids and 102 superclusters at redshifts $0.2 < z < 0.65$. We used the Jubilee simulation to a priori evaluate the optimal ISW measurement configuration for our compensated top-hat filtering technique, and then performed a stacking measurement of the CMB temperature field based on the DES data. For optimal configurations, we detected a cumulative cold imprint of voids with $\\Delta T_{f} \\approx -5.0\\pm3.7~\\mu K$ and a hot imprint of superclusters $\\Delta T_{f} \\approx 5.1\\pm3.2~\\mu K$ ; t...

  2. Alkyl imidazolium ionic-liquid-mediated formation of gold particle superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qingmin; Acharya, Somobrata; Richards, Gary J; Zhang, Shaoling; Vieaud, Julien; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2013-06-18

    The development of new methodologies for controlling the organization of quantum materials in multiple dimensions is crucial to the advancement of device fabrication. By using a self-assembly route using selected imidazolium ionic liquids bearing long alkyl chains (C(n)Imida, n = 8, 10, 12) as ligands, we have achieved a tunable assembly of quantum-sized gold nanoparticles. The initial stabilizer of the gold nanoparticles was partially or wholly substituted depending on the concentration and alkyl chain length. π-π interactions between imidazolium rings also promote the generation of spatially controlled aggregates from the nanometer to micrometer size regimes. In particular, in the case of an imidazolium ionic liquid with decyl chains, gold particles assemble into a core-shell spherical superstructure induced by the aggregation of imidazolium ionic liquid molecules during ligand exchange. Conceptually, the assemblies of nanoparticles mimic biological systems and provide strategies for the organization of single-component nanomaterials into functional assemblies for potential applications. Our approach is general and can be applied to other types of nanomaterials for facile manipulation of the assembly processes, permitting an exploration of physicochemical properties as well as technological applications.

  3. Two-Dimensional Bipyramid Plasmonic Nanoparticle Liquid Crystalline Superstructure with Four Distinct Orientational Packing Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qianqian; Si, Kae Jye; Sikdar, Debabrata; Yap, Lim Wei; Premaratne, Malin; Cheng, Wenlong

    2016-01-26

    Anisotropic plasmonic nanoparticles have been successfully used as constituent elements for growing ordered nanoparticle arrays. However, orientational control over their spatial ordering remains challenging. Here, we report on a self-assembled two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticle liquid crystalline superstructure (NLCS) from bipyramid gold nanoparticles (BNPs), which showed four distinct orientational packing orders, corresponding to horizontal alignment (H-NLCS), circular arrangement (C-NLCS), slanted alignment (S-NLCS), and vertical alignment (V-NLCS) of constituent particle building elements. These packing orders are characteristic of the unique shape of BNPs because all four packing modes were observed for particles with various sizes. Nevertheless, only H-NLCS and V-NLCS packing orders were observed for the free-standing ordered array nanosheets formed from a drying-mediated self-assembly at the air/water interface of a sessile droplet. This is due to strong surface tension and the absence of particle-substrate interaction. In addition, we found the collective plasmonic coupling properties mainly depend on the packing type, and characteristic coupling peak locations depend on particle sizes. Interestingly, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancements were heavily dependent on the orientational packing ordering. In particular, V-NLCS showed the highest Raman enhancement factor, which was about 77-fold greater than the H-NLCS and about 19-fold greater than C-NLCS. The results presented here reveal the nature and significance of orientational ordering in controlling plasmonic coupling and SERS enhancements of ordered plasmonic nanoparticle arrays.

  4. [Composition, physico-chemical properties and molecular superstructure of dietary fiber preparations of the cellan type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongowski, G; Frigge, K; Zenke, I

    1995-07-01

    Dietary fiber preparations of "cellan" type were prepared from apples, white cabbage, sugar beet pulp, soy hulls and wheat bran by treatment with amylolytic and proteolytic enzymes as well as by chemical extractions. Scanning electron microscopic examinations show different morphological structures of the preparations and a high maintenance of native biomolecular superstructure. The content of pectin, protein, polysaccharide-hexoses and -pentoses and the composition of monosaccharides (also after their treatment with 4 or 8% sodium hydroxide) were determined. The cellans possess waterbinding capacities (WBC) between 25 g H2O/g and waterholding capacities between 50 g H2O/g. The WBC is related to the internal surface; it diminishes after treatment with NaOH. The interactions between the cellans and the adsorbed water were characterized by NMR-spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The molecular mobility increases as the water content grows. The T1-values of dried cellans decreased with increasing degree of moisture before drying. The supermolecular structure is comparatively disordered. Only in case of soy cellan a crystalline cellulose-I-modification could be identified by X-ray-diffraction pattern, esp. after NaOH treatment. The low degree of order of cellans was observed in the 13C-NMR spectra, too. Only the soy hull preparation resulted in a spectrum corresponding to well-ordered cellulose. The botanic source has an essential influence on the physico-chemical properties of dietary fiber preparations of cellan type.

  5. LADDER SUPERSTRUCTURE-DIRECTED SYNTHESIS OF A WELL-DEFINED m-PHENELENEDIIMINO-BRIDGED LADDER POLYMETHYLSILOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-sheng Lv; Zhong-jie Ren; You-zhi Wan; Ping Xie; Rong-ben Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A well-defined m-phenylenediimino-bridged ladder polymethylsiloxane (LP) was first synthesized through a well-defined ladder superstructure (LS) acting as synthetic template, which was self-assembled by concerted interaction of hydrogen bonding and aromatic π-π stacking of the monomer (M), N,N'-bis(phenyldichlorosilyl)-m-phenylenediamine. Some key characterization data of LP and, in particular, the extremely vulnerable LS with very unstable Si--Cl and Si-N groups were given. The molecular weights (Mn) of LS and LP are 5010 and 10480, corresponding to about 15 and 46 monomer units, respectively. To monitor the real in situ status of LS in solution the XRD measurements of special freeze-drying samples were performed, demonstrating two characteristic peaks of ladder structure. Most importantly, both LP and LS display exceedingly sharp resonance absorption peaks with a half peak width (△1/2) as small as < 0.3 of MeSi(NH)O2/2 moieties in 29Si-NMR spectra. It is well-known that the higher the regularity of the ladder polysiloxane, the narrower the resonance peak of the siloxane moiety on the ladder backbone, and the smaller the half peak width △1/2. Therefore, the very small values of △1/2 for both LS and LP confirm that both LS and LP possess well-defined ladder structures.

  6. Presenting a Multi-level Superstructure Optimization Approach for Mechatronic System Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole; Bech, Michael Møller

    2010-01-01

    Synergism and integration in the design process is what sets apart a Mechatronic System from a traditional, multidisciplinary system. However the typical design approach has been to divide the design problem into sub problems for each technology area (mechanics, electronics and control) and descr......Synergism and integration in the design process is what sets apart a Mechatronic System from a traditional, multidisciplinary system. However the typical design approach has been to divide the design problem into sub problems for each technology area (mechanics, electronics and control......) and describe the interface between the technologies, whereas the lack of well-established, systematic engineering methods to form the basic set-off in analysis and design of complete mechatronic systems has been obvious. The focus of the current paper is therefore to present an integrated design approach...... for mechatronic system design, utilizing a multi-level superstructure optimization based approach. Finally two design examples are presented and the possibilities and limitations of the approach are outlined....

  7. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  8. Magnesium Sulfate Salt Solutions and Ices Fail to Protect Serratia liquefaciens from the Biocidal Effects of UV Irradiation under Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, Rebecca L.; Page, Jessica L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2017-05-01

    The growth of Serratia liquefaciens has been demonstrated under martian conditions of 0.7 kPa (7 mbar), 0°C, and CO2-enriched anoxic atmospheres (Schuerger et al., 2013, Astrobiology 13:115-131), but studies into the survivability of cells under hypersaline conditions that are likely to be encountered on Mars are lacking. Serratia liquefaciens cells were suspended in aqueous MgSO4 solutions, or frozen brines, and exposed to terrestrial (i.e., 101.3 kPa, 24°C, O2/N2-normal atmosphere) or martian (i.e., 0.7 kPa, -25°C, CO2-anoxic atmosphere) conditions to assess the roles of MgSO4 and UV irradiation on the survival of S. liquefaciens. Four solutions were tested for their capability to attenuate martian UV irradiation in both liquid and frozen forms: sterile deionized water (SDIW), 10 mM PO4 buffer, 5% MgSO4, and 10% MgSO4. None of the solutions in either liquid or frozen forms provided enhanced protection against martian UV irradiation. Sixty minutes of UV irradiation reduced cell densities from 2.0 × 106 cells/mL to less than 10 cells/mL for both liquid and frozen solutions. In contrast, 3-4 mm of a Mars analog soil were sufficient to attenuate 100% of UV irradiation. Results suggest that terrestrial microorganisms may not survive on Sun-exposed surfaces on Mars, even if the cells are embedded in frozen martian brines composed of MgSO4. However, if dispersed microorganisms can be covered by only a few millimeters of dust or regolith, long-term survival is probable.

  9. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  10. Arctic ice islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  12. Bone-repair properties of biodegradable hydroxyapatite nano-rod superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elía, Noelia L.; Mathieu, Colleen; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Laiuppa, Juan A.; Santillán, Graciela E.; Messina, Paula V.

    2015-11-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures for the in vitro conditions of bone-repair. Experiments are underway to investigate the effects of the material microstructure, surface roughness and hydrophilicity on their osseo-integration, osteo-conduction and osteo-induction abilities. Materials were tested in the presence of both, rat primary osteoblasts and rabbit mesenchymal stem cells. The following aspects are discussed: (i) cytotoxicity and material degradation; (ii) rat osteoblast spreading, proliferation and differentiation; and (iii) rabbit mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on nano-HAp and nano-HAp/collagen type I coatings. We effectively prepared a material based on biomimetic HAp nano-rods displaying the appropriate surface topography, hydrophilicity and degradation properties to induce the in vitro desired cellular responses for bone bonding and healing. Cells seeded on the selected material readily attached, proliferated and differentiated, as confirmed by cell viability, mitochondrial metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and cytoskeletal integrity analysis by immunofluorescence localization of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein. These results highlight the influence of material's surface characteristics to determine their tissue regeneration potential and their future use in engineering osteogenic scaffolds for orthopedic implants.Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures

  13. Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctic Ice and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Antarctic ice and clouds, (56.5S, 152.0W), the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica is almost totally clear, showing stress cracks in the ice surface caused by wind and tidal drift. Clouds on the eastern edge of the picture are associated with an Antarctic cyclone. Winds stirred up these storms have been known to reach hurricane force.

  14. Sea Ice Microorganisms: Environmental Constraints and Extracellular Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody W. Deming

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherent to sea ice, like other high latitude environments, is the strong seasonality driven by changes in insolation throughout the year. Sea-ice organisms are exposed to shifting, sometimes limiting, conditions of temperature and salinity. An array of adaptations to survive these and other challenges has been acquired by those organisms that inhabit the ice. One key adaptive response is the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, which play multiple roles in the entrapment, retention and survival of microorganisms in sea ice. In this concept paper we consider two main areas of sea-ice microbiology: the physico-chemical properties that define sea ice as a microbial habitat, imparting particular advantages and limits; and extracellular responses elicited in microbial inhabitants as they exploit or survive these conditions. Emphasis is placed on protective strategies used in the face of fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions in sea ice. Gaps in knowledge and testable hypotheses are identified for future research.

  15. Oil-in-Ice Demonstration 4: Quick Look Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    footwear as needed. System Disposal To dispose of the system , place all contaminated materials and systems components in the DECON trash liners and...explored. Specific equipment included an Ice Management System (IMS) designed to protect a skimmer from ice damage and two temporary storage tanks (TSTs...be applied to other types of response vessels. While underway in the Narragansett Bay, the vessel’s crewmembers deployed the Ice Management System

  16. System identification of superstructures with rocking motion and deformation of bases; Kiso ga henkeishi rocking suru kozobutsu no shindo tokusei suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Naito, Y.; Uchiyama, S.; Maeda, T.; Matsuda, K. [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-20

    Transfer functions of individual parts against bases are generally used as a method for estimating dynamic characteristics of superstructures from observation records of earthquakes or microtremors. However, since soil-structure-interaction (SSI) is included in the observation records, it is difficult to clarify the dynamic characteristics of superstructures, independently. A method has been previously proposed, by which the dynamic characteristics of superstructures without the effect of SSI can be estimated by restricting the vibration mode using equivalent height even in the case of the ground motion condition for multi-particle systems as same as in the case of that for one-particle systems. In this study, this method has been applied to models of SSI systems with rocking and deformation of bases, to estimate the dynamic characteristics of superstructures for ground motion and top excitation conditions. Rigidity of bases was varied as a parameter. Consequently, it was confirmed that the present method can provide accurate estimates of dynamic characteristics of superstructures for both ground motion and top excitation conditions if deformation of bases is not so large. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A Simplified Model of a Reinforced Square Hollow Section (SHS) T-Joint for Stress Evaluation in Bus Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichiensamuth, T.; Pimsarn, M.; Takahashi, K.; Tantanawat, T.

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to create a simplified model of a reinforced square hollow section (SHS) T-joint found in bus superstructures. The approach is to use a combination of one- and two-dimensional finite element models to represent a reference three-dimensional finite element (solid) model of the joint and determine stress concentration factors (SCFs) as functions of the geometrical variables of the joint. This approach requires the stiffness of the simplified model to be equivalent to the stiffness of the reference solid model. Trial models, therefore, must be proposed and their stiffnesses must be evaluated against the stiffness of the reference solid model. The best trial model is then selected based on the stiffness error function defined to represent the deviation of the simplified model's stiffness from the reference model's stiffness. After a trial model with minimum stiffness error is selected, its SCFs, relating the maximum stress in the simplified model to the maximum stress in the reference solid model, are determined. Since the maximum stress is assumed to be at the weld toe where structural discontinuity exists, the maximum stresses on both simplified model and reference solid model are evaluated based on a hot spot stress (HSS) method. In this study, three trial models, namely Model A, Model B, and Model C, were investigated. Model B, consisting of beam and shell elements with particular constraints on the joint-reinforcement geometry, was found to provide the minimum stiffness errors of 8.09%, 6.87%, and 6.44% for three different joint dimensions. The SCFs were then determined as a function of the thickness-to-width ratio of the joint under static in-plane bending load. The resulting simplified model allows the stress evaluation on the bus superstructures to be done more quickly compared to a solid model while maintaining the accuracy of the solutions. Consequently, the designs of bus superstructures can be explored more thoroughly, leading to a better

  18. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  19. Dead-ice environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Kötlujökull transports considerable amounts of supraglacial debris at its snout because of frontal oscillations with frequent ice advances followed by ice-margin stagnation. Kötlujökull provides suitable conditions of studying dead-ice melting and landscape formation in a debris-charged lowland...... glacier environment. The scientific challenges are to answer the key questions. What are the conditions for dead-ice formation? From which sources does the sediment cover originate? Which melting and reworking processes act in the ice-cored moraines? What is the rate of de-icing in the ice-cored moraines...... and conclusions on dead-ice melting and landscape formation from Kötlujökull. Processes and landform-sediment associations are linked to the current climate and glacier–volcano interaction....

  20. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  1. Forecast Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Forecast Icing Product (FIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The FIP algorithm uses...

  2. Current Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Current Icing Product (CIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The CIP algorithm combines...

  3. Ice Adhesion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Uses Evaluate and compare the relative performance of materials and surfcae coating based on their ability to aid in ice removal Test the effectiveness of de-icing...

  4. Cellulose acetate-directed growth of bamboo-raft-like single-crystalline selenium superstructures: high-yield synthesis, characterization, and formation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Ming; Zhan, Yong-Jie; Xu, An-Wu; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2007-06-19

    High-yield synthesis of bamboo-raft-like single-crystalline selenium superstructures has been realized for the first time via a facile solvothermal approach by reducing SeO2 with ethylene alcohol in the presence of cellulose acetate. The formation of a raftlike superstructure with various forms is strongly dependent on the temperature, amount of cellulose acetate, reaction time, and even preheating treatment. The suitable amount of cellulose acetate is essential for the formation of elegant and uniform raft Se. The morphology, microstructure, optical properties, and chemical compositions of bamboo-raft-like selenium were characterized using various techniques (X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution (HR) TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy). A possible growth mechanism has been proposed. Such special superstructures could provide a useful precursor for potential applications.

  5. 78 FR 15876 - Activation of Ice Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... operational questions, contact Charles J. Enders, Air Carrier Operations Branch, AFS-220, Flight Standards...) 493-1422; facsimile (202) 267-5229; email Charles.J.Enders@faa.gov . For aircraft certification...

  6. Ice Cream Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Ice cream headaches By Mayo Clinic Staff Ice cream headaches are brief, stabbing headaches that can happen when you eat, drink or inhale something cold. Digging into an ice cream cone is a common trigger, but eating or ...

  7. Islands in the ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Kjær, Kurt H.; Haile, James Seymour

    2012-01-01

    Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in 'oceans' of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen's Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated ...

  8. Bipartite electronic superstructures in the vortex core of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, T.; Kohsaka, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Iwaya, K.; Hanaguri, T.; Tamegai, T.

    2016-05-01

    The central issue in the physics of cuprate superconductivity is the mutual relationship among superconductivity, pseudogap and broken-spatial-symmetry states. A magnetic field B suppresses superconductivity, providing an opportunity to investigate the competition among these states. Although various B-induced electronic superstructures have been reported, their energy, spatial and momentum-space structures are unclear. Here, we show using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunnelling microscopy on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ that there are two distinct B-induced electronic superstructures, both being localized in the vortex core but appearing at different energies. In the low-energy range where the nodal Bogoliubov quasiparticles are well-defined, we observe the so-called vortex checkerboard that we identify as the B-enhanced quasiparticle interference pattern. By contrast, in the high-energy region where the pseudogap develops, the broken-spatial-symmetry patterns that pre-exist at B=0 T is locally enhanced in the vortex core. This evidences the competition between superconductivity and the broken-spatial-symmetry state that is associated with the pseudogap.

  9. Self-organization of nickel nanoparticles dispersed in acetone: From separate nanoparticles to three-dimensional superstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hernández-Pérez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sonochemical synthesis of monodisperse nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs by reduction of Ni acetylacetonate in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone stabilizer is reported. The Ni-NPs size is readily controlled to 5 nanometer diameter with a standard deviation of less than 5%. The as-prepared Ni-NPs sample was dispersed in acetone, for 4 weeks. For structural analysis was not applied to a magnetic field or heat treatment as key methods to direct the assembly. The transition from separate Ni-NPs into self-organization of three dimensions (3D superstructures was studied by electron microscopy. Experimental analysis suggests that the translation and rotation movement of the Ni-NPs are governed by magnetic frustration which promotes the formation of different geometric arrangements in two dimensions (2D. The formation of 3D superstructures is confirmed from scanning electron microscopy revealing a layered domain that consists of staking of several monolayers having multiple well-defined supercrystalline domains, enabling their use for optical, electronic and sensor applications.

  10. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of TiO2-Bi2WO6 hollow superstructures with excellent photocatalysis and recycle properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Fei; Liu, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Jing-huai; Cheng, Xiao; Wang, You

    2014-01-21

    One-dimensional mesoporous TiO2-Bi2WO6 hollow superstructures are prepared using a hydrothermal method and their photocatalysis and recycle properties are investigated. Experimental results indicate that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles are coupled with hierarchical Bi2WO6 hollow tubes on their surfaces. The TiO2-Bi2WO6 structure has a mesoporous wall and the pores in the wall are on average 21 nm. The hierarchical TiO2-Bi2WO6 heterostructures exhibit the highest photocatalytic activity in comparison with P25, pure Bi2WO6 hollow tube and mechanical mixture of Bi2WO6 tube and TiO2 nanoparticle in the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under simulated sunlight irradiation. The as-prepared TiO2-Bi2WO6 heterostructures can be easily recycled through sedimentation and they retains their high photocatalytic activity during the cycling use in the simulated sunlight-driving photodegradation process of RhB. The prepared mesoporous TiO2-Bi2WO6 with hollow superstructure is therefore a promising candidate material for water decontamination use.

  11. Arctic ice management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Smith, Nathan; Groppi, Christopher; Vargas, Perry; Jackson, Rebecca; Kalyaan, Anusha; Nguyen, Peter; Probst, Luke; Rubin, Mark E.; Singleton, Heather; Spacek, Alexander; Truitt, Amanda; Zaw, Pye Pye; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2017-01-01

    As the Earth's climate has changed, Arctic sea ice extent has decreased drastically. It is likely that the late-summer Arctic will be ice-free as soon as the 2030s. This loss of sea ice represents one of the most severe positive feedbacks in the climate system, as sunlight that would otherwise be reflected by sea ice is absorbed by open ocean. It is unlikely that CO2 levels and mean temperatures can be decreased in time to prevent this loss, so restoring sea ice artificially is an imperative. Here we investigate a means for enhancing Arctic sea ice production by using wind power during the Arctic winter to pump water to the surface, where it will freeze more rapidly. We show that where appropriate devices are employed, it is possible to increase ice thickness above natural levels, by about 1 m over the course of the winter. We examine the effects this has in the Arctic climate, concluding that deployment over 10% of the Arctic, especially where ice survival is marginal, could more than reverse current trends of ice loss in the Arctic, using existing industrial capacity. We propose that winter ice thickening by wind-powered pumps be considered and assessed as part of a multipronged strategy for restoring sea ice and arresting the strongest feedbacks in the climate system.

  12. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  13. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  14. Surface roughness due to residual ice in the use of low power deicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Bond, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    Thicknesses of residual ice are presented to provide information on surface contamination and associated roughness during deicing events. Data was obtained from low power ice protection systems tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) with nine different deicing systems. Results show that roughness associated with residual ice is not characterized by uniformly distributed roughness. Results also show that deicing systems require a critical mass of ice to generate a sufficient expelling force to remove the ice.

  15. Icing Operations - De-Icing Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Procházka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ice, frost and snow on aircraft surfaces can drastically reduce the climb and maneuvering capabilities of an aircraft. The removal of such contamination prior to take off MUST be strictly adhered to in accordance with regulations and standards. The policy with respect to aircraft icing contamination should be “MAKE IT CLEAN AND KEEP IT CLEAN”. All personnel associated with the dispatch and/or operation of aircraft share the responsibility for ensuring that no aircraft is dispatched unless it is clear of ice, snow or frost.

  16. Land Ice: Greenland & Antarctic ice mass anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from NASA's Grace satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are losing mass. The continent of Antarctica (left chart) has been...

  17. Analysis of connection element classes and locations and of some structural requirements for the mounting of different superstructure types on transport vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Đ. Majkić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the basic requirements for transport vehicles. A special request regarding the adaptation of transport vehicles for the transport of various types of cargo was taken into consideration. Superstructures and the situation arising after mounting superstructures on wheeled transport vehicles were analyzed and the following was described: console coupling, stirrups, simplex elastic coupling, two-way elastic and rigid connection elements. Vehicle torsional elasticity is provided by a proper choice of the type of connection between the superstructure and the vehicle chassis. Applying the instructions of vehicle manufacturers for using appropriate connections between the truck superstructure and the vehicle chassis provides positive torsional elasticity of the vehicle. The paper gives the general recommendations of the Volvo, Mercedes and Renault transport vehicle producers for the use of particular connection types of locations as well as structural requirements for the mounting of concrete mixers, tippers and truck tanks on their vehicles. Introduction Achieving a high level of transport effectiveness depends on a number of factors. One of the most important ones is the possibility to increase the payload share in the gross vehicle weight. This share depends on the net vehicle weight, a method of coupling the truck superstructure with the chassis frame as well as on the truck superstructure construction. Realization of this requirement is of significant importance, particularly for large business systems since it results in the reduction of number of necessary vehicles, more economic fleet maintenance and the fleet capacity increase. It is also relatively easy to adapt the vehicle for the transportation of other loads, depending on user's current needs. The adaptation is correctly performed if manufacturer's recommendations are followed during the mounting of the superstructure on the chassis. This paper gives the analysis of the

  18. Proceedings of the 11. International Workshop on Atmospheric Icing of Structures (IWAIS 2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzaneh, M. (ed.) [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Icing Research Building; Goel, A.P. (ed.) [Hydro One, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The widespread impacts and related costs of atmospheric icing were demonstrated in the ice storm that struck Quebec and eastern Ontario in January 1998. The storm incurred losses in the billions of dollars, caused extended power failures, and affected approximately 5.5 million people. The aim of this conference was to regroup as many icing experts and specialists as possible to facilitate interaction conducive to finding practical, safe and economical solutions to atmospheric icing. Recent developments in icing models were reviewed, as well as new approaches to data collection. New technologies in de-icing were presented, and issues concerning the behaviour of electrical equipment during icing events were discussed. The importance of finding adequate practical solutions to help to protect strategic infrastructures exposed to icing was emphasized. The conference was divided into the following 7 sections: (1) ice and snow climate; (2) modelling and simulation of icing; (3) field observations, data gathering and information; (4) impact of ice and snow on insulator performance; (5) design for icing; (6) behaviour of ice or snow-covered power equipment; (7) de-icing and anti-icing techniques. Sixty-eight papers were presented at this conference, all of which were catalogued for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Ice Jams in Alaska. Ice Engineering. Number 16, February 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    An ice jam is an accumulation of ice in rivers that restricts flow and can cause destructive floods costly to riv- erine communities. Freezeup jams...and reliable data on past ice jam events. The CRREL Ice Jam Database is such a com- pilation of freezeup and breakup ice jam events in the United

  20. In situ expression of eukaryotic ice-binding proteins in microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Christiane; Kilpert, Fabian; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Kegel, Jessica U; Krell, Andreas; Mock, Thomas; Valentin, Klaus; Beszteri, Bánk

    2015-01-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) have been isolated from various sea-ice organisms. Their characterisation points to a crucial role in protecting the organisms in sub-zero environments. However, their in situ abundance and diversity in natural sea-ice microbial communities is largely unknown. In this study, we analysed the expression and phylogenetic diversity of eukaryotic IBP transcripts from microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. IBP transcripts were found in abundances similar to those of proteins involved in core cellular processes such as photosynthesis. Eighty-nine percent of the IBP transcripts grouped with known IBP sequences from diatoms, haptophytes and crustaceans, but the majority represented novel sequences not previously characterized in cultured organisms. The observed high eukaryotic IBP expression in natural eukaryotic sea ice communities underlines the essential role of IBPs for survival of many microorganisms in communities living under the extreme conditions of polar sea ice. PMID:25885562

  1. Ag on Ge(111): 2D x-ray structure analysis of the #sq root#3 x #sq root#3 superstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dornisch, D.; Moritz, W.; Schulz, H.;

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the Ag/Ge(111) square-root 3 x square-root 3 superstructure by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. In our structural analysis we find striking similarities to the geometry of Au on Si(111). The Ag atoms form trimer clusters with an Ag-Ag distance of 2.94 +/- 0.04 angstrom...

  2. Superstructure formation and the structural phase diagram of YBasub>2sub>Cu>3sub>O>6sub>+x>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.H.; Zimmermann, M. von; Frello, T.

    1999-01-01

    of the 2D ASYNNNI lattice gas model to include Coulomb interactions between oxygen atoms on chains that are 2a apart, we account for the observed structural phases, and confirm that the superstructures freeze into finite size domains at low temperatures. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Environmentally friendly anti-icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Robert T. (Inventor); Zuk, John (Inventor); Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention describes an aqueous, non-electrolytic, non-toxic, biodegradable, continuous single phase liquid anti-icing or deicing composition for use on the surfaces of, for example, aircraft, airport pavements, roadways, walkways, bridges, entrances, structures, canals, locks, components, vessels, nautical components, railroad switches, and motor vehicles. The anti-icing or deicing composition comprises: (a) water; (b) a non-toxic freezing point depressant selected from the group consisting of monohydric alcohols having from 2 to 6 carbon atoms, polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, monomethyl or ethyl ethers of polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 atoms or mixtures thereof, wherein the freezing point depressant present is between about 14 to 60 percent by weight; (c) a thickener which is present in between about 0.01 and 10 percent by weight; and (d) optionally a corrosion inhibitor which is present in between about 0.01 and 0.1 percent by weight of the total composition. In one embodiment, the deicing composition further includes (e) a monohydric primary aliphatic unbranched alcohol as a means of forming a thin layer of the composition on the surface of the structure to be given ice protection, and/or as means of forming a homogenized foam with xanthan thickener; which alcohol is selected from the group consisting of alcohols having between 8 to 24 carbon atoms, preferably, 1-dodecanol. Compositions of water, propylene glycol, and/or propanol and xanthan are preferred.

  4. Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Fetterer, F.; Knowles, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M.; Arbetter, T.

    2004-12-01

    Of all the recent observed changes in the Arctic environment, the reduction of sea ice cover stands out most prominantly. Several independent analysis have established a trend in Arctic ice extent of -3% per decade from the late 1970s to the late 1990s, with a more pronounced trend in summer. The overall downward trend in ice cover is characterized by strong interannual variability, with a low September ice extent in one year typically followed by recovery the next September. Having two extreme minimum years, such as what was observed in 2002 and 2003 is unusual. 2004 marks the third year in a row of substantially below normal sea ice cover in the Arctic. Early summer 2004 appeared unusual in terms of ice extent, with May a record low for the satellite period (1979-present) and June also exhibiting below normal ice extent. August 2004 extent is below that of 2003 and large reductions in ice cover are observed once again off the coasts of Siberia and Alaska and the Greenland Sea. Neither the 2002 or 2003 anomaly appeared to be strongly linked to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) during the preceding winter. Similarly, the AO was negative during winter 2003/2004. In the previous AO framework of Rigor et al (2002), a positive winter AO implied preconditioning of the ice cover to extensive summer decay. In this hypothesis, the AO does not explain all aspects of the recent decline in Arctic ice cover, such as the extreme minima of 2002, 2003 and 2004. New analysis by Rigor and Wallace (2004) suggest that the very positive AO state from 1989-1995 can explain the recent sea ice minima in terms of changes in the Arctic surface wind field associated with the previous high AO state. However, it is also reasonable to expect that a general decrease in ice thickness accompanying warming would manifest itself as greater sensitivity of the ice pack to wind forcings and albedo feedbacks. The decrease in multiyear ice and attendant changes in ice thickness

  5. Kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Paula

    Spin ice in magnetic pyrochlore oxides is a peculiar magnetic state. Like ordinary water ice, these materials are in apparent violation with the third law of thermodynamics, which dictates that the entropy of a system in thermal equilibrium vanishes as its temperature approaches absolute zero. In ice, a "zero-point" entropy is retained down to low temperatures thanks to a high number of low-energy positions of hydrogen ions associated with the Bernal-Fowler ice-rules. Spins in pyrochlore oxides Ho2Ti 2O7 and Dy2Ti2O7 exhibit a similar degeneracy of ground states and thus also have a sizable zero-point entropy. A recent discovery of excitations carrying magnetic charges in pyrochlore spin ice adds another interesting dimension to these magnets. This thesis is devoted to a theoretical study of a two-dimensional version of spin ice whose spins reside on kagome, a lattice of corner-sharing triangles. It covers two aspects of this frustrated classical spin system: the dynamics of artificial spin ice in a network of magnetic nanowires and the thermodynamics of crystalline spin ice. Magnetization dynamics in artificial spin ice is mediated by the emission, propagation and absorption of domain walls in magnetic nanowires. The dynamics shows signs of self-organized behavior such as avalanches. The theoretical model compares favorably to recent experiments. The thermodynamics of the microscopic version of spin ice on kagome is examined through analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The results show that, in addition to the high-temperature paramagnetic phase and the low-temperature phase with magnetic order, spin ice on kagome may have an intermediate phase with fluctuating spins and ordered magnetic charges. This work is concluded with a calculation of the entropy of kagome spin ice at zero temperature when one of the sublattices is pinned by an applied magnetic field and the system breaks up into independent spin chains, a case of dimensional reduction.

  6. An ice lithography instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  7. [A new virus of rabbit. III. Study on morphological superstructure and antigenicity of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L; Li, T; Song, B; Sun, F

    1992-10-01

    In the spring 1986, an acute infectious disease occurred in Wuhan Second Producing Medical Manufactory, and the rabbit almost died. We tested the mortal symptom and confirmed rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD) as same as Huang Yinyao report. Hubei Traditional Chinese Medicine Institute appear this RHD also. After we purified virus of above two source by low speed, high speed and sucrose density gradient centrifugation, they can react with antiserum of RHDV from Nanjing Agricultural University in agar gel immunodiffusion tests. These results proved that they belong to the same serotype. Data indicate RHDV have difference morphological superstructure, viral polypeptides and especially RHDV can't react with antiserum of standard Parvovirus of rabbit and so on, so we suggest RHDV is a new virus.

  8. Topotactic epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} mesocrystal superstructures with anisotropic construction for efficient overall water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (SANKEN), Osaka University (Japan); Ochi, Tomoya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University (Japan); Kobori, Yasuhiro [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University (Japan); Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University (Japan); Tachikawa, Takashi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University (Japan); Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University (Japan); PRESTO, Science and Technology Agency (JST), Saitama (Japan)

    2017-05-02

    The higher-order structures of semiconductor-based photocatalysts play crucial roles in their physicochemical properties for efficient light-to-energy conversion. A novel perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} mesocrystal superstructure with well-defined orientation of assembled cubic nanocrystals was synthesized by topotactic epitaxy from TiO{sub 2} mesocrystals through a facile hydrothermal treatment. The SrTiO{sub 3} mesocrystal exhibits three times the efficiency for the hydrogen evolution of conventional disordered systems in alkaline aqueous solution. It also exhibits a high quantum yield of 6.7 % at 360 nm in overall water splitting and even good durability up to 1 day. Temporal and spatial spectroscopic observations revealed that the synergy of the efficient electron flow along the internal nanocube network and efficient collection at the larger external cubes produces remarkably long-lived charges for enhanced photocatalysis. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Hierarchical assembly of inorganic nanostructure building blocks to octahedral superstructures-a true template-free self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL-32816 (United States); Karakoti, Ajay S [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL-32816 (United States); Seal, Sudipta [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL-32816 (United States)

    2007-02-21

    A room temperature, template-free, wet chemical synthesis of ceria nanoparticles and their long term ageing characteristics are reported. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques are used to observe the variation in size, structure and oxidation state, respectively as a function of time. The morphology variation and the hierarchical assembly (octahedral superstructure) of nanostructures are imputed to the inherent structural aspects of cerium oxide. It is hypothesized that the 3-5 nm individual building blocks will undergo an intra-agglomerate re-orientation to attain the low energy configuration. This communication also emphasizes the need for long term ageing studies of nanomaterials in various solvents for multiple functionalities.

  10. Ultrasensitive SERS detection of VEGF based on a self-assembled Ag ornamented-AU pyramid superstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2015-06-15

    For the first time, we demonstrated the fabrication of silver nanoparticle ornamented-gold nanoparticle pyramids (Ag-Au Pys) using an aptamer-based self-assembly process and investigated their surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties in the detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Under optimized conditions, the SERS signal was negatively related to VEGF concentration over the range 0.01-1.0 fM and the limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 22.6 aM. The matrix effect and the specificity of this developed method were further examined, and the results showed that the superstructure sensor was ultrasensitive and highly selective. This developed aptamer-based SERS detection method suggests that it may be a promising strategy for a variety of sensing applications.

  11. Helical superstructure of continuum graphene cone uncovered by TEM analysis of herringbone-striped pattern in graphitic whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yukie; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    Cone-shaped graphitic whiskers (CGWs) are a form of pyrolytic carbon, consisting of conically stacked hexagonal carbon layers with an apex angle of ~135-140°. Under transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CGWs often exhibit herringbone-striped patterns. Bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) TEM images indicated that the stripes are due to periodical appearance of a strong inter-planar reflection, which is consistent with helical rotation of layers with stepwise "layer overlap". High-resolution TEM revealed that the period was ~14-15 layers. The relationship between apex angle and stripe periodicity of CGWs could be consistently explained in terms of a helical superstructure of tightly coiled continuous graphene cone.

  12. Structures of the ZrZn22 family: suprapolyhedral nanoclusters, methods of self-assembly and superstructural ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, G D; Blatov, V A

    2009-06-01

    A combinatorial topological analysis is carried out by means of the program package TOPOS4.0 [Blatov (2006), IUCr Comput. Commun. Newsl. 7, 4-38] and the matrix self-assembly is modeled for crystal structures of the ZrZn22 family (space group Fd3m, Pearson code cF184), including the compounds with superstructural ordering. A number of strict rules are proposed to model the crystal structures of intermetallics as a network of cluster precursors. According to these rules the self-assembly of the ZrZn22-like structures was considered within the hierarchical scheme: primary polyhedral cluster --> zero-dimensional nanocluster precursor --> one-dimensional primary chain --> two-dimensional microlayer --> three-dimensional microframework (three-dimensional supraprecursor). The suprapolyhedral cluster precursor AB2X37 of diameter approximately 12 A and volume approximately 350 A3 consists of three polyhedra (one AX16 of the 43m point symmetry and two regular icosahedra BX12 of the 3m point symmetry); the packing of the clusters determines the translations in the resulting crystal structure. A novel topological type of the two-dimensional crystal-forming 4,4-coordinated binodal net AB2, with the Schläfli symbols 3636 and 3366 for nodes A and B, is discovered. It is shown that the ZrZn22 superstructures are formed by substituting some atoms in the cluster precursors. Computer analysis of the CRYSTMET and ICSD databases shows that the cluster AB2X37 occurs in 111 intermetallics belonging to 28 structure types.

  13. C60 superstructure and carbide formation on the Al-terminated Al9Co2(001 ) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledieu, J.; Gaudry, É.; de Weerd, M.-C.; Gille, P.; Diehl, R. D.; Fournée, V.

    2015-04-01

    We report the formation of an ordered C60 monolayer on the Al9Co2 (001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), and ab initio calculations. Dosing fullerenes at 300 K results in a disordered overlayer. However, the adsorption of C60 with the sample held between 573-673 K leads to a [4, -2 ∣1 ,3 ] phase. The growth of C60 proceeds with the formation of two domains which are mirror symmetric with respect to the [100] direction. Within each domain, the superstructure unit cell contains six molecules and this implies an area per fullerene equal to 91 Å2. The molecules exhibit two types of contrast (bright and dim) which are bias dependent. The adsorption energies and preferred molecular configuration at several possible adsorption sites have been determined theoretically. These calculations lead to a possible scheme describing the configuration of each C60 in the observed superstructure. Several defects (vacancies, protrusions,…) and domain boundaries observed in the film are also discussed. If the sample temperature is higher than 693 K when dosing, impinging C60 molecules dissociate at the surface, hence leading to the formation of a carbide film as observed by STM and LEED measurements. The formation of Al4C3 domains and the molecular dissociation are confirmed by XPS/UPS measurements acquired at different stages of the experiment. The cluster substructure present at the Al9Co2 (001) surface dictates the carbide domain orientations.

  14. Hybrid framework with cobalt-chromium alloy and gold cylinder for implant superstructure: Bond strength and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinari, Masao; Uzawa, Shinobu; Komiyama, Yataro

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate tensile bond strengths and corrosion resistance of CoCr alloys joined with gold cylinder by a soldering system in comparison with the conventional cast-joining system. CoCr alloys joined with gold cylinder by a soldering system using a high-fusing gold solder (CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder), gold alloy joined with gold cylinder by a cast joining system (Gold alloy/Gold cylinder) and CoCr castings were fabricated. The tensile bond strength and corrosion resistance in 0.9% NaCl solution (pH 7.4 and pH 2.3) were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fractured surface and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of the joined interfaces were also performed. The tensile bond strengths of the CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder specimens showed similar values as the Gold alloy/Gold cylinder specimens. SEM observation and EPMA analyses suggested firm bonding between the CoCr alloy and gold cylinder. The released elements from the CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder specimens were similar to ones from CoCr castings. Results showed that superstructures made of CoCr alloys joined with the gold cylinder using a high-fusing gold solder had sufficient bond strength and high corrosion resistance. These hybrid frameworks with cobalt-chromium alloy and gold cylinder are promising prosthesis for implant superstructures with the low cost and favorable mechanical properties instead of conventional high-gold alloys. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Amery ice shelf DEM and its marine ice distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Amery Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf in East Antarctica. A new DEM was generated for this ice shelf, using kriging to interpolate the data from ICESat altimetry and the AIS-DEM. The ice thickness distribution map is converted from the new DEM, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The Amery Ice Shelf marine ice, up to 230 m thick, is concentrated in the northwest of the ice shelf. The volume of the marine ice is 2.38×103 km3 and accounts for about 5.6% of the shelf volume.

  16. Ice Tank Experiments Highlight Changes in Sea Ice Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy P.; DeCarolis, Giacomo; Ehlert, Iris; Notz, Dirk; Evers, Karl-Ulrich; Jochmann, Peter; Gerland, Sebastian; Nicolaus, Marcel; Hughes, Nick; Kern, Stefan; de la Rosa, Sara; Smedsrud, Lars; Sakai, Shigeki; Shen, Hayley; Wadhams, Peter

    2009-03-01

    With the current and likely continuing reduction of summer sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, the predominant mechanism of sea ice formation in the Arctic is likely to change in the future. Although substantial new ice formation occurred under preexisting ice in the past, the fraction of sea ice formation in open water likely will increase significantly. In open water, sea ice formation starts with the development of small ice crystals, called frazil ice, which are suspended in the water column [World Meteorological Organization, 1985]. Under quiescent conditions, these crystals accumulate at the surface to form an unbroken ice sheet known in its early stage as nilas. Under turbulent conditions, caused by wind and waves, frazil ice continues to grow and forms into a thick, soupy mixture called grease ice. Eventually the frazil ice will coalesce into small, rounded pieces known as pancake ice, which finally consolidate into an ice sheet with the return of calm conditions. This frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle is currently frequently observed in the Antarctic [Lange et al., 1989]. The cycle normally occurs in regions that have a significant stretch of open water, because this allows for the formation of larger waves and hence increased turbulence. Given the increase of such open water in the Arctic Ocean caused by retreating summer sea ice, the frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle may also become the dominant ice formation process during freezeup in the Arctic.

  17. Ice-on-ice impact experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Manabu; Iijima, Yu-Ichi; Arakawa, Masahiko; Okimura, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Akio; Maeno, Norikazu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1995-02-01

    Impact experiments, cratering and fragmentation, on water ice were performed in order to test the scaling laws previously constructed on rocks and sands for studying the collision process in the planetary history. The installation of a vertical gas gun in a cold room at -18°C (255 K) made it possible to use a projectile of water ice and to get the detailed mass distribution of ice fragments. Experimental results indicated the necessity for large modification of those scaling laws. Material dependence was investigated by using projectiles of ice, aluminum, and polycarbonate. Differences were observed in the morphology and efficiencies of cratering and in the energies required to initiate the fragmentation. Moreover, an abrupt increase of cratering efficiency, suggesting a change of excavation mechanism, was found at a critical diameter of spalled crater. The mass (size) distribution of small ice fragments obeyed a power law with an exponent significantly larger than that in rocks. The exponent was the same as that in Saturn's ring particles estimated from the data by the microwave occultation, which indicates a collisional disruption ring origin.

  18. Small Airframe Manufacturer's Icing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the icing effects, risk mitigation practices, and icing certifications for various Cessna small aircraft models. NASA's role in the development of simulation tools for icing certifications is also discussed.

  19. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  20. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. Sometimes ... clear or white shiny rock (called a crystal). Meth powder can be eaten or snorted up the ...

  1. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  2. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  3. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  4. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  5. Testing The Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The country’s fourth scientific expedition tothe North Pole starts OBSERVATION STATIONS:Members of China’s fourth Arctic expedition set up polar bear-proof "apple houses" on the ice surface of the Arctic Ocean on August 8 The Chinese ice breaker Xuelong

  6. Rheology of glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, K. C.; Alley, R. B.; Thomas, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new method for calculating the stress field in bounded ice shelves is used to compare strain rate and deviatoric stress on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The analysis shows that strain rate (per second) increases as the third power of deviatoric stress (in newtons/sq meter), with a constant of proportionality equal to 2.3 x 10 to the -25th.

  7. Rotating ice blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  8. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  9. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  10. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-07

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history.

  11. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The...

  12. Development and test of a Microwave Ice Accretion Measurement Instrument (MIAMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, B.; Rocks, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an ice accretion measurement instrument that is a highly sensitive, accurate, rugged and reliable microprocessor controlled device using low level microwave energy for non-instrusive real time measurement and recording of ice growth history, including ice thickness and accretion rate is discussed. Data is displayed and recorded digitally. New experimental data is presented, obtained with the instrument, which demonstrates its ability to measure ice growth on a two-dimensional airfoil. The device is suitable for aircraft icing protection. It may be mounted flush, non-intrusively, on any part of an aircraft skin including rotor blades and engine inlets.

  13. Ice flow Modelling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Tangaa

    simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using ice sheet models offers the possibility of deriving reconstructions of past ice sheet topography, flow and extent, consistent with the dynamics of ice flow and the imposed climate forcing. The large-scale response of the ice sheet modelled by such approaches can...... core derived temperature and precipitation histories have a long history of being used in studies of the past evolution of the Greenland ice sheet, acting as climatic forcing of the ice sheet models. However, the conversion from the isotopic records to past temperatures remain challenging, owing...... to both uncertain processes and depositional histories. Using five different temperature reconstructions derived from isotope records of Greenlandic ice cores, the influence of the paleo records on the simulated ice sheet was investigated using a high-resolution, large-scale ice sheet model (PISM...

  14. The first stages of erosion by ice sheets: Evidence from central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A. M.; Migoń, P.

    2010-11-01

    In almost all former and presently glaciated areas of the world, glaciers have modified or even transformed pre-glacial terrain during the many cold stages of the Pleistocene. In consequence, the early stages in the development of glacial landscapes have been overprinted or erased by later phases of erosion. The Sudetes in central Europe provide exceptional opportunities to examine the inception of glacial erosion. Evidence of a long geomorphic evolution before glaciation, with the development of etch surfaces, deep weathering covers and the preservation of Neogene kaolinitic sediments, provides a direct analogue to other lowland crystalline terrains as existed immediately prior to Pleistocene glaciation. Large granite intrusions exist in the Sudetes and its Foreland that support hills that range in size from small tors to large domes. These terrains experienced only thin ice cover for short periods when the Scandinavian ice sheet reached its Pleistocene maximum limits in Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 12 (Elsterian) at 440-430 ka and MIS 8 (Early Saalian) at 250-240 ka. In each of four study areas beyond, at and within the limits of glaciation we have mapped Glacial Erosion Indicators, glacial landform assemblages that indicate progressive glacial modification of the pre-glacial granite terrain. We find that glacial erosion increases with distance from the ice margin, due to greater ice thickness and longer ice cover, but has had only limited impact. On hills, regolith was stripped by moving ice, tors were demolished, and blocks were entrained. However, indicators of more advanced glacial erosion, such as lee-side cliffs and glacial streamlining, are absent, even from granite domes that lay beneath ~ 500 m of ice. The survival of tors beneath ice cover and the removal of tor superstructure by glacial erosion are confirmed. The presence of glacially-modified tors in areas covered only by Elsterian ice implies that the tors existed before 440 ka. Moreover, the contrast

  15. The seeding of ice algal blooms in Arctic pack ice: The multiyear ice seed repository hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lasse M.; Laney, Samuel R.; Duarte, Pedro; Kauko, Hanna M.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Mundy, Christopher J.; Rösel, Anja; Meyer, Amelie; Itkin, Polona; Cohen, Lana; Peeken, Ilka; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Róźańska-Pluta, Magdalena; Wiktor, Józef; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Hop, Haakon; Assmy, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    During the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition (N-ICE2015) from January to June 2015 the pack ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard was studied during four drifts between 83° and 80°N. This pack ice consisted of a mix of second year, first year, and young ice. The physical properties and ice algal community composition was investigated in the three different ice types during the winter-spring-summer transition. Our results indicate that algae remaining in sea ice that survived the summer melt season are subsequently trapped in the upper layers of the ice column during winter and may function as an algal seed repository. Once the connectivity in the entire ice column is established, as a result of temperature-driven increase in ice porosity during spring, algae in the upper parts of the ice are able to migrate toward the bottom and initiate the ice algal spring bloom. Furthermore, this algal repository might seed the bloom in younger ice formed in adjacent leads. This mechanism was studied in detail for the dominant ice diatom Nitzschia frigida. The proposed seeding mechanism may be compromised due to the disappearance of older ice in the anticipated regime shift toward a seasonally ice-free Arctic Ocean.

  16. 趣话ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奉越

    2002-01-01

    在英语中,ice是一个很普通的词,它的基本含义是“冰,冰块”。如:The sportsman slipped on the ice and one of his legs was broken.(这个运动员在冰上滑倒了,一条腿摔断了。)它还可指“冰淇淋”,相当于ice cream。如.After having two ices I felt uncomfortable.

  17. Stripping with dry ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  18. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  19. Ice nucleation terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  20. TEM and SEM observations of super-structures constructed in organogel systems from a combination of boronic-acid-appended bola-amphiphiles with chiral diols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoto, Kazuya; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kimura, Taro; Luboradzki, Roman; Shinkai, Seiji

    2001-03-01

    Two bola-amphiphilic α,ω-diboronic acids separated by a (CH2)11 or (CH2)12 group were synthesized. Complexation with chiral diols readily gave new amphiphiles end-capped with the chiral substituents. Some of these acted as good gelators of organic solvents. Transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope observations established that a variety of super-structures are created in the organogels, depending on the solvents and the structure of the chiral end-cap groups. In most cases, the fibrous aggregates, the network structure which is the driving-force for gelation, showed a helical higher-order structure reflecting the chirality of the end-cap groups. The results indicate that the combinatorial approach utilizing boronic acid functions and diol compounds is useful in creating a variety of new super-structures in the gel phase.

  1. Optomagnetic Detection of MicroRNA Based on Duplex-Specific Nuclease-Assisted Target Recycling and Multilayer Core-Satellite Magnetic Superstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Ma, Jing; Qiu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    -efficiency, and potential for bioresponsive multiplexing. Herein, we demonstrate a sensitive and rapid miRNA detection method based on optomagnetic read-out, duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted target recycling, and the use of multilayer core-satellite magnetic superstructures. Triggered by the presence of target mi......RNA and DSN-assisted target recycling, the core-satellite magnetic superstructures release their "satellites" to the suspension, which subsequently can be quantified accurately in a low-cost and user-friendly optomagnetic setup. Target miRNAs are preserved in the cleaving reaction and can thereby trigger more...... cleavage and release of "satellites". For singleplex detection of let-7b, a linear detection range between 10 fM and 10 nM was observed, and a detection limit of 4.8 fM was obtained within a total assay time of 70 min. Multiplexing was achieved by releasing nanoparticles of different sizes in the presence...

  2. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  3. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  4. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  5. Ice Engineering Research Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Refrigerated Physical Modeling of Waterways in a Controlled EnvironmentThe Research Area in the Ice Engineering Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering...

  6. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  7. Melting ice, growing trade?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sami Bensassi; Julienne C. Stroeve; Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso; Andrew P. Barrett

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR...

  8. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  9. Web life: Ice Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Computer and video gamers of a certain vintage will have fond memories of Lemmings, a game in which players must shepherd pixelated, suicidal rodents around a series of obstacles to reach safety. At first glance, Ice Flows is strikingly similar.

  10. Giant reversible magnetocaloric effect in flower-like β-Co(OH){sub 2} hierarchical superstructures self-assembled by nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianguo; Feng, Chao; Xiao, Feng; Jin, Chuangui; Xia, Ailin, E-mail: liuxianguohugh@gmail.com, E-mail: eeswor@polyu.edu.hk [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, PR (China); Or, Siu Wing [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Sun, Yuping [Center for Engineering Practice and Innovation Education, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, PR (China)

    2014-01-15

    A facile hydrothermal strategy is proposed to synthesize flower-like β- Co(OH){sub 2} hierarchical microspherical superstructures with a diameter of 0.5-1.5 µm, which are self-assembled by β - Co(OH){sub 2} nano sheets with the average thickness ranging between 20 and 40 nm. The magnetocaloric effect associated with magnetic phase transitions in Co(OH){sub 2} superstructures has been investigated. A sign change in the magnetocaloric effect is induced by a magnetic field, which is related to a filed-induced transition from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic state below the Néel temperature. The large reversible magnetic-entropy change –ΔS{sub m} (13.4 J/kg K at 15 K for a field change of 5 T) indicates that flower-like Co(OH){sub 2} superstructures is a potential candidate for application in magnetic refrigeration in the low-temperature range. (author)

  11. High-Tc ferromagnetic semiconductor-like behavior and unusual electrical properties in compounds with a 2×2×2 superstructure of the half-Heusler phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ding-Bang; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Waki, Takeshi; Zhao, Yufeng; Kishida, Kyosuke; Inui, Haruyuki

    2012-02-27

    Heusler phases, including the full- and half-Heusler families, represent an outstanding class of multifunctional materials on account of their great tunability in compositions, valence electron counts (VEC), and properties. Here we demonstrate a systematic design of a series of new compounds with a 2×2×2 superstructure of the half-Heusler unit cell in X-Y-Z (X=Fe, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir; Y=Zn, Mn; Z=Sn, Sb) systems. Their structures were solved by using both powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and also directly observed by using high-angle annular dark-field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope (HAADF-STEM). The VEC values of these new compounds span a wide and continuous range comparable to those for the full- and half-Heusler families, thereby implying tunability in compositions and physical properties in the superstructure. In fact, we observed abnormal electrical properties and a ferromagnetic semiconductor-like behavior with a high and tunable Curie temperature in these superstructures. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Spatial Separation of Charge Carriers in In2O3-x(OH)y Nanocrystal Superstructures for Enhanced Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Le; Wood, Thomas E; Wu, Bo; Dong, Yuchan; Hoch, Laura B; Reyes, Laura M; Wang, Di; Kübel, Christian; Qian, Chenxi; Jia, Jia; Liao, Kristine; O'Brien, Paul G; Sandhel, Amit; Loh, Joel Y Y; Szymanski, Paul; Kherani, Nazir P; Sum, Tze Chien; Mims, Charles A; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-24

    The development of strategies for increasing the lifetime of photoexcited charge carriers in nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors is important for enhancing their photocatalytic activity. Intensive efforts have been made in tailoring the properties of the nanostructured photocatalysts through different ways, mainly including band-structure engineering, doping, catalyst-support interaction, and loading cocatalysts. In liquid-phase photocatalytic dye degradation and water splitting, it was recently found that nanocrystal superstructure based semiconductors exhibited improved spatial separation of photoexcited charge carriers and enhanced photocatalytic performance. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether this strategy is applicable in gas-phase photocatalysis. Using porous indium oxide nanorods in catalyzing the reverse water-gas shift reaction as a model system, we demonstrate here that assembling semiconductor nanocrystals into superstructures can also promote gas-phase photocatalytic processes. Transient absorption studies prove that the improved activity is a result of prolonged photoexcited charge carrier lifetimes due to the charge transfer within the nanocrystal network comprising the nanorods. Our study reveals that the spatial charge separation within the nanocrystal networks could also benefit gas-phase photocatalysis and sheds light on the design principles of efficient nanocrystal superstructure based photocatalysts.

  13. Conceptual design and scaled experimental validation of an actively damped carbon tie rods support system for the stabilization of future particle collider superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, C; Tshilumba, D; Fueyo-Rosa, L; Romanescu, I

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a simple solution to increase the stability of the large superstructures supporting the final electromagnets of future linear particle collider. It consists of active carbon fiber tie rods, fixed at one end on the structure and at the other end to the detector through active tendons. In the first part of the paper, the solution has been tested on a finite element model of one half of the CLIC_ILD final focus structure. With a reasonable design, it is shown numerically that the compliance can be decreased by at least a factor 4, i.e., that the structure is 4 times more robust to technical noise at low frequency. Two additional features of the active rods are that they can also actively damp the structural resonances and realign the superstructures. The second part of the paper presents a successful experimental validation of the concept, applied to a scaled test bench, especially designed to contain the same modal characteristics as the full scale superstructure.

  14. Effect of Cd on GSH and GSH-related enzymes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L existing in Antarctic ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yu; MIAO Jin-lai; LI Guang-you; WANG Quan-fu; KAN Guang-feng; WANG Guo-dong

    2005-01-01

    Glutathione(GSH) and GSH-related enzymes play a great role in protecting organisms from oxidative damage. The GSH level and GSH-related enzymes activities were investigated as well as the growth yield and malonyldialdehyde(MDA) content in the Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L exposure to the different cadmium concentration in this paper. The results showed that the higher concentration Cd inhibited the growth of ICE-L significantly and Cd would induce formation of MDA. At the same time, it is clear that GSH level, glutathione peroxidases(GPx) activity and glutathione S-transferases(GST), activity were higher in ICE-L exposed to Cd than the control. But GR activity dropped notably when ICE-L were cultured in the medium containing Cd. Increase of GSH level, GPx and GST activities acclimate to oxidative stress induced by Cd and protect Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L from toxicity caused by Cd exposure. These parameters may be used to assess the biological impact of Cd in the Antarctic pole region environment.

  15. Geomorphological evidence for ground ice on dwarf planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Britney E.; Hughson, Kynan H.G.; Chilton, Heather T.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Sizemore, Hanna; Bland, Michael; Byrne, Shane; Marchi, Simone; O'Brien, David; Schorghofer, Norbert; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; Hendrick Pasckert, Jan; Lawrence, Justin D.; Buzckowski, Debra; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Sykes, Mark V.; Schenk, Paul M.; DeSanctis, Maria-Cristina; Mitri, Giuseppe; Formisano, Michelangelo; Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Le Corre, Lucille; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2017-01-01

    Five decades of observations of Ceres suggest that the dwarf planet has a composition similar to carbonaceous meteorites and may have an ice-rich outer shell protected by a silicate layer. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has detected ubiquitous clays, carbonates and other products of aqueous alteration across the surface of Ceres, but surprisingly it has directly observed water ice in only a few areas. Here we use Dawn Framing Camera observations to analyse lobate morphologies on Ceres’ surface and we infer the presence of ice in the upper few kilometres of Ceres. We identify three distinct lobate morphologies that we interpret as surface flows: thick tongue-shaped, furrowed flows on steep slopes; thin, spatulate flows on shallow slopes; and cuspate sheeted flows that appear fluidized. The shapes and aspect ratios of these flows are different from those of dry landslides—including those on ice-poor Vesta—but are morphologically similar to ice-rich flows on other bodies, indicating the involvement of ice. Based on the geomorphology and poleward increase in prevalence of these flows, we suggest that the shallow subsurface of Ceres is comprised of mixtures of silicates and ice, and that ice is most abundant near the poles.

  16. Innovative Control Effectors (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    including weight, maneuver performance, signa- ture, hydraulic requirements, demands on the flight control system (FCS) design, and car - rier (CV...applicable to the car - rier-based configurations. Figure 7-36 summarizes an assessment of the ICE series 101 configuration control allocation evaluation. ICE...plain leading edge flaps, all moving horizontal tails, rudder, two airbrakes under fuselage F-15C inner trailing edge plain flap, outer aileron, all

  17. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  18. Layered kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  19. Modelling sea ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Jens; Kleine, Eckhard

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice remains one of the frontiers of ocean modelling and is of vital importance for the correct forecasts of the northern oceans. At large scale, it is commonly considered a continuous medium whose dynamics is modelled in terms of continuum mechanics. Its specifics are a matter of constitutive behaviour which may be characterised as rigid-plastic. The new developed sea ice dynamic module bases on general principles and follows a systematic approach to the problem. Both drift field and stress field are modelled by a variational property. Rigidity is treated by Lagrangian relaxation. Thus one is led to a sensible numerical method. Modelling fast ice remains to be a challenge. It is understood that ridging and the formation of grounded ice keels plays a role in the process. The ice dynamic model includes a parameterisation of the stress associated with grounded ice keels. Shear against the grounded bottom contact might lead to plastic deformation and the loss of integrity. The numerical scheme involves a potentially large system of linear equations which is solved by pre-conditioned iteration. The entire algorithm consists of several components which result from decomposing the problem. The algorithm has been implemented and tested in practice.

  20. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream by propylene glycol monostearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, J M; Frochot, S; Goff, H D

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of propylene glycol monostearate (PGMS) to inhibit ice recrystallization was evaluated in ice cream and frozen sucrose solutions. PGMS (0.3%) dramatically reduced ice crystal sizes in ice cream and in sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer before and after heat shock, but had no effect in quiescently frozen solutions. PGMS showed limited emulsifier properties by promoting smaller fat globule size distributions and enhanced partial coalescence in the mix and ice cream, respectively, but at a much lower level compared to conventional ice cream emulsifier. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy revealed highly irregular crystal morphology in both ice cream and sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer. There was strong evidence to suggest that PGMS directly interacts with ice crystals and interferes with normal surface propagation. Shear during freezing may be required for its distribution around the ice and sufficient surface coverage.

  1. Study on Measures for Protecting Signal Equipment for High-speed Railway from Ice and Snow%高速铁路信号设备应对冰雪天气措施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余卫巍; 吴鹏

    2015-01-01

    Through statistics and analysis of damage quantities of such outdoor trackside signaling equipment as turnout conversion devices, transponders and track circuits on Beijing-Guangzhou high-speed railway in central China over the years and in combination with field investigation of actual damage conditions of outdoor signal equipment under the snow and ice conditions in the station, section and tunnel, main causes leading to damage of outdoor equipment on high-speed railway have been found. According to the causes and consequences of damage, this paper points out the main hazards to traffic safety due to signaling equipment damage of high-speed railway and put forward the following measures for ensu-ring the normal use of signaling equipment on high-speed railway under ice and snow conditions, that is to comprehen-sively know real-time weather condition and analyze equipment status in advance, timely apply for the speed limit ac-cording to the snow conditions, inspect equipment state and repair equipment by night skylight, clean snows and icing a-round the turnout, check the whole high-speed railway after snow stops and eliminate safety hidden trouble of equipment due to snow and ice to effectively reduce the influence of ice and snow on train operation safety on high-speed railway.%通过对京广高速铁路华中地区的道岔转换装置、应答器、轨道电路等室外轨旁信号设备历年来的损伤数量进行统计和分析,并结合站内、区间以及隧道内等不同地段在冰雪条件下的信号室外设备实际受损情况进行实地调查,查找分析出了造成高速铁路室外设备受损的各种主要原因。针对受损的原因和损伤的后果,指出了高速铁路信号设备受损后对行车安全产生的主要危害,提出了针对冰雪天气下保证高速铁路信号设备正常使用的具体措施建议:(1)全面掌握实时天气状态,提前做好设备状态分析;(2)根据降雪情况

  2. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ice age, and iv) onset dates of melt and freezeup . 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from ice-albedo feedback to the observed decrease of...the impact on albedo evolution of ice concentration and melt and freezeup onset dates. This effort will expand on previous work by i) examining...radiation, ice concentration, ice type, and melt and freezeup onset dates on a 25 x 25 km equal area scalable grid. We have daily values of these parameters

  3. Using Finite Element and Eigenmode Expansion Methods to Investigate the Periodic and Spectral Characteristic of Superstructure Fiber Bragg Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Jing He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a numerical simulation method was employed to investigate and analyze superstructure fiber Bragg gratings (SFBGs with five duty cycles (50%, 33.33%, 14.28%, 12.5%, and 10%. This study focuses on demonstrating the relevance between design period and spectral characteristics of SFBGs (in the form of graphics for SFBGs of all duty cycles. Compared with complicated and hard-to-learn conventional coupled-mode theory, the result of the present study may assist beginner and expert designers in understanding the basic application aspects, optical characteristics, and design techniques of SFBGs, thereby indirectly lowering the physical concepts and mathematical skills required for entering the design field. To effectively improve the accuracy of overall computational performance and numerical calculations and to shorten the gap between simulation results and actual production, this study integrated a perfectly matched layer (PML, perfectly reflecting boundary (PRB, object meshing method (OMM, and boundary meshing method (BMM into the finite element method (FEM and eigenmode expansion method (EEM. The integrated method enables designers to easily and flexibly design optical fiber communication systems that conform to the specific spectral characteristic by using the simulation data in this paper, which includes bandwidth, number of channels, and band gap size.

  4. Improved charge transport and injection in a meso-superstructured solar cell by a tractable pre-spin-coating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Haoyuan; Li, Yu; Wang, Shufeng; Wang, Liduo

    2015-10-07

    In meso-superstructured solar cells (MSSCs), the state-of-the-art perovskite acts as both the light harvester and electron transporter due to its ambipolar properties. The inefficient pore filling and infiltration of perovskite directly affect the continuous distribution of perovskite in mesoporous Al2O3, resulting in discontinuous carrier transport in the mesoporous structure and insufficient electron injection to the compact TiO2 layer. Herein, we introduce a simple pre-spin-coating process to improve the infiltration and pore filling of perovskite, which results in higher light absorption and enhanced electron injection, as seen in UV-vis spectra and photoluminescence (PL) spectra, respectively. We first apply time of flight (TOF) experiments to characterize charge transport in MSSCs, and the results reveal that more continuous charge transport pathways are formed with the pre-spin-coating process. This effective method, with ease of processing, demonstrates obviously improved photocurrents, reaching an efficiency as high as 14%, and promotes the application of lead halide perovskite materials in the photovoltaics field.

  5. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work. Following a market survey carried out among 112 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2546/ST/Rev.) was sent on 12 April 2001 to eleven consortia, four consisting of four firms, three consisting of three firms and four consisting of two firms, in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from eight consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SPIE CITRA SUD-EST(FR)-ANTIRUST TECHNOLOGY (GR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 January 2002 for an amount not exceeding 15 375 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this ...

  6. Yb{sub 6}Ir{sub 5}Ga{sub 7} - a MgZn{sub 2} superstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The gallide Yb{sub 6}Ir{sub 5}Ga{sub 7} was synthesized by high-frequency melting of the elements in a sealed niobium ampoule. The structure was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: Nb{sub 6.4}Ir{sub 4}Al{sub 7.6} type, P6{sub 3}/mcm, a = 930.4(1), c = 843.0(1) pm, wR{sub 2} = 0.0597, 379 F{sup 2} values and 22 variables. Yb{sub 6}Ir{sub 5}Ga{sub 7} adopts a superstructure of the MgZn{sub 2} Laves phase by a complete ordering of the iridium and gallium atoms on the zinc substructure, i.e. the network consists of ordered and condensed Ir{sub 3}Ga and IrGa{sub 3} tetrahedra with Ir-Ga distances ranging from 260 to 265 pm. The crystal chemical details and the underlying group-subgroup scheme are discussed. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  8. Numerical simulation of formation and preservation of Ningwu ice cave, Shanxi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Shi, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Ice caves exist in locations where annual average air temperature is higher than 0 °C. An example is Ningwu ice cave, Shanxi Province, the largest ice cave in China. In order to quantitatively investigate the mechanism of formation and preservation of the ice cave, we use the finite-element method to simulate the heat transfer process at this ice cave. There are two major control factors. First, there is the seasonal asymmetric heat transfer. Heat is transferred into the ice cave from outside very inefficiently by conduction in spring, summer and fall. In winter, thermal convection occurs that transfers heat very efficiently out of the ice cave, thus cooling it down. Secondly, ice-water phase change provides a heat barrier for heat transfer into the cave in summer. The calculation also helps to evaluate effects of global warming, tourists, colored lights, climatic conditions, etc. for sustainable development of the ice cave as a tourism resource. In some other ice caves in China, managers have installed airtight doors at these ice caves' entrances with the intention of "protecting" these caves, but this in fact prevents cooling in winter and these cave ices will entirely melt within tens of years.

  9. Nucleation of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  10. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eStibal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet, using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM, flow cytometry (FCM and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (10^2 – 10^7 cells ml-1 and mineral particle (0.1 – 100 mg/ml concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ca 2 x 10^3 to ca 2 x 10^6 cells/ml while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg/ml. The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  11. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  12. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly...... Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using...

  13. Data archaeology at ICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the function of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), both past and present, in particular in the context of its interest in compiling oceanographic data sets. Details are provided of the procedures it adopted to ensure adequate internationally collaborative marine investigations during the first part of the century, such as how it provided a forum for action by its member states, how it coordinated and published the results of scientific programs, and how it provided a foundation, through scientists employed in the ICES Office, for the establishment of the original oceanographic marine databases and associated products, and the scientific interpretation of the results. The growth and expansion of this area of ICES activity is then traced, taking into account the changing conditions for oceanographic data management resulting from the establishment of the National Data Centres, as well as the World Data Centres for Oceanography, which were created to meet the needs of the International Geophysical Year (IGY). Finally, there is a discussion of the way in which the very existence of ICES has proved to be a valuable source of old data, some of which have not yet been digitized, but which can be readily retrieved because they have been very carefully documented throughout the years. Lessons from this activity are noted, and suggestions are made on how the past experiences of ICES can be utilized to ensure the availability of marine data to present and future generations of scientists.

  14. IDEOLOGICALLY CHALLENGING ENTERTAINMENT (ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lori Chalmers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ideologically Challenging Entertainment (ICE is entertainment that challenges ‘us vs. them’ ideologies associated with radicalization, violent conflict and terrorism. ICE presents multiple perspectives on a conflict through mainstream entertainment. This article introduces the theoretical underpinnings of ICE, the first ICE production and the audience responses to it. The first ICE production was Two Merchants: The Merchant of Venice adapted to challenge ideologies of the Arab-Israeli Conflict. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views. Each performance included two versions of the adaptation: a Jewish dominated society with an Arab Muslim minority, contrasted with an Arab Muslim dominated society and a Jewish minority. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views to become more tolerant of differences away from ideological radicalization. Of audience members who did not initially agree with the premise of the production, 40% reconsidered their ideological views, indicating increased tolerance, greater awareness of and desire to change their own prejudices. In addition, 86% of the audience expressed their intention to discuss the production with others, thereby encouraging critical engagement with, and broader dissemination of the message. These outcomes suggest that high quality entertainment – as defined by audience responses to it - can become a powerful tool in the struggle against radicalised ideologies.

  15. Ice Cores of the National Ice Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) is a facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It provides...

  16. Seafloor Control on Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Rigor, I. G.; Hall, D. K.; Neumann, G.

    2011-01-01

    The seafloor has a profound role in Arctic sea ice formation and seasonal evolution. Ocean bathymetry controls the distribution and mixing of warm and cold waters, which may originate from different sources, thereby dictating the pattern of sea ice on the ocean surface. Sea ice dynamics, forced by surface winds, are also guided by seafloor features in preferential directions. Here, satellite mapping of sea ice together with buoy measurements are used to reveal the bathymetric control on sea ice growth and dynamics. Bathymetric effects on sea ice formation are clearly observed in the conformation between sea ice patterns and bathymetric characteristics in the peripheral seas. Beyond local features, bathymetric control appears over extensive ice-prone regions across the Arctic Ocean. The large-scale conformation between bathymetry and patterns of different synoptic sea ice classes, including seasonal and perennial sea ice, is identified. An implication of the bathymetric influence is that the maximum extent of the total sea ice cover is relatively stable, as observed by scatterometer data in the decade of the 2000s, while the minimum ice extent has decreased drastically. Because of the geologic control, the sea ice cover can expand only as far as it reaches the seashore, the continental shelf break, or other pronounced bathymetric features in the peripheral seas. Since the seafloor does not change significantly for decades or centuries, sea ice patterns can be recurrent around certain bathymetric features, which, once identified, may help improve short-term forecast and seasonal outlook of the sea ice cover. Moreover, the seafloor can indirectly influence cloud cover by its control on sea ice distribution, which differentially modulates the latent heat flux through ice covered and open water areas.

  17. EASE-Grid Sea Ice Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides weekly estimates of sea ice age for the Arctic Ocean from remotely sensed sea ice motion and sea ice extent. The ice age data are derived from...

  18. Change in Ice Thaw Dates for Selected U.S. Lakes, 1905-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This figure shows the change in the "ice-off" date, or date of ice thawing and breakup, for 14 U.S. lakes during the period from 1905 to 2015. All of the lakes have...

  19. Palaeoclimate science: Pulsating ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieli, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    During the last ice age, huge numbers of icebergs were episodically discharged from an ice sheet that covered North America. Numerical modelling suggests that these events resulted from a conceptually simple feedback cycle. See Letter p.332

  20. ICE Online Detainee Locator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Online Detainee Locator datasets provide the location of a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was release from ICE custody for any reason with the...

  1. Ice at Mars lander site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Eight dice‐sized bits of ice vanished within 4 days from a trench dug on Mars by the robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix lander, confirming what scientists suspected the material was. “It must be ice...

  2. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    In Russian.) Kryndin, A.N., 1971: Seasonal and yearly variations in the iciness and the position of ice edge in the Black and Azov Seas, which are...p.2057--2063. idreas, E.L., R.M. Williams, C.A. Paulson, 1981: Observatinis of conden- sate profiles over Arctic leads with a hot- film anemometer...A.N., 1971: Seasonal and yearly variations in the iciness and the position of ice edge in the Black and Azov Seas, which are associated with

  3. Antarctica - Ross Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This color picture of Antarctica is one part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire polar continent taken during the hours following Galileo's historic first encounter with its home planet. The view shows the Ross Ice Shelf to the right and its border with the sea. An occasional mountain can be seen poking through the ice near the McMurdo Station. It is late spring in Antarctica, so the sun never sets on the frigid, icy continent. This picture was taken about 6:20 p.m. PST on December 8, 1990. From top to bottom, the frame looks across about half of Antarctica.

  4. Vacancy Concentration in Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1977-01-01

    Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10.......Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10....

  5. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 °C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing. PMID:20215465

  6. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-03-23

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 degrees C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing.

  7. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream as affected by ice structuring proteins from winter wheat grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2006-01-01

    Ice recrystallization in quiescently frozen sucrose solutions that contained some of the ingredients commonly found in ice cream and in ice cream manufactured under commercial conditions, with or without ice structuring proteins (ISP) from cold-acclimated winter wheat grass extract (AWWE), was assessed by bright field microscopy. In sucrose solutions, critical differences in moisture content, viscosity, ionic strength, and other properties derived from the presence of other ingredients (skim milk powder, corn syrup solids, locust bean gum) caused a reduction in ice crystal growth. Significant ISP activity in retarding ice crystal growth was observed in all solutions (44% for the most complex mix) containing 0.13% total protein from AWWE. In heat-shocked ice cream, ice recrystallization rates were significantly reduced 40 and 46% with the addition of 0.0025 and 0.0037% total protein from AWWE. The ISP activity in ice cream was not hindered by its inclusion in mix prior to pasteurization. A synergistic effect between ISP and stabilizer was observed, as ISP activity was reduced in the absence of stabilizer in ice cream formulations. A remarkably smoother texture for ice creams containing ISP after heat-shock storage was evident by sensory evaluation. The efficiency of ISP from AWWE in controlling ice crystal growth in ice cream has been demonstrated.

  8. On the Influence of Superstructures and Deckhouses upon Longitudinal Strength%上层建筑(甲板室)参与总纵强度程度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭际; 肖渤舰

    2014-01-01

    具有发达上层建筑的大型豪华游轮已经成为当前游轮的发展趋势,而关于其上层建筑参与总纵弯曲的程度并未得到系统研究。文中结合有限元方法就这一问题进行探讨,定量分析上层建筑层数、开口尺寸及侧壁距舷侧距离等因素对上层建筑参与总纵弯曲的影响。%Cruise ship with multiple floor superstructures has become more and more popular .However , the longitudinal strength of superstructures has not been well studied .In this paper , the number of superstructures , hole size and the distance be-tween superstructure side and ship side which may have influence on the longitudinal strength of superstructures were studied by finite element method .

  9. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  10. Ultraviolet protection on a snowball Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Cockell, C.S.; Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Horneck, G

    2001-01-01

    Habitats in the Antarctic provide an insight into habitats available on snowball earth. Physical UV protection on snowball earth would have been dominated by the manifestations of ice and snow in different habitats. The snowball period was a golden age of UV protection.

  11. Ice Cream Wars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAMMYTANG

    2004-01-01

    In early March, most Chinese can only vaguely sense a trace of warmth in the spring winds. For thecountry's ice cream producers however, the hot season has already arrived as they scramble for a niche position in thecountry's huge and lucrative

  12. Aircraft Icing Handbook. (Update)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    at the 19th JALC Air Law Symposium, 1985. Sanderson , Janet. I., "Occurrence of Ice in the form of Glaze, Rime, and Hoarfrost with Respect to the...Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Jan. 1992. Brandon , J. M.; Manuel, G. S.; Wright, R. E.; Holmes, B. J., "In-Flight Flow Visualization Using Infrared

  13. Ecology under lake ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hampton, Stephanie E.; Galloway, Aaron W. E.; Powers, Stephen M.; Ozersky, Ted; Woo, Kara H.; Batt, Ryan D.; Labou, Stephanie G.; O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Sharma, Sapna; Lottig, Noah R.; Stanley, Emily H.; North, Rebecca L.; Stockwell, Jason D.; Adrian, Rita; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Arvola, Lauri; Baulch, Helen M.; Bertani, Isabella; Bowman, Larry L., Jr.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Catalan, Jordi; Colom-Montero, William; Domine, Leah M.; Felip, Marisol; Granados, Ignacio; Gries, Corinna; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Haberman, Juta; Haldna, Marina; Hayden, Brian; Higgins, Scott N.; Jolley, Jeff C.; Kahilainen, Kimmo K.; Kaup, Enn; Kehoe, Michael J.; MacIntyre, Sally; Mackay, Anson W.; Mariash, Heather L.; Mckay, Robert M.; Nixdorf, Brigitte; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Palmer, Michelle; Pierson, Don C.; Post, David M.; Pruett, Matthew J.; Rautio, Milla; Read, Jordan S.; Roberts, Sarah L.; Ruecker, Jacqueline; Sadro, Steven; Silow, Eugene A.; Smith, Derek E.; Sterner, Robert W.; Swann, George E. A.; Timofeyev, Maxim A.; Toro, Manuel; Twiss, Michael R.; Vogt, Richard J.; Watson, Susan B.; Whiteford, Erika J.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.

    Winter conditions are rapidly changing in temperate ecosystems, particularly for those that experi-ence periods of snow and ice cover. Relatively little is known of winter ecology in these systems,due to a historical research focus on summer ‘growing seasons’. We executed the first global

  14. Melting ice, growing trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Bensassi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR. Two key constraints on the future viability of the NSR pertain to bathymetry and the future evolution of the sea ice cover. Climate model projections of future sea ice conditions throughout the rest of the century suggest that even under the most “aggressive” emission scenario, increases in international trade between Europe and Asia will be very low. The large inter-annual variability of weather and sea ice conditions in the route, the Russian toll imposed for transiting the NSR, together with high insurance costs and scarce loading/unloading opportunities, limit the use of the NSR. We show that even if these obstacles are removed, the duration of the opening of the NSR over the course of the century is not long enough to offer a consequent boost to international trade at the macroeconomic level.

  15. Proceedings of ICED'09

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED'09, was held August 24-27 2009 at Stanford University, California, USA. The Conference is the flagship event of the Design Society, a society dedicated to contributing to a broad and established understanding of development and design....

  16. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, J.;

    2013-01-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003–2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change...... estimate, we supplement the ICESat data with altimeter surveys from NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper from 2002 to 2010 and NASA's Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor from 2010. The Airborne data are mainly concentrated along the ice margin and thus have a significant impact on the estimate of the volume...... change. Our results show that adding Airborne Topographic Mapper and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor data to the ICESat data increases the catchment-wide estimate of ice volume loss by 11%, mainly due to an improved volume loss estimate along the ice sheet margin. Furthermore, our results show...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4236 - What is the deadline for importing or installing stationary SI ICE produced in the previous model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... installing stationary SI ICE produced in the previous model year? 60.4236 Section 60.4236 Protection of... installing stationary SI ICE produced in the previous model year? (a) After July 1, 2010, owners and operators may not install stationary SI ICE with a maximum engine power of less than 500 HP that do not...

  18. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas, with particular emphasis on the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Some of the largest changes to the sea ice cover are...Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover Don Perovich ERDC – CRREL 72 Lyme Road Hanover, NH 03755 Phone: 603-646-4255 Email: donald.k.perovich...quantitative understanding of the partitioning of solar radiation by the Arctic sea ice cover and its impact on the heat and mass balance of the ice and upper

  19. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Artic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Arctic sea ice cover and its impact on the heat and mass balance of the ice and upper ocean ... Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas, with particular emphasis on the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Some of the largest changes to the sea ice cover are...other parts of the Arctic ice cover appear to now be accelerating. Figure 6. Maps of the linear trend of annual solar heat input to the ocean

  20. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  1. Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  2. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  3. River ice jams at bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D. [New Brunswick Dept. of Transportation, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Beltaos, S. [National Water Research Institute, Burlington, ON (Canada)

    2000-12-01

    Ice jamming, known to cause high water levels at even moderate river flows, is described as both the main and least understood source of ice-related bridge damages. This paper describes a joint study by the New Brunswick Department of Transportation, the Department of the Environment, local governments, and the National Water Research Institute, designed to address problems associated with the interaction of ice jams and bridges. The study consists of collecting information at each of four sites in New Brunswick including: historical data on ice jam locations, causes, and water levels; channel bathymetry, width and slope within each study centred at the respective bridge; and documentation of ice conditions throughout the ice season, including measurement of ice cover thickness, observation of breakup mechanisms, times, causes, characteristics and possible impacts of ice jam release. Data analysis will include determination of high stages due to ice jams or surges caused by upstream ice jam releases, scour potential of surges, and quantification of the structure's capacity to restrain ice movement and to cause jams. The principal objective of the study is to advance beyond empiricism and to develop rational design criteria for bridges by anticipating the effects of climate changes and by incorporating local meteorological and hydrometric records into bridge design for added safety.

  4. Yttrium and hydrogen superstructure and correlation of lattice expansion and proton conductivity in the BaZr0.9Y0.1O2.95 proton conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Ovalle, A.; Pomjakushin, V.; Cervellino, A.; Erat, S.; Stolte, W. C.; Graule, T.

    2009-11-01

    Bragg reflections in Y-resonant x-ray diffractograms of BaZr0.9Y0.1O2.95 (BZY10) reveal that Y is organized in a superstructure. Comparison with neutron diffraction superstructure reflections in protonated/deuterated BZY10 suggests that both superstructures are linked, and that protons move in the landscape imposed by the Y. The thermal lattice expansion decreases abruptly for protonated BZY10 at T ≥648±20 K, coinciding with the onset of lateral proton diffusion and suggesting a correlation of structural changes and proton conductivity. The chemical shift in the Y L1-shell x-ray absorption spectra reveals a reduction from Y3+ toward Y2+ upon protonation.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Automated Ice Edge Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Mari-Ann N.; Isaksem, Hugo; Debien, Annekatrien

    2016-08-01

    The importance of highly detailed and time sensitive ice charts has increased with the increasing interest in the Arctic for oil and gas, tourism, and shipping. Manual ice charts are prepared by national ice services of several Arctic countries. Methods are also being developed to automate this task. Kongsberg Satellite Services uses a method that detects ice edges within 15 minutes after image acquisition. This paper describes a sensitivity analysis of the ice edge, assessing to which ice concentration class from the manual ice charts it can be compared to. The ice edge is derived using the Ice Tracking from SAR Images (ITSARI) algorithm. RADARSAT-2 images of February 2011 are used, both for the manual ice charts and the automatic ice edges. The results show that the KSAT ice edge lies within ice concentration classes with very low ice concentration or open water.

  6. Investigation of the incommensurate and commensurate magnetic superstructures of LiCuVO4 and CuO on the basis of the isotropic spin exchange and classical spin approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D; Koo, H-J; Whangbo, M-H

    2004-06-28

    The spin lattices of magnetic oxides LiCuVO(4) and CuO are made up of CuO(2) ribbon chains. The incommensurate and commensurate magnetic superstructures of these oxides were examined by calculating the total spin exchange interaction energies of their long-range order spin arrangements on the basis of the isotropic spin exchange and classical spin approximations. The incommensurate superstructure (0, 0.532, 0) of LiCuVO(4) was analyzed to find that the next-nearest-neighbor spin exchange interaction J(nnn) is more strongly antiferromagnetic than the nearest-neighbor spin exchange interaction J(nn) in the CuO(2) chains. With this finding, we reassessed the relative strengths of the spin exchange interactions of LiCuVO(4) and CuO and then analyzed the relative energies of their long-range order spin arrangements. The incommensurate superstructure (0, 0.532, 0) of LiCuVO(4) is explained when the J(nn)/J(nnn) ratio is -0.40. Both the incommensurate superstructure (0.506, 0, -0.483) and the commensurate superstructure (0.5, 0, -0.5) of CuO, which occur at 231 and 212.5 K, respectively, are well explained in terms of the calculated total spin exchange interaction energies. The incommensurate superstructure of CuO becomes commensurate by a slight change in one interchain spin exchange interaction, which is due probably to a slight structure change brought about by the temperature lowering.

  7. Using Ice Predictions to Guide Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    prevented the use of several airfields used for transporting personnel and equipment to the ice camp. The rapidly changing conditions of the ice ...of the ice cover. The age of the sea ice serves as an indicator of its physical properties including surface roughness, melt pond coverage, and...Sailors and members of the Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station clear ice from the hatch of the submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) during Ice

  8. Power Grid De-icing Optimal Plan Based on Fractional Sieve Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guangbin; Lin, Meihan; Li, Huaqiang

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the problem that the reliability of system was reduced and the security risk was increased during the DC de-icing period, a decision-making model based on the fractional sieve method was proposed. This model introduced risk assessment theory, and took into account the comprehensive failure probability model of protection action and ice cover. Considering the de-icing condition, a DC de-icing strategy model, which was with the objective function of minimizing the load of shedding and minimizing the operating risk, was proposed. The objective function was optimized by particle swarm optimization algorithm and fractional sieve method. The simulative results of IEEE30-bus system indicated that the load loss caused by de-icing and the operational risk of the system could be effectively reduced by the proposed model. It provided a reference for power department to make a de-icing plan.

  9. Synchronizing ice cores from the Renland and Agassiz ice caps to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Fischer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Four ice cores from the Agassiz ice cap in the Canadian high arctic and one ice core from the Renland ice cap in eastern Greenland have been synchronized to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) which is based on annual layer counts in the DYE-3, GRIP and NGRIP ice cores. Volcanic...... reference horizons, seen in electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) have been used to carry out the synchronization throughout the Holocene. The Agassiz ice cores have been matched to the NGRIP ice core ECM signal, while the Renland core has been matched to the GRIP ice core ECM signal, thus tying...... the cores to GICC05. Furthermore, it has been possible to synchronize the Renland ice core to NGRIP-GICC05 in the glacial period back to 60,000 years b2k (years before A.D. 2000), on the basis of a matching of transitions between stadials and interstadials. This work brings the total number of ice core...

  10. Experimental provocation of 'ice-cream headache' by ice cubes and ice water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mages, Stephan; Hensel, Ole; Zierz, Antonia Maria; Kraya, Torsten; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Background There are various studies on experimentally provoked 'ice-cream headache' or 'headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus' (HICS) using different provocation protocols. The aim of this study was to compare two provocation protocols. Methods Ice cubes pressed to the palate and fast ingestion of ice water were used to provoke HICS and clinical features were compared. Results The ice-water stimulus provoked HICS significantly more often than the ice-cube stimulus (9/77 vs. 39/77). Ice-water-provoked HICS had a significantly shorter latency (median 15 s, range 4-97 s vs. median 68 s, range 27-96 s). There was no difference in pain localisation. Character after ice-cube stimulation was predominantly described as pressing and after ice-water stimulation as stabbing. A second HICS followed in 10/39 (26%) of the headaches provoked by ice water. Lacrimation occurred significantly more often in volunteers with than in those without HICS. Discussion HICS provoked by ice water was more frequent, had a shorter latency, different pain character and higher pain intensity than HICS provoked by ice cubes. The finding of two subsequent HICS attacks in the same volunteers supports the notion that two types of HICS exist. Lacrimation during HICS indicates involvement of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex.

  11. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  12. Animals and ICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hemmen, J Leo; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    experimental and mathematical foundation, it is known that there is a low-frequency regime where the internal time difference (iTD) as perceived by the animal may well be 2-5 times higher than the external ITD, the interaural time difference, and that there is a frequency plateau over which the fraction i......TD/ITD is constant. There is also a high-frequency regime where the internal level (amplitude) difference iLD as perceived by the animal is much higher than the interaural level difference ILD measured externally between the two ears. The fundamental tympanic frequency segregates the two regimes. The present special...... issue devoted to "internally coupled ears" provides an overview of many aspects of ICE, be they acoustic, anatomical, auditory, mathematical, or neurobiological. A focus is on the hotly debated topic of what aspects of ICE animals actually exploit neuronally to localize a sound source....

  13. City under the Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    military conflicts are taking place. Studying the wealth of public representations of Camp Century, established 1959-60 by the US Army 128 miles east of the Thule Air Base and often referred to as the “City under the Ice”, we find a sharp contrast between the domesticated interior and the superpower...... conflict that gave impetus to the camp’s construction. Presented to the public as a scientific station and a technologically-advanced, under-ice extension of the American way of life, while situated in the titanic struggle between West and East, Camp Century took on a number of closed-world meanings....... However, the military logic of Camp Century was self-referential and closed in the sense that the very idea of constructing the city under ice emerged from Cold War strategy. The closed world of Camp Century established a temporary boundary between, on the one hand, the comfortable space controlled by US...

  14. Novel Ice Mitigation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    After the loss of Columbia, there was great concern in the Space Shuttle program for the impact of debris against the leading edges of the Orbiter wings. It was quickly recognized that, in addition to impacts by foam, ice that formed on the liquid-oxygen bellows running down the outside of the External Tank could break free during launch and hit this sensitive area. A Center Director s Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project would concentrate on novel ideas that were potentially applicable. The most successful of the new concepts for ice mitigation involved shape memory alloy materials. These materials can be bent into a given shape and, when heated, will return to their original shape.

  15. Ice anaesthesia in procedural dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shreya; Lowe, Patricia; Fischer, Gayle; Lim, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents findings from a survey of Australian dermatologists who were questioned about their preferred pain control methods when carrying out injectable procedures. We also present, what is to the best of our knowledge, the first proof-of-concept experiment exploring the relationship between ice-to-skin contact time and skin surface temperature, using both ice wrapped in latex and ice wrapped in aluminium foil. Of 79 dermatologists 32 responded to the survey (41% response rate): 31 (97%) injected botulinum toxin type A (BTA) for dynamic lines, 26 (81%) injected BTA for hyperhidrosis, and 24 (75%) injected skin fillers. Ice anaesthesia was the most common method of pain control (75%) followed by use of topical anaesthesia (50%) such as EMLA, compound agents and lignocaine 4%. Ice wrapped in latex or latex-like material was the most common ice packaging used by those surveyed and the median ice-to-skin contact time was 10 s. The ice experiment results indicated that ice wrapped with aluminium foil was equivalent to ice wrapped in latex for short contact times (skin temperature with longer contact times (> 20 s). These findings will be of relevance to cosmetic and paediatric dermatologists or any area of procedural medicine where effective non-injectable pain control is required.

  16. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  17. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffeld, M.; Wang, M. J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers ...

  18. Mercury’s Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The fiery planet Mercury, where the temperature at high noon can exceed 750°F, is not a place that you would expect to find ice. The closestplanet to the sun, this airless, cratered world appears devoid of any wa-ter. frozen or otherwise. But appearances can be deceiving, as proven by ateam of researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Cali-fornia Institute of Technology.

  19. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  20. Spiral Patterning of Au Nanoparticles on Au Nanorod Surface to Form Chiral AuNR@AuNP Helical Superstructures Templated by DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenqi; Lan, Xiang; Zhu, Chenggan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Qiangbin

    2017-02-20

    Plasmonic motifs with precise surface recognition sites are crucial for assembling defined nanostructures with novel functionalities and properties. In this work, a unique and effective strategy is successfully developed to pattern DNA recognition sites in a helical arrangement around a gold nanorod (AuNR), and a new set of heterogeneous AuNR@AuNP plasmonic helices is fabricated by attaching complementary-DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the predesigned sites on the AuNR surface. AuNR is first assembled to one side of a bifacial rectangular DNA origami, where eight groups of capture strands are selectively patterned on the other side. The subsequently added link strands make the rectangular DNA origami roll up around the AuNR into a tubular shape, therefore giving birth to a chiral patterning of DNA recognition sites on the surface of AuNR. Following the hybridization with the AuNPs capped with the complementary strands to the capture strands on the DNA origami, left-handed and right-handed AuNR@AuNP helical superstructures are precisely formed by tuning the pattern of the recognition sites on the AuNR surface. Our strategy of nanoparticle surface patterning innovatively realizes hierarchical self-assembly of plasmonic superstructures with tunable chiroptical responses, and will certainly broaden the horizon of bottom-up construction of other functional nanoarchitectures with growing complexity.

  1. Controllable synthesis of 3D BiVO₄ superstructures with visible-light-induced photocatalytic oxidation of NO in the gas phase and mechanistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Man; Nie, Haoyu; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Zhong, Lei

    2015-11-21

    A surfactant-free solvothermal method was developed for the controlled synthesis of diverse 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructures, including a flower, a double-layer half-open flower and a hollow tube with square cross-sections, via facilely adjusting the pH values with the aid of NH3·H2O. The effects of the morphologies of the prepared 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructure on the photocatalytic oxidation of NO were investigated, indicating that the enhanced photoactivity was not related to the surface area, but associated with the unique morphology, surface structure and good crystallinity. Moreover, the flower-like ms-BiVO4 photocatalyst with a more (040) reactive crystal plane exhibited higher photoactivity than those of other samples. The unique morphology helped with flushing the oxidation products accumulated on the surface of photocatalysts in the H2O2 system, and further improved the photoactivity. A trapping experiment was also conducted to examine the effects of the active species involved in the PCO of NO intuitively.

  2. Contribution of TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose Gel in the Formation of Flower-Like Zinc Oxide Superstructures: Characterization of the TOCgel/ZnO Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Jradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we report on a simple and new approach for the synthesis of hierarchical flower-like zinc oxide superstructures ZnO (FL in the presence of the TEMPO-oxidized cellulose gel (TOCgel through a room temperature sol-gel process in aqueous medium. Resulting composite films based on TOCgel and ZnO were investigated by several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and mechanical tests. SEM images demonstrated the formation of well-shaped flower-like ZnO superstructures within the fibrous structure of the TOCgel with a uniform diameter (~5 μm. FTIR and XPS results clearly confirmed the formation of such ZnO structures. We suggested that the carboxylate groups of TOCgel fibers act as capping agents and promote the construction of such flower-like ZnO via a nucleation-growth process. A proposed mechanism based on the oriented attachment-driven growth was discussed in order to explain the formation of ZnO (FL. The photocatalytic activity of the TOCgel/ZnO composite in the degradation of methylene blue (MB under UV irradiation was clearly confirmed. Finally, mechanical tests demonstrated that the former TOCgel/ZnO film maintained a good flexibility (bent up to ~120° without losing its photocatalytic activity.

  3. Sea ice algal biomass and physiology in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Arrigo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sea ice covers approximately 5% of the ocean surface and is one of the most extensive ecosystems on the planet. The microbial communities that live in sea ice represent an important food source for numerous organisms at a time of year when phytoplankton in the water column are scarce. Here we describe the distributions and physiology of sea ice microalgae in the poorly studied Amundsen Sea sector of the Southern Ocean. Microalgal biomass was relatively high in sea ice in the Amundsen Sea, due primarily to well developed surface communities that would have been replenished with nutrients during seawater flooding of the surface as a result of heavy snow accumulation. Elevated biomass was also occasionally observed in slush, interior, and bottom ice microhabitats throughout the region. Sea ice microalgal photophysiology appeared to be controlled by the availability of both light and nutrients. Surface communities used an active xanthophyll cycle and effective pigment sunscreens to protect themselves from harmful ultraviolet and visible radiation. Acclimation to low light microhabitats in sea ice was facilitated by enhanced pigment content per cell, greater photosynthetic accessory pigments, and increased photosynthetic efficiency. Photoacclimation was especially effective in the bottom ice community, where ready access to nutrients would have allowed ice microalgae to synthesize a more efficient photosynthetic apparatus. Surprisingly, the pigment-detected prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis antarctica was an important component of surface communities (slush and surface ponds where its acclimation to high light may precondition it to seed phytoplankton blooms after the sea ice melts in spring.

  4. Oil-Infused Superhydrophobic Silicone Material for Low Ice Adhesion with Long-Term Infusion Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Yong Han; Wang, Chenyu; Wynne, Kenneth J; Gupta, Mool C

    2016-11-23

    A new approach for anti-icing materials was created to combat the effects of ice accretion and adhesion. The concept combines the strengths of individual characteristics for low ice adhesion based on elasticity, superhydrophobicity, and slippery liquid infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) for an optimal combination of high water repellency and ice-phobicity. This was achieved by replicating microtextures from a laser-irradiated aluminum substrate to an oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer, the result of which is a flexible, superhydrophobic, and lubricated material. This design provides multiple strategies of icing protection through high water repellency to retard ice accretion and with elasticity and oil infusion for low ice adhesion in a single material. Studies showed that an infusion of silicone oils with viscosity at 100 cSt and below 8 wt % in PDMS solution is sufficient to reduce the ice shear strength to an average of 38 kPa while maintaining contact angles and roll-off angles of above 150° and below 10°, respectively. This ice-adhesion value is a ∼95% reduction from a bare aluminum surface and ∼30% reduction from a microtextured, superhydrophobic PDMS material without oil infusion. In addition, three-month aging studies showed that the wetting and ice-adhesion performance of this material did not significantly degrade.

  5. Ecology under lake ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Stephanie E; Galloway, Aaron W E; Powers, Stephen M; Ozersky, Ted; Woo, Kara H; Batt, Ryan D; Labou, Stephanie G; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Sharma, Sapna; Lottig, Noah R; Stanley, Emily H; North, Rebecca L; Stockwell, Jason D; Adrian, Rita; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Arvola, Lauri; Baulch, Helen M; Bertani, Isabella; Bowman, Larry L; Carey, Cayelan C; Catalan, Jordi; Colom-Montero, William; Domine, Leah M; Felip, Marisol; Granados, Ignacio; Gries, Corinna; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Haberman, Juta; Haldna, Marina; Hayden, Brian; Higgins, Scott N; Jolley, Jeff C; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Kaup, Enn; Kehoe, Michael J; MacIntyre, Sally; Mackay, Anson W; Mariash, Heather L; McKay, Robert M; Nixdorf, Brigitte; Nõges, Peeter; Nõges, Tiina; Palmer, Michelle; Pierson, Don C; Post, David M; Pruett, Matthew J; Rautio, Milla; Read, Jordan S; Roberts, Sarah L; Rücker, Jacqueline; Sadro, Steven; Silow, Eugene A; Smith, Derek E; Sterner, Robert W; Swann, George E A; Timofeyev, Maxim A; Toro, Manuel; Twiss, Michael R; Vogt, Richard J; Watson, Susan B; Whiteford, Erika J; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2017-01-01

    Winter conditions are rapidly changing in temperate ecosystems, particularly for those that experience periods of snow and ice cover. Relatively little is known of winter ecology in these systems, due to a historical research focus on summer 'growing seasons'. We executed the first global quantitative synthesis on under-ice lake ecology, including 36 abiotic and biotic variables from 42 research groups and 101 lakes, examining seasonal differences and connections as well as how seasonal differences vary with geophysical factors. Plankton were more abundant under ice than expected; mean winter values were 43.2% of summer values for chlorophyll a, 15.8% of summer phytoplankton biovolume and 25.3% of summer zooplankton density. Dissolved nitrogen concentrations were typically higher during winter, and these differences were exaggerated in smaller lakes. Lake size also influenced winter-summer patterns for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), with higher winter DOC in smaller lakes. At coarse levels of taxonomic aggregation, phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition showed few systematic differences between seasons, although literature suggests that seasonal differences are frequently lake-specific, species-specific, or occur at the level of functional group. Within the subset of lakes that had longer time series, winter influenced the subsequent summer for some nutrient variables and zooplankton biomass. © 2016 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Planetary Ices Attenuation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christine; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    In this chapter, we review the topic of energy dissipation in the context of icy satellites experiencing tidal forcing. We describe the physics of mechanical dissipation, also known as attenuation, in polycrystalline ice and discuss the history of laboratory methods used to measure and understand it. Because many factors - such as microstructure, composition and defect state - can influence rheological behavior, we review what is known about the mechanisms responsible for attenuation in ice and what can be inferred from the properties of rocks, metals and ceramics. Since attenuation measured in the laboratory must be carefully scaled to geologic time and to planetary conditions in order to provide realistic extrapolation, we discuss various mechanical models that have been used, with varying degrees of success, to describe attenuation as a function of forcing frequency and temperature. We review the literature in which these models have been used to describe dissipation in the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, we address gaps in our present knowledge of planetary ice attenuation and provide suggestions for future inquiry.

  7. Fram Strait Spring Ice Export and September Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedsrud, Lars H.; Halvorsen, Mari H.; Stroeve, Julienne; Zhang, Rong; Kloster, Kjell

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Basin exports between 600 000 - 1 million km² of it's sea ice cover southwards through Fram Strait each year, comparing to about 10% of the ice covered area inside the basin. During winter ice export results in growth of new and relatively thin ice inside the basin, while during summer or spring export contributes directly to open water further north. A new updated time series from 1935 to 2014 of Fram Strait sea ice area export shows that the long-term annual mean export is about 880,000 km², with large annual and decadal variability and no long-term trend over the past 80 years. Nevertheless, the last decade has witnessed increased annual ice export, with several years having annual ice export exceed 1 million km². Evaluating the trend onwards from 1979, when satellite based sea ice coverage became more readily available, reveals an increase in annual export of about +6% per decade. This increase is caused by higher southward ice drift speeds due to stronger southward geostrophic winds, largely explained by increasing surface pressure over Greenland. Spring and summer area export increased more (+11% per decade) than in autumn and winter. Contrary to the last decade the 1950 - 1970 period had low export during spring and summer, and mid-September sea ice extent was consistently higher than both before and after these decades. We thus find that export anomalies during spring have a clear influence on the following September sea ice extent in general, and that for the recent decade the export may be partially responsible for the accelerating decline in Arctic sea ice extent.

  8. Floating Ice-Algal Aggregates below melting Arctic Sea Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Assmy; Jens K. Ehn; Mar Fernández-Méndez; Haakon Hop; Christian Katlein; Arild Sundfjord; Katrin Bluhm; Malin Daase; Anja Engel; Agneta Fransson; Granskog, Mats A.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Svein Kristiansen; Marcel Nicolaus; Ilka Peeken

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1 – 15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layer...

  9. Characterization of Ice Roughness Variations in Scaled Glaze Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Because of the significant influence of surface tension in governing the stability and breakdown of the liquid film in flooded stagnation regions of airfoils exposed to glaze icing conditions, the Weber number is expected to be a significant parameter governing the formation and evolution of ice roughness. To investigate the influence of the Weber number on roughness formation, 53.3-cm (21-in.) and 182.9-cm (72-in.) NACA 0012 airfoils were exposed to flow conditions with essentially the same Weber number and varying stagnation collection efficiency to illuminate similarities of the ice roughness created on the different airfoils. The airfoils were exposed to icing conditions in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Following exposure to the icing event, the airfoils were then scanned using a ROMER Absolute Arm scanning system. The resulting point clouds were then analyzed using the self-organizing map approach of McClain and Kreeger (2013) to determine the spatial roughness variations along the surfaces of the iced airfoils. The roughness characteristics on each airfoil were then compared using the relative geometries of the airfoil. The results indicate that features of the ice shape and roughness such as glaze-ice plateau limits and maximum airfoil roughness were captured well by Weber number and collection efficiency scaling of glaze icing conditions. However, secondary ice roughness features relating the instability and waviness of the liquid film on the glaze-ice plateau surface are scaled based on physics that were not captured by the local collection efficiency variations.

  10. The Spitzer ice legacy: Ice evolution from cores to protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Broek, Saskia van den; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J

    2011-01-01

    Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H2O:CO:CO2:CH3OH:NH3:CH4:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H2O of CH4, NH3, and the component of CO2 mixed with H2O typically vary by <25%, indicative of co-formation with H2O. In contrast, some CO and CO2 ice components, XCN and CH3OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN- identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are cons...

  11. IceCube systematic errors investigation: Simulation of the ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resconi, Elisa; Wolf, Martin [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schukraft, Anne [RWTH, Aachen University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astroparticle and astronomy research at the South Pole. It uses one cubic kilometer of Antartica's deepest ice (1500 m-2500 m in depth) to detect Cherenkov light, generated by charged particles traveling through the ice, with an array of phototubes encapsulated in glass pressure spheres. The arrival time as well as the charge deposited of the detected photons represent the base measurements that are used for track and energy reconstruction of those charged particles. The optical properties of the deep antarctic ice vary from layer to layer. Measurements of the ice properties and their correct modeling in Monte Carlo simulation is then of primary importance for the correct understanding of the IceCube telescope behavior. After a short summary about the different methods to investigate the ice properties and to calibrate the detector, we show how the simulation obtained by using this information compares to the measured data and how systematic errors due to uncertain ice properties are determined in IceCube.

  12. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hayashi, Kanetoshi [NKK Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  13. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, John; Korsgaard, Niels J.; KjæR, Kurt H.; BjøRk, Anders A.; Hurkmans, Ruud; Broeke, Michiel R.; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Angelen, Jan H.

    2013-02-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003-2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change estimate, we supplement the ICESat data with altimeter surveys from NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper from 2002 to 2010 and NASA's Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor from 2010. The Airborne data are mainly concentrated along the ice margin and thus have a significant impact on the estimate of the volume change. Our results show that adding Airborne Topographic Mapper and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor data to the ICESat data increases the catchment-wide estimate of ice volume loss by 11%, mainly due to an improved volume loss estimate along the ice sheet margin. Furthermore, our results show a significant acceleration in mass loss at elevations above 1200 m. Both the improved mass loss estimate along the ice sheet margin and the acceleration at higher elevations have implications for predictions of the elastic adjustment of the lithosphere caused by present-day ice mass changes. Our study shows that the use of ICESat data alone to predict elastic uplift rates biases the predicted rates by several millimeters per year at GPS locations along the northwestern coast.

  14. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year.

  15. Proceedings of the Airframe Icing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Ron O. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history of working with its partners towards the understanding of ice accretion formation and its associated degradation of aerodynamic performance. The June 9, 2009, Airframe Icing Workshop held at GRC provided an opportunity to examine the current NASA airframe icing research program and to dialogue on remaining and emerging airframe icing issues and research with the external community. Some of the airframe icing gaps identified included, but are not limited to, ice accretion simulation enhancements, three-dimensional benchmark icing database development, three-dimensional iced aerodynamics modeling, and technology development for a smart icing system.

  16. Atmospheric Ice Accretion Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Virk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric icing on structures has proven to be an area of concern in many cold climate geographical regions like arctic and alpine. Difficulties encountered by the communication, construction and power industries in these areas are the subject of intense investigations for researchers from decades. Three main methods of investigation are generally employed by researchers to study atmospheric ice accretion on structures: a continuous field measurements, b lab based simulations using icing wind tunnel & c numerical modelling. This paper presents a brief review study of various techniques to understand and measure the atmospheric ice accretion on structures, anti/de icing techniques and important parameters for numerical modelling of atmospheric ice accretion.

  17. Pre-activation of aerosol particles by ice preserved in pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Pre-activation denotes the capability of particles or materials to nucleate ice at lower relative humidities or higher temperatures compared to their intrinsic ice nucleation efficiency after having experienced an ice nucleation event or low temperature before. This review presumes that ice preserved in pores is responsible for pre-activation and analyses pre-activation under this presumption. Idealized trajectories of air parcels are used to discuss the pore characteristics needed for ice to persist in pores and to induce macroscopic ice growth out of the pores. The pore width needed to keep pores filled with water decreases with decreasing relative humidity as described by the inverse Kelvin equation. Thus, narrow pores remain filled with ice well below ice saturation. However, the smaller the pore width, the larger the melting and freezing point depressions within the pores. Therefore, pre-activation due to pore ice is constrained by the melting of ice in narrow pores and the sublimation of ice from wide pores imposing restrictions on the temperature and relative humidity range of pre-activation for cylindrical pores. Ice is better protected in ink-bottle-shaped pores with a narrow opening leading to a large cavity. However, whether pre-activation is efficient also depends on the capability of ice to grow macroscopically, i.e. out of the pore. A strong effect of pre-activation is expected for swelling pores, because at low relative humidity (RH) their openings narrow and protect the ice within them against sublimation. At high relative humidities, they open up and the ice can grow to macroscopic size and form an ice crystal. Similarly, ice protected in pockets is perfectly sheltered against sublimation but needs the dissolution of the surrounding matrix to be effective. Pores partially filled with condensable material may also show pre-activation. In this case, complete filling occurs at lower RH than for empty pores and freezing shifts to lower temperatures

  18. Ice cream with additional value

    OpenAIRE

    Melicharová, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to summarise current knowledge about production and properties of ice cream with an additional value. Nowadays, incorporation of probiotics is considered as the most intensively studied possibility for functional ice cream manufacture. Their viability depends on the kind of a microorganism, for example bifidobacteria are mostly less stable than lactobacilli in ice cream matrix. Lactobacillus acidophilus AB518, AK414, Lactobacillus agilis AA1773, AC1888 and L...

  19. THE INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    ICE was built during 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). ICE was a proton and antiproton storage ring, built to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project to be launched in 1978. More on the ICE experimental programme with 7802099. See also 7809081, 7908242.

  20. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years remains a mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O and ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene variations near 100 000 years is a linear (''Milankovitch'' response to summer insolation forcing. Both result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of this non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase both at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and within the ~100 000-year eccentricity band. This timing argues against greenhouse-gas forcing of a slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. Because the effect of CO2 on temperature is logarithmic, the temperature/CO2 feedback on ice volume is also logarithmic. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets were forced by insolation changes at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago and responded in a linear way, but CO2 feedback amplified (roughly doubled the ice response at 41 000 years. After 0.9 million years ago, as polar climates continued to cool, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth at 41 000-year intervals, but weaker ablation permitted ice to survive subsequent insolation maxima of low intensity. These longer-lived ice sheets persisted until peaks in northern summer insolation paced abrupt deglaciations every 100 000±15 000 years. Most ice melting during deglaciations was achieved by the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets, but now acting in the opposite direction. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to have been the mechanisms by which ice sheets

  1. Ice detection and deicing system improves the economics of a wind turbine in the arctic weather conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, J. [Labko Ice Detection Oy (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    The Finnish Lapland is an excellent test area for the wind turbines due to strong winds and heavy icing. Also the need of ice protection is evident, for wind turbines cannot be used in the area at all without such devices which keep the blades free of ice, rime frost or heavy snow. Labco Ice Detection Oy has been working in good cooperation with VTT and Kemijoki Oy to solve this problem technically and economically by developing an ice detector and deicing system. This system detects ice when its thickness is 0,5 mm and melts it so that the blades will stay clean during the ice accretion. The enclosed estimation process indicates that the investment in this system is economically profitable. (author)

  2. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, K.N. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  3. Fluid dynamics of planetary ices

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The role of water ice in the solar system is reviewed from a fluid-dynamical point of view. On Earth and Mars, water ice forms ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers at the surface, which show glacial flow under their own weight. By contrast, water ice is a major constituent of the bulk volume of the icy satellites in the outer solar system, and ice flow can occur as thermal convection. The rheology of polycrystalline aggregates of ordinary, hexagonal ice Ih is described by a power law, different forms of which are discussed. The temperature dependence of the ice viscosity follows an Arrhenius law. Therefore, the flow of ice in a planetary environment constitutes a thermo-mechanically coupled problem; its model equations are obtained by inserting the flow law and the thermodynamic material equations in the balance laws of mass, momentum and energy. As an example of gravity-driven flow, the polar caps of Mars are discussed. For the north-polar cap, large-scale flow velocities of the order of 0.1...1 mm/a are likely...

  4. Ices in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah

    2008-05-01

    The centerpiece of this proposal is my hypothesis that other ices besides H2O help build giant planet cores. I propose a theory project on the ice composition of planet-forming regions and a related observing project on ice detection and mineralogy in debris disks. Together, the theory and observing projects will answer two questions: 1. Where are the condensation fronts of abundant volatiles located in relation to giant planet feeding zones? 2. How much does the presence of CHON ices in planetesimals speed up giant planet formation?

  5. Alternating current breakdown voltage of ice electret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshika, Y.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Okumura, T.; Muramoto, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Ice has low environmental impact. Our research objectives are to study the availability of ice as a dielectric insulating material at cryogenic temperatures. We focus on ferroelectric ice (iceXI) at cryogenic temperatures. The properties of iceXI, including its formation, are not clear. We attempted to obtain the polarized ice that was similar to iceXI under the applied voltage and cooling to 77 K. The polarized ice have a wide range of engineering applications as electronic materials at cryogenic temperatures. This polarized ice is called ice electret. The structural difference between ice electret and normal ice is only the positions of protons. The effects of the proton arrangement on the breakdown voltage of ice electret were shown because electrical properties are influenced by the structure of ice. We observed an alternating current (ac) breakdown voltage of ice electret and normal ice at 77 K. The mean and minimum ac breakdown voltage values of ice electret were higher than those of normal ice. We considered that the electrically weak part of the normal ice was improved by applied a direct electric field.

  6. Wave-Ice and Air-Ice-Ocean Interaction During the Chukchi Sea Ice Edge Advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Ocean gliders Ahead of ice edge Upper ocean (0-200m) T, S, O2, bio- optics , currents During cruise CU-B UAF Autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV...Under ice, up to 50km transects Ice thickness, floe-size distribution, waves, upper ocean properties ADCP, CTD, camera, multibeam sonar...WBMS broadband multibeam sonar, a Nortek 500 kHz AD2CP, and a hyperspectral radiometer. A Seabird Fastcat-49 CTD will also be added. This ROV will

  7. Delicious ice cream, why does salt thaw ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    During winter, we use to spread salt to thaw ice on the streets. In a physics show, one can be almost sure that after showing this effect, the answer to what happens to temperature will be "it increases". But no! It goes down, in such amount that one can complement the show by producing hand-made ice creams [1].

  8. Eulerian method for ice crystal icing in turbofan engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The newer generations of high-bypass-ratio engines are susceptible to the ingestion of small ice crystals which may cause engine power loss or damage. The research presented in this thesis focusses on the development of a computational method for in-engine ice crystal accretion. The work has been ca

  9. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjeldsen, K.K.; Khan, S.A.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Angelen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003–2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change est

  10. Ice storm `98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulard, F.; Trant, D.; Filoso, J.; Van Wesenbeeck, P. [Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environment Statistics Program

    1998-12-31

    As much as 100 millimeters of freezing rain fell on central and eastern Canada between January 4 to 10, 1998. This study concentrates on Canada`s St. Lawrence River Valley where total precipitation exceeded 73 mm in Kingston, 85 mm in Ottawa and 100 mm in areas south of Montreal. By comparison, the largest previously recorded ice storms left between 30 and 40 mm of ice. A state of emergency was declared for the affected regions. 56 per cent of Quebec`s population and 11 per cent of Ontario`s population were affected by the storm. Over 1000 power transmission towers collapsed and more than 30,000 wooden utility poles were brought down. In Quebec, nearly 1.4 million customers were left without electricity. In Ontario that number was about 230,000. While some manufacturers benefited directly from the storm, including makers of hydro and telephone poles, batteries and specialized electrical equipment, the overall economic losses for Montreal and Ottawa were high as estimates run to $585 million and $114 million, respectively. Almost 5 million sugar maple taps in Quebec and Ontario were located and suffered some damage in the affected areas. Nearly one-quarter (274,000) of all dairy cows were also located in the affected areas. Since in the absence of electricity they could not be milked, many of them suffered from mastitis. Many succumbed, others that survived may never attain their former level of productivity. As of June 1998, over 600,000 insurance claims totaling one billion dollars had been filed by Canadian households and businesses from the area affected by the ice storm.1 fig.

  11. Albedo evolution of seasonal Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Polashenski, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing shift in the Arctic sea ice cover from multiyear ice to seasonal ice. Here we examine the impact of this shift on sea ice albedo. Our analysis of observations from four years of field experiments indicates that seasonal ice undergoes an albedo evolution with seven phases; cold snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond drainage, pond evolution, open water, and freezeup. Once surface ice melt begins, seasonal ice albedos are consistently less than albedos for multiyear ice resulting in more solar heat absorbed in the ice and transmitted to the ocean. The shift from a multiyear to seasonal ice cover has significant implications for the heat and mass budget of the ice and for primary productivity in the upper ocean. There will be enhanced melting of the ice cover and an increase in the amount of sunlight available in the upper ocean.

  12. Sea Ice Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    aq pnoiqs suol)0!pOid AixoolQA 00! 191100 (1I ’uoTow poAlosqo aql jo lqlgti 04) ol a~xe juqp suotioaJip 4)!A% parto s~t S stqi pule ’spoods 001 a)tUJT...to provide information as ating characteristics of PIPS. These factors in- to processes and their scales (as ascertained by elude the vertical grid...warranted horizontal compression being compensated by at this time. Further investigation is needed. vertical motion. In the case of ice, upward The space

  13. Arctic Ice Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    jFigure 1. NIfS-7 SWr imagery frou 6 July 1983 portrays variat s i ie con.centra- tion across the experiental area Figure 2. Large floes in the East...and P. T. Shaw. Particle pathways in the and by European Community Commission contract CCE CLI-083 F. Gulf Stream. Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc.. 66, 1106...New York: Academic Press, 1981. pp. 29-62. ice in the arctic," inProc. 4th Symp. Remote Sensing of En viron., 1281 R. T. Lowry, private communication

  14. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years is a long-standing mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O/ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene oscillations near 100 000 years is a linear ('Milankovitch' response to summer insolation forcing. Both responses must result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of the required non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and nearly in phase within the ~100 000-year band. This timing rules out greenhouse-gas forcing of a very slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets responded linearly to insolation forcing at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago, but CO2 feedback amplified the ice response at the 41 000-year period by a factor of approximately two. After 0.9 million years ago, with slow polar cooling, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth every 41 000 years, but weaker ablation permitted some ice to survive insolation maxima of low intensity. Step-wise growth of these longer-lived ice sheets continued until peaks in northern summer insolation produced abrupt deglaciations every ~85 000 to ~115 000 years. Most of the deglacial ice melting resulted from the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to be candidate mechanisms for ice-sheet control of CO2 and their own feedback.

  15. Arctic Sea Ice Predictability and the Sea Ice Prediction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reductions in Arctic sea ice cover have increased the demand for Arctic sea ice predictions by a range of stakeholders, including local communities, resource managers, industry and the public. The science of sea-ice prediction has been challenged to keep up with these developments. Efforts such as the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook (SIO; http://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook) and the Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook have provided a forum for the international sea-ice prediction and observing community to explore and compare different approaches. The SIO, originally organized by the Study of Environmental Change (SEARCH), is now managed by the new Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN), which is building a collaborative network of scientists and stakeholders to improve arctic sea ice prediction. The SIO synthesizes predictions from a variety of methods, including heuristic and from a statistical and/or dynamical model. In a recent study, SIO data from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed. The analysis revealed that in some years the predictions were very successful, in other years they were not. Years that were anomalous compared to the long-term trend have proven more difficult to predict, regardless of which method was employed. This year, in response to feedback from users and contributors to the SIO, several enhancements have been made to the SIO reports. One is to encourage contributors to provide spatial probability maps of sea ice cover in September and the first day each location becomes ice-free; these are an example of subseasonal to seasonal, local-scale predictions. Another enhancement is a separate analysis of the modeling contributions. In the June 2014 SIO report, 10 of 28 outlooks were produced from models that explicitly simulate sea ice from dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models. Half of the models included fully-coupled (atmosphere, ice, and ocean) models that additionally employ data assimilation. Both of these subsets (models and coupled models with data

  16. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  17. The “international” non protection of the holder of the right to protection of personal data / La desprotección “internacional” del titular del derecho a la protección de datos de carácter personal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Ortega Giménez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze different protection mechanisms that could or should be accessed by the person entitled to the protection of personal data, to an international transfer of illegal data in order to obtain adequate protection, balanced and effective, in different centers of production rules: international legal superstructure regional systems integration and transnational space. Analyzes reveal a situation that is far from satisfactory and will conclude by demonstrating that private international law is clearly the most plausible explanation for the injured get a satisfaction to its legitimate interests possibility.

  18. Primary spectrum and composition with IceCube/IceTop

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    IceCube, with its surface array IceTop, detects three different components of extensive air showers: the total signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers and TeV muons in the deep array of IceCube. The spectrum is measured with high resolution from the knee to the ankle with IceTop. Composition and spectrum are extracted from events seen in coincidence by the surface array and the deep array of IceCube. The muon lateral distribution at the surface is obtained from the data and used to provide a measurement of the muon density at 600 meters from the shower core up to 30 PeV. Results are compared to measurements from other experiments to obtain an overview of the spectrum and composition over an extended range of energy. Consistency of the surface muon measurements with hadronic interaction models and with measurements at higher energy is discussed.

  19. Arctic sea-ice ridges—Safe heavens for sea-ice fauna during periods of extreme ice melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, Rolf; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The abundances and distribution of metazoan within-ice meiofauna (13 stations) and under-ice fauna (12 stations) were investigated in level sea ice and sea-ice ridges in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Canada Basin in June/July 2005 using a combination of ice coring and SCUBA diving. Ice meiofauna abundance was estimated based on live counts in the bottom 30 cm of level sea ice based on triplicate ice core sampling at each location, and in individual ice chunks from ridges at four locations. Under-ice amphipods were counted in situ in replicate ( N=24-65 per station) 0.25 m 2 quadrats using SCUBA to a maximum water depth of 12 m. In level sea ice, the most abundant ice meiofauna groups were Turbellaria (46%), Nematoda (35%), and Harpacticoida (19%), with overall low abundances per station that ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 ind l -1 (median 0.8 ind l -1). In level ice, low ice algal pigment concentrations (3 m where abundances were up to 42-fold higher compared with level ice. We propose that the summer ice melt impacted meiofauna and under-ice amphipod abundance and distribution through (a) flushing, and (b) enhanced salinity stress at thinner level sea ice (less than 3 m thickness). We further suggest that pressure ridges, which extend into deeper, high-salinity water, become accumulation regions for ice meiofauna and under-ice amphipods in summer. Pressure ridges thus might be crucial for faunal survival during periods of enhanced summer ice melt. Previous estimates of Arctic sea ice meiofauna and under-ice amphipods on regional and pan-Arctic scales likely underestimate abundances at least in summer because they typically do not include pressure ridges.

  20. Grease ice in basin-scale sea-ice ocean models

    OpenAIRE

    Lars H. Smedsrud; Martin, Torge

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of sea-ice formation is often grease ice, a mixture of sea water and frazil ice crystals. Over time, grease ice typically congeals first to pancake ice floes and then to a solid sea-ice cover. Grease ice is commonly not explicitly simulated in basin-scale sea-ice ocean models, though it affects oceanic heat loss and ice growth and is expected to play a greater role in a more seasonally icecovered Arctic Ocean. We present an approach to simulate the grease-ice layer with, as ba...

  1. Preliminary Survey of Icing Conditions Measured During Routine Transcontinental Airline Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Porter J.

    1952-01-01

    Icing data collected on routine operations by four DC-4-type aircraft equipped with NACA pressure-type icing-rate meters are presented as preliminary information obtained from a statistical icing data program sponsored by the NACA with the cooperation of many airline companies and the United States Air Force. The program is continuing on a much greater scale to provide large quantities of data from many air routes in the United States and overseas. Areas not covered by established air routes are also being included in the survey. The four aircraft which collected the data presented in this report were operated by United Air Lines over a transcontinental route from January through May, 1951. An analysis of the pressure-type icing-rate meter was satisfactory for collecting statistical data during routine operations. Data obtained on routine flight icing encounters from.these four instrumented aircraft, although insufficient for a conclusive statistical analysis, provide a greater quantity and considerably more realistic information than that obtained from random research flights. A summary of statistical data will be published when the information obtained daring the 1951-52 icing season and that to be obtained during the 1952-53 season can be analyzed and assembled. The 1951-52 data already analyzed indicate that the quantity, quality, and range of icing information being provided by this expanded program should afford a sound basis for ice-protection-system design by defining the important meteorological parameters of the icing cloud.

  2. The physics of ice cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Chris

    2003-05-01

    Almost everybody likes ice cream, so it can provide an excellent vehicle for discussing and demonstrating a variety of physical phenomena, such as Newton's law of cooling, Boyle's law and the relationship between microstructure and macroscopic properties (e.g. Young's modulus). Furthermore, a demonstration of freezing point depression can be used to make ice cream in the classroom!

  3. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  4. The IceProd Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.

    2015-01-01

    IceCube is a one-gigaton instrument located at the geographic South Pole, designed to detect cosmic neutrinos, iden- tify the particle nature of dark matter, and study high-energy neutrinos themselves. Simulation of the IceCube detector and processing of data require a significant amount of compu...... the details of job submission and job management from the framework....

  5. Ice as an Abrading Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Grit-blasting method makes unnecessary to disassemble equipment for cleaning. Stream of small, frozen pellets directed at assembly to be cleaned. Pellets consist of deionized-water ice, carbon dioxide ice, or another substance that does not react chemically with parts to be cleaned and leaves no residue. Method suited to cleaning titanium and parts that touch liquid oxygen.

  6. Analytical ice-sheet models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    To model present-day or palaeo-ice sheets in a realistic way requires numerical methods with high spatial resolution and a comprehensive description of the relevant physical processes. Nevertheless, some basic elements of the interaction between ice sheets and climate can be investigated by simple m

  7. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  8. Ices in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. Mayo; van de Bult, C. E. P. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    The chemical and physical properties of ice grains in interstellar space have been studied in the laboratory and theoretically modeled to compare with astronomical spectra between 2700 and 3700/cm. The observed polarization of starlight in this region clearly indicates that elongated particles are involved. Absorption characteristics for various shaped grains whose radii vary from approximately 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer, containing either pure amorphous H20 or amorphous mixtures of H20 with NH3, have been calculated with the aim of narrowing the range of acceptable grain parameters. By comparing the band shapes for spherical, spheroidal, and cylindrical grains with astronomical spectra we show that elongated particles whose radii are approximately equal to 0.15 micrometer produce an acceptable match and that both spherical and elongated particles whose radii are greater than or equal to 0.5 micrometer are definitely not consistent with observations. Details of the band shape are shown to depend on particle size, shape, and composition. Similar profiles can be produced by using different combinations of particle shape and composition. For example, the NH3 signature at 2.97 micrometer, which is prominent in a spherical grain, is greatly suppressed when in an elongated grain. This is exactly equivalent to reducing the concentration of NH3 in a spherical grain. A morphological grain model is used to explain the large variations in the observed strength of the 3.07 micrometer ice band from one region of space to another.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Featherlike Hierarchical Fe-Co Alloy Superstructures%羽状Fe-Co合金分级结构粒子的合成与表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王维; 阳振军

    2016-01-01

    Featherlike hierarchical Fe-Co alloy superstructures are synthesized by using FeCl3 ·6H2 O as the source of iron and sodium citrate as shape-controlling agent. The morphology and composition of the samples are characterized by SEM, EDX and XRD etc. It is have been found that sodium citrate play a key role in forming hierarchical superstructures,the formation mechanism of featherlike superstructures could be ascribed to Diffusion-Limited Aggregation ( DLA) theory: The previous nanocrystals tend to join each other along with direction of the crystal plane without adsorbed sodium citrate and then to form intermediate superstruc-tures, and well-development featherlike superstructures are generated after further growth under the action of Ostwald ripening.%分别以柠檬酸钠和FeCl3·6H2 O为形状控制剂和铁源制备了羽状Fe-Co合金分级结构粒子。用扫描电镜、能谱和X射线衍射对样品的形貌、成分进行了表征分析,并研究了柠檬酸钠用量对产物的影响。结果表明羽状分级结构形成机理可以用扩散限制聚集理论解释,即前期纳米晶核在没有柠檬酸根吸附的晶面上定向聚集形成松散的枝状结构,最后经过奥斯特瓦尔德熟化成羽叶状分级结构。

  10. Advances in Ice Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Radars have been employed for ice remote sensing since the mid-twentieth century. The original application in radioglaciology was to obtain ice thickness: an essential parameter in ice flux calculations and boundary condition in ice flow models. Later, radars were used to estimate basal conditions and track laterally persistent features in the ice. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheet's recent hardware advances include multichannel systems and radar suites covering the usable frequency spectrum. These advances coupled with increased interest in the polar regions result in a concomitant exponential growth in data. We focus on a few results that have come from these changes. Multichannel radar systems improved clutter rejection and enabled 3D imaging. Using computer vision algorithms, we have automated the process of extracting the ice bottom surface in 3D imagery for complex topographies including narrow glacier channels where the ice surface and ice bottom merge together within the 3D images. We present results of wide swath imaging which have enabled narrow, 2-3 km wide, glacier channels to be fully imaged in a single pass. When radar data are available across the frequency spectrum, we have the ability to enhance target detection and measure frequency dependent properties. For example, we can couple HF sounder measurements in warmer ice where scattering attenuates and hides the signal of interest with VHF sounder measurements in cooler ice which have much improved resolution from a single flight line. We present examples of improved bed detection with coupled HF and VHF imagery in a temperate to cold ice transition that show the strong frequency dependence of englacial scattering. To handle the increased data rate, we developed a standard processing chain and data product for CReSIS radar systems, including legacy systems. Application specific GIS tools are an essential part and enable us to merge other data products during data analysis. By using imagery

  11. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  12. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The hydrological systems of ice sheets are complex. Our view of the system is split, largely due to the complexity of observing the systems. Our basic knowledge of processes have been obtained from smaller glaciers and although applicable in general to the larger scales of the ice sheets, ice sheets contain features not observable on smaller glaciers due to their size. The generation of water on the ice sheet surface is well understood and can be satisfactorily modeled. The routing of water from the surface down through the ice is not complicated in terms of procat has been problematic is the way in which the couplings between surface and bed has been accomplished through a kilometer of cold ice, but with the studies on crack propagation and lake drainage on Greenland we are beginning to understand also this process and we know water can be routed through thick cold ice. Water generation at the bed is also well understood but the main problem preventing realistic estimates of water generation is lack of detailed information about geothermal heat fluxes and their geographical distribution beneath the ice. Although some average value for geothermal heat flux may suffice, for many purposes it is important that such values are not applied to sub-regions of significantly higher fluxes. Water generated by geothermal heat constitutes a constant supply and will likely maintain a steady system beneath the ice sheet. Such a system may include subglacial lakes as steady features and reconfiguration of the system is tied to time scales on which the ice sheet geometry changes so as to change pressure gradients in the basal system itself. Large scale re-organization of subglacial drainage systems have been observed beneath ice streams. The stability of an entirely subglacially fed drainage system may hence be perturbed by rapid ice flow. In the case of Antarctic ice streams where such behavior has been observed, the ice streams are underlain by deformable sediments. It is

  13. Continuous Chemistry in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid

    originating from volcanic eruptions, crucial for cross-dating ice cores and relevant for climate interpretations. The method includes a heat bath to minimize the acidifying effect of CO2 both from the laboratory and from the ice itself. While for acidic ice the method finds similar concentrations of H......Ice cores provide high resolution records of past climate and environment. In recent years the use of continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems has increased the measurement throughput, while simultaneously decreasing the risk of contaminating the ice samples. CFA measurements of high temporal...... resolution increase our knowledge on fast climate variations and cover a wide range of proxies informing on a variety of components such as atmospheric transport, volcanic eruptions, forest fires and many more. New CFA methods for the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and pH are presented...

  14. Role of Ordering Energy in Formation of Grain Structure and Special Boundaries Spectrum in OrderedAlloys with L12 Superstructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It was revealed that an average energy of special boundaries is proportional to APB energy in the alloys with the L12 superstructure. This fact proves the appearance of the GAPBs in the planes of location of special boundaries in coincidence sites of ordered alloys. It was determined that the more energy of special boundaries in ordered alloys, the more energy of complex stacking fault. There is a correlation between the distribution of special boundaries as a function its relative energy and ordering energy: the more ordering energy, the more degree of washed away of distribution. The correlation between average relative energy of special boundaries and ordering energy was detected: the more ordering energy, the more average energy of special boundaries. The reverse dependence between ordering energy and average number of special boundaries in grains limited by boundaries of general type was discovered.

  15. The role of ice dynamics in shaping vegetation in flowing waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Polvi, Lina E; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Ice dynamics is an important factor affecting vegetation in high-altitude and high-latitude streams and rivers. During the last few decades, knowledge about ice in streams and rivers has increased significantly and a respectable body of literature is now available. Here we review the literature on how ice dynamics influence riparian and aquatic vegetation. Traditionally, plant ecologists have focused their studies on the summer period, largely ignoring the fact that processes during winter also impact vegetation dynamics. For example, the freeze-up period in early winter may result in extensive formation of underwater ice that can restructure the channel, obstruct flow, and cause flooding and thus formation of more ice. In midwinter, slow-flowing reaches develop a surface-ice cover that accumulates snow, protecting habitats under the ice from formation of underwater ice but also reducing underwater light, thus suppressing photosynthesis. Towards the end of winter, ice breaks up and moves downstream. During this transport, ice floes can jam up and cause floods and major erosion. The magnitudes of the floods and their erosive power mainly depend on the size of the watercourse, also resulting in different degrees of disturbance to the vegetation. Vegetation responds both physically and physiologically to ice dynamics. Physical action involves the erosive force of moving ice and damage caused by ground frost, whereas physiological effects - mostly cell damage - happen as a result of plants freezing into the ice. On a community level, large magnitudes of ice dynamics seem to favour species richness, but can be detrimental for individual plants. Human impacts, such as flow regulation, channelisation, agriculturalisation and water pollution have modified ice dynamics; further changes are expected as a result of current and predicted future climate change. Human impacts and climate change can both favour and disfavour riverine vegetation dynamics. Restoration of streams

  16. The IceProd (IceCube Production) Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Vélez, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    IceProd is a data processing and management framework developed by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory for processing of Monte Carlo simulations and data. IceProd runs as a separate layer on top of middleware or cluster job schedulers and can take advantage of a variety of computing resources including grids such as EGI, OSG, and NorduGrid as well as local clusters running batch systems like HT Condor, PBS, and SGE. This is accomplished by a set of dedicated daemons which process job submission in a coordinated fashion through the use of middleware plug-ins that serve to abstract the details of job submission and job management. IceProd can also manage complex workflow DAGs across distributed computing grids in order to optimize usage of resources. We describe several aspects of IceProd's design and it's applications in collaborative computing environments. We also briefly discuss design aspects of a second generation IceProd, currently being tested in IceCube.

  17. 抗氧化剂BHT微胶囊化产品超微结构的测定%Study on Superstructure of Microencapsulated Antioxidant BHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈梅香

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to study the superstructure of microencapsulated star butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) manufactured by various preparation techniques. The results showed that preparation techniques had significant effects on the structure of microencapsulated products, and thus affected the qualities of products. The research about superstructure of BHT could provide information for analyses on the quality of microencapsulate products.%用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)研究抗氧化剂二丁基羟基甲苯(BHT)微胶囊化产品的超微结构.观察了喷雾干燥法不同壁材组成和工艺条件下制作的微胶囊化产品的表面结构和内部结构,同时考察了喷雾干燥进风温度对微胶囊化产品膜结构的影响.结果表明,不同壁材组成和工艺条件下制作的微胶囊化产品的超微结构有较大差异,合适的壁材组成和工艺条件有利于提高产品质量,同时喷雾干燥进风温度对微胶囊化产品的结构有很大影响,从而也影响到产品的质量.微胶囊化产品超微结构的研究为分析影响产品质量的因素提供了重要依据.

  18. Three-dimensional surface-enhanced Raman scattering hotspots in spherical colloidal superstructure for identification and detection of drugs in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; Wang, Bin; Weng, Shizhuang; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-01-01

    Rapid component separation and robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) identification of drugs in real human urine remain an attractive challenge because of the sample complexity, low molecular affinity for metal surface, and inefficient use of hotspots in one- or two-dimensional (2D) geometries. Here, we developed a 5 min strategy of cyclohexane (CYH) extraction for separating amphetamines from human urine. Simultaneously, an oil-in-water emulsion method is used to assemble monodisperse Ag nanoparticles in the CYH phase into spherical colloidal superstructures in the aqueous phase. These superstructures create three-dimensional (3D) SERS hotspots which exist between every two adjacent particles in 3D space, break the traditional 2D limitation, and extend the hotspots into the third dimension along the z-axis. In this platform, a conservative estimate of Raman enhancement factor is larger than 10(7), and the same CYH extraction processing results in a high acceptability and enrichment of drug molecules in 3D hotspots which demonstrates excellent stability and reproducibility and is suitable for the quantitative examination of amphetamines in both aqueous and organic phases. Parallel ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) examinations corroborate an excellent performance of our SERS platform for the quantitative analysis of methamphetamine (MA) in both aqueous solution and real human urine, of which the detection limits reach 1 and 10 ppb, respectively, with tolerable signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, SERS examinations on different proportions of MA and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in human urine demonstrate an excellent capability of multiplex quantification of ultratrace analytes. By virtue of a spectral classification algorithm, we realize the rapid and accurate recognition of weak Raman signals of amphetamines at trace levels and also clearly distinguish various proportions of multiplex components. Our platform for detecting drugs

  19. Influence of temperature on the controlled growth kinetics and superstructural phase formation of indium on a reconstructed Si (113) 3 × 2 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna TC, Shibin; Deshmukh, Rahul; Singh Chauhan, Amit Kumar; Goswami, Lalit; Govind

    2014-03-01

    The kinetics of growth, thermal stability and superstructural phase formation of the indium atom on a reconstructed Si (113) 3 × 2 surface at room temperature (RT), as well as at high substrate temperature (HT), is discussed. It was observed that at a very low flux rate of 0.08 ML min-1, In-adsorption at RT follows the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) growth mode, while for HT (>200 °C), In-islands (the Volmer-Weber-growth mode) were formed. The residual thermal desorption (RTD) analysis revealed the anomalous behaviour of temperature-driven layering to the clustering rearrangement of In atoms on the Si (113) surface for RT- and 200 °C-grown systems. The RTD study also demonstrates the effect of temperature on growth kinetics as well as on the multilayer/monolayer desorption pathway. The calculated bilayer desorption energy was found to be different for RT- (T B, 0.48 eV) and HT- (T B, 1.57 eV) grown In/Si(113) systems, while the monolayer desorption energy (T M, 2.56 eV) was the same in both the cases. Various coverage-dependent superstructural phases, such as Si(113) 3 × 2 + 3 × 1, 3 × 1, 3 × 2 + 1 × 3 and 1 × 1, have been observed during the RT- and HT-growth of In on the Si (113) surface. A complete phase diagram of In/Si(113) is deduced which depicts the evolution of novel phases as a function of substrate temperature and coverage.

  20. A radioisotope powered cryobot for penetrating the Europan ice shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Bryant, Scott; Zitzelberger, John; Nesmith, Bill

    2001-02-01

    The Cryobot team at JPL has been working on the design of a Cryo-Hydro Integrated Robotic Penetrator System (CHIRPS), which can be used to penetrate the Mars North Polar Cap or the thick sheet ice surrounding Jupiter's moon, Europa. The science for either one of these missions is compelling. For both Mars and Europa the major scientific interest is to reach regions where there is a reservoir of water that may yield signs of past or extant life. Additionally, a Mars polar cap penetration would help us understand both climatic and depositional histories for perhaps as far back as 20 million years. Similarly, penetration of the Europa ice sheet would allow scientists to unravel the mysteries surrounding the thick ice crust, its chemical composition, and subsurface ocean properties. Extreme mass and power constraints make deep drilling/coring impractical. The best way to explore either one of these environments is a cryobot mole penetrator vehicle, which carries a suite of instruments suitable for sampling and analyzing the ice or ocean environments. This paper concentrates on a Europa deep ice (i.e., kilometers thick) application of the CHIRPS, and introduces the reader to the vehicle design with focus on the use of radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) technology as the primary heat (1 kW total) and power source for the robotic vehicle. Radioisotope heater unit (RHU) milli-watt power systems (120 mW total) are also employed to power the mini-radiowave ice transceivers, which are used to relay data through the ice up to the surface lander. The results of modeling and design work for both of these areas are discussed in this paper. Although radioisotope power is baselined for the Europa flight version of the cyrobot, no decision on the final design of the cryobot will be made until the environmental review process is complete. Any use of the cryobot for Mars or Europa will conform to all environmental and planetary protection requirements. .

  1. Jet formation at the sea ice edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, D. L.; Heorton, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The sea ice edge presents a region of many feedback processes between the atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, which are inadequately represented in current climate models. Here we focus on on-ice atmospheric and oceanic flows at the sea ice edge. Mesoscale jet formation due to the Coriolis effect is well understood over sharp changes in surface roughness such as coastlines. This sharp change in surface roughness is experienced by the atmosphere flowing over, and ocean flowing under, a compacted sea ice edge. We have studied a dynamic sea ice edge responding to atmospheric and oceanic jet formation. The shape and strength of atmospheric and oceanic jets during on-ice flows is calculated from existing studies of the sea ice edge and prescribed to idealised models of the sea ice edge. An idealised analytical model of sea ice drift is developed and compared to a sea ice climate model (the CICE model) run on an idealised domain. The response of the CICE model to jet formation is tested at various resolutions. We find that the formation of atmospheric jets during on-ice winds at the sea ice edge increases the wind speed parallel to the sea ice edge and results in the formation of a sea ice edge jet. The modelled sea ice edge jet is in agreement with an observed jet although more observations are needed for validation. The increase in ice drift speed is dependent upon the angle between the ice edge and wind and can result in a 40% increase in ice transport along the sea ice edge. The possibility of oceanic jet formation during on-ice currents and the resultant effect upon the sea ice edge is less conclusive. Observations and climate model data of the polar oceans has been analysed to show areas of likely atmospheric jet formation, with the Fram Strait being of particular interest.

  2. Dry ice blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  3. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  4. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring. Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project, to be launched in 1978. Already early in 1978, stochastic cooling proved a resounding success, such that the antiproton (p-pbar)project was entirely based on it. Tests of electron cooling followed later: protons of 46 MeV kinetic energy were cooled with an electron beam of 26 kV and 1.3 A. The cage seen prominently in the foreground houses the HV equipment, adjacent to the "cooler" installed in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7908242.

  5. Supporting Ice Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, T.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Fowler, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change research, and glaciology in particular, has increasingly embraced seismology in recent years. The NSF supported IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center is working with researchers to develop the unique instruments and techniques for collecting data in this challenging environment. Global concern with sea level change along with strategic interests of the US government and other nations is driving a large investment in glaciological climate research. A number of groups have demonstrated new seismologically-derived constraints on glaciological conditions and processes. Environmental challenges include remote and precarious locations, necessitating robust yet quickly deployable seismic stations and long periods of autonomous operation. Temperature extremes and the possibility of immersion from large annual snow loads, resulting in a deployment surface that can vary from 50 feet of snow cover to bare ice with large melt pools in a single season are additional major challenges. There is also an urgency created by studies indicating that the high latitude continental ice sheets are metastable and that behavior is changing now. Scientists are presently commonly utilizing adaptations of available instrumentation designed for low latitude and milder field conditions as appropriate, but seek better, more capable, and more flexible solutions, including integration of environmental sensors and real-time data telemetry and station control as some of these experiments evolve into a monitoring effort. Seismic instrumentation is only produced by a small number of companies and, innovation for new instruments takes time and requires substantial investment. While pursuing longer-term innovation funding strategies, we are also adapting current instrumentation paradigms to glaciological use (e.g., by leveraging the cold instrument development for research in Antarctica during the IPY). We are also encouraging industrial partners to respond to these demands and challenges with

  6. IceTop: The surface component of IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Elliott, C; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McDermott, A; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, J; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shulman, L; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, is an air shower array with an area of 1 km2. The detector allows a detailed exploration of the mass composition of primary cosmic rays in the energy range from about 100 TeV to 1 EeV by exploiting the correlation between the shower energy measured in IceTop and the energy deposited by muons in the deep ice. In this paper we report on the technical design, construction and installation, the trigger and data acquisition systems as well as the software framework for calibration, reconstruction and simulation. Finally the first experience from commissioning and operating the detector and the performance as an air shower detector will be discussed.

  7. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. -L.; Xiao, Z. -L.; Snezhko, A.; Xu, J.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2016-05-19

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  8. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  9. Ultrasonic guided wave tomography for ice detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang; Rose, Joseph L

    2016-04-01

    Of great concern for many structures, particularly critical sections of rotary and fixed wing aircrafts, is the ability to detect ice either on grounded or in-flight vehicles. As a consequence, some work is reported here that could be useful for a variety of different industries where ice formation is an important problem. This paper presents experimental validations of a probability-based reconstruction algorithm (PRA) on ice detection of plate-like structures. The ice detection tests are performed for three different specimens: a single layer aluminum plate with a circular ice sensing array, a titanium plate with a sparse rectangular ice sensing array, and a carbon-fiber-reinforced titanium plate with an embedded ice sensing array mounted on a carbon fiber back plate. Cases from the simple to the more challenging exemplify that special modes can be used to differentiate ice from water, a sparse rectangular array could also be used for ice detection, and an ice sensing array could be further used to detect the ice on the sensor free side, a very useful application of ice sensing for aircraft wings, for example. Ice detection images for the respective cases are reconstructed to investigate the feasibility of ice sensing with ultrasonic guided wave tomography technology. The results show that the PRA based ultrasonic guided wave tomography method successfully detected and showed ice spots correctly for all three cases. This corroborates the fact that ultrasonic guided wave imaging technology could be a potential useful ice sensing tool in plate-like structures.

  10. Concrete ice abrasion rig and wear measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamsutdinova, G.; Rike, P.B.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Jacobsen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The wear of concrete material due to ice movement is a challenge for offshore and coastal structures. Concrete surfaces exposed to moving ice are subjected to wear at various rates depending on concrete and ice properties. At NTNU, Department of Structural Engineering, concrete ice abrasion phenomen

  11. Salmon River Ice Jam Control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    Deadrnan low stream depths often allows ice to pass beneath the Anchor /boom. But during freezeup , when the quantity of frazil ice is large, an ice...report. US Army Engineer District, Walla LITERATURE CITED Walla. Zufelt, J.E. (1987) Salmon River ice control study, Axelson, K.D. (1990) Freezeup

  12. Concrete ice abrasion rig and wear measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamsutdinova, G.; Rike, P.B.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Jacobsen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The wear of concrete material due to ice movement is a challenge for offshore and coastal structures. Concrete surfaces exposed to moving ice are subjected to wear at various rates depending on concrete and ice properties. At NTNU, Department of Structural Engineering, concrete ice abrasion phenomen

  13. Global dynamics of the Antarctic ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2002-01-01

    The total mass budget of the Antarctic ice sheet is studied with a simple axi-symmetrical model. The ice-sheet has a parabolic profile resting on a bed that slopes linearly downwards from the centre of the ice sheet into the ocean. The mean ice velocity at the grounding line is assumed to be proport

  14. Antarctic ice rises and rumples : Their properties and significance for ice-sheet dynamics and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Moholdt, Geir; Bentley, Michael J.; Pritchard, Hamish D.; Brown, Joel; Conway, Howard; Drews, Reinhard; Durand, Gaël; Goldberg, Daniel; Hattermann, Tore; Kingslake, Jonathan; Lenaerts, Jan T M; Martín, Carlos; Mulvaney, Robert; Nicholls, Keith W.; Pattyn, Frank; Ross, Neil; Scambos, Ted; Whitehouse, Pippa L.

    2015-01-01

    Locally grounded features in ice shelves, called ice rises and rumples, play a key role buttressing discharge from the Antarctic Ice Sheet and regulating its contribution to sea level. Ice rises typically rise several hundreds of meters above the surrounding ice shelf; shelf flow is diverted around

  15. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, A.; Ashmore, David; Bevan, S.; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891; phillipe, morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km acros

  16. Response timescales for martian ice masses and implications for ice flow on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnik, Michelle Rebecca; Waddington, E.D.; Winebrener, D.P.;

    2013-01-01

    ice-flow rates were more significant than today. A plausible range of near-basal ice temperatures and ice-flow enhancement factors can generate the characteristic geometry of an ice mass that has been shaped by flow over reasonable volume-response timescales. All plausible ice-flow scenarios require...

  17. Antarctic ice rises and rumples : Their properties and significance for ice-sheet dynamics and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Moholdt, Geir; Bentley, Michael J.; Pritchard, Hamish D.; Brown, Joel; Conway, Howard; Drews, Reinhard; Durand, Gaël; Goldberg, Daniel; Hattermann, Tore; Kingslake, Jonathan; Lenaerts, Jan T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; Martín, Carlos; Mulvaney, Robert; Nicholls, Keith W.; Pattyn, Frank; Ross, Neil; Scambos, Ted; Whitehouse, Pippa L.

    2015-01-01

    Locally grounded features in ice shelves, called ice rises and rumples, play a key role buttressing discharge from the Antarctic Ice Sheet and regulating its contribution to sea level. Ice rises typically rise several hundreds of meters above the surrounding ice shelf; shelf flow is diverted around

  18. Ice, Ocean and Atmosphere Interactions in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    release; distribution is unlimited. DRI TECHNICAL PROGRAM: Emerging Dynamics Of The Marginal Ice Zone Ice, Ocean and Atmosphere Interactions in the... Arctic Marginal Ice Zone Year 4 Annual Report Jeremy Wilkinson British Antarctic Survey phone: 44 (0)1223 221489 fax: 44 (0) 1223...global) scientific team in order to better understand the ocean , sea ice and atmosphere interaction within the marginal ice zone

  19. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, A.; Ashmore, David; Bevan, S.; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, P.; phillipe, morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km acros

  20. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, A.; Ashmore, David; Bevan, S.; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, P.; phillipe, morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km

  1. Uncertainty in Ice Crystal Orientation Distributions in Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Michael; Waddington, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    Crystal-orientation fabrics in polar ice sheets have a strong influence on ice flow due to the plastic anisotropy of ice. Crystal orientations evolve primarily in response to applied strain, but are also affected by temperature, impurities, interactions with neighbors, and other factors. While the evolution of each ice crystal is physically deterministic, in limited samples, such as those from ice-core thin sections, measured samples are stochastic due to sampling error. Even in continuum representations from models, crystal orientation distribution functions (ODFs) can be treated as stochastic due to uncertainties in how they developed. Here, we present results on the statistics of crystal orientation fabrics. We show a first-order estimate of the sampling distribution of fabric eigenvalues and fabric eigenvectors from ice-core thin sections. We also analyze uncertainty in electron backscatter diffraction measurements. In addition to sampling error, the strain histories of fabrics are generally poorly constrained, and may have varied in unknown ways through time. Nearby layers in ice sheets can also experience different strain histories due to inherent variabilities such as transient flow, or differences in impurities. This means that the continuum ODF itself can be treated as stochastic, because it depends on an effectively-stochastic unknown strain-history. To explore this, we analyze the effects of strain and vorticity variability on the evolution of the continuum ice-crystal ODF. We recast Jeffery's equation for the evolution of the ODF as a stochastic differential equation, with vorticity and strain perturbed by Gaussian processes. From this, we run a Monte-Carlo ensemble to determine likely bounds of true continuum ODF variability in response to random perturbations of strain and vorticity.

  2. Icing in the Cake: Evidence for Ground Ice in Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Britney E.; Chilton, Heather; Hughson, Kynan Horace; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Sizemore, Hanna G.; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Byrne, Shane; Bland, Michael T.; Schorghofer, Norbert; O'Brien, David P.; Marchi, Simone; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn Science and Operations Team

    2016-10-01

    Without surface deposits of ice readily visible and few spectral detections of ice, the task of understanding ice on Ceres falls to other investigations. Several decades of thermal models suggest that subsurface ice on Ceres is stable for the lifetime of the solar system. Here, we report geomorphological evidence of silicate-ice mixtures, which we refer to as "ground ice", from careful analysis of the behavior of surface features on Ceres. In particular, we have focused on trends in mass wasting features. Mass wasting on Ceres is pervasive--in over 20% of craters above 10km in size, often with provocative rounded termini. We have identified three "endmember" classes of lobate mass wasting morphologies: tongue-shaped, furrowed flows hundreds of meters thick on steep slopes, tens of meter thick spatulate-sheeted flows on shallow slopes, and cuspate-sheeted flows, also tens of meters thick, but with morphology that indicates fluidization. These features on Ceres are distinct from those on dry Vesta, which shares a similar impactor population and velocity distribution due to their similar locations in the main belt. Thus, differing material properties are implied between the two bodies. Morphologically, each of these feature types possess an analog found in glaciated regions on Earth and Mars or on the surfaces of the icy satellites that help describe how down slope mass motion may be created. In particular, we identify several spectacular features that share commonatlity with rock glaciers and lahars. Moreover, these abundant features increase in number and aerial coverage towards the poles, and show progressively more fluidization towards the low latitudes. We conclude that the geomorphology of these features are evidence that Ceres' subsurface contains significant ground ice and that the ice is most abundant near the poles.

  3. Direct Visualization of Spruce Budworm Antifreeze Protein Interacting with Ice Crystals: Basal Plane Affinity Confers Hyperactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B.; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2008-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain organisms from freezing by adhering to ice crystals, thereby preventing their growth. All AFPs depress the nonequilibrium freezing temperature below the melting point; however AFPs from overwintering insects, such as the spruce budworm (sbw) are 10–100 times more effective than most fish AFPs. It has been proposed that the exceptional activity of these AFPs depends on their ability to prevent ice growth at the basal plane. To test the hypothesis that...

  4. Ice-crust and ice-film; Miaraban

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, M. [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Snow on the road is converted into packed snow after being repeatedly trodden by automobile tires and pedestrians. During this compaction process, a phenomenon named sintering occurs inside the snow. Snow crystals at a temperature below the melting point are transformed into roundish ice grains with the passage of time, and bondage develops between the grains for the formation of a pack of snow which is very hard (hard-packed snow). This prepares the base for ice-film or ice-crust formation. What is called 'mirror-bahn' is an ice film which is 1mm thick or less. It is a mirror-like ice surface, generally termed the 'slippery packed snow or slippery road surface.' With studded tires repeatedly travelling on the hard-packed snow surface, friction heat is generated due to microscopic slips occurring between the tires in rotation and the ground and due to braking or driving, and the heat melts the very thin surface layer of the hard-packed snow. The surface freezes again for the formation of an ice film presenting a mirror-like surface. Such a slippery road surface is formed under complicatedly variable conditions with the parameters involving weather conditions and traffic density. The primary measure against the slippery road surface is the surface control by use of antifreezing agents. (NEDO)

  5. Arctic ice cover, ice thickness and tipping points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, Peter

    2012-02-01

    We summarize the latest results on the rapid changes that are occurring to Arctic sea ice thickness and extent, the reasons for them, and the methods being used to monitor the changing ice thickness. Arctic sea ice extent had been shrinking at a relatively modest rate of 3-4% per decade (annually averaged) but after 1996 this speeded up to 10% per decade and in summer 2007 there was a massive collapse of ice extent to a new record minimum of only 4.1 million km(2). Thickness has been falling at a more rapid rate (43% in the 25 years from the early 1970s to late 1990s) with a specially rapid loss of mass from pressure ridges. The summer 2007 event may have arisen from an interaction between the long-term retreat and more rapid thinning rates. We review thickness monitoring techniques that show the greatest promise on different spatial and temporal scales, and for different purposes. We show results from some recent work from submarines, and speculate that the trends towards retreat and thinning will inevitably lead to an eventual loss of all ice in summer, which can be described as a 'tipping point' in that the former situation, of an Arctic covered with mainly multi-year ice, cannot be retrieved.

  6. Loss of sea ice in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A

    2009-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover is in decline. The areal extent of the ice cover has been decreasing for the past few decades at an accelerating rate. Evidence also points to a decrease in sea ice thickness and a reduction in the amount of thicker perennial sea ice. A general global warming trend has made the ice cover more vulnerable to natural fluctuations in atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The observed reduction in Arctic sea ice is a consequence of both thermodynamic and dynamic processes, including such factors as preconditioning of the ice cover, overall warming trends, changes in cloud coverage, shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns, increased export of older ice out of the Arctic, advection of ocean heat from the Pacific and North Atlantic, enhanced solar heating of the ocean, and the ice-albedo feedback. The diminishing Arctic sea ice is creating social, political, economic, and ecological challenges.

  7. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  8. Thin-ice Arctic Acoustic Window (THAAW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Thin- ice Arctic Acoustic Window (THAAW) Peter F. Worcester Scripps Institution of...of the ice cover and extensive warming of the intermediate layers. The multiyear ice is melting . Ice keels are getting smaller. With more open water...determine the fundamental limits to signal processing in the Arctic imposed by ocean and ice processes. The hope is that these first few new steps will

  9. A study of ice response spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunguang; JIA Lingling

    2009-01-01

    Some problems concerning the ice forces and ice response spectra are studied from both theoretical and practical points of view. On the basis of structural analysis,the analysis method of ice response spectra is proposed, since it plays an important role in the prediction of maximum structural response in cold regions. And it is illustrated that it is easy to study the structural response to ice using the ice response spectra.

  10. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  11. Ice Jams, Winter 1996-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Engineers® Rivers, streams, and lakes in cold regions freeze during winter months. Ice jams may form during initial ice cover formation ( freezeup jams) or...when ice cover breaks up (breakup jams). Both freezeup and breakup jams cause backwater flooding and damage to low-lying areas and municipal...Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Jam Database is a compilation of freezeup and breakup ice jam events in the United States (White 1996). Currently, there are more

  12. A simple equation for the melt elevation feedback of ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levermann, Anders; Winkelmann, Ricarda

    2016-08-01

    In recent decades, the Greenland Ice Sheet has been losing mass and has thereby contributed to global sea-level rise. The rate of ice loss is highly relevant for coastal protection worldwide. The ice loss is likely to increase under future warming. Beyond a critical temperature threshold, a meltdown of the Greenland Ice Sheet is induced by the self-enforcing feedback between its lowering surface elevation and its increasing surface mass loss: the more ice that is lost, the lower the ice surface and the warmer the surface air temperature, which fosters further melting and ice loss. The computation of this rate so far relies on complex numerical models which are the appropriate tools for capturing the complexity of the problem. By contrast we aim here at gaining a conceptual understanding by deriving a purposefully simple equation for the self-enforcing feedback which is then used to estimate the melt time for different levels of warming using three observable characteristics of the ice sheet itself and its surroundings. The analysis is purely conceptual in nature. It is missing important processes like ice dynamics for it to be useful for applications to sea-level rise on centennial timescales, but if the volume loss is dominated by the feedback, the resulting logarithmic equation unifies existing numerical simulations and shows that the melt time depends strongly on the level of warming with a critical slowdown near the threshold: the median time to lose 10 % of the present-day ice volume varies between about 3500 years for a temperature level of 0.5 °C above the threshold and 500 years for 5 °C. Unless future observations show a significantly higher melting sensitivity than currently observed, a complete meltdown is unlikely within the next 2000 years without significant ice-dynamical contributions.

  13. Sticking properties of ice grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmanns M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the size dependence of pull-off forces of water ice in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. To determine the pull-off force in our laboratory experiments, we use a liquid nitrogen cooled centrifuge. Depending on its rotation frequency, spherical ice grains detach due to the centrifugal force which is related to the adhesive properties. Numerical simulations are conducted by means of molecular dynamics simulations of hexagonal ice using a standard coarse-grained water potential. The pull-off force of a single contact between two spherical ice grains is measured due to strain controlled simulations. Both, the experimental study and the simulations reveal a dependence between the pull-off force and the (reduced particle radii, which differ significantly from the linear dependence of common contact theories.

  14. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  15. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  16. USGS Sea Ice Email Script

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Daily sea ice imagery and charting benefits logistics and navigational planning in the Alaskan Arctic waters, yet access to these data often requires high bandwidth...

  17. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  18. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  19. Sun protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surfaces that reflect light, such as water, sand, concrete, snow, and areas that are painted white. DO ... protect the ears or sides of the face. Special clothing that protects the skin by absorbing UV ...

  20. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    strategies are entangled in cultural, religious, and national identities. Using ethnographic methods, I investigate protection against selected risks: harm from evil eyes, violation of domestic sanctity, and cultural heritage dilapidation. Protection against these risks is examined through studies...

  1. Sun Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 100% UV ray protection (look for models that advertise both UVB and UVA protection). Use a broad- ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  2. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter; Naeslund, Jens-Ove [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Rodhe, Lars [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  3. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O2 and N2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  4. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-11-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040 m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053 m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O 2 and N 2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N 2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O 2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/ 38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250 ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH 4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  5. Earth - Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This color picture of Antarctica is one part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire Antarctic continent taken during the hours following Galileo's historic first encounter with its home planet. The view shows the Ross Ice Shelf. An occasional mountain can be seen poking through the ice. It is late spring in Antarctica, so the sun never sets on the frigid, icy continent. This picture was taken on December 8, 1990.

  6. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  7. Extraction of Ice Sheet Layers from Two Intersected Radar Echograms Near Neem Ice Core in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S.; Muller, J.-P.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of snow and ice over time result in ice sheet layers. These can be remotely sensed where there is a contrast in electromagnetic properties, which reflect variations of the ice density, acidity and fabric orientation. Internal ice layers are assumed to be isochronous, deep beneath the ice surface, and parallel to the direction of ice flow. The distribution of internal layers is related to ice sheet dynamics, such as the basal melt rate, basal elevation variation and changes in ice flow mode, which are important parameters to model the ice sheet. Radar echo sounder is an effective instrument used to study the sedimentology of the Earth and planets. Ice Penetrating Radar (IPR) is specific kind of radar echo sounder, which extends studies of ice sheets from surface to subsurface to deep internal ice sheets depending on the frequency utilised. In this study, we examine a study site where folded ice occurs in the internal ice sheet south of the North Greenland Eemian ice drilling (NEEM) station, where two intersected radar echograms acquired by the Multi-channel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) employed in the NASA's Operation IceBridge (OIB) mission imaged this folded ice. We propose a slice processing flow based on a Radon Transform to trace and extract these two sets of curved ice sheet layers, which can then be viewed in 3-D, demonstrating the 3-D structure of the ice folds.

  8. Better constraints on the sea-ice state using global sea-ice data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathiot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Short-term and decadal sea-ice prediction systems need a realistic initial state, generally obtained using ice-ocean model simulations with data assimilation. However, only sea-ice concentration and velocity data are currently assimilated. In this work, an Ensemble Kalman Filter system is used to assimilate observed ice concentration and freeboard (i.e. thickness of emerged sea ice data into a global coupled ocean–sea-ice model. The impact and effectiveness of our data assimilation system is assessed in two steps: firstly, through the assimilation of synthetic data (i.e., model-generated data and, secondly, through the assimilation of satellite data. While ice concentrations are available daily, freeboard data used in this study are only available during six one-month periods spread over 2005–2007. Our results show that the simulated Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice extents are improved by the assimilation of synthetic ice concentration data. Assimilation of synthetic ice freeboard data improves the simulated sea-ice thickness field. Using real ice concentration data enhances the model realism in both hemispheres. Assimilation of ice concentration data significantly improves the total hemispheric sea-ice extent all year long, especially in summer. Combining the assimilation of ice freeboard and concentration data leads to better ice thickness, but does not further improve the ice extent. Moreover, the improvements in sea-ice thickness due to the assimilation of ice freeboard remain visible well beyond the assimilation periods.

  9. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  10. Characterizing of a Mid-Latitude Ice-Rich Landing Site on Mars to Enable in Situ Habitability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, J.; Schurmeier, L. R.; Wilhelm, M.; Stoker, C.; McKay, C.; Davila, A.; Marinova, M.; Karcz, J.; Smith, H.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest an ice-rich landing site at 188.5E 46.16N within Amazonis Planitia as a candidate location to support a Mars lander mission equipped to study past habitability and regions capable of preserving the physical and chemical signs of life and organic matter. Studies of the ice-rich subsurface on Mars are critical for several reasons. The subsurface environment provides protection from radiation to shield organic and biologic compounds from destruction. The ice-rich substrate is also ideal for preserving organic and biologic molecules and provides a source of H2O for biologic activity. Examination of martian ground ice can test several hypotheses such as: 1) whether ground ice supports habitable conditions, 2) that ground ice can preserve and accumulate organic compounds, and 3) that ice contains biomolecules evident of past or present biological activity on Mars. This Amazonis site, located near the successful Viking Lander 2, shows indirect evidence of subsurface ice (ubiquitous defined polygonal ground, gamma ray spectrometer hydrogen signature, and numerical modeling of ice stability) and direct evidence of exposed subsurface ice. This site also provides surface conditions favorable to a safe landing including no boulders, low rock density, minimal rough topography, and few craters.

  11. Global Sea Ice Charting at the National Ice Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Colon, P.

    2006-12-01

    The National Ice Center (NIC) is a U.S. government tri-agency operational center comprised of components from the United States Navy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG). The mission of the NIC is to provide the highest quality strategic and tactical ice services tailored to meet operational requirements of U.S. national interests. This includes broad responsibilities to monitor all frozen ocean regions of the world in support of coastal and marine sea ice operations and research. Sea ice conditions are routinely monitored and mapped using satellite imagery along with ancillary model and in-situ data. Active microwave images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors are the data of choice for NIC analysts because of their high spatial resolution (~100 m). SAR is in fact the primary data source for ice analysis when available. The high spatial resolution of available SAR data and the reliability shown by the RADARSAT- 1 mission in particular have made the use of these data critical for vessels operating in or near the ice. Limited data from the ESA Envisat Advanced SAR (ASAR) are also used in the analyses when available. Preparations for the use of the Phased Array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) aboard the soon to be launched Japanese ALOS satellite are also underway. Scatterometer backscatter imagery from QuikSCAT is also routinely used for basin-scale and circumpolar ice edge mapping. Automated algorithms for ice type and melt ponds detection as well as the synergy between these observations and the QuikSCAT wind vectors off the marginal ice zone (MIZ) are been explored. ESA Envisat Advanced SAR (ASAR) Global Monitoring Mode (GMM) mosaics of the Arctic and Antarctic regions are becoming an important tool for sea ice edge delineation too. Although SAR observations are the choice for NIC analysts to produce high spatial resolution products gear toward tactical support, passive microwave data such as those from the

  12. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory VI: Neutrino Oscillations, Supernova Searches, Ice Properties

    OpenAIRE

    The IceCube Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrino oscillations with DeepCore; Supernova detection with IceCube and beyond; Study of South Pole ice transparency with IceCube flashers; Submitted papers to the 32nd International Cosmic Ray Conference, Beijing 2011.

  13. Canadian Ice Service Arctic Regional Sea Ice Charts in SIGRID-3 Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces digital Arctic regional sea ice charts for marine navigation, climate research, and input to the Global Digital Sea Ice Data...

  14. Comparison between Greenland Ice-Margin an Ice-Core Oxygen-18 Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Oerter, H.; Thomsen, H. Højmark

    2002-01-01

    or more records were obtained along closely spaced parallel sampling profiles, showing good reproducibility of the records. We present ice-margin delta(18)O records reaching back to the Pleistocene. Many of the characteristic delta(18)O variations known from Greenland deep ice cores can be recognized......Old ice for palaeoenvironmental studies retrieved by deep core drilling in the central regions of the large ice sheets can also be retrieved from the ice-sheet margins. The delta(18)O content of the surface ice was studied at 15 different Greenland ice-margin locations. At some locations, two...... at locations near the central ice divide. This is in accordance with deep ice-core results. We conclude that delta(18)O records measured on ice from the Greenland ice-sheet margin provide useful information about past climate and dynamics of the ice sheet, and thus are important (and cheap) supplements to deep...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems having... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a heat rise of 90 °F. with the engines at 75 percent of maximum continuous power; (2) Each airplane with...

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of Altitude Scaling for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of altitude scaling for turbofan engine ice crystal icing simulation was conducted during the 2015 LF11 engine icing test campaign in PSL.The results showed that a simplified approach for altitude scaling to simulate the key reference engine ice growth feature and associated icing effects to the engine is possible. But special considerations are needed to address the facility operation limitation for lower altitude engine icing simulation.

  17. Response of passive microwave sea ice concentration algorithms to thin ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heygster, Georg; Huntemann, Marcus; Ivanova, Natalia;

    2014-01-01

    The influence of sea ice thickness brightness temperatures and ice concentrations retrieved from passive microwave observations is quantified, using horizontally homogeneous sea ice thickness retrievals from ESA's SMOS sensor observations at high incidence angles. Brightness temperatures are infl......The influence of sea ice thickness brightness temperatures and ice concentrations retrieved from passive microwave observations is quantified, using horizontally homogeneous sea ice thickness retrievals from ESA's SMOS sensor observations at high incidence angles. Brightness temperatures...

  18. Wave-Ice and Air-Ice-Ocean Interaction During the Chukchi Sea Ice Edge Advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Ocean Heat: In the new Arctic summer ice regime, with extended open water periods in areas previously covered with sea ice, ocean heat, received...additional buoy with an 80m temperature chain for monitoring the upper ocean evolution has been built at WHOI to replace the loss of one of the UpTempo...addition was made to the Sea State field program through separate funding to Luc Rainville of APL, who will provide an underway temperature and salinity

  19. Ice core evidence for extensive melting of the greenland ice sheet in the last interglacial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, R M

    1989-05-26

    Evidence from ice at the bottom of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic Islands and Camp Century and Dye-3 in Greenland suggests that the Greenland ice sheet melted extensively or completely during the last interglacial period more than 100 ka (thousand years ago), in contrast to earlier interpretations. The presence of dirt particles in the basal ice has previously been thought to indicate that the base of the ice sheets had melted and that the evidence for the time of original growth of these ice masses had been destroyed. However, the particles most likely blew onto the ice when the dimensions of the ice caps and ice sheets were much smaller. Ice texture, gas content, and other evidence also suggest that the basal ice at each drill site is superimposed ice, a type of ice typical of the early growth stages of an ice cap or ice sheet. If the present-day ice masses began their growth during the last interglacial, the ice sheet from the earlier (Illinoian) glacial period must have competely or largely melted during the early part of the same interglacial period. If such melting did occur, the 6-meter higher-than-present sea level during the Sangamon cannot be attributed to disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, as has been suggested.

  20. Sea ice thickness and recent Arctic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andreas; Yang, Shuting; Kaas, Eigil

    2017-01-01

    The climatic impact of increased Arctic sea ice loss has received growing attention in the last years. However, little focus has been set on the role of sea ice thickness, although it strongly determines surface heat fluxes. Here ensembles of simulations using the EC-Earth atmospheric model (Integrated Forecast System) are performed and analyzed to quantify the atmospheric impacts of Arctic sea ice thickness change since 1982 as revealed by the sea ice model assimilation Global Ice-Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System. Results show that the recent sea ice thinning has significantly affected the Arctic climate, while remote atmospheric responses are less pronounced owing to a high internal atmospheric variability. Locally, the sea ice thinning results in enhancement of near-surface warming of about 1°C per decade in winter, which is most pronounced over marginal sea ice areas with thin ice. This leads to an increase of the Arctic amplification factor by 37%.

  1. Modified PIC Method for Sea Ice Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-xue; JI Shun-ying; SHEN Hung-tao; YUE Qian-jin

    2005-01-01

    The sea ice cover displays various dynamical characteristics such as breakup, rafting, and ridging under external forces. To model the ice dynamic process accurately, the effective numerical modeling method should be established. In this paper, a modified particle-in-cell (PIC) method for sea ice dynamics is developed coupling the finite difference (FD) method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In this method, the ice cover is first discretized into a series of Lagrangian ice particles which have their own sizes, thicknesses, concentrations and velocities. The ice thickness and concentration at Eulerian grid positions are obtained by interpolation with the Gaussian function from their surrounding ice particles. The momentum of ice cover is solved with FD approach to obtain the Eulerian cell velocity, which is used to estimate the ice particle velocity with the Gaussian function also. The thickness and concentration of ice particles are adjusted with particle mass density and smooth length, which are adjusted with the redistribution of ice particles. With the above modified PIC method, numerical simulations for ice motion in an idealized rectangular basin and the ice dynamics in the Bohai Sea are carried out. These simulations show that this modified PIC method is applicable to sea ice dynamics simulation.

  2. Preparation and properties of CeTe/sub 2/O/sub 6/ and ThTe/sub 2/O/sub 6/, compounds with a new superstructure of the fluorite type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, I.L.; Baran, E.J. (La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas)

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that in the systems MO/sub 2//TeO/sub 2/ (with M = Ce, Th), treated in air and at 600 /sup 0/C, only phases of composition MTe/sub 2/O/sub 6/ are formed. They pertains to the cubic crystal system and constitutes a new type of fluorite-superstructure. Different aspects of its crystal chemistry are commented and also the infrared spectra are recorded and briefly discussed.

  3. Magnetic field directed assembly of superstructures of ferrite-ferroelectric core-shell nanoparticles and studies on magneto-electric interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G., E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu; Sreenivasulu, G.; Benoit, Crystal [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Petrov, V. M. [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Institute of Electronic and Information Systems, Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod 173003 (Russian Federation); Chavez, F. [Chemistry Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric are of interest for studies on mechanical strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) interactions and for useful technologies. Here, we report on magnetic-field-assisted-assembly of barium titanate (BTO)-nickel ferrite (NFO) core-shell particles into linear chains and 2D/3D arrays and measurements of ME effects in such assemblies. First, we synthesized the core-shell nano-particles with 50–600 nm BTO and 10–200 nm NFO by chemical self-assembly by coating the ferroic particles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst via the “click” reaction. The core-shell structure was confirmed with electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. We obtained superstructure of the core-shell particles by subjecting them to a magnetic field gradient that exerts an attractive force on the particles and align them toward the regions of high field strengths. At low particle concentration, linear chains were formed and they evolved into 2D and 3D arrays at high particle concentrations. Magnetoelectric characterization on unassembled films and assembled arrays has been performed through measurements of low-frequency ME voltage coefficient (MEVC) by subjecting the sample to a bias magnetic field and an ac magnetic field. The MEVC is higher for field-assembled samples than for unassembled films and is found to be sensitive to field orientation with a higher MEVC for magnetic fields parallel to the array direction than for magnetic fields perpendicular to the array. A maximum MEVC of 20 mV/cm Oe, one of the highest reported for any bulk nanocomposite, is measured across the array thickness. A model is provided for ME coupling in the superstructures of BTO-NFO particulate composites. First, we estimated the MEVC for a free-standing BTO-NFO core-shell particle and then extended the model to include an array of linear chains of the particles. The theoretical estimates are in

  4. Polymorphism of NaVO2F2: a P2₁/c superstructure with pseudosymmetry of P2₁/m in the subcell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zi-Qun; Wang, Jing-Quan; Huang, Ya-Xi; Botis, Sanda M; Pan, Yuanming; Mi, Jin-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    The ADDSYM routine in the program PLATON [Spek (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] has helped researchers to avoid structures of (metal-)organic compounds being reported in an unnecessarily low symmetry space group. However, determination of the correct space group may get more complicated in cases of pseudosymmetric inorganic compounds. One example is NaVO2F2, which was reported [Crosnier-Lopez et al. (1994). Eur. J. Solid State Inorg. Chem. 31, 957-965] in the acentric space group P2₁ based on properties but flagged by ADDSYM as (pseudo)centrosymmetric P2₁/m within default distance tolerances. Herein a systematic investigation reveals that NaVO2F2 exists in at least four polymorphs: P2₁, (I), P2₁/m, (II), P2₁/c, (III), and one or more low-temperature ones. The new centrosymmetric modification, (III), with the space group P2₁/c has a similar atomic packing geometry to phase (I), except for having a doubled c axis. The double-cell of phase (III) arises from atomic shifts from the glide plane c at (x, ¼, z). With increasing temperature, the number of observed reflections decreases. The odd l reflections gradually become weaker and, correspondingly, all atoms shift towards the glide plane, resulting in a gradual second-order transformation of (III) into high-temperature phase (II) (P2₁/m) at below 493 K. At least one first-order enantiotropic phase transition was observed below 139 K from both the single-crystal X-ray diffraction and the differential scanning calorimetry analyses. Periodic first-principles calculations within density functional theory show that both P2₁/c superstructure (III) and P2₁ substructure (I) are more stable than P2₁/m structure (II), and that P2₁/c superstructure (III) is more stable that P2₁ substructure (I).

  5. Synthesis, morphology and microstructure of pomegranate-like hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) superstructure with high coercivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadic, Marin, E-mail: marint@vinca.rs [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Vinca Institute, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Citakovic, Nada [Military Academy, Generala Pavla Jurisica Sturma 33, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Panjan, Matjaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Stanojevic, Boban [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade, University of Belgrade (Serbia); Markovic, Dragana [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Vinca Institute, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanovic, Dorde [Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Spasojevic, Vojislav [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Vinca Institute, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-12-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found superior magnetic properties of the hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM and HRTEM images show a pomegranate-like superstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measurements display high coercivity H{sub C} = 4350 Oe at the room temperature. - Abstract: We found novel and superior magnetic properties of the hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that originate from an internal microstructure of particles and strong inter-particle interactions between nanocrystal sub-units. The hematite particles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron (III) nitrate without any template or surfactant. The purity, size, crystallinity, morphology, microstructure and magnetic features of the as-prepared particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and SQUID magnetometry. An XRD study reveals a pure phase of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} whereas TEM shows {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spheres with a diameter of about 150 nm. RS also shows high quality and purity of the sample. Moreover, TEM and HRTEM images show a pomegranate-like superstructure and evidence that the spherical particles are composed of individual well-crystallized nanoparticle sub-units (self-assembled nanoparticles) with a size of about 20 nm. Magnetic measurements display hysteretic behavior at the room temperature with remanent magnetization M{sub r} = 0.731 emu/g, saturation magnetization M{sub S} = 6.83 emu/g and coercivity H{sub C} = 4350 Oe, as well as the Morin transition at T{sub M} = 261 K. These results and comparison with those in the literature reveal that the sample has extremely high coercivity. The magnetic properties of the sample are discussed in relation to morphology, internal microstructure, surface

  6. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  7. Sensitivity of open-water ice growth and ice concentration evolution in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoxu; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2017-09-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice model is applied to investigate to what degree the area-thickness distribution of new ice formed in open water affects the ice and ocean properties. Two sensitivity experiments are performed which modify the horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio of open-water ice growth. The resulting changes in the Arctic sea-ice concentration strongly affect the surface albedo, the ocean heat release to the atmosphere, and the sea-ice production. The changes are further amplified through a positive feedback mechanism among the Arctic sea ice, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and the surface air temperature in the Arctic, as the Fram Strait sea ice import influences the freshwater budget in the North Atlantic Ocean. Anomalies in sea-ice transport lead to changes in sea surface properties of the North Atlantic and the strength of AMOC. For the Southern Ocean, the most pronounced change is a warming along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), owing to the interhemispheric bipolar seasaw linked to AMOC weakening. Another insight of this study lies on the improvement of our climate model. The ocean component FESOM is a newly developed ocean-sea ice model with an unstructured mesh and multi-resolution. We find that the subpolar sea-ice boundary in the Northern Hemisphere can be improved by tuning the process of open-water ice growth, which strongly influences the sea ice concentration in the marginal ice zone, the North Atlantic circulation, salinity and Arctic sea ice volume. Since the distribution of new ice on open water relies on many uncertain parameters and the knowledge of the detailed processes is currently too crude, it is a challenge to implement the processes realistically into models. Based on our sensitivity experiments, we conclude a pronounced uncertainty related to open-water sea ice growth which could significantly affect the climate system sensitivity.

  8. Greenland Ice Shelves and Ice Tongues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels

    2017-01-01

    literature and physical properties are reviewed. There exists a difference between: (1) Floating glaciers in northern Greenland (>77°N) which experience bottom melting as their dominant ablation mechanism and calve relatively thin, but large (km-sized) tabular icebergs (‘ice islands’), and (2) Grounded......This chapter focuses on a review of the glaciers on north and northeast Greenland that terminate in fiords with long glacier tongues and floating, ice-shelf-like margins. There is some debate as to whether these glacier tongues can be classified as a traditional ice shelf, so the relevant...... glaciers further south (melting estimated at up to 10 m year−1 for locations...

  9. The Greenland Ice Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joughin, I.; Smith, B.; Howat, I. M.; Moon, T. A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous glaciers in Greenland have sped up rapidly and unpredictably during the first part of the 21st Century. We started the Greenland Ice Mapping Project (GIMP) to produce time series of ice velocity for Greenland's major outlet glaciers. We are also producing image time series to document the advance and retreat of glacier calving fronts and other changes in ice-sheet geometry (e.g., shrinking ice caps and ice shelves). When the project began, there was no digital elevation model (DEM) with sufficient accuracy and resolution to terrain-correct the SAR-derived products. Thus, we also produced the 30-m GIMP DEM, which, aside from improving our processing, is an important product in its own right. Although GIMP focuses on time series, complete spatial coverage for initializing ice sheet models also is important. There are insufficient data, however, to map the full ice sheet in any year. There is good RADARSAT coverage for many years in the north, but the C-band data decorrelate too quickly to measure velocity in the high accumulation regions of the southeast. For such regions, ALOS data usually correlate well, but speckle-tracking estimates at L-band are subject to large ionospheric artifacts. Interferometric phase data are far less sensitive to the effect of the ionosphere, but velocity estimates require results from crossing orbits. Thus, to produce a nearly complete mosaic we used data from multiple sensors, beginning with ERS-1/2 data from the mid 1990s. By using a primarily phase-only solution for much of the interior, we have reduced the velocity errors to ~1-3 m/yr. For the faster moving ice-sheet margin where phase data cannot be unwrapped, we used speckle-tracking data. In particular, we have relied on TerraSAR-X for many fast-moving glaciers because the ionosphere far less affects X-band data. This pan-Greenland velocity map as well as many of the time series would not have been possible without an extensive archive of data collected using six

  10. Sea Ice Concentration and Extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2014-01-01

    Among the most seasonal and most dynamic parameters on the surface of the Earth is sea ice which at any one time covers about 3-6% of the planet. In the Northern Hemisphere, sea ice grows in extent from about 6 x 10(exp 6) sq km to 16 x 10(exp 6) sq km, while in the Southern Hemisphere, it grows from about 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km to about 19 x 10(exp 6) sq km (Comiso, 2010; Gloersen et al., 1992). Sea ice is up to about 2-3 m thick in the Northern Hemisphere and about 1 m thick in the Southern Hemisphere (Wadhams, 2002), and compared to the average ocean depth of about 3 km, it is a relatively thin, fragile sheet that can break due to waves and winds or melt due to upwelling of warm water. Being constantly advected by winds, waves, and currents, sea ice is very dynamic and usually follows the directions of the many gyres in the polar regions. Despite its vast expanse, the sea ice cover was previously left largely unstudied and it was only in recent years that we have understood its true impact and significance as related to the Earths climate, the oceans, and marine life.

  11. Sea Ice Concentration and Extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2014-01-01

    Among the most seasonal and most dynamic parameters on the surface of the Earth is sea ice which at any one time covers about 3-6% of the planet. In the Northern Hemisphere, sea ice grows in extent from about 6 x 10(exp 6) sq km to 16 x 10(exp 6) sq km, while in the Southern Hemisphere, it grows from about 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km to about 19 x 10(exp 6) sq km (Comiso, 2010; Gloersen et al., 1992). Sea ice is up to about 2-3 m thick in the Northern Hemisphere and about 1 m thick in the Southern Hemisphere (Wadhams, 2002), and compared to the average ocean depth of about 3 km, it is a relatively thin, fragile sheet that can break due to waves and winds or melt due to upwelling of warm water. Being constantly advected by winds, waves, and currents, sea ice is very dynamic and usually follows the directions of the many gyres in the polar regions. Despite its vast expanse, the sea ice cover was previously left largely unstudied and it was only in recent years that we have understood its true impact and significance as related to the Earths climate, the oceans, and marine life.

  12. Using Sea Ice Age as a Proxy for Sea Ice Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Tschudi, M. A.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the beginning of the modern satellite record starting in October 1978, the Arctic sea ice cover has been shrinking, with the largest changes observed at the end of the melt season in September. Through 2013, the September ice extent has declined at a rate of -14.0% dec-1, or -895,300 km2 dec-1. The seven lowest September extents in the satellite record have all occurred in the past seven years. This reduction in ice extent is accompanied by large reductions in winter ice thicknesses that are primarily explained by changes in the ocean's coverage of multiyear ice (MYI). Using the University of Colorado ice age product developed by J. Maslanik and C. Fowler, and currently produced by M. Tschudi we present recent changes in the distribution of ice age from the mid 1980s to present. The CU ice age product is based on (1) the use of ice motion to track areas of sea ice and thus estimate how long the ice survives within the Arctic, and (2) satellite imagery of sea ice concentration to determine when the ice disappears. Age is assigned on a yearly basis, with the age incremented by one year if the ice survives summer melt and stays within the Arctic domain. Age is counted from 1 to 10 years, with all ice older than 10 years assigned to the "10+" age category. The position of the ice is calculated on weekly time steps on NSIDC's 12.5-km EASE-grid. In the mid-1980s, MYI accounted for 70% of total winter ice extent, whereas by the end of 2012 it had dropped to less than 20%. This reflects not only a change in ice type, but also a general thinning of the ice pack, as older ice tends to be thicker ice. Thus, with older ice being replaced by thinner first-year ice, the ice pack is more susceptible to melting out than it was in 1980's. It has been suggested that ice age may be a useful proxy for long-term changes in ice thickness. To assess the relationship between ice age and thickness, and how this may be changing over time, we compare the ice age fields to several

  13. Characterization of an IceTop tank for the IceCube surface extension IceVeto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Julian; Auffenberg, Jan; Hansmann, Bengt; Rongen, Martin; Stahlberg, Martin; Wiebusch, Christopher [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    IceTop is an air-shower detector located at the South Pole on the surface above the IceCube detector. It consists of 81 detector stations with two Cherenkov tanks each. The tanks are filled with clear ice and instrumented with two photomultipliers. IceTop detects cosmic-ray induced air-showers above an energy threshold of ∝300 TeV. Muons and neutrinos from these air-showers are the main background for astrophysical neutrino searches with IceCube. The usage of IceTop to veto air-showers largely reduces this background in the field of view. To enlarge the field of view an extension of the surface detector, IceVeto, is planned. Therefore, we investigate the properties of an original IceTop tank as a laboratory reference for the development of new detection module designs. First results of these measurements are presented.

  14. Characterizing "Rotten" Ice: Changes in first-year Arctic sea ice during advanced summer melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, C. M.; Junge, K.; Light, B.; Orellana, M. V.; Carpenter, S.; Farley, S. M.; Crump, B. C.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Courville, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic melt seasons are lengthening; as this happens, more Arctic sea ice will undergo advanced stages of melt, becoming so-called "rotten" ice. However, very little is known about this increasingly important ice type. Here, we present results of a physical, optical, chemical, and biological characterization of rotten Arctic sea ice. Sea ice core samples and measurements were collected from landfast sea ice and summer ice floes near Barrow, Alaska during May-July of 2015. We captured a normal progression of ice warming and freshening from May-June which contrasted sharply to physical properties and biological composition of the "rotten" ice targeted in July. Rotten ice is approximately isothermal and highly permeable, a consequence of its characteristic multi-cm-scale brine channels, resulting in an ice that is largely drained of brine and flushed with seawater. 3D micro-CT images of the ice allow us to quantify the evolution of factors related to ice porosity and channel connectivity in May-June vs. rotten ice. Patterns in measured chemistry show an environment in rotten ice that is distinct from May-June ice as well as from the seawater that underlies and permeates the ice. The physical and chemical parameters taken together represent an entirely different microbial habitat than the saline ice of May and June. Correspondingly, the sea ice microbial community also changes significantly over the course of melt. The ice-bottom algal community that dominates the biomass of the cores in May and June was lost by July, yet in July samples some algae appear to remain embedded in or attached to the ice throughout the full core depth. In addition, bacterial counts in upper horizons of rotten ice were dramatically higher than those observed in May-June. Pending results from SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing and exopolymer/gel analyses will also be presented.

  15. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. On the crystal structure of Cr2N precipitates in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel. III. Neutron diffraction study on the ordered Cr2N superstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sung-Joon; Shin, Eunjoo; Takaki, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    The ordered structure of Cr(2)N precipitates in high-nitrogen austenitic steel was investigated utilizing high-resolution neutron powder diffractometry (HRPD). On the basis of the Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction patterns, the ordered Cr2N superstructure was confirmed to be trigonal (space group P31m), with lattice parameters a=4.800 (4) and c=4.472 (5) A, as suggested in previous transmission electron microscopy studies [Lee, Oh, Han, Lee, Kim & Takaki (2005). Acta Cryst. B61, 137-144; Lee, Kim & Takaki (2006). Acta Cryst. B62, 190-196]. The occupancies of the N atoms in four crystallographic sites [1(a), 1(b), 2(d) and 2(c) Wyckoff sites] were determined to be 1.00 (5), 0.0, 0.74 (9) and 0.12 (3), respectively, reflecting a partial disordering of N atoms along the c axis. The position of the metal atom was specified to be x=0.346 (8) and z=0.244 (6), corresponding to a deviation from the ideal position (x=0.333 and z=0.250). This deviation caused the ((1/3 1/3)(0))-type superlattice reflection to appear. A comparison between the ideal and measured crystal structures of Cr2N was performed using a computer simulation of selected-area diffraction patterns.

  17. The Triple Salt Sr14[Ta4N13][TaN4]O-A Nitridotantalate Oxide with 19-fold Rock Salt Superstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsching, Matthias; Daiger, Martin; Hoch, Constantin

    2017-02-21

    A new structure motif in nitridometalate chemistry is the tetracatena-nitridotantalate anion [Ta4N13](19-). It occurs in the crystal structure of the triple salt Sr14[Ta4N13][TaN4]O (monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 15.062(2) Å, b = 7.2484(6) Å, c = 24.266(3) Å, and β = 97.280(10)(o)) together with ortho-tantalate and isolated oxide anions. Synthesis followed a new approach with employment of Sr surplus and reductive conditions aimed at the preparation of subvalent compounds. The new structure type was established on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and also Rietveld refinement. It is a complex superstructure of the rock salt structure type with Ta and Sr atoms forming the face-centered cubic packing and N and O atoms occupying 18/19 of the octahedral voids. We discuss structure and stability of the triple salt with respect to other known nitridometalates and the use of this triple salt for preparative access toward new metal-rich compounds in this field.

  18. Biofouling protection for marine environmental sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Delauney

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available These days, many marine autonomous environment monitoring networks are set up in the world. These systems take advantage of existing superstructures such as offshore platforms, lightships, piers, breakwaters or are placed on specially designed buoys or underwater oceanographic structures. These systems commonly use various sensors to measure parameters such as dissolved oxygen, turbidity, conductivity, pH or fluorescence. Emphasis has to be put on the long term quality of measurements, yet sensors may face very short-term biofouling effects. Biofouling can disrupt the quality of the measurements, sometimes in less than a week.

    Many techniques to prevent biofouling on instrumentation are listed and studied by researchers and manufacturers. Very few of them are implemented on instruments and of those very few have been tested in situ on oceanographic sensors for deployment of at least one or two months.

    This paper presents a review of techniques used to protect against biofouling of in situ sensors and gives a short list and description of promising techniques.

  19. Biofouling protection for marine environmental sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delauney, L.; Compère, C.; Lehaitre, M.

    2010-05-01

    These days, many marine autonomous environment monitoring networks are set up in the world. These systems take advantage of existing superstructures such as offshore platforms, lightships, piers, breakwaters or are placed on specially designed buoys or underwater oceanographic structures. These systems commonly use various sensors to measure parameters such as dissolved oxygen, turbidity, conductivity, pH or fluorescence. Emphasis has to be put on the long term quality of measurements, yet sensors may face very short-term biofouling effects. Biofouling can disrupt the quality of the measurements, sometimes in less than a week. Many techniques to prevent biofouling on instrumentation are listed and studied by researchers and manufacturers. Very few of them are implemented on instruments and of those very few have been tested in situ on oceanographic sensors for deployment of at least one or two months. This paper presents a review of techniques used to protect against biofouling of in situ sensors and gives a short list and description of promising techniques.

  20. Heavy Metal Presence in Two Different Types of Ice Cream: Artisanal Ice Cream (Italian Gelato) and Industrial Ice Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conficoni, D; Alberghini, L; Bissacco, E; Ferioli, M; Giaccone, V

    2017-03-01

    Ice cream, a popular product worldwide, is usually a milk-based product with other types of ingredients (fruit, eggs, cocoa, dried fruit, additives, and others). Different materials are used to obtain the desired taste, texture, consistency, and appearance of the final product. This study surveyed ice cream products available in Italy for heavy metals (lead, cadmium, chromium, tin, and arsenic). The differences between artisanal and industrial ice cream were also investigated because of the importance in the Italian diet and the diffusion of this ready-to-eat food. Ice cream sampling was performed between October 2010 and February 2011 in the northeast of Italy. A total of 100 samples were randomly collected from different sources: 50 industrial samples produced by 19 different brands were collected in coffee bars and supermarkets; 50 artisanal ice cream samples were gathered at nine different artisanal ice cream shops. Ten wooden sticks of industrial ice cream were analyzed in parallel to the ice cream. All samples were negative for arsenic and mercury. None of the artisanal ice cream samples were positive for lead and tin; 18% of the industrial ice cream samples were positive. All positive lead samples were higher than the legal limit stated for milk (0.02 mg/kg). All industrial ice cream samples were negative for cadmium, but cadmium was present in 10% of the artisanal ice cream samples. Chromium was found in 26% of the artisanal and in 58% of the industrial ice cream samples. The heavy metals found in the wooden sticks were different from the corresponding ice cream, pointing out the lack of cross-contamination between the products. Considering the results and the amount of ice cream consumed during the year, contamination through ice cream is a low risk for the Italian population, even though there is need for further analysis.

  1. Atmospheric Methane in Ice Cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of air trapped in ice cores provides us the most direct information about atmospheric CH4 variations in the past history. Ice core records from the "Three Poles (Antarctica, Greenland and Tibetan Plateau)" reveal the detailed fluctuations of atmospheric CH4 concentration with time and are allowed to quantify the CH4 differences among latitudes. These data are indispensably in the farther study of the relationship between greenhouse gases and climatic change, and of the past changes in terrestrial CH4 emissions. Ice cores reconstruction indicates that atmospheric CH4 concentration has increased quickly since industrialization, and the present day's level of atmospheric CH4 (1800 ppbv) is unprecedented during the past Glacial-Interglacial climate cycles.

  2. PU-ICE Summary Information.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Generator Knowledge Report for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment Containment Systems (GK Report) provides information for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment (Pu- ICE) program to support waste management and characterization efforts. Attachment 3-18 presents generator knowledge (GK) information specific to the eighteenth Pu-ICE conducted in August 2015, also known as ‘Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and Pu-ICE Z-2841 (1).’ Shot 18 (Aug 2015) was generated on August 28, 2015 (1). Calculations based on the isotopic content of Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and the measured mass of the containment system demonstrate the post-shot containment system is low-level waste (LLW). Therefore, this containment system will be managed at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico (SNL/NM) as LLW. Attachment 3-18 provides documentation of the TRU concentration and documents the concentration of any hazardous constituents.

  3. Controlling superstructural ordering in the clathrate-I Ba 8 M 16 P 30 (M = Cu, Zn) through the formation of metal–metal bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolyniuk, J.; Whitfield, P. S.; Lee, K.; Lebedev, O. I.; Kovnir, K.

    2017-01-01

    Order–disorder–order phase transitions in the clathrate-I Ba8Cu16P30 were induced and controlled by aliovalent substitutions of Zn into the framework. Unaltered Ba8Cu16P30 crystallizes in an ordered orthorhombic (Pbcn) clathrate-I superstructure that maintains complete segregation of metal and phosphorus atoms over 23 different crystallographic positions in the clathrate framework. The driving force for the formation of this Pbcn superstructure is the avoidance of Cu–Cu bonds. This superstructure is preserved upon aliovalent substitution of Zn for Cu in Ba8Cu16-xZnxP30 with 0 < x < 1.6 (10% Zn/Mtotal), but vanishes at greater substitution concentrations. Higher Zn concentrations (up to 35% Zn/Mtotal) resulted in the additional substitution of Zn for P in Ba8M16+yP30-y (M = Cu, Zn) with 0 ≤ y ≤ 1. This causes the formation of Cu–Zn bonds in the framework, leading to a collapse of the orthorhombic superstructure into the more common cubic subcell of clathrate-I (Pm[3 with combining macron]n). In the resulting cubic phases, each clathrate framework position is jointly occupied by three different elements: Cu, Zn, and P. Detailed structural characterization of the Ba–Cu–Zn–P clathrates-I via single crystal X-ray diffraction, joint synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffractions, pair distribution function analysis, electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy, along with elemental analysis, indicates that local ordering is present in the cubic clathrate framework, suggesting the evolution of Cu–Zn bonds. For the compounds with the highest Zn content, a disorder–order transformation is detected due to the formation of another superstructure with trigonal symmetry and Cu–Zn bonds in the clathrate-I framework. It is shown that small changes in the composition, synthesis, and crystal structure have significant impacts on the structural and transport properties of Zn-substituted Ba8Cu16P30.

  4. Improved method for sea ice age computation based on combination of sea ice drift and concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosov, Anton; Rampal, Pierre; Lavergne, Thomas; Aaboe, Signe

    2017-04-01

    Sea Ice Age is one of the components of the Sea Ice ECV as defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) [WMO, 2015]. It is an important climate indicator describing the sea ice state in addition to sea ice concentration (SIC) and thickness (SIT). The amount of old/thick ice in the Arctic Ocean has been decreasing dramatically [Perovich et al. 2015]. Kwok et al. [2009] reported significant decline in the MYI share and consequent loss of thickness and therefore volume. Today, there is only one acknowledged sea ice age climate data record [Tschudi, et al. 2015], based on Maslanik et al. [2011] provided by National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) [http://nsidc.org/data/docs/daac/nsidc0611-sea-ice-age/]. The sea ice age algorithm [Fowler et al., 2004] is using satellite-derived ice drift for Lagrangian tracking of individual ice parcels (12-km grid cells) defined by areas of sea ice concentration > 15% [Maslanik et al., 2011], i.e. sea ice extent, according to the NASA Team algorithm [Cavalieri et al., 1984]. This approach has several drawbacks. (1) Using sea ice extent instead of sea ice concentration leads to overestimation of the amount of older ice. (2) The individual ice parcels are not advected uniformly over (long) time. This leads to undersampling in areas of consistent ice divergence. (3) The end product grid cells are assigned the age of the oldest ice parcel within that cell, and the frequency distribution of the ice age is not taken into account. In addition, the base sea ice drift product (https://nsidc.org/data/docs/daac/nsidc0116_icemotion.gd.html) is known to exhibit greatly reduced accuracy during the summer season [Sumata et al 2014, Szanyi, 2016] as it only relies on a combination of sea ice drifter trajectories and wind-driven "free-drift" motion during summer. This results in a significant overestimate of old-ice content, incorrect shape of the old-ice pack, and lack of information about the ice age distribution within the grid cells. We

  5. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  6. SOLUTIONS FOR THE NEW TASKS IN AERODYNAMICS IN THE PROCESS OF CERTIFICATION OF AIRPLANCE OF TRASPORT CATEGORY – ANTI-ICE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shevyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are considered new tasks in aerodynamics in the process of certification of airplanes of transport category. The procedure for optimal location of ice detector at the transonic airplane and means of compliance with certification requirements for automatic engagement of anti-ice protection.

  7. RIDES: Raman Icing Detection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Inflight icing of engines and airframe presents a significant hazard to air transport, especially at lower flight elevations during take-off or on approach. Ice...

  8. Lobster Tail Ice Formation on Aerosurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Glace Ice formation commonly refered to as 'Lobster Tail' by scientists and engineers, is caused to form on the leading edge of a aircraft tail section in the icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  9. Climatic change and river ice breakup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltaos, S. [Environment Canada, National Water Research Institute, Burlington, ON (Canada); Burrell, B. C. [New Brunswick Dept. of the Environment and Local Government, Sciences and Planning Division, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    An overview of climatic factors and impact relative to river ice engineering and science is presented. An explanation of the fundamentals of climatic change is followed by a review of direct and indirect climatic influences that govern river ice breakup and related trends. Known responses of river ice to climatic change and potential future changes to ice breakup processes are described along with the probable ecological and socio-economic consequences of these changes. Changes in engineering approaches to accommodate the present ice regime and predicted changes in climatic variables that affect river ice processes and reduce the vulnerability of infrastructure and ecosystems to climatic change are examined. Future research on the links between river ice and stream ecology is suggested to identify ecological concerns that may result from changes in river ice regimes induced by climatic change. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  11. Arctic Landfast Sea Ice 1953-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The files in this data set contain landfast sea ice data (monthly means) gathered from both Russian Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Canadian Ice...

  12. Southern Hemisphere Ice Limits, 1973-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weekly Southern Ocean ice limits, have been digitized from U.S. Navy Fleet Weather Facility ice charts, at the Max-Planck Institut fur Meteorologie, Hamburg....

  13. Monthly snow/ice averages (ISCCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — September Arctic sea ice is now declining at a rate of 11.5 percent per decade, relative to the 1979 to 2000 average. Data from NASA show that the land ice sheets in...

  14. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  15. ROV dives under Great Lakes ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsenga, S.J.; Gannon, John E.; Kennedy, Gregory; Norton, D.C.; Herdendorf, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of the underside of ice have a wide variety of applications. Severe under-ice roughness can affect ice movements, rough under-ice surfaces can scour the bottom disturbing biota and man-made structures such as pipelines, and the flow rate of rivers is often affected by under-ice roughness. A few reported observations of the underside of an ice cover have been made, usually by cutting a large block of ice and overturning it, by extensive boring, or by remote sensing. Such operations are extremely labor-intensive and, in some cases, prone to inaccuracies. Remotely operated vehicles (ROV) can partially solve these problems. In this note, we describe the use, performance in a hostile environment, and results of a study in which a ROV was deployed under the ice in Lake Erie (North American Great Lakes).

  16. Greenland Radar Ice Sheet Thickness Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders were developed and flown over the Greenland ice sheet to obtain ice thickness measurements in support of PARCA...

  17. Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database contains freeze and thaw/breakup dates as well as other descriptive ice cover data for 865 lakes and rivers in the...

  18. Continuous Chemistry in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid

    on parameters involved in the study of photolysis as a source of in situ CO2. The concentration of organic substances in Greenland ice is poorly known due to their low levels and the fact that only a few studies evaluate the concentrations of specific organic compounds. Light does not penetrate deep...... depth was found as a function of wavelength. Further, by computational chemistry hybrid density functional methods (DFT), the four most common conformers of pyruvic acid were investigated in both gas, water and ice using the DFT model CAM-B3LYP with dielectric medium methods. A de rease of the energy...

  19. Electromelting of Confined Monolayer Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Hu

    2013-01-01

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water.

  20. Microwave sensor for ice detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. D.; Chu, A.; Stolarczyk, L. G.; Stolarczyk, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    A microwave technique has been developed for detecting ice build-up on the wing surfaces of commercial airliners and highway bridges. A microstrip patch antenna serves as the sensor, with changes in the resonant frequency and impedance being dependent upon the overlying layers of ice, water and glycol mixtures. The antenna sensor is conformably mounted on the wing. The depth and dielectric constants of the layers are measured by comparing the complex resonant admittance with a calibrated standard. An initial breadboard unit has been built and tested. Additional development is now underway. Another commercial application is in the robotics field of remote sensing of coal seam thickness.