WorldWideScience

Sample records for supersonic beam experiments

  1. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces.

  2. An Introduction to the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a new fuelling method with supersonic molecular beam injection (MBI) has been developed and used in the tokamaks experiments successfully. It is economical to develop and maintain. The advantages of supersonic MBI compared with the conventional of gas-puffing method are as follows: deep deposition of fuel, better fuelling efficiency, reduced recycling and pure plasma. Particle and energy confinement can be improved and density limit extended. This review described the Laval nozzle molecular beam and a simple collective model for the injection of a supersonic MBI into the tokamak plasma.

  3. Dielectric barrier discharge source for supersonic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luria, K.; Lavie, N.; Even, U. [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    We present a new excitation source for pulsed supersonic beams. The excitation is based on dielectric barrier discharge in the beam. It produces cold beams of metastable atoms, dissociated neutral atoms from molecular precursors, and both positive and negative ions with high efficiency and reliability.

  4. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  5. Field Ionization detection of supersonic helium atom beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, R. B.

    2003-10-01

    Field ionization detectors (FID) may offer near-unity detection efficiency and nanoscale spatial resolution. To date, FID detection of molecular beams has been limited to effusive beams of broad Maxwellian velocity distributions. We report FID measurements on monoenergetic helium beams, including intensity measurements and time-of-flight measurements. The FID tips were carefully prepared and characterized in a field ionization microscope prior to use. With the supersonic helium beam we find a much smaller effective detection area ( 50 sq. nm) than was reported in the effusive helium beam experiments ( 200,000 sq. nm). This suggests that the FID ionization yield depends strongly on energy loss by the impinging atom during its initial collision with the FID surface: Our thermal energy, monoenergetic helium beam atoms likely lose little or no energy upon scattering from the clean tungsten FID surface, allowing the scattered atoms to escape the FID polarization field and therby reducing the ionization yield. To improve signal levels, inelastic scattering might be enhanced by use of lower beam velocities (present in the tails of a Maxwellian) or by adsorbing an overlayer on the FID tip (present at cryogenic tip temperatures). These factors likely explain the higher detection yields measured in the effusive beam experiments.

  6. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  7. Pulsed rotating supersonic source used with merged molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, L; Krasovitskiy, V; Rathnayaka, K D D; Lyuksyutov, I F; Herschbach, D R

    2012-01-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device, in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ~10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ~ 10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when...

  8. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  9. An atomic coilgun: using pulsed magnetic fields to slow a supersonic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narevicius, E [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); Parthey, C G [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); Libson, A [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); Narevicius, J [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); Chavez, I [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); Even, U [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Raizen, M G [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, Univesity of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We report the experimental demonstration of a novel method to slow atoms and molecules with permanent magnetic moments using pulsed magnetic fields. In our experiments, we observe the slowing of a supersonic beam of metastable neon from 461.0 {+-} 7.7 to 403 {+-} 16 m s{sup -1} in 18 stages, where the slowed peak is clearly separated from the initial distribution. This method has broad applications as it may easily be generalized, using seeding and entrainment into supersonic beams, to all paramagnetic atoms and molecules.

  10. Pulsed supersonic helium beams for plasma edge diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Rojo, T.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental setup for the production of pulsed supersonic He beams to be used for plasma edge diagnosis in fusion devices is described. A compromise between compact design, low cost, and good quality of the probe beams has been met. The main characteristics of the generated beams, such as pulse shape, absolute flux intensity, and velocity distribution, differ in general from those expected for ideal beam performance and have been determined and optimized experimentally. A first test of this He beam source at the TJ-I UP Torsatron in Madrid is also reported.

  11. Pulsed supersonic helium beams for plasma edge diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez-Rojo, T.; Herrero, V.J.; Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tabares, F.L.; Tafalla, D. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, Avenue Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-03-01

    An experimental setup for the production of pulsed supersonic He beams to be used for plasma edge diagnosis in fusion devices is described. A compromise between compact design, low cost, and good quality of the probe beams has been met. The main characteristics of the generated beams, such as pulse shape, absolute flux intensity, and velocity distribution, differ in general from those expected for ideal beam performance and have been determined and optimized experimentally. A first test of this He beam source at the TJ-I UP Torsatron in Madrid is also reported. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Structure and Chemistry of Atomic Clusters from Supersonic Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-He.

    A tandem time-of-flight (TOF) apparatus was designed to study the structure and chemistry of cold transition metal cluster ions from supersonic beams. By means of a photodissociation laser fluence dependence technique, binding energies of Nb_{rm x }^{+} (x = 2 - 20), Co_{rm x}^{+ } (x = 4 - 20) and etc. were found to generally increase with cluster size. The desorption energies of Nb_{rm x}N _2^{+} (x = 2 - 17) and Nb_{rm x} CO^{+} (x = 2 - 10) also increase with cluster size with some oscillations similar to the size dependent reactivities of these clusters. Photodetachment studies revealed that electron affinities of copper clusters increase with cluster size with a sharp even/odd alternation. Unlike other noble metals, Ag_{rm x}^ {-} clusters display two competing processes: photodissociation and photodetachment. Relative reactivities of cluster ions of Nb, Co, Ag, and etc. have been measured using a fast flow cluster reactor, displaying a similar function of cluster size to that of the neutrals. In addition, preliminary photoelectron experiments have been performed on Cu_{ rm x}^{-} and Nb _{rm x}^{-}. A magnetic Time-of-flight ultraviolet photoelectron spectrometer (MTOFUPS) has been developed to study electronic structures of cold metal and semiconductor cluster anions prepared in supersonic beams. Application of this spectrometer to carbon clusters with a F_2 laser (7.9 eV) allowed their electron affinities and UPS patterns to be measured,demonstrating a remarkable structural evolution of these clusters: Chains (C_2^{ -}-C_9^{-} ) - Rings (C_{10}^ {-}-C_{29}^ {-}) - Cages (C_{38 }^{-}-C_{84 }^{-}). In particular, the UPS of C_{60}^{-} is in excellent agreement with the CNDO/S calculation, providing a striking spectral evidence for the highly symmetric icosahedral soccer ball structure--Buckminsterfullerene. For comparison, the UPS of Si_ {rm x}^{-} and Ge_{rm x}^{ -} are presented. Unlike carbon clusters which prefer structures of low dimensionality, these

  13. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phalnikar, K.A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F.S. [Florida A and M University and Florida State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 {mu}m in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets. (orig.)

  14. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  15. Experimental Study on Electrostatic Guiding of Supersonic D2O Molecular Beam with Two Charged Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ya-Ling; XIA Yong; Chen Hai-Bo; YIN Jian-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the guiding of a supersonic heavy-water(D2O)molecular beam using a hollow electrostatic field generated by the combination of two parallel charged-wires and two grounded metal-plates,and report some new and preliminary experimental results.In the experiment,we detect the guiding signals by using the method of time-of-flight mass spectrum and study the dependence of the relative transmission of the beam guide on the guiding voltage.Our study shows that the relative transmission of the beam guide is increased linearly with increasing guiding voltage Vguid,and the number of the guided D2O molecules is at least increased by 89.4%when the guiding voltage is +20.0kV.Finally,some potential applications of our guiding scheme in the molecule optics are briefly discussed.

  16. Deceleration of a supersonic beam of SrF molecules to 120 m/s

    CERN Document Server

    Mathavan, S C; Esajas, Q; Hoekstra, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the deceleration of a beam of SrF molecules from 290 to 120~m/s. Following supersonic expansion, the molecules in the $X^2\\Sigma$ ($v=0$, $N=1$) low-field seeking states are trapped by the moving potential wells of a traveling-wave Stark decelerator. With a deceleration strength of 9.6 km/s$^2$ we have demonstrated the removal of 85 % of the initial kinetic energy in a 4 meter long modular decelerator. The absolute amount of kinetic energy removed is a factor 1.5 higher compared to previous Stark deceleration experiments. The demonstrated decelerator provides a novel tool for the creation of highly collimated and slow beams of heavy diatomic molecules, which serve as a good starting point for high-precision tests of fundamental physics.

  17. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  18. Synthesis of photocatalytic TiO2 nano-coatings by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters, B.D.; Cavaliere, E; Mul, G.; Gavioli, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on the photocatalytic behavior in gas phase propane oxidation of well-defined TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) coatings prepared via Supersonic Cluster Beam Deposition (SCBD) on Si-wafers and quartz substrates. The temperature dependent crystal phase of the coatings was analyzed by Ram

  19. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  20. Condensed-Phase Mass Fraction in a Supersonic Molecular Beam Containing Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Eldon L.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2008-12-01

    For a supersonic molecular beam containing clusters, a relatively general and simple conservation-of-energy procedure for deducing from time-of-flight measurements the fraction of the beam in the condensed phase is developed. The procedure is applied to measurements for 4He beams formed by expansions which approach the two-phase region either near the critical point or to the liquid side of the critical point. The deduced values of the mass fraction are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating mean values of cluster sizes formed via fragmentation in free-jet expansions of liquid 4He.

  1. Electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams--the new concept, benefits and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Boaz; Alon, Tal; Tsizin, Svetlana; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2015-11-01

    A new type of electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (EI-LC-MS with SMB) is described. This system and its operational methods are based on pneumatic spray formation of the LC liquid flow in a heated spray vaporization chamber, full sample thermal vaporization and subsequent electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams. The vaporized sample compounds are transferred into a supersonic nozzle via a flow restrictor capillary. Consequently, while the pneumatic spray is formed and vaporized at above atmospheric pressure the supersonic nozzle backing pressure is about 0.15 Bar for the formation of supersonic molecular beams with vibrationally cold sample molecules without cluster formation with the solvent vapor. The sample compounds are ionized in a fly-though EI ion source as vibrationally cold molecules in the SMB, resulting in 'Cold EI' (EI of vibrationally cold molecules) mass spectra that exhibit the standard EI fragments combined with enhanced molecular ions. We evaluated the EI-LC-MS with SMB system and demonstrated its effectiveness in NIST library sample identification which is complemented with the availability of enhanced molecular ions. The EI-LC-MS with SMB system is characterized by linear response of five orders of magnitude and uniform compound independent response including for non-polar compounds. This feature improves sample quantitation that can be approximated without compound specific calibration. Cold EI, like EI, is free from ion suppression and/or enhancement effects (that plague ESI and/or APCI) which facilitate faster LC separation because full separation is not essential. The absence of ion suppression effects enables the exploration of fast flow injection MS-MS as an alternative to lengthy LC-MS analysis. These features are demonstrated in a few examples, and the analysis of the main ingredients of Cannabis on a few Cannabis flower extracts is demonstrated. Finally, the advantages of

  2. Beam and experiments: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondel, A.; Bueno, A.; Campanelli, M.; Cervera, A.; Cline, D.B.; Collot, J.; Jong, M. de; Donini, A.; Dydak, F. E-mail: friedrich.dydak@cern.ch; Edgecock, R.; Gavela, M.B.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Gruber, P.; Harris, D.A.; Hernandez, P.; Kuno, Y.; Litchfield, P.J.; McFarland, K.; Mena, O.; Migliozzi, P.; Palladino, V.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.M.; Para, A.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perez, P.; Rigolin, S.; Romanino, A.; Rubbia, A.; Strolin, P.; Wojcicki, S

    2000-08-21

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a neutrino factory. The neutrino factory is a new concept for producing neutrino beams of unprecedented quality in terms of intensity, flavour composition, and precision of the beam parameters. Most importantly, the neutrino factory is the only known way to generate a high-intensity beam of electron neutrinos of high energy. The neutrino beam from a neutrino factory, in particular the electron-neutrino beam, enables the exploration of otherwise inaccessible domains in neutrino oscillation physics by exploiting baselines of planetary dimensions. Suitable detectors pose formidable challenges but seem within reach with only moderate extrapolations from existing technologies. Although the main physics attraction of the neutrino factory is in the area of neutrino oscillations, an interesting spectrum of further opportunities ranging from high-precision, high-rate neutrino scattering to physics with high-intensity stopped muons comes with it.

  3. Supersonic beams at high particle densities: model description beyond the ideal gas approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Rademann, Klaus; Even, Uzi

    2010-10-28

    Supersonic molecular beams constitute a very powerful technique in modern chemical physics. They offer several unique features such as a directed, collision-free flow of particles, very high luminosity, and an unsurpassed strong adiabatic cooling during the jet expansion. While it is generally recognized that their maximum flow velocity depends on the molecular weight and the temperature of the working fluid in the stagnation reservoir, not a lot is known on the effects of elevated particle densities. Frequently, the characteristics of supersonic beams are treated in diverse approximations of an ideal gas expansion. In these simplified model descriptions, the real gas character of fluid systems is ignored, although particle associations are responsible for fundamental processes such as the formation of clusters, both in the reservoir at increased densities and during the jet expansion. In this contribution, the various assumptions of ideal gas treatments of supersonic beams and their shortcomings are reviewed. It is shown in detail that a straightforward thermodynamic approach considering the initial and final enthalpy is capable of characterizing the terminal mean beam velocity, even at the liquid-vapor phase boundary and the critical point. Fluid properties are obtained using the most accurate equations of state available at present. This procedure provides the opportunity to naturally include the dramatic effects of nonideal gas behavior for a large variety of fluid systems. Besides the prediction of the terminal flow velocity, thermodynamic models of isentropic jet expansions permit an estimate of the upper limit of the beam temperature and the amount of condensation in the beam. These descriptions can even be extended to include spinodal decomposition processes, thus providing a generally applicable tool for investigating the two-phase region of high supersaturations not easily accessible otherwise.

  4. The gas density measurement of one long distance supersonic molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Han, J. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Bai, L. X.; Zhou, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    The gas density of the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is a crucial parameter for the fueling or diagnostic process in the tokamak experiments. Using the microphone, one improved method of gas density measurement is proposed, which can greatly improve the measurement capacity by about 3 orders of magnitude by studying the pulsed signal characteristic of the microphone when it is pushed by the SMB. The gas density of the SMB is measured within the axial range of 20-2000 mm, and the axial central density at 2000 mm is about 100 times less than that at 20 mm. It is also found that the radial density distribution follows the Gaussian function in both free expansion (where the SMB can expand freely without any influence from the vacuum chamber) and restricted expansion (where the expansion of the SMB is restricted inside the flight tube of the vacuum system). And the axial central density decreases with the axial distance, which follows the inverse square law in the free expansion, but it deviates from this law in the restricted expansion.

  5. Fast, high temperature and thermolabile GC--MS in supersonic molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv

    1994-05-01

    This work describes and evaluates the coupling of a fast gas chromatograph (GC) based on a short column and high carrier gas flow rate to a supersonic molecular beam mass spectrometer (MS). A 50 cm long megabore column serves for fast GC separation and connects the injector to the supersonic nozzle source. Sampling is achieved with a conventional syringe based splitless sample injection. The injector contains no septum and is open to the atmosphere. The linear velocity of the carrier gas is controlled by a by-pass (make-up) gas flow introduced after the column and prior to the supersonic nozzle. The supersonic expansion serves as a jet separator and the skimmed supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is highly enriched with the heavier organic molecules. The supersonic molecular beam constituents are ionized either by electron impact (EI) or hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) and mass analyzed. A 1 s fast GC--MS of four aromatic molecules in methanol is demonstrated and some fundamental aspects of fast GC--MS with time limit constraints are outlined. The flow control (programming) of the speed of analysis is shown and the analysis of thermolabile and relatively non-volatile molecules is demonstrated and discussed. The tail-free, fast GC--MS of several mixtures is shown and peak tailing of caffeine is compared with that of conventional GC--MS. The improvement of the peak shapes with the SMB--MS is analyzed with the respect to the elimination of thermal vacuum chamber background. The extrapolated minimum detected amount was about 400 ag of anthracence-d10, with an elution time which was shorter than 2s. Repetitive injections could be performed within less than 10 s. The fast GC--MS in SMB seems to be ideal for fast target compound analysis even in real world, complex mixtures. The few seconds GC--MS separation and quantification of lead (as tetraethyllead) in gasoline, caffeine in coffee, and codeine in a drug is demonstrated. Controlled HSI selectivity is demonstrated in

  6. The first results of divertor discharge and supersonic molecular beam injection on the HL-2A tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Liang-Hua; Yuan Bau-Shan; Feng Bei-Bin; Chen Cheng-Yuan; Hong Wen-Yu; Li Ying-Liang

    2007-01-01

    HL-2A tokamak is the first tokamak with divertors in China. The plasma boundary and the position of the striking point on the target plates of the HL-2A closed divertor were simulated by the current filament code and they were in agreement with the diagnostic results in the divertor. Supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) system was first installed and tested on the HL-2A tokamak in 2004. In the present experiment low pressure SMBI fuelling on the HL-2A and during the period of SMB pulse injection into the HL-2A plasma the power density convected at the target plate surfaces was 0.4 times of that before or after the beam injection. It is a useful fuelling method for decreasing the heat load on the neutralizer plates of the divertor.

  7. Hyperon Beam Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment WA89 uses the upgraded Omega facility together with a hyperon beam installed at the end of the H1 beamline. The beam can deliver 2~10$ ^{5} \\% Sigma ^- $ per machine burst at 330 GeV/c with a background of 5 10$ ^{5} \\% \\pi ^- $. \\\\ \\\\ The goals of the experiment are: observation of charmed particles, mainly the charmed-strange baryons and measurements of their production in the kinematical range x$ _{F} $~$>$~0.2, and their decay properties, a search for exotic states such as U(3100) observed in the previous CERN hyperon beam experiment WA62, measurements of hyperon polarization and production properties. \\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector consisting of 24 silicon microstrip planes with 25~$\\mu$m pitch and 6~planes with 50~$\\mu$m pitch provides track measurements of sufficient accuracy to identify the decays of short living charmed particles and measure their lifetimes. A RICH detector provides good $\\pi$/K separation for momenta up to 100~GeV/c and $\\pi$/p separation up to 150~GeV/c. Photons are detecte...

  8. Beam-Beam Experience at KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-11-11

    KEKB has achieved the peak luminosity of 4.1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} and the present capability for delivering integrated luminosity is 224 pb{sup -1}/day. This paper describes (1) the recent performance and the problems of KEKB and (2) the comparison of beam-beam simulations with experiments at KEKB.

  9. Design and first operation of a supersonic gas jet based beam profile monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Tzoganis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Noninterceptive beam profile monitors are of great importance for many particle accelerators worldwide. Extra challenges are posed by high energy, high intensity machines and low energy low intensity accelerators. For these applications, existing diagnostics are no longer suitable due to the high power of the beam or the very low intensity. In addition, many other accelerators, from medical to industrial will benefit from a noninvasive, real time beam profile monitor. In this paper we present a new beam profile monitor with a novel design for the nozzle and skimmer configuration to generate a supersonic gas jet meeting ultrahigh vacuum conditions and we describe the first results for such a beam profile monitor at the Cockcroft Institute. This monitor is able to measure two-dimensional profiles of the particle beam while causing negligible disturbance to the beam or to the accelerator vacuum. The ultimate goal for this diagnostic is to provide a versatile and universal beam profile monitor suitable for measuring any beams.

  10. Supersonic Fe beam source for chromatic aberration-free laser focusing of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, R C M; Van der Straten, P; Leeuwen, K A H

    2002-01-01

    A monochromatic Fe beam is generated by heated supersonic expansion of argon seeded with Fe vapor. At a nozzle temperature of 1930 K and 800 torr argon inlet pressure the Fe beam has an axial velocity spread of 8% and intensity of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 s sup - sup 1 sr sup - sup 1 , corresponding to a deposition rate of 10 nm/h at 150 mm from the nozzle. The two-chamber alumina crucibles are chemically stable for liquid Fe. With 400 mm sup 3 Fe we have operated for more than 200 hours without reloading. The power consumption at 1930 K is 750 W. Temperature stability at constant power (without feedback) is better than 30 K. The source is intended for deposition of nano-structures by laser focusing of the Fe beam. The small axial velocity spread virtually eliminates the increase in focal spot size due to chromatic aberration. (authors)

  11. Generation of intense plasma jets and microparticle beams by an arc in a supersonic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1990-04-01

    Temperatures up to 50000 have been reached in water vortex stabilized Gerdien arcs. In arcs confined within the cores of supersonic hydrogen vortices much higher temperatures should be possible. Furthermore if these arcs are thermally insulated by a strong magnetic field temperatures up to a 106 K may be attainable. At these temperatures and in passing through a Laval nozzle the arc plasma can reach jet velocities of 100km/sec. If small quantities of heavy elements are entrained by this high velocity plasma jet these heavy elements are carried along reaching the same speed and upon condensation can form beams of clusters and microparticles.

  12. The influence of Laval nozzle throat size on supersonic molecular beam injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinkui He; Xianfu Feng; Mingmin Zhong; Fujun Gou; Shuiquan Deng; Yong Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, finite element analysis (FEA) has been used to investigate the effects of different Laval nozzle throat sizes on supersonic molecular beam. The simulations indicate the Mach numbers of the molecular stream peak at different positions along the center axis of the beam, which correspond to local minimums of the molecular densities. With the increase of the throat diam-eter, the first peak of the Mach number increases first and then decreases, while that of the molecular number density increases gradually. Moreover, both first peaks shift pro-gressively away from the throat. At the last part, we discuss the possible applications of our FEA approach to solve some crucial problems met in modern transportations.

  13. Short-range interactions within molecular complexes formed in supersonic beams: structural effects and chiral discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini; Satta; Guidoni; Piccirillo; Speranza

    2000-03-17

    One- and two-color, mass-selected R2PI spectra of the S13-pentanol, were recorded after a supersonic molecular beam expansion. Spectral analysis, coupled with theoretical calculations, indicate that several hydrogen-bonded [R.solv] conformers are present in the beam. The R2PI excitation spectra of [R.solv] are characterized by significant shifts of their band origin relative to that of bare R. The extent and direction of these spectral shifts depend on the structure and configuration of solv and are attributed to different short-range interactions in the ground and excited [R.solv] complexes. Measurement of the binding energies of [R.solv] in their neutral and ionic states points to a subtle balance between attractive (electrostatic and dispersive) and repulsive (steric) forces, which control the spectral features of the complexes and allow enantiomeric discrimination of chiral solv molecules.

  14. Testing of a pulsed He supersonic beam for plasma edge diagnostic in the TJ-IU torsatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Herrero, V.; Tanarro, I.

    1997-02-01

    A new, compact atomic beam source based on the supersonic expansion of He has been developed for application as a plasma edge diagnostic. The beam is produced from a pulsed valve with a duration between 0.2 to 2 ms and a nominal repetition rate 10 and a divergence of ± 1° have been achieved at stagnation pressures below 2 bar. The diagnostic has been tested in ECRH plasmas on the TJ-IU torsatron, representing the first application of a supersonic beam to plasma characterization, to our knowledge. Operational conditions which minimized the total amount of He injected into the plasma were chosen. Non-perturbative injection conditions in the low density plasmas could be obtained at local He densities of ⋍ 1 × 10 11 cm -3 and a beam diameter < 1 cm. Due to the relatively low electron density of the ECRH plasmas, and to the good penetration characteristics of the supersonic He beam, the diagnostic could be used up to fairly low values of the normalized plasma minor radius, {r}/{a} (a = 12 cm) . Details of the optimization of the atomic beam diagnostics and typical results for steady state conditions in the TJ-IU plasmas are presented.

  15. Testing of a pulsed He supersonic beam for plasma edge diagnostic in the TJ-IU torsatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Tafalla, D. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Herrero, V. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    A new, compact atomic beam source based on the supersonic expansion of He has been developed for application as a plasma edge diagnostic. The beam is produced from a pulsed valve with a duration between 0.2 to 2 ms and a nominal repetition rate <500 Hz. A terminal speed ratio >10 and a divergence of {+-}1 have been achieved at stagnation pressures below 2 bar. The diagnostic has been tested in ECRH plasmas on the TJ-IU torsatron, representing the first application of a supersonic beam to plasma characterization, to our knowledge. Operational conditions which minimized the total amount of He injected into the plasma were chosen. Non-perturbative injection conditions in the low density plasmas could be obtained at local He densities of {approx_equal}1 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and a beam diameter <1 cm. Due to the relatively low electron density of the ECRH plasmas, and to the good penetration characteristics of the supersonic He beam, the diagnostic could be used up to fairly low values of the normalized plasma minor radius, r/a (a=12 cm). Details of the optimization of the atomic beam diagnostics and typical results for steady state conditions in the TJ-IU plasmas are presented. (orig.).

  16. Stretchable nanocomposite electrodes with tunable mechanical properties by supersonic cluster beam implantation in elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghi, F.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P., E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Melis, C.; Colombo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy); Ghisleri, C.; Ravagnan, L. [WISE srl, Piazza Duse 2, 20122 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the fabrication of gold-polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite electrodes, by supersonic cluster beam implantation, with tunable Young's modulus depending solely on the amount of metal clusters implanted in the elastomeric matrix. We show both experimentally and by atomistic simulations that the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite can be maintained close to that of the bare elastomer for significant metal volume concentrations. Moreover, the elastic properties of the nanocomposite, as experimentally characterized by nanoindentation and modeled with molecular dynamics simulations, are also well described by the Guth-Gold classical model for nanoparticle-filled rubbers, which depends on the presence, concentration, and aspect ratio of metal nanoparticles, and not on the physical and chemical modification of the polymeric matrix due to the embedding process. The elastic properties of the nanocomposite can therefore be determined and engineered a priori, by controlling only the nanoparticle concentration.

  17. Suppression of runaway current generation by supersonic molecular beam injection during disruptions on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Dai, A. J.; Wang, X. L.; Jiang, Z. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT Team

    2017-08-01

    The suppression of disruption-generated runaway electrons (REs) by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been investigated on the J-TEXT tokamak. Experimental results demonstrate that the hydrogen injected by SMBI during plasma current flattop phase can provoke magnetic perturbations, which increase RE losses rapidly. The effective radial diffusion coefficient of REs due to SMBI is estimated as D r ≈ 16 m2 s-1. Based on this benefit, the SMBI has been used to explore the suppression of disruption-generated REs. In J-TEXT, RE current is created with rapid argon injection by a massive gas injection valve. It is found that hydrogen SMBI before disruption efficiently suppresses the generation of RE current.

  18. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy of the BODIPY chromophore in supersonic beam and superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromeck-Faderl, Anja; Pentlehner, Dominik; Kensy, Uwe; Dick, Bernhard

    2011-07-11

    We present the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of the parent compound of the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye class measured in a supersonic beam and isolated in superfluid helium nanodroplets. The gas-phase spectrum of the isolated molecules displays many low-frequency transitions that are assigned to a symmetry-breaking mode with a strongly nonharmonic potential, presumably the out-of-plane wagging mode of the BF(2) group. The data are in good agreement with transition energies and Franck-Condon factors calculated for a double minimum potential in the upper electronic state. The corresponding transitions do not appear in the helium droplet. This is explained with the quasi-rigid first layer of helium atoms attached to the dopant molecule by van der Waals forces. The spectral characteristics are those of a cyanine dye rather than that of an aromatic chromophore. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO2) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  20. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it, E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it, E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [Centro Interdisciplinare Materiali e Interfacce Nanostrutturati (C.I.Ma.I.Na.), Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO{sub 2}) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  1. Synthesis of photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} nano-coatings by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraters, Bindikt D. [Photo Catalytic Synthesis Group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Cavaliere, Emanuele [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica and Interdisciplinary Laboratories for Advanced Materials Physics (i-Lamp), Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via dei Musei 41, Brescia 25121 (Italy); Mul, Guido [Photo Catalytic Synthesis Group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Gavioli, Luca, E-mail: luca.gavioli@unicatt.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica and Interdisciplinary Laboratories for Advanced Materials Physics (i-Lamp), Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via dei Musei 41, Brescia 25121 (Italy)

    2014-12-05

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of well-defined TiO{sub 2} coatings by supersonic cluster beam deposition. • Morphology is studied for samples annealed at 500, 650 and 800 °C by HR-SEM. • Anatase (500, 650 °C) and Rutile (800 °C) are observed by Raman spectroscopy. • Quartz support improved the coating activity by factor 4–6 compared to Si-wafer. • Silicon is detrimental for photocatalytic activity promoting charge recombination. - Abstract: In this paper we report on the photocatalytic behavior in gas phase propane oxidation of well-defined TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle (NP) coatings prepared via Supersonic Cluster Beam Deposition (SCBD) on Si-wafers and quartz substrates. The temperature dependent crystal phase of the coatings was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, and the morphology by High Resolution-Scanning Electron Microscopy. SCBD deposition in the presence of oxygen enables the in situ synthesis of TiO{sub 2} layers of amorphous NP at room temperature. Adapting the deposition temperature to 500 °C or 650 °C leads to Anatase crystals of variable size ranges, and layers showing significant porosity. At 800 °C mainly Rutile is formed. Post annealing by wafer heating of the amorphous NP prepared at room temperature results in comparable temperature dependent phases and morphologies. Photocatalytic activity in propane oxidation was dependent on the morphology of the samples: the activity decreases as a function of increasing particle size. The presence of water vapor in the propane feed generally increased the activity of the wafer-heated samples, suggesting OH groups are not profoundly present on SCBD synthesized layers. In addition, a remarkable effect of the substrate (Si or Quartz) was observed: strong interaction between Si and TiO{sub 2} is largely detrimental for photocatalytic activity. The consequences of these findings for the application of SCBD to synthesize samples for fundamental (spectroscopic) study of photocatalysis are

  2. Experiments on supersonic turbulent flow development in a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, F. B.; Ferguson, S. D.; Lo, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of supersonic, turbulent, adiabatic-wall flow in a square duct is investigated experimentally over a development length of x/D between 0 and 20 for a uniform flow, Mach 3.9 condition at the duct inlet. Initial discussion centers on the duct configuration itself, which was designed specifically to minimize wave effects and nozzle-induced distortion in the flow. Total pressure contours and local skin friction coefficient distributions are presented which show that the flow develops in a manner similar to that observed for the incompressible case. In particular, undulations exist in total pressure contours within the cross plane and in transverse skin friction coefficient distributions, which are indicative of the presence of a well-defined secondary flow superimposed upon the primary flow. The results are analyzed to show that local law-of-the-wall behavior extends well into the corner region, which implies that wall functions conventionally applied in two-equation type turbulence models, when suitably defined for compressible flow, may also be applied to supersonic streamwise corner flows.

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  4. Classical electron ionization mass spectra in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Alexander; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-09-01

    A major benefit of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and its fly-through ion source is the ability to obtain electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules (cold EI), which show enhanced molecular ions. However, GC/MS with an SMB also has the flexibility to perform 'classical EI' mode of operation which provides mass spectra to mimic those in commercial 70 eV electron ionization MS libraries. Classical EI in SMB is obtained through simple reduction of the helium make-up gas flow rate, which reduces the SMB cooling efficiency; hence the vibrational temperatures of the molecules are similar to those in traditional EI ion sources. In classical EI-SMB mode, the relative abundance of the molecular ion can be tuned and, as a result, excellent identification probabilities and very good matching factors to the NIST MS library are obtained. Classical EI-SMB with the fly-through dual cage ion source has analyte sensitivity similar to that of the standard EI ion source of a basic GC/MS system. The fly-through EI ion source in combination with the SMB interface can serve for cold EI, classical EI-SMB, and cluster chemical ionization (CCI) modes of operation, all easily exchangeable through a simple and quick change (not involving hardware). Furthermore, the fly-through ion source eliminates sample scattering from the walls of the ion source, and thus it offers full sample inertness, tailing-free operation, and no ion-molecule reaction interferences. It is also robust and enables increased column flow rate capability without affecting the sensitivity.

  5. The S1(n,π*) states of cyclopentanone and cyclobutanone in a supersonic nozzle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Masaaki; Hanazaki, Ichiro

    1984-12-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectra of cyclopentanone and cyclobutanone have been observed for their (n,π*) transition in a pulsed supersonic nozzle beam using a high power tunable laser. A drastic reduction of hot bands has been attained, making it possible to discuss the vibronic assignments in more detail than the previous works. The C=O out-of-plane wagging mode was found to be active for both molecules. The ring twisting and flapping in cyclopentanone and the ring puckering in cyclobutanone were also active. The molecules are pyramidally distorted in the excited states with double minimum potentials in the out-of-plane displacement coordinates. The barrier to inversion (V) and the C=O out-of-plane angle at the potential minimum (θm) have been determined for the S1(n,π*) state; V=680±17 cm-1 and θm=34° for cyclopentanone, and V=1850±50 cm-1 and θm=42° for cyclobutanone. The puckering mode (ν20') of cyclobutanone was also found to have a double minimum potential with V=16.9 cm-1. The rotational envelope of each vibronic band has been analyzed on the basis of a computer simulation for an asymmetric top molecule. In contrast with formaldehyde, the A-type (parallel) component, as well as the B-type, was shown to be important in these cyclic ketones. The mechanism of the vibronic intensity borrowing is discussed on the basis of the band-type considerations.

  6. Merged-Beams for Slow Molecular Collision Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Qi; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-01-01

    Molecular collisions can be studied at very low relative kinetic energies, in the milliKelvin range, by merging codirectional beams with much higher translational energies, extending even to the kiloKelvin range, provided that the beam speeds can be closely matched. This technique provides far more intensity and wider chemical scope than methods that require slowing both collision partners. Previously, at far higher energies, merged beams have been widely used with ions and/or neutrals formed by charge transfer. Here we assess for neutral, thermal molecular beams the range and resolution of collision energy that now appears attainable, determined chiefly by velocity spreads within the merged beams. Our treatment deals both with velocity distributions familiar for molecular beams formed by effusion or supersonic expansion, and an unorthodox variant produced by a rotating supersonic source capable of scanning the lab beam velocity over a wide range.

  7. Analysis of Photoablation Products Resulting from Polymer Materials by Supersonic Beam/Multiphoton Ionization/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C H; Murata, Y; Imasaka, T

    1996-04-01

    Photoablation products arising from polymer materials were examined by supersonic beam spectrometry, and the results are compared with those obtained by thermal decomposition. The high selectivity provided by supersonic beam spectrometry allows detection of minor species, e.g., styrene occurred from poly(α-methylstyrene) by cleavage of a methyl group and by proton rearrangement. Because ablation techniques involve high temperatures, thermally stable materials such as poly(p-methylstyrene) can be examined. The latter material is difficult to examine by thermal decomposition, even at 350 °C. It is also possible to differentiate between isomer ablation products, e.g., α-methylstyrene and p-methylstyrene. The instrumental setup described herein was used to examine several authentic samples, such as ABS resin (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) and O-ring (SBR, styrene-butadiene rubber), as well as polystyrene foam. As a result, a styrene segment could be confirmed to be present in these materials. However, no evidence was found for its presence in a glue sample that was suspected to contain styrene on the basis of conventional mass spectrometry. The latter finding confirms the high degree of selectivity of the technique.

  8. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory/Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Couder, M.; Robertson, D.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Erikson, L. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Lemut, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2013-04-19

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  9. The very slow expansion of an ultracold plasma formed in a seeded supersonic molecular beam of NO

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, J P; Grant, E R

    2008-01-01

    The double-resonant laser excitation of nitric oxide, cooled to 1 K in a seeded supersonic molecular beam, yields a gas of $\\approx10^{12}$ molecules cm$^{-3}$ in a single selected Ryberg state. This population evolves to produce prompt free electrons and a durable cold plasma of electrons and intact NO$^{+}$ ions. This plasma travels with the molecular beam through a field free region to encounter a grid. The atomic weight of the expansion gas controls the beam velocity and hence the flight time from the interaction region to the grid. Monitoring electron production as the plasma traverses this grid measures its longitudinal width as a function of flight time. Comparing these widths to the width of the laser beam that defines the initial size of the illuminated volume allows us to gauge the rate of expansion of the plasma. We find that the plasma created from the evolution of a Rydberg gas of NO expands at a small but measurable rate, and that this rate of expansion accords with the Vlasov equations for an i...

  10. Application of advanced computational codes in the design of an experiment for a supersonic throughflow fan rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jerry R.; Schmidt, James F.; Steinke, Ronald J.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Kunik, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Increased emphasis on sustained supersonic or hypersonic cruise has revived interest in the supersonic throughflow fan as a possible component in advanced propulsion systems. Use of a fan that can operate with a supersonic inlet axial Mach number is attractive from the standpoint of reducing the inlet losses incurred in diffusing the flow from a supersonic flight Mach number to a subsonic one at the fan face. The design of the experiment using advanced computational codes to calculate the components required is described. The rotor was designed using existing turbomachinery design and analysis codes modified to handle fully supersonic axial flow through the rotor. A two-dimensional axisymmetric throughflow design code plus a blade element code were used to generate fan rotor velocity diagrams and blade shapes. A quasi-three-dimensional, thin shear layer Navier-Stokes code was used to assess the performance of the fan rotor blade shapes. The final design was stacked and checked for three-dimensional effects using a three-dimensional Euler code interactively coupled with a two-dimensional boundary layer code. The nozzle design in the expansion region was analyzed with a three-dimensional parabolized viscous code which corroborated the results from the Euler code. A translating supersonic diffuser was designed using these same codes.

  11. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; a Beccara, Silvio; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; Alfè, Dario

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C(60) collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C(60) impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  12. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration C

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Colin D.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDnaiel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Non-intrusive hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were obtained in configuration C of the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The combustion of hydrogen fuel injected through an unswept compression ramp into a supersonic cross-flow was imaged over a range of streamwise positions. Images were corrected for optical distortion, variations in the laser sheet profile, and different camera views. Results indicate an effect of fuel equivalence ratio on combustion zone shape and local turbulence length scale. The streamwise location of the reaction zone relative to the fuel injector was also found to be sensitive to the fuel equivalence ratio. The flow boundary conditions in the combustor section, which are sensitive to the fuel flow rate, are believed to have caused this effect. A combination of laser absorption and radiative trapping effects are proposed to have caused asymmetry observed in the images. The results complement previously published OH PLIF data obtained for configuration A along with other non-intrusive measurements to form a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model validation.

  13. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Chiga, N.; Isobe, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H.; Sako, T.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, R.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  14. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: kobayash@lambda.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Chiga, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Isobe, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Y. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sako, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Tanaka, R. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yoneda, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  15. Suite of experiments in beam H3

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The H3 beam runs from bottom to top, in the middle of the photo. On its left preparation is going on for WA10 in beam H5, on its right, behind the concrete wall, the S3 beam runs to BEBC. The H3 beam first meets the IKAR target of the experiment WA9 (right, bottom corner) then crosses the polarized hydrogen target of experiment WA6 sitting inside the large green magnet (centre, also visible the yellow support of the recoil chamber telescope). Finally the beam reaches WA11 and the Goliath magnet (under the white passerelle). The WA9 (left) and the WA5/11 (right) huts stand on top of the photo, the WA6 stands at the right, centre. The three experiments were running in alternance.

  16. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  17. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Craig T.; McRae, Colin D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Chris P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were performed in the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The test section was set up in configuration A, which includes a Mach 2 nozzle, combustor, and extender section. Hydrogen fuel was injected through an unswept compression ramp at two different equivalence ratios. Through the translation of the optical system and the use of two separate camera views, the entire optically accessible range of the combustor was imaged. Single-shot, average, and standard deviation images of the OH PLIF signal are presented at several streamwise locations. The results show the development of a highly turbulent flame structure and provide an experimental database to be used for numerical model assessment.

  18. Interaction of a supersonic NO beam with static and resonant RF fields: Simple theoretical model to account for molecular interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, A. González; Caceres, J. O.; Morato, M.

    2006-09-01

    In previous experimental works from this laboratory two unexpected phenomena were reported: (i) a depletion of ca. 40% in the total intensity of a pulsed He seeded NO beam when these molecules passed a homogeneous and a resonant oscillating RF electric field and (ii) a beam splitting of ca. 0.5° when the transverse beam profile is measured, under the same experimental conditions. In this work a model based on molecular beam interferences is introduced which satisfactorily accounts for these two observations. It is shown how the experimental set-up a simple device used as C-field in early molecular beam electric resonance experiments, can be employed as molecular interferometer to investigate matter-wave interferences in beams of polar molecules.

  19. GC determination of N-nitrosamines by supersonic molecular beam MS equipped with triple quadrupole analyzer, GC/SMB/QQQ/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Voloshenko; Rimma, Shelkov; Lev, Ovadia; Jenny, Gun

    2011-01-31

    The determination of 14 N-nitrosamines by a supersonic molecular beam electron ionization mass spectrometer equipped with triple quadruple analyzer, GC/SMB/EI/QQQ/MS is presented. The supersonic molecular beam electron ionization ion source allows the elucidation of the molecular ion of 13 out of the 14 examined nitrosamines (except for diphenylnitrosamine which was degraded before the analysis). It was possible to use the molecular ions of all the nitrosamines as the parent ions for multiple reactions monitoring mode, which in turn allows significant increase of specificity and lowering of the method limit of detection of the higher molecular weight nitrosamines. The instrumental LOD for different N-nitrosamines was 1-5 pg injection(-1). The proposed method was exemplified by analysis of N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosatables in rubber teats according to the British Standard BS EN 12868:1999. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Ion beam driven HEDP experiments on NDCX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition, with the capability to heat volumetric samples of any solid-phase target material to high energy density. The WDM conditions are achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator to heat foil targets such as Au, Pt, W, Al and Si. The NDCX-1 beam contains a low-intensity uncompressed pulse up to >10 μs of intensity ˜0.4 MW/cm^2, and a high-intensity compressed pulse (FWHM 2-3 ns and fluence ˜4 mJ). WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 2-3 MeV lithium ion beam.

  1. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  2. A low thermal mass fast gas chromatograph and its implementation in fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Moragn, Mati; Amirav, Aviv

    2011-12-30

    A new type of low thermal mass (LTM) fast gas chromatograph (GC) was designed and operated in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), including GC-MS-MS with SMB, thereby providing a novel combination with unique capabilities. The LTM fast GC is based on a short capillary column inserted inside a stainless steel tube that is resistively heated. It is located and mounted outside the standard GC oven on its available top detector port, while the capillary column is connected as usual to the standard GC injector and supersonic molecular beam interface transfer line. This new type of fast GC-MS with SMB enables less than 1 min full range temperature programming and cooling down analysis cycle time. The operation of the fast GC-MS with SMB was explored and 1 min full analysis cycle time of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons in the C(10)H(22) up to C(44)H(90) range was achieved. The use of 35 mL/min high column flow rate enabled the elution of C(44)H(90) in less than 45 s while the SMB interface enabled splitless acceptance of this high flow rate and the provision of dominant molecular ions. A novel compound 9-benzylazidanthracene was analyzed for its purity and a synthetic chemistry process was monitored for the optimization of the chemical reaction yield. Biodiesel was analyzed in jet fuel (by both GC-MS and GC-MS-MS) in under 1 min as 5 ppm fatty acid methyl esters. Authentic iprodion and cypermethrin pesticides were analyzed in grapes extract in both full scan mode and fast GC-MS-MS mode in under 1 min cycle time and explosive mixture including TATP, TNT and RDX was analyzed in under 1 min combined with exhibiting dominant molecular ion for TATP. Fast GC-MS with SMB is based on trading GC separation for speed of analysis while enhancing the separation power of the MS via the enhancement of the molecular ion in the electron ionization of cold molecules in the SMB. This paper further discusses several features of

  3. Experiments and practise in beam shaking

    CERN Document Server

    Marriner, J P; Orlov, Y; Poncet, A; van der Meer, S

    1990-01-01

    Storage rings with negative particle beams suffer from neutralisation effects due to ions produced from the residual gas. For antiproton accumulators currently in service, these problems would be very serious were it not for the existence of efficient clearing systems to extract ions and feedback systems to stabilise the p-beam. Similar problems exist for small electron storage rings, because clearing electrodes are often not sufficient to completely eliminate ions trapped in the beam potential well. One antidote, recently further developed at CERN and Fermilab, consists in shaking the beam at a fixed frequency close to one of the betatron side bands of the main beam and close to the bounce frequency of trapped ions. The authors describe the experience gained in applying this method on the CERN and the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulators, and on the CERN 600 MeV electron positron damping ring (EPA).

  4. Reaction dynamics of Si(001) oxidation at room temperature induced by supersonic O sub 2 molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoka, Y

    2002-01-01

    Potential energy barriers for dissociative chemisorption of O sub 2 molecules on clean and H sub 2 O-preadsorbed Si(001) surfaces were verified using supersonic O sub 2 molecular beams and synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. The saturated oxygen amount on both kinds of Si(001) surfaces were measured as a function of incident energy of O sub 2 molecules. The saturated oxygen amount was dependent in both cases on the incident energy. Especially, two energy thresholds appeared in the H sub 2 O-preadsorbed Si(001) surface oxidation. An Si-2p photoemission spectrum for the oxygen-saturated Si(001) surface formed by O sub 2 gas possessing incident energy below the first threshold on the clean surface revealed the oxygen insertion into backbond sites of Si dimers. The dimer backbonds, however, were not oxidized by O sub 2 irradiation without incident energy larger than 1.0 eV in the H sub 2 O-preadsorbed surface. These facts indicate that a chemisorption reaction path of the oxygen insertion into dimer...

  5. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  6. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  7. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  8. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  9. An Aileron Flutter Experiment and Analysis Using Semi-Span Model for the Small Supersonic Experimental Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Kenichi; Tamayama, Masato; Kikuchi, Takao; Machida, Shigeru; Nakamichi, Jiro

    This paper reports a wind-tunnel experiment and analysis that have been conducted under the National Experimental Airplane for Supersonic Transports (NEXST-1) project of JAXA. In order to perform the flight experiment, the design of the vehicle was examined from the stand point of aeroelasticity. The aileron buzz as well as flutter was of much concern for its aileron system on the main wing. Therefore, both wind-tunnel test and analysis were carried out by using a semi-span model with fuselage. Although the buzz was not observed in the test, damping responses of the aileron rotation mode were obtained. Critical damping was observed in supersonic flow, that meant a buzz could occur in ``region C'' of Lambourne's classification. Linear unsteady aerodynamic analysis is applicable to this type of buzz and the characteristics of the buzz of the model is discussed.

  10. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  11. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  12. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  13. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Coaxial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment was designed to study compressible mixing flow phenomenon under conditions that are representative of those encountered in scramjet combustors. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The initial value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was observed when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations also over-predicted the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, while under-predicting the rate of mixing when argon was used as the injectant. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions were suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Second-order turbulence statistics were also compared to their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts to evaluate the effectiveness of common turbulence closure

  14. On the evolution of the phase-space distributions of a non-spherical molecular ultracold plasma in a supersonic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Sadeghi, Hossein; Hung, Jachin; Grant, Edward

    2016-10-01

    This paper offers a toolbox for characterizing the initial conditions and predicting the evolution of the ultracold plasma that forms after resonant laser preparation of a Rydberg gas entrained in a differentially pumped supersonic molecular beam. The conditions afforded by a skimmed free-jet expansion combined with the geometry of laser excitation, determines the phase-space volume of the excited gas. A hydrodynamic shell model, that accounts for the ellipsoidal spatial distribution of this excitation volume in concert with the deforming effects of dissociative recombination, serves to simulate the ambipolar expansion of this molecular ultracold plasma.

  15. Impact of ablator thickness and laser drive duration on a platform for supersonic, shockwave-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; Shimony, A.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Soltis, J. D.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss changes to a target design that improved the quality and consistency of data obtained through a novel experimental platform that enables the study of hydrodynamic instabilities in a compressible regime. The experiment uses a laser to drive steady, supersonic shockwave over well-characterized initial perturbations. Early experiments were adversely affected by inadequate experimental timescales and, potentially, an unintended secondary shockwave. These issues were addressed by extending the 4x1013 W/cm2 laser pulse from 19 ns to 28 ns, and increasing the ablator thickness from 185 μm to 500 μm. We present data demonstrating the performance of the platform.

  16. A Design of Experiments Investigation of Offset Streams for Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the noise characteristics of a dual-stream jet with four airfoils inserted in the fan nozzle was conducted. The intent of the airfoils was to deflect the fan stream relative to the core stream and, therefore, impact the development of the secondary potential core and noise radiated in the peak jet-noise direction. The experiments used a full-factorial Design of Experiments (DoE) approach to identify parameters and parameter interactions impacting noise radiation at two azimuthal microphone array locations, one of which represented a sideline viewing angle. The parameters studied included airfoil angle-of-attack, airfoil azimuthal location within the fan nozzle, and airfoil axial location relative to the fan-nozzle trailing edge. Jet conditions included subsonic and supersonic fan-stream Mach numbers. Heated jets conditions were simulated with a mixture of helium and air to replicate the exhaust velocity and density of the hot jets. The introduction of the airfoils was shown to impact noise radiated at polar angles in peak-jet noise direction and to have no impact on noise radiated at small and broadside polar angles and to have no impact on broadband-shock-associated noise. The DoE analysis showed the main effects impacting noise radiation at sideline-azimuthal-viewing angles included airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils on the lower side of the jet near the sideline array and airfoil trailing edge distance (with airfoils located at the nozzle trailing edge produced the lowest sound pressure levels). For an array located directly beneath the jet (and on the side of the jet from which the fan stream was deflected), the main effects impacting noise radiation included airfoil angle-of-attack and airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils located on the observation side of the jet as well and trailing edge distance. Interaction terms between multiple configuration parameters were shown to have significant impact on the radiated

  17. Recent and Past Experiences with Beam-Beam Effects at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    1999-11-22

    Proton beam stability when in collision with high current electron bunches was of foremost concern during the design stages of the HERA collider[1]. In initial commissioning the beam-beam interaction proved to be a key factor in determining the lifetime of the proton beam. It was quickly ascertained[2] that the proton beam lifetime in collision could be substantially increased by both matching the electron and proton beam sizes ({sigma}) at the interaction points (IPs) and by carefully centering the beams. Presently, proton beam life times of hundreds of hours are routinely observed. In the near future, the accelerators will be upgraded[3] to include new low-{beta} insertions and to allow for yet higher beam currents. Key factors affecting the stability of colliding proton beams will be described as well as recent experiments performed to explore at high electron beam currents new regimes of the proton beam-beam limit at HERA.

  18. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Valishev, A; Miyamoto, R; White, S; Schmidt, F; Qiang, J

    2012-01-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beambeam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  19. Rotating Dual-Wire Beam Profile Monitor Optimized for Use in Merged-Beams Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, D. G. [Albion College; Bruhns, H. [Columbia University; Savin, D. W. [Columbia University; Kvale, Thomas Jay [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Galutschek, Ernst [ORNL; Aliabadi, Habib [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    A rotating dual-wire beam proile monitor based upon a modified National Electrostatics Corporation Model BPM80 beam profile monitor is described. The device can measure beam profiles in two perpendicular directions (horizontal and vertical) in each of two pseudoplanes that are situated along the beam axis and are separated by a distance of 6.0 cm. The output signal from the device is analyzed in real time to yield horizontal and vertical beam profiles and to calculate the divergence of a particle beam that traverses the device. This set-up is well-suited for merged-beams experiments where one beam is tuned to saved profiles from a second beam in order to minimize the merge angle and beam divergences while maximizing the beam-beam overlaps.

  20. Rotating dual-wire beam profile monitor optimized for use in merged-beams experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, D.G. [Department of Physics, Albion College, Albion, MI 49224-1831 (United States)], E-mail: dseely@albion.edu; Bruhns, H.; Savin, D.W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027-6606 (United States); Kvale, T.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Galutschek, E.; Aliabadi, H.; Havener, C.C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    A rotating dual-wire beam profile monitor based upon a National Electrostatics Corporation Model BPM80 beam profile monitor is described. The device can measure beam profiles in two perpendicular directions (horizontal and vertical) in each of two pseudoplanes that are situated along the beam axis and are separated by a distance of 5.4 cm. The output signal from the device is analyzed in real time to yield horizontal and vertical beam profiles and to calculate the divergence of a particle beam that traverses the device. This set-up is well-suited for merged-beams experiments where one beam is tuned to saved profiles from a second beam in order to minimize the merge angle and beam divergences while maximizing the beam-beam overlaps.

  1. Anomalous argon excitation in pulse supersonic flows of Ar + CH sub 4 , Ar + SiH sub 4 and Ar + CH sub 4 + SiH sub 4 mixtures, activated with an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madirbaev, V Z; Korobejshchikov, N G; Sharafutdinov, R G

    2001-01-01

    The processes of energy exchange in the supersonic flows of the argon mixtures with methane and silane, activated by the electron beam, are studied. It is shown, that at the initial stage of condensation in the flux there takes place selective excitation of the argon atoms energy levels. The boundary parameters, whereby the effect of the anomalous radiation excitation is observed, are determined

  2. Does experience play a role in the ability to perform liver stiffness measurements by means of supersonic shear imaging (SSI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grădinaru-Taşcău, Oana; Sporea, Ioan; Bota, Simona; Jurchiş, Ana; Popescu, Alina; Popescu, Mădălina; Şirli, Roxana; Szilaski, Milana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify if the experience of the examiner does plays a role in the ability to perform liver stiffness (LS) measurements by means of supersonic shear imaging (SSI) due to the lack of recommendation regarding this issue. The study included 371 consecutive subjects (42% men and 58% women, with a median age of 48 years, ranging between 17-85 years) with or without hepatopathies, in which LS was evaluated with an AixplorerTM ultrasound system (SuperSonic Imagine S.A., Aix-en-Provence, France). Reliable LS measurements by means of SSI were defined as the median value of 5 LS measurements expressed in kilopascals (kPa). The SSI measurements were performed by a novice (with less than 300 abdominal ultrasound examinations performed) or by a more experienced operator (with approximately 500 ultrasound examinations performed). The results of both operators were compared. The novice performed 57.4% and the more experienced operator 42.6% of the SSI measurements. The more experienced operator had a higher rate of reliable examinations as compared with the novice: 87.4% vs. 72.8% (p =0.001). The rate of reliable measurements was similar for novice and experienced operator in patients with a normal weight (BMI SSI and leads to achieving more reliable LS measurements especially in obese subjects.

  3. Quantifying equation-of-state and opacity errors using integrated supersonic diffusive radiation flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guymer, T. M., E-mail: Thomas.Guymer@awe.co.uk; Moore, A. S.; Morton, J.; Allan, S.; Bazin, N.; Benstead, J.; Bentley, C.; Comley, A. J.; Garbett, W.; Reed, L.; Stevenson, R. M. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Cowan, J.; Flippo, K.; Hamilton, C.; Lanier, N. E.; Mussack, K.; Obrey, K.; Schmidt, D. W.; Taccetti, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    A well diagnosed campaign of supersonic, diffusive radiation flow experiments has been fielded on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments have used the accurate measurements of delivered laser energy and foam density to enable an investigation into SESAME's tabulated equation-of-state values and CASSANDRA's predicted opacity values for the low-density C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl foam used throughout the campaign. We report that the results from initial simulations under-predicted the arrival time of the radiation wave through the foam by ≈22%. A simulation study was conducted that artificially scaled the equation-of-state and opacity with the intended aim of quantifying the systematic offsets in both CASSANDRA and SESAME. Two separate hypotheses which describe these errors have been tested using the entire ensemble of data, with one being supported by these data.

  4. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@cockcroft.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cormier-Michel, E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, J.; Williams, P.H.; Mckenzie, J.W.; Militsyn, B.L. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-11

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  5. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Clarke, J; Smith, J; Cormier-Michel, E; Jones, J; Williams, P H; Mckenzie, J W; Militsyn, B L; Hanahoe, K; Mete, O; Aimidula, A; Welsch, C P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  6. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, C. [Fermilab

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  7. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  8. First years experience of LHC Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, O R

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. This paper will comment on all of these systems and on their contributions to the various stages of beam commissioning. It will include details on: the beam position system and its use for realtime global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; synchrotron light diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  9. An optical Hamiltonian experiment and the beam dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A. [Department of Physics and CIG, University of Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: bazzani@bo.infn.it; Freguglia, P. [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of L' Aquila (Italy); Fronzoni, L. [Department of Physics and CISC, University of Pisa (Italy); Turchetti, G. [Department of Physics and CIG, University of Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2006-06-01

    The analogy between geometric optics and Hamiltonian mechanics is used to propose an experiment that simulates the beam propagation in a focusing magnetic lattice of a particle accelerator. A laser beam is reflected several times by a parabolic mirror and the resulting pattern is registered by a photo camera. This experiment allows to illustrate some aspects of nonlinear beam transport in presence of nonlinearities and stochastic perturbations. The experimental results are discussed and compared with computer simulations.

  10. Analysis of Dynamic Data from Supersonic Retropropulsion Experiments in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Joshua R.; Berry, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental supersonic retropropulsion tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2 for a range of Mach numbers from 2.4 to 4.6. A 5-inch 70-degree sphere-cone forebody model with a 10-inch cylindrical aftbody experimental model was used which is capable of multiple retrorocket configurations. These configurations include a single central nozzle on the center point of the forebody, three nozzles at the forebody half-radius, and a combination of the first two configurations with no jets being plugged. A series of measurements were achieved through various instrumentation including forebody and aftbody pressure, internal pressures and temperatures, and high speed Schlieren visualization. Specifically, several high speed pressure transducers on the forebody and in the plenum were implemented to look at unsteady flow effects. The following work focuses on analyzing frequency traits due to the unsteady flow for a range of thrust coefficients for single, tri, and quad-nozzle test cases at freestream Mach 4.6 and angle of attack ranging from -8 degrees to +20 degrees. This analysis uses Matlab s fast Fourier transform, Welch's method (modified average of a periodogram), to create a power spectral density and analyze any high speed pressure transducer frequency traits due to the unsteady flow.

  11. SNS BEAM COMMISSIONING TOOLS AND EXPERIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL; Galambos, John D [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) successfully met the primary construction project completion milestones in April 2006. An important ingredient of this successful commissioning was the development and use of software tools. With the increasing digitalization of beam diagnostics and increasing complexity of Integrated Control Systems of large accelerators, the need for high level software tools is critical for smooth commissioning. At SNS a special Java based infrastructure called XAL was prepared for beam commissioning. XAL provides a hierarchal view of the accelerator, is data base configured, and includes a physics model of the beam. This infrastructure and individual applications development along with a historical time line of the SNS commissioning will be discussed.

  12. Beam dump experiment at future electron–positron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Kanemura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new beam dump experiment at future colliders with electron (e− and positron (e+ beams, BDee, which will provide a new possibility to search for hidden particles, like hidden photon. If a particle detector is installed behind the beam dump, it can detect the signal of in-flight decay of the hidden particles produced by the scatterings of e± beams off materials for dumping. We show that, compared to past experiments, BDee (in particular BDee at e+e− linear collider significantly enlarges the parameter region where the signal of the hidden particle can be discovered.

  13. The interaction of C60 on Si(111 7x7 studied by Supersonic Molecular Beams: interplay between precursor kinetic energy and substrate temperature in surface activated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia eAversa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buckminsterfullerene (C60 is a molecule fully formed of carbon that can be used, owing to its electronic and mechanical properties, as clean precursor for the growth of carbon-based materials, ranging from -conjugated systems (graphenes to synthesized species, e.g. carbides such as silicon carbide (SiC. To this goal, C60 cage rupture is the main physical process that triggers material growth. Cage breaking can be obtained either thermally by heating up the substrate to high temperatures (630°C, after C60 physisorption, or kinetically by using Supersonic Molecular Beam Epitaxy (SuMBE techniques. In this work, aiming at demonstrating the growth of SiC thin films by C60 supersonic beams, we present the experimental investigation of C60 impacts on Si(111 7x7 kept at 500°C for translational kinetic energies ranging from 18 to 30 eV. The attained kinetically activated synthesis of SiC submonolayer films is probed by in-situ surface electron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS. Furthermore, in these experimental conditions the C60-Si(111 7×7 collision has been studied by computer simulations based on a tight-binding approximation to Density Functional Theory, DFT. Our theoretical and experimental findings point towards a kinetically driven growth of SiC on Si, where C60 precursor kinetic energy plays a crucial role, while temperature is relevant only after cage rupture to enhance Si and carbon reactivity. In particular, we observe a counterintuitive effect in which for low kinetic energy (below 22 eV, C60 bounces back without breaking more effectively at high temperature due to energy transfer from excited phonons. At higher kinetic energy (22 < K < 30 eV, for which cage rupture occurs, temperature enhances reactivity without playing a major role in the cage break. These results are in good agreement with ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. SuMBE is thus a technique able to drive materials growth at low temperature regime.

  14. Technology choices for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Lee, E.P.; Sabbi, G.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2002-10-31

    Over the next three years the research program of the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is focused on separate scientific experiments in the injection, transport and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 100 mA to 1 A. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a complete ''source-to-target'' experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). By combining the experience gained in the current separate beam experiments IBX would allow the integrated scientific study of the evolution of a single heavy ion beam at high current ({approx}1 A) through all sections of a possible heavy ion fusion accelerator: the injection, acceleration, compression, and beam focusing. This paper describes the main parameters and technology choices of the planned IBX experiment. IBX will accelerate singly charged potassium or argon ion beams up to 10 MeV final energy and a longitudinal beam compression ratio of 10, resulting in a beam current at target of more than 10 Amperes. Different accelerator cell design options are described in detail: Induction cores incorporating either room temperature pulsed focusing-magnets or superconducting magnets.

  15. Direct observation of beam bunching in BWO experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Morimoto, I; Maebara, S; Kishiro, J; Takayama, K; Horioka, K; Ishizuka, H; Kawasaki, S; Shiho, M

    2001-01-01

    Backward Wave Oscillation (BWO) experiments using a Large current Accelerator-1 (Lax-1) Induction Linac as a seed power source for an mm-wave FEL are under way. The Lax-1 is typically operated with a 1 MeV electron beam, a few kA of beam current, and a pulse length of 100 ns. In the BWO experiments, annular and solid beams are injected into a corrugated wave guide with guiding axial magnetic field of 1 T. In the BWO with annular beam an output power of 210 MW at 9.8 GHz was obtained. With a solid beam the output power was 130 MW, and an electron beam bunching with the frequency of 9.6-10.2 GHz was observed by a streak camera.

  16. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  17. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  18. Reproducible and controllable induction voltage adder for scaled beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    A reproducible and controllable induction adder was developed using solid-state switching devices and Finemet cores for scaled beam compression experiments. A gate controlled MOSFET circuit was developed for the controllable voltage driver. The MOSFET circuit drove the induction adder at low magnetization levels of the cores which enabled us to form reproducible modulation voltages with jitter less than 0.3 ns. Preliminary beam compression experiments indicated that the induction adder can improve the reproducibility of modulation voltages and advance the beam physics experiments.

  19. Astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Back

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactions involving short-lived nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics, especially in explosive scenarios which occur in novae, supernovae or X-ray bursts. This article describes the nuclear astrophysics program with radioactive ion beams at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The CARIBU facility as well as recent improvements for the in-flight technique are discussed. New detectors which are important for studies of the rapid proton or the rapid neutron-capture processes are described. At the end we briefly mention plans for future upgrades to enhance the intensity, purity and the range of in-flight and CARIBU beams.

  20. Radioactive beam experiments using the Fragment Mass Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is a recoil mass spectrometer that has many potential applications in experiments with radioactive beams. The FMA can be used for spectroscopic studies of nuclei produced in reactions with radioactive beams. The FMA is also an ideal tool for studying radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, using inverse kinematics. The FMA has both mass and energy dispersion, which can be used to efficiently separate the reaction recoils from the primary beam. When used with radioactive beams, the FMA allows the recoils from radiative capture reactions to be detected in a low-background environment.

  1. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  2. Development of Beam Conditions Monitor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dolenc Kittelmann, Irena; Mikuž, M

    2008-01-01

    If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator the resulting beam losses could cause damage to the inner tracking devices of the experiments. This thesis presents the work performed during the development phase of a protection system for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) system is a stand-alone system designed to detect early signs of beam instabilities and trigger a beam abort in case of beam failures. It consists of two detector stations positioned at z=±1.84m from the interaction point. Each station comprises four BCM detector modules installed symmetrically around the beam pipe with sensors located at r=55 mm. This structure will allow distinguishing between anomalous events (beam gas and beam halo interactions, beam instabilities) and normal events due to proton-proton interaction by measuring the time-of-flight as well as the signal pulse amplitude from detector modules on the timescale of nanoseconds. Additionally, the BCM system aims to provide a coarse instan...

  3. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Abrams, Robert [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Dinkel, Holly [U. Missouri, Columbia; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, Grigory [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  4. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  5. Planned reactor and beam experiments on Neutrino Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Maury [Argonne National Lab, Argonne IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Current and future neutrino oscillation experiments are discussed with an emphasis on those that will measure or further limit the neutrino oscillation parameter {theta}{sub 13}. Some {nu}{sub e} disappearance experiments are being planned at nuclear reactors, and more ambitious {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} appearance experiments are being planned using accelerator beams.

  6. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  7. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Co-Axial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Edwards, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The baseline value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was noted when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid simulation results showed the same trends as the baseline Reynolds-averaged predictions. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions are suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Comparisons between resolved second-order turbulence statistics and their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts were also performed.

  8. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  9. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  10. The S1(n, π*) states of acetaldehyde and acetone in supersonic nozzle beam: Methyl internal rotation and C=O out-of-plane wagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Masaaki; Hanazaki, Ichiro; Nagashima, Umpei

    1985-05-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectra of CH3CHO, CH3CDO, (CH3)2CO, and (CD3)2CO have been observed in an Ar supersonic nozzle beam. Vibrational analyses have been performed for vibronic bands in the region at wavelengths longer than 313 nm. The 0-0 bands of the S1(n, π*) states were located at 29 771, 29 813, 30 435, and 30 431 cm-1, respectively. The spectra could be analyzed taking the C=O out-of-plane wagging and the CH3 internal rotation as active modes. By fitting a double minimum potential function to the observed vibrational levels, it has been shown that these molecules are pyramidally distorted in the S1(n, π*) state with barrier heights to inversion of 541, 578, 468, and 480 cm-1, respectively. Similar analyses using the Mathieu function gave threefold potential functions for the methyl internal rotation with barrier heights to rotation of 691, 645, 740, and 720 cm-1 for CH3CHO, CH3CDO, (CH3)2CO, and (CD3)2CO, respectively. High resolution measurements of rotational envelopes have shown that the out-of-plane polarization dominates in the acetone spectrum. This result, together with a detailed investigation of the vibronic intensity borrowing mechanism, has led us to conclude that the second order interaction dominates in which the methyl torsion and the C=O out-of-plane wagging are active. The origin of the methyl rotational barrier in the S1 state is discussed on the basis of our recent ab initio calculations. The hyperconjugative interaction is suggested to be important in determining the barrier.

  11. Ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2010-08-01

    As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition to a relatively large sample. The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating and diagnosing warm dense matter (WDM) targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and a suite of target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher temperature and pressure in the WDM targets. Future experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  12. Monitoring system experiments on beam loss at SSRF injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Experiments on beam loss by using beam loss monitoring (BLM) system were carried out at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) injector. This system used highly sensitive and current-integrated Si-photodiode detectors and an Ethernet data acquisition (DAQ) system. The experimental results demonstrate that the Si-photodiode detectors are a useful tool that provides dynamic information on beam loss and investigates problems of machine operation. It also shows that the Si-photodiode BLM system is suitable for pulse-radiation of high-energy accelerators.

  13. Operational experience during initial beam commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

    2010-01-01

    After the incident on the 19th September 2008 and more than one year without beam the commissioning of the LHC started again on November 20, 2009. Progress was rapid and collisions under stable beam conditions were established at 1.2 TeV within 3 weeks. In 2010 after qualification of the new quench protection system the way to 3.5 TeV was open and collision were delivered at this energy after a month of additional commissioning. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these first periods of commissioning with beam.

  14. Monitoring system experiments on beam loss at SSRF injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Xia, XiaoBin; Xu, XunJiang; Liu, Xin; Xu, JiaQiang; Wang, GuangHong; Zeng, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Experiments on beam loss by using beam loss monitoring (BLM) system were carried out at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) injector. This system used highly sensitive and current-integrated Si-photodiode detectors and an Ethernet data acquisition (DAQ) system. The experimental results demonstrate that the Si-photodiode detectors are a useful tool that provides dynamic information on beam loss and investigates problems of machine operation. It also shows that the Si-photodiode BLM system is suitable for pulse-radiation of high-energy accelerators.

  15. The Beam Conditions Monitor of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Ch; Lieng, M; Nedos, M; Sauerbrey, J; Schleich, S; Spaan, B; Warda, K; Wishahi, J

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons. Its most sensitive components are protected by means of a Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM), based on polycrystalline CVD diamond sensors. Its configuration, operation and decision logics to issue or remove the beam permit signal for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are described in this paper.

  16. Experiments with high-energy neutrino beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, J

    1989-09-15

    Experiments in which high-energy neutrinos were used as projectiles have made substantial contributions to our understanding of both weak and strong interactions, as well as the structure of hadrons. This article offers some illustrations. It recalls the discovery of the neutral weak current and some experiments on its nature. The sections on charged-current inclusive scattering recall the important role of these experiments in the understanding of the quark structure of the nucleon and the validity of quantum chromodynamics. The section on dimuon production illustrates the role of neutrino experiments in establishing the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani current as well as the measurement of the structure function of the strange quark in the nucleon.

  17. MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2009-05-01

    MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

  18. Beam Extinction Monitoring in the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, Eric [Fermilab; Bartoszek, Larry [Technicare; Gaponenko, Andrei [Fermilab; Kasper, Peter [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches approximately 200ns FW long, separated by 1.7 microseconds, with no out-of-time protons at the 10⁻¹⁰ fractional level. The verification of this level of extinction is very challenging. The proposed technique uses a special purpose spectrometer which will observe particles scattered from the production target of the experiment. The acceptance will be limited such that there will be no saturation effects from the in-time beam. The precise level and profile of the out-of-time beam can then be built up statistically, by integrating over many bunches.

  19. A combined beta-beam and electron capture neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J; Orme, C; Palomares-Ruiz, S; Pascoli, S

    2009-01-01

    The next generation of long baseline neutrino experiments will aim at determining the value of the unknown mixing angle, theta_{13}, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy and the presence of CP-violation in the lepton sector. Beta-beams and electron capture experiments have been studied as viable candidates for long baseline experiments. They use a very clean electron neutrino beam from the beta-decays or electron capture decays of boosted ions. In the present article we consider an hybrid setup which combines a beta-beam with an electron capture beam by using boosted Ytterbium ions. We study the sensitivity to the CP-violating phase delta and the theta_{13} angle, the CP-discovery potential and the reach to determine the type of neutrino mass hierarchy for this type of long baseline experiment. The analysis is performed for different neutrino beam energies and baselines. Finally, we also discuss how the results would change if a better knowledge of some of the assumed parameters was achieved by the time this e...

  20. Warm Dense Matter Experiments Driven by Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.

    2009-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. We present results from warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at NDCX-I. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to a spot size ˜ 1 mm, and compressed pulse length ˜ 2 ns. The uncompressed beam flux is >=500 kW/cm^2, and the compressed pulse flux is > 5 MW/cm^2. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. Future plans include construction of the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-4 MeV lithium ion beam. We have developed a target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, and high-speed gated cameras. We compare measurements of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters with model predictions. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher flux on target.

  1. DARHT-II Long-Pulse Beam-Dynamics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl; Bartsch, Richard; Bender, Howard; Briggs, Richard J; Broste, William; Carlson, Carl; Caudill, Larry; Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Chen Yu Jiuan; Dalmas, Dale; Durtschi, Grant; Eversole, Steven; Eylon, Shmuel; Fawley, William M; Frayer, Daniel; Gallegos, Robert J; Harrison, James; Henestroza, Enrique; Holzscheiter, M H; Houck, Timothy L; Hughes, Thomas P; Jacquez, Edward; Johnson, Douglas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jones, Kenneth; McCuistian, Brian T; Meidinger, Alfred; Montoya, Nicholas; Mostrom, Chris; Moy, Kenneth; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Rodriguez, Leroy; Rodriguez, Patrick; Rowton, Larry J; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin; Schulze, Martin E; Simmons, David; Studebaker, Jan; Sturgess, Ronald; Sullivan, Gary; Swinney, Charles; Tang, Yan; Temple, Rodney; Tipton, Angela; Tom, C Y; Vernon Smith, H; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 18-MeV electron beam with more than 1500-ns current/energy "flat-top." In initial tests DARHT-II has already accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500-ns to 1200-ns full-width at half maximum (FWHM) with more than1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments are now underway with a ~2000-ns pulse length, but reduced current and energy. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multi-MeV LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated absence of BBU, the pulse lengths were too short to test the predicted protection against ion-hose instability. The present experiments are designed to resolve these and other beam-dynamics issues with a ~2000-ns pulse length beam.

  2. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K.; Wojda, F.; Senje, L.; Burza, M.; Aurand, B.; Genoud, G.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  3. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  4. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  5. Beam dynamics experiments to study the suppression of transverse instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, T.; Lidia, S.

    2003-03-01

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystron’s (RK’s) have been proposed as power sources for future generation linear electron-positron colliders. These drivers are susceptible to several transverse beam breakup (BBU) instabilities. An experiment to study a particular technique (the “betatron node scheme”) for ameliorating the high-frequency BBU has been performed at LBNL on a 1MeV, 500A induction accelerator beam. The results of this experiment are particularly important for RK, but apply to any system where the betatron phase advance between perturbing structures is an integral multiple of 180°. This phase advance is beneficial in linear accelerators as the instability growth changes from exponential to linear. In the experiment described below, the beam is contained in a solenoidal focusing channel, rf cavities are spaced every 60cm, and growth in the transverse motion was measured as a function of phase advance. Details of the experiment and results are presented.

  6. Merged neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwalder, Andreas [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute for Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A detailed description of a merged beam apparatus for the study of low energy molecular scattering is given. This review is intended to guide any scientist who plans to construct a similar experiment, and to provide some inspiration in describing the approach we chose to our goal. In our experiment a supersonic expansion of paramagnetic particles is merged with one of polar molecules. A magnetic and an electric multipole guide are used to bend the two beams onto the same axis. We here describe in detail how the apparatus is designed, characterised, and operated. (orig.)

  7. ALPtraum: ALP production in proton beam dump experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Döbrich, Babette; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Ringwald, Andreas; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2016-01-01

    With their high beam energy and intensity, existing and near-future proton beam dumps provide an excellent opportunity to search for new very weakly coupled particles in the MeV to GeV mass range. One particularly interesting example is a so-called axion-like particle (ALP), i.e. a pseudoscalar coupled to two photons. The challenge in proton beam dumps is to reliably calculate the production of the new particles from the interactions of two composite objects, the proton and the target atoms. In this work we argue that Primakoff production of ALPs proceeds in a momentum range where production rates and angular distributions can be determined to sufficient precision using simple electromagnetic form factors. Reanalysing past proton beam dump experiments for this production channel, we derive novel constraints on the parameter space for ALPs. We show that the NA62 experiment at CERN could probe unexplored parameter space by running in 'dump mode' for a few days and discuss opportunities for future experiments su...

  8. ALPtraum. ALP production in proton beam dump experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Babette [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Ringwald, Andreas; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    With their high beam energy and intensity, existing and near-future proton beam dumps provide an excellent opportunity to search for new very weakly coupled particles in the MeV to GeV mass range. One particularly interesting example is a so-called axion-like particle (ALP), i.e. a pseudoscalar coupled to two photons. The challenge in proton beam dumps is to reliably calculate the production of the new particles from the interactions of two composite objects, the proton and the target atoms. In this work we argue that Primakoff production of ALPs proceeds in a momentum range where production rates and angular distributions can be determined to sufficient precision using simple electromagnetic form factors. Reanalysing past proton beam dump experiments for this production channel, we derive novel constraints on the parameter space for ALPs. We show that the NA62 experiment at CERN could probe unexplored parameter space by running in 'dump mode' for a few days and discuss opportunities for future experiments such as SHiP.

  9. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  10. Beam current transformer (BCT) for experiment WA1/2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In experiment WA1/2, a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS was directed at a target, downstream of which a hadron line selected, in several narrow momentum bands, a beam of either pi+ and K+ or pi- and K-. These neutrino-parent particles, before entering a 292 m long decay tunnel, passed through a set of 2 BCTs of a design seen here. They measured the hadron intensity (10^10 to 10^11 particles/pulse) with a precision of the order of 1%. There were 2 of them, for enhanced precision and confidence. After the discovery of neutral currents in the Gargamelle-experiment, WA1/2 was the first follow-up, high-precision experiment (Z.Phys.C35, 443-452, 1987 and Z.Phys.C45, 361-379, 1990). See also 7706516X.

  11. Scaled beam merging experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Seidl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy ion fusion drivers. However, the resultant transverse phase space dilution must be minimized so as not to sacrifice focusability at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been completed employing four 3-mA Cs^{+} beams injected at 160 keV. The focusing elements upstream of the merge consist of four quadrupoles and a final combined-function element (quadrupole and dipole. Following the merge, the resultant single beam is transported in a single alternating gradient channel where the subsequent evolution of the distribution function is diagnosed. The results are in fair agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. They indicate that for some heavy ion fusion driver designs, the phase space dilution from merging is acceptable.

  12. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm-2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.

  13. Detail design of the beam source for the SPIDER experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Agostinetti, P., E-mail: piero.agostinetti@igi.cnr.i [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; Trevisan, L. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (PRIMA-Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated) is planned to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova, Italy). PRIMA includes two experimental devices: a full size plasma source with low voltage extraction called SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) and a full size neutral beam injector at full beam power called MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement). SPIDER is the first experimental device to be built and operated, aiming at testing the extraction of a negative ion beam (made of H{sup -} and in a later stage D{sup -} ions) from an ITER size ion source. The main requirements of this experiment are a H{sup -}/D{sup -} current of approximately 70 A/50 A and an energy of 100 keV. This paper presents an overview of the SPIDER beam source design, with a particular focus on the main design choices, aiming at reaching the best compromise between physics, optics, thermo-mechanical, cooling, assembly and electrical requirements.

  14. Shaping of cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Grieser, Silke; Koehler, Esperanza; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2013-07-01

    With a cluster-jet target high and constant densities at the interaction point can be achieved and adjusted continuously during operation. At the University of Muenster the prototype of the cluster-jet target for the PANDA experiment was built up in PANDA geometry and set successfully into operation. Due to observed structures within the cluster beam, a tilting system was installed, allowing for an adjustment of the nozzle system relative to the experimental setup. With this installation target densities of more than 2 x 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} were achieved at 2.1 m behind the nozzle. By the use of special shaped skimmers it is possible to determine the size and shape of the cluster beam at the later scattering chamber. Beside the absolutely target density also a low residual gas background at the interaction region is of high interest. Thus the identification of an optimized skimmer geometry will be of high relevance for the experimental conditions at PANDA. From measured cluster beam profiles it is possible to calculate both the expected areal density at the interaction point as well as the gas background. The results of target beam properties with a shaped cluster beam by slit collimators are presented and discussed.

  15. Automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jayapandian, J; Amarendra, G; Venugopal-Rao, G; Purniah, B; Viswanathan, B

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting the special BIOS interrupt (INT 1CH) of PC in conjunction with a compatible high-voltage controller card and menu-driven control program, we report here the automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments. The beam experiment consists of monitoring the Doppler broadening lineshape parameters corresponding to the annihilation 511 keV gamma-ray at various positron beam implantation energies. The variation and monitoring of the sample high voltage, which determines positron beam energy, is carried out using a controller add-on card coupled to a 0-30 kV high-voltage unit. The design features of this controller card are discussed. This controller card is housed in a PC, which also houses a multichannel analyser (MCA) card. The MCA stores the Doppler energy spectrum of the annihilation gamma-ray. The interactive control program, written in Turbo C, carries out the assigned tasks. The design features of the automation and results are presented.

  16. Atomic-Beam Magnetic Resonance Experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the atomic-beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) experiments at ISOLDE is to map the nuclear behaviour in wide regions of the nuclear chart by measuring nuclear spins and moments of ground and isomeric states. This is made through an investigation of the atomic hyperfine structure of free, neutral atoms in a thermal atomic-beam using radio-frequency techniques. On-line operation allows the study of short-lived nuclei far from the region of beta-stability.\\\\ \\\\ The ABMR experiments on the |2S^1 ^2 elements Rb, Cs, Au and Fr have been completed, and present efforts are directed towards the elements with an open p-shell and on the rare-earth elements.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental data obtained are compared with results from model calculations, giving information on the single-particle structure and on the nuclear shape parameters.

  17. Beam waveguide for ECRH at TJ-II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayza, M.S.; Del Rio Bocio, C. [Universidad Publica de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Garcia, R.M.; Cepero Diaz, J.R.; Likin, K.M. [Asociacion Euratom-Ciemat para Fusion, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors present the main parameters of the transmission line system for Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) for TJ-II experiment in Madrid. This system is based upon two quasioptical transmission lines to carry 400 kW and 0.5 sec of pulse length each line operating at the frequency of 53.2 GHz. The principal parameters of the designed mirrors and that of the guided beams are given in next paragraphs.

  18. Studies on cluster beam shapes for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Koehler, Esperanza; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    One of the two planned internal targets for the PANDA experiment at the accelerator center FAIR will be a cluster-jet target. With this type of target high and constant densities at the interaction point can be achieved and adjusted continuously during operation. At the University of Muenster the prototype of this cluster-jet target was built up in PANDA geometry and set successfully into operation. With this installation hydrogen target densities of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} were achieved at 2 m behind the cluster source. By the use of special shaped skimmers it is possible to determine the size and shape of the cluster beam at the later scattering chamber. Since parallel to the absolute target density also a low residual gas background at the interaction region is of high interest, the identification of an optimized skimmer geometry will be of high relevance for the experimental conditions at PANDA. From measured cluster beam profiles it is possible to calculate both the expected areal density at the interaction point as well as the gas background. First results of beam properties with a shaped cluster beam by slit collimators are presented and discussed.

  19. Photoionization mass spectrometric studies of selected compounds in a molecular beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, W.M.

    1979-03-01

    Photoionization efficiency curves have been measured at moderate to high resolution for several species produced in supersonic molecular beams of acetone, acetone-d/sub 6/ and CS/sub 2/. The molecular beam photoionization mass spectrometer which has been assembled for this work is described. The performance of this instrument has been characterized by a number of experiments and calculations.

  20. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  1. The integrated beam experiment - A next step experiment for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, C.M.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, D.P. Grote; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Davidson, R.C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is proposing as its next experiment the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). All experiments in the U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program up to this time have been of modest scale and have studied the physics of selected parts of a heavy ion driver. The mission of the IBX, a proof-of-principle experiment, is to demonstrate in one integrated experiment the transport from source to focus of a single heavy ion beam with driver-relevant parameters--i.e., the production, acceleration, compression, neutralization, and final focus of such a beam. Present preconceptual designs for the IBX envision a 5-10 MeV induction linac accelerating one K{sup +} beam. At injection (1.7 MeV) the beam current is approximately 500 mA, with pulse length of 300 ns. Design flexibility allows for several different acceleration and compression schedules, including the possibility of longitudinal (unneutralized) drift compression by a factor of up to ten in pulse length after acceleration, and neutralized drift compression. Physics requirements for the IBX, and preliminary physics and engineering design work are discussed in this paper.

  2. Muon beam experiments to probe the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhong, Yi-Ming

    2017-06-01

    A persistence of several anomalies in muon physics, such as the muon anomalous magnetic moment and the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, hints at new light particles beyond the Standard Model. We address a subset of these models that have a new light scalar state with sizable couplings to muons and suppressed couplings to electrons. A novel way to search for such particles would be through muon beam-dump experiments by (1) missing momentum searches; (2) searches for decays with displaced vertices. The muon beams available at CERN and Fermilab present attractive opportunities for exploring the new scalar with a mass below the dimuon threshold, and potentially covering a range of relevant candidate models. For the models considered in this paper, both types of signals, muon missing momentum and anomalous energy deposition at a distance, can probe a substantial fraction of the unexplored parameter space of the new light scalar, including a region that can explain the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy.

  3. Transverse beam compression on the Paul trap simulator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik P. Gilson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paul trap simulator experiment is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates a long, thin charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG transport system by putting the physicist in the beam’s frame of reference. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including all nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent quadrupolar electric fields created by the confinement electrodes of a linear Paul trap correspond to the axially dependent magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Results are presented for experiments in which the lattice period and strength are changed over the course of the experiment to transversely compress a beam with an initial depressed tune of 0.9. Instantaneous and smooth changes are considered. Emphasis is placed on determining the conditions that minimize the emittance growth and the number of halo particles produced by the beam compression process. Both the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed with the warp code and envelope equation solutions agree well with the experimental data.

  4. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  5. Particle beam therapy (hadrontherapy): basis for interest and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, R; Zurlo, A; Loasses, A; Krengli, M; Tosi, G; Zurrida, S; Zucali, P; Veronesi, U

    1998-03-01

    The particle or hadron beams deployed in radiotherapy (protons, neutrons and helium, carbon, oxygen and neon ions) have physical and radiobiological characteristics which differ from those of conventional radiotherapy beams (photons) and which offer a number of theoretical advantages over conventional radiotherapy. After briefly describing the properties of hadron beams in comparison to photons, this review discusses the indications for hadrontherapy and analyses accumulated experience on the use of this modality to treat mainly neoplastic lesions, as published by the relatively few hadrontherapy centres operating around the world. The analysis indicates that for selected patients and tumours (particularly uveal melanomas and base of skull/spinal chordomas and chondrosarcomas), hadrontherapy produces greater disease-free survival. The advantages of hadrontherapy are most promisingly realised when used in conjunction with modern patient positioning, radiation delivery and focusing techniques (e.g. on-line imaging, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy) developed to improve the efficacy of photon therapy. Although the construction and running costs of hadrontherapy units are considerably greater than those of conventional facilities, a comprehensive analysis that considers all the costs, particularly those resulting from the failure of less effective conventional radiotherapy, might indicate that hadrontherapy could be cost effective. In conclusion, the growing interest in this form of treatment seems to be fully justified by the results obtained to date, although more efficacy and dosing studies are required.

  6. Results from the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, N.; OPERA Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The OPERA experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory was designed to study ν μ → ν τ oscillations in appearance mode in the CNGS neutrino beam. In this paper we report the detection of the 5 th ν τ candidate event found in the analysis of an enlarged data sample. Given the number of analysed events and the low background, ν μ → ν τ oscillations have been established with a significance of 5.1σ. The analysis of the present electron neutrino sample in the framework of the 3 + 1 sterile model is also presented. Finally the analysis of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray sample is discussed.

  7. Neutral Beam Injection Experiments in the HL-1M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严龙文; 雷光玖; 钟光武; 江涛; 周艳; 姜韶风; 丁玄同; 周才品; 刘永

    2003-01-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments have been carried out with two operation modes of a bucket ion source in the HL-1M tokamak. During the first mode, more than 30% rise in ion temperature above the Ohmic level is routinely achieved after NBI power about 0. 5 MW is injected. Ion temperature only increases 20-30% for the second operation mode, which is often limited by current termination. The heating effects of the NBI have been analysed experimentally and theoretically. The performance of the NBI system is well described.

  8. The CERN Beam Interlock System: Principle and Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Puccio, B; Kwiatkowski, M; Romera Ramirez, I; Todd, B

    2010-01-01

    A complex Machine Protection System has been designed to protect the LHC machine from an accidental release of the beam energy, with about 20 subsystems providing status information to the Beam Interlock System that is the backbone of machine protection. Only if the subsystems are in the correct state for beam operation, the Beam Interlock System receives a status flag and beam can be injected into LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The Beam Interlock System also relays commands from the connected subsystems in case of failure for triggering the LHC Beam Dumping System. To maintain the required level of safety of the Beam Interlock System, the performance of the key components is verified before every fill of the machine and validated after every emergency beam dump before beam operation is allowed to continue. This includes all critical paths, starting from the inputs from connected systems triggering a beam dump request, followed by the correct interruption and propagation sequence of the two redundant beam permi...

  9. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  10. LEDA beam diagnostics instrumentation: Measurement comparisons and operational experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, J. D.; Barr, D.; Bruhn, D.; Day, L. A.; Kasemir, K. U.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Ledford, J.; Lysenko, W.; Madsen, D. W.; Martinez, D. G.; O'Hara, J. F.; Pieck, M.; Power, J. F.; Sellyey, W.; Shurter, R. B.; Stettler, M. W.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility has been used to characterize the pulsed- and cw-beam performance of a 6.7 MeV, 100 mA radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Diagnostic instrumentation, primarily located in a short beam transport downstream of the RFQ, allow facility commissioners and operators to measure and monitor the RFQ's accelerated and total beam transmission, beam loss, bunched beam current, beam energy and output phase, and beam position. Transverse beam profile measurements are acquired under both low and high duty-factor pulsed beam conditions using a slow wire scanner and a camera that images beam-induced fluorescence. The wire scanner is also used to acquire transverse beam emittance information using a technique known as a "quad scan". This paper reviews the measurement performance and discusses the resulting data.

  11. A monochromatized chopped beam of cold neutrons for low background experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussiere, A. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Grivot, P. (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kossakowski, R. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Liaud, P. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Saintignon, P. de (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Schreckenbach, K. (Inst. Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1993-07-15

    The design and performance of a monochromatized, chopped beam of cold neutrons are described. The beam is particularly suited for experiments where a low level of gamma ray and diffused neutron background is required. (orig.)

  12. New insights into nucleation. Pressure trace measurements and the first small angle X-ray scattering experiments in a supersonic laval nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D.

    2007-07-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of the n-alcohols and the n-alkanes have been determined by combining information from two sets of supersonic Laval nozzle expansion experiments under identical conditions. The nucleation rates J=N/{delta}t{sub Jmax} for the n-alcohols are in the range of 1.10{sup 17}supersonic nozzle expansion. A good agreement between the experimental results and those available in literature is found by applying Hale's scaling formalism [Hale, B., Phys. Rev. A 33, 4256 (1986); Hale, B., Metall. Trans. A 23, 1863 (1992)]. The scaling parameters from this work are also in good agreement with those shown by Rusyniak et al. [Rusyniak, M., M. S. El-Shall, J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11873 (2001)] and Brus et al. [Brus, D., V. Zdimal F. Stratmann, J. Chem Phys. 124, 164306 (2006)]. In the first experiment static pressure measurements were conducted for the n-alkanes to determine the condensible partial pressure, temperature, supersaturation, characteristic time, and the expansion rate corresponding to the maximum nucleation rate. Characteristic times in the range of 13{<=}{delta}t{sub Jmax}/{mu}s{<=}34 were found. In the second set of experiments, the first flow rate resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments are conducted to determine the particle number density for both substance classes. Particle number densities in the range of 1.10{sup 12}

  13. Characterization of the nonlinear elastic properties of soft tissues using the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique: inverse method, ex vivo and in vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Guo-Yang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Hu, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Dong; Liang, Si; Cao, Yanping

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic elastography has become a new clinical tool in recent years to characterize the elastic properties of soft tissues in vivo, which are important for the disease diagnosis, e.g., the detection of breast and thyroid cancer and liver fibrosis. This paper investigates the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) method commercialized in recent years with the purpose to determine the nonlinear elastic properties based on this promising technique. Particularly, we explore the propagation of the shear wave induced by the acoustic radiation force in a stressed hyperelastic soft tissue described via the Demiray-Fung model. Based on the elastodynamics theory, an analytical solution correlating the wave speed with the hyperelastic parameters of soft tissues is first derived. Then an inverse approach is established to determine the hyperelastic parameters of biological soft tissues based on the measured wave speeds at different stretch ratios. The property of the inverse method, e.g., the existence, uniqueness and stability of the solution, has been investigated. Numerical experiments based on finite element simulations and the experiments conducted on the phantom and pig livers have been employed to validate the new method. Experiments performed on the human breast tissue and human heel fat pads have demonstrated the capability of the proposed method for measuring the in vivo nonlinear elastic properties of soft tissues. Generalization of the inverse analysis to other material models and the implication of the results reported here for clinical diagnosis have been discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimized Two-Baseline Beta-Beam Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, Sandhya; Donini, Andrea; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    We propose a realistic Beta-Beam experiment with four source ions and two baselines for the best possible sensitivity to theta_{13}, CP violation and mass hierarchy. Neutrinos from 18Ne and 6He with Lorentz boost gamma=350 are detected in a 500 kton water Cerenkov detector at a distance L=650 km (first oscillation peak) from the source. Neutrinos from 8B and 8Li are detected in a 50 kton magnetized iron detector at a distance L=7000 km (magic baseline) from the source. Since the decay ring requires a tilt angle of 34.5 degrees to send the beam to the magic baseline, the far end of the ring has a maximum depth of d=2132 m for magnetic field strength of 8.3 T, if one demands that the fraction of ions that decay along the straight sections of the racetrack geometry decay ring (called livetime) is 0.3. We alleviate this problem by proposing to trade reduction of the livetime of the decay ring with the increase in the boost factor of the ions, such that the number of events at the detector remains almost the same....

  15. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Palmer, Dennis T; Siemann, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun, originally proposed for the NLCTA, is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV. This is followed by a matching section, final focus and buncher for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. The RF gun is discussed in another paper. We discuss only the beam dynamics and high resolution analysis system at 6 MeV based on using Parmela and high-order Transport for bunch charges from 50 pC to 1 nC. Beyond the diagnostics, this system uses the emittance compensating solenoids and a low energy, high resolution spectrometer (LES) to help tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5° extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without linear dispersion or use of sextu...

  16. A 3D printed beam splitter for polar neutral molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Sean D S

    2016-01-01

    We describe a beam splitter for polar neutral molecules. An electrostatic hexapole initially confines and guides a supersonic expansion of ammonia, and it then smoothly transforms into two bent quadrupole guides, thus splitting the molecular beam in two correlated fractions. This paves the way towards molecular beam experiments wherein one beam is modified through interactions with, e.g. a laser beam or another molecular beam, while the other one remains unmodified and serves as a reference. Because both beams originate from the same parent beam, such differential experiments can dramatically enhance the sensitivity. The highly complex electrode structure required for the beam splitter would be very difficult to build by traditional means. Instead, we introduce a new method of production: 3D printing of a plastic piece, followed by electroplating. The 3D printed piece can take any desired shape and, since the entire structure can be printed as a single piece, provides inherently precise alignment. Electroplat...

  17. Results from the OPERA experiment at the CNGS beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhin, A.; OPERA Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The OPERA experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory is searching for νμ → ντ oscillations in appearance mode in the CNGS neutrino beam. Four ντ candidate events have been found so far, using a sub-sample of data from the 2008-2012 runs. Given the number of analysed events and the low background, νμ → ντ oscillations are established with a significance of 4.2 σ. In this paper the data analysis is discussed, with emphasis on the background constraints obtained using dedicated data-driven control samples. We present also the analysis of the τ neutrino and electron neutrino data in the framework of the 3+1 sterile neutrino model. The measurement of the muon charge ratio in the collected cosmic ray sample is also reported.

  18. Transverse beam diagnostics for the XUV seeding experiment at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedewadt, Joern

    2011-12-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FEL) offer intense, transversely coherent, and ultra short radiation pulses in the extreme ultraviolet, the soft- and the hard-X-ray spectral range. Undulator radiation from spontaneous emission is amplified. Due to the stochastic emission process, the radiation exhibits a low temporal coherence, and the structure of the amplified radiation in the temporal and in the spectral domain shows large shot-to-shot fluctuations. In order to improve the temporal coherence, an external radiation pulse is used to induce (or seed) the FEL process. With this, only a defined wavelength range within the FEL bandwidth is amplified provided that the irradiance of the external radiation exceeds the noise level of the FEL amplifier. In addition to the improved longitudinal coherence, a seeded FEL provides the possibility to perform pump-probe experiments with an expected temporal resolution of the order of the pulse durations. In order to experimentally proof this statement, a test experiment for direct HHG-seeding at wavelength below 40 nm was installed at the free-electron laser facility FLASH at DESY. Crucial for the seeded operation of an FEL is the six-dimensional laser-electron overlap of the seed laser pulses with the electron bunches. Hence, dedicated diagnostics to measure and mechanisms to control the overlap are essential. Within this thesis, a transport beamline for the seed laser beam and the transverse diagnostics for seed laser- and the electron-beam were developed and commissioned. Results of the performance of the seed injection beamline are presented, and first measurements of the seeded operation of the FEL are analyzed and evaluated. (orig.)

  19. A beam halo event of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    Beam halo events: These occur as a single beam of protons is circulating in one direction in LHC, just passing through ATLAS. An outlier particle hits a part of the detector causing a spray of particles.

  20. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Russinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Wang, L.; Xu, F.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Ferri, F.; Lucchini, G.; Mazza, R.; Paleari, F.; Strati, F.; Palladino, V.; Cecchet, G.; de Bari, A.; Capponi, M.; Cirillo, A.; Iaciofano, A.; Manfredini, A.; Parisi, M.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Filthaut, F.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Gruber, P.; Hanke, K.; Haseroth, H.; Janot, P.; Lombardi, A.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Grichine, V.; Gschwendtner, E.; Masciocchi, F.; Sandstrom, R.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; Petitjean, C.; Seviour, R.; Alexander, J.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Griffiths, S.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; White, C.; York, S.; Adams, D.; Apsimon, R.; Barclay, P.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Drumm, P.; Edgecock, R.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Ivaniouchenkov, Y.; Jones, A.; Lintern, A.; MacWaters, C.; Nelson, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rochford, J.H.; Rogers, C.; Spensley, W.; Tarrant, J.; Tilley, K.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fish, A.; Hare, R.; Greenwood, S.; Jamdagni, A.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; McKigney, E.; Matsushita, T.; Pasternak, J.; Sashalmi, T.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Blackmore, V.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.; Tunnell, C.D.; Witte, H.; Yang, S.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Geer, S.; Neuffer, D.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Roberts, T.J.; DeMello, A.; Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Huang, D.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; Lee, K.; Yang, X.; Rimmer, R.A.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Gregoire, G.; Hart, T.L.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.; Gallardo, J.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  1. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.

    2012-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  2. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kolev, D.; Russinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Wang, L.; Xu, F. Y.; Zheng, S. X.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Ferri, F.; Lucchini, G.; Mazza, R.; Paleari, F.; Strati, F.; Palladino, V.; Cecchet, G.; Bari, A. de; Capponi, M.; Cirillo, A.; Iaciofano, A.; Manfredini, A.; Parisi, M.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Filthaut, F.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Gruber, P.; Hanke, K.; Haseroth, H.; Janot, P.; Lombardi, A.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Graulich, J. -S; Grichine, V.; Gschwendtner, E.; Masciocchi, F.; Sandstrom, R.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; Petitjean, C.; Seviour, R.; Alexander, J.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Griffiths, S.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; White, C.; York, S.; Adams, D.; Apsimon, R.; Barclay, P.; Baynham, D. E.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Courthold, M.; Drumm, P.; Edgecock, R.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Ivaniouchenkov, Y.; Jones, A.; Lintern, A.; MacWaters, C.; Nelson, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rochford, J. H.; Rogers, C.; Spensley, W.; Tarrant, J.; Tilley, K.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Walaron, K.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hare, R.; Greenwood, S.; Jamdagni, A.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; McKigney, E.; Matsushita, T.; Pasternak, J.; Sashalmi, T.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Blackmore, V.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J. H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.; Tunnell, C. D.; Witte, H.; Yang, S.; Booth, C. N.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Bross, A. D.; Geer, S.; Neuffer, D.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Roberts, T. J.; DeMello, A.; Green, M. A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M. S.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Huang, D.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; Lee, K.; Yang, X.; Rimmer, R. A.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Gregoire, G.; Hart, T. L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G. G.; Heidt, C.; Gallardo, J.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  3. The first experience with LHC beam gas ionization monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dehning, B; Guerrero, A; Patecki, M; Versteegen, R

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Gas Ionization Monitors (BGI) are used to measure beam emittance on LHC. This paper describes the detectors and their operation and discusses the issues met during the commissioning. It also discusses the various calibration procedures used to correct for non-uniformity of Multi-Channel plates and to correct the beam size for effects affecting the electron trajectory after ionization.

  4. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Vanecek, D.L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.

    2003-10-31

    We have demonstrated experimental techniques to provide active neutralization for space-charge dominated beams as well as to prevent uncontrolled ion beam neutralization by stray electrons. Neutralization is provided by a localized plasma injected from a cathode arc source. Unwanted secondary electrons produced at the wall by halo particle impact are suppressed using a radial mesh liner that is positively biased inside a beam drift tube. We present measurements of current transmission, beam spot size as a function of axial position, beam energy and plasma source conditions. Detailed comparisons with theory are also presented.

  5. Diagnostics for heavy ion beam driven Warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Lidia, Steve; Seidl, Peter; Waldron, Will

    2009-11-01

    A set of diagnostic has been developed for the WDM experiments at Berkeley. The diagnostics are aimed at the in-situ measurement of temperature, expansion velocity and pressure of a WDM sample.A specially developed two-channel pyrometer probes color temperatures at 750 nm,1000 nm and 1400 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. The system has a broad dynamic range with a lower limit ˜2000 K and upper limit ˜100000 K. The pyrometer design is based on custom spectrally selective beam splitters and can be upgraded up to seven channels. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorder by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. The system is calibrated absolutely with a tungsten ribbon lamp (NIST traceable). The various sweeping times of the streak unit allows for temporal resolution varying from 1 ps to 1 us. The spectrometer has a lower sensitivity than the pyrometer and applied in experiments with higher temperatures. Hydrodynamic expansion velocity of a target's free surface is measured by a commercially available all- fiber Doppler shift laser interferometer (VISAR). The installed delay etalon allows for velocity detection with 2 m/s precision and 0.5 ns resolution.

  6. Several atomic-physics issues connected with the use of neutral beams in fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, D.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Fonck, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Energetic neutral beams are used for heating and diagnostics in present magnetic fusion experiments. They are also being considered for use in future large experiments. Atomic physics issues are important for both the production of the neutral beams and the interaction of the beams and the plasma. Interest in neutral beams based on negative hydrogen ions is growing, largely based on advances in producing high current ion sources. An extension of the negative ion approach has been the suggestion to use negative ions of Z > 1 elements, such as carbon and oxygen, to form high power neutral beams for plasma heating.

  7. The simultaneous and nearly-collinear K0 beams for experiment NA48

    CERN Document Server

    Biino, C; Gatignon, L; Grafström, P; Wahl, H

    1998-01-01

    A system of simultaneous and nearly-collinear beams of long- and short-lived neutral kaons has been installed and extensively studied. These beams form an integral part of the NA48 experiment at the C ERN SPS, which aims to study direct CP-violation. The beam splitting is achieved by a novel application of a bent silicon crystal. The principles and design of these beams, as well as their performanc e are described.

  8. Expected damage to accelerator equipment due to the impact of the full LHC beam: beam instrumentation, experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the biggest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, designed to collide two proton beams with particle momentum of 7 TeV/c each. The stored energy of 362MJ in each beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper or to evaporate about 300 liter of water. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can cause severe damage to accelerator equipment. Reliable machine protection systems are necessary to safely operate the accelerator complex. To design a machine protection system, it is essential to know the damage potential of the stored beam and the consequences in case of a failure. One (catastrophic) failure would be, if the entire beam is lost in the aperture due to a problem with the beam dumping system. This thesis presents the simulation studies, results of a benchmarking experiment, and detailed target investigation, for this failure case. In the experiment, solid copper cylinders were irradiated with the 440GeV proton beam delivered by the ...

  9. Supersonic flow imaging via nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to influence of compressibility,shock wave,instabilities,and turbulence on supersonic flows, current flow visualization and imaging techniques encounter some problems in high spatiotemporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)measurements.Therefore,nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method(NPLS)is developed here.The nanoparticles are used as tracer,and pulse planar laser is used as light source in NPLS;by recording images of particles in flow field with CCD, high spatiotemporal resolution supersonic flow imaging is realized.The flow-following ability of nanoparticles in supersonic flows is studied according to multiphase flow theory and calibrating experiment of oblique shock wave.The laser scattering characteristics of nanoparticles are analyzed with light scattering theory.The results of theoretical and experimental studies show that the dynamic behavior and light scattering characteristics of nanoparticles highly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution and SNR of NPLS,with which the flow field involving shock wave,expansion,Mach disk,boundary layer,sliding-line,and mixing layer can be imaged clearly at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  10. Compensation of beam-beam and space-charge effects: experience to-date and near-future opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V

    2014-01-01

    Beam-beam interactions and space-charge effects belong to the category of the most long-standing issues in beam physics, and even today, after several decades of very active exploration and development of counter-measures, they still pose the most profound limitations on performance of accelerator facilities. In this brief review we consider past experience in active compensation of these effects and possible new schemes for further exploration in near-future, in particular, within the framework of the electron-ion collider R&D.

  11. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 microseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Jessica; Softley, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 microseconds. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of greater or equal to 200 microseconds were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3,000 rpm to 80,000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 microseconds to 13 microseconds, and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  12. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  13. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br{sub 2} down to 13 μs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br{sub 2} and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br{sub 2}. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  14. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  15. Development and testing of fiber beam monitors for the Muon g-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkquist, Robin; Diamond, Edward; Martinez, Benjamin; Sblendorio, Alec; Gray, Frederick; Muon g-2 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon to a precision of 140 parts per billion. Careful characterization of the stored muon beam will be crucial for the experiment, because several beam-related systematic effects must be taken into account. The fiber beam monitors will provide a direct measurement of the spatial, temporal and momentum distributions and betatron oscillations of the stored muon beam. These detectors were originally built by KEK for the previous Muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab, but have been repaired and refurbished for the upcoming experiment, including new scintillating fibers and upgraded SiPM-based readout electronics. We present the final design of the fiber beam monitor system and the results of a recent beam test performed at SLAC.

  16. Digital Beam Position Monitor for the Happex Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Sherlon R; Freyberger, Arne; Kaufman, Lisa; Musson, John

    2005-01-01

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high-precision (1 mm), high-bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM-010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The Multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a digital receiver daughter board and digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 4 MHz, and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with a resolution of one mm, 100 kHz output bandw...

  17. Semiconductor cluster beams: One and two color ionization studies of Six and Gex

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, J R; Liu, Yuan; O'Brien, S. C.; Zhang, Qing-ling; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F.K.; Smalley, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Supersonic beams of clusters of Si and Ge atoms have been produced by laser vaporization followed by supersonic expansion in a helium carrier. The cluster beams were characterized by F2(7.9 eV) and ArF(6.4 eV) excimer laser ionization accompanied by time-of-flight mass analysis. In addition, the feasibility of a resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopic study was explored by two-color experiments involving initial excitation with the second (2.36 eV) and third (3.54 eV) harmonics of...

  18. Manipulations of Double Electron Beams within One RF Period for Seeded SM-LWFA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Feng; Cline, David B; Kimura, Wayne D; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2005-01-01

    Although seeded SM-LWFA only requires one electron beam to initiate the laser wakefield, it would be highly desirable to have a second electron beam traveling after the first one to probe the accelerated electrons. To create and preserve significant amount of wakefield in the STELLA SM-LWFA experiment, the first e-beam needs to be tiny (<40 microns FWHM) in size and short in length within the plasma. To probe the wakefield which is damped within 10 ps for certain plasma density, the separation between the first and second beams needs to be within one RF period and the second e-beam must have smaller energy spread and smaller size. Design of double beams in one RF period to meet the strict requirements and the preliminary beam study at BNL-ATF facility are presented. The scheme of double beams with ATF bunch compressor is also discussed.

  19. The Beam and Detector for the NA48 Neutral Kaon CP Violation Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, V; Marras, D; Musa, L; Nappi, A; Batley, J Richard; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Galik, R; Gershon, T; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Katvars, S; Lazzeroni, C; Moore, R; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; Patel, M; Slater, M; Takach, S; White, T O; Wotton; Bal, F; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Burns, M; Ceccucci, A; Clément, M; Cuhadar-Donzelsmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels; Falaleev, V; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Hallgren, B; Kapusta, P; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Iwanski, W; Lacourt, A; Laverriere, G; Linser, G; Ljuslin, C; Marchioro, A; Mast, M; Matheys, J P; Morel, M; Norton, A; Orlic, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Taureg, H; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wertelaers, P; Weterings, J; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kalinin, A; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tkatchev, A; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Peach, K J; Sacco, R; Veitch, E; Walker, A; Carassiti, V; Contalbrigo, M; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Duclos, J; Ferretti, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Rossi, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Simani, C; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Michetti, A; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Behler, M; Blümer, H; Coward, D; Ebersberger, C; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Geib, K H; Hirstius, A; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Luitz, S; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Melzer-Pellmann, I; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Peters, A; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Staeck, J; Wanke, R; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Zeitnitz, O; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Martin-Chassard, G; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Bordacchini, F; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lariccia, P; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Papi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Punturo, M; Talamonti, C; Tondini, F; Bertanza, L; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Francesco; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Gorini, B; Laico, F; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V; Passuello, D; Pierazzini, G M; Raffaelli, F; Sozzi, M; Tripiccione, R; Anvar, S; Bédérède, D; Bugeon, F; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Durand, D; Edard, S; Fallou, J L; Formica, A; Gosset, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Heitzmann, J; Le Provost, H; Louis, F; Mandzhavidze, I; Mazzucato, E; Migliori, A; Mur, M; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Steinkamp, O; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Maier, A; Schwarz, I; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Barberis, P L; Benotto, F; Bertolino, F; Biino, C; Brunasso, O; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Dattola, D; Goy-Lopez, S; Govi, G; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Palestini, S; Pastrone, N; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, E; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    The Beam and Detector, used for the NA48 experiment, devoted to the measurement of $Re(\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon)$, and for the NA48/1 experiment on rare K_S and neutral hyperon decays, are described.

  20. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  1. Future experiments with neutrino superbeams, beta-beams, and neutrino factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deborah A Harris

    2003-10-27

    This report describes the goals of the next generations of accelerator-based neutrino experiments, and the various strategies that are being considered to achieve those goals. Because these next steps in the field are significantly different from the current or previous steps, novel techniques must be considered for both the detectors and the neutrino beams themselves. We consider not only conventional neutrino beams created by decays of pions, but also those which could be made by decays of beams of relativistic isotopes (so-called ''beta-beams'') and also by decays of beams of muons (neutrino factories).

  2. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  3. First Experiences of Beam Presence Detection Based on Dedicated Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Jalal, A; Gasior, M; Todd, B

    2011-01-01

    High intensity particle beam injection into the LHC is only permitted when a low intensity pilot beam is already circulating in the LHC. This requirement addresses some of the risks associated with high intensity injection, and is enforced by a so-called Beam Presence Flag (BPF) system which is part of the interlock chain between the LHC and its injector complex. For the 2010 LHC run, the detection of the presence of this pilot beam was implemented using the LHC Fast Beam Current Transformer (FBCT) system. However, the primary function of the FBCTs, that is reliable measurement of beam currents, did not allow the BPF system to satisfy all quality requirements of the LHC Machine Protection System (MPS). Safety requirements associated with high intensity injections triggered the development of a dedicated system, based on Beam Position Monitors (BPM). This system was meant to work first in parallel with the FBCT BPF system and eventually replace it. At the end of 2010 and in 2011, this new BP...

  4. A Study of Particle Beam Spin Dynamics for High Precision Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Andrew J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In the search for physics beyond the Standard Model, high precision experiments to measure fundamental properties of particles are an important frontier. One group of such measurements involves magnetic dipole moment (MDM) values as well as searching for an electric dipole moment (EDM), both of which could provide insights about how particles interact with their environment at the quantum level and if there are undiscovered new particles. For these types of high precision experiments, minimizing statistical uncertainties in the measurements plays a critical role. \\\\ \\indent This work leverages computer simulations to quantify the effects of statistical uncertainty for experiments investigating spin dynamics. In it, analysis of beam properties and lattice design effects on the polarization of the beam is performed. As a case study, the beam lines that will provide polarized muon beams to the Fermilab Muon \\emph{g}-2 experiment are analyzed to determine the effects of correlations between the phase space variables and the overall polarization of the muon beam.

  5. Production, Characterization, and Measurement of H(D) Beams on the ORNL Merged-Beams Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J. D. [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Kvale, Thomas Jay [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Strasser, S. M. [Albion College; Seely, D. G. [Albion College; Havener, Charles C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Total cross section measurements of electron capture processes are being studied for low-energy, Aq++H(D) collisions using the Ion-Atom Merged-Beams apparatus at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). On this apparatus, a modified Faraday cup detector is used to measure the intensity of the neutral beam. The conversion of the measured electrical current to the true neutral particle beam current is necessary to accurately determine the true cross section values. Inherent in this conversion process is the number of secondary electrons (gamma) emitted from the surface of the detector upon impact of an atom. The method employed to determine gamma and its role in the absolute electron capture measurements at ORNL-MIRF are presented. With a recent upgrade to the apparatus, the neutral beam H(D) production technique has been improved and is discussed in detail in this paper.

  6. The LHC RF System - Experience with beam operation

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P; Argyropoulos, T; Arnaudon, L; Bohl, T; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A; Ciapala, E; Dubouchet, F; Esteban-Muller, J; Ferreira-Bento, J; Glenat, D; Hagmann, G; Hofle, W; Jacquet, D; Jaussi, M; Kouzue, S; Landre, D; Lollierou, J; Maesen, P; Martinez Yanez, P; Mastoridis, T; Molendijk, J; Nicou, C; Noirjean, J; Papotti, G; Pashnin, A; Pechaud, G; Pradier, J; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Shaposhnikova, E; Schokker, M; Stellfeld, D; Tuckmantel, J; Valuch, D; Wehrle, U; Weierud, F

    2011-01-01

    The LHC RF system commissioning with beam and physics operation for 2010 and 2011 are presented. It became clear in early 2010 that RF noise was not a lifetime limiting factor: the crossing of the much feared 50 Hz line for the synchrotron frequency did not affect the beam. The broadband LHC RF noise is reduced to a level that makes its contribution to beam diffusion in physics well below that of Intra Beam Scattering. Capture losses are also under control, at well below 0.5%. Longitudinal emittance blow-up, needed for ramping of the nominal intensity single bunch, was rapidly commissioned. In 2011, 3.5 TeV/beam physics has been conducted with 1380 bunches at 50 ns spacing, corresponding to 55% of the nominal current. The intensity per bunch (1.3 1011 p) is significantly above the nominal 1.15 1011. By August 2011 the LHC has accumulated more than 2 fb-1 integrated luminosity, well in excess of the 1 fb-1 target for 2011.

  7. Linac code benchmarking of HALODYN and PARMILA based on beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X.; Bayer, W.; Hofmann, I.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the 'High Intensity Pulsed Proton Injector' (HIPPI) project in the European Framework Programme, a program for the comparison and benchmarking of 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) linac codes with experiment has been implemented. HALODYN and PARMILA are two of the codes involved in this program. In this study, the initial Twiss parameters were obtained from the results of beam experiments that were conducted using the GSI UNILAC in low-beam-current. Furthermore, beam dynamics simulations of the Alvarez Drift Tube Linac (DTL) section were performed by HALODYN and PARMILA codes and benchmarked for the same beam experiments. These simulation results exhibit some agreements with the experimental results for the low-beam-current case. The similarities and differences between the experimental and simulated results were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, various physical aspects of the simulation codes and the linac design strategy are also discussed.

  8. Simulating the Beam-line at CERN's ISOLDE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the optical matching along portions of the ISOLDE beam-line and automating this procedure will make it easier for scientists to determine what the strengths of the electrical elds of each beam-line element should be in order to reduce particle loss. Simulations are run using a program called MAD-X, however, certain issues were discovered that hindered an immediate success of the simulations. Specifically, the transfer matrices for electrostatic components like the switchyards, kickers, and electric quadrupoles were missing from the original coding. The primary aim of this project was to design these components using AutoCAD and then extract the transfer matrices using SIMION. Future work will then implement these transfer matrices into the MAD-X code to make the simulations of the beam-line more accurate.

  9. An Innovative Beam Halo Monitor system for the CMS experiment at the LHC: Design, Commissioning and First Beam Results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00344917; Dabrowski, Anne

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a multi-purpose experiment situated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The CMS has the mandate of searching new physics and making precise measurements of the already known mechanisms by using data produced by collisions of high-energy particles. To ensure high quality physics data taking, it is important to monitor and ensure the quality of the colliding particle beams. This thesis presents the research and design, the integration and the first commissioning results of a novel Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) that was designed and built for the CMS experiment. The BHM provides an online, bunch-by-bunch measurement of background particles created by interactions of the proton beam with residual gas molecules in the vacuum chamber or with collimator material upstream of the CMS, separately for each beam. The system consists of two arrays of twenty direction-sensitive detectors that are distributed azimuthally around the outer forward shielding of the CMS experiment. Each detector is ...

  10. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  11. Beam polarimetry in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment; Strahlpolarimetrie am CBELSA/TAPS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammer, Susanne

    2010-02-19

    In the identification of nucleon resonances polarization observables play an important role. For the photoproduction experiments of the CBELAS/TAPS assembly at the accelerator facility ELSA in the framework of this thesis linearly and circularly polarized were realized and prepared. Linearly polarized photons were produced on a diamond crystal under usage of the coherent bremsstrahlung. By alignment of the crystal in the bremsstrahlung coherent intensity increasements in form of pronounced edges could be generated. The number of the polarized photons lying in the increasement determines in comparison to the incoherently produced background the degree of polarization. The position of the coherent edge could be tuned by means of control distributions to an arbitrary position in the measured energy spectrum as well as the degree of polarization of the photons optimized. For the production of circularly polarized photons longitudinally polarized electrons on the bremsstrahlung target are required. The polarization transfer of the bremsstrahlung process is uniquely given by the QED, so that the degree of polarization of the photons can be determined via a measurement of the electron-beam polarization. With this goal a for the first time in the CBELSA/TAPS applied momentum-selecting Moeller polarimeter was developed and integrated in the photon-tagging facility. Via a change of the beam helicity the counting-rate asymmetry for parallely and antiparallely beam and target electrons was measured and the degree of polarization of the electrons at beam energies of 2350 MeV determined to typically above 60%. By means of dedicated test measurements and simulations the functionality of the Moeller polarimeter was checked and the relative systematic uncertainty determined to 1%. Since 2007 the Moeller polarimeter essential for the double-polarization experiments is in current operation. Finally a method was sketched, in which via the known cross-section asymmetry of the

  12. Beam polarimetry in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment; Strahlpolarimetrie am CBELSA/TAPS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammer, Susanne

    2010-02-19

    In the identification of nucleon resonances polarization observables play an important role. For the photoproduction experiments of the CBELAS/TAPS assembly at the accelerator facility ELSA in the framework of this thesis linearly and circularly polarized were realized and prepared. Linearly polarized photons were produced on a diamond crystal under usage of the coherent bremsstrahlung. By alignment of the crystal in the bremsstrahlung coherent intensity increasements in form of pronounced edges could be generated. The number of the polarized photons lying in the increasement determines in comparison to the incoherently produced background the degree of polarization. The position of the coherent edge could be tuned by means of control distributions to an arbitrary position in the measured energy spectrum as well as the degree of polarization of the photons optimized. For the production of circularly polarized photons longitudinally polarized electrons on the bremsstrahlung target are required. The polarization transfer of the bremsstrahlung process is uniquely given by the QED, so that the degree of polarization of the photons can be determined via a measurement of the electron-beam polarization. With this goal a for the first time in the CBELSA/TAPS applied momentum-selecting Moeller polarimeter was developed and integrated in the photon-tagging facility. Via a change of the beam helicity the counting-rate asymmetry for parallely and antiparallely beam and target electrons was measured and the degree of polarization of the electrons at beam energies of 2350 MeV determined to typically above 60%. By means of dedicated test measurements and simulations the functionality of the Moeller polarimeter was checked and the relative systematic uncertainty determined to 1%. Since 2007 the Moeller polarimeter essential for the double-polarization experiments is in current operation. Finally a method was sketched, in which via the known cross-section asymmetry of the

  13. Beam instability in 980-nm power lasers: Experiment and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James; Tan, G. L.; Ohkubo, M.; Fukushima, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ijichi, T.; Irikawa, M.; Mand, R. S.; Xu, J. M.

    1994-12-01

    A theoretical analysis of beam instability (steering), commonly observed in high power ridge waveguide laser diodes is presented. A physical model of multiple interfering lateral modes is proposed and implemented in a two-dimensional self-consistent numerical code. It is shown that the dynamic evolution of the effective waveguide and the coherent lasing of emergent multiple lateral modes of the waveguide under high injection could lead to beam steering and knees in the fiber coupled L-I characteristics. The theory of simultaneous lasing and interaction between several lateral modes is found to be consistent with the observed back-plane radiation image.

  14. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...

  15. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  16. Progress in beam focusing and compression for warm-dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A. X.; Cohen, R. H.; Coleman, J. E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P. K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm-dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K + ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ˜50-fold current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available volt seconds (Vs); (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be >10 13 cm -3.

  17. Characterisation of the Muon Beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V.J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C.N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A.D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, G.; Cobb, J.H.; Colling, D.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L.M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Filthaut, F.; Fish, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fletcher, R.; Forrest, D.; Francis, V.; Freemire, B.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O.M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harrison, P.; Hart, T.L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Kolev, D.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lau, W.; Leaver, J.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Lucchini, G.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.B.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M.A.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Roberts, T.J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rusinov, I.; Sakamoto, H.; Sanders, D.A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P.J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Stanley, T.; Summers, D.J.; Takahashi, M.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C.D.; Vankova, G.; Verguilov, V.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Walaron, K.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C.G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Zisman, M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  18. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  19. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  20. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A. [Harwell Oxford, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics, Coventry (United Kingdom); Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hunt, C.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Richards, A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H. [Universite de Geneve, DPNC, Section de Physique, Geneva (Switzerland); De Bari, A.; Cecchet, G. [Sezione INFN Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy); Bayes, R.; Forrest, D.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K. [The University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Lucchini, G. [Sezione INFN Milano Bicocca (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Milano (Italy); Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova, G. [St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Department of Atomic Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravar, U. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L. [Sezione INFN Roma Tre e Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Owens, P.; White, C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C. [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Cooke, P.; Gamet, R. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J. [University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Filthaut, F. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ishimoto, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science, Department of Physics, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J. [Brunel University, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Onel, Y. [University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa City, IA (United States); Palladino, V. [Universita Federico II, Sezione INFN Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Roberts, T.J. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (US); Collaboration: The MICE Collaboration

    2013-10-15

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 {pi} mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 {pi} mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of balance beam deformation in the inertial mass measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhuang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Li, Shisong

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides an analysis of mechanical balance beam deformation in the inertial mass measurement experiment since 2012. The relation between the applied test masses and three types of mechanical elastic deformation of the balance beam, i.e. the changes of rotational inertia, beam length and mass center, are discussed. It is found that changes in the rotational inertia and beam length are high order small quantities of the test mass, and a mechanically optimized balance beam which has good mechanical strength and a light structure is adopted to decrease the influence of the two types of deformation. The mass center change, being proportional to the test mass, has the most impact and can be compensated by a novel mass center compensation approach. Simulations and experiments confirm the effectiveness of the new balance beam and the mass center compensation method. It is emphasized that the analysis of the beam deformation in this paper can also be applied in other experiments where mechanical deformation of the balance beam needs to be considered.

  2. Infinitesimal Conical Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    The calculation of infinitesimal conical supersonic flow has been applied first to the simplest examples that have also been calculated in another way. Except for the discovery of a miscalculation in an older report, there was found the expected conformity. The new method of calculation is limited more definitely to the conical case.

  3. True beam commissioning experience at Nordland Hospital Trust, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daci, Lulzime, E-mail: lulzime.daci@nodlandssykehuset.no [Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø (Norway); Malkaj, Partizan, E-mail: malkaj-p@hotmail.com [Faculty of Mathematics Engineering and Physics Engineering, Polytechnic University of Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    To evaluate the measured of all photon beam data of first Varian True Beam version 2.0 slim model, recently commissioned at Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø. To compare and evaluate the possibility of beam matching with the Clinac2300, for the energies of 6MV and 15 MV. Materials/Methods: Measurements of PDD, OAR, and Output factors were realized with the IBA Blue-phantom with different detectors and evaluated between them for all photon energies: 6MV, 15MV, 6MV FFF and 10MV FFF. The ionization chambers used were Pin Point CC01, CC04, Semiflex CC13 and photon diode by Iba dosimetry. The data were processed using Beizer algorithm with a resolution of 1 mm. The measured depth dose curves, diagonals, OAR, and output factors were imported into Eclipse in order to calculate beam data for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA version 10.0.28) for both the dataset measured with CC04 and CC13 and compared. The model head of 23EX was selected as the most near model to True Beam as a restriction of our version of Aria. It was seen that better results were achieved with the CC04 measured data as a result of better resolution. For the biggest field after 10 cm depth a larger difference is seen between measured and calculated for both dataset, but it is within the criteria for acceptance. Results: The Beam analysis criteria of 2 mm at 50% dose is achieved for all the fields accept for 40x40 that is within 3%. Depth difference at maximum dose is within 1 mm for all the fields and dose difference at 100 mm and 200 mm is lower than 1% for or all the fields. The PDD between two machines for all the fields differ after Dmax with less than 1%. For profiles in the field zone and outside field the difference is within 1% for all the fields. In the penumbra region the difference is from 2% up to 12% for big fields. As for diagonals they differ as a result of the head construction at the edge of the field and the penumbra region. The output factors differ for big fields

  4. True beam commissioning experience at Nordland Hospital Trust, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the measured of all photon beam data of first Varian True Beam version 2.0 slim model, recently commissioned at Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø. To compare and evaluate the possibility of beam matching with the Clinac2300, for the energies of 6MV and 15 MV. Materials/Methods: Measurements of PDD, OAR, and Output factors were realized with the IBA Blue-phantom with different detectors and evaluated between them for all photon energies: 6MV, 15MV, 6MV FFF and 10MV FFF. The ionization chambers used were Pin Point CC01, CC04, Semiflex CC13 and photon diode by Iba dosimetry. The data were processed using Beizer algorithm with a resolution of 1 mm. The measured depth dose curves, diagonals, OAR, and output factors were imported into Eclipse in order to calculate beam data for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA version 10.0.28) for both the dataset measured with CC04 and CC13 and compared. The model head of 23EX was selected as the most near model to True Beam as a restriction of our version of Aria. It was seen that better results were achieved with the CC04 measured data as a result of better resolution. For the biggest field after 10 cm depth a larger difference is seen between measured and calculated for both dataset, but it is within the criteria for acceptance. Results: The Beam analysis criteria of 2 mm at 50% dose is achieved for all the fields accept for 40x40 that is within 3%. Depth difference at maximum dose is within 1 mm for all the fields and dose difference at 100 mm and 200 mm is lower than 1% for or all the fields. The PDD between two machines for all the fields differ after Dmax with less than 1%. For profiles in the field zone and outside field the difference is within 1% for all the fields. In the penumbra region the difference is from 2% up to 12% for big fields. As for diagonals they differ as a result of the head construction at the edge of the field and the penumbra region. The output factors differ for big fields within 5% and

  5. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q.; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations,...

  6. Validation experiments for LBM simulations of electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Regina; Rüde, Ulrich; Markl, Matthias; Jüchter, Vera; Körner, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    This paper validates three-dimensional (3D) simulation results of electron beam melting (EBM) processes by comparing experimental and numerical data. The physical setup is presented which is discretized by a 3D thermal lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). An experimental process window is used for the validation depending on the line energy injected into the metal powder bed and the scan velocity of the electron beam. In the process window, the EBM products are classified into the categories, porous, good and swelling, depending on the quality of the surface. The same parameter sets are used to generate a numerical process window. A comparison of numerical and experimental process windows shows a good agreement. This validates the EBM model and justifies simulations for future improvements of the EBM processes. In particular, numerical simulations can be used to explain future process window scenarios and find the best parameter set for a good surface quality and dense products.

  7. Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (IBEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Stevens, Nicholas; Olle, Raymond; Merrow, James

    1992-01-01

    Ion beam textured and commercial materials suitable for use in space power systems were flown in low Earth orbit on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for 5.8 years. Because of their location on LDEF (98 deg from the ram direction), the 36 materials were primarily exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, the vacuum of space, the micrometeoroid environment, and grazing incidence atomic oxygen. Measurements of solar absorptance and thermal emittance (pre- and post-flight) showed no changes for almost all of the materials, except for the S-13G and Kapton and coated Kapton samples. The optical property stability of ion beam textured surfaces and most other surfaces indicates that they are functionally durable to the synergistic rigors of the space environment.

  8. Experiments with a radioactive sup 5 sup 6 Ni beam

    CERN Document Server

    Rehm, K E; Jiang, C L; Ackermann, D; Ahmad, I; Brumwell, F; Davids, C N; Decrock, P; Fischer, S M; Görres, J; Greene, J P; Hackmann, G; Harss, B; Henderson, D; Henning, W F; Janssens, R V F; McMichael, G E; Nanal, V; Nisius, D; Nolen, Jerry A; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Reiter, P; Schiffer, J P; Seweryniak, D; Segel, R E; Wiedenhöver, I; Wiescher, M; Wuosmaa, A H

    2000-01-01

    A technique for producing a high-quality radioactive sup 5 sup 6 Ni (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 =6.1 d) beam via the two-accelerator method has been developed. Beam intensities of 2x10 sup 7 sup 5 sup 6 Ni/s were extracted from the ion source and 2x10 sup 4 sup 5 sup 6 Ni/s were delivered to the target. For a study of neutron transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, a high-efficiency detection system was built consisting of a large solid angle (2.8 sr), high-granularity Si detector array for measuring the outgoing protons in coincidence with the heavy reaction products identified with respect to mass A and nuclear charge Z in the focal plane of a recoil mass separator.

  9. Experiments on a Hybrid Composite Beam for Bridge Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Van Nosdall, Stephen Paul

    2013-01-01

    This thesis details a study of the structural behavior of Hybrid-Composite Beams (HCB) consisting of a fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) shell with a concrete arch tied with steel prestressing strands.  The HCB offers advantages in life cycle costs through reduced transportation weight and increased corrosion resistance. By better understanding the system behavior, the proportion of load in each component can be determined, and each component can be designed for the appropriate forces. A long te...

  10. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. RTA beam dynamics experiments: Limiting cumulative transverse instability growth in a linear periodic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Tim; Lidia, Steve; Westenskow, Glen

    2001-05-01

    A critical issue for a Two-Beam accelerator based upon extended relativistic klystrons is controlling the cumulative dipole instability growth. We describe a theoretical scheme to reduce the growth from an exponential to a more manageable linear rate, and a new experiment to test this concept. The experiment utilizes a 1-MeV, 600-Amp, 200-ns electron beam and a short beamline of periodically spaced RF dipole pillbox cavities and solenoid magnets for transport. Descriptions of the RTA injector and the planned beamline are presented, followed by theoretical studies of the beam transport and dipole mode growth.

  12. Experiments with low energy ion beam transport into toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The stellarator-type storage ring for accumulation of multi- Ampere proton and ion beams with energies in the range of $100~AkeV$ to $1~AMeV$ is designed at Frankfurt university. The main idea for beam confinement with high transversal momentum acceptance was presented in EPAC2006. This ring is typically suited for experiments in plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The accumulator ring with a closed longitudinal magnetic field is foreseen with a strength up to $6-8~T$. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed. The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnetic fields were first described in EPAC2008 within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system with two beam lines representing the main beam line and the injection line. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special diagnostics probe for \\textit{"in situ"} ion beam detection was installed.This...

  13. Air ejector experiments using the two-dimensional supersonic-cascade tunnel. 2nd Report. Relationship between ejector performance and throat area ratio (I); Choonsoku nijigen yokuretsu fudoyo kuki ejector no jikken. 2. Ejector seino to mensekihi no kankei (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamori, S.; Sakaguchi, H. [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-12-01

    A two-dimensional cascade experiment requires air to be sucked to prevent air flow separation at the cascades. This paper describes a straigth-tube type air ejector (subsonic) fabricated for use as an air sucking low-pressure source in a supersonic cascade tunnel. Investigations were made on effects of the ratio of nozzle area to mixing tube throat area, AR, and the total primary folw pressure ratio, P{sub 01} /P{sub A}, on the relationship between the secondary folw rate, w{sub 2}, and the secondary (suction) side pressure ratio,P{sub 02} /p{sub A}. As a result, a relationship (secondary side folw rate characterisic) was obtained of the W{sub 2} using the AR as an index and the P{sub 01} /P{sub A} as a parameter with the P{sub 2} /P{sub A}. Influences from the AR and the P{sub 01} /P{sub A} were also identified. Discussions were also given on the air sucking conditions during transonic and supersonic cascade experiment for representative cascade shapes and conditions (stagger angles, pitch chord rations, flow-in Mach numbers), as well as the secondary side flow rate characteristics of this ejector. A conclusion was drawn that this ejector can be used in experiment with a Mach number of less than 1.2. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Air ejector experiments using the two-dimensional supersonic-cascade tunnel. 2nd Report. Choonsoku nijigen yokuretsu fudoyo kuki ejector no jikken. 2. ; Ejector seino to mensekihi no kankei (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamori, S.; Sakaguchi, H. (National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    A two-dimensional cascade experiment requires air to be sucked to prevent air flow separation at the cascades. This paper describes a straigth-tube type air ejector (subsonic) fabricated for use as an air sucking low-pressure source in a supersonic cascade tunnel. Investigations were made on effects of the ratio of nozzle area to mixing tube throat area, AR, and the total primary folw pressure ratio, P{sub 01} /P{sub A}, on the relationship between the secondary folw rate, w{sub 2}, and the secondary (suction) side pressure ratio,P{sub 02} /p{sub A}. As a result, a relationship (secondary side folw rate characterisic) was obtained of the W{sub 2} using the AR as an index and the P{sub 01} /P{sub A} as a parameter with the P{sub 2} /P{sub A}. Influences from the AR and the P{sub 01} /P{sub A} were also identified. Discussions were also given on the air sucking conditions during transonic and supersonic cascade experiment for representative cascade shapes and conditions (stagger angles, pitch chord rations, flow-in Mach numbers), as well as the secondary side flow rate characteristics of this ejector. A conclusion was drawn that this ejector can be used in experiment with a Mach number of less than 1.2. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Investgation of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection density feedback expriments on EAST*%基于超声分子束和普通充气的聚变等离子体密度反馈实验研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑星炜; 李建刚; 胡建生; 李加宏; 曹斌; 吴金华

    2013-01-01

    To achieve desirable plasma density control, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) feedback control system has been de-veloped on EAST tokamak recently. The performance of SMBI is compared with that of gas puffing feedback system. The performance of pulse width mode is better than that of pulse amplitude mode when gas puffing is used for density feedback control. In one-day experiment scenario, the variation of gas input and wall retention can be clarified into two stages. In the first stage the retention ratio is as high as 80%-90%, and the gas input is of about the order of 1022. However, in the second stage, the retention ratio is in a range of 50%-70%. The gas input of a single discharge is small and the net wall retention grows slowly. The result of SMBI feedback control experiment is also analyzed. The shorter delay time of SMBI makes it more quickly to feedback control the plasma density. Result shows that, compared with gas puffing, the gas input of SMBI decreaseds ∼ 30% and the wall retention is reduced ∼ 40%. This shows SMBI’s advantage for the long pulse high-density discharges in EAST.%  本文介绍了全超导托卡马克装置 EAST 实验中等离子体密度反馈的方法和结果. EAST 密度反馈采用普通充气(gas puffing)和超声分子束(supersonic molecule beam injection, SMBI)在放电过程中反馈进气,获得稳定、预期的等离子体密度.典型的一天放电实验中,每次放电的充气量和壁滞留的变化可分为两个阶段:第一阶段为初始约20次放电,该阶段充气量非常高且呈指数趋势下降,粒子滞留率为80%-90%,壁滞留迅速上升.第二阶段为随后的约50次放电,该阶段充气量较小且保持稳定,粒子滞留率为50%-70%,壁滞留缓慢上升. SMBI 的加料效率为15%-30%,延迟时间小于5 ms.因此使用 SMBI 进行密度反馈效果优于 gas puffing 反馈,相同条件下前者充气量较后者减少了∼30%,壁滞留减少了∼40%,

  16. Cross-beam energy transfer to a single f-20 beam: simulations of previous and upcoming experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Thomas; Turnbull, David; Kirkwood, Robert; Michel, Pierre; Wilks, Scott; Berger, Richard; Hinkel, Denise; Moody, John; Langer, Steve; Langdon, Bruce; Strozzi, David

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by materials research applications, cross-beam energy transfer can be used to transfer energy from one or more quads of beamlets at the NIF, which have an effective f-number of 8, to a single f-20 beam. Using plasma comprised of a preheated C5H12 gasbag, a preliminary experiment at the NIF demonstrated amplification of a 750 J f-20 beam by a factor of 2 in both power and energy. A witness plate providing gated x-ray images was used to obtain total energies and transmitted spot intensities for the pump quad, seed beamlet, and a calibration quad. These experimental diagnostics offer the opportunity to perform quantitative comparisons with simulations. We use the laser-plasma interaction code pF3D to simulate the energy transfer process, using plasma conditions obtained from the plasma hydrodynamics code HYDRA. Our simulations of the completed single-pump quad experiment recover the measured seed amplification and transmitted spot power distributions. We also show simulation results for the upcoming two-pump quad experiment.

  17. End-to-End Beam Simulations for the New Muon G-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostelev, Maxim [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Bailey, Ian [Lancaster U.; Herrod, Alexander [Liverpool U.; Morgan, James [Fermilab; Morse, William [RIKEN BNL; Stratakis, Diktys [RIKEN BNL; Tishchenko, Vladimir [RIKEN BNL; Wolski, Andrzej [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the new muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with an unprecedented uncertainty of 140 ppb. A beam of positive muons required for the experiment is created by pion decay. Detailed studies of the beam dynamics and spin polarization of the muons are important to predict systematic uncertainties in the experiment. In this paper, we present the results of beam simulations and spin tracking from the pion production target to the muon storage ring. The end-to-end beam simulations are developed in Bmad and include the processes of particle decay, collimation (with accurate representation of all apertures) and spin tracking.

  18. Short-Pulse, Compressed Ion Beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, Peter A; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P; Grote, David; Ji, Qing; Kaganovich, I D; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynam...

  19. Measurement of the muon beam direction and muon flux for the T2K neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bay, F; Bronner, C; Ereditato, A; Friend, M; Hartz, M; Hiraki, T; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Juget, F; Kikawa, T; Kobayashi, T; Kubo, H; Matsuoka, K; Maruyama, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakadaira, T; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Oyama, Y; Pistillo, C; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Suzuki, S Y; Tada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yokoyama, M

    2014-01-01

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment measures neutrino oscillations by using an almost pure muon neutrino beam produced at the J-PARC accelerator facility. The T2K muon monitor was installed to measure the direction and stability of the muon beam which is produced together with the muon neutrino beam. The systematic error in the muon beam direction measurement was estimated, using data and MC simulation, to be 0.28 mrad. During beam operation, the proton beam has been controlled using measurements from the muon monitor and the direction of the neutrino beam has been tuned to within 0.3 mrad with respect to the designed beam-axis. In order to understand the muon beam properties,measurement of the absolute muon yield at the muon monitor was conducted with an emulsion detector. The number of muon tracks was measured to be $(4.06\\pm0.05)\\times10^4$ cm$^{-2}$ normalized with $4\\times10^{11}$ protons on target with 250 kA horn operation. The result is in agreement with the prediction which is corrected ba...

  20. Numerical and experimental investigations on supersonic ejectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z. [CETC-Varennes, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Desevaux, P. [CREST-UMR 6000, Belfort (France); Mercadier, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). THERMAUS

    2005-02-01

    Supersonic ejectors are widely used in a range of applications such as aerospace, propulsion and refrigeration. The primary interest of this study is to set up a reliable hydrodynamics model of a supersonic ejector, which may be extended to refrigeration applications. The first part of this work evaluated the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors. The validation concentrated on the shock location, shock strength and the average pressure recovery prediction. Axial pressure measurements with a capillary probe performed previously [Int. J. Turbo Jet Engines 19 (2002) 71; Conference Proc., 10th Int. Symp. Flow Visualization, Kyoto, Japan, 2002], were compared with numerical simulations while laser tomography pictures were used to evaluate the non-mixing length. The capillary probe has been included in the numerical model and the non-mixing length has been numerically evaluated by including an additional transport equation for a passive scalar, which acted as an ideal colorant in the flow. At this point, the results show that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments. In the second part, the tested model was used to reproduce the different operation modes of a supersonic ejector, ranging from on-design point to off-design. In this respect, CFD turned out to be an efficient diagnosis tool of ejector analysis (mixing, flow separation), for design, and performance optimization (optimum entrainment and recompression ratios). (Author)

  1. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  2. Proton and Pb ion beam extraction experiments with bent crystals at the CERN-SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Elsener, K; Klem, J T; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1997-01-01

    Extraction of particle beams from the CERN-SPS using bent silicon crystals is described. A summary of the early results is given. Emphasis is on the recent experiments, in particular on the energy dependence of proton extraction at 14, 120 and 270 GeV. 'U-shaped' crystals of different thickness and with a different miscut angle have been compared at 120 GeV. Non-linear excitation of the beam was used in one experiment, with the aim to achieve larger impact parameters - the results show a particular behaviour in the tails of the beam. Finally, the first experimental result on extraction of a 22 TeV fully stripped Pb ion beam with a bent crystal is also described.

  3. Beam Charge Measurement for the g2p/GEp experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Pengjia

    2016-01-01

    The g2p/GEp experiments used a solid NH3 polarized target, where the polarization of the target is sensitive to temperature and radiation. The beam current was limited to 5-100 nA during the experiment to avoid too much depolarization of target (The typical Hall A running condition for beam current is 1 uA to 100 uA). The measured charge was further used to get the accurate physics cross sections. New BCM (Beam Current Monitor) receivers and a DAQ system were used to measure the beam current at such a low current range. A tungsten calorimeter was used to calibrate the BCMs. This technical note summarizes the calibration procedure and the performance of the BCMs.

  4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR (LEDA) HALO EXPERIMENT BEAM INSTRUMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J. D. (John Douglas); Barr, D. S. (Dean S.); Colestock, P. L. (Patrick L.),; Day, L. A. (Lisa A.); Sellyey, W. C. (William C.); Shurter, R. B. (Robert B.); Stettler, M. W. (Matthew W.); Valdiviez, R. (Robert); Gruchalla, M. (Michael); O' Hara, J. F. (James F.); Schulze, M. E. (Martin E.); Barr, D. S. (Dean S.)

    2001-01-01

    A 52 quadrupole-magnet FODO lattice has been assembled and operated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of this lattice is to provide a platform to measure the resulting beam halo as the first few magnets of the lattice produce various mismatch conditions. These data are then compared with particle simulation so that halo formation mechanisms may be better understood. The lattice is appended to the LEDA 6.7-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and is followed by a short high-energy beam transport (HEBT) that safely dumps the beam into a 670-kW beam stop.

  5. H-mode fueling optimization with the supersonic deuterium jet in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Lundberg, D P; Maingi, R; Menard, J E; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Stotler, D P

    2008-06-18

    High-performance, long-pulse 0.7-1.2 MA 6-7 MW NBI-heated small-ELM H-mode plasma discharges are developed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) as prototypes for confinement and current drive extrapolations to future spherical tori. It is envisioned that innovative lithium coating techniques for H-mode density pumping and a supersonic deuterium jet for plasma refueling will be used to achieve the low pedestal collisionality and low n{sub e}/n{sub G} fractions (0.3-0.6), both of which being essential conditions for maximizing the non-inductive (bootstrap and beam driven) current fractions. The low field side supersonic gas injector (SGI) on NSTX consists of a small converging-diverging graphite Laval nozzle and a piezoelectric gas valve. The nozzle is capable of producing a deuterium jet with Mach number M {le} 4, estimated gas density at the nozzle exit n {le} 5 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, estimated temperature T {ge} 70 K, and flow velocity v = 2:4 km/s. The nozzle Reynolds number Reis {approx_equal} 6000. The nozzle and the valve are enclosed in a protective carbon fiber composite shroud and mounted on a movable probe at a midplane port location. Despite the beneficial L-mode fueling experience with supersonic jets in limiter tokamaks, there is a limited experience with fueling of high-performance H-mode divertor discharges and the associated density, MHD stability, and MARFE limits. In initial supersonic deuterium jet fueling experiments in NSTX, a reliable H-mode access, a low NBI power threshold, P{sub LH} {le} 2 MW, and a high fueling efficiency (0.1-0.4) have been demonstrated. Progress has also been made toward a better control of the injected fueling gas by decreasing the uncontrolled high field side (HFS) injector fueling rate by up to 95 % and complementing it with the supersonic jet fueling. These results motivated recent upgrades to the SGI gas delivery and control systems. The new SGI-Upgrade (SGI-U) capabilities include multi-pulse ms

  6. Commissioning and first results of the Intense Beam EXperiment (IBEX) linear Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, S. L.; Carr, E. J.; Martin, L. K.; Budzik, K.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Prior, C. R.

    2017-07-01

    The Intense Beam Experiment (IBEX) is a linear Paul trap designed to replicate the dynamics of intense particle beams in accelerators. Similar to the S-POD apparatus at Hiroshima University, IBEX is a small scale experiment which has been constructed and recently commissioned at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to support theoretical studies of next-generation high intensity proton and ion accelerators, complementing existing computer simulation approaches. Here we report on the status of commissioning and first results obtained.

  7. Initial Off-Axis Neutral Beam Checkout and Physics Experiments on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Hyatt, A. W.; Murphy, C. J.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Scoville, J. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; Pace, D. C.; Holcomb, C. T.; Grierson, B. A.; Tobias, B. J.; Solomon, W. M.; Moyer, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    Two of the eight neutral beam sources on DIII-D have been modified to allow vertical steering, with the injection angle varying from horizontal to downward at an angle of 16.5 degrees for off-axis deposition. Initial experiments to assess the basic beam functionality, geometry, and confinement were carried out. Dα images of beam into gas and plasma yield beam neutral profiles and are key in assessing beam shape and clipping. Neutron and fast-ion Dα (FIDA) diagnostics verify classical behavior of the off-axis beam ions in MHD-quiescent conditions. An initial physics experiment takes advantage of the downward steered beams to vary the fast-ion gradient ∇βf from centrally peaked to hollow. Systematic scans determine the stability and impact of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes and toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes as a function of ∇βf . Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, SC-G903402, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC05-06OR23100, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-09CH11466, & DE-FG02-07ER54917.

  8. Neutral Beam Injection System for the C-2W Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaevsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Alexander; Kolmogorov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Artem; Korepanov, Sergey; Binderbauer, Michl; TAE Team; BINP Team

    2016-10-01

    C-2U Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) experiment proved substantial reduction in turbulence-driven losses via tangential neutral beam injection (NBI) coupled with electrically biased plasma guns at the plasma ends. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (more than 5 ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without beams. To further improve FRC sustainment and demonstrate the FRC ramp-up, the C-2U experimental device is undergoing a major upgrade. The upgrade, C-2W, will have a new NBI system producing a record total hydrogen beam power of 20 + MW in a 30ms pulse. The NBI system consists of eight positive-ion based injectors featuring flexible, modular design. Four out of eight NBI injectors have a capability to switch the beam energy during a shot from the initial 15 keV to 40 keV at a constant beam current. This feature allows to increase the beam energy and thereby optimize the beam-plasma coupling during the magnetic field ramp up. This presentation provides an overview of the C-2W NBI system, including the design of the switchable energy injectors, layout of the power supply system, and results of the prototype testing.

  9. Particle beam experiments for the analysis of reactive sputtering processes in metals and polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, Carles; Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Kreiter, Oliver; Arcos, Teresa de los; Benedikt, Jan; Keudell, Achim von [RD Plasmas with Complex Interactions, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    A beam experiment is presented to study heterogeneous reactions relevant to plasma-surface interactions in reactive sputtering applications. Atom and ion sources are focused onto the sample to expose it to quantified beams of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, noble gas ions, and metal vapor. The heterogeneous surface processes are monitored in situ by means of a quartz crystal microbalance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two examples illustrate the capabilities of the particle beam setup: oxidation and nitriding of aluminum as a model of target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering, and plasma pre-treatment of polymers (PET, PP)

  10. Set-Up on the Basis of Multiwire Proportional and Ionization Chambers for Radioactive Beam Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Astabatyan, R A; Kavalov, R L; Kugler, A; Kuznetsov, I V; Kushniruk, V F; Lobastov, S P; Lukyanov, S M; Markaryan, E R; Maslov, V A; Mikhailov, L; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Poroshin, N O; Skobelev, N K; Smirnov, V I; Sobolev, Yu G; Ugryumov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    A large-aperture set-up designed for nuclear physics experiments on beams of radioactive nuclei is described. The set-up includes Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) for measuring the beam profile, MWPC for measuring reaction product angular distributions, a CsI(Tl)-crystal detector and a longitudinal drift ionization chamber for identifying scattered particles and measuring their energy. The results of tests of coordinate MWPCs, particle identification on photon and ion beams, and preliminary measurements of the elastic scattering and the charge exchange reaction of 170 MeV ^{6}He on a CH_{2} target are presented.

  11. Particle beam experiments for the analysis of reactive sputtering processes in metals and polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Carles; Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Kreiter, Oliver; de los Arcos, Teresa; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-10-01

    A beam experiment is presented to study heterogeneous reactions relevant to plasma-surface interactions in reactive sputtering applications. Atom and ion sources are focused onto the sample to expose it to quantified beams of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, noble gas ions, and metal vapor. The heterogeneous surface processes are monitored in situ by means of a quartz crystal microbalance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two examples illustrate the capabilities of the particle beam setup: oxidation and nitriding of aluminum as a model of target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering, and plasma pre-treatment of polymers (PET, PP).

  12. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The sim

  13. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  14. Focal-Plane Imaging of Crossed Beams in Nonlinear Optics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Herring, G. C.

    2007-01-01

    An application of focal-plane imaging that can be used as a real time diagnostic of beam crossing in various optical techniques is reported. We discuss two specific versions and demonstrate the capability of maximizing system performance with an example in a combined dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering interferometric Rayleigh scattering experiment (CARS-IRS). We find that this imaging diagnostic significantly reduces beam alignment time and loss of CARS-IRS signals due to inadvertent misalignments.

  15. Experiments with the newly available carbon beams at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Garcia borge, M J; Koester, U H; Koldste, G T

    2002-01-01

    Recent target-ions-source developments at ISOLDE providing significantly increased yields for carbon isotopes, open up for new and intriguing experiments. We propose to exploit this in two different ways. In particular we wish to do an elastic resonance scattering experiment of $^{9}$C on a proton target to gain information on the particle unbound system $^{10}$N. Furthermore we wish to perform decay experiments of the neutron-rich carbon isotopes, with special focus on $^{17-19}$C but also including a test to see whether the even more neutron-rich isotopes $^{20,22}$C are accessible at ISOLDE.

  16. Beam Position Reconstruction for the g2p Experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Pengjia; Allison, Trent; Badman, Toby; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Jian-ping; Cummings, Melissa; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Liu, Jie; Musson, John; Slifer, Karl; Sulkosky, Vincent; Ye, Yunxiu; Zhang, Jixie; Zielinski, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Beam-line equipment was upgraded for experiment E08-027 (g2p) in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Two beam position monitors (BPMs) were necessary to measure the beam position and angle at the target. A new BPM receiver was designed and built to handle the low beam currents (50-100 nA) used for this experiment. Two new super-harps were installed for calibrating the BPMs. In addition to the existing fast raster system, a slow raster system was installed. Before and during the experiment, these new devices were tested and debugged, and their performance was also evaluated. In order to achieve the required accuracy (1-2 mm in position and 1-2 mrad in angle at the target location), the data of the BPMs and harps were carefully analyzed, as well as reconstructing the beam position and angle event by event at the target location. The calculated beam position will be used in the data analysis to accurately determine the kinematics for each event.

  17. Beam position reconstruction for the g2p experiment in Hall A at Jefferson lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Pengjia, E-mail: pzhu@jlab.org [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Allada, Kalyan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 02139 (United States); Allison, Trent [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Badman, Toby [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Jian-ping [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Cummings, Melissa [College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Gu, Chao [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Huang, Min [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Liu, Jie [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Musson, John [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Slifer, Karl [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Sulkosky, Vincent [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 02139 (United States); Ye, Yunxiu [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jixie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zielinski, Ryan [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Beam-line equipment was upgraded for experiment E08-027 (g2p) in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Two beam position monitors (BPMs) were necessary to measure the beam position and angle at the target. A new BPM receiver was designed and built to handle the low beam currents (50–100 nA) used for this experiment. Two new super-harps were installed for calibrating the BPMs. In addition to the existing fast raster system, a slow raster system was installed. Before and during the experiment, these new devices were tested and debugged, and their performance was also evaluated. In order to achieve the required accuracy (1–2 mm in position and 1–2 mrad in angle at the target location), the data of the BPMs and harps were carefully analyzed, as well as reconstructing the beam position and angle event by event at the target location. The calculated beam position will be used in the data analysis to accurately determine the kinematics for each event.

  18. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  19. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  20. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  1. Beam transport experiment with a new kicker control system on the HIRFL-CSR

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan-Yu; Luo, Jin-Fu; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Zhou, Wen-Xiong; Ni, Fa-Fu; Yin, Jun; Yin, Jia; Yuan, You-Jin; Shang-Guan, Jin-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The kicker control system was used for beam extraction and injection between two cooling storage rings (CSRs) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To meet the requirements of special physics experiments, the kicker controller was upgraded. The new controller was designed based on ARM+DSP+FPGA technology and monolithic circuit architecture, which can achieve a precision time delay of 2.5 ns. In September 2014, the new kicker control system was installed in the kicker field, and the test experiment using the system was completed. In addition, a pre-trigger signal was provided by the controller, which was designed to synchronize the beam diagnostic system and physics experiments. Experimental results indicate that the phenomena of "missed kick" and "inefficient kick" were not observed, and the multichannel trigger signals' delay could be adjusted individually for kick power supplies in digitization; thus, the beam transport efficiency was improved compared with that of the original system. The ...

  2. Beam Steering, Focusing and Compression for Warm-Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anders, A.; Cohen, R. H.; Coleman, J. E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B. G.; Roy, P. K.; Sefkow, A. B.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Axial compression leading to ˜100X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching, but still short of, the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We present measurements from the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: (1) axial compression and radial focusing; (2) spatial and temporal distribution of energy deposition at the target plane; and (3) centroid motion of the beam spot through the pulse.

  3. Out-of-Time Beam Extinction in the MU2E Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, E. J. [Fermilab; Werkema, S. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches 250 ns FW long, separated by 1.7 $\\mu$ sec, with no out-of-time protons at the $10^{10}$ fractional level. Satisfying this "extinction" requirement is very challenging. The formation of the bunches is expected to result in an extinction on the order of $10^5$. The remaining extinction will be accomplished by a system of resonant magnets and collimators, configured such that only in-time beam is delivered to the experiment. Our simulations show that the total extinction achievable by the system is on the order of $10^{12}$, with an efficiency for transmitting in-time beam of 99.6%.

  4. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R&D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented.

  5. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Ellsworth, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; McLean, H., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Rusnak, B., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Sears, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, 418 Washington St SE, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  6. New results from the CERN-SPS beam deflection experiments with bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurichter, A.; Kirsebom, K.; Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Worm, T.; Uggerhøj, E.; Mikkelsen, U.; Graftström, P.; Gatignon, L.; Elsener, K.; Doble, N.; Biino, C.; Freund, A.; Vilakazi, Z.; Hage-Ali, M.; Siffert, P.; Clément, M.

    1996-10-01

    Results from five distinct bending experiments performed recently in the H8 beam at CERN are presented. Firstly, deflection of a positive pion beam at 200 GeV/c is compared to the "standard" 450-GeV/c proton beam for a bending angle of 3.1 mrad along the (111) plane in a 50 mm silicon crystal. Second, deflection of negative pions at 200 GeV/c is investigated for the same crystal, for incidence along the (111) plane as well as the axis. Small deflection effects are seen, but no negative particles are bent through the full bending angle of the crystal. Third, the first results from beam deflection at high energy using a germanium crystal are shown. Slightly higher deflection efficiencies than for silicon are seen for large bending angles, but significantly smaller than expected for such a crystal with higher atomic number. Fourth, deflection efficiencies using a strongly irradiated silicon crystal have been measured for the first time, and a small reduction in efficiency is seen in the irradiated region. Finally, deflection of positive particles using axial alignment of a bent silicon crystal has been investigated at 450 GeV/c. Qualitatively similar behaviour as in previous experiments at 12 GeV/c is seen; the beam splits into several beams corresponding to the different planes, and even weak planes are observed.

  7. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3......The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3...

  8. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  9. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomae, R., E-mail: rthomae@tlabs.ac.za; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V. [CERN, BE/ABP/HSL, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  10. A synthetic diagnostic for beam emission spectroscopy in the helically symmetric experiment stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, T. J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) has a number of active spectroscopy diagnostics. Due to the relatively large beam width compared to the plasma minor radius, it is difficult to achieve good spatial resolution at the core of the HSX plasma. This is due to the fact that the optical sightline cuts through many flux surfaces with varying field vectors within the beam. In order to compare the experimental results with theoretical models it is important to accurately model the beam width effects. A synthetic diagnostic has been developed for this purpose. This synthetic diagnostic calculates the effect of spot size and beam width on the measurements of quantities of interest, including radial electric field, flow velocity, and Stark polarization.

  11. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, T. [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (FRIS), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ∼10{sup −6} to ∼10{sup −3}.

  12. Experiments on the margin of beam induced quenches a superconducting quadrupole magnet in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Bednarek, M J; Nebot Del Busto, E; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    Protection of LHC equipment relies on a complex system of collimators to capture injected and circulating beam in case of LHC kicker magnet failures. However, for specific failures of the injection kickers, the beam can graze the injection protection collimators and induce quenches of downstream superconducting magnets. This occurred twice during 2011 operation and cannot be excluded during future operation. Tests were performed during Machine Development periods of the LHC to assess the quench margin of the quadrupole located just downstream of the last injection protection collimator in point 8. In addition to the existing Quench Protection System, a special monitoring instrumentation was installed at this magnet to detect any resistance increase below the quench limit. The correlation between the magnet and Beam Loss Monitor signals was analysed for different beam intensities and magnet currents. The results of the experiments are presented.

  13. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  14. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  15. The Edge supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  16. The GRA Beam-Splitter Experiment and Wave-Particle Duality of Light

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloyerou, P N

    2005-01-01

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect (GRA) performed a beam-splitter experiment to demonstrate particle behaviour of light and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment to demonstrate wave behaviour of light. The distinguishing feature of these experiments is the use of a gating system to produce near ideal single photon states. With the demonstration of both wave and particle behaviour (in the two mutually exclusive experiments) they claim to have demonstrated the dual wave-particle behaviour of light, and hence, to have confirmed Bohr's Principle of complementarity. The demonstration of the wave behaviour of light is not in dispute. But, we want to demonstrate, contrary to the claims of GRA, that their beam-splitter experiment does not conclusively confirm the particle behaviour of light, and hence does not confirm particle-wave duality, nor, more generally, is complementarity confirmed. Our demonstration consists of providing a detailed model based on the Causal Interpretation of Quantum Fields (CIEM), which does not...

  17. Simulations and experiments of intense ion beam current density compression in space and timea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Anders, A.; Coleman, J. E.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory has achieved 60-fold longitudinal pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) [P. K. Roy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 234801 (2005)]. To focus a space-charge-dominated charge bunch to sufficiently high intensities for ion-beam-heated warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy studies, simultaneous transverse and longitudinal compression to a coincident focal plane is required. Optimizing the compression under the appropriate constraints can deliver higher intensity per unit length of accelerator to the target, thereby facilitating the creation of more compact and cost-effective ion beam drivers. The experiments utilized a drift region filled with high-density plasma in order to neutralize the space charge and current of an ˜300 keV K+ beam and have separately achieved transverse and longitudinal focusing to a radius 2 MeV) ion beam user-facility for warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-relevant target physics experiments.

  18. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  19. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D. [and others

    1999-07-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed.

  20. MARINET experiment KNSWING testing an I-Beam OWC attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Bingham, Harry B.

    2015-01-01

    The research and results presented in this paper concerns experiments on wave energy conversion carried out in the one meter deep wave tank at the Hydraulic and Maritime Research Center (HMRC) at University College Cork, Ireland in 2013. The purpose is to investigate how much power an attenuator...... - a ship shaped wave energy converter facing the waves with its bow - can absorb along its sides in a range of regular and irregular wave conditions.The experiments were carried out in model scale 1:50 resembling the wave conditions and water depth of the Danish part of the North Sea and a 150. m long wave...... that the converter can absorb more than 2.5. MW of wave power that in wave conditions with significant wave heights of 5. m. A capture width ratio between 20% and 25% was measured in the most frequent wave conditions with average periods between 5 and 7. s with significant wave height of 2 m. In short crested waves...

  1. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  2. 500-MeV electron beam bench-mark experiments and calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farley, E.; Crase, K.; Selway, D.

    1979-12-01

    Experiments measuring the energy deposited by electron beams were performed to provide bench marks against which to evaluate our HANDYL76 electron beam computer code. The experiments, done at Stanford's Mk III accelerator, measured dose vs depth and dose vs radius profiles induced in layered aluminum targets by 500-MeV electrons. The dose was measured by passive thermoluminescence and photographic film placed between aluminum plates. The calculations predict a dose vs radius profile that forward-peaks on axis after the beam passes through a 200-cm air gap; the experimental measurements do not show this peak. This discrepancy indicates there may be a problem in using HANDYL76 to calculate deep penetration of a target with a large gap.

  3. Soliton generation by internal tidal beams impinging on a pycnocline: laboratory experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Gostiaux, Louis; Gerkema, Theo; Magalhães, Jorge M; Da Silva, José C B; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first laboratory experiments that show the generation of internal solitary waves by the impingement of a quasi-two-dimensional internal wave beam on a pycnocline. These experiments were inspired by observations of internal solitary waves in the deep ocean from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, where this so-called mechanism of 'local generation' was argued to be at work, here in the form of internal tidal beams hitting the thermocline. Nonlinear processes involved here are found to be of two kinds. First, we observe the generation of a mean flow and higher harmonics at the location where the principal beam reflects from the surface and pycnocline; their characteristics are examined using particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Second, we observe internal solitary waves that appear in the pycnocline, detected with ultrasonic probes; they are further characterized by a bulge in the frequency spectrum, distinct from the higher harmonics. Finally, the relevance of our re...

  4. The fiber-SiPMT beam monitor of the R484 experiment at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, R.; Bonesini, M.; Bertoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Rossella, M.; Tortora, L.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.

    2015-03-01

    The scintillating fibers SiPM based beam monitor detector, designed to deliver position, shape and timing of the low energy muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility for the R484 experiment, has been successfully tested on the electron beam at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN LNF laboratories. We report here the lay out and the read out structure as well as the very promising results.

  5. Evidence of Wigner rotation phenomena in the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A result from particle tracking states that, after a microbunched electron beam is kicked, its trajectory changes while the orientation of the microbunching wavefront remains as before. Experiments at the LCLS showed that radiation in the kicked direction is produced practically without suppression. This could be explained if the orientation of the microbunching wavefront is readjusted along the kicked direction. In previous papers we showed that when the evolution of the electron beam modulation is treated according to relativistic kinematics, the orientation of the microbunching wavefront in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity. There we refrained from using advanced theoretical concepts to explain or analyze the wavefront rotation. For example, we only hinted to the relation of this phenomenon with the concept of Wigner rotation. This more abstract view of wavefront rotation underlines its elementary nature. The Wigner rotation is known as a fundamental effect in elementary particle physics. The composition of non collinear boosts does not result in a simple boost but, rather, in a Lorentz transformation involving a boost and a rotation, the Wigner rotation. Here we show that during the LCLS experiments, a Wigner rotation was actually directly recorded for the first time with a ultrarelativistic, macroscopic object: an ultrarelativistic electron bunch in an XFEL modulated at nm-scale of the size of about 10 microns. Here we point out the role of Wigner rotation in the analysis and interpretation of experiments with ultrarelativistic, microbunched electron beams in FELs. After the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS it became clear that, in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic, the projection of the microbunching wave vector onto the beam velocity is a Lorentz invariant, similar to the helicity in particle physics.

  6. Mixing in Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin

    2010-01-01

    In many astrophysical environments, mixing of heavy elements occurs in the presence of a supersonic turbulent velocity field. Here we carry out the first systematic numerical study of such passive scalar mixing in isothermal supersonic turbulence. Our simulations show that the ratio of the scalar mixing timescale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$, to the flow dynamical time, $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ (defined as the flow driving scale divided by the rms velocity), increases with the Mach number, $M$, for $M \\lsim3$, and becomes essentially constant for $M \\gsim3.$ This trend suggests that compressible modes are less efficient in enhancing mixing than solenoidal modes. However, since the majority of kinetic energy is contained in solenoidal modes at all Mach numbers, the overall change in $\\tau_{\\rm c}/\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ is less than 20\\% over the range $1 \\lsim M \\lsim 6$. At all Mach numbers, if pollutants are injected at around the flow driving scale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$ is close to $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}.$ This suggests that scalar mixing is drive...

  7. First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Gatchell, M.; Rosen, S.; Reinhed, P.; Loefgren, P.; Braennholm, L.; Blom, M.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Baeckstroem, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Kaellberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2013-05-15

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C{sub n}{sup -}, n= 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C{sub 2}{sup -} molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s {+-} 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10{sup -14} mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  8. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH BEAM ABORT SYSTEM FOR SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATOR QUENCH MITIGATION*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkay, Katherine C.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Sajaev, Vadim; Wang, Ju

    2017-06-25

    A beam abort system has been implemented in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring. The abort system works in tandem with the existing machine protection system (MPS), and its purpose is to control the beam loss location and, thereby, minimize beam loss-induced quenches at the two superconducting undulators (SCUs). The abort system consists of a dedicated horizontal kicker designed to kick out all the bunches in a few turns after being triggered by MPS. The abort system concept was developed on the basis of single- and multi-particle tracking simulations using elegant and bench measurements of the kicker pulse. Performance of the abort system—kick amplitudes and loss distributions of all bunches—was analyzed using beam position monitor (BPM) turn histories, and agrees reasonably well with the model. Beam loss locations indicated by the BPMs are consistent with the fast fiber-optic beam loss monitor (BLM) diagnostics described elsewhere [1,2]. Operational experience with the abort system, various issues that were encountered, limitations of the system, and quench statistics are described.

  9. First Operational Experience with the LHC Beam Dump Trigger Synchronisation Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, A; Magnin, N; Juteau, P; Voumard, N

    2011-01-01

    Two LHC Beam Dumping Systems (LBDS) remove the counter-rotating beams safely from the collider during setting up of the accelerator, at the end of a physics run and in case of emergencies. Dump requests can come from 3 different sources: the machine protection system in emergency cases, the machine timing system for scheduled dumps or the LBDS itself in case of internal failures. These dump requests are synchronized with the 3 μs beam abort gap in a fail-safe redundant Trigger Synchronization Unit (TSU) based on a Digital Phase Locked Loop (DPLL), locked onto the LHC beam revolution frequency with a maximum phase error of 40 ns. The synchronized trigger pulses coming out of the TSU are then distributed to the high voltage generators of the beam dump kickers through a redundant fault-tolerant trigger distribution system. This paper describes the operational experience gained with the TSU since its commissioning with beam in 2009, and highlights the improvements, which have been implemented f...

  10. First biological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Distel, L.; Distel, B.; Roessner, B.; Schwotzer, G.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Eyrich, W.; Fritsch, M.; Teufel, A. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Besserer, J.; Boer, J. de; Moosburger, M.; Quicken, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1997-09-01

    At the tandem accelerator laboratories in Munich and Erlangen vertical beamlines were installed last year. The advantage of a vertical beamline is that cells can be irradiated in a medium at 37 C and with simultaneous gassing, therefore also in physiological conditions. First experiments were carried out at the accelerator in Munich with a proton energy of 25 MeV. Chinese Hamster cells B14 were irradiated in Petri dishes where the base was of 1 mm polystyrol or 2 {mu}m hostaphan foils. The cell survival was measured by the cell survival assay and the repopulation of the colonies by the total colony volume. A solution of DNA with protein was irradiated to study DNA double strand breaks by constant field gel electrophoresis and DNA protein crosslinks by the nitrocellulose filter assay. For cell survival, total colony volume and DNA double-strand breaks X-rays and protons gave corresponding results, while with protons, higher yields of DNA-protein crosslinks were observed than with X-rays. (orig.)

  11. Relationship Between Differential Interference Angle and Parameter of Experiment in Molecular Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Qing; LI Jian; MA Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) was observed in the intramolecular rotational energy transfer in the experiment of the static cell, and the integral interference angles were measured. To observe more precise information, the experiment in the molecular beam should be taken, from which the relationship between the differential interference angle and the scattering angle can be obtained. In this paper, the theoretical model of CQI is described in an atom-diatom system in the condition of the molecular beam, based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory, taking into accounts the long-range interaction potential. The method of observing and measuring correctly the differential interference angle is presented. The changing tendency of the differential interference angle with the impact parameter and relative velocity is discussed. The changing tendencies of the differential interference angle with the parameter of experiment in the molecular beam, including the impact parameter and the velocity are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understand or perform the experiment in the molecular beam.

  12. Z-scan experiment with anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxin; Pu, Jixiong; Qi, Hongqun

    2009-09-01

    We analyze the z-scan experiment with anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beams. The expression for the cross-spectral density of the AGSM beam passing through the lens and onto the nonlinear thin sample is derived. Based on the expression, we simulate the results of the z-scan experiment theoretically and analyze the effects of the e factor (e=w(0x)/w(0y)) and the spatial degree of coherence in the x and y orientations on the on-axis z-scan transmittance. It is found that DeltaTp(-v) becomes larger with an increment of the e factor and the spatial degree of coherence. So we can improve the sensitivity of the z-scan experiment by increasing the e factor and the spatial degree of coherence. The results are helpful for improving the sensitivity of the z-scan experiment.

  13. Investigation on the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector has been studied by varying the primary and secondary Mach numbers. The effect of the primary fluid injection configurations in ejector, namely peripheral and central, has been investigated as well. Schlieren pictures of flow structure in the former part of the mixing duct with different stagnation pressure ratio of the primary and secondary flows have been taken. Pressure ratios of the primary and secondary flows at the limiting condition have been obtained from the results of pressure and optical measurements. Additionally, a computational fluid dynamics analysis has been performed to clarify the physical meaning of the pressure matching performance diagram of the ejector. The obtained results show that the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector increases with the increase of the secondary Mach number, and the performance decreases slightly with the increase of the primary Mach number. The phenomenon of boundary layer separation induced by shock wave results in weaker pressure matching performance of the central ejector than that of the peripheral one. Furthermore, based on the observations of the experiment, a simplified analytical model has been proposed to predict the limiting pressure ratio, and the predicted values obtained by this model agree well with the experimental data.

  14. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-03-17

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C{sup 3+} ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged {sup 24}Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  15. Debye-scale solitary structures measured in a beam-plasma laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lefebvre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary electrostatic pulses have been observed in numerous places of the magnetosphere such as the vicinity of reconnection current sheets, shocks or auroral current systems, and are often thought to be generated by energetic electron beams. We present results of a series of experiments conducted at the UCLA large plasma device (LAPD where a suprathermal electron beam was injected parallel to a static magnetic field. Micro-probes with tips smaller than a Debye length enabled the detection of solitary pulses with positive electric potential and half-widths 4–25 Debye lengths (λDe, over a set of experiments with various beam energies, plasma densities and magnetic field strengths. The shape, scales and amplitudes of the structures are similar to those observed in space, and consistent with electron holes. The dependance of these properties on the experimental parameters is shown. The velocities of the solitary structures (1–3 background electron thermal velocities are found to be much lower than the beam velocities, suggesting an excitation mechanism driven by parallel currents associated to the electron beam.

  16. Ion traps for precision experiments at rare-isotope-beam facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Ion traps first entered experimental nuclear physics when the ISOLTRAP team demonstrated Penning trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides. From then on, the demand for ion traps has grown at radioactive-ion-beam (RIB) facilities since beams can be tailored for the desired experiment. Ion traps have been deployed for beam preparation, from bunching (thereby allowing time coincidences) to beam purification. Isomerically pure beams needed for nuclear-structure investigations can be prepared for trap-assisted or in-trap decay spectroscopy. The latter permits studies of highly charged ions for stellar evolution, which would be impossible with traditional experimental nuclear-physics methods. Moreover, the textbook-like conditions and advanced ion manipulation - even of a single ion - permit high-precision experiments. Consequently, the most accurate and precise mass measurements are now performed in Penning traps. After a brief introduction to ion trapping, I will focus on examples which showcase the versatility and utility of the technique at RIB facilities. I will demonstrate how this atomic-physics technique has been integrated into nuclear science, accelerator physics, and chemistry. DOE.

  17. Facility for parity and time reversal experiments with intense epithermal (eV) neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Bowman, J. D.; Herczeg, P.; Szymanski, J.; Yuan, V. W.; Anaya, J. M.; Mortensen, R.; Postma, H.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Baker, O. K.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Mitchell, G. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Zhu, X.; McDonald, A. B.; Benton, D.; Tippens, B.; Chupp, T. E.

    1988-12-01

    A facility for polarized epithermal neutrons of high intensity is set up at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for parityviolation and time reversal experiments at neutron resonances over a wide range of neutron energies. The beam is polarized with the aid of a polarized proton target used as a neutronspin filter. Total cross section measurements as well as capture gamma-ray experiments will be carried out. The main features of this system will be discussed.

  18. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  19. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  20. First Beam Observation and Near Future Plans at SPring-8 LEPS2 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Muramatsu, Norihito

    2013-01-01

    The first photon beam was successfully produced by laser Compton backscattering at the LEPS2 beamline, which was newly constructed at SPring-8 for the purpose to increase the beam intensity one order of magnitude more than that of the LEPS experiments and to achieve the large acceptance coverage with high resolution detectors. The BGOegg electromagnetic calorimeter with associated detectors are being set up at the LEPS2 experimental building for the physics programs, including the searches for $\\eta$'-bound nuclei and highly excited baryon resonances. In parallel to the BGOegg experiments, the LEPS2 charged particle spectrometer will be prepared inside the 1 Tesla solenoidal magnet, transported from the BNL-E949 experiment.

  1. Evidence of Wigner Rotation Phenomena in the Beam Splitting Experiment at the LCLS

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    A result from particle tracking states that, after a microbunched electron beam is kicked, its trajectory changes while the orientation of the microbunching wavefront remains as before. Experiments at the LCLS showed that radiation in the kicked direction is produced practically without suppression. This could be explained if the orientation of the microbunching wavefront is readjusted along the kicked direction. In previous papers we showed that when the evolution of the electron beam modulation is treated according to relativistic kinematics, the orientation of the microbunching wavefront in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity. There we refrained from using advanced theoretical concepts to explain or analyze the wavefront rotation. For example, we only hinted to the relation of this phenomenon with the concept of Wigner rotation. This more abstract view of wavefront rotation underlines its elementary nature. The Wigner rotation is known as a fundamental eff...

  2. In Situ Experiment and Modelling of RC-Structure Using Ambient Vibration and Timoshenko Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Clotaire; Guéguen, Philippe; Boutin, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Recently, several experiments were reported using ambient vibration surveys in buildings to estimate the modal parameters of buildings. Their modal properties are full of relevant information concerning its dynamic behaviour in its elastic domain. The main scope of this paper is to determine relevant, though simple, beam modelling whose validity could be easily checked with experimental data. In this study, we recorded ambient vibrations in 3 buildings in Grenoble selected because of their vertical structural homogeneity. First, a set of recordings was done using a 18 channels digital acquisition system (CityShark) connected to six 3C Lennartz 5s sensors. We used the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique to extract the modal parameters of these buildings. Second, it is shown in the following that the experimental quasi-elastic behaviour of such structure can be reduced to the behaviour of a vertical continuous Timoshenko beam. A parametric study of this beam shows that a bijective relation exists bet...

  3. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  4. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, D. [Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe Universität, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stiebing, K.E., E-mail: stiebing@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe Universität, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Winters, D.F.A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, D-69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Varentsov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR), Darmstadt (Germany); Warczak, A.; Malarz, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Stöhlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisch-Astronomische Fakultät der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743, Jena (Germany)

    2014-11-11

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 3} for helium and 8.1×10{sup 12} atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  5. Beam-Induced Effects and Radiological Issues in High-Intensity High-Energy Fixed Target Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Drozhdin, A I; Pronskikh, V S; Reitzner, D; Tropin, I S; Vaziri, K

    2014-01-01

    The next generation of accelerators for Megawatt proton and heavy-ion beams moves us into a completely new domain of extreme specific energies of up to 0.1 MJ/g (Megajoule/gram) and specific power up to 1 TW/g (Terawatt/gram) in beam interactions with matter. This paper is focused on deleterious effects of controlled and uncontrolled impacts of high-intensity beams on components of beam-lines, target stations, beam absorbers, shielding and environment. Two new experiments at Fermilab are taken as an example. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will explore the interactions and transformations of the world's highest-intensity neutrino beam by sending it from Fermilab more than 1,000 kilometers through the Earth's mantle to a large liquid argon detector. The Mu2e experiment is devoted to studies of the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos.

  6. The effect of asymmetric beams in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wehus, Ingunn Kathrine; Eriksen, H K; Groeneboom, Nicolaas E

    2009-01-01

    We generate simulations of the CMB temperature field as observed by the WMAP satellite, taking into account the detailed shape of the asymmetric beams and scanning strategy of the experiment, and use these to re-estimate the WMAP beam transfer functions. This method avoids the need of artificially symmetrizing the beams, as done in the baseline WMAP approach, and instead measures the total convolution effect by direct simulation. We find noticeable differences with respect to the nominal transfer functions. For instance, the nominal V1 beam under-estimates the full beam convolution by ~0.5% at l=500 and ~1.0% at l=800. Similar differences are seen for other DA's. This in turn implies that the high-l power spectrum is biased low by 1-2%, effectively tilting the spectrum slightly. Re-estimating cosmological parameters we find that the spectral index of scalar perturbations is n_s = 0.969 +- 0.014 after correcting for this effect, corresponding to a positive shift of 0.3 sigma compared to the previously released...

  7. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  8. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  9. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T; Aiba, M; Arsov, V; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B; Calvi, M; Craievich, P; Dehler, M; Frei, F; Ganter, R; Hauri, C P; Ischebeck, R; Ivanisenko, Y; Janousch, M; Kaiser, M; Keil, B; Löhl, F; Orlandi, G L; Loch, C Ozkan; Peier, P; Prat, E; Raguin, J -Y; Reiche, S; Schilcher, T; Wiegand, P; Zimoch, E; Anicic, D; Armstrong, D; Baldinger, M; Baldinger, R; Bertrand, A; Bitterli, K; Bopp, M; Brands, H; Braun, H H; Brönnimann, M; Brunnenkant, I; Chevtsov, P; Chrin, J; Citterio, A; Divall, M Csatari; Dach, M; Dax, A; Ditter, R; Divall, E; Falone, A; Fitze, H; Geiselhart, C; Guetg, M W; Hämmerli, F; Hauff, A; Heiniger, M; Higgs, C; Hugentobler, W; Hunziker, S; Janser, G; Kalantari, B; Kalt, R; Kim, Y; Koprek, W; Korhonen, T; Krempaska, R; Laznovsky, M; Lehner, S; Pimpec, F Le; Lippuner, T; Lutz, H; Mair, S; Marcellini, F; Marinkovic, G; Menzel, R; Milas, N; Pal, T; Pollet, P; Portmann, W; Rezaeizadeh, A; Ritt, S; Rohrer, M; Schär, M; Schebacher, L; Scherrer, St; Schmidt, V Schlott T; Schulz, L; Smit, B; Stadler, M; Steffen, B; Stingelin, L; Sturzenegger, W; Treyer, D M; Trisorio, A; Tron, W; Vicario, C; Zennaro, R; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultra-low-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics meas...

  10. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  11. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  12. Recent Experiments At Ndcx-II: Irradiation Of Materials Using Short, Intense Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, P A; Persaud, A; Feinberg, E; Ludewigt, B; Silverman, M; Sulyman, A; Waldron, W L; Schenkel, T; Barnard, J J; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I D; Stepanov, A; Treffert, F; Zimmer, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the performance of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) accelerator at Berkeley Lab, and summarize recent studies of material properties created with nanosecond and millimeter-scale ion beam pulses. The scientific topics being explored include the dynamics of ion induced damage in materials, materials synthesis far from equilibrium, warm dense matter and intense beam-plasma physics. We summarize the improved accelerator performance, diagnostics and results of beam-induced irradiation of thin samples of, e.g., tin and silicon. Bunches with over 3x10^10 ions, 1- mm radius, and 2-30 ns FWHM duration have been created. To achieve these short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV He+ ion beam is neutralized in a drift compression section which removes the space charge defocusing effect during final compression and focusing. Quantitative comparison of detailed particle-in-cell simulations with the experiment play an important role in optimizing acc...

  13. Towards pump-probe experiments of defect dynamics with short ion beam pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, T.; Lidia, S. M.; Weis, C. D.; Waldron, W. L.; Schwartz, J.; Minor, A. M.; Hosemann, P.; Kwan, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    A novel, induction type linear accelerator, the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II), is currently being commissioned at Berkeley Lab. This accelerator is designed to deliver intense (up to 3 × 1011 ions/pulse), 0.6 to ∼600 ns duration pulses of 0.05-1.2 MeV lithium ions at a rate of about 2 pulses per minute onto 1-10 mm scale target areas. When focused to mm-diameter spots, the beam is predicted to volumetrically heat micrometer thick foils to temperatures of ∼30,000 °K. At lower beam power densities, the short excitation pulse with tunable intensity and time profile enables pump-probe type studies of defect dynamics in a broad range of materials. We briefly describe the accelerator concept and design, present results from beam pulse shaping experiments and discuss examples of pump-probe type studies of defect dynamics following irradiation of materials with intense, short ion beam pulses from NDCX-II.

  14. Towards pump probe experiments of defect dynamics with short ion beam pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Lidia, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Weis, C. D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Waldron, W. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Schwartz, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Minor, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hosemann, P [University of California, Berkeley; Kwan, J. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01

    A novel, induction type linear accelerator, the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II), is currently being commissioned at Berkeley Lab. This accelerator is designed to deliver intense (up to 3 1011 ions/pulse), 0.6 to 600 ns duration pulses of 0.05 1.2 MeV lithium ions at a rate of about 2 pulses per minute onto 1 10 mm scale target areas. When focused to mm-diameter spots, the beam is predicted to volumetrically heat micrometer thick foils to temperatures of 30,000 K. At lower beam power densities, the short excitation pulse with tunable intensity and time profile enables pump probe type studies of defect dynamics in a broad range of materials. We briefly describe the accelerator concept and design, present results from beam pulse shaping experiments and discuss examples of pump probe type studies of defect dynamics following irradiation of materials with intense, short ion beam pulses from NDCX-II.

  15. Towards pump–probe experiments of defect dynamics with short ion beam pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T., E-mail: t_schenkel@lbl.gov [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, 5R121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lidia, S.M.; Weis, C.D.; Waldron, W.L.; Schwartz, J. [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, 5R121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hosemann, P. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kwan, J.W. [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, 5R121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A novel, induction type linear accelerator, the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II), is currently being commissioned at Berkeley Lab. This accelerator is designed to deliver intense (up to 3 × 10{sup 11} ions/pulse), 0.6 to ∼600 ns duration pulses of 0.05–1.2 MeV lithium ions at a rate of about 2 pulses per minute onto 1–10 mm scale target areas. When focused to mm-diameter spots, the beam is predicted to volumetrically heat micrometer thick foils to temperatures of ∼30,000 °K. At lower beam power densities, the short excitation pulse with tunable intensity and time profile enables pump–probe type studies of defect dynamics in a broad range of materials. We briefly describe the accelerator concept and design, present results from beam pulse shaping experiments and discuss examples of pump–probe type studies of defect dynamics following irradiation of materials with intense, short ion beam pulses from NDCX-II.

  16. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  17. Beam transport experiment with a new kicker control system on the HIRFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yu; Zhou, De-Tai; Luo, Jin-Fu; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Zhou, Wen-Xiong; Ni, Fa-Fu; Yin, Jun; Yin, Jia; Yuan, You-Jin; Shang-Guan, Jing-Bin

    2016-04-01

    A kicker control system is used for beam extraction and injection between two cooling storage rings (CSRs) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To meet the requirements of special physics experiments, the kicker controller has been upgraded, with a new controller designed based on ARM+DSP+FPGA technology and monolithic circuit architecture, which can achieve a precision time delay of 2.5 ns. In September 2014, the new kicker control system was installed in the kicker field, and the test experiment using the system was completed. In addition, a pre-trigger signal was provided by the controller, which was designed to synchronize the beam diagnostic system and physics experiments. Experimental results indicate that the phenomena of “missed kick” and “inefficient kick” were not observed, and the multichannel trigger signal delay could be adjusted individually for kick power supplies in digitization; thus, the beam transport efficiency was improved compared with that of the original system. The fast extraction and injection experiment was successfully completed based on the new kicker control systems for HIRFL. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232123)

  18. Dark Matter Search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglieri, M. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). National Institute for Nuclear Physics. et al

    2016-07-05

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a $\\sim$1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle $\\chi$ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the results obtained with a prototype detector running at INFN-LNS (Italy), while the beam-related background has been evaluated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed experiment will be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments in the MeV-GeV DM mass range by up to two orders of magnitude.

  19. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  20. The GRA beam-splitter experiments and particle-wave duality of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloyerou, P N [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, University of Zambia, PO Box 32379, Lusaka 10101 (Zambia)

    2006-09-15

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect (GRA) performed a beam-splitter experiment to demonstrate the particle behaviour of light and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment to demonstrate the wave behaviour of light. The distinguishing feature of these experiments is the use of a gating system to produce near ideal single-photon states. With the demonstration of both wave and particle behaviour (in two mutually exclusive experiments) they claim to have demonstrated the dual particle-wave behaviour of light and hence to have confirmed Bohr's principle of complementarity. The demonstration of the wave behaviour of light is not in dispute. But we want to demonstrate, contrary to the claims of GRA, that their beam-splitter experiment does not conclusively confirm the particle behaviour of light, and hence does not confirm particle-wave duality, nor, more generally, does it confirm complementarity. Our demonstration consists of providing a detailed model based on the causal interpretation of quantum fields (CIEM), which does not involve the particle concept, of GRA's which-path experiment. We will also give a brief outline of a CIEM model for the second, interference, GRA experiment.

  1. The GRA beam-splitter experiments and particle wave duality of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloyerou, P. N.

    2006-09-01

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect (GRA) performed a beam-splitter experiment to demonstrate the particle behaviour of light and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment to demonstrate the wave behaviour of light. The distinguishing feature of these experiments is the use of a gating system to produce near ideal single-photon states. With the demonstration of both wave and particle behaviour (in two mutually exclusive experiments) they claim to have demonstrated the dual particle-wave behaviour of light and hence to have confirmed Bohr's principle of complementarity. The demonstration of the wave behaviour of light is not in dispute. But we want to demonstrate, contrary to the claims of GRA, that their beam-splitter experiment does not conclusively confirm the particle behaviour of light, and hence does not confirm particle-wave duality, nor, more generally, does it confirm complementarity. Our demonstration consists of providing a detailed model based on the causal interpretation of quantum fields (CIEM), which does not involve the particle concept, of GRA's which-path experiment. We will also give a brief outline of a CIEM model for the second, interference, GRA experiment.

  2. Further Study of Prompt Neutrino Production in a Proton Beam Dump Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In previous beam dump experiments at CERN, the production of prompt @n^e and @n(@m) in proton-nucleus collisions has been established. A difference in the prompt @n^e and @n(@m) fluxes which would indicate new physics, cannot be ruled out on the basis of existing data.\\\\ \\\\ The main aim of this beam dump experiment is to check with much better accuracy the equality of the prompt @n^e and @n(@m) fluxes. The use of two copper dumps with average density 1 and 1/3 permits the separation of the prompt and conventional neutrino fluxes by extrapolation to infinite density. The dumps will be located at the downstream end of the decay tunnel of the SPS neutrino facility.

  3. Vibration induced sliding: theory and experiment for a beam with a spring-loaded mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Erik; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    The study sets up a simple model for predicting vibration induced sliding of mass, and provides quantitative experimental evidence for the validity of the model. The results lend confidence to recent theoretical developments on using vibration induced sliding for passive vibration damping......, and contributes to a further understanding of this nonlinear phenomenon. A mathematical model is set up to describe vibration induced sliding for a base-excited cantilever beam with a spring-loaded pointmass. Approximations simplify the model into two nonlinear ordinary differential equations, describing motions...... of the system at near-resonant excitation of a single beam mode. This simplified model is studied numerically and analytically, and tested against laboratory experiments. The experiments provide evidence that the simplified mathematical model retains those features of the real system that are necessary...

  4. NEUTRINO SUPER BEAM FACILITY FOR A LONG BASELINE EXPERIMENT FROM BNL TO HOMESTAKE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KAHN,S.

    2002-10-21

    An upgrade to the BNL Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) could produce a very intense proton source at a relatively low cost. Such a proton beam could be used to generate a conventional neutrino beam with a significant flux at large distances from the laboratory. This provides the possibility of a very long baseline neutrino experiment at the Homestake mine. The construction of this facility would allow a program of experiments to study many of the aspects of neutrino oscillations including CP violations. This study examines a 1 MW proton source at BNL and a large 1 megaton detector positioned at the Homestake Mine as the ultimate goal of a staged program to study neutrino oscillations.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Jet Behavior and Impingement Characteristics of Preheating Shrouded Supersonic Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng WEI; Rong ZHU; Ting CHENG; Fei ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    As a novel supersonic j et technology,preheating shrouded supersonic j et was developed to deliver oxygen into molten bath efficiently and affordably.However,there has been limited research on the jet behavior and im-pingement characteristics of preheating shrouded supersonic j ets.Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)models were established to investigate the effects of main and shrouding gas temperatures on the characteristics of flow field and impingement of shrouded supersonic j et.The preheating shrouded supersonic j et behavior was simulated and meas-ured by numerical simulation and j et measurement experiment respectively.The influence of preheating shrouded su-personic j et on gas j et penetration and fluid flow in liquid bath was calculated by the CFD model which was validated against water model experiments.The results show that the uptrend of the potential core length of shrouded super-sonic j et would be accelerated with increasing the main and shrouding gas temperatures.Also,preheating supersonic j ets demonstrated significant advantages in penetrating and stirring the liquid bath.

  6. AEgIS experiment: Towards antihydrogen beam production for antimatter gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Amsler, Claude; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Belov, Alexandre S; Bonomi, Germano; Bräunig, Philippe; Brusa, Roberto S; Bremer, Johan; Cabaret, Louis; Canali, Carlo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Cialdi, Simone; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Dassa, Luca; Derking, Jan Hendrik; Di Domizio, Sergio; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Dudarev, Alexey; Ereditato, Antonio; Ferragut, Rafael; Fontana, Andrea; Genova, Pablo; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Gninenko, Sergei N; Hogan, Stephen D; Haider, Stefan; Jordan, Elena; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kawada, Jiro; Kellerbauer, Alban; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Knecht, Andreas; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lehner, Sebastian; Malbrunot, Chloe; Matveev, Viktor A; Merkt, Frederic; Moia, Fabio; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nédélec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus K; Pacifico, Nicola; Petráček, Vojtech; Pistillo, Ciro; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Regenfus, Christian; Riccardi, Cristina; Røhne, Ole; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Scampoli, Paola; Storey, James; Subieta Vasquez, Martin A.; Spaček, Michal; Czech Technical U. in Prague - FNSPE - B\\oehova 7 - 11519 - Praha 1 - Czech Aff25 Testera, Gemma; Vaccarone, Renzo; Villa, Fabio; Widmann, Eberhard; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an experiment that aims to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen in the Earth’s field. A cold antihydrogen beam will be produced by charge exchange reaction between cold antiprotons and positronium excited in Rydberg states. Rydberg positronium (with quantum number n between 20 and 30) will be produced by a two steps laser excitation. The antihydrogen beam, after being accelerated by Stark effect, will fly through the gratings of a moir ́ e deflectometer. The deflection of the horizontal beam due to its free fall will be measured by a position sensitive detector. It is estimated that the detection of about 10 3 antihydrogen atoms is required to determine the gravitational acceleration with a precision of 1%. In this report an overview of the AEgIS experiment is presented and its current status is described. Details on the production of slow positronium and its excitation with lasers ar...

  7. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  8. Systematic investigations on high intense cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A high-density cluster-jet target will be one of two planned internal target stations for the PANDA experiment at the antiproton accelerator and storage ring HESR/FAIR. For the investigation of elementary anti pN interactions hydrogen and deuterium are of highest interest as used target material. Cluster-jet targets allow high and constant target densities at the interaction point, i.e. 2 m behind the nozzle, with the possibility of a continuous variation during operation. At the University of Muenster a cluster-jet target prototype was designed, built up and set succesfully into operation. The system is installed in complete PANDA geometry, so that the observed cluster beam characteristics can be directly transferred to the later situation at PANDA. Recent optical investigations on the cluster beam directly behind the nozzle resulted in the observation of distinct density structures when the target is operated at highest densities. The development and installation of a special nozzle tilting system allows for the extraction of these high-intense core beams, leading to a significant improvement of the target density. The performance and achieved densities of cluster beams are presented.

  9. Commissioning experience and first results from the new SLS beam size monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Schlott, V; Saa Hernandez, A; Streun, A; Andersson, A; Breunlin, J; Milas, N

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the TIARA work package “SLS vertical emittance tuning” (SVET), an extremely small vertical beam size of 3.6 $\\mu$m, corresponding to a vertical emittance of 0.9 pm, was verified using an optical monitor based on imaging of $\\pi$-polarized light. Since the existing beam size monitor reached its limit of resolution, a new monitor beam line was designed and installed at the 08BD bending magnet of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) storage ring. Larger magnification and operation at shorter wavelength provide improved spatial resolution. Reflective optics enables convenient switching between different wavelengths. An optical table is located in a hutch outside the storage ring tunnel to provide access during operation. Movable obstacles in the beam path create interference patterns and thus provide redundancy of model based analysis of the images. In this paper we report on our commissioning experience and provide a comparison of the different measurement methods at different wavelengths.

  10. Design and experiments for the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a cavity beam position monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang; ZHENG Shu-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The waveguide to coaxial cable adapter is very important to the cavity beam position monitor(CBPM)because it determines how much of the energy in the cavity could be coupled outside.In this paper,the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a CBPM is designed and experiments are conducted.The curve shapes of experiments and simulations are very similar and the difference in reflection is less than 0.1.This progress provides a reliable method for designing the adapter.

  11. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  12. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  13. Coherent and non coherent atom optics experiment with an ultra-narrow beam of metastable rare gas atoms; Experiences d'optique atomique coherente ou non avec un jet superfin d'atomes metastables de gaz rares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grucker, J

    2007-12-15

    In this thesis, we present a new type of atomic source: an ultra-narrow beam of metastable atoms produced by resonant metastability exchange inside a supersonic beam of rare gas atoms. We used the coherence properties of this beam to observe the diffraction of metastable helium, argon and neon atoms by a nano-transmission grating and by micro-reflection-gratings. Then, we evidenced transitions between Zeeman sublevels of neon metastable {sup 3}P{sub 2} state due to the quadrupolar part of Van der Waals potential. After we showed experimental proofs of the observation of this phenomenon, we calculated the transition probabilities in the Landau - Zener model. We discussed the interest of Van der Waals - Zeeman transitions for atom interferometry. Last, we described the Zeeman cooling of the supersonic metastable argon beam ({sup 3}P{sub 2}). We have succeeded in slowing down atoms to speeds below 100 m/s. We gave experimental details and showed the first time-of-flight measurements of slowed atoms.

  14. a Highly-Integrated Supersonic-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2017-06-01

    A highly integrated supersonic-jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer of coaxially oriented beam-resonator arrangement (COBRA) type, covering 2-20GHz, has been recently built at Chongqing University, China. Built up almost entirely in an NI PXIe chassis, we take the advantage of the NI PXIe-5451 Dual-channel arbitrary waveform generator and the PXIe-5654 RF signal generator to create a spectrometer with wobbling capacity for fast resonator tuning. Based on the I/Q modulation, associate with PXI control and sequence boards built at the Leibniz Universitat Hannover, the design of the spectrometer is much simpler and very compact. The Fabry-Pérot resonator is semi-confocal with a spherical reflector of 630 mm diameter and a radius of 900 mm curvature and one circulator plate reflector of 630 mm diameter. The vacuum is effectuated by a three-stage mechanical (two-stage rotary vane and roots booster) pump at the fore line of a DN630 ISO-F 20000 L/s oil-diffusion pump. The supersonic-jet expansion is pulsed by a general valve Series 9 solenoid valve which is controlled by a general valve IOTA one driver governed by the experiment-sequence generation. First molecular examples to illustrate the performance of the new setup will include OCS and CF_3CHFCl.

  15. Upgrade of the Minos+ Experiment Data Acquisition for the High Energy NuMI Beam Run

    CERN Document Server

    Badgett, William; Torretta, Donatella; Meier, Jerry; Gunderson, Jeffrey; Osterholm, Denise; Saranen, David

    2015-01-01

    The Minos+ experiment is an extension of the Minos experiment at a higher energy and more intense neutrino beam, with the data collection having begun in the fall of 2013. The neutrino beam is provided by the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam-line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The detector apparatus consists of two main detectors, one underground at Fermilab and the other in Soudan, Minnesota with the purpose of studying neutrino oscillations at a base line of 735 km. The original data acquisition system has been running for several years collecting data from NuMI, but with the extended run from 2013, parts of the system needed to be replaced due to obsolescence, reliability problems, and data throughput limitations. Specifically, we have replaced the front-end readout controllers, event builder, and data acquisition computing and trigger processing farms with modern, modular and reliable devices with few single points of failure. The new system is based on gigabit Ethernet T...

  16. The INFN Micro-Si experiment: A silicon microdosimeter for assessing radiation quality of hadrontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Dal Corso, F.; Fazzi, A.; Gonella, F.; Introini, M. V.; Lippi, I.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Pola, A.; Varoli, V.; Zotto, P.

    2013-07-01

    The MICRO-SI experiment, funded by INFN from 2008 up to 2010, aimed at developing a silicon microdosimeter capable of responding to neutrons and to hadron-therapy beams down to a few keV μm-1. The main goals which were achieved in the framework of this experiment are described in details. The detector, designed and fabricated by exploiting the monolithic telescope technology, demonstrated to provide charge confinement inside the micrometric sensitive volume, thus minimizing the field-funnelling effect. An innovative segmented telescope device was developed in order to have a silicon detector offering sensitive volume dimensions similar to those which can be simulated by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The response of the segmented device to hadron beams was characterized with clinical protons and with 62 AMeV carbon ions at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Catania, Italy). Irradiations with mono-energetic neutrons at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro, Italy) were also performed. The agreement with the spectra measured with a TEPC is very satisfactory and gives confidence on the application of such a silicon device to assess the quality of hadrontherapy beams.

  17. Experiments with combined laser and gamma beams at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan; Cuciuc, Mihai; D'Alessi, Loris; Neagu, Liviu; Rosu, Madalin; Seto, Keita; Tesileanu, Ovidiu; Xu, Yi; Zeng, Ming

    2017-06-01

    We briefly describe in this paper some of the proposed experiments for the E7 and E4 experimental areas at ELI-NP. Our experiments tackle fundamental problems in physics, taking advantage of the unique configuration (high intensity laser plus gamma/electron beam) at ELI-NP in Magurele, Romania. We discuss the gradual approach from a complexity point of view, from "commissioning" or "day 1" experiments to the ones needing key results from the previously proposed ones and R&D advances in fields such as laser wakefield acceleration of electrons, extremely high vacuum or synchronization at tens of femtoseconds level between the pulses. The high repetition rate of the ultra-short laser pulses at E4 is a key factor for the success of the proposed experiment.

  18. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  19. Particle beam experiments for the investigation of plasma-surface interactions: application to magnetron sputtering and polymer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Corbella, Carles; Kreiter, Oliver; Arcos, Teresa de los; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01

    A beam experiment is presented to study heterogeneous reactions relevant to plasma-surface interactions. Atom and ion beams are focused onto the sample to expose it to quantified beams of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, noble gas ions and metal vapor. The heterogeneous surface processes are monitored in-situ and in real time by means of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Two examples illustrate the capabilities of the particle beam setup: oxidation and nitriding of aluminum as a model of target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering, and plasma treatment of polymers (PET, PP).

  20. Simulating systematic errors in X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments: Sample and beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curis, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Biomathematiques, Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Rene, Descartes (Paris V)-4, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France)]. E-mail: emmanuel.curis@univ-paris5.fr; Osan, Janos [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI)-P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB), Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY)-Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Benazeth, Simone [Laboratoire de Biomathematiques, Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Rene, Descartes (Paris V)-4, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE)-Ba-hat timent 209D, Campus d' Orsay, 91406 Orsay (France); Toeroek, Szabina [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI)-P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    The article presents an analytical model to simulate experimental imperfections in the realization of an X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiment, performed in transmission or fluorescence mode. Distinction is made between sources of systematic errors on a time-scale basis, to select the more appropriate model for their handling. For short time-scale, statistical models are the most suited. For large time-scale, the model is developed for sample and beam imperfections: mainly sample inhomogeneity, sample self-absorption, beam achromaticity. The ability of this model to reproduce the effects of these imperfections is exemplified, and the model is validated on real samples. Various potential application fields of the model are then presented.

  1. $\\Xi ^{-}$ Production by $\\Sigma ^{-}$,$\\pi^{-}$ and Neutrons in the Hyperon Beam Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Barberis, D; Beck, M; Bérat, C; Beusch, Werner; Boss, M; Brons, S; Brückner, W; Buénerd, M; Busch, C; Büscher, C; Charignon, F; Chauvin, J; Chudakov, E A; Dersch, U; Dropmann, F; Engelfried, J; Faller, F; Fournier, A; Gerassimov, S G; Godbersen, M; Grafström, P; Haller, T; Heidrich, M; Hubbard, E L; Hurst, R B; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Keller, N; Martens, K; Martin, P; Masciocchi, S; Michaels, R; Müller, U; Neeb, H; Newbold, D; Newsom, C R; Paul, S; Pochodzalla, J; Potashnikova, I K; Povh, B; Ren, Z; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Rosner, G; Rossi, L; Rudolph, H; Scheel, C V; Schmitt, L; Siebert, Hans-Wolfgang; Simon, A; Smith, V; Thilmann, O; Trombini, A; Vesin, E; Volkemer, B; Vorwalter, K; Walcher, T; Wälder, G; Werding, R; Wittmann, E; Zavertyaev, M V

    1997-01-01

    Inclusive cross sections for \\ximin\\ hyperon production in high-energy \\sigmamin, \\pimin\\ and neutron induced interactions were measured by the experiment WA89 at CERN. Secondary \\sigmamin\\ and \\pimin\\ beams with average momenta of 345~\\gevc1 and a neutron beam of average momentum 65~\\gevc1 were produced by primary protons of 450~\\gevc1\\ from the CERN SPS. Both single and double differential cross sections are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and the Feynman variable $x_F$. A strong leading effect for \\ximin\\ produced by \\sigmamin\\ is observed. The influence of the target mass on the \\ximin\\ cross section is explored by comparing reactions on copper and carbon nuclei.

  2. Neutrino mass hierarchy and {theta}{sub 13} with a magic baseline beta-beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India) and Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)]. E-mail: sanjib@mri.ernet.in; Choubey, Sandhya [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)]. E-mail: sandhya@mri.ernet.in; Raychaudhuri, Amitava [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India) and Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)]. E-mail: raychaud@mri.ernet.in

    2007-05-28

    We underscore the physics advantage of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The CERN-INO distance is close to the so-called 'magic' baseline which helps evade some of the parameter degeneracies and allows for a better measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy and {theta}{sub 13}. We expound the possibility of using radioactive {sup 8}B and {sup 8}Li as the source isotopes for the {nu}{sub e} and {nu}-bar{sub e} beta-beam, respectively, and show that very good sensitivity to both the mass hierarchy and {theta}{sub 13} is possible with a boost {gamma} in the 250-500 ballpark.

  3. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  4. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  5. A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aihara, H; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernandez, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Perez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2014-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex

  6. Experience with Multi-Beam and Multi-Beamline FEL-Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Faatz, B.; Honkavaara, K.; Kuhlmann, M.; Schreiber, S.; Treusch, R.; Vogt, M.

    2017-07-01

    DESY’s free-electron laser FLASH provides soft X-ray pulses for scientific users at wavelengths down to 4nm simultaneously in two undulator beamlines. They are driven by a common linear superconducting accelerator with a beam energy of up to 1.25 GeV. The superconducting technology allows the acceleration of electron bunch trains of several hundred bunches with a spacing of 1 microsecond or more and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. A fast kickerseptum system directs one part of the bunch train to FLASH1 and the other part to FLASH2 keeping the full 10 Hz repetition rate for both. The unique setup of FLASH allows independent FEL pulse parameters for both beamlines. In April 2016, simultaneous operation of FLASH1 and FLASH2 for external users started. This paper reports on our operating experience with this type of multi-beam, multi-beamline set-up.

  7. Radioactive beam EXperiments at ISOLDE : Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer reactions of exotic nuclei.

    CERN Multimedia

    Kugler, E; Ratzinger, U; Wenander, F J C

    2002-01-01

    % IS347 \\\\ \\\\We propose to perform a pilot experiment to study very neutron rich (A<32) Na-Mg and (A<52) K-Ca isotopes in the region around the neutron shell closures of N=20 and N=28 after Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer, and to demonstrate highly efficient and cost-effective ways to bunch, charge-state breed and accelerate already existing mass-separated singly-charged radioactive ion beams. \\\\ \\\\To do this we plan to accelerate the ISOLDE beams up to 2~MeV/u by means of a novel acceleration scheme and to install an efficient $\\gamma$-ray array for low-multiplicity events around the target position.

  8. Design and Qualification of Transparent Beam Vacuum Chamber Supports for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, JL; Garion, C

    2014-01-01

    Three beryllium beam vacuum chambers pass through the aperture of the large dipole magnet and particle acceptance region of the LHCb experiment, coaxial to the LHC beam. At the interior of the magnet, a system of rods and cables supports the chambers, holding them rigidly in place, in opposition to the vacuum forces caused by their conical geometry. In the scope of the current upgrade programme, the steel and aluminium structural components are replaced by a newly designed system, making use of beryllium, in addition to a number of organic materials, and are optimised for overall transparency to incident particles. Presented in this paper are the design criteria, along with the unique design developments carried out at CERN, and furthermore, a description of the technologies procured from industrial partners, specifically in obtaining the best solution for the cable components.

  9. The First Experience With Space Scanning Extracted Beam On The Spin@u-70 Setup Target Possibility And Measurement Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, A G; Gres, V N; Terekhov, V I

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of experiments aimed at a provision of possibilities of the extracted beam space scanning on polarized target of the SPIN@U-70 Setup. The design and features of the special instrumentation are given.

  10. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelo, S. Esteban; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe i 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red-wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the line-of-sight velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid- and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filaments that resemble penumbral grains. The patches may undergo fragmentations and mergings during their lifetime; some of them are recurrent. Supersonic downflows are associated with strong and rather vertical magnetic fields with a reversed polarity compared to that of the sunspot. Our results suggest that downflows returning back to the solar surface with supersonic velocities are abruptly stopped in dense deep layers and produce a shock. Consequently, this shock enhances the temperature and is detected as a bright grain in the continuum filtergrams, which could explain the existence of outward-moving grains in the mid- and outer penumbra.

  11. An upgraded experiment of X-ray photon-photon elastic scattering with a Laue-case beam collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaji, T; Yamazaki, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Tamasaku, K; Tanaka, Y; Inubushi, Y; Sawada, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T

    2016-01-01

    The new result of a photon-photon scattering experiment in the X-ray region is reported. An X-ray beam collider is used to divide and collide X-ray beams from an X-ray Free Electron Laser, SACLA. The sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by an upgraded X-ray beam collider and improvement of the SACLA beam quality. The intensity of the colliding photon beams increased significantly, giving an integrated luminosity of (1.24 \\pm 0.08) \\times 10^{28} m^{-2}. No signal of scattered X rays was observed. The obtained 95% C.L. limit on the QED cross section is 1.9 \\times 10^{-27} m^2 at \\omega_{cms}=6.5 keV, which is more stringent by around three orders of magnitude than our previous result.

  12. Proton/hydrogen-transfer coordinate of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid investigated in a supersonic beam: combined IR/UV spectroscopy in the S0, S1, and D0 states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Holger; Bartl, Kristina; Funk, Andreas; Gerlach, Andreas; Gerhards, Markus

    2008-12-01

    As a model system for intramolecular proton/hydrogen-transfer coordinates, the structure of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid is investigated for the ground, first electronically excited and also the ionic state. Combined IR/UV spectroscopy in molecular-beam experiments is applied and the experimental results are interpreted by the application of DFT and CASPT2 methods. No proton or hydrogen transfer is observed, but evidence is given for a hydrogen dislocation of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in the S(1) state and to lesser extent in the D(0) state. To obtain direct information on the proton/hydrogen-transfer coordinate, IR spectra are recorded both in the region of the OH and especially the CO stretching vibrations by also applying two new variants of combined IR/UV spectroscopy for the S(1) and D(0) states. The CO groups are directly involved in the hydrogen bond and, in contrast to the hydrogen-bonded OH groups, the CO stretching frequencies can be observed in all electronic states.

  13. The construction of the Fiber-SiPM beam monitor system of the R484 and R582 experiments at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, M.; Bertoni, R.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Cervi, T.; de Bari, A.; Menegolli, A.; Prata, M. C.; Rossella, M.; Tortora, L.; Carbone, R.; Mocchiutti, E.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.

    2017-03-01

    The scintillating fiber-SiPM beam monitor detectors, designed to deliver beam informations for the R484 and R582 experiments at the high intensity, low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL facility, have been successfully constructed and operated. Details on their construction and first performances in beam are reported.

  14. Corpuscular model of two-beam interference and double-slit experiments with single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Fengping; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The simulation comprises models that capture the essential features of the apparatuses used in the experiment, including the single-photon detectors recording individual detector clicks. We demonstrate that incorporating in the detector model, simple and minimalistic processes mimicking the memory and threshold behavior of single-photon detectors is sufficient to produce multipath interference patterns. These multipath interference patterns are built up by individual particles taking one single path to the detector where they arrive one-by-one. The particles in our model are not corpuscular in the standard, classical physics sense in that they are information carriers that exchange information with the apparatuses of the ...

  15. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  16. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  17. First test results of a high-speed beam conditions monitor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the design and first test results of the high- speed beam conditions monitor (BCM) for the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). The goal of the BCM is to monitor instantaneous rates of collision and background and detect signs of beam instabilities. The detector is based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition (pCVD) diamond as active sensor material. We have chosen this detector material for its proven radiation hardness and fast signal properties. For the readout of the diamonds we developed front-end readout electronics based on high-bandwidth RF amplifiers. The signal response of the amplifier has been optimized for the ionization current signal of pCVD diamond in order to achieve a signal risetime of beam. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of such a detector system for the ATLAS BCM. The tests yield BCM signals w...

  18. Unraveling neutrino parameters with a magical beta-beam experiment at INO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)], E-mail: sanjib@mri.ernet.in; Choubey, Sandhya [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)], E-mail: sandhya@mri.ernet.in; Raychaudhuri, Amitava [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)], E-mail: raychaud@mri.ernet.in

    2008-07-21

    We expound in detail the physics reaches of an experimental set-up in which the proposed large magnetized iron detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) would serve as the far detector for a so-called beta-beam. If this pure {nu}{sub e} and/or {nu}-bar{sub e} beam is shot from some source location like CERN such that the source-detector distance L{approx_equal}7500 km, the impact of the CP phase {delta}{sub CP} on the oscillation probability and associated parameter correlation and degeneracies are almost negligible. This 'magical' beta-beam experiment would have unprecedented sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and {theta}{sub 13}, two of the missing ingredients needed for our understanding of the neutrino sector. With Lorentz boost {gamma}=650 and irrespective of the true value of {delta}{sub CP}, the neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined at 3{sigma} C.L. if sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}(true)>5.6x10{sup -4} and we can expect an unambiguous signal for {theta}{sub 13} at 3{sigma} C.L. if sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}(true)>5.1x10{sup -4} independent of the true neutrino mass hierarchy.

  19. Neutrino mass hierarchy and $\\theta_{13}$ with a magic baseline beta-beam experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, S K; Raychaudhuri, Amitava K; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Choubey, Sandhya; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2006-01-01

    We underscore the physics advantage of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The CERN-INO distance is close to the so-called "magic" baseline which helps evade some of the parameter degeneracies and allows for a better measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy and $\\theta_{13}$. We expound the possibility of using radioactive $^8B$ and $^{8}Li$ as the source isotopes for the $\

  20. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  1. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  2. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    CERN Document Server

    Pozuelo, Sara Esteban; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe I 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the LOS velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filamen...

  3. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  4. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  5. An intermediate gamma beta-beam neutrino experiment with long baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Davide; Orme, Christopher; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pascoli, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    In order to address some fundamental questions in neutrino physics a wide, future programme of neutrino oscillation experiments is currently under discussion. Among those, long baseline experiments will play a crucial role in providing information on the value of theta13, the type of neutrino mass ordering and on the value of the CP-violating phase delta, which enters in 3-neutrino oscillations. Here, we consider a beta-beam setup with an intermediate Lorentz factor gamma=450 and a baseline of 1050 km. This could be achieved in Europe with a beta-beam sourced at CERN to a detector located at the Boulby mine in the United Kingdom. We analyse the physics potential of this setup in detail and study two different exposures (1 x 10^{21} and 5 x 10^{21} ions-kton-years). In both cases, we find that the type of neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined at 99% CL, for all values of delta, for sin^2(2 theta13) > 0.03. In the high-exposure scenario, we find that the value of the CP-violating phase delta could be meas...

  6. Control of stopping position of radioactive ion beam in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.F., E-mail: yangxf@ribf.riken.jp [School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Wakui, T. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Imamura, K. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, T. [Dept. of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dept. of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yoshida, N.; Shirai, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Y.; Hayasaka, M. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, S.; Muramoto, S. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Wada, M.; Sonoda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei with extremely low yields by measuring nuclear spins and moments, a new laser spectroscopy technique – “OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher) has been proposed in recent years. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated by means of a considerable amount of offline and online studies of various atoms in superfluid helium. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, trapping atoms in the observation region of laser is a key step. Therefore, a method which enables us to trap accelerated atoms at a precise position in He II is highly needed for performing experiment. In this work, a technique making use of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is established for checking the stopping position of beam based on the LISE++ calculation. The method has been tested and verified by on-line experiments with the {sup 84,85,87}Rb beam. Details of the experimental setup, working procedure and testing results of this method are presented.

  7. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  8. Dark matter search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglieri, M; Caiffi, B; Celentano, A; De Vita, R; Fanchini, E; Marsicano, L; Musico, P; Osipenko, M; Panza, F; Ripani, M; Santopinto, E; Taiuti, M; Bellini, V; Bondí, M; De Napoli, M; Mammoliti, F; Leonora, E; Randazzo, N; Russo, G; Sperduto, M; Sutera, C; Tortorici, F; Baltzell, N; Dalton, M; Freyberger, A; Girod, F X; Kubarovsky, V; Pasyuk, E; Smith, E S; Stepanyan, S; Ungaro, M; Whitlatch, T; Izaguirre, E; Krnjaic, G; Snowden-Ifft, D; Loomba, D; Carpinelli, M; Sipala, V; Schuster, P; Toro, N; Essig, R; Wood, M H; Holtrop, M; Paremuzyan, R; De Cataldo, G; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Lagamba, L; Nappi, E; Perrino, R; Balossino, I; Barion, L; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Lenisa, P; Movsisyan, A; Spizzo, F; Turisini, M; De Persio, F; Cisbani, E; Garibaldi, F; Meddi, F; Urciuoli, G M; Hasch, D; Lucherini, V; Mirazita, M; Pisano, S; Simi, G; D'Angelo, A; Lanza, L; Rizzo, A; Schaerf, C; Zonta, I; Filippi, A; Fegan, S; Kunkel, M; Bashkanov, M; Beltrame, P; Murphy, A; Smith, G; Watts, D; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Glazier, D; Ireland, D; McKinnon, B; Sokhan, D; Colaneri, L; Pereira, S Anefalos; Afanasev, A; Briscoe, B; Strakovsky, I; Kalantarians, N; Weinstein, L; Adhikari, K P; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Fassi, L El; Ye, L; Hicks, K; Cole, P; Dobbs, S; Fanelli, C

    2016-01-01

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a $\\sim$1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle $\\chi$ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the result...

  9. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II; Experimentos con haces nucleares radiactivos II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  10. Dark matter search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglieri, M; De Vita, R; Izaguirre, E; Krnjaic, G; Smith, E; Stepanyan, S; Bersani, A; Fanchini, E; Fegan, S; Musico, P; Osipenko, M; Ripani, M; Santopinto, E; Taiuti, M; Schuster, P; Toro, N; Dalton, M; Freyberger, A; Girod, F -X; Kubarovsky, V; Ungaro, M; De Cataldo, G; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Lagamba, L; Nappi, E; Perrino, R; Carpinelli, M; Sipala, V; Aiello, S; Bellini, V; De Napoli, M; Giusa, A; Mammoliti, F; Leonora, E; Noto, F; Randazzo, N; Russo, G; Sperduto, M; Sutera, C; Ventura, C; Barion, L; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Lenisa, P; Movsisyan, A; Spizzo, F; Turisini, M; De Persio, F; Cisbani, E; Fanelli, C; Garibaldi, F; Meddi, F; Urciuoli, G M; Pereira, S Anefalos; De Sanctis, E; Hasch, D; Lucherini, V; Mirazita, M; Montgomery, R; Pisano, S; Simi, G; D'Angelo, A; Lanza, L Colaneri L; Rizzo, A; Schaerf, C; Zonta, I; Calvo, D; Filippi, A; Holtrop, M; Peremuzyan, R; Glazier, D; Ireland, D; McKinnon, B; Afanasev, D Sokhan A; Briscoe, B; Kalantarians, N; Fassi, L El; Weinstein, L; Beltrame, P; Murphy, A; Watts, D; Zana, L; Hicks, K

    2014-01-01

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This Letter of Intent presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a 1 m$^3$ segmented plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) is sensitive to DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, with very low threshold recoil energies ($\\sim$1 MeV), and limited only by reducible cosmogenic backgrounds. Sensitivity to DM-electron elastic scattering and/or inelastic DM would be below 10 counts per year after requiring all electromagnetic showers in the detector to exceed a few-hundred MeV, which dramatically reduces or altogether eliminates all backgrounds. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress to finalize the detector design and experimental set up. An existing 0.036 m$^3$ prototype based on the s...

  11. Discovery of τ Neutrino Appearance in the CNGS Neutrino Beam with the OPERA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bodnarchuk, I.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Lellis, G.; de Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; di Crescenzo, A.; di Ferdinando, D.; di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fornari, F.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, A. M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laudisio, F.; Lauria, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P. F.; Malgin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matsushita, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Mikado, S.; Miyanishi, M.; Mizutani, F.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevsky, A.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Paparella, L.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Shakirianova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Sotnikov, A.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladymyrov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Zemskova, S.; Opera Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., by detecting the τ leptons produced in charged current ντ interactions. The experiment took data from 2008 to 2012 in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso beam. The observation of the νμ→ντ appearance, achieved with four candidate events in a subsample of the data, was previously reported. In this Letter, a fifth ντ candidate event, found in an enlarged data sample, is described. Together with a further reduction of the expected background, the candidate events detected so far allow us to assess the discovery of νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode with a significance larger than 5 σ .

  12. Performance of high-rate TRD prototypes for the CBM experiment in test beam and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The goal of the future Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities not covered by other experiments. Among other detectors, it will employ a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for tracking of charged particles and electron identification. To meet the demands for tracking and for electron identification at large particle densities and very high interaction rates, high efficiency TRD prototypes have been developed. These prototypes with double-sided pad plane electrodes based on Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) have been tested at GSI and implemented in the simulation framework of CBM. Results of the performance in a test beam and in simulations are shown. In addition, we present a study of the performance of CBM for electron identification and dilepton reconstruction with this new detector layout.

  13. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  14. De-squeeze the beams: the TOTEM and ATLAS/ALFA experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    A special week-long proton–proton run with larger beam sizes at the interaction point is intended to probe the p-p elastic scattering regime at small angles.   Nicola Turini, deputy spokesperson for TOTEM, in front of one of the experiment’s ‘Roman Pot’ detectors in the LHC tunnel. (Photo: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Usually, the motto of the LHC is “maximum luminosity”. But for a few days per year, the LHC ignores its motto to run at very low luminosity for the forward experiments. This week, the LHC will provide the TOTEM and ATLAS/ALFA experiments with data for a broad physics programme. The TOTEM experiment at Point 5 and the ATLAS/ALFA experiment at Point 1 study the elastic scattering of protons, which are not observable in normal operation runs. In the elastic scattering process, the two protons survive their encounter intact and only change directions by exchanging momentum. To allow this special run, the operators play with the so-c...

  15. Experimental study of mixing enhancement using pylon in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Manmohan; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    The Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine has been recognized as one of the most promising air breathing propulsion system for the supersonic/hypersonic flight mission requirements. Mixing and combustion of fuel inside scramjet engine is one of the major challenging tasks. In the current study the main focus has been to increase the penetration and mixing of the secondary jet inside the test chamber at supersonic speeds. In view of this, experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pylon on the mixing of secondary jet injection into supersonic mainstream flow at Mach 1.65. Two different pylons are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained by normal injection from a flat plate. The mixing studies are performed by varying the height of the pylon while keeping all other parameters the same. The study mainly focused on analyzing the area of spread and penetration depth achieved by different injection schemes based on the respective parameters. The measurements involved Mie scattering visualization and the flow features are analyzed using Schlieren images. The penetration height and spread area are the two parameters that are used for analyzing and comparing the performance of the pylons. It is observed that the secondary jet injection carried out from behind the big pylon resulted in maximum penetration and spread area of the jet as compared to the small pylon geometry. Moreover it is also evident that for obtaining maximum spreading and penetration of the jet, the same needs to be achieved at the injection location.

  16. Physics Opportunities of a Fixed-Target Experiment using the LHC Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.; /SLAC; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-03-16

    We outline the many physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton and lead-ion beams of the LHC extracted by a bent crystal. In a proton run with the LHC 7-TeV beam, one can analyze pp, pd and pA collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and even higher using the Fermi motion of the nucleons in a nuclear target. In a lead run with a 2.76 TeV-per-nucleon beam, {radical}s{sub NN} is as high as 72 GeV. Bent crystals can be used to extract about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons/sec; the integrated luminosity over a year reaches 0.5 fb{sup -1} on a typical 1 cm-long target without nuclear species limitation. We emphasize that such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton and the neutron can be accessed at large x and even at x larger than unity in the nuclear case. Single diffractive physics and, for the first time, the large negative-xF domain can be accessed. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter versus the features of the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions, including the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions over the full range of target-rapidity domain with a large variety of nuclei. The polarization of hydrogen and nuclear targets allows an ambitious spin program, including measurements of the QCD lensing effects which underlie the Sivers single-spin asymmetry, the study of transversity distributions and possibly of polarized parton distributions. We also emphasize the potential offered by pA ultra-peripheral collisions where the nucleus target A is used as a coherent photon source, mimicking photoproduction processes in ep collisions. Finally, we note that W and Z bosons can be produced and detected in a fixed-target experiment and in their

  17. Passive Acoustic Radar for Detecting Supersonic Cruise Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; XIAO Hui

    2005-01-01

    A Passive Acoustic Radar is presented as a necessary complement to electromagnetic wave radar, which will be expected to be an effective means for detecting cruise missiles. Acoustic characteristics of supersonic flying projectiles with diverse shapes are expounded via experiment. It is pointed out that simulation experiment could be implemented using bullet or shell instead of cruise missile. Based on theoretical analysis and experiment, the "acoustic fingerprint" character of cruise missile is illustrated to identify it in a strong noise environment. After establishing a locating mathematical model,the technique of acoustic embattling is utilized to resolve a problem of confirming the time of early-warning, considering the fact that velocity of sound is much slower than that of light. Thereby, a whole system of passive acoustic radar for detecting supersonic cruise missile is formed.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics of High-Brightness Electron Beams and Beam-Plasma Interactions: Theories, Simulations, and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Bohn (deceased), P. Piot and B. Erdelyi

    2008-05-31

    According to its original Statement of Work (SOW), the overarching objective of this project is: 'To enhance substantially the understanding of the fundamental dynamics of nonequilibrium high-brightness beams with space charge.' Our work and results over the past three and half years have been both intense and fruitful. Inasmuch as this project is inextricably linked to a larger, growing research program - that of the Beam Physics and Astrophysics Group (BPAG) - the progress that it has made possible cannot easily be separated from the global picture. Thus, this summary report includes major sections on 'global' developments and on those that can be regarded as specific to this project.

  19. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS.

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, Hans

    2016-01-01

    SHiP is an experiment to look for very weakly interacting particles at a new to be constructed beam-dum p facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integ rating $2\\times 10^{20}$ proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c$^2$. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL). The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained...

  20. Optimal design of a smart post-buckled beam actuator using bat algorithm: simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rajnish; Ganguli, Ranjan; Kumar, Ravi

    2017-05-01

    The optimized design of a smart post-buckled beam actuator (PBA) is performed in this study. A smart material based piezoceramic stack actuator is used as a prime-mover to drive the buckled beam actuator. Piezoceramic actuators are high force, small displacement devices; they possess high energy density and have high bandwidth. In this study, bench top experiments are conducted to investigate the angular tip deflections due to the PBA. A new design of a linear-to-linear motion amplification device (LX-4) is developed to circumvent the small displacement handicap of piezoceramic stack actuators. LX-4 enhances the piezoceramic actuator mechanical leverage by a factor of four. The PBA model is based on dynamic elastic stability and is analyzed using the Mathieu-Hill equation. A formal optimization is carried out using a newly developed meta-heuristic nature inspired algorithm, named as the bat algorithm (BA). The BA utilizes the echolocation capability of bats. An optimized PBA in conjunction with LX-4 generates end rotations of the order of 15° at the output end. The optimized PBA design incurs less weight and induces large end rotations, which will be useful in development of various mechanical and aerospace devices, such as helicopter trailing edge flaps, micro and nano aerial vehicles and other robotic systems.

  1. Prompt neutrino production in the 1982 beam dump experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bostock, Paul

    Principles of beam dump experiments are reviewed and the 1982 beam dump at CERN using the Big European Bubble Chamber is described in detail. Neutrino events have been detected using both the bubble chamber and its associated electronic detectors. Prompt event rates are established for Vμ , Ṽμ , Ve and Ṽe . The prompt rates are consistent with lepton universality. The charm production cross-section required to explain the prompt electron-(anti)neutrino signal is approximately 16-105/μb per nucleon, assuming linear dependence of this cross-section on nucleon number. This range of values reflects the fact that we have not been able to find a model which is consistent with all aspects of the data. The neutral to charged current ratio for electron-neutrinos is found to be 0.23 ±0.16. The expected number of tau-neutrino events is estimated and kinematic and visual searches for tau-neutrino interactions are described. One visually detected candidate is described in detail. No positive evidence for a tau-ne...

  2. Features of accelerated electron beam formation in LHCD experiments on FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Krikunov, S. V.; Kuprienko, D. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    In experiments with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) on the FT-2 tokamak, lower hybrid (LH) waves have been successfully used for the first time to ensure effective additional heating of plasma electrons from 450 to 600 eV ( I Pl = 32 kA, Δ t RF = 14 ms, P RF = 100 kW, F = 920 MHz). Several factors influencing the efficiency of plasma heating have been discovered. In particular, significant growth of radiation losses in the LHCD regime has been found, which is probably related to an increase in the intensity of synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons. The increase in this intensity in the 53-156 GHz frequency range was accompanied by short spikes of microwave radiation, which were observed only in a narrower frequency range (53-78 GHz) and apparently resulted from interaction of a runaway electron beam with significant local mirrors of toroidal magnetic field. A model of the additional heating of plasma electrons due to absorption of the microwave radiation generated by a beam of accelerated electrons is proposed.

  3. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra H.B.

    2016-01-01

    to be constructed beam-dump facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2 × 1020 proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c2. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL. The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Integrated in SHiP is an Emulsion Cloud Chamber, already used in the OPERA experiment, which will allow to study active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular SHiP can distinguish between vτ and v̄τ, and their deep inelastic scattering cross sections will be measured with statistics three orders of magnitude larger than currently available.

  4. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auty, David John [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0%$\\bar{v}$μ, which can be separated from the vμ because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study $\\bar{v}$μ oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for vμ, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam $\\bar{v}$μ before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure $\\bar{v}$μ beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% $\\bar{v}$μ component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The $\\bar{v}$μ of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3-7.6+7.6(stat.)-3.6+3.6(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 σ deficit, and a best fit value of Δ$\\bar{m}$322 = 18 x 10-3 eV2 and sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$23 = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of $\\bar{v}$μ events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The

  5. Ion temperature anisotropy in high power helium neutral beam fuelling experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, A.C.; Core, W.G.F.; Gerstel, U.C.; Von Hellermann, M.G.; Koenig, R.W.T.; Marcus, F.B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    During helium beam fuelling experiments in JET, distinctive anisotropic features have been observed in the velocity distribution function describing both fast and thermal alpha particle populations. During the initial fuelling phase the central helium ion temperature observed perpendicular to the magnetic field is higher than the central electron temperature, while the central helium ion temperature observed parallel to the magnetic field is lower than or equal to the central electron temperature. In order to verify temperature measurements of both perpendicular and parallel lines of sight, other independent methods of deducing the ion temperature are investigated: deuterium ion temperature, deuterium density, comparison with neutron rates and profiles (influence of a possible metastable population of helium). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchernycheva M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211A and GaAs(111B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies.

  7. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Dubrovskii, V G; Sibirev, N V; Cirlin, G E; Sartel, C; Tchernycheva, M; Harmand, J C; Glas, F

    2010-07-24

    The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs) during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211)A and GaAs(111)B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies.

  8. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  9. The Validity of the Weizsacker-Williams Approximation and the Analysis of Beam Dump Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Miller, Gerald A

    2016-01-01

    Beam dump experiments have been aimed at searching for new particles or putting constraint limits on their existence by comparing null results with expectations based on the cross section calculated using the Weizsacker-Williams (WW) and other approximations to simplify the phase space integral and amplitude calculation. We examine the validity of the widely used WW approximation along with other popular assumptions. Using scalar boson production as an example, we perform the complete calculation to obtain the cross section and the resulting number of particles produced without such approximations, apply these results to exclusion plot and data fitting, and examine the error when using these commonly used approximations. We find that there could be more than 100\\% errors in cross sections and 20\\% errors in exclusion plot boundaries for certain parameters. In the event of a discovery, the mass and coupling of the new boson as determined by the approximate and exact calculations could differ at more than the $...

  10. Evidence for Some New Hyperon Resonances -- to be Checked by $K_L$ Beam Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, B S

    2016-01-01

    Quenched and unquenched quark models predict very different patterns for the spectrum of the low excited hyperon states. Evidence is accumulating for the existence of some new hyperon resonances, such as a $\\Sigma^*$ of spin-parity $J^P=1/2^-$ around 1400 MeV instead of 1620 MeV as listed in PDG, a new $\\Sigma(1540)3/2^-$ resonance, a new narrow $\\Lambda(1670)3/2^-$ resonance and a new $\\Lambda(1680)3/2^+$ resonance. All these new hyperon resonances fit in the predicted pattern of the unquenched quark models very well. It is extremely important to check and establish the spectrum of these low excited hyperon states by the proposed $K_L$ beam experiments at JLAB.

  11. A new luminometer and beam conditions monitor for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacheban, Olena; Hempel, Maria [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Ryjov, Vladimir; Stickland, David; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Henschel, Hans; Lange, Wolfgang [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Leonard, Jessica; Walsh, Roberval [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Levy, Itamar [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lohmann, Wolfgang [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Przyborowski, Dominik [AGH-UST University, Cracow (Poland); Schuwalow, Sergej [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, which allows for the determination of the absolute cross sections from the observed rate in a detector. The Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F) was upgraded in the last LHC long technical stop (LS1) to 24 diamond sensors read out by a dedicated fast ASIC in 130 nm CMOS technology. The backend comprises a deadtime-less histogramming unit, with a 6.25 ns bin width, in VME standard. A microTCA system with better time resolution is in development. BCM1F is used for luminosity and machine induced background measurements at the CMS experiment. The performance of the detector in the first running period, as well as results on the calibration (Van-der-Meer scan) and the measurements of the luminosity are presented.

  12. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, H. B.

    2016-11-01

    SHiP is an experiment to look for very weakly interacting particles at a new to be constructed beam-dump facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2 × 1020 proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c2. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL). The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Integrated in SHiP is an Emulsion Cloud Chamber, already used in the OPERA experiment, which will allow to study active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular SHiP can distinguish between vτ and v¯τ, and their deep inelastic scattering cross sections will be measured with statistics three orders of magnitude larger than currently available.

  13. Measurement of air and nitrogen fluorescence light yields induced by electron beam for UHECR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, P; Grebenyuk, V; Naumov, D; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Y; Onofre, A; Porokhovoi, S; Sabirov, B; Tkatchev, L G

    2006-01-01

    Most of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, EUSO, TUS,...) use air fluorescence to detect and measure extensive air showers (EAS). The precise knowledge of the Fluorescence Light Yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the reconstruction of UHECR. The MACFLY - Measurement of Air Cherenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield - experiment has been designed to perform such FLY measurements. In this paper we will present the results of FLY in the 290-440 nm wavelength range for dry air and pure nitrogen, both excited by electrons with energy of 1.5 MeV, 20 GeV and 50 GeV. The experiment uses a 90Sr radioactive source for low energy measurement and a CERN SPS electron beam for high energy. We find that the FLY is proportional to the deposited energy (E_d) in the gas and we show that the air fluorescence properties remain constant independently of the electron energy. At the reference point: atmospheric dry air at 1013 hPa and 23C, the ratio FLY/E_d=17.6 photon/MeV with ...

  14. Fast beam conditions monitor BCM1F for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Castro, E. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (US)] (and others)

    2009-10-15

    The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first beams of the LHC are described. (orig.)

  15. Development of Fragmented Low-Z Ion Beams for the NA61 Experiment at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Bohl, T; Breuker, H; Calviani, M; Manglunki, D; Mataguez, S; Maury, S; Valderanis, C; Cornelis, K; Spanggaard, J; Cettour-Cave, S; Gazdzicki, M; Seyboth, P; Guber, F; Ivashkin, A

    2011-01-01

    The NA61 experiment, aims to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement at low SPS energies and to find signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. A broad range in T-μB phase diagram will be covered by performing an energy (13A-158AGeV/c) and system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) scan. In a first phase, fragmented ion beams of 7Be or 11C produced as secondaries with the same momentum per nucleon when the incident primary Pb-ion beam hits a thin Be target will be used. The H2 beam line that transports the beam to the experiment acts as a double spectrometer which combined with a new thin target (degrader) where fragments loose energy proportional to the square of their charge allows the separation of the wanted A/Z fragments. Thin scintillators and TOF measurement for the low energy points are used as particle identification devices. In this paper results from the first test of the fragmented ion beam done in 2010 will be presented showing that a pure Be beam can be obtained sa...

  16. Computer simulation and visualization of supersonic jet for gas cluster equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshkin, A.; Ermakov, Y.; Chernysh, V.; Ivanov, I.; Kryukov, I.; Alekseev, K.; Kargin, N.; Insepov, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Supersonic nozzle is a key component of a gas cluster condensation system. We describe a flow visualization system using glow discharge with annular or plane electrodes. The geometric parameters of a supersonic jet under typical conditions used in a gas cluster ion beam accelerator are investigated. As well numerical simulations were performed. Dependence of inlet and ambient pressures and nozzle throat diameter on the shock bottle dimensions is described for different working gases. Influence of condensation rate on shock bottle axial size is discussed.

  17. Computer simulation and visualization of supersonic jet for gas cluster equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieshkin, A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Y. [Scobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute, Lomonosov State Moscow University, GSP-1, Leninskiye Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernysh, V.; Ivanov, I. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kryukov, I. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, prosp. Vernadskogo, 101, Block 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation); Alekseev, K.; Kargin, N. [National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI», Kashirskoye shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Insepov, Z., E-mail: zinsepov@purdue.edu [Purdue University, 500 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, Kabanbay Batyr Avenue 53, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-21

    Supersonic nozzle is a key component of a gas cluster condensation system. We describe a flow visualization system using glow discharge with annular or plane electrodes. The geometric parameters of a supersonic jet under typical conditions used in a gas cluster ion beam accelerator are investigated. As well numerical simulations were performed. Dependence of inlet and ambient pressures and nozzle throat diameter on the shock bottle dimensions is described for different working gases. Influence of condensation rate on shock bottle axial size is discussed.

  18. Monitoring extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex for "energy + transmutation" experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Vasil'ev, S. E.; Vishnevskiy, A. V.; Vladimirova, N. M.; Kudashkin, I. V.; Makan'kin, A. M.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    A monitoring system for measuring absolute intensity and the space—time structure of extracted beams of Nuclotron based on ionization and activation methods has been created and tested. The monitoring system provides a measurement of the absolute intensity of extracted beams with a precision of 10% and beam position with a precision of 0.5 mm.

  19. submitter Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    CERN Document Server

    Thomae, R; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  20. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  1. Fast Beam Conditions Monitor BCM1F for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, A; Hall-Wilton, R; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Macpherson, A; Ohlerich, M; Rodriguez, N; Ryjov, V; Schmidt, R S; Stone, R L

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first be ams of the LHC are described.

  2. Dynamical separation of spherical bodies in supersonic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence, Stuart; Parziale, N. J.; Deiterding, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the unsteady separation behaviour of two spheres in a highly supersonic flow is carried out. The spherical bodies, initially touching, are released with negligible relative velocity, an arrangement representing the idealized binary fragmentation of a meteoritic body in the atmosphere. In experiments performed in a Mach-4 Ludwieg tube, nylon spheres are initially suspended in the test section by weak threads and, following detachment of ...

  3. The Role of Geometrically Necessary Dislocations in Cantilever Beam Bending Experiments of Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Husser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of single crystalline, micro-sized copper is investigated in the context of cantilever beam bending experiments. Particular focus is on the role of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs during bending-dominated load conditions and their impact on the characteristic bending size effect. Three different sample sizes are considered in this work with main variation in thickness. A gradient extended crystal plasticity model is presented and applied in a three-dimensional finite-element (FE framework considering slip system-based edge and screw components of the dislocation density vector. The underlying mathematical model contains non-standard evolution equations for GNDs, crystal-specific interaction relations, and higher-order boundary conditions. Moreover, two element formulations are examined and compared with respect to size-independent as well as size-dependent bending behavior. The first formulation is based on a linear interpolation of the displacement and the GND density field together with a full integration scheme whereas the second is based on a mixed interpolation scheme. While the GND density fields are treated equivalently, the displacement field is interpolated quadratically in combination with a reduced integration scheme. Computational results indicate that GND storage in small cantilever beams strongly influences the evolution of statistically stored dislocations (SSDs and, hence, the distribution of the total dislocation density. As a particular example, the mechanical bending behavior in the case of a physically motivated limitation of GND storage is studied. The resulting impact on the mechanical bending response as well as on the predicted size effect is analyzed. Obtained results are discussed and related to experimental findings from the literature.

  4. The new Beam Halo Monitor for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolo

    In the context of increasing beam energy and luminosity of the LHC accelerator at CERN, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the CMS cavern for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector, called the Beam Halo Monitor, will provide an online, bunch-by-bunch measurement of background induced by beam halo interactions, separately for each beam. The detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast UV sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The directional and fast response of the system allows the discrimination of the background particles from the dominant flux in the cavern induced by pp collision debris, produced within the 25 ns bunch spacing. The readout electronics of this detector will make use of many components developed for the upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be d...

  5. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernández, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Ovsiannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pérez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be establis...

  6. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  7. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niner, Evan David [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  8. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  9. Flight Research and Validation Formerly Experimental Capabilities Supersonic Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Experimental Capabilities Supersonic project, that is being reorganized into Flight Research and Validation. The work of Experimental Capabilities Project in FY '09 is reviewed, and the specific centers that is assigned to do the work is given. The portfolio of the newly formed Flight Research and Validation (FRV) group is also reviewed. The various projects for FY '10 for the FRV are detailed. These projects include: Eagle Probe, Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE), Supersonic Boundary layer Transition test (SBLT), Aero-elastic Test Wing-2 (ATW-2), G-V External Vision Systems (G5 XVS), Air-to-Air Schlieren (A2A), In Flight Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS), Dynamic Inertia Measurement Technique (DIM), and Advanced In-Flight IR Thermography (AIR-T).

  10. Historical Account And Branching To Rarefied Gas Dynamics Of Atomic and Molecular Beams : A Continuing And Fascinating Odyssey Commemorated By Nobel Prizes Awarded To 23 Laureates In Physics And Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Roger

    2005-05-01

    This Historical Account derived in part from D. R. Herschbach was presented as an opening lecture of the Molecular Beam Session organized at the 24th International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics held in Bari, Italy, in July 2004. The emphasis is on the impressive results due to the molecular beam techniques in the last century. The first section summarizes the historical beam experiments performed by 14 Nobel Prize laureates having used the thermally effusive sources to establish the basic principles of Modern Physics. The second section is on the branching of Molecular Beams to Rarefied Gas Dynamics having permitted to investigate the physics of supersonic free jets and transform the molecular beam techniques. Finally, the last section relates the spectacular molecular beam experiments in helium free jet ultracooling, molecular spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics, clustering and modification of low density matter, and biomolecule mass spectrometry, rewarded by nine Nobel Prizes in Chemistry from 1986 to 2002.

  11. A Preliminary Evaluation of Supersonic Transport Category Vehicle Operations in the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Matthew C.; Guminsky, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Several public sector businesses and government agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are currently working on solving key technological barriers that must be overcome in order to realize the vision of low-boom supersonic flights conducted over land. However, once these challenges are met, the manner in which this class of aircraft is integrated in the National Airspace System may become a potential constraint due to the significant environmental, efficiency, and economic repercussions that their integration may cause. Background research was performed on historic supersonic operations in the National Airspace System, including both flight deck procedures and air traffic controller procedures. Using this information, an experiment was created to test some of these historic procedures in a current-day, emerging Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) environment and observe the interactions between commercial supersonic transport aircraft and modern-day air traffic. Data was gathered through batch simulations of supersonic commercial transport category aircraft operating in present-day traffic scenarios as a base-lining study to identify the magnitude of the integration problems and begin the exploration of new air traffic management technologies and architectures which will be needed to seamlessly integrate subsonic and supersonic transport aircraft operations. The data gathered include information about encounters between subsonic and supersonic aircraft that may occur when supersonic commercial transport aircraft are integrated into the National Airspace System, as well as flight time data. This initial investigation is being used to inform the creation and refinement of a preliminary Concept of Operations and for the subsequent development of technologies that will enable overland supersonic flight.

  12. First EXL experiment with stored radioactive beam: Proton scattering on 56Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid M. von

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available EXL (EXotic nuclei studied in Light-ion induced reactions at the NESR storage ring is a project within NUSTAR at FAIR. It aims at investigations of light-ion induced direct reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ions cooled and stored in the future NESR (New Experimental Storage Ring. The existing ESR (Experimental Storage Ring at GSI, together with its internal gas-jet target, provides a unique opportunity to perform such kind of experiments on a smaller scale at the present time. We have developed a UHV-compatible (Ultra High Vacuum detector setup mainly based on DSSDs (Double-sided Silicon-Strip Detector for the target-like recoils [4]. With this setup we were able to successfully investigate reactions with a stored radioactive beam for the first time ever. As a part of the first EXL campaign we investigated the reaction 56Ni(p,p56Ni in inverse kinematics in order to measure the differential cross section for elastic proton scattering and deduce the nuclear-matter distribution and radius of 56Ni. In the following, the experimental setup is introduced in more detail, and the current status of the ongoing analysis is discussed.

  13. LENDA, a Low Energy Neutron Detector Array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perdikakis, G; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Caesar, C; Cannon, S; Deaven, J M; Doster, H J; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Marks, J; Meharchand, R; Nguyen, D T; Peterman, D; Prinke, A; Scott, M; Shimbara, Y; Thorne, K; Valdez, L; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab- oratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p, n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (> 100 MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV - 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neut...

  14. Overview of recent results from the Beam Energy Scan program in the STAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    It is believed, that shortly after the Big Bang the Universe existed in the state of the Quark Gluon Plasma, where quarks and gluons act as quasi-free particles. During relativistic heavy ion collisions this state of matter can be reproduced. Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) calculations show possible existence of the critical point and the 1st order phase transition between hadron gas and QGP. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC) program called Beam Energy Scan (BES) was developed for experimental verification of above QCD predictions. Within this program the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment gathered data from gold-gold collisions at √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV. This data are analysed by STAR Collaboration in search for answers to questions concerning the nuclear matter phases, namely: what is the collision energy for the onset of the QGP formation? What is the nature of a phase transition between QGP and hadron gas? Is there a critical point and if yes, where is it situated? In this proceedings a few of the latest STAR results that address these questions are presented.

  15. LENDA: A low energy neutron detector array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikakis, G., E-mail: perdikak@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sasano, M.; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caesar, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cannon, S. [Hastings College, Hastings, NE 68901 (United States); Deaven, J.M.; Doster, H.J.; Guess, C.J.; Hitt, G.W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Marks, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Meharchand, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nguyen, D.T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Peterman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2012-09-11

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (>100MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV to 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neutron energy threshold of <150keV, an intrinsic time (position) resolution of {approx} 400 ps ({approx} 6 cm) and an efficiency >20% for neutrons below 4 MeV have been obtained.

  16. Quarkonium Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN; Brodsky, S.J.; /SLAC; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Hadjidakis, C.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-04-09

    We outline the many quarkonium-physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the p and Pb LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. This provides an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb{sup -1} per year on a typical 1cm-long target. Such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. With such a high luminosity, one can analyse quarkonium production in great details in pp, pd and pA collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 72 GeV in PbA collisions. In a typical pp (pA) run, the obtained quarkonium yields per unit of rapidity are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those expected at RHIC and about respectively 10 (70) times larger than for ALICE. In PbA, they are comparable. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, the large negative-x{sub F} domain can be accessed for the first time, greatly extending previous measurements by Hera-B and E866. Such analyses should help resolving the quarkonium-production controversies and clear the way for gluon PDF extraction via quarkonium studies. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter and the features of the hot and dense matter formed in PbA collisions. A polarised proton target allows the study of transverse-spin asymmetries in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production, providing access to the gluon and charm Sivers functions.

  17. The OPERA experiment in the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquafredda, R.; Adam, T.; Agafonova, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Ambrosio, M.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Arrabito, L.; Aufranc, C.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bagulya, A.; Baussan, E.; Bergnoli, A.; Bersani Greggio, F.; Bertolin, A.; Besnier, M.; Biaré, D.; Bick, D.; Blin, S.; Borer, K.; Boucrot, J.; Boutigny, D.; Boyarkin, V.; Bozza, C.; Brugière, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Carlus, B.; Carrara, E.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chon-Sen, N.; Chukanov, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; D'Amato, G.; Dal Corso, F.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Damet, J.; de La Taille, C.; DeLellis, G.; Déclais, Y.; Descombes, T.; DeSerio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Giovanni, A.; Di Marco, N.; Di Troia, C.; Dick, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dominjon, A.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dulach, B.; Dusini, S.; Ebert, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, O.; Elsener, K.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Fanin, C.; Favier, J.; Felici, G.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.; Fournier, L.; Franceschi, A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, C.; Galkin, V. I.; Galkin, V. A.; Gallet, R.; Gardien, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Gaudiot, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Girerd, C.; Goellnitz, C.; Goeltzenlichter, T.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grapton, J.-N.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Gschwendtner, E.; Guerin, C.; Guler, M.; Gustavino, C.; Guyonnet, J.-L.; Hagner, C.; Hamane, T.; Hara, T.; Hauger, M.; Hess, M.; Hierholzer, M.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Incurvati, M.; Jakovcic, K.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Janutta, B.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S. H.; Khovansky, N.; Kimura, M.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Kolev, D.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kreslo, I.; Krumstein, Z.; Kutsenov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Laktineh, I.; Lavy, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, T. D.; LeFlour, T.; Lenkeit, J.; Lewis, J.; Lieunard, S.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Lutter, G.; Malgin, A.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Meddahi, M.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Meschini, A.; Messina, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Monacelli, P.; Monteiro, I.; Moreau, F.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Mugnier, P.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Napolitano, T.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Nozdrin, A.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevski, A.; Orlandi, D.; Orlova, G.; Osedlo, V.; Ossetski, D.; Paniccia, M.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, K.; Publichenko, P.; Pupilli, F.; Raux, L.; Repellin, J. P.; Rescigno, R.; Rizhikov, D.; Roganova, T.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sadovski, A.; Sanelli, C.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Saveliev, V.; Sazhina, G.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schütz, H. U.; Schuler, J.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Serrano, J.; Shibuya, H.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J. S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, P.; Sugonyaev, V.; Takahashi, S.; Talochkin, V.; Tenti, M.; Tereschenko, V.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Tsarev, V.; Tsenov, R.; Tufanli, S.; Ugolino, U.; Ushida, N.; Van Beek, G.; Verguilov, V.; Viant, T.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Waelchli, T.; Weber, M.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurtz, J.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C. S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2009-04-01

    The OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment has been designed to prove the appearance of ντ in a nearly pure νμ beam (CNGS) produced at CERN and detected in the underground Hall C of the Gran Sasso Laboratory, 730 km away from the source. In OPERA, τ leptons resulting from the interaction of ντ are produced in target units called bricks made of nuclear emulsion films interleaved with lead plates. The OPERA target contains 150000 of such bricks, for a total mass of 1.25 kton, arranged into walls interleaved with plastic scintillator strips. The detector is split into two identical supermodules, each supermodule containing a target section followed by a magnetic spectrometer for momentum and charge measurement of penetrating particles. Real time information from the scintillators and the spectrometers provide the identification of the bricks where the neutrino interactions occurred. The candidate bricks are extracted from the walls and, after X-ray marking and an exposure to cosmic rays for alignment, their emulsion films are developed and sent to the emulsion scanning laboratories to perform the accurate scan of the event. In this paper, we review the design and construction of the detector and of its related infrastructures, and report on some technical performances of the various components. The construction of the detector started in 2003 and it was completed in Summer 2008. The experiment is presently in the data taking phase. The whole sequence of operations has proven to be successful, from triggering to brick selection, development, scanning and event analysis.

  18. CMS validation Experience: Test-beam 2004 data vs Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperov, Stefan

    2007-03-01

    A comparison between the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation of CMS Detector's Calorimetric System and data from the 2004 Test-Beam at CERN's SPS H2 beam-line is presented. The overall simulated response agrees quite well with the measured response. Slight differences in the longitudinal shower profiles between the MC predictions made with different Physics Lists are observed.

  19. Scintillations of a partially coherent beam in a laboratory turbulence: experiment and comparison to theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    A partially coherent beam generated by coupling the output of a superluminescent diode to a multimode optical fiber is propagated through a stationary laboratory turbulence. Statistical quantities are measured as a function of propagation distance and coherence radius of the beam and are compared to existing theories in the regime of weak fluctuations.

  20. Experience of direct percutaneous sac injection in type II endoleak using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoong-Seok; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2015-04-01

    Cone beam CT, usually used in dental area, could easily obtain 3-dimensional images using cone beam shaped ionized radiation. Cone beam CT is very useful for direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) which needs very precise measurement to avoid puncture of inferior vena cava or vessel around sac or stent graft. Here we describe two cases of DPSI using cone beam CT. In case 1, a 79-year-old male had widening of preexisted type II endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, transarterial embolization failed due to tortuous collateral branches of lumbar arteries. In case 2, a 72-year-old female had symptomatic sac enlargement by type II endoleak after EVAR. However, there was no route to approach the lumbar arteries. Therefore, we performed DPSI assisted by cone beam CT in cases 1, 2. Six-month CT follow-up revealed no sign of sac enlargement by type II endoleak.

  1. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  2. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Adam James [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  3. Deliverable 6.2 - Software: upgraded MC simulation tools capable of simulating a complete in-beam ET experiment, from the beam to the detected events. Report with the description of one (or few) reference clinical case(s), including the complete patient model and beam characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    The ENVISION Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Deliverable 6.2 - Software: upgraded MC simulation tools capable of simulating a complete in-beam ET experiment, from the beam to the detected events. Report with the description of one (or few) reference clinical case(s), including the complete patient model and beam characteristics

  4. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  5. Simultaneous scintillation measurements of coherent and partially coherent beams in an open atmosphere experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Anatoly; Velizhanin, Kirill; Gelikonov, Grigory

    2014-03-01

    Scintillation indices, probability distribution functions and signal spectra are measured simultaneously for spatially coherent and partially coherent optical beams propagating through various distances in an open atmosphere. The partially coherent beam is produced by coupling the broadband output of a superluminescent diode to a multimode optical fiber. A simple system to adjust the coherence radius by controlling the numerical aperture at the fiber output is implemented. Substantial reduction of the scintillation index and signal fade probability as compared to a slightly diverging coherent Gaussian beam are observed at all propagation distances studied up to 6.5 km.

  6. Computational and experimental investigation of supersonic convection over a laser heated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marineau, Eric C.

    This research concerns the development and validation of simulation of the beam-target interaction to determine the target temperature distribution as a function of time for a given target geometry, surface radiation intensity and free stream flow condition. The effect of a turbulent supersonic flow was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Experiments were in the Virginia Tech supersonic wind tunnel with a Mach 4 nozzle, ambient total temperature, total pressure of 160 psi and Reynolds number of 5x107/m. The target consisted of a 6.35 mm stainless steel plate painted at black. The target was irradiated with a 300 Watt continuous beam Ytterbium fiber laser generating a 4 mm Gaussian beam at 1.08 micron 10 cm from the leading edge where a 4 mm turbulent boundary layer prevailed. An absorbed laser power of 65, 81, 101, 120 Watts was used leading to a maximum heat flux between 1035 to 1910 W/cm 2. The target surface and backside temperature was measured using a mid-wave infrared camera. The backside temperature was also measured using eight type-K thermocouples. Two tests are made, one with the flow-on and the other with the flow-off. For the flow-on case, the laser is turned on after the tunnel starts and the flow reaches a steady state. For the flow-off case, the plate is heated at the same power but without the supersonic flow. The cooling effect is seen by subtracting the flow-off temperature from the flow-on temperature. This temperature subtraction is useful in cancelling the bias errors such that the overall uncertainty is significantly reduced. A new conjugate heat transfer algorithm was implemented in the GASP solver and validated by predicting the temperature distribution inside a cooled nozzle wall. The conjugate heat transfer algorithm was used to simulate the experiments at 81 and 65 Watts. Most computations were performed using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model on a 280; 320 cell grid. A grid convergence study was performed. At 65 Watts

  7. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  8. Mass flow and its pulsation measurements in supersonic wing wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmakov, A. S.; Shevchenko, A. M.; Yatskikh, A. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental study of the flow in the wing wake are presented. Experiments were carried out in supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM SB RAS. Rectangle half-wing with sharp edges with a chord length of 30 mm and semispan of 95 mm was used to generate vortex wake. Experimental data were obtained in the cross section located 6 chord length downstream of the trailing edge at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4 and at wing angles of attack of 4 and 10 degrees. Constant temperature hot-wire anemometer was used to measure disturbances in supersonic flow. Hot-wire was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 10 μm and length of 1.5 mm. Shlieren flow visualization were performed. As a result, the position and size of the vortex core in the wake of a rectangular wing were determined. For the first time experimental data on the mass flow distribution and its pulsations in the supersonic longitudinal vortex were obtained.

  9. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  10. Experience on Fabrication and Assembly of the First CLIC Two-Beam Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Rossi, F; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC two-beam module prototypes are intended to prove the design of all technical systems under the different operation modes. Two validation programs are currently under way and they foresee the construction of four prototype modules for mechanical tests without beam and three prototype modules for tests with RF and beam. The program without beam will show the capability of the technical solutions proposed to fulfil the stringent requirements on radio-frequency, supporting, pre-alignment, stabilization, vacuum and cooling systems. The engineering design was performed with the use of CAD/CAE software. Dedicated mock-ups of RF structures, with all mechanical interfaces and chosen technical solutions, are used for the tests and therefore reliable results are expected. The components were fabricated by applying different technologies and methods for manufacturing and joining. The first full-size prototype module was assembled in 2012. This paper is focused on the production process including the comparison o...

  11. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaorong [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Bincheng [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  12. First negative ion beam measurement by the Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment (STRIKE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serianni, G., E-mail: gianluigi.serianni@igi.cnr.it; De Muri, M.; Veltri, P.; Bonomo, F.; Chitarin, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Valente, M. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Franzen, P.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from Rf plasma (SPIDER) test facility is under construction in Padova to optimise the operation of the beam source of ITER neutral beam injectors. The SPIDER beam will be characterised by the instrumented calorimeter STRIKE, whose main components are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon-composite tiles. A small-scale version of the entire system has been employed in the BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions (BATMAN) testbed by arranging two prototype tiles in the vertical direction. The paper presents a description of the mini-STRIKE system and of the data analysis procedures, as well as some results concerning the BATMAN beam under varying operating conditions.

  13. Neutrino Beam Simulations and Data Checks for the NOvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Tutto, Marco [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the NuMI beam line intended to clarify how the particle trajectories through the focusing system and consequently the neutrino event yield are affected by the variation of the Horn Currents.

  14. CERN-INO magical Beta-beam experiment: A high precision probe for neutrino parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, S K; Raychaudhuri, A

    2008-01-01

    This talk is an attempt to underscore in detail the physics reach of an experimental set-up where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN would be observed in the proposed large magnetized iron calorimeter detector (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The "magical" CERN-INO beta-beam set-up offers an excellent avenue to use the "Golden" channel ($\

  15. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  16. Power production experiments at the Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar Lunde; Adli, Erik; Lundheim, Lars Magne

    2010-01-01

    CLIC is an international study of a future multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider, where the energy of a high-intensity drive beam is extracted and transferred to the main beam via Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) in the form of rf power. The study of power production is therefore essential for the feasibility of CLIC. Power production in PETS has been studied, and ex- periments have been performed in the decelerator Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3. In particular, the correlation of the power production and the beam position inside the structure has been studied. It is shown that the total produced power is constant when the beam has a position offset through the PETS. In addition, the difference between the measured phases from each side is independent of the beam position, which allows for efficient combination of the fields. However, the ratio of the power on each side of the PETS unexpectedly shows a linear dependence on the horizontal offset, with a correlation value of 0.8...

  17. The OPERA experiment. Discovery of ν{sub τ} appearance in the CNGS ν{sub μ} beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, Annika [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik (Germany); Collaboration: OPERA-Hamburg-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment OPERA has been designed for the direct observation of ν{sub τ} appearance in the CNGS ν{sub μ} beam. The OPERA detector is located at the LNGS underground laboratory, with a distance of 730 km from the neutrino source at CERN. It is a hybrid apparatus built of about 150000 Emulsion Cloud Chamber modules providing micrometric resolution and Electronic Detector elements for online readout, interaction location, and the measurement of particle charge and momentum. While CNGS beam data taking lasted from 2008 to 2012, the neutrino oscillation analysis is still ongoing: With the observation of a 5th τ neutrino event in an enlarged data sample, the experiment was recently able to report the discovery of ν{sub μ} → ν{sub τ} oscillations at a significance larger than 5 σ.

  18. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon $g$ $-$ $2$ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasi, A; Bedeschi, F; Bartolini, M; Cantatore, G; Cauz, D; Corradi, G; Dabagov, S; DI Sciascio, G; Di Stefano, R; Driutti, A; Escalante, O; Ferrari, C; Fienberg, A T; Fioretti, A; Gabbanini, C; Gioiosa, A; Hampai, D; Hertzog, D W; Iacovacci, M; Karuza, M; Kaspar, J; Liedl, A; Luisiani, A; Marignetti, F; Mastroianni, S; Moricciani, D; Pauletta, G; Piacentino, G M; Raha, N; Rossi, E; Santi, L; Venanzoni, G

    2016-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  19. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Driutti, A.; Escalante, O.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Gioiosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Liedl, A.; Lusiani, A.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Piacentino, G. M.; Raha, N.; Rossi, E.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  20. Investigating of short period gravity waves using multi-beam experiments above Andenes in the polar summer mesopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, Gunter; Sommer, Svenja; Chau, Jorge L.; Latteck, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    In summer 2013 the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) conducted a multi-beam scanning experiment using 65 different beam directions. These systematic scanning experiments are analysed with respect to gravity waves with periods from 4 minutes up to 8 hours using polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) as tracer. The gravity waves are investigated by decomposing the wind field into a mean wind and superimposed tidal components (diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal). After subtracting these mean winds and tides we get a residuum wind dominated by the gravity waves with periods shorter than 8 hours. Using this approach we have been able to identified significant wave burst, with amplitudes as high as 50 m/s and 10-20 m/s for the horizontal and vertical wind components, respectively. In addition, we have identified events that indicate the development of KH-instabilities.

  1. Photoionization studies with molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y.

    1976-09-01

    A molecular beam photoionization apparatus which combines the advantages of both the molecular beam method with photoionization mass spectrometry has been designed and constructed for carrying out some unique photoionization experiments. Rotational cooling during the supersonic expansion has resulted in high resolution photoionization efficiency curves for NO, ICl, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/I. The analysis of these spectra has yielded ionization potentials for these molecules to an accuracy of +- 3 MeV. Detailed autoionization structures were also resolved. This allows the investigation of the selection rules for autoionization, and the identification of the Rydberg series which converge to the excited states of the molecular ions. The degree of relaxation for thermally populated excited states has been examined using NO and ICl as examples. As a result of adiabatic cooling, a small percentage of dimers is also formed during the expansion. The photoionization efficiency curves for (NO)/sub 2/, ArICl, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ have been obtained near the thresholds. Using the known dissociation energies of the (NO)/sub 2/, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ van der Waals molecules, the corresponding dissociation energies for NO-NO/sup +/, Ar/sub 2//sup +/, Kr/sub 2//sup +/, and Xe/sub 2//sup +/ have been determined. The ionization mechanisms for this class of molecules are examined and discussed.

  2. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that the collimated jets can achieve much higher density, temperature and velocity when multiple laser beams are focused to form a hollow ring pattern at the target, instead of focused onto a single spot. We carried out simulations with different ring radii and studied their effects on the jet properties. Implications for laboratory collisionless shock experiments are discussed.

  3. Suppression of Alfvén Modes on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade with Outboard Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Belova, E. V.; Battaglia, D. J.; Bell, R. E.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; NSTX-U Team

    2017-06-01

    In this Letter we present data from experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, where it is shown for the first time that small amounts of high pitch-angle beam ions can strongly suppress the counterpropagating global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE). GAE have been implicated in the redistribution of fast ions and modification of the electron power balance in previous experiments on NSTX. The ability to predict the stability of Alfvén modes, and developing methods to control them, is important for fusion reactors like the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, which are heated by a large population of nonthermal, super-Alfvénic ions consisting of fusion generated α 's and beam ions injected for current profile control. We present a qualitative interpretation of these observations using an analytic model of the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonance drive responsible for GAE instability which has an important dependence on k⊥ρL . A quantitative analysis of this data with the hym stability code predicts both the frequencies and instability of the GAE prior to, and suppression of the GAE after the injection of high pitch-angle beam ions.

  4. Analyzing the structure of the optical path difference of the supersonic film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haolin; Yi, Shihe; Fu, Jia; He, Lin

    2016-10-01

    While high-speed aircraft are flying in the atmosphere, its optical-hood is subjected to severe aerodynamic heating. Supersonic film cooling method can effectively isolate external heating, but the flow structures formed by the supersonic film cooling can cause the beam degradation and affect the imaging quality. To research the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling, an experimental model was adopted in this paper, its mainstream Mach number 3.4, designed jet Mach number 2.5, measured jet Mach number 2.45. High-resolution images of flow were acquired by the nano-based planar laser scattering (NPLS) technique, by reconstructing the density field of supersonic film cooling, and then, the optical path difference (OPD) were acquired by the ray-tracing method. Depending on the comparison between K-H vortex and OPD distribution, the valleys of OPD correspond to the vortex `rollers' and the peaks to the `braids'. However, the corresponding relationship becomes quite irregular for the flow field with developed vortices, and cannot be summarized in this manner. And then, the OPD were analyzed by correlation function and structure function, show that, there is a relationship between the shape of OPD correlation function and the vortex structure, the correlation function type changed with the development of the vortex. The correctness that the mixing layer makes a main contribution to the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling was verified, and the structure function of aero-optical distortion has a power relationship that is similar to that of atmospheric optics. At last, the power spectrum corresponding to the typical region of supersonic film cooling were acquired by improved periodgram.

  5. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  6. Experiments on Optimal Vibration Control of a Flexible Beam Containing Piezoelectric Sensors and Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo L.C.M. Abreu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a digital regulator is designed and experimentally implemented for a flexible beam type structure containing piezoelectric sensors and actuators by using optimal control design techniques. The controller consists of a linear quadratic regulator with a state estimator, namely a Kalman observer. The structure is a cantilever beam containing a set of sensor/actuator PVDF/PZT ceramic piezoelectric patches bonded to the beam surface at the optimal location obtained for the first three vibration modes. The equations of motion of the beam are developed by using the assumed modes technique for flexible structures in infinite-dimensional models. This paper uses a method of minimizing the effect of the removed higher order modes on the low frequency dynamics of the truncated model by adding a zero frequency term to the low order model of the system. A measure of the controllability and observability of the system based on the modal cost function for flexible structures containing piezoelectric elements (intelligent structures is used. The observability and controllability measures are determined especially to guide the placement of sensors and actuators, respectively. The experimental and numerical transfer functions are adjusted by using an optimization procedure. Experimental results illustrate the optimal control design of a cantilever beam structure.

  7. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  8. Experiments investigating the generation and transport of 10--12 MeV, 30-kA, mm-size electron beams with linear inductive voltage adders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present the design, analysis, and results of the high-brightness electron beam experiments currently under investigation at Sandia National Laboratories. The anticipated beam parameters are the following: 8--12 MeV, 35--50 kA, 30--60 ns FWHM, and 0.5-mm rms beam radius. The accelerators utilized are SABRE and HERMES III. Both are linear inductive voltage adders modified to higher impedance and fitted with magnetically immersed foil less electron diodes. In the strong 20--50 Tesla solenoidal magnetic field of the diode, mm-size electron beams are generated and propagated to a beam stop. The electron beam is field emitted from mm-diameter needle-shaped cathode electrode and is contained in a similar size envelop by the strong magnetic field. These extremely space charge dominated beams provide the opportunity to study beam dynamics and possible instabilities in a unique parameter space. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 1.5-mm FWHM electron beams, while the HERMES-III experiments are on-going.

  9. Electromagnetic fields from pulsed electron beam experiments in space - Spacelab-2 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. I.; Reeves, G. D.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    During the Spacelab-2 mission a small satellite carrying various plasma diagnostic instruments was released from the Shuttle to coorbit at distances up to 300 m. During a magnetic conjunction of the Shuttle and the satellite an electron beam modulated at 1.22 kHz was emitted from the Shuttle during a 7 min period. The spatial structure of the electromagnetic fields generated by the beam was observed from the satellite out to a distance of 153 m perpendicular to the beam. The magnetic field amplitude of the strongest harmonics were comparable to the amplitude of simultaneously observed whistlers, while the electric field amplitudes were estimated to 1-10 mV/m.

  10. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A pixelated luminosity detector counts coincidences in several three layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to measure the luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point.The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background.A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fused quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules...

  11. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Wang, Feiran; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei, E-mail: zhangpei@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Li, Fuli [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Optoelectronic Devices, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical systems, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of the PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  12. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with HBT type experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Fuli

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical system, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of a PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  13. First events from the CNGS neutrino beam detected in the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Acquafredda, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Arrabito, L.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bergnoli, A.; Bersani Greggio, F.; Besnier, M.; Beyer, M.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Borer, K.; Boucrot, J.; Boyarkin, V.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buontempo, S.; Caffari, Y.; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Carlus, B.; Carrara, E.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chon-Sen, N.; Chukanov, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; Dal Corso, F.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Damet, J.; De Lellis, G.; Declais, Y.; Descombes, T.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Giovanni, A.; Di Marco, N.; Di Troia, C.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dulach, B.; Dusini, S.; Ebert, J.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Fanin, C.; Favier, J.; Felici, G.; Ferber, T.; Fournier, L.; Franceschi, A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, C.; Galkin, V.I.; Galkin, V.A.; Gallet, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Gaudiot, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Giarmana, O.; Giorgini, M.; Girard, L.; Girerd, C.; Goellnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Gornoushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guerin, C.; Guler, M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamane, T.; Hara, T.; Hauger, M.; Hess, M.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Incurvati, M.; Jakovcic, K.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Janutta, B.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Kolev, D.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kreslo, I.; Krumstein, Z.; Laktineh, I.; de La Taille, C.; Le Flour, T.; Lieunard, S.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Malgin, A.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Mantello, U.; Marotta, A.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Matveev, V.; Messina, M.; Meyer, L.; Micanovic, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, Piero; Monteiro, I.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Mugnier, P.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Napolitano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Nozdrin, A.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevski, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ossetski, D.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Pessard, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, K.; Publichenko, P.; Raux, L.; Repellin, J.P.; Roganova, T.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rubbia, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Ryzhikov, D.; Sadovski, A.; Sanelli, C.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Saveliev, V.; Savvinov, N.; Sazhina, G.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schutz, H.U.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sewing, J.; Shibuya, H.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spaeti, R.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, Paolo Emilio; Sugonyaev, V.; Takahashi, S.; Tereschenko, V.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tolun, P.; Toshito, T.; Tsarev, V.; Tsenov, R.; Ugolino, U.; Ushida, N.; Van Beek, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vilain, P.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Waelchli, T.; Waldi, R.; Weber, M.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurth, R.; Wurtz, J.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zamboni, I.; Zimmerman, R.

    2006-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino detector at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) was designed to perform the first detection of neutrino oscillations in appearance mode, through the study of nu_mu to nu_tau oscillations. The apparatus consists of a lead/emulsion-film target complemented by electronic detectors. It is placed in the high-energy, long-baseline CERN to LNGS beam (CNGS) 730 km away from the neutrino source. In August 2006 a first run with CNGS neutrinos was successfully conducted. A first sample of neutrino events was collected, statistically consistent with the integrated beam intensity. After a brief description of the beam and of the various sub-detectors, we report on the achievement of this milestone, presenting the first data and some analysis results.

  14. Plasma and Beam Production Experiments with HYBRIS, aMicrowave-assisted H- Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, R. AUTHOR-Kwan, S.; Hahto, S.; Regis, M.; Wallig, J.

    2006-09-13

    A two-stage ion source concept had been presented a few years ago, consisting of a proven H- ion source and a 2.45-GHz Electron Cyclotron-Resonance (ECR) type ion source, here used as a plasma cathode. This paper describes the experimental development path pursued at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, from the early concept to a working unit that produces plasma in both stages and creates a negative particle beam. Without cesiation applied to the second stage, the H{sup -} fraction of this beam is very low, yielding 75 micro-amperes of extracted ion beam current at best. The apparent limitations of this approach and envisaged improvements are discussed.

  15. a Continuous Supersonic Expansion Discharge Nozzle for Rotationally Cold Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Carrie A.; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    Molecular ions play an important role in chemistry and astronomy. In particular, molecular ions are key reaction intermediates, and in the interstellar medium, where temperatures and densities are low, they dominate the chemistry. Studying these ions spectroscopically in the laboratory poses a difficult challenge due to their reactivity. In our effort to study molecular ions, our research group is building SCRIBES (Sensitive Cooled Resolved Ion BEam Spectroscopy), which combines a cold ion source, mass spectrometry, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. With this apparatus, we will be able to record rotationally-resolved gas-phase spectra, enabling interstellar searches for these species. The SCRIBES instrument requires a source of rotationally cold ions, and this has been accomplished by coupling a supersonic expansion with an electric discharge. Other groups (e.g. Thaddeus and McCarthy at Harvard, Salama et. al at NASA-Ames) have produced cold ions in a similar fashion, but always with a pulsed discharge source. Due to our need for a continuous ion source for SCRIBES, we have designed a continuous supersonic expansion discharge nozzle. We will discuss the various design factors considered during the construction of our continuous self-aligning cold ion source.

  16. LHCb: Beam and Background Monitoring and the Development of an Online Condition Analysis Tool for the LHCb Experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data since more than half a year at the LHC, recording events from collisions at the highest energy ever achieved. For its physics purposes in the sector of CP violation, the experiment will record data with the best precision achievable. An online and offline beam and background monitoring became therefore essential to understand the performance of the LHC accelerator at CERN, to monitor and study the behavior of the background around the LHCb experiment and to optimize the experimental conditions. During my second year as a Doctoral Student at CERN, I have been working on the timing and readout control as well as on the online Beam, Background, and Luminosity Monitoring of the LHCb experiment in the frame of the LHCb Online group. The group is responsible for the complete data acquisition of the LHCb experiment, from the Front-End Electronics (FEE) to the storage of the data for offline analysis, including the Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system. The latter controls and...

  17. Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, E. L.; Earle, G. D.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    From commercial origins as a molybdenum molecular beam nozzle, a ceramic nozzle of silicon carbide (SiC) was developed for space environment simulation. The nozzle is mechanically stable under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. A heated, continuous, supersonically-expanded hydrogen beam with a 1% argon seed produced an argon beam component of nearly 4 km/s, with an argon flux exceeding 1x1014 /cm2.s. This nozzle was part of a molecular beam machine used in the Atmospheric Experiments Branch at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to characterize the performance of the University of Texas at Dallas Ram Wind Sensor (RWS) aboard the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) launched in the Spring of 2008.

  18. Beam-loading Compensation Experiment in the CLIC Test Facility. Modelling and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kononenko, Oleksiy; Grudiev, Alexej; Tecker, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Transient beam-loading in the main linac is an important performance issue for a Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study. In order to keep the luminosity losses less than 1%, the rms bunch-to-bunch relative energy spread must be below 0.03%. Beam-loading model and a compensation scheme, which meet this requirement, have been recently developed for CLIC. In this paper we propose ways to confirm the feasibility of the compensation scheme experimentally in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). As a part of this study a CTF3-specific model to simulate an RF power production is developed and the corresponding numerical results are discussed

  19. Beam test calibration of the balloon-borne imaging calorimeter for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchesi, P S; Bagliesi, M G; Basti, A; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Ciocci, M A; Di Virgilio, A; Lomtatze, T; Ganel, O; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Ligabue, F; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Wu, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) is a multi-flight balloon mission designed to collect direct data on the elemental composition and individual energy spectra of cosmic rays. Two instrument suites have been built to be flown alternately on a yearly base. The tungsten/Sci-Fi imaging calorimeter for the second flight, scheduled for December 2005, was calibrated with electron and proton beams at CERN. A calibration procedure based on the study of the longitudinal shower profile is described and preliminary results of the beam test are presented.

  20. The trigger system of the ICARUS experiment for the CNGS beam

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M; Benetti, P.; Boffelli, F.; Bubak, A.; Calligarich, E.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Falcone, A.; Farnese, C.; Fava, Angela; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Otwinowski, S.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Torti, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zani, A.; Zaremba, K.

    2014-01-01

    The ICARUS T600 detector, with its 470 tons of active mass, is the largest liquid Argon TPC ever built. Operated for three years in the LNGS underground laboratory, it has collected thousands of CNGS neutrino beam interactions and cosmic ray events with energy spanning from tens of MeV to tens of GeV, with a trigger system based on scintillation light, charge signal on TPC wires and time information (for beam related events only). The performance of trigger system in terms of efficiency, background and live-time as a function of the event energy for the CNGS data taking is presented.

  1. Supersonic Magnetic Flows in the Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Borrero, J M; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, W; Berkefeld, T; Solanki, S K; Bonet, J A; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we describe some recent observations of high-speed magnetized flows in the quiet Sun granulation. These observations were carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) onboard the stratospheric balloon {\\sc Sunrise}, and possess an unprecedented spatial resolution and temporal cadence. These flows were identified as highly shifted circular polarization (Stokes $V$) signals. We estimate the LOS velocity responsible for these shifts to be larger than 6 km s$^{-1}$, and therefore we refer to them as {\\it supersonic magnetic flows}. The average lifetime of the detected events is 81.3 s and they occupy an average area of about 23\\,000 km$^2$. Most of the events occur within granular cells and correspond therefore to upflows. However some others occur in intergranular lanes or bear no clear relation to the convective velocity pattern. We analyze a number of representative examples and discuss them in terms of magnetic loops, reconnection events, and convective collapse.

  2. Comparison of fast ion confinement during on-axis and off-axis neutral beam experiments on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hao, G. Z.; Podesta, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Medley, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A second and more tangential neutral beam line is a major upgrade component of the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U) with the purpose of improving neutral beam current drive efficiency and providing more flexibility in current/pressure profile control. Good fast ion confinement is essential to achieve the anticipated improvements in performance. In a planed ``sanity check'' experiment, various short and long (relative to fast ion slowing-down time) neutral beam (NB) pulses with different source mixes will be injected into quiescent L-mode plasmas to characterize the fast ion confinement and distribution function produced by the new and the existing NBI lines. The neutron rate decay after the turn-off of short NB pulses will be used to estimate the fast ion confinement time and to investigate its dependence on NB source/geometry, injection energy, and plasma current. The newly installed Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) and Fast-Ion D-Alapha (FIDA) diagnostics will be described and will be used to measure fast ion slowing-down distribution function and spatial profile during the injection of relatively long NB pulses. Fast ion prompt losses will be monitored with a scintillator Fast Lost Ion Probe (sFLIP) diagnostic. The experimental techniques, measurements of fast ion confinement time and distribution function, and comparisons with classical predictions from NUBEAM modeling will be presented in detail. Work supported by US DOE.

  3. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2017-02-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A dedicated pixelated luminosity detector measures coincidences in several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at a luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point. The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two-pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cherenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fuzed quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015. Results on their commissioning and essential characteristics using data since the start-up of LHC will be presented.

  4. Beam test results on double-gap resistive plate chambers proposed for CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; Bruno, G.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Lamanna, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Gianini, G.; Ratti, S. P.; Vitulo, P.

    Resistive Plate Chambers were tested in a muon and pion beam to study the performances at different running conditions. Results on a first chamber built without the linseed oil treatment of the bakelite surfaces are presented together with an evaluation of the local effects due to the spacers. These results are extrapolated to the conditions expected at LHC.

  5. Beam Test Results on Resistive Plate Chambers for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Calaeo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lammana, G; Loddo, Flavio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; Natali, Sergio; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Puglise, G; Ranieri, Riccardo; Ratti, Sergio P; Romano, Francesco; Vitulo, Paolo

    1998-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers were tested in a muon and a pion beam to study the performances at different running conditions. Results on a first chamber built without the linseed oil treatment of the bakelite surfaces are presented together with an evaluation of the local effects dut to spacers. These results are extrapolated to the conditions expected at LHC.

  6. Unraveling neutrino parameters with a magical beta-beam experiment at INO

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2007-01-01

    We expound in detail the physics reach of an experimental set-up in which the proposed large magnetized iron detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) would serve as the far detector for a so-called beta-beam. If this pure $\

  7. Whistler Wave generation by an electron beam in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Gabriel; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter; Thomas, Sam; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Wolman, Ben; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    A multi-grid pulsed electron beam (Ebeam = 1-4.8 KV, area =1.32 cm2, τ >5 μs) is inserted into a background plasma (He, n = 5X1010 cm3, B0z = 80 G, L = 1.5 m, dia = 40 cm). The pulsed electron beam power supply, can generate up to 4800 Volts at 10 Amps and was constructed by the LAPTAG high school students. The beam can be oriented at any angle with respect to the background magnetic field. The pulsed beam generates whistler waves by Cherenkov radiation. The waves are detected with 3 axis magnetic pickup probes which can be moved in planes transverse or parallel to the background magnetic field under computer control. The whistler wave pattern is used to determine the wavenumber k and Fourier analysis of the signal determines ω. The wave dispersion relation is compared to theory. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  8. Calibration of a turbidity meter for making estimates of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Management of water resources such as a reservoir requires using analytical models which describe such parameters as the suspended sediment field. To select or develop an appropriate model requires making many measurements to describe the distribution of this parameter in the water column. One potential method for making those measurements expeditiously is to measure light transmission or turbidity and relate that parameter to total suspended solids concentrations. An instrument which may be used for this purpose was calibrated by generating curves of transmission measurements plotted against measured values of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients. Results of these experiments indicate that field measurements made with this instrument using curves generated in this study should correlate with total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in the water column within 20 percent.

  9. Demonstration of long-pulse acceleration of high power positive ion beam with JT-60 positive ion source in Japan–Korea joint experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, A., E-mail: kojima.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Jeong, S.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, D.H.; Kim, T.S.; Lee, K.W.; Park, M.; Jung, B.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mogaki, K.; Komata, M.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The long-pulse acceleration of the high-power positive ion beam has been demonstrated with the JT-60 positive ion source in the joint experiment among Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) under the collaboration program for the development of plasma heating and current drive systems. In this joint experiment, the increase of the heat load and the breakdowns induced by the degradation of the beam optics due to the gas accumulation was one of the critical issues for the long-pulse acceleration. As a result of development of the long-pulse operation techniques of the ion source and facilities of the neutral beam test stand in KAERI, 2 MW 100 s beam has been achieved for the first time. The achieved beam performance satisfies the JT-60SA requirement which is designed to be a 1.94 MW ion beam power from an ion source corresponding to total neutral beam power of 20 MW with 24 ion sources. Therefore, it was found that the JT-60 positive ion sources were applicable in the JT-60SA neutral beam injectors. Moreover, because this ion source is planned to be a backup ion source for KSTAR, the operational region and characteristic has been clarified to apply to the KSTAR neutral beam injector.

  10. Design project: LONGBOW supersonic interceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Robert; Baker, Matt; Capstaff, Joseph G.; Dishman, Robert; Fick, Gregory; Frick, Stephen N.; Kelly, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A recent white paper entitled 'From the Sea' has spotlighted the need for Naval Aviation to provide overland support to joint operations. The base for this support, the Aircraft Carrier (CVN), will frequently be unable to operate within close range of the battleground because of littoral land-based air and subsurface threats. A high speed, long range, carrier capable aircraft would allow the CVN to provide timely support to distant battleground operations. Such an aircraft, operating as a Deck-Launched Interceptor (DLI), would also be an excellent counter to Next Generation Russian Naval Aviation (NGRNA) threats consisting of supersonic bombers, such as the Backfire, equipped with the next generation of high-speed, long-range missiles. Additionally, it would serve as an excellent high speed Reconnaissance airplane, capable of providing Battle Force commanders with timely, accurate pre-mission targeting information and post-mission Bomb Damage Assessment (BDA). Recent advances in computational hypersonic airflow modeling has produced a method of defining aircraft shapes that fit a conical shock flow model to maximize the efficiency of the vehicle. This 'Waverider' concept provides one means of achieving long ranges at high speeds. A Request for Proposal (RFP) was issued by Professor Conrad Newberry that contained design requirements for an aircraft to accomplish the above stated missions, utilizing Waverider technology.

  11. On highly focused supersonic microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Willem, Claas; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Deveraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    By focusing a laser pulse in a liquid-filled glass-microcapillary open at one end, a small mass of liquid is instantaneously vapourised. This leads to a shock wave which travels towards the concave free surface where it generates a high-speed microjet. The initial shape of the meniscus plays a dominant role in the process. The velocity of the jet can reach supersonic speeds up to 850\\,m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The entire evolution of the jet is observed by high-speed recordings of up to $10^6\\,$fps. A parametric study of the jet velocity as a function of the contact angle of the liquid-glass interface, the energy absorbed by the liquid, the diameter of the capillary tube, and the distance between the laser focus and the free surface is performed, and the results are rationalised. The method could be used for needle-free injection of vaccines or drugs.

  12. Supersonic Cloud Collision-II

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2009-01-01

    In this, second paper of the sequel of two papers, we present five SPH simulations of fast head-on cloud collisions and study the evolution of the ram pressure confined gas slab. Anathpindika (2008) (hereafter paper I) considered highly supersonic cloud collisions and examined the effect of bending and shearing instabilities on the shocked gas slab. The post-collision shock here, as in paper I, is also modelled by a simple barotropic equation of state (EOS). However, a much stiffer EOS is used to model the shock resulting from a low velocity cloud collision. We explore the parameter space by varying the pre-collision velocity and the impact parameter. We observe that pressure confined gas slabs become Jeans unstable if the sound crossing time, $t_{cr}$, is much larger than the freefall time, $t_{ff}$, of putative clumps condensing out of them. Self gravitating clumps may spawn multiple/larger $N$-body star clusters. We also suggest that warmer gas slabs are unlikely to fragment and may end up as diffuse gas c...

  13. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  14. Observation of Single-Mode, Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in a Supersonic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W C; Malamud, G; Shimony, A; Di Stefano, C A; Trantham, M R; Klein, S R; Shvarts, D; Kuranz, C C; Drake, R P

    2015-10-02

    We report the first observation, in a supersonic flow, of the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability from a single-mode initial condition. To obtain these data, we used a novel experimental system to produce a steady shock wave of unprecedented duration in a laser-driven experiment. The shocked, flowing material creates a shear layer between two plasmas at high energy density. We measured the resulting interface structure using radiography. Hydrodynamic simulations reproduce the large-scale structures very well and the medium-scale structures fairly well, and imply that we observed the expected reduction in growth rate for supersonic shear flow.

  15. Reverse Circulation Drilling Method Based on a Supersonic Nozzle for Dust Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyu Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To reduce dust generated from drilling processes, a reverse circulation drilling method based on a supersonic nozzle is proposed. The suction performance is evaluated by the entrainment ratio. A series of preliminary laboratory experiments based on orthogonal experimental design were conducted to test the suction performance and reveal the main factors. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD were conducted to thoroughly understand the interaction mechanism of the flows. The Schlieren technique was further carried out to reveal the flow characteristic of the nozzle. The results show that the supersonic nozzle can significantly improve the reverse circulation effect. A high entrainment ratio up to 0.76 was achieved, which implied strong suction performance. The CFD results agreed well with experimental data with a maximum difference of 17%. This work presents the great potential for supersonic nozzles and reverse circulation in dust control, which is significant to protect the envrionment and people’s health.

  16. Position resolution of the prototype AGATA triple-cluster detector from an in-beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recchia, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.recchia@pd.infn.it; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Gadea, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); IFIC, CSIC - University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Venturelli, R. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Beck, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarczyk, P. [IFJ PAN, PL-31-342 Krakow (Poland); Buerger, A. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Dimmock, M. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Duchene, G. [Laboratoire Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Eberth, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Faul, T. [Laboratoire Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, R. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Hauschild, K. [CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Campus (France); Holler, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Jones, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Korten, W. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kroell, Th. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-11

    AGATA belongs to a new generation of {gamma}-ray detector arrays for nuclear spectroscopy at present in its final stage of development. The detectors of these new arrays will be based on 36-fold electronically segmented coaxial germanium diodes operated in position sensitive mode. An in-beam test of the AGATA prototype triple cluster detector was carried out with the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of such detectors and in order to measure the most sensitive parameters for their overall performance. An inverse kinematics reaction was performed, using a {sup 48}Ti beam at an energy of 100 MeV, impinging on a deuterated titanium target. The results from the analysis of the experimental data, compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo simulations, give an estimation of the position sensitivity of these detectors of about 5 mm FWHM, consistent with the specifications required.

  17. High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using electron beam ion traps and advanced light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bernitt, Sven; Eberle, Sita; Hell, Natalie; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kelley, Rich; Leutenegger, Maurice; Porter, F. Scott; Rudolph, Jan; Steinbrugge, Rene; Traebert, Elmar; Crespo-Lopez-Urritia, Jose R.

    2015-08-01

    We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap coupled with a NASA/GSFC microcalorimeter spectrometer instrument to systematically address problems found in the analysis of high resolution X-ray spectra from celestial sources, and to benchmark atomic physics codes employed by high resolution spectral modeling packages. Our results include laboratory measurements of transition energies, absolute and relative electron impact excitation cross sections, charge exchange cross sections, and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths. More recently, we have coupled to the Max-Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics-Heidelberg's FLASH-EBIT electron beam ion trap to third and fourth generation advanced light sources to measure photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections, as well as, natural line widths of X-ray transitions in highly charged iron ions. Selected results will be presented.

  18. Analysis methods of safe Coulomb-excitation experiments with radioactive ion beams using the GOSIA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinska, M. [CEA Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gaffney, L.P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); University of the West of Scotland, School of Engineering, Paisley (United Kingdom); Wrzosek-Lipska, K. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Clement, E. [GANIL, Caen Cedex (France); Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J. [University of Jyvaskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaskylae (Finland); University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Kesteloot, N. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Napiorkowski, P. [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Duppen, P. van [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Warr, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    With the recent advances in radioactive ion beam technology, Coulomb excitation at safe energies becomes an important experimental tool in nuclear-structure physics. The usefulness of the technique to extract key information on the electromagnetic properties of nuclei has been demonstrated since the 1960s with stable beam and target combinations. New challenges present themselves when studying exotic nuclei with this technique, including dealing with low statistics or number of data points, absolute and relative normalisation of the measured cross-sections and a lack of complementary experimental data, such as excited-state lifetimes and branching ratios. This paper addresses some of these common issues and presents analysis techniques to extract transition strengths and quadrupole moments utilising the least-squares fit code, GOSIA. (orig.)

  19. Beam asymmetry Σ in η′ photoproduction off the proton at the GRAAL experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandaglio G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The only recent η′ photoproduction data off proton available in literature are the differential and total cross sections published by the CLAS and CB-ELSA-TAPS Collaborations. However, the wide information about reaction cross sections are not sufficient to understand the role of resonances involved in the process. Different theoretical works stressed the importance to measure also polarization observables in order to solve the ambiguities in the choice of the parameters used in their models. We present the analysis of η′ photoproduction off the proton analysis, identifying the investigated meson by the π+π−η, π0π0η, and γγ decay modes by using the GRAAL apparatus; and we show the preliminary GRAAL results on the beam asymmetry Σ at beam energy of 1475 MeV.

  20. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idris, Sarada, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Tajau, Rida, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Karim, Jamilah, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Jusoh, Suhaimi, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ghazali, Zulkafli, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Shamshad [School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-12

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  1. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Sarada; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha; Tajau, Rida; Karim, Jamilah; Jusoh, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Ahmad, Shamshad

    2014-02-01

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  2. Initial clinical experience with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, J; Vischioni, B; Fossati, P; Srivastava, A; Vitolo, V; Iannalfi, A; Fiore, M R; Krengli, M; Mizoe, J E; Orecchia, R

    2013-07-01

    We report the initial toxicity data with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO). In September 2011, CNAO commenced patient treatment with scanned proton beams within two prospective Phase II protocols approved by the Italian Health Ministry. Patients with chondrosarcoma or chordoma of the skull base or spine were eligible. By October 2012, 21 patients had completed treatment. Immobilization was performed using rigid non-perforated thermoplastic-masks and customized headrests or body-pillows as indicated. Non-contrast CT scans with immobilization devices in place and MRI scans in supine position were performed for treatment-planning. For chordoma, the prescribed doses were 74 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) and 54 CGE to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2, respectively. For chondrosarcoma, the prescribed doses were 70 CGE and 54 CGE to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Treatment was delivered five days a week in 35-37 fractions. Prior to treatment, the patients' positions were verified using an optical tracking system and orthogonal X-ray images. Proton beams were delivered using fixed-horizontal portals on a robotic couch. Weekly MRI incorporating diffusion-weighted-imaging was performed during the course of proton therapy. Patients were reviewed once weekly and acute toxicities were graded with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Median age of patients = 50 years (range, 21-74). All 21 patients completed the proton therapy without major toxicities and without treatment interruption. Median dose delivered was 74 CGE (range, 70-74). The maximum toxicity recorded was CTCAE Grade 2 in four patients. Our preliminary data demonstrates the clinical feasibility of scanned proton beams in Italy.

  3. Energy distribution of secondary particles in ion beam deposition process of Ag: experiment, calculation and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundesmann, C.; Feder, R.; Lautenschlaeger, T.; Neumann, H. [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Ion beam sputter deposition allows tailoring the properties of the film-forming, secondary particles (sputtered target particles and backscattered primary particles) and, hence, thin film properties by changing ion beam (ion energy, ion species) and geometrical parameters (ion incidence angle, polar emission angle). In particular, the energy distribution of secondary particles and their influence on the ion beam deposition process of Ag was studied in dependence on process parameters. Energy-selective mass spectrometry was used to measure the energy distribution of sputtered and backscattered ions. The energy distribution of the sputtered particles shows, in accordance with theory, a maximum at low energy and an E{sup -2} decay for energies above the maximum. If the sum of incidence angle and polar emission angle is larger than 90 , additional contributions due to direct sputtering events occur. The energy distribution of the backscattered primary particles can show contributions by scattering at target particles and at implanted primary particles. The occurrence of these contributions depends again strongly on the scattering geometry but also on the primary ion species. The energy of directly sputtered and backscattered particles was calculated using equations based on simple two-particle-interaction whereas the energy distribution was simulated using the well-known Monte Carlo code TRIM.SP. In principal, the calculation and simulation data agree well with the experimental findings. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Utilizing ion-beam secondary radiation for experiments on space radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Masao; Fujitaka, Kazunobu [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    For the purpose to make a space radiation field at the ground field, the Biology room of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS-HIMAC) was used. Heavy ion species used in the room was mostly C and occasionally, He, Ne, Si, Ar and Fe. The secondary radiation including albed neutrons came from materials of profile monitor, Lucite filter, beam target and beam dumper of the heavy ion beam along the central line of the room to a CO{sub 2}-incubator placed at the corner of the room. Accumulated absorbed dose in the incubator was continuously measured for 223 days (5344 hr) with a Si-semiconductor detector (Siemens Plc.) set behind the plastic bottle containing the cell culture medium. The total dose was corrected by the thermoluminescent dosemeter of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} :Tb (TLD-MSO, Kasei Optonics), whose 4 chips were packed in a case of tissue equivalent resin Tough-water phantom (Kyoto Kagaku) and the package was also placed in the incubator. It was found that the field designed in NIRS-HIMAC could be used for the purpose. The dominant LET range in the incubator was assumed to be <10 keV/{mu}m and the quality factor, about 1. (K.H.)

  5. High energy density physics effects predicted in simulations of the CERN HiRadMat beam-target interaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been done at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility in which large cylindrical copper targets were irradiated with 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The primary purpose of these experiments was to confirm the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons and their hadronic shower in solid materials, that was predicted by previous numerical simulations. The experimental measurements have shown very good agreement with the simulation results. This provides confidence in our simulations of the interaction of the 7 TeV LHC (Large Hadron Collider) protons and the 50 TeV Future Circular Collider (FCC) protons with solid materials, respectively. This work is important from the machine protection point of view. The numerical simulations have also shown that in the HiRadMat experiments, a significant part of thetarget material is be converted into different phases of High Energy Density (HED) matter, including two-phase solid-liquid mixture, expanded as well as compressed hot liquid phases, two-phase liquid-gas mixture and gaseous state. The HiRadMat facility is therefore a unique ion beam facility worldwide that is currently available for studying the thermophysical properties of HED matter. In the present paper we discuss the numerical simulation results and present a comparison with the experimental measurements.

  6. Ray-tracing simulations of spherical Johann diffraction spectrometer for in-beam X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagodziński, P., E-mail: jagodzin@tu.kielce.pl [Department of Physics, Kielce University of Technology, Tysiaclecia PP 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Pajek, M.; Banaś, D. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, Świȩtokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Beyer, H.F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Trassinelli, M. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75015 Paris (France); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Insitut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Institut für Optic und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The results of the Monte-Carlo ray-tracing simulations for a Johann-type Bragg spectrometer with spherically curved-crystal designed to detect the X-rays from a fast-moving source are reported. These calculations were performed to optimize the X-ray spectrometer to be used at the gas-target installed at ion storage ring for high-resolution X-ray experiments. In particular, the two-dimensional distributions of detected photons were studied using the Monte-Carlo method both for the stationary and moving X-ray sources, taking into account a detailed description of X-ray source and X-ray diffraction on the crystal as well as a role of the Doppler effect for in-beam experiments. The origin of the asymmetry of observed X-ray profiles was discussed in detail and the procedure to derive a precise (sub-eV) X-ray transition energy for such asymmetric profiles was proposed. The results are important for the investigations of 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 2}→1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} intrashell transition in excited He-like uranium ions in in-beam X-ray experiments.

  7. Spatial dynamics of laser-induced fluorescence in an intense laser beam: experiment and theory in alkali metal atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalnins, Uldis

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that it is possible to model accurately optical phenomena in intense laser fields by taking into account the intensity distribution over the laser beam. We developed a theoretical model that divided an intense laser beam into concentric regions, each with a Rabi frequency that corresponds to the intensity in that region, and solved a set of coupled optical Bloch equations for the density matrix in each region. Experimentally obtained magneto-optical resonance curves for the $F_g=2\\longrightarrow F_e=1$ transition of the $D_1$ line of $^{87}$Rb agreed very well with the theoretical model up to a laser intensity of around 200 mW/cm$^2$ for a transition whose saturation intensity is around 4.5 mW/cm$^2$. We have studied the spatial dependence of the fluorescence intensity in an intense laser beam experimentally and theoretically. An experiment was conducted whereby a broad, intense pump laser excited the $F_g=4\\longrightarrow F_e=3$ transition of the $D_2$ line of cesium while a weak, narrow probe ...

  8. Ongoing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retro-Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerhamer, Guy; Trumble, Kerry; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl; Buning, Pieter; Sozer, Emre

    2011-01-01

    During the Entry, Decent, and Landing phase of planetary exploration, previous methods of deceleration do not scale with high mass spacecraft. Supersonic Retro-Propulsion(SRP)is a viable method to decelerate large spacecraft including those that will carry humans to Mars. Flow data at these conditions are difficult to obtain through flight or wind tunnel experiments

  9. Light sgoldstino's interactions analysis and prospects for potential discovery in electron beam dump experiment at CERN SPS

    OpenAIRE

    Astapov, K. O.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we have discussed light sgoldstino in context of MSSM model. We have analyzed couplings of scalar sgoldstino to SM particles, namely to photons, $Z^0$ bosons, leptons and quarks. We also took into account the impact on those interactions of the admixture of lightest MSSM Higgs scalar in the sgoldstino state. The signal rate of rare decays at CERN electron beam dump experiment NA64 for the scalar sgoldstino has been estimated. Expected signal rate allowed us to exclude som...

  10. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  11. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  12. Simulating Supersonic Turbulence in Galaxy Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations of dwarf galaxy out- flows driven by supersonic turbulence. Here we develop a subgrid model to track not only the thermal and bulk velocities of the gas, but also its turbulent velocities and length scales. This allows us to deposit energy from supernovae directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much larger than a particle mean free path, but much smaller than resolved large-scale flows. Unlike previous approaches, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, with realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Pockets of hot, diffuse gas around individual OB associations sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability. The overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow that escapes the galaxy by eating away at the exterior gas through turbulent mixing, rather than gathering it into a thin, unstable shell. Supersonic, turbul...

  13. Studies of the Machine Induced Background, simulations for the design of the Beam Condition Monitor and implementation of the Inclusive $\\phi$ Trigger at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lieng, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments of the LHC at CERN, built to perform precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays. In order to protect the sensitive elements of the experiment from adverse beam conditions the Beam Condition Monitor has been created. Such conditions increase the particle flux arriving from the LHC, known as Machine Induced Background. These particles interfere with the experiment, for example through the physics trigger. In this thesis software development and simulations for the design and validation of the Beam Condition Monitor is shown, ranging from LHCb-specific algorithm implementation to beam dump threshold determination. Furthermore, software development in order to attain a complete simulation chain of machine induced background is shown. The results of these simulations are compared to early data collected at LHCb. Lastly, the development and implementation of the Inclusive $\\phi$ trigger line for the High Level Trigger is presented. This line aims to reconstruct ...

  14. Nuclear physics experiments with in-beam fast-timing and plunger techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotty, C.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear lifetime and g factor are crucial observables in nuclear physics, as they give access to the excited states nuclear wave functions using the well-known electromagnetic transition operators. Thus, they are benchmarks to validate or discard nuclear structure theories. During the last decades, the evolution of the nuclear instruments and methods gave birth to several techniques used to measure lifetimes and moments. Among them, the in-beam Fast Electronic Scintillation Timing (FEST) technique is used to measure lifetimes of nuclear states in the picosecond to nanosecond range. Plunger devices originally developed to perform lifetime measurements of excited states in the picosecond range using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) are now also employed to measure g factor using the new Time-Differential Recoil-In-Vacuum (TDRIV) technique. Recently commissioned, the ROmanian array for SPectroscopy in HEavy ion REactions (ROSPHERE) is dedicated to perform γ-ray spectroscopy, specially suited for lifetime measurements using the RDDS and in-beam fast-timing techniques at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator facility of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). An introduction of above-mentioned techniques is provided and selected results are illustrating them with physics cases. The in-beam fast-timing and RDDS techniques are described using lifetime measurements respectively in 67Cu and 120Te measured at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator. Finally, the precise g factor measurement of the first-excited state in 24Mg using by the new TDRIV technique at the ALTO-Tandem Orsay facility is presented.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Eder, David; Fisher, Aaron; Masters, Nathan

    2016-03-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as well as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.

  16. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  17. Dynamic modeling of double-helical gear with Timoshenko beam theory and experiment verification

    OpenAIRE

    Jincheng Dong; Sanmin Wang; He Lin; Ying Wang

    2016-01-01

    In the dynamic study of the double-helical gear transmission, the coupling shaft in the middle of the two helical gears is difficult to be handled accurately. In this article, the coupling shaft is treated as the Timoshenko beam elements and is synthesized with the lumped-mass method of the two helical gear pairs. Then, the numerical integration method is used to solve the amplitude–frequency responses and dynamic factors under diverse operating conditions. A gear vibration test rig of closed...

  18. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  19. Supersonic Flutter of Laminated Curved Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flutter analysis of laminated composite curved panels is investigated using doubly-curved, quadrilateral, shear flexible, shell element based on field-consistency approach. The formulation includes transverse shear deformation, in-plane and rotary inertias. The aerodynamic force is evaluated using two-dimensional static aerodynamic approximation for high supersonic flow. Initially, the model developed here is verified for the flutter analysis of flat plates. Numerical results are presented for isotropic, orthotropic and laminated anisotropic curved panels. A detailed parametric study is carried out to observe the effects of aspect and thickness ratios, number of layers, lamination scheme, and boundary conditions on flutter boundary.

  20. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  1. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the AMS experiment: test beam results with a prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Luísa; Goncalves, Patrícia; Pereira, Rui

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the velocity and electric charge of the charged cosmic particles. This detector will contribute to the high level of redundancy required for AMS as well as to the rejection of albedo particles. Charge separation up to iron and a velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are expected. A RICH protoptype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultiplier units, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the sodium fluoride radiator. In addition, the reflec...

  2. Dynamic modeling of double-helical gear with Timoshenko beam theory and experiment verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincheng Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the dynamic study of the double-helical gear transmission, the coupling shaft in the middle of the two helical gears is difficult to be handled accurately. In this article, the coupling shaft is treated as the Timoshenko beam elements and is synthesized with the lumped-mass method of the two helical gear pairs. Then, the numerical integration method is used to solve the amplitude–frequency responses and dynamic factors under diverse operating conditions. A gear vibration test rig of closed power circuit is developed for in-depth experimental measurements and model validation. After comparing the theoretical data with the practical results, the following conclusions are drawn: (1 the dynamic model with the Timoshenko beam element is quite appropriate and reliable in the dynamic analysis of double-helical gear transmission and is of great theoretical value in the accurate dynamic research of the double-helical gear transmission. (2 In both theoretical analysis and experimental measurements, the dynamic factors of gear pair diminish with the increase in the input torque and augment with the increase in the input speed. (3 The deviation ratio of the theoretical data and the experimental results decrease with the increase in the input torque, reaching the minimum at the highest input speed.

  3. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. C.; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  4. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M. C., E-mail: mthompson@trialphaenergy.com; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  5. Laser cooling of a stored ion beam: A first step towards crystalline beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangst, J.S.

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses: a brief introduction to storage rings; crystalline beams; laser cooling of ion beams; description of astrid-the experimental setup; first experiments with lithium 7 ion beam; experiments with erbium 166 ion beams; further experiments with lithium 7 ion beams; beam dynamics, laser cooling,and crystalline beams in astrid; possibilities for further study in astrid.

  6. In vitro biological effectiveness of JRR-4 epithermal neutron beam. Experiment under free air beam and in water phantom. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2002-01-01

    The surviving curve and the biological effectiveness factor of dose components generated in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were separately determined in neutron beams at Japan Research Reactor No.4. Surviving fraction of V79 Chinese hamster cell with or without sup 1 sup 0 B was obtained using an epithermal neutron beam (ENB), a mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam (TNB-1), and a thermal neutron beam (TNB-2), which were used or planned to use for BNCT clinical trial. The cell killing effect of these neutron beams with or without the presence of sup 1 sup 0 B depended highly on the neutron beam used, according to the epithermal and fast neutron content in the beam. The biological effectiveness factor values of the boron capture reaction for ENB, TNB-1 and TNB-2 were 3.99+-0.24, 3.04+-0.19 and 1.43+-0.08, respectively. The biological effectiveness factor values of the high-LET dose components based on the hydrogen recoils and the nitrogen capture reaction were 2.50+-0.32, 2.34+-0.30 and 2.17+-0.28 for EN...

  7. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  8. CZT strip detectors for imaging and spectroscopy: Collimated beam and ASIC readout experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurczynski, P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Krizmanic, J.F.; Parsons, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We report the status of ongoing investigations into Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) strip detectors for application in hard x-ray astronomy. We have instrumented a nine strip by nine strip region of a two sided strip detector made in our detector fabrication facility. In order to measure the position resolution of our detectors, we have implemented a collimated beam that concentrates radiation to a spot size less than the strip width of our detector. We have also performed charge collection studies as a function of incident photon energy and bias voltage with a single sided, 100{mu}m pitch CZT strip detector wire bonded to an SVX ASIC charge amplifier. The detectors exhibited excellent strip uniformity in terms of photon count rate and spectroscopic information.

  9. Operational experience of the industrial plant for electron beam flue gas treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Licki, Janusz; Pawelec, Andrzej; Tymiński, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew

    2004-09-01

    Electron beam flue gas treatment technology is one of the most advanced technologies among new generation processes for air pollution control. The process, which has been developed in Japan, the United States, Germany and Poland allows simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO x with high efficiency and by-product generated can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial installations using this technology have been constructed in the world, one in China and the second in Poland. Other plants are constructed in Japan and China. Chinese installation is mostly SO 2 removal oriented (since the NO x emission limits in China are not imposed up to now), so Polish plant one is as a matter of fact the first installation for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gases. The plant located in EPS Pomorzany in Szczecin treats the flue gases emitted from two Benson boilers of 65 MW e and 100 MW th each. The flue gases of maximum flow of 270 000 N m 3/h are irradiated by four accelerators of 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each. Description of the plant and the results obtained have been presented in this paper. The plant has been in operation for more than 2500 h (5500 h including one accelerator set operation). Removal efficiencies up to 95% for SO 2 and up to 70% for NO x were achieved. Several thousand tons of the by-product was sold in the form of NPK fertilizer. Economically, the technology is competitive with the conventional ones.

  10. Ultracold ordered electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habs, D.; Kramp, J.; Krause, P.; Matl, K.; Neumann, R.; Schwalm, D.

    1988-01-01

    We have started an experimental program to develop an ultracold electron beam, which can be used together with a standard electron cooling device in the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR. In contrast to the standard-type design using electron beam extraction beam extraction from a heated cathode, the ultracold beam is produced by photoemission of electrons from a cooled semiconductor crystal irradiated with an intense near-infrared laser light beam. Adiabatic acceleration is expected to provide ordering of the electron beam itself. Besides the cooling of ion beams to extremely low temperatures, with the aim of obtaining crystallization, the ultracold beam will constitute an excellent target for atomic physics experiments.

  11. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  12. Conditions for supersonic bent Marshak waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qiang; Li, Jing; Dan, Jia-kun; Wang, Kun-lun; Zhou, Shao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic radiation diffusion approximation is a useful way to study the radiation transportation. Considering the bent Marshak wave theory in 2-dimensions, and an invariable source temperature, we get the supersonic radiation diffusion conditions which are about the Mach number $M>8(1+\\sqrt{\\ep})/3$, and the optical depth $\\tau>1$. A large Mach number requires a high temperature, while a large optical depth requires a low temperature. Only when the source temperature is in a proper region these conditions can be satisfied. Assuming the material opacity and the specific internal energy depend on the temperature and the density as a form of power law, for a given density, these conditions correspond to a region about source temperature and the length of the sample. This supersonic diffusion region involves both lower and upper limit of source temperature, while that in 1-dimension only gives a lower limit. Taking $\\rm SiO_2$ and the Au for example, we show the supersonic region numerically.

  13. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelastic calculations at low-supersonic freestreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to simulate transonic unsteady flows and corresponding aeroelasticity of wings at low-supersonic freestreams. The flow is modeled by using the transonic small-perturbation theory. The structural equations of motions are modeled using modal equations of motion directly coupled with aerodynamics. Supersonic freestreams are simulated by properly accounting for the boundary conditions based on pressure waves along the flow characteristics in streamwise planes. The flow equations are solved using the time-accurate, alternating-direction implicit finite-difference scheme. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved by an integration procedure based on the time-accurate, linear-acceleration method. The flow modeling is verified by comparing calculations with experiments for both steady and unsteady flows at supersonic freestreams. The unsteady computations are made for oscillating wings. Comparisons of computed results with experiments show good agreement. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing at Mach numbers ranging from subtransonic to upper-transonic (supersonic) freestreams. The extension of the transonic dip into the upper transonic regime is illustrated.

  14. SU-E-T-68: Clinical Implementation of Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy: A New- York Presbyterian Hospital Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afghan, M; Shih, R; Chen, H [New York Presbyterian/Columbia Hospital, NY, NY (United States); Kulidzhanov, F; Sabbas, A [New York Presbyterian Hospital/Cornell, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSET) is used in the treatment of rare skin diseases such as mycosis fungoides, the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We report our experience with clinical implementation of TSET. Methods: A modified six-dual-field irradiation technique was chosen to deliver TSET. A Varian Trilogy linear accelerator with a nominal 6 MeV beam using high dose rate total skin electron mode (HDTSe) was employed. The recommendations of AAPM task group report 23 were followed for the commissioning. An acrylic plate (energy degrader) of 3.2 mm depth was mounted on the HDTSe applicator. The nominal source to skin distance was set at 450 cm. The optimum tilt angle of the gantry was determined using NACP-02 ionization chamber embedded in certified therapy grade solid water. Percent depth dose measurements were performed using ionization chamber and radiochromic films embedded in solid water and anthropomorphic phantom. For absolute dose measurements, TG-51 formalism was employed. The dose distribution on the entire skin was measured by irradiating the anthropomorphic phantom, with TLDs attached, mimicking the real treatment. Results: The 3.2 mm acrylic plate mounted on the HDTSe applicator degraded the energy of the electron beam to 4.1 MeV in the treatment plane, located at an SSD of 450 cm. The optimum tilt angle was found to be ±20°. A single-dual field had a longitudinal uniformity, measured at a depth of dose maximum, of ±7% over a length of about 200 cm. For the entire treatment the multiplication factor was found to be 2.86. On the surface of the phantom, the dose varied from 108% to 93% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: We have successfully commissioned TSET meeting the guidelines of the TG report 23, and treated our first patient on February 25, 2014.

  15. Three Online Neutron Beam Experiments Based on the iLab Shared Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Yakov Ostrocsky; Philip Bailey; Gordon Kohse; James Hardison; V. Judson Harward; Kimberly DeLong

    2011-01-01

    Students at MIT have traditionally executed certain experiments in the containment building of the MIT nuclear reactor as part of courses in Nuclear Engineering and the third year laboratory course for Physics majors. A joint team of faculty and research staff from the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT-NRL) and MIT’s Center for Educational Computing Initiatives have implemented online versions of three classic experiments; (a) a determination of MIT reactor coolant temperature through measu...

  16. A Cherenkov-based Beam Loss Scintillator system for beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R

    2013-01-01

    The installation of a scintillator-based system in the LHCb cavern was initially proposed in order to observe injection problems around the LHCb interaction region. Thanks to the fact that LHCb had already developed a custom-made electronics board (BPIM) for the LHCb beam pickups and global LHCb timing monitoring, a complete, inexpensive but flexible and robust system was quickly developed and installed few cm from the beam pipe just in front of the LHCb VELO detector in time for the very first beams injected in the LHC. The current and final system – commonly referred to as Beam Loss Scintillator (BLS) system - ultimately played a central role in the fast beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at LHCb. In this paper, the features of the detector – based on quartz radiator and Cherenkov light - are described, including the functionalities that the system acquired during the proton-proton physics programmes in 2009- 2013 thanks to its flexibility, reliability and sensitivity to beam hal...

  17. Treatment of benign brain lesions True Beam radiosurgery in the first year of experience; Tratamiento de lesiones cerebrales benignas con radiocirugia en el True-Beam: Primer ano de experiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lliso, F.; Carmona, V.; Gimeno, J.; Candela, C.; Bautista, J. A.; Perez-Calatayud, J.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the work is analyse the first year of experience in the treatment of injury brain benign with Rapid Arc in the patients treated in a throttle True Beam STX with radiosurgery who achieved an adequate level of efficiency and accuracy. (Author)

  18. A High-Pressure Polarized $^3$He Gas Target for Nuclear Physics Experiments Using A Polarized Photon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Q; Chen, W; Gao, H; Zheng, W; Zong, X; Averett, T; Cates, G D; Tobias, W A

    2009-01-01

    Following the first experiment on three-body photodisintegration of polarized $^3$He utilizing circularly polarized photons from High Intensity Gamma Source (HI$\\gamma$S) at Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), a new high-pressure polarized $^3$He target cell made of pyrex glass coated with a thin layer of sol-gel doped with aluminum nitrate nonahydrate has been built in order to reduce photon beam induced backgrounds. The target is based on the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping of hybrid rubidium and potassium and the highest polarization achieved is $\\sim$62\\% determined from both NMR-AFP and EPR polarimetry. The $X$ parameter is estimated to be $0.17\\pm0.06$ and the performance of the target is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We also present beam test results from this new target cell and the comparison with the GE180 $^3$He target cell used previously at HI$\\gamma$S. This is the first time that sol-gel coating technique has been used in a polarized $^3$He target for nuclea...

  19. Empirical model for controlling beam-beam effects in ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzen, G

    1980-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction may limit the beam intensity in ISABELLE. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the beam-beam interaction, there appears to be no reliable method at present for computing the effects of the beam-beam interaction. The steps taken at ISABELLE to limit beam-beam effects are based largely on the experience accumulated at the ISR. At the ISR, the beam-beam effects do not appear to be large, and the beam intensity at the ISR does not appear to be limited by beam-beam effects. The beam-beam effects may be much stronger in ISABELLE because of factors like higher intensity and stronger non-linearities.

  20. Water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces: insights from environmental molecular beam experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Johansson, Sofia M; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2014-11-26

    Water uptake on aerosol and cloud particles in the atmosphere modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for climate on Earth. Here, we apply an environmental molecular beam (EMB) method to characterize water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces. The adsorption of surface-active compounds including short-chain alcohols, nitric acid, and acetic acid significantly affects accommodation of D2O on ice. n-Hexanol and n-butanol adlayers reduce water uptake by facilitating rapid desorption and function as inefficient barriers for accommodation as well as desorption of water, while the effect of adsorbed methanol is small. Water accommodation is close to unity on nitric-acid- and acetic-acid-covered ice, and accommodation is significantly more efficient than that on the bare ice surface. Water uptake is inefficient on solid alcohols and acetic acid but strongly enhanced on liquid phases including a quasi-liquid layer on solid n-butanol. The EMB method provides unique information on accommodation and rapid kinetics on volatile surfaces, and these studies suggest that adsorbed organic and acidic compounds need to be taken into account when describing water at environmental interfaces.