WorldWideScience

Sample records for supermassive bosons serves

  1. The possibility of formation of Supermassive Black Holes from Bose-Einstein Condensation of Bosonic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2015-01-01

    Observed active galactic nuclei at redshifts of about 6 strongly suggest that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) had formed early on. Accretion of matter onto remnants of Population III stars leading to SMBHs is a very slow process, and therefore the model faces difficulties in explaining quasars detected at $ z \\gtrsim 6$. In this paper we invoke Bose-Einstein condensation of dark bosons to demonstrate that existence of very light ($m \\sim 10^{-23} \\ \\mbox{eV}$) spinless dark matter particles can not only lead to SMBHs of mass $\\gtrsim 10^{10} \\ M_\\odot$ at $ z \\gtrsim 6$ but also such particles can masquerade as dark matter as well as dark energy.

  2. Bosonization

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Bosonization is a useful technique for studying systems of interacting fermions in low dimensions. It has applications in both particle and condensed matter physics.This book contains reprints of papers on the method as used in these fields. The papers range from the classic work of Tomonaga in the 1950's on one-dimensional electron gases, through the discovery of fermionic solitons in the 1970's, to integrable systems and bosonization on Riemann surfaces. A four-chapter pedagogical introduction by the editor should make the book accessible to graduate students and experienced researchers alik

  3. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon, E-mail: josejuan.blanco@ehu.es, E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es, E-mail: kepa.sousa@ehu.es, E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  4. Supermassive Cosmic String Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4D Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N=1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  5. Supermassive Seeds for Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jarrett L; Li, Hui; Holz, Daniel E

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of quasars powered by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) out to z > 7 allow to constrain both the initial seed masses and the growth of the most massive black holes (BHs) in the early universe. The combination of the limited role of mergers in growing seed BHs as inferred from recent cosmological simulations, the sub-Eddington accretion rates of BHs expected at the earliest times, and the large radiative efficiencies of the most massive BHs inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei at high redshift, all suggest that the initial BH seeds may have been as massive as > 10^5 solar masses. This is consistent with the prediction of the direct collapse scenario of SMBH seed formation, in which a supermassive primordial star forms in a region of the universe with a high molecule-dissociating background radiation field, and collapses directly into a 10^4 --10^6 solar mass seed BH. This also corroborates the results of recent cosmological simulations which suggest that these massive BHs wer...

  6. Origin of supermassive black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.; Rubin, S G

    2007-01-01

    The origin of supermassive black holes in the galactic nuclei is quite uncertain in spite of extensive set of observational data. We review the known scenarios of galactic and cosmological formation of supermassive black holes. The common drawback of galactic scenarios is a lack of time and shortage of matter supply for building the supermassive black holes in all galaxies by means of accretion and merging. The cosmological scenarios are only fragmentarily developed but propose and pretend to...

  7. Lattice Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, J; Bagchi, B; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas; Basu, Asis; Bagchi, Bijon

    2000-01-01

    Fermions on the lattice have bosonic excitations generated from the underlying periodic background. These, the lattice bosons, arise near the empty band or when the bands are nearly full. They do not depend on the nature of the interactions and exist for any fermion-fermion coupling. We discuss these lattice boson solutions for the Dirac Hamiltonian.

  8. Higgs Boson Pizza Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    CERN celebrated the fourth anniversary of the historical Higgs boson announcement with special pizzas.    400 pizzas were served on Higgs pizza day in Restaurant 1 at CERN to celebrate the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs Boson (Image: Maximilien Brice/ CERN) What do the Higgs boson and a pizza have in common? Pierluigi Paolucci, INFN and CMS collaboration member, together with INFN president Fernando Ferroni found out the answer one day in Naples: the pizza in front of them looked exactly like a Higgs boson event display. A special recipe was then created in collaboration with the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in the St. Lucia area of Naples, and two pizzas were designed to resemble two Higgs boson decay channel event displays. The “Higgs Boson Pizza Day” was held on Monday, 4 July 2016, on the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boso...

  9. Dynamics around supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gualandris, Alessia

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of galactic nuclei reflects the presence of supermassive black holes (SBHs) in many ways. Single SBHs act as sinks, destroying a mass in stars equal to their own mass in roughly one relaxation time and forcing nuclei to expand. Formation of binary SBHs displaces a mass in stars roughly equal to the binary mass, creating low-density cores and ejecting hyper-velocity stars. Gravitational radiation recoil can eject coalescing binary SBHs from nuclei, resulting in offset SBHs and lopsided cores. We review recent work on these mechanisms and discuss the observable consequences.

  10. Evolution of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M

    2006-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies, and the available data show an empirical correlation between bulge luminosity - or stellar velocity dispersion - and black hole mass, suggesting a single mechanism for assembling black holes and forming spheroids in galaxy halos. The evidence is therefore in favour of a co-evolution between galaxies, black holes and quasars. In cold dark matter cosmogonies, small-mass subgalactic systems form first to merge later into larger and larger structures. In this paradigm galaxy halos experience multiple mergers during their lifetime. If every galaxy with a bulge hosts a SMBH in its center, and a local galaxy has been made up by multiple mergers, then a black hole binary is a natural evolutionary stage. The evolution of the supermassive black hole population clearly has to be investigated taking into account both the cosmological framework and the dynamical evolution of SMBHs and their hosts. The seeds of SMBHs have to be looked ...

  11. Close supermassive binary black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that when the peaks of the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are significantly blueshifted or redshifted from the systemic velocity of the host galaxy, this could be a consequence of orbital motion of a supermassive blackhole binary (SMB). The AGN J1536+0441 (=SDSS J153636.22+044127.0) has recently been proposed as an example of this phenomenon. It is proposed here instead that 1536+044 is an example of line emission from a disc. If this is correct, the lack of clear optical spectral evidence for close SMBs is significant and argues either that the merging of close SMBs is much faster than has generally been hitherto thought, or if the approach is slow, that when the separation of the binary is comparable to the size of the torus and broad-line region, the feeding of the black holes is disrupted.

  12. Supermassive Black Holes in BCGs

    CERN Document Server

    Bontá, E D; Miralda-Escudé, J; Coccato, L; Corsini, E M; Pizzella, A

    2006-01-01

    We observed a sample of three Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), Abell 1836-BCG, Abell 2052-BCG, and Abell 3565-BCG, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board the Space Telescope. For each target galaxy we obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of the Halpha and [NII]lambda6583 emission lines at three slit positions, to measure the central ionized-gas kinematics. ACS images in three different filters (F435W, F625W, and FR656N) have been used to determine the optical depth of the dust, stellar mass distribution near the nucleus, and intensity map. We present supermassive black hole (SBH) mass estimates for two galaxies which show regular rotation curves and strong central velocity gradients, and an upper limit on the SBH mass of the third one. For the SBHs of Abell 1836-BCG and Abell 3565-BCG, we derived M_bh=4.8(-0.7,+0.8)10**9 M_sun and M_bh=1.3(-0.4,+0.3)10**9 M_sun at 1 sigma confidence level, respectively. For the SBH of Abell 2052-BCG, we found M_bh < 7.3 1...

  13. Supermassive screwed cosmic string in dilaton gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, V B [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da ParaIba, 58059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Ferreira, Cristine N [Nucleo de Fisica, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Campos, Rua Dr Siqueira, 273-Parque Dom Bosco, 28030-130, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Cuesta, H J Mosquera [Instituto de Cosmologia, Relatividade e AstrofIsica (ICRA-BR), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-06-21

    The early universe might have undergone phase transitions at energy scales much higher than the one corresponding to the grand unified theories (GUT) scales. At these higher energy scales, the transition at which gravity separated from all other interactions, the so-called Planck era, more massive strings called supermassive cosmic strings could have been produced, with energy of about 10{sup 19} GeV. The dynamics of strings formed with this energy scale cannot be described by means of the weak-field approximation, as in the standard procedure for ordinary GUT cosmic strings. As suggested by string theories, at this extreme energy, gravity may be transmitted by some kind of scalar field (usually called the dilaton) in addition to the tensor field of Einstein's theory of gravity. It is then permissible to tackle the issue regarding the dynamics of supermassive cosmic strings within this framework. With this aim, we obtain the gravitational field of a supermassive screwed cosmic string in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity. We show that for the supermassive configuration, exact solutions of scalar-tensor screwed cosmic strings can be found in connection with the Bogomol'nyi limit. We show that the generalization of Bogomol'nyi arguments to the Brans-Dicke theory is possible when torsion is present and we obtain an exact solution in this supermassive regime, with the dilaton solution obtained by consistency with internal constraints.

  14. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-09

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  15. Two-boson composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Bouvrier, P. Alexander; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Composite bosons made of two bosonic constituents exhibit deviations from ideal bosonic behavior due to their substructure. This deviation is reflected by the normalization ratio of the quantum state of N composites. We find a set of saturable, efficiently evaluable bounds for this indicator, which...... quantifies the bosonic behavior of composites via the entanglement of their constituents. We predict an abrupt transition between ordinary and exaggerated bosonic behavior in a condensate of two-boson composites....

  16. Higgs Boson Production and Weak Boson Structure

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The influence of the QCD structure of the weak bosons on the Higgs boson production in $e$-$p$ scattering is studied. The energy and Higgs boson mass dependence of the cross-section, following from the new contributions, is calculated.

  17. Gravitational Waves From Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Girolamo, Tristano

    2016-10-01

    In this talk, I will present the first direct detections of gravitational waves from binary stellar-mass black hole mergers during the first observing run of the two detectors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, which opened the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, and then discuss prospects for observing gravitational waves from supermassive black holes with future detectors.

  18. Supermassive Black Holes and Galaxy Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    The formation of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is intimately related to galaxy formation, although precisely how remains a mystery. I speculate that formation of, and feedback from, SMBH may alleviate problems that have arisen in our understanding of the cores of dark halos of galaxies.

  19. Making Supermassive Black Holes Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Where does the angular momentum come from that causes supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to spin on their axes and launch powerful jets? A new study of nearby SMBHs may help to answer this question.High-mass SMBHs are thought to form when two galaxies collide and the SMBHs at their centers merge. [NASA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI)]High- vs. Low-Mass MonstersObservational evidence suggests a dichotomy between low-mass SMBHs (those with 106-7 M) and high-mass ones (those with 108-10 M). High-mass SMBHs are thought to form via the merger of two smaller black holes, and the final black hole is likely spun up by the rotational dynamics of the merger. But what spins up low-mass SMBHs, which are thought to build up very gradually via accretion?A team of scientists led by Jing Wang (National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences) have attempted to address this puzzle by examining the properties of the galaxies hosting low-mass SMBHs.A Sample of Neighboring SMBHsWang and collaborators began by constructing a sample of radio-selected nearby Seyfert 2 galaxies: those galaxies in which the stellar population and morphology of the host galaxy are visible to us, instead of being overwhelmed by continuum emission from the galaxys active nucleus.An example of a galaxy with a concentrated, classical bulge (M87; top) and a one with a disk-like pseudo bulge (Triangulum Galaxy; bottom). The authors find that for galaxies hosting low-mass SMBHs, those with more disk-like bulges appear to have more powerful radio jets. [Top: NASA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI), Bottom: Hewholooks]From this sample, the authors then selected 31 galaxies that have low-mass SMBHs at their centers, as measured using the surrounding stellar dynamics. Wang and collaborators cataloged radio information revealing properties of the powerful jets launched by the SMBHs, and they analyzed the host galaxies properties by modeling their brightness profiles.Spin-Up From Accreting GasBy examining this

  20. Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filloux, Charline; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Durier, Fabrice; Silk, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Cosmological simulations describing both the evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies were performed by using the tree PM-SPH code GADGET-2 (Springel 2005). Physical mechanisms affecting the dynamics and the physical conditions of the gas (ionization and cooling processes, local heating by stars, injection of mechanical energy by supernovae, chemical enrichment) were introduced in the present version of the code (Filloux 2009). Black holes in a state of accretion (AGNs) also inject mechanical energy in the surrounding medium, contributing for quenching the star formation activity. In all simulations a ΛCDM cosmology was adopted (h = 0.7, ΩΛ=0.7, Ωm=0.3, Ωb=0.046 and σ8=0.9). Simulations were performed in a volume with a side of 50h-1 Mpc, starting at z = 50 and through the present time (z = 0). For low and intermediate resolution runs, the initial gas mass particles are respectively 5.35× 108 M⊙ and 3.09×108 M⊙. Black holes (BHs) are represented by collisionless particles and seeds of 100 M⊙ were introduced in density peaks at z = 15, growing either by accretion or coalescence. The accretion rate from the “disk mode” is based on a turbulent viscous thin disk model whereas in the “spherical mode” the rate is given by the Bondi-Hoyle formula. When accreting matter, jets, modeled by conical regions perpendicular to the disk plane, inject kinetic energy into the surrounding medium. Two models were tested: in the first, the injected energy rate is about 10% of the gravitational energy rate released in the accretion process while in the second, the injected energy rate is based on the Blandford & Znajek (1977) mechanism. All simulations give, at z = 0, similar black hole mass function but they overestimate slightly the BH density for masses above ~ 108 M⊙. The resulting BH density in this mass range is affected by feedback processes since they control the amount of gas available for accretion. The present simulations are not

  1. Supermassive Dark Stars: Detectable in JWST and HST

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, K; Valluri, M; Ilie, C; Spolyar, D; Bodenheimer, P

    2010-01-01

    The first stars to form in the history of the universe may have been powered by dark matter annihilation rather than by fusion. This new phase of stellar evolution may have lasted millions to billions of years. These dark stars can grow to be very large, > 10^5 solar masses, and are relatively cool (~10^4 K). They are also very bright, being potentially detectable in the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope or even the Hubble Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out, the dark stars have a short fusion phase, before collapsing into black holes (BH). The resulting BH could serve as seeds for the (unexplained) supermassive black holes at high redshift and at the centers of galaxies.

  2. Formation and coalescence of cosmological supermassive-black-hole binaries in supermassive-star collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisswig, C; Ott, C D; Abdikamalov, E; Haas, R; Mösta, P; Schnetter, E

    2013-10-11

    We study the collapse of rapidly rotating supermassive stars that may have formed in the early Universe. By self-consistently simulating the dynamics from the onset of collapse using three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics with fully dynamical spacetime evolution, we show that seed perturbations in the progenitor can lead to the formation of a system of two high-spin supermassive black holes, which inspiral and merge under the emission of powerful gravitational radiation that could be observed at redshifts z is approximately equal or > to 10 with the DECIGO or Big Bang Observer gravitational-wave observatories, assuming supermassive stars in the mass range 10(4)-10(6)M[symbol: see text]. The remnant is rapidly spinning with dimensionless spin a*=0.9. The surrounding accretion disk contains ~10% of the initial mass.

  3. Formation of supermassive black holes through fragmentation of torodial supermassive stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Burkhard; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Hawke, Ian; Ott, Christian D; Schnetter, Erik; Müller, Ewald

    2006-04-28

    We investigate new paths to supermassive black hole formation by considering the general relativistic evolution of a differentially rotating polytrope with a toroidal shape. We find that this polytrope is unstable to nonaxisymmetric modes, which leads to a fragmentation into self-gravitating, collapsing components. In the case of one such fragment, we apply a simplified adaptive mesh refinement technique to follow the evolution to the formation of an apparent horizon centered on the fragment. This is the first study of the onset of nonaxisymmetric dynamical instabilities of supermassive stars in full general relativity.

  4. The Higgs Boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  5. Formation of the First Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bromm, V; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    We consider the physical conditions under which supermassive black holes could have formed inside the first galaxies. Our SPH simulations indicate that metal-free galaxies with a virial temperature ~10^4 K and with suppressed H2 formation (due to an intergalactic UV background) tend to form a binary black hole system which contains a substantial fraction (>10%) of the total baryonic mass of the host galaxy. Fragmentation into stars is suppressed without substantial H2 cooling. Our simulations follow the condensation of ~5x10^6 M_sun around the two centers of the binary down to a scale of 10 that would be detectable by LISA.

  6. Joint Formation of Supermassive Black Holes and Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Martin G. Haehnelt(IoA/KICC, Cambridge)

    2003-01-01

    The tight correlation between black hole mass and velocity dispersion of galactic bulges is strong evidence that the formation of galaxies and supermassive black holes are closely linked. I review the modeling of the joint formation of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes in the context of the hierarchical structure formation paradigm.

  7. Supermassive black holes from collapsing dark matter Bose–Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Gupta, Patrick; Thareja, Eklavya

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of active galactic nuclei at redshifts ≳ 6 suggests that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) formed early on. Growth of the remnants of population III stars by accretion of matter, both baryonic as well as collisionless dark matter (DM), leading up to formation of SMBHs is a very slow process. Therefore, such models encounter difficulties in explaining quasars detected at z≳ 6 . Furthermore, massive particles making up collisionless DM have not only so far eluded experimental detection but they also do not satisfactorily explain gravitational structures on small scales. In recent years, there has been a surge in research activities concerning cosmological structure formation that involve coherent, ultra-light bosons in a dark fluid-like or fuzzy cold DM state. In this paper, we study collapse of such ultra-light bosonic halo DM that is in a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) phase to give rise to SMBHs on dynamical time scales. Time evolution of such self-gravitating BECs is examined using the Gross–Pitaevskii equation in the framework of time-dependent variational method. Comprised of identical dark bosons of mass m, BECs can collapse to form black holes of mass M eff on time scales  ∼108 yrs provided m~{{M}\\text{eff}}≳ 0.64~mPl2 . In particular, ultra-light dark bosons of mass ∼ {{10}-20}~\\text{eV} can lead to SMBHs with mass ≳ {{10}10}~{{M}ȯ} at z≈ 6 . Recently observed radio-galaxies in the ELAIS-N1 deep field with aligned jets can also possibly be explained if vortices of a rotating cluster size BEC collapse to form spinning SMBHs with angular momentum J≲ 3.6~{{n}W}\\frac{G{{M}2}}{c} , where n W and M are the winding number and mass of a vortex, respectively.

  8. The Final Fates of Accreting Supermassive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The formation of supermassive stars (SMSs) via rapid mass accretion and their direct collapse into black holes (BHs) is a promising pathway for sowing seeds of supermassive BHs in the early universe. We calculate the evolution of rapidly accreting SMSs by solving the stellar structure equations including nuclear burning as well as general relativistic (GR) effects up to the onset of the collapse. We find that such SMSs have less concentrated structure than fully-convective counterpart, which is often postulated for non-accreting ones. This effect stabilizes the stars against GR instability even above the classical upper mass limit $\\gtrsim 10^5~M_\\odot$ derived for the fully-convective stars. The accreting SMS begins to collapse at the higher mass with the higher accretion rate. The collapse occurs when the nuclear fuel is exhausted only for cases with $\\dot M \\lesssim 0.1~M_\\odot~{\\rm yr}^{-1}$. With $\\dot{M} \\simeq 0.3 - 1~M_\\odot~{\\rm yr}^{-1}$, the star becomes GR-unstable during the helium-burning stage ...

  9. Witnessing the birth of a supermassive protostar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Hartwig, T.

    2016-05-01

    The detection of z > 6 quasars reveals the existence of supermassive black holes of a few 109 M⊙. One of the potential pathways to explain their formation in the infant universe is the so-called direct collapse model which provides massive seeds of 105-106 M⊙. An isothermal direct collapse mandates that haloes should be of a primordial composition and the formation of molecular hydrogen remains suppressed in the presence of a strong Lyman Werner flux. In this study, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two massive primordial haloes employing a detailed chemical model which includes H- cooling as well as realistic opacities for both the bound-free H- emission and the Rayleigh scattering of hydrogen atoms. We are able to resolve the collapse up to unprecedentedly high densities of ˜10-3 g cm-3 and to scales of about 10-4 au. Our results show that the gas cools down to ˜5000 K in the presence of H- cooling, and induces fragmentation at scales of about 8000 au in one of the two simulated haloes, which may lead to the formation of a binary. In addition, fragmentation also occurs on the au scale in one of the haloes but the clumps are expected to merge on short time-scales. Our results confirm that H- cooling does not prevent the formation of a supermassive star and the trapping of cooling radiation stabilizes the collapse on small scales.

  10. Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.3 has exacerbated the time compression problem implied by the appearance of supermassive black holes only ~900 Myr after the big bang, and only ~500 Myr beyond the formation of Pop II and III stars. Aside from heralding the onset of cosmic reionization, these first and second generation stars could have reasonably produced the ~5-20 solar-mass seeds that eventually grew into z~6-7 quasars. But this process would have taken ~900 Myr, a timeline that appears to be at odds with the predictions of LCDM without an anomalously high accretion rate, or some exotic creation of ~10^5 solar-mass seeds. There is no evidence of either of these happening in the local universe. In this paper, we show that a much simpler, more elegant solution to the supermassive black hole anomaly is instead to view this process using the age-redshift relation predicted by the R_h=ct Universe, an FRW cosmology with zero active mass. In this context, cosm...

  11. Observing stellar mass and supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    During the last 50 years, great progress has been made in observing stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in binary systems and supermassive BHs in galactic nuclei. In 1964, Zeldovich and Salpeter showed that in the case of nonspherical accretion of matter onto a BH, huge energy releases occur. The theory of disk accretion of matter onto BHs was developed in 1972-1973 by Shakura and Sunyaev, Pringle and Rees, and Novikov and Thorne. Up to now, 100 years after the creation of Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, which predicts the existence of BHs, the masses of tens of stellar-mass BHs ( M_BH=(4-35) M_⊙) and many hundreds of supermassive BHs ( M_BH=(10^6-1010) M_⊙) have been determined. A new field of astrophysics, so-called BH demography, is developing. The recent discovery of gravitational waves from BH mergers in binary systems opens a new era in BH studies.

  12. Star formation around supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnell, I A; Rice, W K M

    2008-08-22

    The presence of young massive stars orbiting on eccentric rings within a few tenths of a parsec of the supermassive black hole in the galactic center is challenging for theories of star formation. The high tidal shear from the black hole should tear apart the molecular clouds that form stars elsewhere in the Galaxy, and transport of stars to the galactic center also appears unlikely during their lifetimes. We conducted numerical simulations of the infall of a giant molecular cloud that interacts with the black hole. The transfer of energy during closest approach allows part of the cloud to become bound to the black hole, forming an eccentric disk that quickly fragments to form stars. Compressional heating due to the black hole raises the temperature of the gas up to several hundred to several thousand kelvin, ensuring that the fragmentation produces relatively high stellar masses. These stars retain the eccentricity of the disk and, for a sufficiently massive initial cloud, produce an extremely top-heavy distribution of stellar masses. This potentially repetitive process may explain the presence of multiple eccentric rings of young stars in the presence of a supermassive black hole.

  13. Bosonic behavior of entangled fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Tichy, Malte; Alexander Bouvrie, Peter; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Two bound, entangled fermions form a composite boson, which can be treated as an elementary boson as long as the Pauli principle does not affect the behavior of many such composite bosons. The departure of ideal bosonic behavior is quantified by the normalization ratio of multi-composite-boson st......Two bound, entangled fermions form a composite boson, which can be treated as an elementary boson as long as the Pauli principle does not affect the behavior of many such composite bosons. The departure of ideal bosonic behavior is quantified by the normalization ratio of multi...

  14. Are Bosonic Replicas Faulty?

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Vladimir Al

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing discussion about a seeming asymmetry in the performance of fermionic and bosonic replicas, we present an exact, nonperturbative approach to zero-dimensional replica field theories belonging to the broadly interpreted "beta=2" Dyson symmetry class. We then utilise the formalism developed to demonstrate that the bosonic replicas do correctly reproduce the microscopic spectral density in the QCD inspired chiral Gaussian unitary ensemble. This disproves the myth that the bosonic replica field theories are intrinsically faulty.

  15. Gravitational waves from supermassive stars collapsing to a supermassive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Uchida, Haruki; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-07-01

    We derive the gravitational waveform from the collapse of a rapidly rotating supermassive star (SMS) core leading directly to a seed of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in axisymmetric numerical-relativity simulations. We find that the peak strain amplitude of gravitational waves emitted during the black hole formation is ≈5 ×10-21 at the frequency f ≈5 mHz for an event at the cosmological redshift z =3 , if the collapsing SMS core is in the hydrogen-burning phase. Such gravitational waves will be detectable by space laser interferometric detectors like eLISA with signal-to-noise ratio ≈10 , if the sensitivity is as high as LISA for f =1 - 10 mHz . The detection of the gravitational wave signal will provide a potential opportunity for testing the direct-collapse scenario for the formation of a seed of SMBHs.

  16. Gravitational waves from supermassive stars collapsing to a supermassive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Masaru; Uchida, Haruki; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We derive the gravitational waveform from the collapse of a rapidly rotating supermassive star (SMS) core leading directly to a seed of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in axisymmetric numerical-relativity simulations. We find that the peak strain amplitude of gravitational waves emitted during the black-hole formation is $\\approx 5 \\times 10^{-21}$ at the frequency $f \\approx 5$\\,mHz for an event at the cosmological redshift $z=3$, if the collapsing SMS core is in the hydrogen-burning phase. Such gravitational waves will be detectable by space laser interferometric detectors like eLISA with signal-to-noise ratio $\\approx 10$, if the sensitivity is as high as LISA for $f=1$--10\\,mHz. The detection of the gravitational-wave signal will provide a potential opportunity for testing the direct-collapse scenario for the formation of a seed of SMBHs.

  17. Growth of Supermassive Black Holes, Galaxy Mergers and Supermassive Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, S.; Baker, J. G.; Liu, F. K.

    The study of galaxy mergers and supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) is central to our understanding of the galaxy and black hole assembly and (co-)evolution at the epoch of structure formation and throughout cosmic history. Galaxy mergers are the sites of major accretion episodes, they power quasars, grow supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and drive SMBH-host scaling relations. The coalescing SMBBHs at their centers are the loudest sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the Universe, and the subsequent GW recoil has a variety of potential astrophysical implications which are still under exploration. Future GW astronomy will open a completely new window on structure formation and galaxy mergers, including the direct detection of coalescing SMBBHs, high-precision measurements of their masses and spins, and constraints on BH formation and evolution in the high-redshift Universe.

  18. Growth of supermassive black holes, galaxy mergers and supermassive binary black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Komossa, S; Liu, F K

    2016-01-01

    The study of galaxy mergers and supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) is central to our understanding of the galaxy and black hole assembly and (co-)evolution at the epoch of structure formation and throughout cosmic history. Galaxy mergers are the sites of major accretion episodes, they power quasars, grow supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and drive SMBH-host scaling relations. The coalescing SMBBHs at their centers are the loudest sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe, and the subsequent GW recoil has a variety of potential astrophysical implications which are still under exploration. Future GW astronomy will open a completely new window on structure formation and galaxy mergers, including the direct detection of coalescing SMBBHs, high-precision measurements of their masses and spins, and constraints on BH formation and evolution in the high-redshift universe.

  19. MEASURING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE SPINS IN AGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Brenneman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the spins of supermassive black holes (SMBHs in active galactic nuclei (AGN can inform us about the relative role of gas accretion vs. mergers in recent epochs of the life of the host galaxy and its AGN. Recent theoretical and observation advances have enabled spin measurements for ten SMBHs thus far, but this science is still very much in its infancy. Herein, I discuss how we measure black hole spin in AGN, using recent results from a long Suzaku campaign on NGC 3783 to illustrate this process and its caveats. I then present our current knowledge of the distribution of SMBH spins in the local universe. I also address prospects for improving the accuracy, precision and quantity of these spin constraints in the next decade and beyond with instruments such as NuSTAR, Astro-H and future large-area X-ray telescopes.

  20. Supermassive blackholes without super Eddington accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Damian Joseph; Kim, Matt I.; Garofalo, David; D'Avanzo, Jaclyn; Torres, John

    2017-08-01

    We explore the X-ray luminosity function at high redshift for active galactic nuclei using an albeit simplified model for mass build-up using a combination of mergers and mass accretion in the gap paradigm (Garofalo et al. 2010). Using a retrograde-dominated configuration we find an interesting low probability channel for the growth of one billion solar mass black holes within hundreds of millions of years of the big bang without appealing to super Eddington accretion (Kim et al. 2016). This result is made more compelling by the connection between this channel and an end product involving active galaxies with FRI radio morphology but weaker jet powers in mildly sub-Eddington accretion regimes. We will discuss our connection between the unexplained paucity of a given family of AGNs and the rapid growth of supermassive black holes, two heretofore seemingly unrelated aspects of the physics of AGNs that will help further understand their properties and evolution.

  1. Formation of Supermassive Black Hole Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muhammad A.; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The detection of quasars at z > 6 unveils the presence of supermassive black holes of a few billion solar masses. The rapid formation process of these extreme objects remains a fascinating and open issue. Such discovery implies that seed black holes must have formed early on, and grown via either rapid accretion or BH/galaxy mergers. In this theoretical review, we discuss in detail various BH seed formation mechanisms and the physical processes at play during their assembly. We discuss the three most popular BH formation scenarios, involving the (i) core-collapse of massive stars, (ii) dynamical evolution of dense nuclear star clusters, (iii) collapse of a protogalactic metal free gas cloud. This article aims at giving a broad introduction and an overview of the most advanced research in the field.

  2. Formation of supermassive black hole seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, Muhammad A

    2016-01-01

    The detection of quasars at $z>6$ unveils the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs) of a few billion solar masses. The rapid formation process of these extreme objects remains a fascinating and open issue. Such discovery implies that seed black holes must have formed early on, and grown via either rapid accretion or BH/galaxy mergers. In this theoretical review, we discuss in detail various BH seed formation mechanisms and the physical processes at play during their assembly. We discuss the three most popular BH formation scenarios, involving the (i) core-collapse of massive stars, (ii) dynamical evolution of dense nuclear star clusters, (iii) collapse of a protogalactic metal free gas cloud. This article aims at giving a broad introduction and an overview of the most advanced research in the field.

  3. Where Is Higgs Boson?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Quantum physicists think they know the answer. Probabilistic calculations reveal than the data provided by previous experiments has been miscalculated and that the Higgs boson has in fact been discovered. Weird! The Higgs boson is the only particle predicted by the Standard Model that hasn't been discovered yet.

  4. Bosonization and Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2016-01-01

    We study bosonization in 2+1 dimensions using mirror symmetry, a duality that relates pairs of supersymmetric theories. Upon breaking supersymmetry in a controlled way, we dynamically obtain the bosonization duality that equates the theory of a free Dirac fermion to QED3 with a single scalar boson. This duality may be used to demonstrate the bosonization duality relating an $O(2)$-symmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point to QED3 with a single Dirac fermion, Peskin-Dasgupta-Halperin duality, and the recently conjectured duality relating the theory of a free Dirac fermion to fermionic QED3 with a single flavor. Chern-Simons and BF couplings for both dynamical and background gauge fields play a central role in our approach. In the course of our study, we describe a chiral mirror pair that may be viewed as the minimal supersymmetric generalization of the two bosonization dualities.

  5. The Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Pimenta, Jean Jûnio Mendes; Natti, Érica Regina Takano; Natti, Paulo Laerte

    2013-01-01

    The Higgs boson was predicted in 1964 by British physicist Peter Higgs. The Higgs is the key to explain the origin of the mass of other elementary particles of Nature. However, only with the coming into operation of the LHC, in 2008, there were technological conditions to search for the Higgs boson. Recently, a major international effort conducted at CERN, by means of ATLAS and CMS experiments, has enabled the observation of a new bosonic particle in the region of 125 GeVs. In this paper, by means of known mechanisms of symmetry breaking that occur in the BCS theory of superconductivity and in the theory of nuclear pairing, we discuss the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model. Finally, we present the current state of research looking for the Higgs boson and the alternative theories and extensions of the Standard Model for the elementary particle physics. Keywords: Higgs boson, BCS theory, nuclear pairing, Higgs mechanism, Standard Model.

  6. Bosonic Partition Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerstein, M; Verbaarschot, J J M

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of quenched Dirac spectra of two-dimensional lattice QCD is consistent with spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking which is forbidden according to the Coleman-Mermin-Wagner theorem. One possible resolution of this paradox is that, because of the bosonic determinant in the partially quenched partition function, the conditions of this theorem are violated allowing for spontaneous symmetry breaking in two dimensions or less. This goes back to work by Niedermaier and Seiler on nonamenable symmetries of the hyperbolic spin chain and earlier work by two of the auhtors on bosonic partition functions at nonzero chemical potential. In this talk we discuss chiral symmetry breaking for the bosonic partition function of QCD at nonzero isospin chemical potential and a bosonic random matrix theory at imaginary chemical potential and compare the results with the fermionic counterpart. In both cases the chiral symmetry group of the bosonic partition function is noncompact.

  7. Bosonization and mirror symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Shamit; Mulligan, Michael; Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2016-10-01

    We study bosonization in 2 +1 dimensions using mirror symmetry, a duality that relates pairs of supersymmetric theories. Upon breaking supersymmetry in a controlled way, we dynamically obtain the bosonization duality that equates the theory of a free Dirac fermion to QED3 with a single scalar boson. This duality may be used to demonstrate the bosonization duality relating an O (2 )-symmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point to QED3 with a single Dirac fermion, Peskin-Dasgupta-Halperin duality, and the recently conjectured duality relating the theory of a free Dirac fermion to fermionic QED3 with a single flavor. Chern-Simons and BF couplings for both dynamical and background gauge fields play a central role in our approach. In the course of our study, we describe a "chiral" mirror pair that may be viewed as the minimal supersymmetric generalization of the two bosonization dualities.

  8. The supermassive black hole of Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, N; Thomas, J; Bender, R; Davies, R I; Gebhardt, K

    2008-01-01

    The radio galaxy Fornax A (NGC 1316) is a prominent merger remnant in the outskirts of the Fornax cluster. Its giant radio lobes suggest the presence of a powerful AGN and thus a central supermassive black hole (SMBH). We present high-resolution adaptive optics assisted integral-field data of Fornax A, taken with SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope in the K band. We use axisymmetric orbit models to determine the mass of the SMBH in the centre of Fornax A. The three-dimensional nature of our data provides the possibility to directly test the consistency of the data with axisymmetry by modelling each of the four quadrants separately. According to our dynamical models, consistent SMBH masses and dynamical Ks band mass-to-light ratios are obtained for all quadrants, with =1.3x10^8 M_\\odot (rms(M_BH)=0.4x10^8 Msun) and =0.68 (rms(M/L)=0.03), confirming the assumption of axisymmetry. For the folded and averaged data we find M_BH=(1.5+0.75-0.8)x10^8 Msun and M/L=(0.65+0.075-0.05) (3-sigma errors). Thus the black-hol...

  9. Supermassive black holes in the distant universe

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This book provides a unique overview of recent developments in studies of AGN and the evolution of supermassive black holes, with particular emphasis on the revolutionary results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories Each chapter is a comprehensive analysis and review by an expert in the field that should provide easy access to the subject The chapters progressively follow a single theme---the mapping of the accretion history of the universe---from both theoretical and observational points of view The chapters are written at a level that should be accessible to graduate students and non-specialists, yet the depth and innovation of the analyses will also make it highly informative to the specialist The topical nature of the subject matter means that the material presented in this book is not well covered in the present literature Moreover, the depth and interconnectedness of the chapters ensures that the coverage is much more comprehensive and informative than a conference proceeding would be The...

  10. Supermassive Dark Stars: Detectable in JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may be Dark Stars, powered by dark matter heating rather than by nuclear fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be their own antipartners, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars for millions to billions of years. In this paper we show that these objects can grow to be supermassive dark stars (SMDS) with masses $\\gtrsim (10^5-10^7) \\msun$. The growth continues as long as dark matter heating persists, since dark stars are large and cool (surface temperature $\\lesssim 5\\times 10^4$K) and do not emit enough ionizing photons to prevent further accretion of baryons onto the star. The dark matter may be provided by two mechanisms: (1) gravitational attraction of dark matter particles on a variety of orbits not previously considered, and (2) capture of WIMPs due to elastic scattering. Once the dark matter fuel is exhausted, the SMDS becomes a heavy main sequence star; these sta...

  11. Witnessing the birth of a supermassive protostar

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, Muhammad A; Hartwig, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The detection of $\\rm z>6$ quasars reveals the existence of supermassive black holes of a few $\\rm 10^9~M_{\\odot}$. One of the potential pathways to explain their formation in the infant universe is the so-called direct collapse model which provides massive seeds of $\\rm 10^5-10^6~M_{\\odot}$. An isothermal direct collapse mandates that halos should be of a primordial composition and the formation of molecular hydrogen remains suppressed in the presence of a strong Lyman Werner flux. In this study, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two massive primordial halos employing a detailed chemical model which includes $\\rm H^-$ cooling as well as realistic opacities for both the bound-free $\\rm H^-$ emission and the Rayleigh scattering of hydrogen atoms. We are able to resolve the collapse up to unprecedentedly high densities of $\\rm \\sim 10^{-3}~g/cm^3$ and to scales of about $\\rm 10^{-4}$ AU. Our results show that the gas cools down to $\\rm \\sim $ 5000 K in the presence of $\\rm H^-$ cooling, an...

  12. Observational Signatures of Binary Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze; Miller, M Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary AGN. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength $\\lambda_n$ at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches $\\propto \\lambda_n^{16/3}$; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A sec...

  13. Libraries serving dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Odile

    2014-01-01

    This book based on experiences of libraries serving interreligious dialogue, presents themes like library tools serving dialogue between cultures, collections dialoguing, children and young adults dialoguing beyond borders, story telling as dialog, librarians serving interreligious dialogue.

  14. Charged Higgs Boson Searches

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of a charged Higgs boson would be tangible proof of physics beyond the Standard Model. This note presents the ATLAS potential for discovering a charged Higgs boson, utilizing five different final states of the signal arising from the three dominating fermionic decay modes of the charged Higgs boson. The search covers the region below the top quark mass, taking into account the present experimental constraints, the transition region with a charged Higgs boson mass of the order of the top quark mass, and the high-mass region with a charged Higgs boson mass up to 600 GeV. All studies are performed with a realistic simulation of the detector response including all three trigger levels and taking into account all dominant systematic uncertainties. Results are given in terms of discovery and exclusion contours for each channel individually and for all channels combined, showing that the ATLAS experiment is capable of detecting the charged Higgs boson in a significant fraction of the (tan beta , mH+-) ...

  15. Higgs boson pizza

    CERN Multimedia

    Cinzia De Melis

    2016-01-01

    Four years after the historic announcement of the Higgs boson discovery at CERN, a collaboration between INFN and CERN has declared 4 July 2016 as “Higgs Boson Pizza Day”. The idea was born in Naples, by Pierluigi Paolucci and INFN president Fernando Ferroni, who inspired the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in St. Lucia to create the Higgs boson pizza in time for the opening of a Art&Science exhibition on 15 September 2015 in Naples. The animation shows the culinary creation of a Higgs boson in form of a vegetarian and ham&salami pizza. Ham&Salami: A two asparagus (proton-proton) collision produces a spicy Higgs boson (chorizo) decaying into two high-energy salami (photon) clusters and a lot of charged (sliced ham) and neutral (olive) particles that are detected in the pizza (detector) entirely covered with mozzarella sensors. A two asparagus (proton-proton) collision produces a juicy Higgs boson (cherry tomato) decaying into four high-energy (charged) peppers producing a tasty sign...

  16. A Nearly Naked Supermassive Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, J. J.; Darling, Jeremy; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Petrov, L.

    2017-01-01

    During a systematic search for supermassive black holes (SMBHs) not in galactic nuclei, we identified the compact, symmetric radio source B3 1715+425 with an emission-line galaxy offset ≈ 8.5 {kpc} from the nucleus of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the redshift z = 0.1754 cluster ZwCl 8193. B3 1715+425 is too bright (brightness temperature {T}{{b}}∼ 3× {10}10 {{K}} at observing frequency ν =7.6 {GHz}) and too luminous (1.4 GHz luminosity {L}1.4{GHz}∼ {10}25 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1) to be powered by anything but an SMBH, but its host galaxy is much smaller (∼ 0.9 {kpc}× 0.6 {kpc} full width between half-maximum points) and optically fainter (R-band absolute magnitude {M}{{r}}≈ -18.2) than any other radio galaxy. Its high radial velocity {v}{{r}}≈ 1860 {km} {{{s}}}-1 relative to the BCG, continuous ionized wake extending back to the BCG nucleus, and surrounding debris indicate that the radio galaxy was tidally shredded passing through the BCG core, leaving a nearly naked SMBH fleeing from the BCG with space velocity v≳ 2000 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The radio galaxy has mass M≲ 6× {10}9 {M}ȯ and infrared luminosity {L}{IR}∼ 3× {10}11 {L}ȯ close to its dust Eddington limit, so it is vulnerable to further mass loss from radiative feedback.

  17. Astrophysical phenomena related to supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Jörg-Uwe

    2006-12-01

    The thesis contains the results of my recent projects in astrophysical research. All projects aim at pushing the limits of our knowledge about the interaction between a galaxy, the fundamental building block of today's universe, and a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at its center. Over the past years a lot of observational evidence has been gathered for the current understanding, that at least a major part of the galaxies with a stellar bulge contain central SMBHs. The typical extragalactic approach consists of searching for the spectroscopic pattern of Keplerian rotation, produced by stars and gas, when orbiting a central dark mass (Kormendy & Richstone 1995). It suggests that a significant fraction of large galaxies host in their very nucleus a SMBH of millions to billions of solar masses (Kormendy & Gebhardt 2001). In the closest case, the center of our Milky Way, the most central stars, which can be imaged, were shown to move on orbits with circulation times of a few decades only, evidencing a mass and compactness of the dark counter part of the Keplerian motion, which can only be explained by a SMBH (Eckart & Genzel 1996; Ghez et al. 2000; Schödel et al. 2002). Having acknowledged the widespread existence of SMBHs the obvious next step is investigating the interaction with their environment. Although the basic property of a SMBH, which is concentrating a huge amount of mass in a ludicrously small volume defined by the Schwarzschild radius, only creates a deep gravitational trough, its existence evokes much more phenomena than simply attracting the surrounding matter. It can trigger or exacerbate star formation via tidal forces (Morris 1993). It shapes the distribution of its surrounding matter to accretion discs, which themselves release gravitational potential energy as radiation, possibly due to magnetic friction (Blandford 1995). The radiation efficiency of such active galactic nuclei (AGN) can become roughly 100 times more efficient than atomic nuclear

  18. The Supermassive Black Hole—Galaxy Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The observed scaling relations imply that supermassive black holes (SMBH) and their host galaxies evolve together. Near-Eddington winds from the SMBH accretion discs explain many aspects of this connection. The wind Eddington factor should be in the range ˜1-30. A factor give black hole winds with velocities v˜0.1 c, observable in X-rays, just as seen in the most extreme ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Higher Eddington factors predict slower and less ionized winds, observable in the UV, as in BAL QSOs. In all cases the wind must shock against the host interstellar gas and it is plausible that these shocks should cool efficiently. There is detailed observational evidence for this in some UFOs. The wind sweeps up the interstellar gas into a thin shell and propels it outwards. For SMBH masses below a certain critical ( M- σ) value, all these outflows eventually stall and fall back, as the Eddington thrust of the wind is too weak to drive the gas to large radii. But once the SMBH mass reaches the critical M- σ value the global character of the outflow changes completely. The wind shock is no longer efficiently cooled, and the resulting thermal expansion drives the interstellar gas far from the black hole, which is unlikely to grow significantly further. Simple estimates of the maximum stellar bulge mass M b allowed by self-limited star formation show that the SMBH mass is typically about 10-3 M b at this point, in line with observation. The expansion-driven outflow reaches speeds v out≃1200 km s-1 and drives rates in cool (molecular) gas, giving a typical outflow mechanical energy L mech≃0.05 L Edd, where L Edd is the Eddington luminosity of the central SMBH. This is again in line with observation. These massive outflows may be what makes galaxies become red and dead, and can have several other potentially observable effects. In particular they have the right properties to enrich the intergalactic gas with metals. Our current picture of SMBH-galaxy coevolution is

  19. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984-2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  20. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984–2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  1. Merging a Pair of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-10-01

    When galaxies merge, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the galaxies centers are thought to coalesce, forming a new, larger black hole. But can this merger process take place on timescales short enough that we could actually observe it? Results from a new simulation suggests that it can!When Galaxies CollideThese stills demonstrate the time evolution of the galaxy merger after the beginning of the authors simulation (starting from z=3.6). The red and blue dots mark the positions of the SMBHs. [Adapted from Khan et al. 2016]At present, its not well understood how the merger of two SMBHs proceeds from the merger of their host galaxies. Whats more, there are concerns about whether the SMBHs can coalesce on reasonable timescales; in many simulations and models, the inspiral of these behemoths stalls out when they are about a parsec apart, in whats known as the final parsec problem.Why are these mergers poorly understood? Modeling them from the initial interactions of the host galaxies all the way down to the final coalescence of their SMBHs in a burst of gravitational waves is notoriously complicated, due to the enormous range of scales and different processes that must be accounted for.But in a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fazeel Khan (Institute of Space Technology in Pakistan) has presented a simulation that successfully manages to track the entire merger making it the first multi-scale simulation to model the complete evolution of an SMBH binary that forms within a cosmological galaxy merger.Stages of aSimulationKhan and collaborators tackled the challenges of this simulation by using a multi-tiered approach.Beginning with the output of a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, the authors select a merger of two typical massive galaxies at z=3.6 and use this as the starting point for their simulation. They increase the resolution and add in two supermassive black holes, one at the center of each galaxy.They then continue to evolve the galaxies

  2. Boson/Fermion Janus Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamically, bosons and fermions differ by their statistics only. A general entropy functional is proposed by superposition of entropic terms, typical for different quantum gases. The statistical properties of the corresponding Janus particles are derived by variation of the weight of the boson/fermion fraction. It is shown that di-bosons and anti-fermions separate in gas and liquid phases, while three-phase equilibrium appears for poly-boson/fermion Janus particles.

  3. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  4. Quantization over boson operator spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosen, Tomaz [Department of Physics, FMF, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Seligman, Thomas H [Instituto de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-10-01

    The framework of third quantization-canonical quantization in the Liouville space-is developed for open many-body bosonic systems. We show how to diagonalize the quantum Liouvillean for an arbitrary quadratic n-boson Hamiltonian with arbitrary linear Lindblad couplings to the baths and, as an example, explicitly work out a general case of a single boson. (fast track communication)

  5. Quantization over boson operator spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Prosen, Tomaz

    2010-01-01

    The framework of third quantization - canonical quantization in the Liouville space - is developed for open many-body bosonic systems. We show how to diagonalize the quantum Liouvillean for an arbitrary quadratic n-boson Hamiltonian with arbitrary linear Lindblad couplings to the baths and, as an example, explicitly work out a general case of a single boson.

  6. Higgs boson and inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Chaojun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Higgs is the only scalar particle that already observed up to now.In the standard model of particle physics,Higgs plays a very important role.On the other hand,inflation is also driven by scalar field called inflaton.Higgs boson can not be the inflaton since the large hierarchy energy scale of the mass between inflaton and itself.However,by using some indirectly method,inflaton could be another aspect of the Higgs boson.In this paper,the authors review some Higgs inflation models and discuss the role of the cosmological constant during inflation.

  7. The Formation of Supermassive Black Holes in the First Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Banerjee, Robi; Sur, Sharanya; Glover, Simon C. O.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the formation of supermassive black holes in the early universe, and how to probe their subsequent evolution with the upcoming mm/sub-mm telescope ALMA. We first focus on the chemical and radiative conditions for black hole formation, in particular considering radiation trapping and molec

  8. Effective boson-spin model for nuclei ensemble based universal quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Z; Shi, T; Sun, C P

    2004-01-01

    We study the collective excitation of a macroscopic ensemble of polarized nuclei fixed in a quantum dot. Under the approximately homogeneous condition that we explicitly present in this paper, this many-particle system behaves as a single mode boson interacting with the spin of a single conduction band electron confined in this quantum dot. Within this effective spin-boson system, the quantum information carried by the electronic spin can be coherently transferred into the collective bosonic mode of excitation in the ensemble of nuclei. In this sense, the collective bosonic excitation can serve as a stable quantum memory to store the quantum information of spin state of electron.

  9. Z Bosons in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2077480; Müller, Katharina; Anderson, Jonathan

    In this thesis several measurements of the $Z$ boson production cross section in the LHCb detector are presented. After an introduction with the description of the underlying theory; the detector and the properties of the collisions the machine provided to us in LHC run I in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 the details of the $Z$ reconstruction in the $Z\\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^-$ final state is discussed. In Chapter 3 jets are added to the $Z$ bosons. Several aspects of jet reconstruction are presented and a cross section measurement for the associated production of $Z$ bosons with jets at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV is presented for two transverse momentum thresholds of the jets. In Chapter 4 the capability of the LHCb detector to reconstruct charmed mesons is used to establish a $ZD^{0}$ and a $ZD^{+}$ signal and to measure the total cross section. In Chapter 5 the cross section of inclusive $Z$ boson production is measured at a low statistics sample of $3.3~\\text{pb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV.

  10. Natural NMSSM Higgs bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Stephen F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Muehlleitner, Margarete; Walz, Kathrin [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Nevzorov, Roman [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The Higgs sector of the Next-to Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM) features five neutral Higgs bosons. Compared to the MSSM it is extended by one additional complex singlet field. The discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the LHC last summer opens up the exciting possibility to consider the idea that this might actually be one of the NMSSM Higgs bosons. We study the phenomenology of the NMSSM Higgs sector requiring the presence of a CP-even Higgs boson with a mass close to 126 GeV. To this end we perform a parameter scan and investigate the observable Higgs cross sections into the final states γγ, WW, ZZ, bb and ττ. Our focus is on an enhanced rate into γγ. We discuss where such an enhancement can originate from and study the correlations between the different channels. Our scenarios feature light stop masses, which leads to low fine-tuning, and comply nicely with the LHC results.

  11. The H boson

    CERN Document Server

    Duplantier, Bertrand; Rivasseau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides a detailed description of the seminal theoretical construction in 1964, independently by Robert Brout and Francois Englert, and by Peter W. Higgs, of a mechanism for short-range fundamental interactions, now called the Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) mechanism. It accounts for the non-zero mass of elementary particles and predicts the existence of a new particle - an elementary massive scalar boson. In addition to this the book describes the experimental discovery of this fundamental missing element in the Standard Model of particle physics. The H Boson, also called the Higgs Boson, was produced and detected in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of CERN near Geneva by two large experimental collaborations, ATLAS and CMS, which announced its discovery on the 4th of July 2012. This new volume of the Poincaré Seminar Series, The H Boson, corresponds to the nineteenth seminar, held on November 29, 2014, at Institut Henri Po incaré in Paris.

  12. BEH Boson (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Checchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The most relevant results on Higgs sector from CMS are presented. The status of the measurements of the Higgs Boson properties after the complete analysis of Run I dataset and an overview of the results obtained with the limited luminosity delivered at 13 TeV in 2015 are given. Implications of the results and future perspectives are also briefly discussed.

  13. Precision calculations for the decay of Higgs bosons in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianhui

    2009-01-21

    Precision calculations are required for the verification of the standard model (SM) and serve as a useful tool for probing and disentangling new physics beyond the SM. In this thesis we concentrate on the extension of the SM with supersymmetry, i.e. the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) and investigate the decay processes of Higgs bosons within this model. At tree-level, the light CP-even MSSM Higgs boson, h{sup 0}, becomes SM-like when the other Higgs bosons get heavy. Thus it is of particular interest to investigate the impact of higher order corrections. We present the complete one-loop electroweak radiative corrections to the decay of h{sup 0} to four fermions via gauge boson pair, the results are further improved by currently available two-loop corrections to the Higgs boson self energies. The gauge boson in the photonic one-loop diagrams can become resonant and lead to singularities that have to be regularized by its finite width. To incorporation the gauge boson width, the one-loop integrals that involve such singularities are evaluated analytically. While the one-loop electroweak corrections yield visible effects for a relatively light MSSM Higgs sector, they only give rise to negligible effects when the Higgs bosons other than h{sup 0} become heavy, even if the genuine supersymmetric particle spectrum is relatively light. Consequently it is rather difficult to distinguish the light CP-even MSSM Higgs boson from the SM one if all other MSSM Higgs bosons are heavy, even though the one-loop corrections are included. We also consider the decay of the heavy CP-even MSSM Higgs boson, H{sup 0}, to off-/on-shell gauge boson pair. The one-loop corrections turn out to be significant as the tree-level coupling of H{sup 0} to gauge bosons is usually suppressed. (orig.)

  14. Experimental Boson Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Langford, Nathan K; Kundys, Dmytro; Gates, James C; Smith, Brian J; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    While universal quantum computers ideally solve problems such as factoring integers exponentially more efficiently than classical machines, the formidable challenges in building such devices motivate the demonstration of simpler, problem-specific algorithms that still promise a quantum speedup. We construct a quantum boson sampling machine (QBSM) to sample the output distribution resulting from the nonclassical interference of photons in an integrated photonic circuit, a problem thought to be exponentially hard to solve classically. Unlike universal quantum computation, boson sampling merely requires indistinguishable photons, linear state evolution, and detectors. We benchmark our QBSM with three and four photons and analyze sources of sampling inaccuracy. Our studies pave the way to larger devices that could offer the first definitive quantum-enhanced computation.

  15. Repelling Point Bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    There is a body of conventional wisdom that holds that a solvable quantum problem, by virtue of its solvability, is pathological and thus irrelevant. It has been difficult to refute this view owing to the paucity of theoretical constructs and experimental results. Recent experiments involving equivalent ions trapped in a spatial conformation of extreme anisotropic confinement (longitudinal extension tens, hundreds or even thousands of times transverse extension) have modified the view of relevancy, and it is now possible to consider systems previously thought pathological, in particular point Bosons that repel in one dimension. It has been difficult for the experimentalists to utilize existing theory, mainly due to long-standing theoretical misunderstanding of the relevance of the permutation group, in particular the non-commutativity of translations (periodicity) and transpositions (permutation). This misunderstanding is most easily rectified in the case of repelling Bosons.

  16. Higgs Boson Properties

    CERN Document Server

    David, André

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the measured properties of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN LHC. Searches for deviations from the properties predicted by the standard theory are also summarised. The present status corresponds to the combined analysis of the full Run 1 data sets of collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  17. Higgs Boson Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, André Dührssen, Michael

    2016-10-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the measured properties of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN LHC. Searches for deviations from the properties predicted by the standard theory are also summarised. The present status corresponds to the combined analysis of the full Run 1 data sets of collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  18. Supermassive black holes formed by direct collapse of inflationary perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism of producing a new type of primordial perturbations which collapse to primordial black holes whose mass can be as large as necessary for them to grow to the supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts, without contradicting COBE/FIRAS upper limits on cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In our model, the observable Universe consists of two kinds of many small patches which experienced different expansion histories during inflation. Large amplitudes of primordial perturbations enough to form primordial black holes are realized on patches that experienced more Hubble expansion than the others. By making these patches the minor component, the rarity of supermassive black holes can be explained. On the other hand, most regions of the Universe experienced the standard history and hence have only standard almost scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations confirmed by observations of CMB or large-scale structures of the universe. Thus our mechanism can evade the constra...

  19. Binary pairs of supermassive black holes - Formation in merging galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtaoja, L.; Valtonen, M.J.; Byrd, G.G. (Turku Univ. (Finland); Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1989-08-01

    A process in which supermassive binary blackholes are formed in nuclei of supergiant galaxies due to galaxy mergers is examined. There is growing evidence that mergers of galaxies are common and that supermassive black holes in center of galaxies are also common. Consequently, it is expected that binary black holes should arise in connection with galaxy mergers. The merger process in a galaxy modeled after M87 is considered. The capture probability of a companion is derived as a function of its mass. Assuming a correlation between the galaxy mass and the blackholes mass, the expected mass ratio in binary black holes is calculated. The binary black holes formed in this process are long lived, surviving longer than the Hubble time unless they are perturbed by black holes from successive mergers. The properties of these binaries agree with Gaskell's (1988) observational work on quasars and its interpretation in terms of binary black holes. 39 refs.

  20. Supermassive black holes, large scale structure and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Mongan, T R

    2013-01-01

    A holographic analysis of large scale structure in the universe estimates the mass of supermassive black holes at the center of large scale structures with matter density varying inversely as the square of the distance from their center. The estimate is consistent with two important test cases involving observations of the supermassive black hole with mass 3.6\\times10^{-6} times the galactic mass in Sagittarius A^{*} near the center of our Milky Way and the 2\\times10^{9} solar mass black hole in the quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 at redshift z=7.085. It is also consistent with upper bounds on central black hole masses in globular clusters M15, M19 and M22 developed using the Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico.

  1. Magnetically-levitating disks around supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburov, Evghenii; Levin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on the formation of magnetically-levitating accretion disks around supermassive black holes. The structure of these disks is calculated by numerically modelling tidal disruption of magnetized interstellar gas clouds. We find that the resulting disks are entirely supported by the pressure of the magnetic fields against the component of gravitational force directed perpendicular to the disks. The magnetic field shows ordered large-scale geometry that remains stable for the duration of our numerical experiments extending over 10% of the disk lifetime. Strong magnetic pressure allows high accretion and inhibits disk fragmentation. This in combination with the repeated feeding of manetized molecular clouds to a supermassive black hole yields a possible solution to the long-standing puzzle of black hole growth in the centres of galaxies.

  2. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, Grant R; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen L; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds - a departure from the "hot mode" accretion model - although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z=0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities can precipitate from this hot gas, producing a rain of c...

  3. An Observed Fundamental Plane Relation for Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Cox, Thomas J; Robertson, Brant; Krause, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    We study observed correlations between supermassive black hole (BHs) and the properties of their host galaxies, and show that the observations define a BH 'fundamental plane' (BHFP), of the form M_BH sigma^(3.0+-0.3)*R_e^(0.43+-0.19), or M_BH M_bulge^(0.54+-0.17)*sigma^(2.2+-0.5), analogous to the FP of elliptical galaxies. The BHFP is preferred over a simple relation between M_BH and any of sigma, M_bulge, M_dyn, or R_e alone at >99.9% significance. The existence of this BHFP has important implications for the formation of supermassive BHs and the masses of the very largest black holes, and immediately resolves several apparent conflicts between the BH masses expected and measured for outliers in both the M_BH-sigma and M_BH-M_bulge relations.

  4. Coevolution (Or Not) of Supermassive Black Holes and Host Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Kormendy, John; Ho, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    We review the observed demographics and inferred evolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) found by dynamical modeling of spatially resolved kinematics. Most influential was the discovery of a tight correlation between BH mass and the velocity dispersion of the host-galaxy bulge. It and other correlations led to the belief that BHs and bulges coevolve by regulating each other's growth. New results are now replacing this simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs corr...

  5. On the Maximum Mass of Accreting Primordial Supermassive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. E.; Heger, Alexander; Whalen, Daniel J.; Haemmerlé, Lionel; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2017-06-01

    Supermassive primordial stars are suspected to be the progenitors of the most massive quasars at z ˜ 6. Previous studies of such stars were either unable to resolve hydrodynamical timescales or considered stars in isolation, not in the extreme accretion flows in which they actually form. Therefore, they could not self-consistently predict their final masses at collapse, or those of the resulting supermassive black hole seeds, but rather invoked comparison to simple polytropic models. Here, we systematically examine the birth, evolution, and collapse of accreting, non-rotating supermassive stars under accretion rates of 0.01-10 M ⊙ yr-1 using the stellar evolution code Kepler. Our approach includes post-Newtonian corrections to the stellar structure and an adaptive nuclear network and can transition to following the hydrodynamic evolution of supermassive stars after they encounter the general relativistic instability. We find that this instability triggers the collapse of the star at masses of 150,000-330,000 M ⊙ for accretion rates of 0.1-10 M ⊙ yr-1, and that the final mass of the star scales roughly logarithmically with the rate. The structure of the star, and thus its stability against collapse, is sensitive to the treatment of convection and the heat content of the outer accreted envelope. Comparison with other codes suggests differences here may lead to small deviations in the evolutionary state of the star as a function of time, that worsen with accretion rate. Since the general relativistic instability leads to the immediate death of these stars, our models place an upper limit on the masses of the first quasars at birth.

  6. Higher harmonics increase LISA's mass reach for supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sinha, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    Current expectations on the signal to noise ratios and masses of supermassive black holes which the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can observe are based on using in matched filtering only the dominant harmonic of the inspiral waveform at twice the orbital frequency. Other harmonics will affect the signal-to-noise ratio of systems currently believed to be observable by LISA. More significantly, inclusion of other harmonics in our matched filters would mean that more massive systems that were previously thought to be {\\it not} visible in LISA should be detectable with reasonable SNRs. Our estimates show that we should be able to significantly increase the mass reach of LISA and observe the more commonly occurring supermassive black holes of masses $\\sim 10^8M_\\odot.$ More specifically, with the inclusion of all known harmonics LISA will be able to observe even supermassive black hole coalescences with total mass $\\sim 10^8 M_\\odot (10^9M_\\odot)$ (and mass-ratio 0.1) for a low frequency cut-off of $10...

  7. Supermassive black holes formed by direct collapse of inflationary perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-11-01

    We propose a mechanism of producing a new type of primordial perturbations that collapse to primordial black holes, whose mass can be as large as necessary for them to grow to the supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts, without contradicting Cosmic Background Explorer/Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (COBE/FIRAS) upper limits on cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In our model, the observable Universe consists of two kinds of many small patches which experienced different expansion histories during inflation. Primordial perturbations large enough to form primordial black holes are realized on patches that experienced more Hubble expansion than the others. By making these patches the minor component, the rarity of supermassive black holes can be explained. On the other hand, most regions of the Universe experienced the standard history and, hence, only have standard almost-scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations confirmed by observations of CMB or large-scale structures of the Universe. Thus, our mechanism can evade the constraint from the nondetection of the CMB distortion set by the COBE/FIRAS measurement. Our model predicts the existence of supermassive black holes even at redshifts much higher than those observed. Hence, our model can be tested by future observations peeking into the higher-redshift Universe.

  8. The Collapse of Differentially Rotating Supermassive Stars: Conformally Flat Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Saijo, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of rapidly rotating relativistic supermassive stars by means of a 3+1 hydrodynamical simulations in conformally flat spacetime of general relativity. We study the evolution of differentially rotating supermassive stars of $q \\equiv J/M^{2} \\sim 1$ ($J$ is the angular momentum and $M$ is the gravitational mass of the star) from the onset of radial instability at $R/M \\sim 65$ ($R$ is the circumferential radius of the star) to the point where the conformally flat approximation breaks down. We find that the collapse of the star of $q \\gtrsim 1$, a radially unstable differentially rotating star form a black hole of $q \\lesssim 1$. The main reason to prevent formation of a black hole of $q \\gtrsim 1$ is that quite a large amount of angular momentum stays at the surface. We also find that most of the mass density collapses coherently to form a supermassive black hole with no appreciable disk nor bar. In the absence of nonaxisymmetric deformation, the collapse of differentia...

  9. Bosonization and Lie Group Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Yuan K

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a concise quantum operator formula for bosonization in which the Lie group structure appears in a natural way. The connection between fermions and bosons is found to be exactly the connection between Lie group elements and the group parameters. Bosonization is an extraordinary way of expressing the equation of motion of a complex fermion field in terms of a real scalar boson in two dimensions. All the properties of the fermion field theory are known to be preserved under this remarkable transformation with substantial simplification and elucidation of the original theory, much like Lie groups can be studied by their Lie algebras.

  10. Gravitational Interaction of Higgs Boson and Weak Boson Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    With the LHC discovery of a 125GeV Higgs-like particle, we study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson via the unique dimension-4 operator involving Higgs doublet and scalar curvature, \\xi H^\\dag H R, with nonminimal coupling \\xi. This Higgs portal term can be transformed away in Einstein frame and induces gauge-invariant effective interactions in the Higgs sector. We study the weak boson scattering in Einstein frame, and explicitly demonstrate the longitudinal-Goldstone boson equivalence theorem in the presence of \\xi coupling. With these, we derive unitarity bound on the Higgs gravitational coupling \\xi in Einstein frame, which is stronger than that inferred from the LHC Higgs measurements. We further analyze \\xi-dependent weak boson scattering cross sections at TeV scale, and study the LHC probe of \\xi coupling via weak boson scattering experiments.

  11. Crossover from Bosonic to Fermionic features in Composite Boson Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thilagam, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of conversion of composite bosons into fermionic fragment species with increasing densities of bound fermion pairs using the open quantum system approach. The Hilbert space of $N$-state-function is decomposed into a composite boson subspace and an orthogonal fragment subspace of quasi-free fermions that enlarges as the composite boson constituents deviate from ideal boson commutation relations. The tunneling dynamics of coupled composite boson states in confined systems is examined, and the appearance of exceptional points under experimentally testable conditions (densities, lattice temperatures) is highlighted. The theory is extended to examine the energy transfer between macroscopically coherent systems such as multichromophoric macromolecules (MCMMs) in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes.

  12. ElectroWeak Bosons Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Ouraou, Ahmimed; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Latest results on the measurement of gauge boson couplings, from ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, are presented. This review starts with an introduction to boson couplings, then the measurements of Triple and Quartic Couplings are described. And finally, limits on anomalous couplings are summarized.

  13. Hierarchy in Sampling Gaussian-correlated Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Joonsuk

    2016-01-01

    Boson Sampling represents a class of physical processes potentially intractable for classical devices to simulate. The Gaussian extension of Boson Sampling remains a computationally hard problem, where the input state is a product of uncorrelated Gaussian modes. Besides, motivated by molecular spectroscopy, Vibronic Boson Sampling involves operations that can generate Gaussian correlation among different Boson modes. Therefore, Gaussian Boson Sampling is a special case of Vibronic Boson Sampling. However, this does not necessarily mean that Vibronic Boson Sampling is more complex than Gaussian Boson Sampling. Here we develop a hierarchical structure to show how the initial correlation in Vibronic Boson Sampling can be absorbed in Gaussian Boson Sampling with ancillary modes and in a scattershot fashion. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling ...

  14. A Minimally Symmetric Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Low, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)xU(1) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal in all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (PNGB). Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  15. Electricity Serves Our Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Features a color poster entitled "Electricity Serves Our Community" and describes how the poster can be used to help teach about energy, electricity concepts, and types of electrical generation. Explains how teachers can obtain other resources such as posters, lesson plans, and kits from the National Energy Foundation. (PR)

  16. Why do they serve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Stéphanie; Glad, Ane

    2016-01-01

    that after the mission peace-keepers are generally more disappointed than peace-enforcers. Our results also show that self-benefit motives are important for younger soldiers with only a high school education, and that this group usually serves as peace-enforcers during their gap year....

  17. Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setlur

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that it is possible to bosonize fermions in any number of dimensions using the hydrodynamic variables, namely the velocity potential and density. The slow part of the Fermi field is defined irrespective of dimensionality and the commutators of this field with currents and densities are exponentiated using the velocity potential as conjugate to the density. An action in terms of these canonical bosonic variables is proposed that reproduces the correct current and density correlations. This formalism in one dimension is shown to be equivalent to the Tomonaga-Luttinger approach as it leads to the same propagator and exponents. We compute the one-particle properties of a spinless homogeneous Fermi system in two spatial dimensions with long-range gauge interactions and highlight the metal-insulator transition in the system. A general formula for the generating function of density correlations is derived that is valid beyond the random phase approximation. Finally, we write down a formula for the annihilation operator in momentum space directly in terms of number conserving products of Fermi fields.

  18. Higgs le boson manquant

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Sean; Evans, Lyn; Gagnon, Pauline; Bernet, Lison

    2013-01-01

    Ce livre conte l'histoire de la plus fascinante aventure scientifique de notre temps : la quête du "boson de Higgs". La découverte présumée de cette particule élémentaire en juillet 2012 a secoué le monde, tant pour son étrangeté que pour la démesure des moyens déployés. Qu'on en juge : un accélérateur de 27 km de circonférence sous la frontière franco-suisse - le LHC, la plus grande machine jamais construite par l'Homme-, une équipe de 6 000 chercheurs, techniciens, ingénieurs, informaticiens, etc., et un budget de plus de 9 milliards de $ ! L'auteur, cosmologiste et vulgarisateur de renom, nous révèle les enjeux de cette recherche ultime : le boson expliquerait ni plus ni moins pourquoi la matière qui nous entoure a une masse, et lèverait un coin du voile qui entoure la mystérieuse "matière noire". Il détaille surtout sa genèse et les rivalités, les doutes mais aussi les intuitions géniales des acteurs du projet. Cette galerie de personnages hors norme font de la lecture de ce li...

  19. Search for nonminimal neutral Higgs bosons from Z -boson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komamiya, S.; Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Averill, D.; Ballam, J.; Barish, B.C.; Barklow, T.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartelt, J.; Bethke, S.; Blockus, D.; Bonvicini, G.; Boyarski, A.; Brabson, B.; Breakstone, A.; Bulos, F.; Burchat, P.R.; Burke, D.L.; Cence, R.J.; Chapman, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Cords, D.; Coupal, D.P.; Dauncey, P.; DeStaebler, H.C.; Dorfan, D.E.; Dorfan, J.M.; Drewer, D.C.; Elia, R.; Feldman, G.J.; Fernandes, D.; Field, R.C.; Ford, W.T.; Fordham, C.; Frey, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Gatto, C.; Gero, E.; Gidal, G.; Glanzman, T.; Goldhaber, G.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Gratta, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Hanson, G.; Harr, R.; Harral, B.; Harris, F.A.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hayes, K.; Hearty, C.; Heusch, C.A.; Hildreth, M.D.; Himel, T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Hong, S.J.; Hutchinson, D.; Hylen, J.; Innes, W.R.; Jacobsen, R.G.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Kadyk, J.A.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.S.; Koska, W.; Kowalski, L.A.; Kozanecki, W.; Kral, J.F.; Kuhlen, M.; Labarga, L

    1990-06-11

    Using the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider, we search for decays of the {ital Z} boson to a pair of nonminimal Higgs bosons ({ital Z}{r arrow}{ital H}{sub {ital s}}{sup 0}{ital H}{sub {ital p}}{sup 0}), where one of them is relatively light ({approx lt}10 GeV). We find no evidence for these decays and we obtain limits on the {ital ZH}{sub {ital s}}{sup 0}{ital H}{sub {ital p}}{sup 0} coupling as a function of the Higgs-boson masses.

  20. Formation of discs around super-massive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicovic, Felipe G.; Cuadra, Jorge; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    We model numerically the evolution of 104 M ⊙ turbulent molecular clouds in near-radial infall onto 106 M ⊙, equal-mass supermassive black hole binaries, using a modified version of the SPH code gadget-3. We investigate the different gas structures formed depending on the relative inclination between the binary and the cloud orbits. Our first results indicate that an aligned orbit produces mini-discs around each black hole, almost aligned with the binary; a perpendicular orbit produces misaligned mini-discs; and a counter-aligned orbit produces a circumbinary, counter-rotating ring.

  1. Formation of discs around super-massive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Goicovic, Felipe G; Sesana, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We model numerically the evolution of $10^4M_\\odot$ turbulent molecular clouds in near-radial infall onto $10^6M_\\odot$, equal-mass super-massive black hole binaries, using a modified version of the SPH code GADGET-3. We investigate the different gas structures formed depending on the relative inclination between the binary and the cloud orbits. Our first results indicate that an aligned orbit produces mini-discs around each black hole, almost aligned with the binary; a perpendicular orbit produces misaligned mini-discs; and a counter-aligned orbit produces a circumbinary, counter-rotating ring.

  2. ASTRONOMICAL PLATE ARCHIVES AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hudec

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent extensive digitisation of astronomical photographic plate archives, the development of new dedicated software and the use of powerful computers have for the first time enabled effective data mining in extensive plate databases, with wide applications in various fields of recent astrophysics. As an example, analyses of supermassive binary black holes (binary blazars require very long time intervals (50 years and more, which cannot be provided by other data sources. Examples of data obtained from data mining in plate archives are presented and briefly discussed.

  3. Theory of disk accretion onto supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Armitage, P J

    2004-01-01

    Accretion onto supermassive black holes produces both the dramatic phenomena associated with active galactic nuclei and the underwhelming displays seen in the Galactic Center and most other nearby galaxies. I review selected aspects of the current theoretical understanding of black hole accretion, emphasizing the role of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and gravitational instabilities in driving the actual accretion and the importance of the efficacy of cooling in determining the structure and observational appearance of the accretion flow. Ongoing investigations into the dynamics of the plunging region, the origin of variability in the accretion process, and the evolution of warped, twisted, or eccentric disks are summarized.

  4. M33 A Galaxy with No Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Gebhardt, K; Kormendy, J; Pinkney, J C; Bower, G A; Green, R; Gull, T R; Hutchings, J B; Joseph, C L; Kaiser, M E; Nelson, C H; Richstone, D O; Weistrop, D; Gebhardt, Karl; Lauer, Tod R.; Kormendy, John; Pinkney, Jason; Bower, Gary A.; Green, Richard; Gull, Theodore; Joseph, Chuck; Nelson, Charles H.; Richstone, Douglas; Weistrop, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Galaxies that contain bulges appear to contain central black holes whose masses correlate with the velocity dispersion of the bulge. We show that no corresponding relationship applies in the pure disk galaxy M33. Three-integral dynamical models fit Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 photometry and STIS spectroscopy best if the central black hole mass is zero. The upper limit is 1500 M_sun. This is significantly below the mass expected from the velocity dispersion of the nucleus and far below any mass predicted from the disk kinematics. Our results suggest that supermassive black holes are associated only with galaxy bulges and not with their disks or dark halos.

  5. Understanding the fate of merging supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the fate of merging supermassive black holes in galactic mergers, and the gravitational wave emission from this process, are important LISA science goals. To this end, we present results from numerical relativity simulations of binary black hole mergers using the so-called Lazarus approach to model gravitational radiation from these events. In particular, we focus here on some recent calculations of the final spin and recoil velocity of the remnant hole formed at the end of a binary black hole merger process, which may constraint the growth history of massive black holes at the core of galaxies and globular clusters.

  6. Higgs Boson Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    StDenis, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a new boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC proton-proton collider is confirmed using the full data set collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The spin and parity properties of the boson are consistent with that of a scalar particle with positive parity. Comparison of the $J^{P}=0^+$ hypothesis to alternatives $J^{P} = 0^-,1^{+},1^-,2^+$ result in exclusion of these other choices at 97.8\\%, 99.97\\%, 99.7\\%, and 99.3\\% CL. The Higgs-boson Mass is $m_H = 125.5 \\pm 0.2 {\\rm (stat.)} ^{+0.5}_{-0.5} {\\rm (syst.)}$ \\GeV. Evidence for production of the Higgs boson by vector boson fusion is obtained in a model-independent approach by comparing the signal strengths $\\mu$ of vector boson fusion and production associated with a vector boson to to that for gluon fusion including associated production of top quark pairs: $\\mu_{\\rm VBF+VH}/\\mu_{\\rm ggF+ttH}= 1.4 ^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \\rm{(stat.)} ^{+0.6}_{-0.4} \\rm{(syst.)}$ which is 3.3 Gaussian standard deviations from zero.

  7. Light or heavy supermassive black hole seeds: the role of internal rotation in the fate of supermassive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Rossi, Elena M.

    2016-10-01

    Supermassive black holes are a key ingredient of galaxy evolution. However, their origin is still highly debated. In one of the leading formation scenarios, a black hole of ˜100 M⊙ results from the collapse of the inner core of a supermassive star (≳ 104 - 5 M⊙), created by the rapid accumulation (≳ 0.1 M⊙ yr-1) of pristine gas at the centre of newly formed galaxies at z ˜ 15. The subsequent evolution is still speculative: the remaining gas in the supermassive star can either directly plunge into the nascent black hole, or part of it can form a central accretion disc, whose luminosity sustains a surrounding, massive, and nearly hydrostatic envelope (a system called a "quasi-star"). To address this point, we consider the effect of rotation on a quasi-star, as angular momentum is inevitably transported towards the galactic nucleus by the accumulating gas. Using a model for the internal redistribution of angular momentum that qualitative matches results from simulations of rotating convective stellar envelopes, we show that quasi-stars with an envelope mass greater than a few 105 M⊙ × black hole mass/100 M⊙)0.82 have highly sub-keplerian gas motion in their core, preventing gas circularisation outside the black hole's horizon. Less massive quasi-stars could form but last for only ≲ 104 years before the accretion luminosity unbinds the envelope, suppressing the black hole growth. We speculate that this might eventually lead to a dual black hole seed population: (i) massive (>104 M⊙) seeds formed in the most massive (>108 M⊙) and rare haloes; (ii) lighter (˜102 M⊙) seeds to be found in less massive and therefore more common haloes.

  8. Light or heavy supermassive black hole seeds: the role of internal rotation in the fate of supermassive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are a key ingredient of galaxy evolution. However, their origin is still highly debated. In one of the leading formation scenarios, a black hole of ˜100 M⊙ results from the collapse of the inner core of a supermassive star (≳104-5 M⊙), created by the rapid accumulation (≳0.1 M⊙ yr-1) of pristine gas at the centre of newly formed galaxies at z ˜ 15. The subsequent evolution is still speculative: the remaining gas in the supermassive star can either directly plunge into the nascent black hole or part of it can form a central accretion disc, whose luminosity sustains a surrounding, massive, and nearly hydrostatic envelope (a system called a `quasi-star'). To address this point, we consider the effect of rotation on a quasi-star, as angular momentum is inevitably transported towards the galactic nucleus by the accumulating gas. Using a model for the internal redistribution of angular momentum that qualitatively matches results from simulations of rotating convective stellar envelopes, we show that quasi-stars with an envelope mass greater than a few 105 M_{⊙} × (black hole mass/100 M_{⊙})^{0.82} have highly sub-Keplerian gas motion in their core, preventing gas circularization outside the black hole's horizon. Less massive quasi-stars could form but last for only ≲104 yr before the accretion luminosity unbinds the envelope, suppressing the black hole growth. We speculate that this might eventually lead to a dual black hole seed population: (i) massive (>104 M⊙) seeds formed in the most massive (>108 M⊙) and rare haloes; (ii) lighter (˜102 M⊙) seeds to be found in less massive and therefore more common haloes.

  9. Coupling chiral bosons to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, N R F; Braga, N R F; Wotzasek, C

    1995-01-01

    chiral boson actions of Floreanini and Jackiw (FJ), and of McClain,Wu and Yu (MWY) have been recently shown to be different representations of the same chiral boson theory. MWY displays manifest covariance and also a (gauge) symmetry that is hidden in the FJ side, which, on the other hand, displays the physical spectrum in a simple manner. We make use of the covariance of the MWY representation for the chiral boson to couple it to background gravity showing explicitly the equivalence with the previous results for the FJ representation

  10. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  11. The Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    Brunet, S

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS Higgs poster targeted to general public, explaining the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism and why it is important. It also explains the role of the Higgs Boson, how we look for it, the journey of the discovery and what comes after the discovery. Also available in French (http://cds.cern.ch/record/1697501). Don’t hesitate to use it in your institute’s corridors and in your outreach events! The poster is in A0 format. You can click on the image to download the high-quality .pdf version and print it at your favorite printshop. For any questions or comments you can contact atlas-outreach-coordination@cern.ch.

  12. Galaxy Rotation and Rapid Supermassive Black Hole Binary Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    During a galaxy merger, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in each galaxy is thought to sink to the center of the potential and form a supermassive black hole binary; this binary can eject stars via 3-body scattering, bringing the SMBHs ever closer. In a static spherical galaxy model, the binary stalls at a separation of about a parsec after ejecting all the stars in its loss cone -- this is the well-known final parsec problem. However it has been shown that SMBH binaries in non-spherical galactic nuclei harden at a nearly constant rate until reaching the gravitational wave regime. Here we use a suite of direct N-body simulations to follow SMBH binary evolution in both corotating and counterrotating flattened galaxy models. For N larger than 500K, we find that the evolution of the SMBH binary is convergent, and is independent of the particle number. Rotation in general increases the hardening rate of SMBH binaries even more effectively than galaxy geometry alone. SMBH binary hardening rates are similar for co...

  13. Ram-pressure feeding of supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggianti, Bianca M.; Jaffé, Yara L.; Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Radovich, Mario; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Fritz, Jacopo; Bettoni, Daniela; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fasano, Giovanni; Bellhouse, Callum; Hau, George; Omizzolo, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    When a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy accretes matter, it gives rise to a highly energetic phenomenon: an active galactic nucleus. Numerous physical processes have been proposed to account for the funnelling of gas towards the galactic centre to feed the black hole. There are also several physical processes that can remove gas from a galaxy, one of which is ram-pressure stripping by the hot gas that fills the space between galaxies in galaxy clusters. Here we report that six out of a sample of seven ‘jellyfish’ galaxies—galaxies with long ‘tentacles’ of material that extend for dozens of kiloparsecs beyond the galactic disks—host an active nucleus, and two of them also have galactic-scale ionization cones. The high incidence of nuclear activity among heavily stripped jellyfish galaxies may be due to ram pressure causing gas to flow towards the centre and triggering the activity, or to an enhancement of the stripping caused by energy injection from the active nucleus, or both. Our analysis of the galactic position and velocity relative to the cluster strongly supports the first hypothesis, and puts forward ram pressure as another possible mechanism for feeding the central supermassive black hole with gas.

  14. The Direct Collapse of Supermassive Black Hole Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2016-10-01

    The direct collapse model of supermassive black hole seed formation requires that thegas cools predominantly via atomic hydrogen. To this end we simulate the effect of ananisotropic radiation source on the collapse of a halo at high redshift. The radiationsource is placed at a distance of 3 kpc (physical) from the collapsing object and is setto emit monochromatically in the center of the Lyman-Werner (LW) band. The LW radiationemitted from the high redshift source is followed self-consistently using ray tracingtechniques. Due to self-shielding, a small amount of H2 is able to form at the verycenter of the collapsing halo even under very strong LW radiation. Furthermore, we find thata radiation source, emitting radiation field case,in terms of H2 fraction at an equivalent radius. These differences will significantly effectthe dynamics of the collapse. With the inclusion of a strong anisotropic radiation source, thefinal mass of the collapsing object is found to be M ~ 105 M⊙. This is consistentwith predictions for the formation of a supermassive star or quasi-star leading to asupermassive black hole.

  15. Measuring the Innermost Stable Circular Orbits of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, G.; Krawczynski, H.; Zalesky, L.; Kochanek, C. S.; Dai, X.; Morgan, C. W.; Mosquera, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a promising new technique, the g-distribution method, for measuring the inclination angle (i), the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), and the spin of a supermassive black hole. The g-distribution method uses measurements of the energy shifts in the relativistic iron line emitted by the accretion disk of a supermassive black hole due to microlensing by stars in a foreground galaxy relative to the g-distribution shifts predicted from microlensing caustic calculations. We apply the method to the gravitationally lensed quasars RX J1131–1231 (z s = 0.658, z l = 0.295), QJ 0158–4325 (z s = 1.294, z l = 0.317), and SDSS 1004+4112 (z s = 1.734, z l = 0.68). For RX J1131‑1231, our initial results indicate that r ISCO ≲ 8.5 gravitational radii (r g) and i ≳ 55° (99% confidence level). We detect two shifted Fe lines in several observations, as predicted in our numerical simulations of caustic crossings. The current ΔE distribution of RX J1131–1231 is sparsely sampled, but further X-ray monitoring of RX J1131–1231 and other lensed quasars will provide improved constraints on the inclination angles, ISCO radii, and spins of the black holes of distant quasars.

  16. Tidal disruption of asteroids by supermassive black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomboc A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The compact radio source Sgr A* at the centre of our Galaxy harbours a super-massive black hole, and is therefore the nearest laboratory for testing the super-massive black hole astrophysics and environment. Since it is not an active galactic nucleus, it also offers the possibility of observing the capture of low-mass objects, such as comets or asteroids, that may orbit the central black hole. In this paper we discuss conditions for tidal disruption of low-mass objects and predictions of the appearance and light curve of such events, as well as their relevance for the X-ray and infra-red flares detected in Sgr A*. The modelled light curves of such tidal disruption events bear marks of the strong gravitational field: tidal squeezing and elongation of the object, gravitational lensing, aberration of light, and Doppler effects. Finally, we show that this model is able to reproduce and fit X-ray flares.

  17. Dark matter haloes determine the masses of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2009-01-01

    The energy and momentum deposited by the radiation from accretion onto the supermassive black holes (BHs) that reside at the centres of virtually all galaxies can halt or even reverse gas inflow, providing a natural mechanism for supermassive BHs to regulate their growth and to couple their properties to those of their host galaxies. However, it remains unclear whether this self-regulation occurs on the scale at which the BH is gravitationally dominant, on that of the stellar bulge, the galaxy, or that of the entire dark matter halo. To answer this question, we use self-consistent simulations of the co-evolution of the BH and galaxy populations that reproduce the observed correlations between the masses of the BHs and the properties of their host galaxies. We first confirm unambiguously that the BHs regulate their growth: the amount of energy that the BHs inject into their surroundings remains unchanged when the fraction of the accreted rest mass energy that is injected, is varied by four orders of magnitude....

  18. Measuring the Innermost Stable Circular Orbits of Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chartas, G; Zalesky, L; Kochanek, C S; Dai, X; Morgan, C W; Mosquera, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a promising new technique, the g-distribution method, for measuring the inclination angle (i), the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), and the spin of a supermassive black hole. The g-distribution method uses measurements of the energy shifts in the relativistic iron line emitted by the accretion disk of a supermassive black hole due to microlensing by stars in a foreground galaxy relative to the g-distribution shifts predicted from microlensing caustic calculations. We apply the method to the gravitationally lensed quasars RX J1131-1231 (z_s=0.658, z_l=0.295), QJ 0158-4325 (z_s=1.294, z_l=0.317), and SDSS 1004+4112 (z_s=1.734, z_l=0.68). For RX J1131-1231 our initial results indicate that r_ISCO 76 degrees. We detect two shifted Fe lines, in several observations, as predicted in our numerical simulations of caustic crossings. The current DeltaE-distribution of RX J1131-1231 is sparsely sampled but further X-ray monitoring of RX J1131-1231 and other lensed quasars will provide improved constrai...

  19. Supermassive black hole spin-flip during the inspiral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, Laszlo A [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Szeged (Hungary); Biermann, Peter L [MPI for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Caramete, Laurentiu I, E-mail: gergely@physx.u-szeged.h, E-mail: plbiermann@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d, E-mail: lcaramete@gmail.co [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-10-07

    During post-Newtonian evolution of a compact binary, a mass ratio {nu} different from 1 provides a second small parameter, which can lead to unexpected results. We present a statistics of supermassive black hole candidates, which enables us first to derive their mass distribution, and then to establish a logarithmically even probability in {nu} of the mass ratios at their encounter. In the mass ratio range {nu} in (1/30, 1/3) of supermassive black hole mergers representing 40% of all possible cases, the combined effect of spin-orbit precession and gravitational radiation leads to a spin-flip of the dominant spin during the inspiral phase of the merger. This provides a mechanism for explaining a large set of observations on X-shaped radio galaxies. In another 40% with mass ratios {nu} in (1/30, 1/1000) a spin-flip never occurs, while in the remaining 20% of mergers with mass ratios {nu} in (1/3, 1) it may occur during the plunge. We analyze the magnitude of the spin-flip angle occurring during the inspiral as a function of the mass ratio and original relative orientation of the spin and orbital angular momentum. We also derive a formula for the final spin at the end of the inspiral in this mass ratio range.

  20. Supermassive black hole spin-flip during the inspiral

    CERN Document Server

    Gergely, László Á; Caramete, Laurenţiu I

    2010-01-01

    During post-Newtonian evolution of a compact binary, a mass ratio different from one provides a second small parameter, which can lead to unexpected results. We present a statistics of supermassive black hole candidates, which enables us first to derive their mass distribution, then to establish a logarithmically even probability of the mass ratios at their encounter. In the mass ratio range (1/30,1/3) of supermassive black hole mergers representing 40% of all possible cases, the combined effect of spin-orbit precession and gravitational radiation leads to a spin-flip of the dominant spin during the inspiral phase of the merger. This provides a mechanism for explaining a large set of observations on X-shaped radio galaxies. In another 40%, with mass ratios (1/30,1/1000) a spin-flip never happens, while in the remaining 20% of mergers with mass ratios (1/3,1) it may occur during the plunge. We analyze the magnitude of the spin-flip angle occurring during the inspiral as function of the mass ratio and original ...

  1. Capture of compact objects by supermassive black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filloux, Charline [Dpt. CASSIOPEE, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 429 06304 Nice (France); Pacheco, Jose A de Freitas [Dpt. CASSIOPEE, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 429 06304 Nice (France); Regimbau, Tania [Dpt. ARTEMIS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 429 06304 Nice (France)

    2007-05-15

    Capture rates of compact objects were calculated using a recent solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in energy-space, including two-body resonant effects. The present study indicates that capture rates scale as {proportional_to} M{sub bh}{sup -1.048} consequence of the fact that dwarf galaxies have central regions denser than luminous objects. If the mass distribution of supermassive black holes has a lower cutoff at {approx}1.4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub o-dot} (corresponding to the lowest supermassive black hole mass), then 9 inspiral events are expected to be seen by LISA (7-8 corresponding to white dwarf captures and 1-2 to neutron star or stellar black hole captures) after 1 yr of operation. However, if the mass distribution extends down to {approx}2 x 10{sup 5}M{sub o-dot}, then the number of expected events increases up to 579 (corresponding to {approx}274 stellar black hole captures, {approx}194 neutron star captures and {approx}111 white dwarf captures)

  2. Drama is Served

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svømmekjær, Heidi Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on how the theme of food is used for making social, gender, and other distinctions in the weekly Danish radio series The Hansen Family (The Danish Broadcasting Corporation, 1929-49) and in relation to other radio programmes from the 1930s and 1940s. These distinctions serve t...... with the wife. To Mrs. Hansen, it is the fruit of hard labour rather than a meal to be enjoyed. On a more general level, food is a limited resource, which often causes social tensions to burst onto the surface of human interaction....

  3. Serving the Public Interest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    system is likely to produce good governance. That is, if benevolent candidates are common, if the president has little discretionary power, and if the public sector is effective. We analyze the role of institutions like investigative media and re-election and show that they can improve or further hamper......We present a model of political selection in which voters elect a president from a set of candidates. We assume that some of the candidates are benevolent and that all voters prefer a benevolent president, i.e. a president who serves the public interest. Yet, political selection may fail in our...

  4. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T J M; Fonseca, Sofia; Araujo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four

  5. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T J M; Fonseca, Sofia; Araujo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-

  6. Higgs in bosonic channels (CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gori Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The Higgs boson mass measurement from the combination of H → ZZ → 4ℓ and H → γγ channels gives a value mH = 125.03+0.26−0.27 (stat. +0.13−0.15 (syst.. An upper limit ΓH < 22 MeV can be put on the Higgs boson width thanks to the new indirect method.

  7. Higgs boson measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, Chris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive set of Higgs boson measurements has been performed in pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and the results combined between the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Recent results from ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are consistent with expectations. With more data available, additional Higgs boson processes are on the cusp of observation, while measured processes promise improved precision.

  8. Bose-Einstein condensed supermassive black holes: a case of renormalized quantum field theory in curved space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the question whether a realistic black hole can be in principal similar to a star, having a large but finite redshift at its horizon. If matter spreads throughout the interior of a supermassive black hole with mass $M\\sim10^9M_\\odot$, it has an average density comparable to air and it may arise from a Bose-Einstein condensate of densely packed H-atoms. Within the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation with a positive cosmological constant, a bosonic quantum field describing H atoms is coupled to the curvature scalar with dimensionless coupling $\\xi$. In the Bose-Einstein condensed groundstate an exact, self-consistent solution for the metric occurs for a certain large value of $\\xi$, quadratic in the black hole mass. It is put forward that $\\xi$ is set by proper choice of the background metric as a first step of a renormalization approach, while otherwise the non-linearities are small. The black hole has a hair, the binding energy. Fluctuations about the ground state are considered.

  9. Boson Stars with Nontrivial Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Hoffmann, Christian; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    We construct boson star solutions in the presence of a phantom field, allowing for a nontrivial topology of the solutions. The wormholes residing at the core of the configurations lead to a number of qualitative changes of the boson star solutions. In particular, the typical spiraling dependence of the mass and the particle number on the frequency of the boson stars is lost. Instead, the boson stars with nontrivial topology approach a singular configuration in the limit of vanishing frequency. Depending on the value of the coupling constant, the wormhole geometry changes from a single throat configuration to a double throat configuration, featuring a belly inbetween the two throats. Depending on the mass of the boson field and its self-interaction, the mass and the size of these objects cover many orders of magnitude, making them amenable to various astrophysical observations. A stability analysis reveals, that the unstable mode of the Ellis wormhole is retained in the presence of the bosonic matter. However,...

  10. VLBA Reveals Closest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have found the closest pair of supermassive black holes ever discovered in the Universe -- a duo of monsters that together are more than 150 million times more massive than the Sun and closer together than the Earth and the bright star Vega. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF "These two giant black holes are only about 24 light-years apart, and that's more than 100 times closer than any pair found before," said Cristina Rodriguez, of the University of New Mexico (UNM) and Simon Bolivar University in Venezuela. Black holes are concentrations of mass with gravity so strong that not even light can escape them. The black hole pair is in the center of a galaxy called 0402+379, some 750 million light-years from Earth. Astronomers presume that each of the supermassive black holes was once at the core of a separate galaxy, then the two galaxies collided, leaving the black holes orbiting each other. The black holes orbit each other about once every 150,000 years, the scientists say. "If two black holes like these were to collide, that event would create the type of strong gravitational waves that physicists hope to detect with instruments now under construction," said Gregory Taylor, of UNM. The physicists will need to wait, though: the astronomers calculate that the black holes in 0402+379 won't collide for about a billion billion years. "There are some things that might speed that up a little bit," Taylor remarked. An earlier VLBA study of 0402+379, an elliptical galaxy, showed the pair of radio-wave-emitting objects near its core. Further studies using the VLBA and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope in Texas, revealed that the pair of objects is indeed a pair of supermassive black holes. "We needed the ultra-sharp radio 'vision' of the VLBA, particularly at the high radio frequencies of 22 and 43 GigaHertz, to get the detail needed to show that those objects are a pair of

  11. Cosmological Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes. II. Evidence for Downsizing of Spin Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan-Rong; Ho, Luis C

    2012-01-01

    The spin is an important but poorly constrained parameter for describing supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Using the continuity equation of SMBH number density, we explicitly obtain the mass-dependent cosmological evolution of the radiative efficiency for accretion, which serves as a proxy for SMBH spin. Our calculations make use of the SMBH mass function of active and inactive galaxies (derived in the first paper of this series), the bolometric luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), corrected for the contribution from Compton-thick sources, and the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We find that the radiative efficiency generally increases with increasing black hole mass at high redshifts (z>~1), roughly as \\eta \\propto M_bh^0.5, while the trend reverses at lower redshifts, such that the highest efficiencies are attained by the lowest mass black holes. Black holes with M_bh>~10^8.5M_sun maintain radiative efficiencies as high as \\eta~0.3-0.4 at high redshifts, near the maximum for rapidly ...

  12. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D{sub 2}, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. Our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  13. Astrophysics of Super-Massive Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    We present here an overview of recent work in the subject of astrophysical manifestations of super-massive black hole (SMBH) mergers. This is a field that has been traditionally driven by theoretical work, but in recent years has also generated a great deal of interest and excitement in the observational astronomy community. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to SMBH mergers provide the means to detect and characterize these highly energetic events at cosmological distances, even in the absence of a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. In addition to providing a mechanism for observing SMBH mergers, EM counterparts also give important information about the environments in which these remarkable events take place, thus teaching us about the mechanisms through which galaxies form and evolve symbiotically with their central black holes.

  14. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  15. Can supermassive black hole seeds form in galaxy mergers?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, A; Salvaterra, R

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently suggested that supermassive black holes at z = 5-6 might form from super-fast (\\dot M > 10^4 Msun/yr) accretion occurring in unstable, massive nuclear gas disks produced by mergers of Milky-Way size galaxies. Interestingly, such mechanism is claimed to work also for gas enriched to solar metallicity. These results are based on an idealized polytropic equation of state assumption, essentially preventing the gas from cooling. We show that under more realistic conditions, the disk rapidly (< 1 yr) cools, the accretion rate drops, and the central core can grow only to \\approx 100 Msun. In addition, most of the disk becomes gravitationally unstable in about 100 yr, further quenching the accretion. We conclude that this scenario encounters a number of difficulties that possibly make it untenable.

  16. Triplets of supermassive black holes: Astrophysics, Gravitational Waves and Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Hoffman, Loren; Benacquista, Matthew; Eichhorn, Christoph; Makino, Junichiro; Spurzem, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) found in the centers of many galaxies have been recognized to play a fundamental active role in the cosmological structure formation process. In hierarchical formation scenarios, SMBHs are expected to form binaries following the merger of their host galaxies. If these binaries do not coalesce before the merger with a third galaxy, the formation of a black hole triple system is possible. Numerical simulations of the dynamics of triples within galaxy cores exhibit phases of very high eccentricity (as high as $e \\sim 0.99$). During these phases, intense bursts of gravitational radiation can be emitted at orbital periapsis. This produces a gravitational wave signal at frequencies substantially higher than the orbital frequency. The likelihood of detection of these bursts with pulsar timing and the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna ({\\it LISA}) is estimated using several population models of SMBHs with masses $\\gtrsim 10^7 {\\rm M_\\odot}$. Assuming a fraction of binaries $\\ge 0.1$ ...

  17. Improved Constraints to the Local Supermassive Black Hole Occupation Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Gallo, Elena; Miller, Brendan P.

    2017-01-01

    The occupation fraction of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in local dwarf galaxies is thought to be related to the formation mechanism of the first black holes in the early Universe. Light black hole seeds, such as Pop III star remnants, are likely to result in a significantly higher occupation fraction compared to heavy seeds (~104 solar mass) arising from the global collapse of massive gas clouds. Chandra observations of nearby dwarf galaxies can push the detection threshold for SMBH activity down to the lowest observable Eddington ratios. This, folded with analytical prescriptions for the intrinsic occupation fraction across the mass spectrum, yields an observational constraints to the SMBH occupation fraction in the dwarf galaxy regime. Building on previous work by Miller et al. (2015), here we analyze a sample of ~240 early-type galaxies (D < 30 Mpc) with archival Chandra coverage, and report on our improved constraints to the local SMBH occupation fraction.

  18. Dynamically important magnetic fields near accreting supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaninasab, M; Clausen-Brown, E; Savolainen, T; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2014-06-05

    Accreting supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies often produce 'jets'--collimated bipolar outflows of relativistic particles. Magnetic fields probably play a critical role in jet formation and in accretion disk physics. A dynamically important magnetic field was recently found near the Galactic Centre black hole. If this is common and if the field continues to near the black hole event horizon, disk structures will be affected, invalidating assumptions made in standard models. Here we report that jet magnetic field and accretion disk luminosity are tightly correlated over seven orders of magnitude for a sample of 76 radio-loud active galaxies. We conclude that the jet-launching regions of these radio-loud galaxies are threaded by dynamically important fields, which will affect the disk properties. These fields obstruct gas infall, compress the accretion disk vertically, slow down the disk rotation by carrying away its angular momentum in an outflow and determine the directionality of jets.

  19. Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troitsky, Sergey [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences,60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-11

    Though widely accepted, it is not proven that supermassive compact objects (SMCOs) residing in galactic centers are black holes. In particular, the Milky Way’s SMCO can be a giant nontopological soliton, Q-ball, made of a scalar field: this fits perfectly all observational data. Similar but tiny Q-balls produced in the early Universe may constitute, partly or fully, the dark matter. This picture explains in a natural way, why our SMCO has very low accretion rate and why the observed angular size of the corresponding radio source is much smaller than expected. Interactions between dark-matter Q-balls may explain how SMCOs were seeded in galaxies and resolve well-known problems of standard (non-interacting) dark matter.

  20. Cosmological Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes: Mass Functions and Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan-Rong; Ho, Luis C

    2012-01-01

    We derive the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) over the redshift range 0

  1. Tidal disruption events from supermassive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R; Nixon, Chris; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the pre-disruption gravitational dynamics and post-disruption hydrodynamics of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. We focus on binaries with relatively low mass primaries ($10^6M_{\\odot}$), moderate mass ratios, and separations with reasonably long gravitational wave inspiral times (tens of Myr). First, we generate a large ensemble (between 1 and 10 million) of restricted three-body integrations to quantify the statistical properties of tidal disruptions by circular SMBH binaries of initially-unbound stars. Compared to the reference case of a disruption by a single SMBH, the binary potential induces significant variance into the specific energy and angular momentum of the star at the point of disruption. Second, we use Newtonian numerical hydrodynamics to study the detailed evolution of the fallback debris from 120 disruptions randomly selected from the three-body ensemble (excluding only the most deeply penetrating encounters). We find that the overall mor...

  2. Growth of supermassive BHs and mass supply processes from galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatu, Nozomu

    2011-11-01

    We will talk on our evolutionary model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and a star formation in circumnuclear disk (CND), in which the mass-supply from a host galaxy and the physical states of CND are self-consistently considered. In the model, the turbulence excited by SN transports the angular momentum. Based on this model, we examined the physical link between the SMBH growth and different mass supply processes from host galaxies (e.g., major mergers, minor mergers, and bars). In this talk, we will show that the dispersion of final SMBH mass becomes larger as the total gas mass supplied from hosts is smaller. We will also suggest that smaller BHs grow through slower mass supply processes. Finally, we will discuss the conditions that SMBHs co-evolve with host galaxies.

  3. Could supermassive black holes be quintessential primordial black holes?

    CERN Document Server

    Bean, R; Bean, Rachel; Magueijo, Joao

    2002-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence for a population of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic bulges. We examine in detail the conditions under which these black holes must have originated from primordial black holes (PBHs). We consider the merging and accretion history experienced by SMBHs to find that, whereas it is possible that they were formed by purely astrophysical processes, this is unlikely and most probably a populations of primordial progenitors is necessary. We identify the mass distribution and comoving density of this population and then propose a cosmological scenario producing PBHs with the right properties. Although this is not essential we consider PBHs produced at the end of a period of inflation with a blue spectrum of fluctuations. We constrain the value of the spectral tilt in order to obtain the required PBH comoving density. We then assume that PBHs grow by accreting quintessence showing that their mass scales like the horizon mass while the quintessence field itself is scal...

  4. Multiple supermassive black hole systems: SKA's future leading role

    CERN Document Server

    Deane, Roger; Jarvis, Matt; Coriat, Mickäel; Bernardi, Gianni; Frey, Sandor; Heywood, Ian; Klöckner, Hans-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are believed to evolve through a process of hierarchical merging and accretion. Through this paradigm, multiple SMBH systems are expected to be relatively common in the Universe. However, to date there are poor observational constraints on multiple SMBHs systems with separations comparable to a SMBH gravitational sphere of influence (<< 1 kpc). In this chapter, we discuss how deep continuum observations with the SKA will make leading contributions towards understanding how multiple black hole systems impact galaxy evolution. In addition, these observations will provide constraints on and an understanding of stochastic gravitational wave background detections in the pulsar timing array sensitivity band (nanoHz -microHz). We also discuss how targets for pointed gravitational wave experiments (that cannot be resolved by VLBI) could potentially be found using the large-scale radio-jet morphology, which can be modulated by the presence of a close-pair binary SMBH...

  5. Astrophysics of Super-massive Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittman, Jeremy D

    2013-01-01

    We present here an overview of recent work in the subject of astrophysical manifestations of super-massive black hole (SMBH) mergers. This is a field that has been traditionally driven by theoretical work, but in recent years has also generated a great deal of interest and excitement in the observational astronomy community. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to SMBH mergers provide the means to detect and characterize these highly energetic events at cosmological distances, even in the absence of a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. In addition to providing a mechanism for observing SMBH mergers, EM counterparts also give important information about the environments in which these remarkable events take place, thus teaching us about the mechanisms through which galaxies form and evolve symbiotically with their central black holes.

  6. The Growth of Supermassive Black Holes Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Nandra, K; Alexander, D M; Ballantyne, D R; Barcons, X; Bauer, F E; Boller, T; Brandt, W N; Brusa, M; Cattaneo, A; Chartas, G; Coil, A L; Comastri, A; Croton, D J; Della Ceca, R; Dickinson, M; Fabian, A C; Fazio, G G; Fiore, F; Flanagan, K A; Forman, W R; Gehrels, N; Georgakakis, A; Georgantopoulos, I; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Hopkins, P F; Hornschemeier, A E; Ivison, R J; Kauffmann, G; King, A R; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Kunieda, H; Laird, E S; Levenson, N A; Li, Y; Madau, P; Ohashi, T; Pounds, K A; Primack, J R; Ranalli, P; Ricker, G R; Rossi, E M; Shemmer, O; Somerville, R S; Stern, D; Stiavelli, M; Tananbaum, H; Terashima, Y; Treister, E; Ueda, Y; Vignali, C; Volonteri, M; Watson, M G; White, N E; White, S D M

    2009-01-01

    One of the main themes in extragalactic astronomy for the next decade will be the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Many future observatories, including JWST, ALMA, GMT, TMT and E-ELT will intensively observe starlight over a broad redshift range, out to the dawn of the modern Universe when the first galaxies formed. It has, however, become clear that the properties and evolution of galaxies are intimately linked to the growth of their central black holes. Understanding the formation of galaxies, and their subsequent evolution, will therefore be incomplete without similarly intensive observations of the accretion light from supermassive black holes (SMBH) in galactic nuclei. To make further progress, we need to chart the formation of typical SMBH at z>6, and their subsequent growth over cosmic time, which is most effectively achieved with X-ray observations. Recent technological developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation now bring this within our grasp, enabling capabilities fully matched to those...

  7. The edge of infinity. Supermassive black holes in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio

    In the past, they were recognized as the most destructive force in nature. Now, following a cascade of astonishing discoveries, supermassive black holes have undergone a dramatic shift in paradigm. Astronomers are finding out that these objects may have been critical to the formation of structure in the early universe, spawning bursts of star formation, planets, and even life itself. They may have contributed as much as half of all the radiation produced after the Big Bang, and as many as 200 million of them may now be lurking through the vast expanses of the observable cosmos. In this elegant, non-technical account, Melia conveys for the general reader the excitement generated by the quest to expose what these giant distortions in the fabric of space and time have to say about our origin and ultimate destiny.

  8. High redshift supermassive blackholes: accretion through cold flows

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2013-01-01

    We use zoom-in techniques to re-simulate three high-redshift (z > 5.5) halos which host 10^9 solar mass blackholes from the ~ Gpc volume, MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. We examine a number of factors potentially affecting supermassive blackhole growth at high redshift in cosmological simulations. These include numerical resolution, feedback prescriptions and formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. We find that varying the size of the region over which feedback energy is deposited directly, either for fixed number of neighbours or fixed volume makes very little difference to the accretion history of blackholes. Changing mass resolution by factors of up to 64 also does not change the blackhole growth history significantly. We find that switching from the density-entropy formulation to the pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics slightly increases the accretion rate onto blackholes. In general numerical details appear to have small effects on the main fueling m...

  9. The Future of Direct Supermassive Black Hole Mass Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The repeated discovery of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the centers of galactic bulges, and the discovery of relations between the SMBH mass (M) and the properties of these bulges, has been fundamental in directing our understanding of both galaxy and SMBH formation and evolution. However, there are still many questions surrounding the SMBH - galaxy relations. For example, are the scaling relations linear and constant throughout cosmic history, and do all SMBHs lie on the scaling relations? These questions can only be answered by further high quality direct M estimates from a wide range in redshift. In this paper we determine the observational requirements necessary to directly determine SMBH masses, across cosmological distances, using current M modeling techniques. We also discuss the SMBH detection abilities of future facilities. We find that if different M modeling techniques, using different spectral features, can be shown to be consistent, then both 30 m ground- and 16 m space-based tel...

  10. Evolution Of Binary Supermassive Black Holes In Rotating Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Rasskazov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of a binary supermassive black hole with stars in a galactic nucleus can result in changes to all the elements of the binary's orbit, including the angles that define its orientation. If the nucleus is rotating, the orientation changes can be large, causing large changes in the binary's orbital eccentricity as well. We present a general treatment of this problem based on the Fokker-Planck equation for f, defined as the probability distribution for the binary's orbital elements. First- and second-order diffusion coefficients are derived for the orbital elements of the binary using numerical scattering experiments, and analytic approximations are presented for some of these coefficients. Solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation are then derived under various assumptions about the initial rotational state of the nucleus and the binary hardening rate. We find that the evolution of the orbital elements can become qualitatively different when we introduce nuclear rotation: 1) the orientation of the binar...

  11. Boson Stars Early History and Recent Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Schunck, Franz E.

    1998-01-01

    Boson stars are descendants of the so-called geons of Wheeler, except that they are built from scalar particles instead of electromagnetic fields. If scalar fields exist in nature, such localized configurations kept together by their self-generated gravitational field can form within Einstein's general relativity. In the case of complex scalar fields, an absolutely stable branch of such non-topological solitons with conserved particle number exists. Our present surge stems from the speculative possibility that these compact objects could provide a considerable fraction of the non-baryonic part of dark matter. In any case, they may serve as a convenient "laboratory" for studying numerically rapidly rotating bodies in general relativity and the generation of gravitational waves.

  12. Cosmic String Loops as the Seeds of Super-Massive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bramberger, Sebastian F; Jreidini, Paul; Quintin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of super-massive black holes at high redshifts indicate a possible tension with the standard Lambda CDM paradigm of early universe cosmology which has difficulties in explaining the origin of the required nonlinear compact seeds which trigger the formation of these super-massive black holes. Here we show that cosmic string loops which result from a scaling solution of strings formed during a phase transition in the very early universe lead to an additional source of compact seeds. The number density of string-induced seeds dominates at high redshifts and can help trigger the formation of the observed super-massive black holes.

  13. Implications of primordial black holes on the first stars and the origin of the super--massive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bambi, Cosimo; Dolgov, Alexander D; Freese, Katherine; Volonteri, Marta

    2008-01-01

    If the cosmological dark matter has a component made of small primordial black holes, they may have a significant impact on the physics of the first stars and on the subsequent formation of massive black holes. Primordial black holes would be adiabatically contracted into these stars and then would sink to the stellar center by dynamical friction, creating a larger black hole which may quickly swallow the whole star. The first stars would thus live only for a very short time and would not contribute much to reionization of the universe. They would instead become $10 - 10^3 M_\\odot$ black holes which (depending on subsequent accretion) could serve as seeds for the super--massive black holes seen at high redshifts as well as those inside galaxies today.

  14. Working Group Report: Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Sally; Gritsan, Andrei; Logan, Heather; Qian, Jianming; Tully, Chris; Van Kooten, Rick [et al.

    2013-10-30

    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

  15. Scaling of boson sampling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, P. D.; Opanchuk, B.; Rosales-Zárate, L.; Reid, M. D.; Forrester, P. J.

    2016-10-01

    Boson sampling is the problem of generating a multiphoton state whose counting probability is the permanent of an n ×n matrix. This is created as the output n -photon coincidence rate of a prototype quantum computing device with n input photons. It is a fundamental challenge to verify boson sampling, and therefore the question of how output count rates scale with matrix size n is crucial. Here we apply results from random matrix theory as well as the characteristic function approach from quantum optics to establish analytical scaling laws for average count rates. We treat boson sampling experiments with arbitrary inputs, outputs, and losses. Using the scaling laws we analyze grouping of channel outputs and the count rates for this case.

  16. Search for additional Higgs bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Jochen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most well-established theories in physics. However, it has some flaws which cannot be explained without physics beyond the Standard Model. Most of the theoretically explored extensions which provide potential solutions include further Higgs bosons in addition to the discovered resonance with the mass of about 125 GeV. This talk summarizes current efforts carried out by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations targeting at the discovery of further resonances. A variety of observables in multiple final states is studied and interpreted in terms of additional Higgs bosons predicted by selected models. Those additional bosons are not necessarily neutral, but could also be charged.

  17. Light Front Boson Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    stract The scope and aim of this work is to describe the two-body interaction mediated by a particle (either the scalar or the gauge boson) within the light-front formulation. To do this, first of all we point out the importance of propagators and Green functions in Quantum Mechanics. Then we project the covariant quantum propagator onto the light front time to get the propagator for scalar particles in these coordinates. This operator propagates the wave function from x+ = 0 to x+ > O. It corresponds to the definition of the time ordering operation in the light front time x+. We calculate the light-front Green's function for 2 interacting bosons propagating forward in x+. We also show how to write down the light front Green's function from the Feynman propagator and finally make a generalization to N bosons.

  18. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe Kα line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  19. Interaction of Supermassive Black Holes with their Stellar and Dark Matter Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, David

    2004-01-01

    A review of recent theoretical work on the interactions of supermassive single and binary black holes with their nuclear environments, highlighting ways in which the observed structure of nuclei can be used to constrain the formation history of black holes.

  20. Serving Bowl Selection Biases the Amount of Food Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Wansink, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how common serving bowls containing food for multiple persons influence serving behavior and consumption and whether they do so independently of satiation and food evaluation. Methods: In this between-subjects experiment, 68 participants were randomly assigned to either a group serving pasta from a large-sized bowl (6.9-L…

  1. LHCb results with vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchesi, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of electroweak bosons production provide an important test of the Standard Model at the LHC energies and allow the partonic content of the proton to be constrained. The LHCb forward acceptance is suited for measurements complementary to the other LHC experiments. W and Z bosons are reconstructed in e and μ leptonic final states using data samples collected at energies in the center of mass frame of √ s = 7 , 8 , 13 TeV corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 , 2 , 0 . 29 fb − 1 respectively. Results on W + b / c quark and on W / Z + jets are also presented.

  2. Evidence of Higgs Boson Production through Vector Boson Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00333580

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 provided confirmation of the proposed mechanism for preserving the electroweak $SU(2) \\times U(1)$ gauge symmetry of the Standard Model of particle physics. It also heralded in a new era of precision Higgs physics. This thesis presents a measurement of the rate at which the Higgs boson is produced by vector boson fusion in the \\wwlnln decay channel. With gauge boson couplings in both the production and decay vertices, a VBF measurement in this channel is a powerful probe of the $VVH$ vertex strength. Using $4.5$~fb$^{-1}$ and $20.3$~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at respective center-of-mass energies of 7 and $8 \\tev$ in the ATLAS detector, measurements of the statistical significance and the signal strength are carried out in the Higgs mass range $100 \\leq m_H \\leq 200 \\gev$. These measurements are enhanced with a boosted decision tree that exploits the correlations between eight kinematic inputs in order to separate signal and background processes. At the...

  3. ALMA Explores How Supermassive Black Holes Talk to Their Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    We believe that supermassive black holes evolve in tandem with their host galaxies but how do the two communicate? Observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have revealed new clues about how a monster black hole talks to its galaxy.A Hubble image of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster. [Adapted from Russell et al. 2017]Observing FeedbackActive galactic nuclei (AGN), the highly luminous centers of some galaxies, are thought to radiate due to active accretion onto the supermassive black hole at their center.Its long been suspected that the radiation and outflowing material which often takes the form of enormous bipolar radio jets emitted into the surroundings influence the AGNs host galaxy, affecting star formation rates and the evolution of the galaxy. This AGN feedback has been alternately suggested to trigger star formation, quench it, and truncate the growth of massive galaxies.The details of this feedback process, however, have yet to be thoroughly understood in part because its difficult to obtain detailed observations of how AGN outflows interact with the galactic gas surrounding them. Now, a team of scientists led by Helen Russell (Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge, UK) has published the results of a new, high-resolution look at the gas in a massive galaxy in the center of the Phoenix cluster.Many Uses for FuelThe Phoenix cluster, a nearby (z = 0.596) group of star-forming galaxies, is the most luminous X-ray cluster known. The central galaxy in the cluster is especially active: it hosts a starburst of 500800 solar masses per year, the largest starburst found in any galaxy below a redshift of z= 1.The star formation in this galaxy is sustained by an enormous reservoir of cold molecular gas roughly 20 billion solar masses worth. This reservoir also powers the galaxys central black hole, fueling powerful radio jets that extend into the hot atmosphere of the galaxy and blow a giant bubble into the hot gas at each pole

  4. Gravitational Stability of Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kusmartsev, Fjodor V; Schunck, Franz E

    1991-01-01

    We investigate the stability of general-relativistic boson stars by classifying singularities of differential mappings and compare it with the results of perturbation theory. Depending on the particle number, the star has the following regimes of behavior: stable, metastable, pulsation, and collapse.

  5. Higgs in Bosonic channel (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    All the investigated properties result to be fully consistent with the SM predictions: the signal strength and the signal strength modifiers are consistent with unity in all the bosonic channels considered; the hypothesis of a scalar particle is strongly favored, ag...

  6. Higgs boson properties in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mansoulie, Bruno; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement by the ATLAS collaboration of Higgs boson properties is presented, in terms of production cross-sections, simplified template cross-sections, couplings. The measurements are based on the analysis of the H decay channels to diphoton and 4 leptons, using 36.1 fb-1 of 13 TeV data recorded in 2015 and 2016.

  7. Phenomenological analysis of the interacting boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R. L.; Levit, S.

    1982-01-01

    The classical Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model is defined and expressed in terms of the conventional quadrupole variables. This is used in the analyses of the dynamics in the various limits of the model. The purpose is to determine the range and the features of the collective phenomena which the interacting boson model is capable of describing. In the commonly used version of the interacting boson model with one type of the s and d bosons and quartic interactions, this capability has certain limitations and the model should be used with care. A more sophisticated version of the interacting boson model with neutron and proton bosons is not discussed. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Interacting bosons, classical IBM Hamiltonian in quadrupole variables, phenomenological content of the IBM and its limitations.

  8. Cosmological growth and feedback from supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mocz, P; Fabian, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a simple evolutionary scenario for the growth of supermassive black holes (BHs), assuming growth due to accretion only, to learn about the evolution of the BH mass function from $z=3$ to 0 and from it calculate the energy budgets of different modes of feedback. We tune the parameters of the model by matching the derived X-ray luminosity function (XLF) with the observed XLF of active galactic nuclei. We then calculate the amount of comoving kinetic and bolometric feedback as a function of redshift, derive a kinetic luminosity function and estimate the amount of kinetic feedback and $PdV$ work done by classical double Fanaroff-Riley II (FR II) radio sources. We also derive the radio luminosity function for FR IIs from our synthesized population and set constraints on jet duty cycles. Around 1/6 of the jet power from FR II sources goes into $PdV$ work done in the expanding lobes during the time the jet is on. Anti hierarchical growth of BHs is seen in our model due to addition of an amount of mass bei...

  9. Prospects for Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Masses with TMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan; Wright, Shelley A.; Barth, Aaron J.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Simard, Luc; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of giant-segmented mirror telescopes will enable us to observe galactic nuclei at much higher angular resolution and sensitivity than ever before. These capabilities will introduce a revolutionary shift in our understanding of the origin and evolution of supermassive black holes by enabling more precise black hole mass measurements in a mass range that is unreachable today. We present simulations and predictions of the observations of nuclei that will be made with the Thirty Meter Telescope and the adaptive optics assisted integral- field spectrograph IRIS, which is capable of diffraction-limited spectroscopy from Z band (0.9 μm) to K band (2.2 μm). These simulations, for the first time, use realistic values for the sky, telescope, adaptive optics system, and instrument to determine the expected signal-to-noise ratio of a range of possible targets spanning intermediate mass black holes of ˜10^4 M⊙ to the most massive black holes known today of >10^10 M⊙. I will present simulations across a spectrum of black hole masses and galaxy types to show the ability of IRIS and TMT to quantitatively explore the demographics of black holes in the universe. I will discuss how these observations will enable our study of the origin of the MBH - galaxy velocity dispersion and MBH - galaxy luminosity relationships, and the evolution of black holes through cosmic time.

  10. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, David

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) will eventually detect the gravitational wave (GW) background produced by a cosmological population of binary supermassive black hole (SBHs). In this talk, I review the ways in which the formation and evolution of the binary population determine the amplitude and form of the GW spectrum. A major source of systematic uncertainty is the mass function of SBHs; in the past, SBH masses have often been overestimated, and the number of SBHs with trustworthy mass estimates is still very small. The presence of gas and stars around the binaries accelerates the evolution at large separations, reducing the amplitude of the GW spectrum at low frequencies. I will highlight two recent developments in our theoretical understanding of binary evolution. (1) Slight departures from axi-symmetry in a galaxy imply a sustained supply of stars to the very center, thus overcoming the “final-parsec problem”. (2) In the generic case of a rotating nucleus, the plane of the binary’s orbit evolves predictably toward alignment with the symmetry plane of the nucleus; the binary’s eccentricity also evolves in tandem with the orientation, sometimes reaching values close to one. These processes should leave distinct imprints on the stochastic GW spectrum, and have important implications for the likelihood of GW detection in the near future.

  11. Examining subgrid models of supermassive black holes in cosmological simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M

    2010-01-01

    While supermassive black holes (SMBHs) play an important role in galaxy and cluster evolution, at present they can only be included in large-scale cosmological simulation via subgrid techniques. However, these subgrid models have not been studied in a systematic fashion. Using a newly-developed fast, parallel spherical overdensity halo finder built into the simulation code FLASH, we perform a suite of dark matter-only cosmological simulations to study the effects of subgrid model choice on relations between SMBH mass and dark matter halo mass and velocity dispersion. We examine three aspects of SMBH subgrid models: the choice of initial black hole seed mass, the test for merging two black holes, and the frequency of applying the subgrid model. We also examine the role that merging can play in determining the relations, ignoring the complicating effects of SMBH-driven accretion and feedback. We find that the choice of subgrid model can dramatically affect the black hole merger rate, the cosmic SMBH mass densit...

  12. Forming supermassive black holes by accreting dark and baryon matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, J; Lou, Y Q; Zhang, S; Hu, Jian; Shen, Yue; Lou, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2006-01-01

    Given a large-scale mixture of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) particles and baryon matter distributed in the early Universe, we advance here a two-phase accretion scenario for forming supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses around $\\sim 10^9 M_{\\odot}$ at high redshifts $z (\\gsim 6)$. The first phase is conceived to involve a rapid quasi-spherical and quasi-steady Bondi accretion of mainly SIDM particles embedded with baryon matter onto seed black holes (BHs) created at redshifts $z\\lsim 30$ by the first generation of massive Population III stars; this earlier phase rapidly gives birth to significantly enlarged seed BH masses of $M_{\\hbox{\\tiny BH},t_1}\\backsimeq 1.4\\times 10^6\\ M_\\odot \\sigma_0/(1\\hbox{cm}^2\\hbox{g}^{-1})(C_s/30\\hbox{km s}^{-1})^4$ during $z\\sim 20-15$, where $\\sigma_0$ is the cross section per unit mass of SIDM particles and $C_s$ is the velocity dispersion in the SIDM halo referred to as an effective "sound speed". The second phase of BH mass growth is envisaged to proceed primar...

  13. Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes from Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Filloux, Ch; Pacheco, J A de Freitas; Silk, J

    2009-01-01

    The correlations between the mass of supermassive black holes and properties of their host galaxies are investigated through cosmological simulations. Black holes grow from seeds of 100 solar masses inserted into density peaks present in the redshift range 12-15. Seeds grow essentially by accreting matter from a nuclear disk and also by coalescences resulting from merger episodes. At z=0, our simulations reproduce the black hole mass function and the correlations of the black hole mass both with stellar velocity dispersion and host dark halo mass. Moreover, the evolution of the black hole mass density derived from the present simulations agrees with that derived from the bolometric luminosity function of quasars, indicating that the average accretion history of seeds is adequately reproduced . However, our simulations are unable to form black holes with masses above $10^9 M_{\\odot}$ at $z\\sim 6$, whose existence is inferred from the bright quasars detected by the Sloan survey in this redshift range.

  14. Overlapping Inflow Events as Catalysts for Supermassive Black Hole Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona-Loaiza, Juan Manuel; Dotti, Massimo; Valdarnini, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest issues in modelling black hole fuelling is our lack of understanding of the processes by which gas loses angular momentum and falls from galactic scales down to the nuclear region where an accretion disc forms, subsequently guiding the inflow of gas down to the black hole horizon. It is feared that gas at larger scales might still retain enough angular momentum and settle into a larger scale disc with very low or no inflow to form or replenish the inner accretion disc (on ~0.01 pc scales). In this paper we report on hydrodynamical simulations of rotating infalling gas shells impacting at different angles onto a pre-existing, primitive large scale (~10 pc) disc around a super-massive black hole. The aim is to explore how the interaction between the shell and the disc redistributes the angular momentum on scales close to the black hole's sphere of influence. Angular momentum redistribution via hydrodynamical shocks leads to inflows of gas across the inner boundary, enhancing the inflow rate ...

  15. Modeling AGN outbursts from supermassive black hole binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When galaxies merge to assemble more massive galaxies, their nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs should form bound binaries. As these interact with their stellar and gaseous environments, they will become increasingly compact, culminating in inspiral and coalescence through the emission of gravitational radiation. Because galaxy mergers and interactions are also thought to fuel star formation and nuclear black hole activity, it is plausible that such binaries would lie in gas-rich environments and power active galactic nuclei (AGN. The primary difference is that these binaries have gravitational potentials that vary – through their orbital motion as well as their orbital evolution – on humanly tractable timescales, and are thus excellent candidates to give rise to coherent AGN variability in the form of outbursts and recurrent transients. Although such electromagnetic signatures would be ideally observed concomitantly with the binary’s gravitational-wave signatures, they are also likely to be discovered serendipitously in wide-field, high-cadence surveys; some may even be confused for stellar tidal disruption events. I discuss several types of possible “smoking gun” AGN signatures caused by the peculiar geometry predicted for accretion disks around SMBH binaries.

  16. Galaxy rotation and supermassive black hole binary evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, M. A.; Tahir, A.; Khan, F. M.; Holley-Bockelmann, H.; Baig, A. M.; Berczik, P.; Chishtie, F.

    2017-09-01

    Supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries residing at the core of merging galaxies are recently found to be strongly affected by the rotation of their host galaxies. The highly eccentric orbits that form when the host is counterrotating emit strong bursts of gravitational waves that propel rapid SMBH binary coalescence. Most prior work, however, focused on planar orbits and a uniform rotation profile, an unlikely interaction configuration. However, the coupling between rotation and SMBH binary evolution appears to be such a strong dynamical process that it warrants further investigation. This study uses direct N-body simulations to isolate the effect of galaxy rotation in more realistic interactions. In particular, we systematically vary the SMBH orbital plane with respect to the galaxy rotation axis, the radial extent of the rotating component, and the initial eccentricity of the SMBH binary orbit. We find that the initial orbital plane orientation and eccentricity alone can change the inspiral time by an order of magnitude. Because SMBH binary inspiral and merger is such a loud gravitational wave source, these studies are critical for the future gravitational wave detector, Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, an ESA/NASA mission currently set to launch by 2034.

  17. Hypervelocity intracluster stars ejected by supermassive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Holley-Bockelmann, K; Mihos, J C; Feldmeier, J J; Ciardullo, R; McBride, C; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Feldmeier, John J.; Ciardullo, Robin; Bride, Cameron Mc

    2005-01-01

    Hypervelocity stars have been recently discovered in the outskirts of galaxies, such as the unbound star in the Milky Way halo, or the three anomalously fast intracluster planetary nebulae (ICPNe) in the Virgo Cluster. These may have been ejected by close 3-body interactions with a binary supermassive black hole (SMBBH), where a star which passes within the semimajor axis of the SMBBH can receive enough energy to eject it from the system. Stars ejected by SMBBHs may form a significant sub-population with very different kinematics and mean metallicity than the bulk of the intracluster stars. The number, kinematics, and orientation of the ejected stars may constrain the mass ratio, semimajor axis, and even the orbital plane of the SMBBH. We investigate the evolution of the ejected debris from a SMBBH within a clumpy and time-dependent cluster potential using a high resolution, self-consistent cosmological N-body simulation of a galaxy cluster. We show that the predicted number and kinematic signature of the fas...

  18. Growth of Accreting Supermassive Black Hole Seeds and Neutrino Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Ter-Kazarian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of microscopic theory of black hole (MTBH, which explores the most important processes of rearrangement of vacuum state and spontaneous breaking of gravitation gauge symmetry at huge energies, we have undertaken a large series of numerical simulations with the goal to trace an evolution of the mass assembly history of 377 plausible accreting supermassive black hole seeds in active galactic nuclei (AGNs to the present time and examine the observable signatures today. Given the redshifts, masses, and luminosities of these black holes at present time collected from the literature, we compute the initial redshifts and masses of the corresponding seed black holes. For the present masses MBH/M⊙≃1.1×106 to 1.3×1010 of 377 black holes, the computed intermediate seed masses are ranging from MBHSeed/M⊙≃26.4 to 2.9×105. We also compute the fluxes of ultrahigh energy (UHE neutrinos produced via simple or modified URCA processes in superdense protomatter nuclei. The AGNs are favored as promising pure UHE neutrino sources, because the computed neutrino fluxes are highly beamed along the plane of accretion disk, peaked at high energies, and collimated in smaller opening angle (θ≪1.

  19. Tidal disruption rate of stars by spinning supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kesden, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A supermassive black hole can disrupt a star when its tidal field exceeds the star's self-gravity, and can directly capture stars that cross its event horizon. For black holes with mass M > 10^7 solar masses, tidal disruption of main-sequence stars occurs close enough to the event horizon that a Newtonian treatment of the tidal field is no longer valid. The fraction of stars that are directly captured is also no longer negligible. We calculate generically oriented stellar orbits in the Kerr metric, and evaluate the relativistic tidal tensor at pericenter for those stars not directly captured by the black hole. We combine this relativistic analysis with previous calculations of how these orbits are populated to determine tidal-disruption rates for spinning black holes. We find, consistent with previous results, that black-hole spin increases the upper limit on the mass of a black hole capable of tidally disrupting solar-like stars to ~7 x 10^8 solar masses. More quantitatively, we find that direct stellar capt...

  20. Supermassive Black Holes and Kinematics of Disc Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zasov, A V; Katkov, I Yu

    2011-01-01

    The statistical relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in disk galaxies and the kinematic properties of their host galaxies are analyzed. We use the radial velocity profiles for several galaxies obtained earlier at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences parallel with the data for other galaxies taken from the literature. We demonstrate that the SMBH masses correlate well with the velocities of rotation of disks at a fixed distance R \\approx 1 kpc (V1), which characterize the mean density of the central region of the galaxy. The SMBH masses correlate appreciably weaker with the asymptotic velocity at large distances from the center and with the angular velocity at the optical radius R_{25}. We suggest that the growth of the SMBH occurs inside of the forming "classical" bulge during a monolithic collapse of gas in the central kpc-size region of the protogalaxy. We have also found a correlation between the SMBH mass and the total (i...

  1. The formation of supermassive black holes in rapidly rotating disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2015-06-01

    Massive primordial halos exposed to moderate UV backgrounds are the potential birthplaces of supermassive black holes. In these halos, an initially isothermal collapse will occur, leading to high accretion rates of ~0.1 M⊙ yr-1. During the collapse, the gas in the interior will turn into a molecular state, and will form accretion disk in order to conserve angular momentum. We consider here the structure of such an accretion disk and the role of viscous heating in the presence of high accretion rates for a central star of 10, 100, and 104 M⊙. Our results show that the temperature in the disk increases considerably due to viscous heating, leading to a transition from the molecular to the atomic cooling phase. We found that the atomic cooling regime may extend out to several 100 AU for a 104 M⊙ central star and that it provides substantial support to stabilize the disk. It therefore favors the formation of a massive central object. The comparison of clump migration and contraction time scales shows that stellar feedback from these clumps may occur during the later stages of the evolution. Overall, viscous heating provides an important pathway to obtain an atomic gas phase within the center of the halo, and helps in the formation of very massive objects. The massive object may collapse to form a massive black hole of about ≥104 M⊙.

  2. Magnetic fields during the formation of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W

    2013-01-01

    Observations of quasars at $\\rm z> 6$ report the existence of a billion solar mass black holes. Comprehending their formation in such a short time scale is a matter of ongoing research. One of the most promising scenarios to assemble supermassive black holes is a monolithic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds in atomic cooling halos with $\\rm T_{vir} \\geq 10^{4} K$. In this article, we study the amplification and impact of magnetic fields during the formation of seed black holes in massive primordial halos. We perform high resolution cosmological magnetohydrodynamics simulations for four distinct halos and follow their collapse for a few free-fall times until the simulations reach a peak density of $\\rm 7 \\times 10^{-10} g/cm^{3}$. Our findings show that irrespective of the initial seed field, the magnetic field strength reaches a saturated state in the presence of strong accretion shocks. Under such conditions, the growth time becomes very short and amplification occurs rapidly within a small fraction of th...

  3. Never Before Seen: Two Supermassive Black Holes in Same Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    For the first time, scientists have proof two supermassive black holes exist together in the same galaxy, thanks to data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These black holes are orbiting each other and will merge several hundred million years from now, to create an even larger black hole resulting in a catastrophic event that will unleash intense radiation and gravitational waves. The Chandra image reveals that the nucleus of an extraordinarily bright galaxy, known as NGC 6240, contains not one, but two giant black holes, actively accreting material from their surroundings. This discovery shows that massive black holes can grow through mergers in the centers of galaxies, and that these enigmatic events will be detectable with future space-borne gravitational wave observatories. "The breakthrough came with Chandra's ability to clearly distinguish the two nuclei, and measure the details of the X-radiation from each nucleus," said Guenther Hasinger, of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, a coauthor of an upcoming Astrophysical Journal Letters paper describing the research. "These cosmic fingerprints revealed features characteristic of supermassive black holes -- an excess of high-energy photons from gas swirling around a black hole, and X-rays from fluorescing iron atoms in gas near black holes," he said. Previous X-ray observatories had shown that the central region produces X-rays, while radio, infrared and optical observations had detected two bright nuclei, but the nature of this region remained a mystery. Astronomers did not know the location of the X-ray source, or the nature of the two bright nuclei. "With Chandra, we hoped to determine which one, if either, of the nuclei was an active supermassive black hole," said Stefanie Komossa, also of the Max Planck Institute, lead author of the paper on NGC 6240. "Much to our surprise, we found that both were active black holes!" At a distance of about 400 million light years, NGC 6240

  4. The Self-Regulated Growth of Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Younger, Joshua D; Cox, T J; Herquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We present a series of simulations of the self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galaxies via three different fueling mechanisms: major mergers, minor mergers, and disk instabilities. The SMBHs in all three scenarios follow the same black hole fundamental plane (BHFP) and correlation with bulge binding energy seen in simulations of major mergers, and observed locally. Furthermore, provided that the total gas supply is significantly larger than the mass of the SMBH, its limiting mass is not influenced by the amount of gas available or the efficiency of black hole growth. This supports the assertion that SMBHs accrete until they reach a critical mass at which feedback is sufficient to unbind the gas locally, terminating the inflow and stalling further growth. At the same time, while minor and major mergers follow the same projected correlations (e.g., the $M_{BH}-\\sigma$ and Magorrian relations), SMBHs grown via disk instabilities do not, owing to structural differences between the host bu...

  5. Coevolution (Or Not) of Supermassive Black Holes and Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kormendy, John

    2013-01-01

    We review the observed demographics and inferred evolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) found by dynamical modeling of spatially resolved kinematics. Most influential was the discovery of a tight correlation between BH mass and the velocity dispersion of the host-galaxy bulge. It and other correlations led to the belief that BHs and bulges coevolve by regulating each other's growth. New results are now replacing this simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs correlate differently with different galaxy components. BHs are found in pure-disk galaxies, so classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges are not necessary to grow BHs. But BHs do not correlate with galaxy disks. And any correlations with disk-grown pseudobulges or halo dark matter are so weak as to imply no close coevolution. We suggest that there are four regimes of BH feedback. 1- Local, stochastic feeding of small BHs in mainly bulgeless galaxies involves too little energy to result in coevolution. 2- Global feeding in ma...

  6. The growth of supermassive black holes fed by accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Armijo, M A Montesinos

    2010-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are probably present in the centre of the majority of the galaxies. There is a consensus that these exotic objects are formed by the growth of seeds either by accreting mass from a circumnuclear disk and/or by coalescences during merger episodes. The mass fraction of the disk captured by the central object and the related timescale are still open questions, as well as how these quantities depend on parameters like the initial mass of the disk or the seed or on the angular momentum transport mechanism. This paper is addressed to these particular aspects of the accretion disk evolution and of the growth of seeds. The time-dependent hydrodynamic equations were solved numerically for an axi-symmetric disk in which the gravitational potential includes contributions both from the central object and from the disk itself. The numerical code is based on a Eulerian formalism, using a finite difference method of second-order, according to the Van Leer upwind algorithm on a staggered mesh. The pr...

  7. The Formation and Growth of the Earliest Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, James; Comastri, Andrea; Topical Panel 2. 1

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how supermassive black holes (BHs) form and grow in the very early (z>6) Universe, when the first stars and galaxies were forming, is one of the major science aims of the Athena mission. The physical processes responsible for the initial formation of these BHs and their early growth via accretion - when they are seen as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) - remain unclear. Large-scale optical/near-infrared imaging surveys have identified a few tens of luminous AGNs at z>6, powered by extremely massive BHs, and place vital constraints on the range of possible formation and growth mechanisms. To make further progress, however, we must identify lower luminosity and obscured AGNs at z>6, which represent the bulk of early BH growth. I will discuss recent measurements that trace the evolution of AGN population out to the highest possible redshifts (z~5-6) using the latest X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, Athena will provide the superb sensitivity over a wide field-of-view that is required to identify the earliest (z>6) growing BHs, trace their evolution within the early galaxy population, and determine the physical mechanisms that drive their formation and growth. Achieving these aims represents a major challenge that will push the capabilities of both Athena and supporting ground- and space-based observatories. I will present the prospects for a large Athena survey programme and discuss both the technical and scientific challenges that must be addressed in preparation for the Athena mission.

  8. The Assembly of Supermassive Black Holes at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The supermassive black holes (SMBHs) massive enough (>10^9 Msun) to power the bright redshift z=6 quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are thought to have assembled by mergers and/or accretion from less massive ``seed'' BHs. If the seeds are the 100 Msun remnant BHs of the first generation of stars, they must be in place well before redshift z=6, and must avoid being ejected from their parent proto-galaxies by the large (several 100 km/s) kicks they suffer from gravitational-radiation induced recoil during mergers with other BHs. We simulate the SMBH mass function at redshift z>6 using dark matter (DM) halo merger trees, coupled with a prescription for the halo occupation fraction, accretion histories, and radial recoil trajectories of the growing BHs. Our purpose is (i) to map out plausible scenarios for successful assembly of the z=6 quasar BHs by exploring a wide region of parameter space, and (ii) to predict the rate of low-frequency gravitational wave events detectable by the Laser Int...

  9. Coevolution of Supermassive Black Holes and Circumnuclear Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakatu, Nozomu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and a circumnuclear disk (CND), taking into account the mass-supply from a host galaxy and the physical states of CND. In the model, two distinct accretion modes depending on gravitational stability of the CND play a key role on accreting gas to a SMBH. (i) If the CMD is gravitationally unstable, energy feedback from supernovae (SNe) supports a geometrically thick, turbulent gas disk. The accretion in this mode is dominated by turbulent viscosity, and it is significantly larger than that in the mode (ii), i.e., the CMD is supported by gas pressure. Once the gas supply from the host is stopped, the high accretion phase ($\\sim 0.01- 0.1 M_{\\odot} {\\rm yr}^{-1}$) changes to the low one (mode (ii), $\\sim 10^{-4} M_{\\odot} {\\rm yr}^{-1}$), but there is a delay with $\\sim 10^{8}$ yr. Through this evolution, the gas-rich CND turns into the gas poor stellar disk. We found that not all the gas supplied from the host galaxy accrete onto the SMBH ev...

  10. Possible evolution of supermassive black holes from FRI quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Matthew I.; Christian, Damian J.; Garofalo, David; D'Avanzo, Jaclyn

    2016-08-01

    We explore the question of the rapid buildup of black hole mass in the early universe employing a growing black hole mass-based determination of both jet and disc powers predicted in recent theoretical work on black hole accretion and jet formation. Despite simplified, even artificial assumptions about accretion and mergers, we identify an interesting low probability channel for the growth of one billion solar mass black holes within hundreds of millions of years of the big bang without appealing to super Eddington accretion. This result is made more compelling by the recognition of a connection between this channel and an end product involving active galaxies with FRI radio morphology but weaker jet powers in mildly sub-Eddington accretion regimes. While FRI quasars have already been shown to occupy a small region of the available parameter space for black hole feedback in the paradigm, we further suggest that the observational dearth of FRI quasars is also related to their connection to the most massive black hole growth due to both these FRIs high redshifts and relative weakness. Our results also allow us to construct the AGN (active galactic nucleus) luminosity function at high redshift, that agree with recent studies. In short, we produce a connection between the unexplained paucity of a given family of AGNs and the rapid growth of supermassive black holes, two heretofore seemingly unrelated aspects of the physics of AGNs.

  11. Toward Precision Supermassive Black Hole Masses Using Megamaser Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Greene, Jenny E.; Braatz, James A.; Constantin, Anca; Kuo, Cheng-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Megamaser disks provide the most precise and accurate extragalactic supermassive black hole (BH) masses. Here we describe a search for megamasers in nearby galaxies using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We focus on galaxies where we believe that we can resolve the gravitational sphere of influence of the BH and derive a stellar or gas dynamical measurement with optical or NIR observations. Since there are only a handful of super massive BHs that have direct BH mass measurements from more than one method, even a single galaxy with a megamaser disk and a stellar dynamical BH mass would provide necessary checks on the stellar dynamical methods. We targeted 87 objects from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Massive Galaxy Survey, and detected no new maser disks. Most of the targeted objects are elliptical galaxies with typical stellar velocity dispersions of 250 km s-1 and distances within 130 Mpc. We discuss the implications of our non-detections, whether they imply a threshold X-ray luminosity required for masing, or possibly reflect the difficulty of maintaining a masing disk around much more massive (≳ {10}8 {M}⊙ ) BHs at a low Eddington ratio. Given the power of maser disks for probing BH accretion and demographics, we suggest that future maser searches should endeavour to remove remaining sample biases, in order to sort out the importance of these covariant effects.

  12. Towards Precision Supermassive Black Hole Masses using Megamaser Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Remco C E van den; Braatz, James A; Constantin, Anca; Kuo, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Megamaser disks provide the most precise and accurate extragalactic supermassive black hole masses. Here we describe a search for megamasers in nearby galaxies using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We focus on galaxies where we believe that we can resolve the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole and derive a stellar or gas dynamical measurement with optical or NIR observations. Since there are only a handful of super massive black holes (SMBH) that have direct black hole mass measurements from more than one method, even a single galaxy with a megamaser disk and a stellar dynamical black hole mass would provide necessary checks on the stellar dynamical methods. We targeted 87 objects from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Massive Galaxy Survey, and detected no new maser disks. Most of the targeted objects are elliptical galaxies with typical stellar velocity dispersions of 250 km/s and distances within 130 Mpc. We discuss the implications of our non-detections, whether they imply a threshold X-ray lumi...

  13. Alignment of supermassive black hole binary orbits and spins

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of accretion onto supermassive black hole binaries suggest that much, perhaps most, of the matter eventually accretes onto one hole or the other. If so, then for binaries whose inspiral from ~1 pc to 0.001 - 0.01 pc is driven by interaction with external gas, both the binary orbital axis and the individual black hole spins can be reoriented by angular momentum exchange with this gas. Here we show that, unless the binary mass ratio is far from unity, the spins of the individual holes align with the binary orbital axis in a time few-100 times shorter than the binary orbital axis aligns with the angular momentum direction of the incoming circumbinary gas; the spin of the secondary aligns more rapidly than that of the primary by a factor ~(m_1/m_2)^{1/2}>1. Thus the binary acts as a stabilizing agent, so that for gas-driven systems, the black hole spins are highly likely to be aligned (or counteraligned if retrograde accretion is common) with each other and with the binary orbital axis. This alignm...

  14. MIGRATION TRAPS IN DISKS AROUND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellovary, Jillian M.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, NY 10024 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contain stars, stellar mass black holes, and other stellar remnants, which perturb the disk gas gravitationally. The resulting density perturbations exert torques on the embedded masses causing them to migrate through the disk in a manner analogous to planets in protoplanetary disks. We determine the strength and direction of these torques using an empirical analytic description dependent on local disk gradients, applied to two different analytic, steady-state disk models of SMBH accretion disks. We find that there are radii in such disks where the gas torque changes sign, trapping migrating objects. Our analysis shows that major migration traps generally occur where the disk surface density gradient changes sign from positive to negative, around 20–300R{sub g}, where R{sub g} = 2GM/c{sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius. At these traps, massive objects in the AGN disk can accumulate, collide, scatter, and accrete. Intermediate mass black hole formation is likely in these disk locations, which may lead to preferential gap and cavity creation at these radii. Our model thus has significant implications for SMBH growth as well as gravitational wave source populations.

  15. Luminous Thermal Flares from Quiescent Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gezari, Suvi; Cenko, S Bradley; Eracleous, Michael; Forster, Karl; Goncalves, Thiago S; Martin, D Chris; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Seibert, Mark; Schiminovich, David; Wyder, Ted K

    2009-01-01

    A dormant supermassive black hole lurking in the center of a galaxy will be revealed when a star passes close enough to be torn apart by tidal forces, and a flare of electromagnetic radiation is emitted when the bound fraction of the stellar debris falls back onto the black hole and is accreted. Here we present the third candidate tidal disruption event discovered in the GALEX Deep Imaging Survey: a 1.6x10^{43} erg s^{-1} UV/optical flare from a star-forming galaxy at z=0.1855. The UV/optical SED during the peak of the flare measured by GALEX and Palomar LFC imaging can be modeled as a single temperature blackbody with T_{bb}=1.7x10^{5} K and a bolometric luminosity of 3x10^{45} ergs s^{-1}, assuming an internal extinction with E(B-V)_{gas}=0.3. The Chandra upper limit on the X-ray luminosity during the peak of the flare, L_{X}(2-10 keV) M_{g} > -18.9) to predict the detection capabilities of upcoming optical synoptic surveys. (Abridged)

  16. The interaction between supermassive black holes and globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Spera, Mario; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Almost all galaxies along the Hubble sequence host a compact massive object (CMO) in their center. The CMO can be either a supermassive black hole (SMBH) or a very dense stellar cluster, also known as nuclear star cluster (NSC). Generally, heavier galaxies (mass >~ 10^{11} solar masses) host a central SMBH while lighter show a central NSC. Intermediate mass hosts, instead, contain both a NSC and a SMBH. One possible formation mechanisms of a NSC relies on the dry-merger (migratory) scenario, in which globular clusters (GCs) decay toward the center of the host galaxy and merge. In this framework, the absence of NSCs in high-mass galaxies can be imputed to destruction of the infalling GCs by the intense tidal field of the central SMBH. In this work, we report preliminary results of N-body simulations performed using our high-resolution, direct, code HiGPUs, to investigate the effects of a central SMBH on a single GC orbiting around it. By varying either the mass of the SMBH and the mass of the host galaxy, we d...

  17. Gravitational Wave Signal from Assembling the Lightest Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Rubbo, Louis

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the gravitational wave signal from the growth of 10 million solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBH) from the remnants of Population III stars. The assembly of these lower mass black holes is particularly important because observing SMBHs in this mass range is one of the primary science goals for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a planned NASA/ESA mission to detect gravitational waves. We use high resolution cosmological N-body simulations to track the merger history of the host dark matter halos, and model the growth of the SMBHs with a semi-analytic approach that combines dynamical friction, gas accretion, and feedback. We find that the most common source in the LISA band from our volume consists of mergers between intermediate mass black holes and SMBHs at redshifts less than 2. This type of high mass ratio merger has not been widely considered in the gravitational wave community; detection and characterization of this signal will likely require a different technique than is us...

  18. Cosmological Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes. II. Evidence for Downsizing of Spin Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Ho, Luis C.

    2012-04-01

    The spin is an important but poorly constrained parameter for describing supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Using the continuity equation of SMBH number density, we explicitly obtain the mass-dependent cosmological evolution of the radiative efficiency for accretion, which serves as a proxy for SMBH spin. Our calculations make use of the SMBH mass function of active and inactive galaxies (derived in the first paper of this series), the bolometric luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), corrected for the contribution from Compton-thick sources, and the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We find that the radiative efficiency generally increases with increasing black hole mass at high redshifts (z >~ 1), roughly as ηvpropM 0.5 •, while the trend reverses at lower redshifts, such that the highest efficiencies are attained by the lowest mass black holes. Black holes with M • >~ 108.5 M ⊙ maintain radiative efficiencies as high as η ≈ 0.3-0.4 at high redshifts, near the maximum for rapidly spinning systems, but their efficiencies drop dramatically (by an order of magnitude) by z ≈ 0. The pattern for lower mass holes is somewhat more complicated but qualitatively similar. Assuming that the standard accretion disk model applies, we suggest that the accretion history of SMBHs and their accompanying spins evolves in two distinct regimes: an early phase of prolonged accretion, plausibly driven by major mergers, during which the black hole spins up, then switching to a period of random, episodic accretion, governed by minor mergers and internal secular processes, during which the hole spins down. The transition epoch depends on mass, mirroring other evidence for "cosmic downsizing" in the AGN population; it occurs at z ≈ 2 for high-mass black holes and somewhat later, at z ≈ 1, for lower mass systems.

  19. On Bosonic Magnetic Flux Operator and Bosonic Faraday Operator Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; WANG Tong-Tong; WANG Ji-Suo

    2007-01-01

    In the literature about mesoscopic Josephson devices the magnetic flux is considered as an operator, the fundamental commutative relation between the magnetic flux operator and the Cooper-pair charge operator is usually preengaged. In this paper we show that such a relation can be deduced from the basic Bose operators' commutative relation through the entangled state representation. The Faraday formula in bosonic form is then equivalent to the second Josephson equation. The current operator equation for LC mesoscopic circuit is also derived.

  20. Vector-Boson Fusion and Vector-Boson Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vector-boson fusion and vector-boson scattering are an important class of processes for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is characterized by two high-energetic jets in the forward regions of the detector and reduced jet activity in the central region. The higher center-of-mass energy during the current and subsequent runs strongly boosts the sensitivity in these processes and allows to test the predictions of the Standard Model to a high precision. In this review, we first present the main phenomenological features of vector-boson fusion and scattering processes. Then we discuss the effects of higher-order corrections, which are available at NLO QCD for all processes and up to N3LO QCD and NLO electro-weak for VBF-H production. An additional refinement is the addition of parton-shower effects, where recently a lot of progress has been made. The appearance of triple and quartic gauge vertices in the production processes enables us to probe anomalous gauge couplings. We introduce and compare the different ...

  1. Very high energy emission from passive supermassive black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedaletti, Giovanna

    2009-10-22

    The H.E.S.S. experiment, an array of four Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, widened the horizon of Very High Energy (VHE) astronomy. Its unprecedented sensitivity is well suited for the study of new classes of expected VHE emitters, such as passive galactic nuclei that are the main focus of the work presented in this thesis. Acceleration of particles up to Ultra High Energies is expected in the magnetosphere of supermassive black holes (SMBH). The radiation losses of these accelerated particles are expected to reach the VHE regime in which H.E.S.S. operates. Predicted fluxes exceed the sensitivity of the array. However, strong photon fields in the surrounding of the acceleration region might absorb the produced radiation. Therefore observations focus on those galactic nuclei that are underluminous at lower photon energies. This work presents data collected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes on the test candidate NGC 1399 and their interpretation. While no detection has been achieved, important constraints can be derived from the obtained upper limits on the maximum energy attainable by the accelerated particles and on the magnetic field strength in the acceleration region. A limit on the magnetic field of B < 74 Gauss is given. The limit is model dependent and a scaling of the result with the assumptions is given. This is the tightest empirical constraint to date. Because of the lack of signal from the test candidate, a stacking analysis has been performed on similar sources in three cluster fields. A search for signal from classes of active galactic nuclei has also been made in the same three fields. None of the analyzed samples revealed a significant signal. Also presented are the expectations for the next generation of Cherenkov Telescopes and an outlook on the relativistic effects expected on the VHE emission close to SMBH. (orig.)

  2. Modified evolution of stellar binaries from supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Yi-Han; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of main-sequence binaries resided in the galactic centre is influenced a lot by the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Due to this perturbation, the stars in a dense environment are likely to experience mergers or collisions through secular or non-secular interactions. In this work, we study the dynamics of the stellar binaries at galactic centre, perturbed by another distant SMBH. Geometrically, such a four-body system is supposed to be decomposed into the inner triple (SMBH-star-star) and the outer triple (SMBH-stellar binary-SMBH). We survey the parameter space and determine the criteria analytically for the stellar mergers and the tidal disruption events (TDEs). For a relative distant and equal masses SMBH binary, the stars have more opportunities to merge as a result from the Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations in the inner triple. With a sample of tight stellar binaries, our numerical experiments reveal that a significant fraction of the binaries, ∼70 per cent, experience merger eventually. Whereas the majority of the stellar TDEs are likely to occur at a close periapses to the SMBH, induced by the outer Kozai effect. The tidal disruptions are found numerically as many as ∼10 per cent for a close SMBH binary that is enhanced significantly than the one without the external SMBH. These effects require the outer perturber to have an inclined orbit (≥40°) relatively to the inner orbital plane and may lead to a burst of the extremely astronomical events associated with the detection of the SMBH binary.

  3. Tidal stripping of stars near supermassive black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandford R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a binary system composed of a supermassive black hole and a star orbiting the hole in an equatorial, circular orbit, the stellar orbit will shrink due to the action of gravitational radiation, until the star fills its Roche lobe outside the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO of the hole or plunges into the hole. In the former case, gas will flow through the inner Lagrange point (L1 to the hole. If this tidal stripping process happens on a time scale faster than the thermal time scale but slower than the dynamical time scale, the entropy as a function of the interior mass is conserved. The star will evolve adiabatically, and, in most cases, will recede from the hole while filling its Roche lobe. We calculate how the stellar equilibrium properties change, which determines how the stellar orbital period and mass-transfer rate change through the “Roche evolution” for various types of stars in the relativistic regime. We envisage that the mass stream eventually hits the accretion disc, where it forms a hot spot orbiting the hole and may ultimately modulate the luminosity with the stellar orbital frequency. The ultimate goal is to probe the mass and spin of the hole and provide a test of general relativity in the strong-field regime from the resultant quasi-periodic signals. The observability of such a modulation is discussed along with a possible interpretation of an intermittent 1 hour period in the X-ray emission of RE J1034+ 396.

  4. Tidal disruption events from supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Armitage, Philip J.; Nixon, Chris; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the pre-disruption gravitational dynamics and post-disruption hydrodynamics of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. We focus on binaries with relatively low mass primaries (106 M⊙), moderate mass ratios, and separations with reasonably long gravitational wave inspiral times (tens of Myr). First, we generate a large ensemble (between 1 and 10 million) of restricted three-body integrations to quantify the statistical properties of tidal disruptions by circular SMBH binaries of initially unbound stars. Compared to the reference case of a disruption by a single SMBH, the binary potential induces a significant variance into the specific energy and angular momentum of the star at the point of disruption. Second, we use Newtonian numerical hydrodynamics to study the detailed evolution of the fallback debris from 120 disruptions randomly selected from the three-body ensemble (excluding only the most deeply penetrating encounters). We find that the overall morphology of the debris is greatly altered by the presence of the second black hole, and the accretion rate histories display a wide range of behaviours, including order of magnitude dips and excesses relative to control simulations that include only one black hole. Complex evolution typically persists for many orbital periods of the binary. We find evidence for power in the accretion curves on time-scales related to the binary orbital period, though there is no exact periodicity. We discuss our results in the context of future wide-field surveys, and comment on the prospects of identifying and characterizing the subset of events occurring in nuclei with binary SMBHs.

  5. Circularization of tidally disrupted stars around spinning supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Stone, Nicholas; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-10-01

    We study the circularization of tidally disrupted stars on bound orbits around spinning supermassive black holes by performing 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with post-Newtonian corrections. Our simulations reveal that debris circularization depends sensitively on the efficiency of radiative cooling. There are two stages in debris circularization if radiative cooling is inefficient: first, the stellar debris streams self-intersect due to relativistic apsidal precession; shocks at the intersection points thermalize orbital energy and the debris forms a geometrically thick, ring-like structure around the black hole. The ring rapidly spreads via viscous diffusion, leading to the formation of a geometrically thick accretion disc. In contrast, if radiative cooling is efficient, the stellar debris circularizes due to self-intersection shocks and forms a geometrically thin ring-like structure. In this case, the dissipated energy can be emitted during debris circularization as a precursor to the subsequent tidal disruption flare. The circularization time-scale is remarkably long in the radiatively efficient cooling case, and is also sensitive to black hole spin. Specifically, Lense-Thirring torques cause dynamically important nodal precession, which significantly delays debris circularization. On the other hand, nodal precession is too slow to produce observable signatures in the radiatively inefficient case. Since the stellar debris is optically thick and its photon diffusion time is likely longer than the time-scale of shock heating, our inefficient cooling scenario is more generally applicable in eccentric tidal disruption events (TDEs). However, in parabolic TDEs for MBH ≳ 2 × 106 M⊙, the spin-sensitive behaviour associated with efficient cooling may be realized.

  6. On the Supermassive Black Hole-Galaxy Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Sahil; Zhang, Shawn; Rodriguez, Aldo; Primack, Joel R.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a major focus of astronomy has been the study of the effects of supermassive black holes (SMBH) on their host galaxies. Recent results have found strong correlations between SMBH mass and host galaxy properties, most notably in the bulge velocity dispersion and galaxy stellar mass. We utilize these relations along with a novel convolution method to construct number density models of different galaxy properties. Using these models, we compare two fundamental methods for constructing a black hole mass function (BHMF) with the M⊙-σ and M⊙-M* relations. With these methods, we estimate the redshift evolution of the BHMF and, based on that, compare mass growth histories of central black holes and their host galaxies. Additionally, we utilize a data compilation of over 500 galaxies with individual measurements of galaxy properties (BH mass, stellar velocity dispersion, stellar mass, etc.) and classify galaxies by their morphologies in order to shed light on the controversial Shankar et al. (2016) argument that observations are biased in favor of massive SMBHs. We find that such a bias has little impact on the SMBH-galaxy relations.We conclude that the galaxy sample is a fair representation of the local universe and argue that our BH number density and scaling relations can be employed in the future to constrain relevant mechanisms for galaxy formation. We emphasize that this is the most comprehensive and accurate study of SMBH-galaxy coevolution as of now. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  7. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603 (United States); Marconi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Batcheldor, D., E-mail: dxl1840@g.rit.edu [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  8. Astronomers Dissect a Supermassive Black Hole with Natural Magnifying Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Combining a double natural "magnifying glass" with the power of ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have scrutinised the inner parts of the disc around a supermassive black hole 10 billion light-years away. They were able to study the disc with a level of detail a thousand times better than that of the best telescopes in the world, providing the first observational confirmation of the prevalent theoretical models of such discs. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 47a/08 The Einstein Cross The team of astronomers from Europe and the US studied the "Einstein Cross", a famous cosmic mirage. This cross-shaped configuration consists of four images of a single very distant source. The multiple images are a result of gravitational lensing by a foreground galaxy, an effect that was predicted by Albert Einstein as a consequence of his theory of general relativity. The light source in the Einstein Cross is a quasar approximately ten billion light-years away, whereas the foreground lensing galaxy is ten times closer. The light from the quasar is bent in its path and magnified by the gravitational field of the lensing galaxy. This magnification effect, known as "macrolensing", in which a galaxy plays the role of a cosmic magnifying glass or a natural telescope, proves very useful in astronomy as it allows us to observe distant objects that would otherwise be too faint to explore using currently available telescopes. "The combination of this natural magnification with the use of a big telescope provides us with the sharpest details ever obtained," explains Frédéric Courbin, leader of the programme studying the Einstein Cross with ESO's Very Large Telescope. In addition to macrolensing by the galaxy, stars in the lensing galaxy act as secondary lenses to produce an additional magnification. This secondary magnification is based on the same principle as macrolensing, but on a smaller scale, and since stars are much smaller than galaxies, is known as "microlensing". As the stars are

  9. Discovery of the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.

  10. Discovery of the higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.

  11. A general approach to bosonization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setulur; V Meera

    2007-10-01

    We summarize recent developments in the field of higher dimensional bosonization made by Setlur and collaborators and propose a general formula for the field operator in terms of currents and densities in one dimension using a new ingredient known as a `singular complex number'. Using this formalism, we compute the Green function of the homogeneous electron gas in one spatial dimension with short-range interaction leading to the Luttinger liquid and also with long-range interactions that lead to a Wigner crystal whose momentum distribution computed recently exhibits essential singularities. We generalize the formalism to finite temperature by combining with the author's hydrodynamic approach. The one-particle Green function of this system with essential singularities cannot be easily computed using the traditional approach to bosonization which involves the introduction of momentum cutoffs, hence the more general approach of the present formalism is proposed as a suitable alternative.

  12. Introduction to bosonic string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Carmen [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], e-mail: carmen@iafe.uba.ar

    2009-07-01

    This is an introductory set of five lectures on bosonic string theory. The first one deals with the classical theory of bosonic strings. The second and third lectures cover quantization. Three basic quantization methods are sketched: the old covariant formalism, the light-cone gauge quantization, where the spectrum is derived and the Polyakov path integral formalism and in particular the partition function at one loop. Finally, the last lecture covers interactions, low energy effective action, the general idea of compactification and in particular toroidal compactification. The notes are based on books by Green, Schwarz and Witten, Polchinski, Lust and Theissen and Kaku and review papers by D'Hocker and Phong and O. Alvarez. (author)

  13. Triple and quartic gauge boson couplings : Electroweak Bosons interactions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kupco, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The status of multi-bosons physics at LHC is reviewed. Recent results on cross-sections and anomalous couplings measurements are discussed for diboson, tribosons and vector boson scattering processes.

  14. Distinguishing a SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from SM Higgs boson at muon collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jai Kumar Singhal; Sardar Singh; Ashok K Nagawat

    2007-06-01

    We explore the possibility of distinguishing the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson via Higgs boson pair production at future muon collider. We study the behavior of the production cross-section in SM and MSSM with Higgs boson mass for various MSSM parameters tan and A. We observe that at fixed CM energy, in the SM, the total cross-section increases with the increase in Higgs boson mass whereas this trend is reversed for the MSSM. The changes that occur for the MSSM in comparison to the SM predictions are quantified in terms of the relative percentage deviation in cross-section. The observed deviations in cross-section for different choices of Higgs boson masses suggest that the measurements of the cross-section could possibly distinguish the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson.

  15. Bosonic colored group field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Geloun, Joseph [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France); University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou (BJ). International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA-UNESCO Chair); Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Departement de Mathematiques et Informatique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Dakar (Senegal); Magnen, Jacques [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Physique Theorique, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rivasseau, Vincent [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    Bosonic colored group field theory is considered. Focusing first on dimension four, namely the colored Ooguri group field model, the main properties of Feynman graphs are studied. This leads to a theorem on optimal perturbative bounds of Feynman amplitudes in the ''ultraspin'' (large spin) limit. The results are generalized in any dimension. Finally, integrating out two colors we write a new representation, which could be useful for the constructive analysis of this type of models. (orig.)

  16. One or more Higgs bosons?

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Kannike, Kristjan; Sala, Filippo; Tesi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Now that one has been found, the search for signs of more scalars is a primary task of current and future experiments. In the motivated hypothesis that the extra Higgs bosons of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) be the lightest new particles around, we outline a possible overall strategy to search for signs of the CP-even states. This work complements Ref. arXiv:1304.3670.

  17. CMS standard model Higgs boson results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Abia Pablo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In July 2012 CMS announced the discovery of a new boson with properties resembling those of the long-sought Higgs boson. The analysis of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 19.6 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, confirm the Higgs-like nature of the new boson, with a signal strength associated with vector bosons and fermions consistent with the expectations for a standard model (SM Higgs boson, and spin-parity clearly favouring the scalar nature of the new boson. In this note I review the updated results of the CMS experiment.

  18. A Search for Dark Higgs Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-06-08

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the Standard Model-dark sector mixing angle and the dark sector coupling constant.

  19. Charged Higgs Boson Search at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, D P

    2005-01-01

    This review starts with a brief introduction to the charged Higgs boson $(H^\\pm)$ in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). It then discusses the prospects of a relatively light $H^\\pm$ boson search via top quark decay and finally a heavy $H^\\pm$ boson search at LHC. The viable channels for $H^\\pm$ search are discussed, with particular emphasis on the $H^\\pm -> tau+nu$ decay channel.

  20. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; Fonseca, Sofia; Araújo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-level volleyball players received jump-float serves from four servers in two reception zones—zone 1 and 5. The ball and the receiver's head were tracked with two video cameras, allowing 3D world-coordinates reconstruction. Logistic-regression models were used to predict the type of pass used (overhand or underhand) and serve-reception efficacy (error, out, or effective) from variables related with the serve kinematics and related with the receiver's on-court positioning and movement. Receivers' initial position was different when in zone 1 and 5. This influenced the serve-related variables as well as the type of pass used. Strong predictors of using an underhand rather than overhand pass were higher ball contact of the server, reception in zone 1, receiver's initial position more to the back of the court and backward receiver movement. Receiver's larger longitudinal displacements and an initial position more to the back of the court had a strong relationship with the decreasing of the serve-reception efficacy. Receivers' positioning and movement were the factors with the largest impact on the type of pass used and the efficacy of the reception. Reception zone affected the variance in the ball's kinematics (with the exception of the ball's lateral displacement), as well as in the receivers' positioning (distances from the net and from the target). Also the reception zone was associated with the type of pass used by the receiver but not with reception efficacy. Given volleyball's rotation rule, the receiver needs to master receiving in the different reception zones; he/she needs to adapt to the diverse constraints of each zone to maintain performance efficacy. Thus

  1. Predicting Volleyball Serve-reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver’s actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-level players received jump-float serves from four servers in two reception zones – zone 1 and 5. The ball and the receiver’s head were tracked with two video cameras, allowing 3D world-coordinates reconstruction. Logistic-regression models were used to predict the type of pass used (overhand or underhand and serve-reception efficacy (error, out, or effective from variables related with the serve kinematics and related with the receiver’s on-court positioning and movement. Receivers’ initial position was different when in zone 1 and 5. This influenced the serve-related variables as well as the type of pass used. Strong predictors of using an underhand rather than overhand pass were higher ball contact of the server, reception in zone 1, receiver’s initial position more to the back of the court and backward receiver movement. Receiver’s larger longitudinal displacements and an initial position more to the back of the court had a strong relationship with the decreasing of the serve-reception efficacy. Receivers’ positioning and movement were the factors with the largest impact on the type of pass used and the efficacy of the reception. Reception zone affected the variance in the ball’s kinematics (with the exception of the ball’s lateral displacement, as well as in the receivers’ positioning (distances from the net and from the target. Also the reception zone was associated with the type of pass used by the receiver but not with reception efficacy. Given volleyball’s rotation rule, the receiver needs to master receiving in the different reception zones; he/she needs to adapt to the diverse constraints of each zone to maintain

  2. Investigation of Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings Through W Boson Pair Production in Dilepton Decay Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Paul Craig [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    An investigation of the interactions between the $W$ boson and the $Z$ boson and photon through the pair production of bosons is presented. This has been accomplished via a study of the reaction $p\\overline{p} \\to \\ell\\overline{\

  3. Bosonic Coherent Motions in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihn E. Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of fundamental spin-0 bosons as bosonic coherent motion (BCM in the Universe. The fundamental spin-0 bosons have the potential to account for the baryon number generation, cold dark matter (CDM via BCM, inflation, and dark energy. Among these, we pay particular attention to the CDM possibility because it can be experimentally tested with the current experimental techniques. We also comment on the panoply of the other roles of spin-0 bosons--such as those for cosmic accelerations at early and late times.

  4. Invisible 'glue' bosons in model field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, M I

    2002-01-01

    Fermionic psi(x) and bosonic phi(x) fields with vector coupling are discussed. It is shown that 'clothed' bosons of the model do not interact with fermions and between themselves. If phi(x) does not interact with other fields of the particle physics, then the 'clothed' bosons have properties of the cosmological 'dark' matter': they cannot be detected in Earth's laboratories. This cause of the boson invisibility contrasts with the origin of the unobservability of the isolated gluons in QCD which is explained by the confinement of colour

  5. Physics of W bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, S

    2004-01-01

    The high-energy and high-luminosity data-taking campaigns of the LEP e+e- collider provided the four collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, with about 50 000 W-boson pairs and about a thousand singly-produced W bosons. This unique data sample has an unprecedented reach in probing some aspects of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions, and this article reviews several achievements in the understanding of W-boson physics at LEP. The measurements of the cross sections for W-boson production are discussed, together with their implication on the existence of the coupling between Z and W bosons. The precision measurements of the magnitude of triple gauge-boson couplings are presented. The observation of the longitudinal helicity component of the W-boson spin, related to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, is described together with the techniques used to probe the CP and CPT symmetries in the W-boson system. A discussion on the intricacies of the measurement of the mass of the W boson, ...

  6. Line Shapes Emitted from Spiral Structures around Symmetric Orbits of Supermassive Binary Black Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Smailagić; E. Bon

    2015-12-01

    Variability of active galactic nuclei is not well understood. One possible explanation is existence of supermassive binary black holes (SMBBH) in their centres. It is expected that major mergers are common in the Universe. It is expected that each supermassive black hole of every galaxy eventually finish as a SMBBH system in the core of newly formed galaxy. Here we model the emission line profiles of active galactic nuclei (AGN) assuming that the flux and emission line shape variations are induced by supermassive binary black hole systems (SMBBH). We assume that the accreting gas inside the circumbinary (CB) disk is photo ionized by mini accretion disk emission around each SMBBH. We calculate variations of emission line flux, shifts and shapes for different parameters of SMBBH orbits. We consider cases with different masses and inclinations for circular orbits and measure the effect to the shape of emission line profiles and flux variability.

  7. On the viability of gravitational Bose-Einstein condensates as alternatives to supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hujeirat, A A

    2011-01-01

    Black holes are inevitable mathematical outcome of spacetime-energy coupling in general relativity. Currently these objects are of vital importance for understanding numerous phenomena in astrophysics and cosmology. However, neither theory nor observations have been capable of unequivocally prove the existence of black holes or granting us an insight of what their internal structures could look like, therefore leaving researchers to speculate about their nature. In this paper the reliability of supermassive Bose-Einstein condensates (henceforth SMBECs) as alternative to supermassive black holes is examined. Such condensates are found to suffer of a causality problem that terminate their cosmological growth toward acquiring masses typical for quasars and enforce them to collapse into supermassive black hole (SMBHs). It is argued that SMBEC-cores most likely would be subject to an extensive deceleration of its rotational frequency as well as to vortex-dissipation induced by the magnetic fields that thread the c...

  8. How Much Mass do Supermassive Black Holes Eat in their Old Age?

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, P F; Hernquist, L; Hopkins, Philip F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-01-01

    We consider the distribution of local supermassive black hole Eddington ratios and accretion rates, accounting for the dependence of radiative efficiency and bolometric corrections on the accretion rate. We find that black hole mass growth, both of the integrated mass density and the masses of most individual objects, must be dominated by an earlier, radiatively efficient, high accretion rate stage, and not by the radiatively inefficient low accretion rate phase in which most local supermassive black holes are currently observed. This conclusion is particularly true of supermassive black holes in elliptical host galaxies, as expected if they have undergone merger activity in the past which would fuel quasar activity and rapid growth. We discuss models of the time evolution of accretion rates and show that they all predict significant mass growth in a prior radiatively efficient state. The only way to avoid this conclusion is through careful fine-tuning of the accretion/quasar timescale to a value that is inco...

  9. Line Shapes Emitted from Spiral Structures around Symmetric Orbits of Supermassive Binary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Smailagić, Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Variability of active galactic nuclei is not well understood. One possible explanation is existence of supermassive binary black holes (SMBBH) in their centres. It is expected that major mergers are common in the Universe. It is expected that each supermassive black hole of every galaxy eventually finish as a SMBBH system in the core of newly formed galaxy. Here we model the emission line profiles of active galactic nuclei (AGN) assuming that the flux and emission line shapes variation are induced by supermassive binary black hole systems (SMBBH). We assume that accreting gas inside of circumbinary (CB) disk is photo ionized by mini accretion disk emission around each SMBBH. We calculate variations of emission line flux, shifts and shapes for different parameters of SMBBH orbits. We consider cases with different masses and inclinations for circular orbits and measure the effect to the shape of emission line profiles and flux variability.

  10. Constraints on Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries from Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schutz, Katelin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent measurements of the dynamical masses $M_{\\rm bh}$ of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and leverage this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of $M_{\\rm bh}$ in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in a...

  11. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  12. The coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes: a local perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Timothy M; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2011-07-08

    One of the most fascinating discoveries in the past decade was that galaxies typically contain a centrally located black hole with a mass that is millions or even billions of times that of the Sun. There is now compelling evidence that we cannot understand how galaxies formed and evolved without understanding the life cycles of these supermassive black holes (and vice versa). We summarize the current understanding of this coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes (based largely on observations of the local, present-day universe) and describe prospects for the future.

  13. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  14. Short-living Supermassive Magnetar Model for the Early X-ray Flares Following Short GRBs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Gao; Yi-Zhong Fan

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a short-lived supermassive magnetar model to account for the X-ray flares following short γ-ray bursts. In this model the central engine of the short γ-ray bursts is a supermassive millisecond magnetar, formed in coalescence of double neutron stars. The X-ray flares are powered by the dipole radiation of the magnetar. When the magnetar has lost a significant part of its angular momentum, it collapses to a black hole and the X-ray flares cease abruptly.

  15. CKP Hierarchy, Bosonic Tau Function and Bosonization Formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan W. van de Leur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop the theory of CKP hierarchy introduced in the papers of Kyoto school [Date E., Jimbo M., Kashiwara M., Miwa T., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 50 (1981, 3806-3812] (see also [Kac V.G., van de Leur J.W., Adv. Ser. Math. Phys., Vol. 7, World Sci. Publ., Teaneck, NJ, 1989, 369-406]. We present appropriate bosonization formulae. We show that in the context of the CKP theory certain orthogonal polynomials appear. These polynomials are polynomial both in even and odd (in Grassmannian sense variables.

  16. CKP Hierarchy, Bosonic Tau Function and Bosonization Formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Leur, Johan W.; Orlov, Alexander Yu.; Shiota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    We develop the theory of CKP hierarchy introduced in the papers of Kyoto school [Date E., Jimbo M., Kashiwara M., Miwa T., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 50 (1981), 3806-3812] (see also [Kac V.G., van de Leur J.W., Adv. Ser. Math. Phys., Vol. 7, World Sci. Publ., Teaneck, NJ, 1989, 369-406]). We present appropriate bosonization formulae. We show that in the context of the CKP theory certain orthogonal polynomials appear. These polynomials are polynomial both in even and odd (in Grassmannian sense) variables.

  17. CKP Hierarchy, Bosonic Tau Function and Bosonization Formulae

    OpenAIRE

    van de Leur, Johan W.; Alexander Yu. Orlov; Takahiro Shiota

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of CKP hierarchy introduced in the papers of Kyoto school [Date E., Jimbo M., Kashiwara M., Miwa T., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 50 (1981), 3806-3812] (see also [Kac V.G., van de Leur J.W., Adv. Ser. Math. Phys., Vol. 7, World Sci. Publ., Teaneck, NJ, 1989, 369-406]). We present appropriate bosonization formulae. We show that in the context of the CKP theory certain orthogonal polynomials appear. These polynomials are polynomial both in even and odd (in Grassmannian sense) varia...

  18. Fundamentals of ServCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This training manual for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Catalog (ServCat) provides detailed instructions on searching for records, creating records, and managing...

  19. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  20. Higgs boson couplings: measurements and theoretical interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Mariotti, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    This report will review the Higgs boson properties: the mass, the total width and the couplings to fermions and bosons. The measurements have been performed with the data collected in 2011 and 2012 at the LHC accelerator at CERN by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Theoretical frameworks to search for new physics are also introduced and discussed.

  1. ATLAS results on Higgs decays to bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurements, by the ATLAS collaboration, of the Higgs boson properties in the decays to bosons will be presented. The measurements are based on the analysis of 36.1 fb-1 at sqrt(s)=13 TeV, collected in 2015 and 2016 for the Run-2 of LHC.

  2. Goldstone Bosons as Fractional Cosmic Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-01-01

    It is suggested that Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos, contributing about 0.39 to what is reported as the effective number of neutrino types in the era before recombination. The broken symmetry associated with these Goldstone bosons is further speculated to be the conservation of the particles of dark matter.

  3. The study of the W boson

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmüller, O L; Thompson, J C

    2002-01-01

    the status of the measurement of the W boson mass at LEP-2 is reviewed. Properties of the W such as branching ration into quarks and leptons and couplings to other neutral gauge bosons are reported. 4-fermion production cross-sections in e sup + e sup - collisions are also presented. (authors)

  4. ELECTROWEAK VECTOR BOSON PRODUCTION IN JOINT RESUMMATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KULESZA,A.; STERMAN,G.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2002-03-16

    We study the application of the joint resummation to electroweak boson production at hadron colliders. The joint resummation formalism resumes both threshold and transverse momentum corrections to the transverse momentum distribution at, next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We obtain a good description of the transverse momentum distribution of Z bosons produced at the Tevatron collider.

  5. Sensitivity to an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include Higgs bosons decaying predominantly or partially to non-interacting particles such as the SUSY Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP). To set limits on the production cross-section times the branching fraction to invisible decay products of such Higgs bosons with the ATLAS detector requires an examination of specific production modes such as the associated production (ZH) or the vector boson fusion (VBF) process. The predominant Standard Model backgrounds for these processes are ZZ to nunu for the ZH channel and jets from QCD processes and W or Z bosons produced in association with jets for the VBF channel. The sensitivity to an invisibly decaying Higgs boson is investigated in this paper using fully simulated ATLAS data for both signal and background. The ATLAS potential for triggering these events is also discussed.

  6. Thermostatistics of bosonic and fermionic Fibonacci oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Abdullah; Arik, Metin; Senay, Mustafa; Topcu, Gozde

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we first introduce some new properties concerning the Fibonacci calculus. We then discuss the thermostatistics of gas models of two-parameter deformed oscillators, called bosonic and fermionic Fibonacci oscillators, in the thermodynamical limit. In this framework, we analyze the behavior of two-parameter deformed mean occupation numbers describing the Fibonacci-type bosonic and fermionic intermediate-statistics particles. A virial expansion of the equation of state for the bosonic Fibonacci oscillators’ gas model is obtained in both two and three dimensions, and the first five virial coefficients are derived in terms of the real independent deformation parameters p and q. The effect of bosonic and fermionic p, q-deformation on the thermostatistical properties of Fibonacci-type p, q-boson and p, q-fermion gas models are also discussed. The results obtained in this work can be useful for investigating some exotic quasiparticle states encountered in condensed matter systems.

  7. Chiral bosonization for non-commutative fields

    CERN Document Server

    Das, A; Méndez, F; López-Sarrion, J; Das, Ashok; Gamboa, Jorge; M\\'endez, Fernando; L\\'opez-Sarri\\'on, Justo

    2004-01-01

    A model of chiral bosons on a non-commutative field space is constructed and new generalized bosonization (fermionization) rules for these fields are given. The conformal structure of the theory is characterized by a level of the Kac-Moody algebra equal to $(1+ \\theta^2)$ where $\\theta$ is the non-commutativity parameter and chiral bosons living in a non-commutative fields space are described by a rational conformal field theory with the central charge of the Virasoro algebra equal to 1. The non-commutative chiral bosons are shown to correspond to a free fermion moving with a speed equal to $ c^{\\prime} = c \\sqrt{1+\\theta^2} $ where $c$ is the speed of light. Lorentz invariance remains intact if $c$ is rescaled by $c \\to c^{\\prime}$. The dispersion relation for bosons and fermions, in this case, is given by $\\omega = c^{\\prime} | k|$.

  8. Spherical Boson Stars as Black Hole mimickers

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, F S; 10.1103/PhysRevD.80.084023

    2010-01-01

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole we also study the deflection of light.

  9. Universal physics of three bosons with isospin

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    We show that there exist two types of universal phenomena for three-boson systems with isospin degrees of freedom. In the isospin symmetric limit, there is only one universal three-boson bound state with the total isospin one, whose binding energy is proportional to that of the two-boson bound state. With large isospin symmetry breaking, the standard Efimov states of three identical bosons appear at low energies. Both phenomena can be realized by three pions with the pion mass appropriately tuned in lattice QCD simulations, or by spin-one bosons in cold atom experiments. Implication to the in-medium softening of multi-pion states is also discussed.

  10. Search for new heavy charged gauge bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magass, Carsten Martin [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany)

    2007-11-02

    Additional gauge bosons are introduced in many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model. A search for a new heavy charged gauge boson W' decaying into an electron and a neutrino is presented. The data used in this analysis was taken with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. Since no significant excess is observed in the data, an upper limit is set on the production cross section times branching fraction σW'xBr (W' → ev). Using this limit, a W' boson with mass below ~1 TeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level assuming that the new boson has the same couplings to fermions as the Standard Model W boson.

  11. Boson Sampling for Molecular Vibronic Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Joonsuk; Peropadre, Borja; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    Quantum computers are expected to be more efficient in performing certain computations than any classical machine. Unfortunately, the technological challenges associated with building a full-scale quantum computer have not yet allowed the experimental verification of such an expectation. Recently, boson sampling has emerged as a problem that is suspected to be intractable on any classical computer, but efficiently implementable with a linear quantum optical setup. Therefore, boson sampling may offer an experimentally realizable challenge to the Extended Church-Turing thesis and this remarkable possibility motivated much of the interest around boson sampling, at least in relation to complexity-theoretic questions. In this work, we show that the successful development of a boson sampling apparatus would not only answer such inquiries, but also yield a practical tool for difficult molecular computations. Specifically, we show that a boson sampling device with a modified input state can be used to generate molecu...

  12. Bosonization of supersymmetric KdV equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Xiaonan [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Lou, S.Y., E-mail: sylou@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China); School of Mathematics, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2012-01-16

    Bosonization approach to the classical supersymmetric systems is presented. By introducing the multi-fermionic parameters in the expansions of the superfields, the N=1 supersymmetric KdV (sKdV) system is transformed to a system of coupled bosonic equations. The method can be applied to any fermionic systems. By solving the coupled bosonic equations, some novel types of exact solutions can be explicitly obtained. Especially, the richness of the localized excitations of the supersymmetric integrable system is discovered. The rich multi-soliton solutions obtained here have not yet been obtained by using other methods. However, the traditional known multi-soliton solutions can also not be obtained by the bosonization approach of this Letter. Some open problems on the bosonization of the supersymmetric integrable models are proposed in the both classical and quantum levels.

  13. Di-boson results at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraud Pierre-François

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pairs of gauge boson produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy √s of 7 TeV are reconstructed with the ATLAS detector in their leptonic final states. Based on samples of integrated luminosity See PDF mathcal{L} = 1.0 fb−1 (for WW, WZ and ZZ and 35 pb−1 (for Wγ and Zγ of 2011 and 2010 LHC data, the total di-boson production cross sections are measured. They are found, together with the kinematic distributions of the selected di-boson systems to be compatible with the expectation from the Standard Model. The di-boson production also gives a handle on possible anomalous triple gauge boson couplings, for which 95% confidence limits are set.

  14. The influence of magnetic fields, turbulence, and UV radiation on the formation of supermassive black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Borm, C.; Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The seeds of the supermassive black holes with masses of ~109M⊙ observed already at z ~ 6 may have formed through the direct collapse of primordial gas in Tvir ≳ 104 K halos, whereby the gas must stay hot (~104 K) in order to avoid fragmentation. Aims: The interplay between magnetic fields,

  15. Toward the event horizon—the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H.; Markoff, S.

    2013-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts the best constrained supermassive black hole in the universe, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Its mass and distance have been accurately determined from stellar orbits and proper motion studies, respectively, and its high-frequency radio, and highly variable near-infrared and

  16. Upper limits on the mass of supermassive black holes from HST/STIS archival data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsini, E. M.; Beifiori, A.; Bontá, E. D.; Pizzella, A.; Coccato, L.; Sarzi, M.; Bertola, F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The growth of supermassive black holes (SBHs) appears to be closely linked with the formation of spheroids. There is a pressing need to acquire better statistics on SBH masses, since the existing samples are preferentially weighted toward early-type galaxies with very massive SBHs. With th

  17. The influence of magnetic fields, turbulence, and UV radiation on the formation of supermassive black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Borm, C.; Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The seeds of the supermassive black holes with masses of ~109 M⊙ observed already at z ~ 6 may have formed through the direct collapse of primordial gas in Tvir ≳ 104 K halos, whereby the gas must stay hot (~104 K) in order to avoid fragmentation.  Aims: The interplay between magnetic field

  18. Diphoton and diboson probes of fermiophobic Higgs bosons at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Antonio; Garcia-Pepin, Mateo; Quirós, Mariano; Santiago, José; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector with electroweak charged scalars can possess exotic `Higgs' bosons with vanishing or suppressed couplings to Standard Model fermions. These `fermiophobic' scalars, which cannot be produced via gluon fusion, are constrained by LHC measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to have a small vacuum expectation value. This implies that vector boson fusion and associated vector boson production are in general suppressed rendering conventional Higgs searches insensitive. However, Drell-Yan Higgs pair production, which is not present in the SM, can be sizeable even in the limit of vanishing exotic Higgs vacuum expectation value. We utilize this to show that diphoton searches at 8 TeV LHC already rule out a large class of neutral fermiophobic Higgs bosons below ˜ 110 GeV. This includes fermiophobic scalars found in two Higgs doublet as well as Higgs triplet and Georgi-Machacek type models. Our results extend the only relevant limit on fermiophobic Higgs bosons obtained by a recent CDF analysis of 4 γ + X Tevatron data. Furthermore, diphoton limits are independent of the decay of the second Higgs boson and thus apply even for degenerate masses in contrast to the CDF search. We also find that if the fermiophobic Higgs has very enhanced couplings to photons, masses as large as ˜ 150 GeV can be ruled out while if these couplings are somehow highly suppressed, masses below ˜ 90 GeV can still be ruled out. Finally, we show that WW and ZZ diboson searches may serve as complementary probes for masses above the diphoton limit up to ˜ 250 GeV and discuss prospects at 13 TeV LHC.

  19. Is There a Size Limit for Supermassive Black Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) lurk in the centers of galaxies, and weve measured their masses to range from hundreds of thousands to ten billion solar masses. But is there a maximum mass that these monsters are limited to?Observed MaximumSince the era when the first SMBHs formed, enough time has passed for them to potentially grow to monstrous size, assuming a sufficient supply of fuel.Instead, however, we observe that SMBHs in the centers of the largest local-universe galaxies max out at a top mass of a few times 1010 solar masses. Even more intriguingly, this limit appears to be redshift-independent: we see the same maximum mass of a few 1010 solar masses for SMBHs fueling the brightest of quasars at redshifts up to z~7.Accretion rate (solid) and star formation rate (dashed) vs. radius in a star-forming accretion disk, for several different values of black-hole mass. Though accretion rates start out very high at large radius, they drop to just a few solar masses per year at small radii, because much of the gas is lost to star formation in the disk. [Inayoshi Haiman 2016]So why dont we see any giants larger than around 10 billion solar masses, regardless of where we look? Two astronomers from Columbia University, Kohei Inayoshi (Simons Fellow) and Zoltn Haiman, suggest that there is a limiting mass for SMBHs thats set by small-scale physical processes, rather than large processes like galaxy evolution, star formation history, or background cosmology.Challenges for AccretionGrowing an SMBH thats more massive than 1010 solar masses requires gas to be quickly funneled from the outer regions of the galaxy (hundreds of light-years out), through the large accretion disk that surrounds the black hole, and into the nuclear region (light-year scales): the gas must be brought in at rates as high as 1,000 solar masses per year.Modeling this process, Inayoshi and Haiman demonstrate that at such high rates, the majority of the gas instead gets stuck in the disk, causing

  20. Coevolution (Or Not) of Supermassive Black Holes and Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Ho, Luis C.

    2013-08-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) have been found in 85 galaxies by dynamical modeling of spatially resolved kinematics. The Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized BH research by advancing the subject from its proof-of-concept phase into quantitative studies of BH demographics. Most influential was the discovery of a tight correlation between BH mass [Formula: see text] and the velocity dispersion σ of the bulge component of the host galaxy. Together with similar correlations with bulge luminosity and mass, this led to the widespread belief that BHs and bulges coevolve by regulating each other's growth. Conclusions based on one set of correlations from [Formula: see text] in brightest cluster ellipticals to [Formula: see text] in the smallest galaxies dominated BH work for more than a decade. New results are now replacing this simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs correlate differently with different galaxy components. A reasonable aim is to use this progress to refine our understanding of BH-galaxy coevolution. BHs with masses of 105-106M⊙ are found in many bulgeless galaxies. Therefore, classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges are not necessary for BH formation. On the other hand, although they live in galaxy disks, BHs do not correlate with galaxy disks. Also, any [Formula: see text] correlations with the properties of disk-grown pseudobulges and dark matter halos are weak enough to imply no close coevolution. The above and other correlations of host-galaxy parameters with each other and with [Formula: see text] suggest that there are four regimes of BH feedback. (1) Local, secular, episodic, and stochastic feeding of small BHs in largely bulgeless galaxies involves too little energy to result in coevolution. (2) Global feeding in major, wet galaxy mergers rapidly grows giant BHs in short-duration, quasar-like events whose energy feedback does affect galaxy evolution. The resulting hosts are classical bulges and coreless

  1. Higgs Boson - on Your Own

    CERN Document Server

    Csorgo, T

    2013-01-01

    One of the highlights of 2012 in physics is related to two papers, published by the ATLAS and the CMS Collaborations, that announced the discovery of at least one new particle in pp collisions at CERN LHC. At least one of the properties of this new particle is found to be similar to that of the Higgs boson, the last and most difficult to find building block from the Standard Model of particle physics. Physics teachers are frequently approached by their media-educated students, who inquire about the properties of the Higgs boson, but physics teachers are rarely trained to teach this elusive aspect of particle physics in elementary, middle or junior high schools. In this paper I describe a card-game, that can be considered as a hands-on and easily accessible tool that allows interested teachers, students and also motivated lay-persons to play with the properties of the newly found Higgs-like particle. This new particle was detected through its decays to directly observable, final state particles. Many of these ...

  2. From The Beatles to Bosons

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie McClellan

    2013-01-01

    Before embarking on a successful career as a musician, Alan Parsons started out as a sound engineer - earning his first credit on The Beatles’ Abbey Road.  Over the years, he has worked and collaborated with various artists, but 30 September 2013 marks a unique collaboration.  For CERN’s ‘Bosons & More’ party, Alan Parsons Live Project will be sharing the stage with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande.  Having already visited CERN in 2011, Alan Parsons provides an insight into his views on science and his upcoming performance at the ‘Bosons & More’ event.     Alan Parsons during his visit to CERN in August 2011. Since visiting CERN in 2011, how have your feelings towards the Organization developed? I was thrilled to hear about the recent discovery and how years of work had paid off. Together with my wife, Lisa, and my band, we were very privileged to come to CERN a couple of years ago, hav...

  3. Collective Interference of Composite Two-Fermion Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tichy, Malte; Bouvrie, Peter Alexander; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The composite character of two-fermion bosons manifests itself in the interference of many composites as a deviation from the ideal bosonic behavior. A state of many composite bosons can be represented as a superposition of different numbers of perfect bosons and fermions, which allows us to prov...

  4. Composite Weak Bosons at the Large Hadronic Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Harald

    In a composite model of the weak bosons the p-wave bosons are studied. The state with the lowest mass is identified with the boson, which has been discovered at the LHC. Specific properties of the excited bosons are discussed, in particular their decays into weak bosons and photons. Recently a two-photon signal has been observed, which might come from the decay of a neutral heavy boson with a mass of about 0.75 TeV. This particle could be an excited weak tensor boson.

  5. Higgs boson: near the end of the quest; Boson de Higgs: la physique proche du Graal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalatbari, A.

    2012-01-15

    The 2 experiments ATLAS and CMS that look for the existence of the Higgs boson at the LHC, published their last results in end 2011. Both teams announced very strong hints for a Higgs boson with a mass around 125 GeV. The detection of the Higgs boson is based on the identification of the particles produced in its decay and the difficulty is that the decay scheme of the Higgs depends strongly on its mass. For instance, a Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV has a probability rate of 70% to decay into a pair of bottom quarks while a mass of 160 GeV will produce pairs of W bosons with a probability rate of 90%. A Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV fits well theories beyond the standard model like supersymmetry. (A.C.)

  6. Search for a Higgs Boson Decaying to Weak Boson Pairs at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    A Higgs particle produced in association with a Z boson and decaying into weak boson pairs is searched for in 336.4 1/pb of data collected by the L3 experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 200 to 209 GeV. Limits on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decay into two weak bosons as a function of the Higgs mass are derived. These results are combined with the L3 search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs. A Higgs produced with a Standard Model e+e- --> Zh cross section and decaying only into electroweak boson pairs is excluded at 95% CL for a mass below 107 GeV.

  7. Light Higgs bosons in phenomenological NMSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Clermont Univ., CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Rathsman, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High-Energy Physics; Lund Univ. (Sweden). Theoretical High Energy Physics; Staal, O. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zeune, L. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Goettingen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.

    2010-12-15

    We consider scenarios in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) where the CP-odd and charged Higgs bosons are very light. As we demonstrate, these can be obtained as simple deformations of existing phenomenological MSSM benchmarks scenarios with parameters defined at the weak scale. This offers a direct and meaningful comparison to the MSSM case. Applying a wide set of up-to-date constraints from both high-energy collider and flavour physics, the Higgs boson masses and couplings are studied in viable parts of parameter space. The LHC phenomenology of the light Higgs scenario for neutral and charged Higgs boson searches is discussed. (orig.)

  8. ATLAS measurements of vector boson production

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of vector boson production, inclusive and with associated jets in pp collisions in LHC Run1 will be presented. The results are compared to NLO Monte Carlo simulations and to NNLO QCD predictions corrected for NLO EW effects. The production of jets in association with a W or a Z boson is an important process to study QCD in a multiscale environment in pp collisions at the LHC. The production of heavy flavour in association with a W or Z boson is sensitive to the parton density functions and to the modeling heavyquark flavour production mechanisms.

  9. Bosonization and Cluster Updating of Lattice Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Wiese, U J

    1993-01-01

    A lattice fermion model is formulated in Fock space using the Jordan-Wigner representation for the fermion creation and annihilation operators. The resulting path integral is a sum over configurations of lattice site occupation numbers $n(x,t) = 0,1$ which may be viewed as bosonic Ising-like variables. However, as a remnant of Fermi statistics a nonlocal sign factor arises for each configuration. When this factor is included in measured observables the bosonic occupation numbers interact locally, and one can use efficient cluster algorithms to update the bosonized variables.

  10. Weak Gauge Boson Radiation in Parton Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy

    2014-01-01

    The emission of W and Z gauge boson is included in a traditional QCD + QED shower. The unitarity of the shower algorithm links the real radiation of the weak gauge bosons to the negative weak virtual corrections. The shower evolution process leads to a competition between QCD, QED and weak radiation, and allows for W and Z boson production inside jets. Various effects on LHC physics are studied, both at low and high transverse momenta, and effects at higher-energy hadron colliders are outlined.

  11. Mapping the genuine bosonic quartic couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Eboli, O J P

    2016-01-01

    The larger center-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider Run 2 opens up the possibility of a more detailed study of the quartic vertices of the electroweak gauge bosons. Our goal in this work is to classify all operators possessing quartic interactions among the electroweak gauge bosons that do not exhibit triple gauge-boson vertices associated to them. We obtain all relevant operators in the non-linear and linear realizations of the $SU(2)_L \\otimes U(1)_Y$ gauge symmetry.

  12. Leptogenesis and neutral gauge bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Heeck, Julian

    2016-01-01

    We consider low-scale leptogenesis via right-handed neutrinos $N$ coupled to a $Z'$ boson, with gauged $U(1)_{B-L}$ as a simple realization. Keeping the neutrinos sufficiently out of equilibrium puts strong bounds on the $Z'$ coupling strength and mass, our focus being on light $Z'$ and $N$, testable in the near future by SHiP, HPS, Belle II, and at the LHC. We show that leptogenesis could be robustly falsified in a large region of parameter space by the double observation of $Z'$ and $N$, e.g. in the channel $pp\\to Z' \\to NN$ with displaced $N$-decay vertex, and by several experiments searching for light $Z'$, according to the mass of $N$.

  13. Boson--Fermion hybrid representation formulation, I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.; Feng, D.H.

    1981-08-01

    A boson--fermion hybrid representation is presented. In this framework, a fermion system is described concurrently by the bosonic and the fermonic degrees of freedom. A fermion pair in this representation can be treated as a boson without violating the Pauli principle. Furthermore the ''bosonic interactions'' are shown to originate from the exchange processes of the fermions and can be calculated from the original fermion interactions. Both the formulation of the BFH representations for the even and odd nuclear systems are given. We find that the basic equation of the nuclear field theory (NFT) is just the usual Schroedinger equation in such a representation with the empirical NFT diagrammatic rules emerging naturally. This theory was numerically checked in the case of four nucleons moving in a single-j shell and the exactness of the theory was established.

  14. Higgs Boson search at the CMS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury Somnath

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of the search for the Standard Model (SM Higgs Boson with the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy are reported. A large number of the Higgs Boson decay channels in the mass range from 110 GeV to 600 GeV are considered, and combined upper limits on the production cross section as a function of the Higgs Boson mass are derived. The SM Higgs is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass range between 127.5 GeV and 600 GeV. In addition, searches for Higgs Bosons in scenarios Beyond the Standard Model (BSM lead to improved constraints on the Higgs sector of BSM theories such as supersymmetry.

  15. Majorization preservation of Gaussian bosonic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels are majorization-preserving over the set of passive states of the harmonic oscillator. This means that comparable passive states under majorization are transformed into equally comparable passive states by any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. Our proof relies on a new preorder relation called Fock-majorization, which coincides with regular majorization for passive states but also induces another order relation in terms of mean boson number, thereby connecting the concepts of energy and disorder of a quantum state. The consequences of majorization preservation are discussed in the context of the broadcast communication capacity of Gaussian bosonic channels. Because most of our results are independent of the specific nature of the system under investigation, they could be generalized to other quantum systems and Hamiltonians, providing a new tool that may prove useful in quantum information theory and especially quantum thermodynamics.

  16. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2012-01-31

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible productionin e{sup +} e{sup -}, {anti p}p and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which have been complemented bysearches at the Fermilab Tevatron. The LHC has recently entered the hunt, excluding a Higgs boson over a large range of masses and revealing a tantalizing hint in the range 119 to125 GeV, and there are good prospects that the existence or otherwise of the Higgs boson will soon be established. One of the most attractive possibilities is that the Higgs bosonis accompanied by supersymmetry, though composite options have yet to be excluded. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  17. Acquiring a taste for the Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    Before CERN's scientists had even announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, others were already attributing some interesting characteristics to it: flavoursome, sparkling and liquid...   The artisan brewery Hopfenstark in Quebec launched its new "Higgs boson" beer in November 2010. Ever since, it has been intriguing enthusiasts with its unique taste explosion. The boson was a source of inspiration for brewer Frédéric Cormier, the Hopfenstark brewery's owner, who is a big fan of science programmes. "I returned from a trip to Europe in 2010 with the idea for a new beer that would be unlike any other," he explains. "I was always reading and hearing about CERN's particle accelerator in the media, so I did some research on the famous Higgs boson and decided to give my new creation the same name." For Frédéric Cormier, it's important that the names of his beers refle...

  18. Electroweak Precision Data and New Gauge Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2009-01-01

    I review constraints on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson from high energy electroweak (EW) precision data. The same data set also strongly limits various mixing effects of hypothetical extra neutral gauge bosons (Z') with the ordinary Z. I also discuss low energy precision measurements which are sensitive to other aspects of Z' physics, such as the direct exchange amplitude and the flavor or CP violating sectors.

  19. Deformed Bosons: Combinatorics of Normal Ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Penson, K A; Solomon, A I

    2004-01-01

    We solve the normal ordering problem for (A* A)^n where A* (resp. A) are one mode deformed bosonic creation (resp. annihilation) operators satisfying [A,A*]=[N+1]-[N]. The solution generalizes results known for canonical and q-bosons. It involves combinatorial polynomials in the number operator N for which the generating functions and explicit expressions are found. Simple deformations provide examples of the method.

  20. Evolution of boson-fermion stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Palenzuela, Carlos; Alic, Daniela; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Becerril, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    The boson-fermion stars can be modeled with a complex scalar field coupled minimally to a perfect fluid (i.e., without viscosity and non-dissipative). We present a study of these solutions and their dynamical evolution by solving numerically the Einstein-Klein-Gordon-Hydrodynamic (EKGHD) system. It is shown that stable configurations exist, but stability of general configurations depends finely upon the number of bosons and fermions.

  1. Diffractive Production of the Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    2003-01-01

    Diffractive production of the Higgs boson at hadron colliders is discussed in the light of the observed rate of hard diffractive dijet events at the Tevatron. The Higgs predictions of models successful for dijets are compared. LHC seems promising for a diffractive light Higgs boson and its mass determination. Hard diffractive dijets, diphotons and dileptons at the Tevatron (Run II) will be necessary to remove the remaining large uncertainties on cross-sections and signals.

  2. Supersymmetry search via gauge boson fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindya Datta

    2003-02-01

    We propose a novel method for the search of supersymmetry, especially for the electroweak gauginos at the large hadron collider (LHC). Gauge boson fusion technique was shown to be useful for heavy and intermediate mass Higgs bosons. In this article, we have shown that this method can also be applied to find the signals of EW gauginos in supersymmetric theories where the canonical search strategies for these particles fail.

  3. Higgs boson couplings and properties with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Finco, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Many different production and decay modes of the 126 GeV mass Higgs boson have been studied by the CMS collaboration at the LHC collider. The analysis is based on pp collision data col- lected at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5/fb and 20/fb respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson couplings and of the study of its properties are presented.

  4. Bosonic Dynamical Mean-Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Michiel; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-02-01

    We derive the bosonic dynamical mean-field equations for bosonic atoms in optical lattices with arbitrary lattice geometry. The equations are presented as a systematic expansion in 1/z, z being the number of lattice neighbours. Hence the theory is applicable in sufficiently high-dimensional lattices. We apply the method to a two-component mixture, for which a rich phase diagram with spin order is revealed.

  5. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  6. Conformal gravity and the bosonic string

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julve, J.; Tiemblo, A.; Tresguerres, R.

    1987-09-01

    We show that the Callan et al. effective equations of motion for the bosonic closed string in a non-trivial background may not be derived only from the bosonic part of the N=1 supergravity action of Manton and Chapline, but also from just a general conformally invariant theory of gravity. In our scheme the invariance under gauge transformations of the antisymmetric tensor field turns out to be a consequence of the metricity condition.

  7. Dynamical Study of 3D Boson Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Choptuik, M. W.

    1998-10-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of ``boson stars'' in 3D numerical relativity. Boson stars are equilibrium states of a self-gravitating, complex Klein-Gordon field: a resurgence of interest in scalar fields in the context of astroparticle physics and quantum cosmology has prompted investigation of their dynamics, particularly since they are possible dark matter candidates. In addition, even though any direct physical relevance has yet to be demonstrated, boson star systems provide excellent numerical laboratories in which to study strong gravitational fields. Specifically, the boson star model provides an ideal vehicle with which to implement and evaluate (1) various coordinate conditions in the context of the ADM formalism, and (2) multi-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement techniques which appear crucial for many problems in 3D numerical relativity. We first consider boson stars in the Newtonian regime, where the (numerical) stability of single stars is shown and the interaction of multiple-star-systems is simulated. We also discuss issues which hamper progress towards a stable evolution of general relativistic boson stars, and then show some preliminary results for the general relativistic case.

  8. Food and drink serving contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Janko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Food and drink catering service is almost as old as the civilization itself. Even though this vocation is a part of the catering activity, Serbian law does not foresee this contract section as personalized. Key legal sources for this kind of contract are business customs. Food and drink serving contract is a mixed-type contract and its legal nature is very interesting due to its complexity. Specific for this contract is the fact that it is not an ordinary service, but also an activity which requires a degree of culinary skills, knowledge of customs of other nations, as well as other skills. The very category of a good professional in business economy / hospitality industry is very dynamic, as it needs to be evaluated according to all given circumstances, which may be rather unpredictable. By considering the legal nature, but also the rights and obligations of the contracting parties, we tried to point to the questions that require a special attention. Legal sources that indirectly refer to food and drink serving contracts were taken into account. Apart from the Law on Obligatory Relations, we also considered here the Law on Tourism also pointing to the comparative law and jurisprudence.

  9. The shortest-known-period star orbiting our Galaxy's supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, L; Ghez, A M; Schödel, R; Yelda, S; Boehle, A; Lu, J R; Do, T; Morris, M R; Becklin, E E; Matthews, K

    2012-10-01

    Stars with short orbital periods at the center of our Galaxy offer a powerful probe of a supermassive black hole. Over the past 17 years, the W. M. Keck Observatory has been used to image the galactic center at the highest angular resolution possible today. By adding to this data set and advancing methodologies, we have detected S0-102, a star orbiting our Galaxy's supermassive black hole with a period of just 11.5 years. S0-102 doubles the number of known stars with full phase coverage and periods of less than 20 years. It thereby provides the opportunity, with future measurements, to resolve degeneracies in the parameters describing the central gravitational potential and to test Einstein's theory of general relativity in an unexplored regime.

  10. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Plasmas around Merging Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Miller, M Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher S; van Meter, James R

    2012-01-01

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and are the most powerful sources of gravitational waves accessible to space-based gravitational observatories. Some such mergers may occur in the presence of matter and magnetic fields and hence generate an electromagnetic counterpart. In this paper we present the first general relativistic simulations of magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals. In particular we observe a total amplification of the magnetic field of ~2 orders of magnitude which is driven by the accretion onto the binary and that leads to much stronger electromagnetic signals, more than a factor of 10^4 larger than comparable calculations don...

  11. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Plasmas around Merging Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John G.; Miller, M. Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher S.; van Meter, James R.

    2012-06-01

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and are the most powerful sources of gravitational waves accessible to space-based gravitational observatories. Some such mergers may occur in the presence of matter and magnetic fields and hence generate an electromagnetic counterpart. In this Letter, we present the first general relativistic simulations of magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals. In particular, we observe a total amplification of the magnetic field of ~2 orders of magnitude, which is driven by the accretion onto the binary and that leads to much stronger electromagnetic signals, more than a factor of 104 larger than comparable calculations done in the force-free regime where such amplifications are not possible.

  12. Resolving the Bondi Accretion Flow toward the Supermassive Black Hole of NGC 3115 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, J.; Million, E.; Yukita, M.; Mathews, W.; Bregman, J.

    2011-09-01

    Gas undergoing Bondi accretion on to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) becomes hotter toward smaller radii. We searched for this signature with a Chandra observation of the hot gas in NGC 3115, which optical observation show has a very massive SMBH. Our observations show that the gas temperature rises toward the galaxy center as expected in all accretion models in which the black hole is gravitationally capturing the ambient gas. The data support that the Bondi radius is at least about 4-5 arcsec (188-235 pc), suggesting a supermassive blackhole of two billion solar masses that is consistent with the upper end of the optical results. The density profile within the Bondi radius has a power law index of 1.03, and we will discuss the interpretations of the results.

  13. Suppression of star formation in early-type galaxies by feedback from supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kaviraj, Sugata; Yi, Sukyoung K; Boselli, Alessandro; Barlow, Tom; Conrow, Tim; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Chris; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Tim; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alex

    2006-08-24

    Detailed high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of nearby galaxies have revealed the presence of supermassive black holes. These black holes may interact with their host galaxies by means of 'feedback' in the form of energy and material jets; this feedback affects the evolution of the host and gives rise to observed relations between the black hole and the host. Here we report observations of the ultraviolet emissions of massive early-type galaxies. We derive an empirical relation for a critical black-hole mass (as a function of velocity dispersion) above which the outflows from these black holes suppress star formation in their hosts by heating and expelling all available cold gas. Supermassive black holes are negligible in mass compared to their hosts but nevertheless seem to play a critical role in the star formation history of galaxies.

  14. An Energetic AGN Outburst Powered by a Rapidly Spinning Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R; Rafferty, D A; Birzan, L; Nulsen, P E J; Kirkpatrick, C C; Wise, M W

    2008-01-01

    Powering the 10E62 erg AGN outburst in the MS0735.6+7421 cluster's central galaxy by accretion implies that its putative supermassive black hole (SMBH) grew by ~6E8 solar masses or nearly 1/3 of its mass over the past 100 Myr. Guided by data at several wavelengths, we place restrictive upper limits on the amount of cold gas and star formation near the nucleus of 10E10 solar mass ultramassive black hole.

  15. Effects of Goldstone Bosons on Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Huitzu

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosion events in the universe. An amount of gravitational energy of the order of the rest-mass energy of the Sun is released from a small region, within seconds or longer. This should lead to the formation of a fireball of temperature in the MeV range, consisting of electrons/positrons, photons, and a small fraction of baryons. We exploit the potential of GRB fireballs for being a laboratory for testing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, where we find that Weinberg's Higgs portal model serves as a good candidate for this purpose. Due to the resonance effects, the Goldstone bosons can be rapidly produced by electron-positron annihilation process in the initial fireballs of the gamma-ray bursts. On the other hand, the mean free path of the Goldstone bosons is larger than the size of the GRB initial fireballs, so they are not coupled to the GRB's relativistic flow and can lead to significant energy loss. Using generic values for the GRB initial fireball ...

  16. Extreme Environments: From supermassive black holes to supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Felicia

    2016-06-01

    -when-brighter' trend often found in the X-ray spectra of flaring blazars. I further find that the Compton dominance (which is redshift independent) agrees well with the blazar sequence. I find that the Fermi's blazar divide, which seems to indicate a lack of sources peaking between 10^14 Hz and 10^16 Hz is likely due to absorption/extinction in this energy band, and is not source-intrinsic. I study the thermal excess found in the optical/UV spectra of blazars, often called the "Big Blue Bump"(BBB). The temperature of the BBB in BL Lac objects is usually 6000 K, which suggest that the BBB is emission from the host galaxy, which is not completely outshone by the non-thermal continuum. In quasars the temperatures of the BBB lie between 10000 K and 40000 K, much lower than the expected 76000 K for an accretion disk temperature of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 10^9 solar masses. It is possible that this is due to reprocessing of the emission by clouds near the broad line region. It is interesting to note however, that the BBB of the 22 sources can be better described by a single temperature black body than a multi-temperature black body. For an accretion disk we would expect a very large range in temperatures, possibly further broadened by gravity and the velocity of disk. Another possible explanation is free-free emission in a hot corona surrounding the black hole, though a more detailed investigation is necessary to draw firm conclusions about the BBB in blazars. I have studied the fundamental plane of black holes as a tool for estimating the black hole mass. The fundamental plane of black holes finds one plane in a black hole mass, X-ray luminosity, and radio luminosity three-dimensional space. Separate works in the literature find various parameters for this plane, depending on the source population used for determining the parameters. I have tested most of the recent works and used the X-ray and radio luminosity from the SEDs to estimate the black hole mass. This estimate

  17. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson production and limits on anomalous quartic gauge-boson couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hulin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The production of vector boson scattering and triple gauge bosons are studied using $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The vector boson scattering processes of $W^{\\pm}W^{\\pm}(\\rightarrow \\ell^{\\pm}\

  18. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Stephen Luke [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL

  19. A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil C; van den Bosch, Remco; Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay; Neumayer, Nadine; Chilingarian, Igor; Hilker, Michael; McDermid, Richard; Spitler, Lee; Brodie, Jean; Frank, Matthias J; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2014-09-18

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies.

  20. High-energy signatures of binary systems of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Pérez, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Context. Binary systems of supermassive black holes are expected to be strong sources of long gravitational waves prior to merging. These systems are good candidates to be observed with forthcoming space-borne detectors. Only a few of these systems, however, have been firmly identified to date. Aims. We aim at providing a criterion for the identification of some supermassive black hole binaries based on the characteristics of the high-energy emission of a putative relativistic jet launched from the most massive of the two black holes. Methods. We study supermassive black hole binaries where the less massive black hole has carved an annular gap in the circumbinary disk, but nevertheless there is a steady mass flow across its orbit. Such a perturbed disk is hotter and more luminous than a standard thin disk in some regions. Assuming that the jet contains relativistic electrons, we calculate its broadband spectral energy distribution focusing on the inverse Compton up-scattering of the disk photons. We also comp...

  1. Do Stellar Winds Prevent the Formation of Supermassive Stars by Accretion?

    CERN Document Server

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Saio, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive stars (SMS; ~ 10^5 M_sun) formed from metal-free gas in the early Universe attract attention as progenitors of supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts. To form SMSs by accretion, central protostars must accrete at as high rates as ~ 0.1-1 M_sun/yr. Such protostars have very extended structures with bloated envelopes, like super-giant stars, and are called super-giant protostars (SGPSs). Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, SGPSs have density inverted layers, where the luminosity becomes locally super-Eddington, near the surface. If the envelope matter is allowed to flow out, however, a stellar wind could be launched and hinder the accretion growth of SGPSs before reaching the supermassive regime. We examine whether radiation-driven winds are launched from SGPSs by constructing steady and spherically symmetric wind solutions. We find that the wind velocity does not reach the escape velocity in any case considered. This is because once the temperature falls below ~ 10^4 K, t...

  2. Constraining the Orbits of the Supermassive Binary Blackhole Pair 0402+379

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Ben; Peck, Alison B.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Zavala, Robert T.; Romani, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are a relatively common occurrence in the Universe. Given that most large galaxies harbor supermassive black holes in their centers, it should follow that two supermassive black holes could be found in the centers of galaxies that have recently undergone a merger event. Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHB) with small separation (referred to as "tight binaries"), however, are quite rare, implying that the mergers happen less often than we think, or that the binary black hole merger happens much more quickly than expected from simulations. We present observations of one of the best candidates for a tight SMBHB, 0402+379, made in 2003, 2005, and 2009 using the VLBA at 3 frequencies, and report on their apparent relative component motions over this time frame. Additionally, these results are compared to earlier observations of 0402+379 which can help establish a long time baseline. This information, although still preliminary, can be used to provide constraints on the orbits of this binary system which in turn may yield insight as to why these binary systems are not significantly more commonly detected in, for example, ULIRGs in the late stages of merger.

  3. Massive black hole factories: Supermassive and quasi-star formation in primordial halos

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Ferrara, Andrea; Galli, Daniele; Latif, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive stars and quasi-stars (massive stars with a central black hole) are both considered as potential progenitors for the formation of supermassive black holes. They are expected to form from rapidly accreting protostars in massive primordial halos. We explore how long rapidly accreting protostars remain on the Hayashi track, implying large protostellar radii and weak accretion luminosity feedback. We assess the potential role of energy production in the nuclear core, and determine what regulates the evolution of such protostars into quasi-stars or supermassive stars. We follow the contraction of characteristic mass scales in rapidly accreting protostars, and infer the timescales for them to reach nuclear densities. We compare the characteristic timescales for nuclear burning with those for which the extended protostellar envelope can be maintained. We find that the extended envelope can be maintained up to protostellar masses of 3.6x10^8 \\dot{m}^3 solar, where \\dot{m} denotes the accretion rate in so...

  4. Hunting for Infrared Signatures of Supermassive Black Hole Activity in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Kevin; Reines, Amy; Greene, Jenny; Stern, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In order to explore the origin of the relationship between the growth of a galaxy and its central supermassive black hole, evidence must be found for black holes in galaxies at a wide range in masses. Searching for supermassive black holes in dwarf galaxies is especially important as these objects have less complicated merger histories, and they may host black holes that are similar to early proposed ``seed'' black holes. However, this selection is complicated by the fact that star formation in these dwarf galaxies can often mask the optical signatures of supermassive black hole growth and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in these objects. The all-sky infrared coverage offered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has been used to great success to select AGNs in more massive galaxies, but great care must be used when using infrared selection techniques on samples of dwarf galaxies. In particular, compact, highly star-forming dwarf galaxies can have infrared colors that may lead them to be erroneously selected as AGNs. In this talk, I will discuss recent work exploring infrared selection of AGN candidates in dwarf galaxies, and present a set of potential IR dwarf-galaxy AGN candidates. I will also outline the importance in these results with respect to future selection of AGNs in low-metallicity galaxies at high-redshift.

  5. The general relativistic instability supernova of a supermassive population III star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses ≳10,000 M{sub ☉} in primeval galaxies in strong ultraviolet backgrounds at z ∼ 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by z ∼ 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. However, we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 M{sub ☉} can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10{sup 55} erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at z ≲ 20 to Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.

  6. Supermassive Black Hole Growth During The Peak Of Cosmic Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Nathaniel Robert

    2016-01-01

    Massive galaxies in the nearby universe all show evidence of a central Supermassive Black Hole. The black holes are seen to grow over time by accretion of gas from their host galaxy, a phenomenon referred to as an Active Galactic Nucleus. This process is believed to be fundamental to the observed correlations between black hole mass and properties of the host galaxies. We have a more limited and biased understanding of the growth of supermassive black holes in more 'typical' galaxies at z ˜ 1 -- 2. In this work, we search for Active Galactic Nuclei in a population of star-forming galaxies spanning a mass range of M* ˜ 107 -- 1012 M[special character omitted] at 0.62 Parallels (WISP) survey, for which we designed and implemented a suite of data analysis routines for discovering and measuring star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei. We find a sample of 50 active galactic nuclei, identified by their strong, rest-frame optical, emission-line ratios. We find that growing supermassive black holes in low-mass galaxies at z [special character omitted] 1 either make up a greater fraction of their galaxies' masses than those in massive galaxies, or perhaps emit a greater fraction of their energy in [O III].

  7. Double-double radio galaxies: remnants of merger of supermassive binary black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F K; Cao, S L; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2003-01-01

    The activity of active galaxy may be triggered by the merge of galaxies and present-day galaxies are probably the product of successive minor mergers. The frequent galactic merges at high redshift imply that active galaxy harbors supermassive unequal-mass binary black holes in its center at least once during its life time. In this paper, we showed that the recently discovered double-lobed FR II radio galaxies are the remnants of such supermassive binary black holes. The inspiraling secondary black hole opens a gap in the accretion disk and removes the inner accretion disk when it merges into the primary black hole, leaving a big hole of about several hundreds of Schwarzschild radius in the vicinity of the post-merged supermassive black hole and leading to an interruption of jet formation. When the outer accretion disk slowly refills the big hole on a viscous time scale, the jet formation restarts and the interaction of the recurrent jets and the inter-galactic medium forms a secondary pair of lobes. We applie...

  8. Do stellar winds prevent the formation of supermassive stars by accretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Saio, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2017-03-01

    Supermassive stars (SMSs; ∼105 M⊙) formed from metal-free gas in the early Universe attract attention as progenitors of supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts. To form SMSs by accretion, central protostars must accrete at as high rates as ∼0.1-1 M⊙ yr-1. Such protostars have very extended structures with bloated envelopes, like supergiant stars, and are called supergiant protostars (SGPSs). Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, SGPSs have density-inverted layers, where the luminosity becomes locally super-Eddington, near the surface. If the envelope matter is allowed to flow out, however, a stellar wind could be launched and hinder the accretion growth of SGPSs before reaching the supermassive regime. We examine whether radiation-driven winds are launched from SGPSs by constructing steady and spherically symmetric wind solutions. We find that the wind velocity does not reach the escape velocity in any case considered. This is because once the temperature falls below ∼104 K, the opacity plummet drastically owing to the recombination of hydrogen and the acceleration ceases suddenly. This indicates that, in realistic non-steady cases, even if outflows are launched from the surface of SGPSs, they would fall back again. Such a 'wind' does not result in net mass-loss and does not prevent the growth of SGPSs. In conclusion, SGPSs will grow to SMSs and eventually collapse to massive black holes of ∼105 M⊙, as long as the rapid accretion is maintained.

  9. Direct formation of supermassive black holes via multi-scale gas inflows in galaxy mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Escala, A; Callegari, S

    2010-08-26

    Observations of distant quasars indicate that supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses already existed less than a billion years after the Big Bang. Models in which the 'seeds' of such black holes form by the collapse of primordial metal-free stars cannot explain the rapid appearance of these supermassive black holes because gas accretion is not sufficiently efficient. Alternatively, these black holes may form by direct collapse of gas within isolated protogalaxies, but current models require idealized conditions, such as metal-free gas, to prevent cooling and star formation from consuming the gas reservoir. Here we report simulations showing that mergers between massive protogalaxies naturally produce the conditions for direct collapse into a supermassive black hole with no need to suppress cooling and star formation. Merger-driven gas inflows give rise to an unstable, massive nuclear gas disk of a few billion solar masses, which funnels more than 10(8) solar masses of gas to a sub-parsec-scale gas cloud in only 100,000 years. The cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, which eventually leads to the formation of a massive black hole. The black hole can subsequently grow to a billion solar masses on timescales of about 10(8) years by accreting gas from the surrounding disk.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in associated production with w boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Xu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-11-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron is presented in this dissertation. The process of interest is the associated production of W boson and Higgs boson, with the W boson decaying leptonically and the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of bottom quarks. The dataset in the analysis is accumulated by the D0 detector from April 2002 to April 2008 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1. The events are reconstructed and selected following the criteria of an isolated lepton, missing transverse energy and two jets. The D0 Neural Network b-jet identification algorithm is further used to discriminate b jets from light jets. A multivariate analysis combining Matrix Element and Neural Network methods is explored to improve the Higgs boson signal significance. No evidence of the Higgs boson is observed in this analysis. In consequence, an observed (expected) limit on the ratio of σ (p$\\bar{p}$ → WH) x Br (H → b$\\bar{b}$) to the Standard Model prediction is set to be 6.7 (6.4) at 95% C.L. for the Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV.

  11. ServCat Document Selection Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The ServCat document selection guidelines were developed for selecting appropriate documents to upload into ServCat. When beginning to upload documents into ServCat,...

  12. Top quark, W-boson and light Higgs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, S.

    1997-10-01

    The top quark, the W-boson and the Higg boson form an interesting triptych of elementary particles. In the Standard Model knowing the mass of two of these particles, usually the top quark and W-boson, we can predict the mass of the third, the Higgs boson. Therefore in this proceedings I will primarily cover the following topics, top quark physics, W-boson mass and the light Higgs boson at the proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the Tevatron. Other hadron collider topics to be cover in this conference include B-physics, QCD, Electroweak Physics, and Supersymmetry.

  13. Higgs Bosons in Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the LHC with a mass m_H\\simeq 126 GeV, we review different models where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In the Randall-Sundrum model electroweak observables provide very strong bounds on the mass of KK modes which motivates extensions to overcome this problem. Two extensions are briefly discussed. One particular extension is based on the deformation of the metric such that it strongly departs from the AdS_5 structure in the IR region while it goes asymptotically to AdS_5 in the UV brane. This model has the IR brane close to a naked metric singularity (which is outside the physical interval) characteristic of soft-walls constructions. The proximity of the singularity provides a strong wave-function renormalization for the Higgs field which suppresses the T and S parameters. The second class of considered extensions are based on the introduction of an extra gauge group in the bulk such that the custod...

  14. Bosonic self-energy functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügel, Dario; Werner, Philipp; Pollet, Lode; Strand, Hugo U. R.

    2016-11-01

    We derive the self-energy functional theory for bosonic lattice systems with broken U(1) symmetry by parametrizing the bosonic Baym-Kadanoff effective action in terms of one- and two-point self-energies. The formalism goes beyond other approximate methods such as the pseudoparticle variational cluster approximation, the cluster composite boson mapping, and the Bogoliubov+U theory. It simplifies to bosonic dynamical-mean-field theory when constraining to local fields, whereas when neglecting kinetic contributions of noncondensed bosons, it reduces to the static mean-field approximation. To benchmark the theory, we study the Bose-Hubbard model on the two- and three-dimensional cubic lattice, comparing with exact results from path integral quantum Monte Carlo. We also study the frustrated square lattice with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, which is beyond the reach of Monte Carlo simulations. A reference system comprising a single bosonic state, corresponding to three variational parameters, is sufficient to quantitatively describe phase boundaries and thermodynamical observables, while qualitatively capturing the spectral functions, as well as the enhancement of kinetic fluctuations in the frustrated case. On the basis of these findings, we propose self-energy functional theory as the omnibus framework for treating bosonic lattice models, in particular, in cases where path integral quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from severe sign problems (e.g., in the presence of nontrivial gauge fields or frustration). Self-energy functional theory enables the construction of diagrammatically sound approximations that are quantitatively precise and controlled in the number of optimization parameters but nevertheless remain computable by modest means.

  15. Cold bosons in optical lattices: a tutorial for exact diagonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Exact diagonalization (ED) techniques are a powerful method for studying many-body problems. Here, we apply this method to systems of few bosons in an optical lattice, and use it to demonstrate the emergence of interesting quantum phenomena such as fragmentation and coherence. Starting with a standard Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we first revise the characterisation of the superfluid to Mott insulator (MI) transitions. We then consider an inhomogeneous lattice, where one potential minimum is made much deeper than the others. The MI phase due to repulsive on-site interactions then competes with the trapping of all atoms in the deep potential. Finally, we turn our attention to attractively interacting systems, and discuss the appearance of strongly correlated phases and the onset of localisation for a slightly biased lattice. The article is intended to serve as a tutorial for ED of Bose-Hubbard models.

  16. Vector Boson Scattering, Triple Gauge-Boson Production, and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge-Boson Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hulin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vector-boson scattering processes provide a unique way to probe the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Similar physics can be probed by studying the production of three gauge bosons. The results can also be used for a model-independent search for new physics at the TeV scale via anomalous quartic gauge couplings. The ATLAS collaboration has studied vector boson scattering in final states with two gauge bosons and two forward jets in 20.3 /fb of 8TeV proton-proton collision data, in particular two same-sign W bosons, a WZ boson pair, and a W or Z boson in association with an isolated photon. The studies are complemented by a search for anomalous vector boson production of WW+WZ pairs in their semileptonic decays to lnujj in association with two forward jets. The collaboration has used this data set as well to study the production of three gauge bosons. A search was carried out for the production of three W bosons. The cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with two isolated...

  17. ATLAS measurements of vector boson production

    CERN Document Server

    Debenedetti, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vector boson production in pp collisions at 7, 8 and 13 TeV has been extensively studied by ATLAS. Recent results include the precision measurements of the transverse momentum of the Z/gamma* boson production, sensitive to soft resummation effects, hard jet emissions and electroweak corrections. A precise measurement of the angular coefficients of the Z­boson production tests the underlying QCD dynamics of the Drell­Yan process. A first measurement of the inclusive W and Z cross section at a cms energy of 13TeV has been derived. The Production of jets in association with a vector boson is an important process to study QCD in a multi­scale environment. Cross sections, differential in several kinematics variables, have been measured with the ATLAS detector and compared to state­of­the­art QCD calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. First measurements of vector boson + jets production have been performed at cms energies of 13TeV. An overview of these results is given.

  18. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  19. Higgs boson parameters and decays into fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bluj, Michal Jacek

    2016-01-01

    In 2012 the discovery of a new boson with a mass of about 125 GeV and properties in agreement with those expected for the Higgs boson in the standard model was announced. In this note we review the results of searches for the fermionic decays the Higgs boson and the study of its properties performed with the proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 5~fb$^{-1}$ and approximately 20~fb$^{-1}$ per experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV, respectively. Decay rates to fermions and extracted couplings are consistent with the expectation of the standard model. In addition, we present a search for lepton flavour violating decays of the Higgs boson which can occur in several extensions of the standard model, and a search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs performed in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM).

  20. Our dear boson – and so what?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    A long-sought particle finally found. On Wednesday 4 July, enthusiasm spread from CERN to the worldwide media. But a question legitimately arises: why is this particle attracting so much interest? In other words, how is it different from all the others? (And, by the way, what is a boson?).   CERN, 4 July 2012: a long-sought particle finally found. Strictly speaking, we cannot even call it the “Higgs” boson yet. Only after careful checking of its properties will physicists be able to say if the new boson corresponds to the particle that theorists predicted in 1964. However, the experimental data we have so far already tells us, unambiguously, that this new particle is different from all the other elementary particles we know. “Every particle is either a boson or a fermion,” explains John Ellis, former CERN theorist and currently professor at King's College in London. “All known particles spin like small tops, with the known bosons tha...

  1. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  2. Chiral bosonization for non-commutative fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Ashok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)]. E-mail: das@pas.rochester.edu; Gamboa, Jorge [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago 2 (Chile); Mendez, Fernando [INFN, Laboratorio Nazionali del Gran Sasso, SS, 17bis, 67010 Asergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Lopez-Sarrion, Justo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    A model of chiral bosons on a non-commutative field space is constructed and new generalized bosonization (fermionization) rules for these fields are given. The conformal structure of the theory is characterized by a level of the Kac-Moody algebra equal to (1+{theta}{sup 2}) where {theta} is the non-commutativity parameter and chiral bosons living in a non-commutative fields space are described by a rational conformal field theory with the central charge of the Virasoro algebra equal to 1. The non-commutative chiral bosons are shown to correspond to a free fermion moving with a speed equal to c' = c(1+{theta}{sup 2}){sup 1/2} where c is the speed of light. Lorentz invariance remains intact if c is rescaled by c{yields}c'. The dispersion relation for bosons and fermions, in this case, is given by {omega} = c' vertical bar k vertical bar. (author)

  3. Vector boson pair production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, K L

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the contribution of gluon-gluon induced processes to vector boson pair production at hadron colliders, specifically the production of WZ, W gamma and Z gamma pairs. We calculate the tree level processes gg -> WZqq-bqr, gg -> W gamma qq-bar and gg -> Z gamma qq-bar, and the one loop process gg -> Z gamma. We use the helicity method and include the decay of the W and Z bosons into leptons in the narrow width approximation. We include anomalous triple gauge couplings in all of our vector boson pair production calculations. In order to integrate over the qq-bar final state phase space we use an extended version of the subtraction method to NNLO and cancel collinear singularities explicitly. The general subtraction terms that are obtained apply to all vector boson pair production processes. Due to the large gluon density at low x, the gluon induced terms of vector boson pair production are expected to be the dominant NNLO QCD correction, relevant at LHC energies. However, we show that due to a cancell...

  4. Measurements of the Higgs boson properties with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tomoto, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Slide draft for the Crimea 2013 workshop. The subject of the talk will be measurements of the Higgs boson properties, including the spin, mass, signal strength, and couplings of a new boson discovered in 2012 at the ATLAS experiment.

  5. Integrability and Quantum Phase Transitions in Interacting Boson Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dukelsky, J; García-Ramos, J E; Pittel, S

    2003-01-01

    The exact solution of the boson pairing hamiltonian given by Richardson in the sixties is used to study the phenomena of level crossings and quantum phase transitions in the integrable regions of the sd and sdg interacting boson models.

  6. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  7. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets.

  8. Search for a Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a W Boson at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Ruckert, Benjamin

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is the most modern proton-proton collider and data taking will start in 2009, with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The ATLAS detector, which is one of two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider, is able to detect a Standard Model Higgs boson if it exists. This is one of the main tasks of the ATLAS experiment. This thesis deals with a Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson. The Monte Carlo study is based on physics events generated at the nominal centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider of 14 TeV. Large parts of this analysis have been done using the global Grid infrastructure of the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A mass range of the Higgs boson of mH = 130 - 190 GeV has been taken into account. In this mass range, the Higgs boson dominantly decays into a pair of W bosons, leading to initially three W bosons: WH -> WWW. Two orthogonal analysis channels have been investigated in detailed studies of the background properti...

  9. Diboson Production, Vector Boson Fusion and Vector Boson Scattering measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Cong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of heavy di-boson pairs, such as WW, WZ and ZZ, in the fully-leptonic and partially in the semi-leptonic final states at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. Moreover, searches for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV will be presented. These studies are closely connected to the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs, which will be presented in this talk. When selecting two jets at high invariant mass in addition to the production of th...

  10. Results on BSM Higgs boson searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Giulini, Maddalena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Many beyond the SM theories (BSM) foresee a complex Higgs sector and hence additional Higgs bosons. These new scalar particles could appear as excesses in events containing two bosons or two fermions. Direct searches for BSM Higgs bosons in final states with tau leptons, heavy quarks or vector bosons have been performed by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Recent results of these searches are reviewed in this article.

  11. Boson Stars in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Lehner, Luis

    2013-01-01

    We construct boson stars in global Anti de Sitter (AdS) space and study their stability. Linear perturbation results suggest that the ground state along with the first three excited state boson stars are stable. We evolve some of these solutions and study their nonlinear stability in light of recent work \\cite{Bizon:2011gg} arguing that a weakly turbulent instability drives scalar perturbations of AdS to black hole formation. However evolutions suggest that boson stars are nonlinearly stable and immune to the instability for sufficiently small perturbation. Furthermore, these studies find other families of initial data which similarly avoid the instability for sufficiently weak parameters. Heuristically, we argue that initial data families with widely distributed mass-energy distort the spacetime sufficiently to oppose the coherent amplification favored by the instability. From the dual CFT perspective our findings suggest that there exist families of rather generic initial conditions in strongly coupled CFT ...

  12. Light gauge boson in rare $K$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The inconsistent conclusions for a light gauge boson $X$ production in the $K^- \\to \\pi^- X$ exist in the literature. It is found that the process can be generated by the tree-level $W$-boson annihilation and loop-induced $s\\to dX$. We find that it strongly depends on the $SU(3)$ limit or the unique gauge coupling to the quarks, whether the $K^-\\to \\pi^- X$ decay, which is from the $W$-boson annihilation, is suppressed by $m^2_X \\epsilon_X \\cdot p_K$; however, no such suppression is found via the loop-induced $s\\to d X$. The constraints on the relevant couplings are studied.

  13. Elementary Goldstone Higgs Boson and Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanne, Tommi; Gertov, Helene; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a perturbative extension of the Standard Model featuring elementary pseudo-Goldstone Higgs and dark matter particles. These are two of the five Goldstone bosons parametrising the SU(4)/Sp(4) coset space. They acquire masses, and therefore become pseudo-Goldstone bosons, due...... of the theory, the quantum corrections are precisely calculable. The remaining pseudo-Goldstone boson is identified with the dark matter candidate because it is neutral with respect to the Standard Model and stable. By a direct comparison with the Large Hadron Collider experiments, the model is found...... to be phenomenologically viable. Furthermore the dark matter particle leads to the observed thermal relic density while respecting the most stringent current experimental constraints....

  14. The general boson normal ordering problem

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Solomon, A I; Blasiak, Pawel; Penson, Karol A.; Solomon, Allan I.

    2003-01-01

    We solve the boson normal ordering problem for F[(a*)^r a^s], with r,s positive integers, where a* and a are boson creation and annihilation operators satisfying [a,a*]=1. That is, we provide exact and explicit expressions for the normal form wherein all a's are to the right. The solution involves integer sequences of numbers which are generalizations of the conventional Bell and Stirling numbers whose values they assume for r=s=1. A comprehensive theory of such generalized combinatorial numbers is given including closed-form expressions (extended Dobinski-type formulas)and generating functions. These last are special expectation values in boson coherent states.

  15. W Boson Polarisation at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Couchman, J; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Elements of the spin density matrix for W bosons in e+e- -> W+W- -> qqln events are measured from data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP. This information is used calculate polarised differential cross-sections and to search for CP-violating effects. Results are presented for W bosons produced in e+e- collisions with centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The average fraction of W bosons that are longitudinally polarised is found to be (23.9 +- 2.1 +- 1.1)% compared to a Standard Model prediction of (23.9 +- 0.1)%. All results are consistent with CP conservation.

  16. Efficient experimental validation of photonic boson sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolo, N; Bentivegna, M; Brod, D J; Crespi, A; Flamini, F; Giacomini, S; Milani, G; Ramponi, R; Mataloni, P; Osellame, R; Galvao, E F; Sciarrino, F

    2013-01-01

    A boson sampling device is a specialised quantum computer that solves a problem which is strongly believed to be computationally hard for classical computers. Recently a number of small-scale implementations have been reported, all based on multi-photon interference in multimode interferometers. In the hard-to-simulate regime, even validating the device's functioning may pose a problem. In a recent criticism of boson sampling experiments, Gogolin et al. argued that the output would be effectively indistinguishable from the trivial, uniform distribution. Here we report new boson sampling experiments on larger photonic chips, and analyse the data using a scalable statistical test recently proposed by Aaronson and Arkhipov. We show the test successfully validates small experimental data samples against the hypothesis that they are uniformly distributed. We also show how to discriminate data arising from either indistinguishable or distinguishable photons. Our results pave the way towards demonstrating the quantu...

  17. Quantum simulation with a boson sampling circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Olivares, Diego; Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study a system that consists of 2 M matter qubits that interact through a boson sampling circuit, i.e., an M -port interferometer, embedded in two different architectures. We prove that, under the conditions required to derive a master equation, the qubits evolve according to effective bipartite X Y spin Hamiltonians, with or without local and collective dissipation terms. This opens the door to the simulation of any bipartite spin or hard-core boson models and exploring dissipative phase transitions as the competition between coherent and incoherent exchange of excitations. We also show that in the purely dissipative regime this model has a large number of exact and approximate dark states, whose structure and decay rates can be estimated analytically. We finally argue that this system may be used for the adiabatic preparation of boson sampling states encoded in the matter qubits.

  18. Reheating with a composite Higgs boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croon, Djuna; Sanz, Verónica; Tarrant, Ewan R. M.

    2016-08-01

    The flatness of the inflaton potential and lightness of the Higgs boson could have the common origin of the breaking of a global symmetry. This scenario provides a unified framework of Goldstone inflation and composite Higgs models, where the inflaton and the Higgs particle both have a pseudo-Goldstone boson nature. The inflaton reheats the Universe via decays to the Higgs and subsequent secondzary production of other SM particles via the top and massive vector bosons. We find that inflationary predictions and perturbative reheating conditions are consistent with cosmic microwave background data for sub-Planckian values of the fields, as well as opening up the possibility of inflation at the TeV scale. We explore this exciting possibility, leading to an interplay between collider data cosmological constraints.

  19. Bosonic-Seesaw Portal Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of Higgs-portal dark matter-production mechanism, called bosonic-seesaw portal scenario. Bosonic seesaw provides the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking, triggered by mixing between the elementary Higgs and a composite Higgs generated by a new-color strong dynamics (hypercolor) which dynamically breaks the classical-scale invariance of the model. The composite hypercolor-baryonic matter can then be a dark matter candidate, which significantly couples to the standard-model Higgs via the bosonic seesaw, and can be produced from the thermal plasma below the decoupling temperature around the new strong coupling scale, to account for the observed relic abundance of the dark matter: the dark matter can closely be related to the mechanism of the electroweak symmetry breaking.

  20. Higgs Boson Masses in NMSSM with Spontaneous CP-violation

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The Higgs boson mass problem is considered in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model for the case of the spontaneous CP violation. The renormalization group equations for the gauge, Yukawa and scalar coupling constants, the effective Higgs potential and lower experimental bounds on Higgs boson and chargino masses are analyzed. The restrictions on the Higgs boson masses are found.

  1. Search for heavy resonances in vector boson fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guangyi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    If the Higgs boson discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is not exactly the one in the Standard Model, an alternative mechanism is needed to restore unitarity in the scattering amplitude of longitudinal gauge bosons, and new resonances may appear. This paper presents a search for new heavy neutral resonances ($R$) produced through vector boson fusion process $qq \\rightarrow Rqq \\rightarrow \\ell^+ \

  2. Can Family Gauge Bosons Be Visible by Terrestrial Experiments?

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    It is investigated whether observations of family gauge bosons by terrestrial experiments are possible or not. We propose an extended version of Sumino's family gauge boson model based on U(3) family symmetry. Then, we can expect the lowest family gauge boson $A_1^1$ with $M \\sim 4.3$ TeV.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Quantization over boson operator spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2010-10-01

    The framework of third quantization—canonical quantization in the Liouville space—is developed for open many-body bosonic systems. We show how to diagonalize the quantum Liouvillean for an arbitrary quadratic n-boson Hamiltonian with arbitrary linear Lindblad couplings to the baths and, as an example, explicitly work out a general case of a single boson.

  4. Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drechsel, P.; Gröber, R.; Heinemeyer, S.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM based on an on-shell (OS) renormalization of the gauge-boson and Higgs-boson masses and the parameters of the top/scalar top sector. We compare the implementation of the OS calculations in the codes NMSSMCALC and NMSSM-FeynHiggs up...

  5. Cosmic expansion from boson and fermion fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, Rudinei C; Kremer, Gilberto M, E-mail: rudijantsch@gmail.com, E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2011-06-21

    This paper consists in analyzing an action that describes boson and fermion fields minimally coupled to the gravity and a common matter field. The self-interaction potentials of the fields are not chosen a priori but from the Noether symmetry approach. The Noether forms of the potentials allow the boson field to play the role of dark energy and matter and the fermion field to behave as standard matter. The constant of motion and the cyclic variable associated with the Noether symmetry allow the complete integration of the field equations, whose solution produces a universe with alternated periods of accelerated and decelerated expansion.

  6. Cosmic expansion from boson and fermion fields

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Rudinei C

    2011-01-01

    This paper consists in analyzing an action that describes boson and fermion fields minimally coupled to the gravity and a common matter field. The self-interaction potentials of the fields are not chosen a priori but from the Noether symmetry approach. The Noether forms of the potentials allow the boson field to play the role of dark energy and matter and the fermion field to behave as standard matter. The constant of motion and the cyclic variable associated with the Noether symmetry allow the complete integration of the field equations, whose solution produces a Universe with alternated periods of accelerated and decelerated expansion.

  7. Theoretical Survey of Higgs Boson and Axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Robert O.

    2000-04-05

    The success as well as the problems of the minimal Standard Model are recalled. The authors survey essentially this Model and the theory of the standard axion (Nambu-Goldstone boson). Possible invisible and visualized (theoretical) axions are discussed as are certain astrophysical aspects of the existence of an axion. They survey also axion cosmology in superstring models and its consequence, in the new anomaly cancellation mechanism to the sense of Green and Schwarz. Recent results for the search of the Higgs boson, and the axion are resumed. A great important is reserved for discussion of the Standard Model.

  8. Boson sampling from a Gaussian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A P; Laing, A; Rahimi-Keshari, S; Rudolph, T; O'Brien, J L; Ralph, T C

    2014-09-05

    We pose a randomized boson-sampling problem. Strong evidence exists that such a problem becomes intractable on a classical computer as a function of the number of bosons. We describe a quantum optical processor that can solve this problem efficiently based on a Gaussian input state, a linear optical network, and nonadaptive photon counting measurements. All the elements required to build such a processor currently exist. The demonstration of such a device would provide empirical evidence that quantum computers can, indeed, outperform classical computers and could lead to applications.

  9. On the gauging of chiral bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Wotzasek, C

    1995-01-01

    We study the coupling of chiral bosons to external electromagnetic fields. It is observed that a naive gauging procedure leaves the gauge invariant chirality condition incompatible with the field equations. We propose the use of this feature as a consistency test to select the appropriate way to perform the gauge coupling. We verify that among all the possible gauging schemes, only the coupling of gauge fields with chiral currents passes the consistency test. As an application, we use this gauging scheme to show how the introduction of a gauge field becomes necessary in order to sold together a right and a left chiral boson.

  10. Searches for BSM Higgs Bosons with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Gabriela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass of about 125GeV has prompted the question of whether or not this particle is part of a much larger and more complex Higgs sector than that envisioned in the Standard Model. In this talk, the current results from the ATLAS Experiment regarding Beyond-the-Standard Model (BSM) Higgs hypothesis tests are outlined. Searches for additional Higgs bosons are presented and interpreted in well-motivated BSM Higgs frameworks, such as two-Higgs-doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  11. Net tightens round the Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P. [Particle and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    Results presented at the International Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics in mid-July provide strong hints that the Higgs boson, one of the holy grails of particle physics, is lurking just around the corner. Over 500 physicists gathered in Tampere, Finland, armed with the latest data and hot on the trail of this elusive particle, the interactions of which are thought to be responsible for giving particles their mass. The Higgs boson is the only unobserved piece in the jigsaw puzzle of elementary particles in the Standard Model. And it now appears to be within tantalizing reach of experiments that will take place over the next few years. (UK)

  12. Inflation and pseudo-Goldstone Higgs boson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanne, Tommi; Sannino, Francesco; Tenkanen, Tommi

    2017-01-01

    We consider inflation within a model framework where the Higgs boson arises as a pseudo-Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of a global symmetry at a scale significantly larger than the electroweak one. We show that in such a model the scalar self-couplings can be parametrically suppressed...... and, consequently, the nonminimal couplings to gravity can be of order one or less, while the inflationary predictions of the model remain compatible with the precision cosmological observations. Furthermore, in the model we study, the existence of the electroweak scale is entirely due to the inflaton...

  13. W Boson Mass Measurement at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, C; Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystrický, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Kim, H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N V; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu-Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S Y; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Hays, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The W boson mass (mW) is a key parameter of the standard model, constraining the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson. Using Tevatron ppbar collision data from 1992-1996, the CDF and D0 collaborations measured mW to a precision of 59 MeV. The ongoing Tevatron Run 2 has produced a factor of 5 more collisions, promising a significant reduction in the W mass uncertainty. CDF has analyzed the first 200/pb of Run 2 data and determined the uncertainty on its W mass measurement to be 76 MeV.

  14. Z Boson Pair-Production at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    Events stemming from the pair-production of Z bosons in e^+e^- collisions are studied using 217.4 pb^-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies from 200 GeV up to 209 GeV. The special case of events with b quarks is also investigated. Combining these events with those collected at lower centre-of-mass energies, the Standard Model predictions for the production mechanism are verified. In addition, limits are set on anomalous couplings of neutral gauge bosons and on effects of extra space dimensions.

  15. Search for Charged Higgs Bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    A search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons is performed with the L3 detector at LEP using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 629.4/pb. Decays into a charm and a strange quark or into a tau lepton and its neutrino are considered. No significant excess is observed and lower limits on the mass of the charged Higgs boson are derived at the 95% confidence level. They vary from 76.5 to 82.7GeV, as a function of the H->tv branching ratio.

  16. Exact Solution for Jaynes-Cummings Model with Bosonic Field Nonlinearity and Strong Boson-Fermion Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin; YU Wan-Lun; XIANG An-Ping

    2006-01-01

    We use Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant approach to treat the modified Jaynes-Cummings models involving any forms of nonlinearty of the bosonic field when strong boson-fermion couplings are nilpotent Grassmann valued. The general state functions, time evolution operator and the time-evolution expressions for both the bosonic number and the fermionic number are presented.

  17. Measurement of cross sections and couplings of the Higgs Boson in bosonic decay channels with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Nikita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson, the measurement of its coupling properties are of particular importance. In this talk measurement of the cross sections and couplings of the Higgs boson in bosonic decay channels with the ATLAS detector are presented.

  18. THE SUPERNOVA THAT DESTROYED A PROTOGALAXY: PROMPT CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Johnson, Jarrett L.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Meiksin, Avery [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The first primitive galaxies formed from accretion and mergers by z {approx} 15, and were primarily responsible for cosmological reionization and the chemical enrichment of the early cosmos. But a few of these galaxies may have formed in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner UV fluxes that sterilized them of H{sub 2}, preventing them from forming stars or expelling heavy elements into the intergalactic medium prior to assembly. At masses of 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} and virial temperatures of 10{sup 4} K, these halos began to rapidly cool by atomic lines, perhaps forming 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} Pop III stars and, later, the seeds of supermassive black holes. We have modeled the explosion of a supermassive Pop III star in the dense core of a line-cooled protogalaxy with the ZEUS-MP code. We find that the supernova (SN) expands to a radius of {approx}1 kpc, briefly engulfing the entire galaxy, but then collapses back into the potential well of the dark matter. Fallback fully mixes the interior of the protogalaxy with metals, igniting a violent starburst and fueling the rapid growth of a massive black hole at its center. The starburst would populate the protogalaxy with stars in greater numbers and at higher metallicities than in more slowly evolving, nearby halos. The SN remnant becomes a strong synchrotron source that can be observed with eVLA and eMERLIN and has a unique signature that easily distinguishes it from less energetic SN remnants. Such explosions, and their attendant starbursts, may well have marked the birthplaces of supermassive black holes on the sky.

  19. Music from the heavens - gravitational waves from supermassive black hole mergers in the EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, Jaime; Bower, Richard G.; Theuns, Tom; McAlpine, Stuart; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Regan, John

    2016-11-01

    We estimate the expected event rate of gravitational wave signals from mergers of supermassive black holes that could be resolved by a space-based interferometer, such as the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), utilizing the reference cosmological hydrodynamical simulation from the EAGLE suite. These simulations assume a Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony with state-of-the-art subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. They have been shown to reproduce the observed galaxy population with unprecedented fidelity. We combine the merger rates of supermassive black holes in EAGLE with the latest phenomenological waveform models to calculate the gravitational waves signals from the intrinsic parameters of the merging black holes. The EAGLE models predict ˜2 detections per year by a gravitational wave detector such as eLISA. We find that these signals are largely dominated by mergers between seed mass black holes merging at redshifts between z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 1. In order to investigate the dependence on the assumed black hole seed mass, we introduce an additional model with a black hole seed mass an order of magnitude smaller than in our reference model. We also consider a variation of the reference model where a prescription for the expected delays in the black hole merger time-scale has been included after their host galaxies merge. We find that the merger rate is similar in all models, but that the initial black hole seed mass could be distinguished through their detected gravitational waveforms. Hence, the characteristic gravitational wave signals detected by eLISA will provide profound insight into the origin of supermassive black holes and the initial mass distribution of black hole seeds.

  20. A Probabilistic Approach to Mass Serving System

    OpenAIRE

    Dominika Crnjac Miliæ; Martina Crnjac

    2008-01-01

    Clients are coming randomly and are served immediately if there is a free serving station in the system, and if all the stations are occupied, they enter the queue. After being served they leave the system. There are many serving systems depending on: the process which describes arrival; serving mechanisms; length of queue; a) 0 - system with cancellation, b) k – system with a finite queue, c) ? - system with an infinite queue. This paper will describe in detail a system with one serving stat...

  1. Can the 750-GeV diphoton resonance be the singlet Higgs boson of custodial Higgs triplet model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Kuo, An-Li

    2016-09-01

    The observation of diphoton excess around the mass of 750 GeV in LHC Run-II motivates us to consider whether the singlet Higgs boson in the custodial Higgs triplet model can serve as a good candidate because an earlier study of comprehensive parameter scan shows that it can have the right mass in the viable mass spectra. By assuming the singlet Higgs mass at 750 GeV, its total width less than 50 GeV and imposing constraints from the LHC 8-TeV data, we identify an approximately linear region on the (vΔ , α) plane along which the exotic Higgs boson masses satisfy a specific hierarchy and have lower possible spectra, where vΔ denotes the triplet vacuum expectation value and α is the mixing angle between the singlet Higgs boson and the standard model-like Higgs boson. Although the diphoton decay rate can be enhanced by charged Higgs bosons running in the loop in this region, it is mostly orders of magnitude smaller than that required for the observed production rate, except for the small vΔ region when the diphoton fusion production mechanism becomes dominant. Nonetheless, this part of parameter space suffers from the problems of breakdown of perturbativity and large uncertainties in the photon parton distribution function of proton.

  2. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-10-21

    Galaxy mergers produce supermassive black hole binaries, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  3. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-10-01

    Galaxy mergers produce supermassive black hole binaries, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  4. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  5. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hayasaki, Kimitake

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers produce binaries of supermassive black holes, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  6. The Effect of Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments on Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeland, Sarah; Siemens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to the gravitational wave (GW) stochastic background produced by supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Environmental effects such as gas and stars accelerate the evolution of SMBHBs and may deplete the stochastic background at low frequencies. How much this effects the sensitivity of PTAs to the stochastic background depends on the astrophysical mechanism and where the binary's evolution transitions from being driven by environmental effects to driven by GW emission. We will discuss how these issues impact our observing strategy and estimated time-to-detection.

  7. The Effect of Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments on Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeland, Sarah; Siemens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to the gravitational wave (GW) stochastic background produced by supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Environmental effects such as gas and stars accelerate the evolution of SMBHBs and may deplete the stochastic background at low frequencies. How much this effects the sensitivity of PTAs to the stochastic background depends on the astrophysical mechanism and where the binary's evolution transitions from being driven by environmental effects to driven by GW emission. We will discuss how these issues impact our observing strategy and estimated time-to-detection. National Science Foundation PIRE program.

  8. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Masters, Karen L.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by the Nature Publishing Group. Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the galaxy population above M∗ ∼ 2×10^10 M , where their numbers have increased by a factor of ∼ 25 since z ∼ 2. Once star formation is initially shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat subseq...

  9. Constraints on the Dynamical Environments of Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries Using Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-05-05

    We introduce a technique for gravitational-wave analysis, where Gaussian process regression is used to emulate the strain spectrum of a stochastic background by training on population-synthesis simulations. This leads to direct Bayesian inference on astrophysical parameters. For pulsar timing arrays specifically, we interpolate over the parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments, including three-body stellar scattering, and evolving orbital eccentricity. We illustrate our approach on mock data, and assess the prospects for inference with data similar to the NANOGrav 9-yr data release.

  10. Milky Way Supermassive Black Hole: Dynamical Feeding from the Circumnuclear Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Wright, Melvyn; Sun, Ai-Lei; Minh, Young Chol

    2012-01-01

    The supermassive black hole (SMBH), Sgr A*, at the Galactic Center is surrounded by a molecular circumnuclear disk (CND) lying between 1.5-4 pc radii. The irregular and clumpy structures of the CND, suggest dynamical evolution and episodic feeding of gas towards the central SMBH. New sensitive data from the SMA and GBT, reveal several >5-10 pc scale molecular arms, which either directly connect to the CND, or may penetrate inside the CND. The CND appears to be the convergence of the innermost...

  11. Gravitational-wave limits from pulsar timing constrain supermassive black hole evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-10-18

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density (Ω(GW)) with 95% confidence to be Ω(GW)(H0/73 kilometers per second per megaparsec)(2) formation model implemented in the Millennium Simulation Project is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  12. The Coevolution of Supermassive Black Holes and Massive Galaxies at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, A.; Raimundo, S.; Aversa, R.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Negrello, M.; Celotti, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.

    2014-02-01

    We exploit the recent, wide samples of far-infrared (FIR) selected galaxies followed up in X-rays and of X-ray/optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) followed up in the FIR band, along with the classic data on AGNs and stellar luminosity functions at high redshift z >~ 1.5, to probe different stages in the coevolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and host galaxies. The results of our analysis indicate the following scenario: (1) the star formation in the host galaxy proceeds within a heavily dust-enshrouded medium at an almost constant rate over a timescale generation X-ray instruments.

  13. Recent multi-boson and vector-boson scattering measurements from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Spettel, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Recent multi-boson and vector-boson scattering measurements from ATLAS Measurements of the cross sections of the production of multiple electroweak gauge bosons constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. We present recent measurements of the inclusive and differential cross sections for WW, WZ, Z+photon, WWW, Z+2photons, exclusive WW and electroweak production of single W or Z bosons at pp collision energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. Distributions sensitive to anomalous triple or quartic gauge couplings have been studied and limits on new physics have been derived.

  14. Higgs boson couplings to bosons with the ATLAS detector: run 1 legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, Elisabeth; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The final ATLAS measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channels $H \\rightarrow ZZ^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\\ell\\ell\\ell$, $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow WW^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  15. Measurement of Triple-Gauge-Boson Couplings of the W Boson at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duensing, S; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    We report on measurements of the triple-gauge-boson couplings of the W boson in $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ collisions with the L3 detector at LEP. W-pair, single-W and single-photon events are analysed in a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 76.7~pb$^{-1}$ collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161~GeV and 183~GeV. CP-conserving as well as both C- and P-conserving triple-gauge-boson couplings are determined. The results, in good agreement with the Standard-Model expectations, confirm the existence of the self coupling among the electroweak gauge bosons and constrain its structure.

  16. Aspects of Z boson production at higher orders at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Ryan D.

    Electroweak gauge boson production is a critical component of physics studies performed at hadron colliders. It serves as a 'standard candle' at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this thesis, various aspects of Z boson production at hadron colliders are considered. We introduce an improved version of the simulation code FEWZ ( Fully Exclusive W and Z Production) for hadron collider production of lepton pairs through the Drell-Yan process at next-to-next-to-leading-order in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The program is fully differential in the phase space of leptons and additional hadronic radiation. We discuss improvements in performance and user customization through phase-space constraints and predefined histograms, illustrating the new features by presenting numerous phenomenological results for LHC physics. Considering new physics effects to electroweak gauge boson production at hadron colliders, we study the supersymmetric QCD corrections to dilepton production with an associated jet at the LHC. We investigate these effects to the integrated cross section and the kinematic distributions of the final state leptons and jet. Electroweak gauge bosons are intimately related to electroweak symmetry breaking, which is achieved in the Standard Model (SM) by the Higgs boson, a scalar particle. Extending the SM scalar sector with new color-octet scalars, we investigate the phenomenology of (8, 2)1/2 doublets by studying their properties and production mechanisms at the LHC. Studying these color-octet scalars provides a window to the underlying Yukawa structure of the scalar sector. We discuss the discovery potential of color-octet scalars at the LHC and their implications on adjoint SU(5) grand unified theories.

  17. New gauge boson $B_{H}$ production associated with W boson pair via $\\gamma\\gamma$ collision in the littlest Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X; Liu, Y; Liu, S; Yang, H; Wang, Xuelei; Chen, Jihong; Liu, Yaobei; Liu, Suzhen; Yang, Hua

    2006-01-01

    The littlest Higgs model is the most economical little Higgs model. The observation of the new gauge bosons predicted by the littlest Higgs model could serve as a robust signature of the model. The ILC, with the high energy and luminosity, can open an ideal window to probe these new gauge bosons, specially, the lightest $B_H$. In the framework of the littlest Higgs model, we study a gauge boson $B_{H}$ production process $\\gamma\\gamma\\to W^{+}W^{-}B_H$. The study shows that the cross section of the process can vary in a wide range($10^{-1}-10^1$ fb) in most parameter spaces preferred by the electroweak precision data. The high c.m. energy(For example, $\\sqrt{s}=1500$ GeV) can obviously enhance the cross section to the level of tens fb. For the favorable parameter spaces, the sufficient typical events could be assumed at the ILC. Therefore, our study about the process $\\gamma\\gamma\\to W^{+}W^{-}B_H$ could provide a useful theoretical instruction for probing $B_H$ experimentally at ILC. Furthermore, such proces...

  18. The Z boson spin observables as messengers of new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain); Bernabeu, J.; Segarra, A. [Universitat de Valencia, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot (Spain); CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain); Mitsou, V.A. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    We demonstrate that the eight multipole parameters describing the spin state of the Z boson are able to disentangle known Z production mechanisms and signals from new physics at the LHC. They can be extracted from appropriate asymmetries in the angular distribution of lepton pairs from the Z boson decay. The power of this analysis is illustrated by (1) the production of Z boson plus jets; (2) Z boson plus missing transverse energy; (3) W and Z bosons originating from the two-body decay of a heavy resonance. (orig.)

  19. Bosonic Partition Functions at Nonzero (Imaginary) Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerstein, M

    2016-01-01

    We consider bosonic random matrix partition functions at nonzero chemical potential and compare the chiral condensate, the baryon number density and the baryon number susceptibility to the result of the corresponding fermionic partition function. We find that as long as results are finite, the phase transition of the fermionic theory persists in the bosonic theory. However, in case that bosonic partition function diverges and has to be regularized, the phase transition of the fermionic theory does not occur in the bosonic theory, and the bosonic theory is always in the broken phase.

  20. MC@NLO for the hadronic decay of Higgs bosons in associated production with vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Latunde-Dada, Oluseyi

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe simulations of the hadronic decay of Higgs bosons produced in association with vector bosons at linear and hadronic colliders. We use the Monte Carlo at next-to-leading-order MC@NLO matching prescription with the Herwig++ event generator to predict various spectra of the resulting b anti-b pairs and compare our results with leading order and matrix element correction predictions.

  1. Renormalized Unruh-DeWitt Particle Detector Models for Boson and Fermion Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hümmer, Daniel; Kempf, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Since quantum field theories do not possess proper position observables, Unruh-DeWitt detector models serve as a key theoretical tool for extracting localized spatio-temporal information from quantum fields. Most studies have been limited, however, to Unruh-DeWitt (UDW) detectors that are coupled linearly to a scalar bosonic field. Here, we investigate UDW detector models that probe fermionic as well as bosonic fields through both linear and quadratic couplings. In particular, we present a renormalization method that cures persistent divergencies of prior models. We then show how perturbative calculations with UDW detectors can be streamlined through the use of extended Feynman rules that include localized detector-field interactions.Our findings pave the way for the extension of previous studies of the Unruh and Hawking effects with UDW detectors, and provide new tools for studies in relativistic quantum information, for example, regarding relativistic quantum communication and studies of the entanglement st...

  2. The search for the Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    Riordan, M; Wu Sau Lan

    2001-01-01

    A critical requirement of the Standard Model is a mechanism to endow elementary particles with mass. This mechanism should manifest itself as the Higgs boson and a number of accelerator laboratories are designing machines and experiments to find it (1 1/2 pages).

  3. Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian for Neutral Higgs Boson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-Zhi; WANG Qing

    2008-01-01

    A neutral Higgs boson is added into the traditional electroweak chiral Lagrangian by writing down all possible high dimension operators. The matter part of the Lagrangian is investigated in detail. We find that if Higgs field dependence of Yukawa couplings can be factorized out, there will be no flavour changing neutral couplings; neutral Higgs can induce coupling between light and heavy neutrinos.

  4. Higgs boson physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ocariz, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The experimental status on Higgs boson physics is reviewed. Results from both ATLAS and CMS, using data collected in LHC run 1, are presented. First preliminary results from data collected in 2015 at 13 TeV are also presented. Prospects for Higgs physics with Run 2 and beyond are discussed.

  5. Bosonic physical states in N = 1 supergravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S M; Ortiz, M E; Page, D N; Carroll, S M; Freedman, D Z; Ortiz, M E; Page, D N

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that states in N=1 supergravity that solve all of the constraint equations cannot be bosonic in the sense of being independent of the fermionic degrees of freedom. (Based on a talk given by Miguel Ortiz at the 7th Marcel Grossmann Meeting.)

  6. NLO vector boson production with light jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Dixon, L J; Cordero, F Febres; Forde, D; Gleisberg, T; Hoeche, S; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D; Ozeren, K

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we present recent progress in the computation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections for the production of an electroweak vector boson in association with jets at hadron colliders. We focus on results obtained using the virtual matrix element library BLACKHAT in conjunction with SHERPA, focusing on results relevant to understanding the background to top production.

  7. Higgs Boson Studies at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S.B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X.B.; Budd, H.S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B.C.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S., J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.F.; Dittmann, J.R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Faure, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J.A.; Garcia-Guerra, G.A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P.D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Grunendahl, S.; Grunewald, M.W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S.R.; Haley, J.; Han, J.Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A.S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jeong, M.S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K.K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, A.W.; Junk, T.R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J.M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, W.M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Li, D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.Z.; Lim, J.K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A.L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N.K.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Petroff, P.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.A.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A.V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P.N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Sanders, M.P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A.S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, K.J.; Snider, F.D.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; Van Leeuwen, W.M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.W.; Vasilyev, I.A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A.Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H.D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wang, R.J.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W.C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Williams, M.R.J.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D.R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T.R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S.W.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.M.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-09-17

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the standard model Higgs boson with mass in the range 90--200 GeV/c^2 produced in the gluon-gluon fusion, WH, ZH, ttbarH, and vector boson fusion processes, and decaying in the H->bbbar, H->W^+W^-, H->ZZ, H->\\tau^+\\tau^-, and H->\\gamma \\gamma\\ modes. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 10 fb^-1 and were collected at the Fermilab Tevatron in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The searches are also interpreted in the context of fermiophobic and fourth generation models. We observe a significant excess of events in the mass range between 115 and 140 GeV/c^2. The local significance corresponds to 3.1 standard deviations at m_H=125 GeV/c^2, consistent with the mass of the Higgs boson observed at the LHC. Furthermore, we separately combine searches for H->bbbar, H->W^+W^-, H->\\tau^+\\tau^-, and H->\\gamma \\gamma. The observed signal strengths in all channels are consistent with the presence of a standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 1...

  8. Probing a composite spin-boson environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Rivas, Angel; Huelga, Susana F [Quantum Physics Group, STRI, School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Fazio, Rosario [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: s.f.huelga@herts.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    We consider non-interacting multi-qubit systems as controllable probes of an environment of defects/impurities modelled as a composite spin-boson environment. The spin-boson environment consists of a small number of quantum-coherent two-level fluctuators (TLFs) damped by independent bosonic baths. A master equation of the Lindblad form is derived for the probe-plus-TLF system. We discuss how correlation measurements in the probe system encode information about the environment structure and could be exploited to efficiently discriminate between different experimental preparation techniques, with particular focus on the quantum correlations (entanglement) that build up in the probe as a result of the TLF-mediated interaction. We also investigate the harmful effects of the composite spin-boson environment on initially prepared entangled bipartite qubit states of the probe and on entangling gate operations. Our results offer insights in the area of quantum computation using superconducting devices, where defects/impurities are believed to be a major source of decoherence.

  9. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  10. Single Boson Realizations of the Higgs Algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUANDong; WUChu; SUNHong-Zhou

    2003-01-01

    We obtained for the Higgs algebra three kinds of single boson realizations such as the unitary Holstein-Primakoff-like realization, the non-unitary Dyson-like realization, and the unitary Villain-like realization. The corre-sponding similarity transformations between the Holstein-Primakoff-like realizations and the Dyson-like realizations are given.

  11. Bosons & More: Celebrating CERN / Part 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Team, CERN

    2013-01-01

    The "Bosons & More" event for CERN people this evening celebrated the success of the Open Days, and the exceptional achievements of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The British progressive rock band the Alan Parsons Live Project lead the celebrations until late in the night.

  12. Universality in bosonic dimer-dimer scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deltuva, A. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-08-15

    Bosonic dimer-dimer scattering is studied near the unitary limit using momentum-space equations for the four-particle transition operators. The impact of the Efimov effect on the dimer-dimer scattering observables is explored, and a number of universal relations is established with high accuracy. The rate for the creation of Efimov trimers via dimer-dimer collisions is calculated.

  13. LHC Higgs boson results involving fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Following the discovery of a Higgs-like particle in the bosonic decay modes, the fermionic decay modes need to be seen to prove this particle is a Standard Model (SM) Higgs. In this presentation, an overview of the recent Higgs search results in the fermionic decays of $\\tau\\tau$, $b\\bar{b}$, $\\mu\\mu$ and $\\tau\

  14. Parameter Symmetry of the Interacting Boson Model

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, A M; Smirnov, Yu F; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the symmetry of the parameter space of the interacting boson model (IBM). It is shown that for any set of the IBM Hamiltonian parameters (with the only exception of the U(5) dynamical symmetry limit) one can always find another set that generates the equivalent spectrum. We discuss the origin of the symmetry and its relevance for physical applications.

  15. Boson Stars in Higher Derivative Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baibhav, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have constructed Boson star (BS) solutions in four dimensional scalar-Gauss-Bonnet (sGB) theory. In order to have non-trivial effect from Gauss-Bonnet term, we invoked non-minimal coupling between a complex scalar field and the Gauss-Bonnet term with a coupling parameter, $\\alpha$. We show that the scalar field can no longer take arbitrary value at the center of the star. Furthermore, boson-stars in our higher derivative theory turn out to be slightly massive but much more compact than those in the usual Einstein's gravity. Interestingly, we found that for $\\alpha0.8$, binding energy for all possible boson stars is always negative. This implies that these stars are intrinsically stable against the decay by dispersion. We also present the mass-radius and mass-frequency curves for boson-star and compare them with other compact objects in gravity models derived from Gauss-Bonnet term.

  16. Boson stars in higher-derivative gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibhav, Vishal; Maity, Debaprasad

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have constructed boson star (BS) solutions in four-dimensional scalar-Gauss-Bonnet (sGB) theory. In order to have a nontrivial effect from the Gauss-Bonnet term, we invoked nonminimal coupling between a complex scalar field and the Gauss-Bonnet term with a coupling parameter, α . We show that the scalar field can no longer take arbitrary value at the center of the star. Furthermore, boson stars in our higher-derivative theory turn out to be slightly massive but much more compact than those in the usual Einstein's gravity. Interestingly, we found that for α 0.8 , binding energy for all possible boson stars is always negative. This implies that these stars are intrinsically stable against the decay by dispersion. However, for -0.4 negative binding energy depending on scalar field value at the center of the star. We also present the mass-radius and mass-frequency curves for boson stars and compare them with other compact objects in gravity models derived from the Gauss-Bonnet term.

  17. La chasse au boson de Higgs

    CERN Multimedia

    Grousson, Mathieu

    2007-01-01

    AT the end of 2007, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world will come into force. Protons will collide at the speed of the light. The great hope of searchers: to find in the remains resulting from these shocks, the famous Higgs boson. (6 pages)

  18. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  19. Higgs boson studies at the Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X. B.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; De Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, R.-J.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-09-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the standard model Higgs boson with mass in the range 90-200GeV/c2 produced in the gluon-gluon fusion, WH, ZH, tt¯H, and vector boson fusion processes, and decaying in the H→bb¯, H→W+W-, H→ZZ, H→τ+τ-, and H→γγ modes. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 10fb-1 and were collected at the Fermilab Tevatron in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV. The searches are also interpreted in the context of fermiophobic and fourth generation models. We observe a significant excess of events in the mass range between 115 and 140GeV/c2. The local significance corresponds to 3.0 standard deviations at mH=125GeV/c2, consistent with the mass of the Higgs boson observed at the LHC, and we expect a local significance of 1.9 standard deviations. We separately combine searches for H→bb¯, H→W+W-, H→τ+τ-, and H→γγ. The observed signal strengths in all channels are consistent with the presence of a standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 125GeV/c2.

  20. Combinatorial Solutions to Normal Ordering of Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Horzela, A; Penson, K A; Solomon, A I

    2005-01-01

    We present a combinatorial method of constructing solutions to the normal ordering of boson operators. Generalizations of standard combinatorial notions - the Stirling and Bell numbers, Bell polynomials and Dobinski relations - lead to calculational tools which allow to find explicitly normally ordered forms for a large class of operator functions.

  1. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  2. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, V

    2016-01-01

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible production in e+ e−, and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which were complemented by searches at the Fermilab Tevatron. Then the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS entered the hunt, announcing on July 4, 2012 the discovery of a "Higgs-like" particle with a mass of about 125 GeV. This identification has been supported by subsequent measurements of its spin, parity and coupling properties. It was widely anticipated that the Higgs boson would be accompanied by supersymmetry, although other options, like compositeness, were not completely excluded. So far there are no signs of any new physics, and the measured properties of the Higgs boson are consistent with the predictions of the minimal Standard Model. This article reviews some of the key historical d...

  3. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures

  4. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, Richard; Macedo, Caio F B; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter. We focus on bosonic fields with mass $m_B$, such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark-matter accretion onto stars, in dark matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of $f=2.5\\times 10^{14}\\,\\left(m_{B}c^2/eV\\right)\\,{\\rm Hz}$. Using perturbative analysis and Numerical Relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chand...

  5. Accelerating research into the Higgs boson particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Nikolaidou, Rosy

    "The only Standard Model particle yet to be observed, the search for the Higgs Boson - the so-called 'God Particle' - demands advanced facilities and physics expertise. At the Cern laboratory in Switzerland, the ARTEMIS project is well-placed to pursue research in this area" (2 pages)

  6. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, E.; Keizerov, S.; Rakhmetov, E.; Svirina, K.

    2016-07-01

    Many models—in particular, the brane-world models with two branes—predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously [Phys. Rev. D 90, 095026 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.095026] that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were canceled out, making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair-production processes involving the SM gauge bosons, the similarity property also appears. However, a detailed consideration shows that in this case it is not enough to simply replace the masses and the constants (mh→mr and v →Λr). One should also rescale the triple Higgs coupling by the factor ξ ≡1 +m/r2-mh2 3 mh2 .

  7. Constraining black holes with light boson hair and boson stars using epicyclic frequencies and quasiperiodic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Nicola; Pani, Paolo; Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Ferrari, Valeria

    2017-06-01

    Light bosonic fields are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model. Even when minimally coupled to gravity, these fields might evade the assumptions of the black-hole no-hair theorems and give rise to spinning black holes which can be drastically different from the Kerr metric. Furthermore, they allow for self-gravitating compact solitons, known as (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the x-ray flux emitted by accreting compact objects carry information about the strong-field region, thus providing a powerful tool to constrain deviations from Kerr's geometry and to search for exotic compact objects. By using the relativistic precession model as a proxy to interpret the QPOs in terms of geodesic frequencies, we investigate how the QPO frequencies could be used to test the no-hair theorem and the existence of light bosonic fields near accreting compact objects. We show that a detection of two QPO triplets with current sensitivity can already constrain these models and that the future eXTP mission or a LOFT-like mission can set very stringent constraints on black holes with bosonic hair and on (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The peculiar geodesic structure of compact scalar/Proca boson stars implies that these objects can easily be ruled out as alternative models for x-ray source GRO J1655-40.

  8. Search for new heavy charged gauge bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magass, Carsten Martin

    2007-11-02

    The TEVATRON proton-antiproton collider at FERMILAB (near Chicago/USA) is operating at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV since March 2001. This analysis uses data taken with the DOe detector until February 2006 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about {integral}Ldt=1 fb{sup -1}. Using this dataset, a search for a new heavy charged gauge boson W{sup '} and its subsequent decay into an electron and a neutrino is performed: p anti p{yields}W{sup '}+X{yields}e{nu}+X. Additional gauge bosons (including the equivalent to the Z, the Z{sup '}) are introduced in many extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics. Assuming the most general case, the new gauge group can comprise a new mixing angle and new couplings. Here, the Altarelli Reference Model is considered which represents a generalization of the Manifest Left-Right Symmetric Model with light right-handed neutrinos. This model makes the assumptions that the new gauge boson W{sup '} has the same couplings as the Standard Model W boson and that there is no mixing. Hence, the W{sup '} is a heavy copy of the Standard Model W boson. The clear decay signature (in analogy to the decay of the W) contains an isolated electron with extreme high energy which is important for triggering. The neutrino can not be detected, but it gives rise to missing energy in the detector. The Jacobian peak in the transverse mass distribution stemming from the W decay is used for calibration, whereas the tail of the transverse mass distribution is searched for a possible W{sup '} signal. The data agrees with the expectation from background processes. For instance, in the data 37 events are reconstructed with transverse masses above 300 GeV compared to a prediction of 37.1{+-}2.1(stat){sup +6.0}{sub -3.7}(sys) background events. Since no significant excess is found in the data, an upper limit is set on the production cross section for heavy charged gauge bosons decaying into electron

  9. Search for Higgs bosons at LEP2 and hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The search for the Higgs boson was one of the most relevant issues of the final years of LEP running at high energies. An excess of 3 sigma beyond the background expectation has been found, consistent with the production of the Higgs boson with a mass near 115 GeV/c/sup 2/. At the upgraded Tevatron and at LHC the search for the Higgs boson will continue. At the Tevatron Higgs bosons can be detected with masses up to 180 GeV with an assumed total integrated luminosity of 20 fb/sup -1/. LHC has the potential to discover the Higgs boson in many different decay channels for Higgs masses up to 1 TeV. It will be possible to measure Higgs boson parameters, such as mass, width, and couplings to fermions and bosons. The results from Higgs searches at LEP2 and the possibilities for searches at hadron colliders will be reviewed. (156 refs).

  10. Search for MSSM Higgs bosons and beyond at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit

    2017-01-01

    Searches for beyond the Standard Model (BSM) Higgs bosons are presented, particularly in the context of MSSM and Higgs Triplet Model, including a neutral Higgs boson decays into two tau leptons, charged Higgs bosons in decays of tau lepton and neutrino, charged Higgs bosons in decays of vector bosons, and doubly-charged Higgs boson in three and four lepton final states. The data is collected with the CMS detector at the LHC which corresponds to integrated luminosities of 2.3 and 12.9 fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016, respectively. No signature of BSM Higgs boson is observed. The upper limits are placed on the cross-section times branching fraction for each search, as well as interpreted in different models of an extended Higgs sector.

  11. The formation of galaxy stellar cores by the hierarchical merging of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M; Haardt, F; Volonteri, Marta; Madau, Piero

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a hierarchical structure formation scenario in which galaxy stellar cores are created from the binding energy liberated by shrinking supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The binary orbital decay heats the surrounding stars, eroding a preexisting 1/r^2 stellar cusp. We follow the merger history of dark matter halos and associated SMBHs via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from early times to the present in a LCDM cosmology. Massive black holes get incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, and form a binary system. Stellar dynamical processes drive the binary to harden and eventually coalesce. A simple scheme is applied in which the loss cone is constantly refilled and a constant density core forms due to the ejection of stellar mass. We find that a model in which the effect of the hierarchy of SMBH interactions i...

  12. The Assembly and Merging History of Supermassive Black Holes in Hierarchical Models of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M; Madau, A F P; Volonteri, Marta; Haardt, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    We assess models for the assembly of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of galaxies that trace their hierarchical build-up far up in the dark halo `merger tree'. We assume that the first `seed' black holes (BHs) formed in (mini)halos collapsing at z=20 from high-sigma density fluctuations. As these pregalactic holes become incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, they sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, form a binary system, and eventually coalesce. The merger history of dark matter halos and associated BHs is followed by cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy. A simple model, where quasar activity is driven by major mergers and SMBHs accrete at the Eddington rate a mass that scales with the fifth power of the velocity dispersion, is shown to reproduce the optical LF of quasars in the redshift range 1

  13. Supermassive Black Hole Binary Evolution in Axisymmetric Galaxies: the final parsec problem is not a problem

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Fazeel

    2013-01-01

    During a galaxy merger, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in each galaxy is thought to sink to the center of the potential and form a supermassive black hole binary; this binary can eject stars via 3-body scattering, bringing the SMBHs ever closer. In a static spherical galaxy model, the binary stalls at a separation of about a parsec after ejecting all the stars in its loss cone -- this is the well-known final parsec problem. Earlier work has shown that the centrophilic orbits in triaxial galaxy models are key in refilling the loss cone at a high enough rate to prevent the black holes from stalling. However, the evolution of binary SMBHs has never been explored in axisymmetric galaxies, so it is not clear if the final parsec problem persists in these systems. Here we use a suite of direct N-body simulations to follow SMBH binary evolution in galaxy models with a range of ellipticity. For the first time, we show that mere axisymmetry can solve the final parsec problem; we find the the SMBH evolution is indep...

  14. Probing the growth of supermassive black holes at z>6 with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Rhook, K J; Rhook, Kirsty J.; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2006-01-01

    HII regions surrounding supermassive black holes (BHs) in an otherwise still neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) are likely to be the most easily detectable sources by future 21cm experiments like LOFAR. We have made predictions for the size distribution of such HII regions for several physically motivated models for BH growth at high redshift and compared this to the expected LOFAR sensitivity to these sources. The number of potentially detectable HII regions does not only depend on the ionisation state of the intergalactic medium and the decoupling of the spin temperature of the neutral hydrogen from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature, but is also strongly sensitive to the rate of growth of BHs at high redshift. If the supermassive BHs at redshift 6 were built up via continuous Eddington-limited accretion from low mass seed BHs at high redshift, then LOFAR is not expected to detect isolated QSO HII regions at redshifts much larger than 6, and only if the IGM is still significantly neutral. If ...

  15. Improving Stellar Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Barred Spiral Galaxies With Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, Benjamin; Valluri, Monica

    2017-01-01

    For the past decade researchers have focused on accurately measuring the masses of supermassive black holes in different types of galaxies. Relatively less effort has been devoted to possible systematic errors in the measurement of the central velocity dispersion of stars, sigma_*, with which the masses of supermassive black holes are known to be well correlated. In barred galaxies the measurement of sigma_* depends quite sensitively on the method used to calculate it and the kind of spectroscopic data (long-slit or IFU) and the orientation of the bar to the line-of-sight and inclination of the disk. We used simulations of barred disk galaxies with adiabatically grown SMBHs to generate mock kinematical data from which sigma_* is derived and compared with the true 3D velocity dispersion of stars in the simulations. By comparing simulations with real IFU data we aim to correct the measured sigma_* for aperture size /shape, disk inclination and bar position angle, to obtain the intrinsic central velocity dispersion of stars.

  16. Does disk fragmentation prevent the formation of supermassive stars in protogalaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Inayoshi, Kohei

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive stars (SMSs; >10^5 Msun) formed in the first protogalaxies with virial temperature T_vir>10^4 K are expected to collapse into seeds of supermassive black hole (SMBHs) in the high-redshift universe (z>7). Fragmentation of the primordial gas is, however, a possible obstacle to SMS formation. We discuss the expected properties of a compact, metal-free, marginally unstable nuclear protogalactic disk, and the fate of the clumps formed in the disk by gravitational instability. Interior to a characteristic radius R_f=few*10^{-2} pc, the disk fragments into massive clumps with M_c~30 Msun. The clumps grow via accretion and migrate inward rapidly on a timescale of ~10^4 yr, which is comparable or shorter than the Kelvin-Helmholz time >10^4 yr. Some clumps may evolve to zero-age main sequence stars and halt gas accretion by radiative feedback, but most of the clumps can migrate inward and merge with the central protostar before forming massive stars. Moreover, we found that dust-induced-fragmentation in me...

  17. The impact of reionization on the formation of supermassive black hole seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jarrett L; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    Black holes (BHs) formed from the direct collapse of primordial gas in the early Universe are strong candidates for the seeds of supermassive BHs residing in the centers of massive galaxies today and powering quasars at z > 6. These direct collapse black holes (DCBHs) are thought to form from pristine primordial gas collapsing in atomic cooling haloes in the presence of a strong molecule-dissociating, Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation field, which prevents the cooling of the gas to temperatures below ~ 10^4 K. The runaway gravitational collapse of this hot gas leads to the formation of a supermassive star which collapses to form a 10^4 - 10^6 M_Sun BH. Given that star forming galaxies are likely to be the source of the LW radiation in this scenario, it is likely that some ionizing radiation from these galaxies accompanies the LW radiation. We present cosmological simulations resolving the collapse of primordial gas into an atomic cooling halo, including the effects of both LW and ionizing radiation. We find that in...

  18. Effect of cosmic ray/X-ray ionization on supermassive black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Inayoshi, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    We study effects of external ionization by cosmic rays (CRs) and X-rays on the thermal evolution of primordial clouds under strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. A strong FUV radiation dissociates H2 and quenches its cooling. Even in such an environment, a massive cloud with Tvir>10^4 K can contract isothermally at 8000 K by Lyman alpha cooling. This cloud collapses monolithically without fragmentation, and a supermassive star (>10^5 Msun) is believed to form at the center, which eventually evolves to a supermassive black hole (SMBH). However, candidates of FUV sources, including star-forming galaxies, are probably sources of strong CRs and X-rays, as well. We find that the external ionization promotes H2 production and elevates the threshold FUV intensity Jcr needed for the SMBH formation for CR energy density U_CR>10^-14 erg/cm^3 or X-ray intensity J_X>10^-24 erg/s/cm^2/sr/Hz at 1 keV. The critical FUV flux increases in proportion to U_CR^{1/2} (J_X^{1/2}) in the high CR (X-ray, respectively) limit. With ...

  19. Supermassive Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei with Tidal Disruption of Stars: Paper II - Axisymmetric Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Shiyan; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Tidal Disruption of stars by supermassive central black holes from dense rotating star clusters is modelled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. As in a previous paper on spherical star clusters we study the time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate and the origin of tidally disrupted stars, now according to several classes of orbits which only occur in axisymmetric systems (short axis tube and saucer). Compared with that in spherical systems, we found a higher TD rate in axisymmetric systems. The enhancement can be explained by an enlarged loss-cone in phase space which is raised from the fact that total angular momentum $\\bf J$ is not conserved. As in the case of spherical systems, the distribution of the last apocenter distance of tidally accreted stars peaks at the classical critical radius. However, the angular distribution of the origin of the accreted stars reveals interesting features. Inside the influence radius of the supermassive black hole the angular distribution of disrupted star...

  20. Detecting eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Resolvable source strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Gair, J R; McWilliams, S T

    2015-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black-hole binaries and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational-waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system's gravitational-wave signal enters the pulsar-timing array band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric supermassive black-hole bi...

  1. A Lower Limit on the Halo Mass to form Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dotan, Calanit; Shaviv, Nir J

    2011-01-01

    We consider a scenario where supermassive black holes form through direct accumulation of gas at the centre of proto-galaxies. In the first stage, the accumulated gas forms a super-massive star whose core collapses when the nuclear fuel is exhausted, forming a black hole of $M_{\\rm BH} \\approx 100 M_{\\sun}$. As the black hole starts accreting, it inflates the surrounding dense gas into an almost hydrostatic self-gravitating envelope, with at least 10-100 times the mass of the hole. We find that these "quasistars" suffer extremely high rates of mass loss through winds from their envelopes, in analogy to very massive stars such as eta-Carinae. Only for envelope masses greater than 2.8 \\times 10^{5} (M_{\\rm BH}/100 M_{\\sun})^{9/11} is the envelope evaporation time-scale longer than the accretion time-scale of the black hole. This relation thus constitutes a "threshold growth line" above which quasistars can grow their internal black holes. Accretion rates can be 10 to 100 times the Eddington rate. The quasistars...

  2. GENERAL RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETIZED PLASMAS AROUND MERGING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 21114 (United States); Coleman Miller, M.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and are the most powerful sources of gravitational waves accessible to space-based gravitational observatories. Some such mergers may occur in the presence of matter and magnetic fields and hence generate an electromagnetic counterpart. In this Letter, we present the first general relativistic simulations of magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals. In particular, we observe a total amplification of the magnetic field of {approx}2 orders of magnitude, which is driven by the accretion onto the binary and that leads to much stronger electromagnetic signals, more than a factor of 10{sup 4} larger than comparable calculations done in the force-free regime where such amplifications are not possible.

  3. Masses of Nearby Supermassive Black Holes with Very-Long Baseline Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim; Gillessen, Stefan; Marrone, Daniel P; Ozel, Feryal; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Fish, Vincent L

    2012-01-01

    Dynamical mass measurements to date have allowed determinations of the mass M and the distance D of the galactic center black hole Sgr A* as well as those of other nearby supermassive black holes. In the case of Sgr A*, these measurements are limited by a degeneracy between the mass and distance scaling roughly as M ~ D^2. Future very-long baseline interferometric observations will image a bright and narrow ring surrounding the shadow of the supermassive black hole, if its accretion flow is optically thin. In this paper, we show that the combination of dynamical measurements and VLBI imaging of the ring of Sgr A* breaks the degeneracy between mass and distance. We estimate the signal to noise ratio of near-future VLBI arrays consisting of five to six stations and simulate measurements of the mass and distance of Sgr A* using the expected size of the ring image and existing data of stellar ephemerides. We demonstrate that VLBI observations at 1 mm can already improve the error on the mass by a factor of three ...

  4. Cosmological quintessence accretion onto primordial black holes conditions for their growth to the supermassive scale

    CERN Document Server

    Custodio, P S

    2005-01-01

    In this work we revisit the growth of small primordial black holes (PBHs) immersed in a quintessential field and/or radiation to the supermassive black hole (SMBHs) scale. We show the difficulties of scenarios in which such huge growth is possible. For that purpose we evaluated analytical solutions of the differential equations (describing mass evolution) and point out the strong fine tuning for that conclusions. The timescale for growth in a model with a constant quintessence flux is calculated and we show that it is much bigger than the Hubble time.The fractional gain of the mass is further evaluated in other forms, including quintessence and/or radiation. We calculate the cosmological density $\\Omega$ due to quintessence necessary to grow BHs to the supermassive range and show it to be much bigger than one. We also describe the set of complete equations analyzing the evolution of the BH+quintessence universe, showing some interesting effects such the quenching of the BH mass growth due to the evolution of ...

  5. X-ray constraints on the local supermassive black hole occupation fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Brendan P; Greene, Jenny E; Kelly, Brandon C; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Baldassare, Vivienne

    2014-01-01

    Distinct seed formation mechanisms are imprinted upon the fraction of dwarf galaxies currently containing a central supermassive black hole. Seeding by Pop III remnants is expected to produce a higher occupation fraction than is generated with direct gas collapse precursors. Chandra observations of nearby early-type galaxies can directly detect even low-level supermassive black hole activity, and the active fraction immediately provides a firm lower limit to the occupation fraction. Here, we use the volume-limited AMUSE surveys of ~200 optically-selected early-type galaxies to characterize simultaneously, for the first time, the occupation fraction and the scaling of nuclear X-ray luminosity with stellar mass, accounting for intrinsic scatter, measurement uncertainties, and X-ray limits. For early-type galaxies with log(M_star/M_sun)20% (at 95% confidence), but full occupation cannot be excluded. The preferred dependence of log(L_X) upon log(M_star) has a slope of about 0.7-0.8, consistent with the "downsizin...

  6. THE FIRST SPECTROSCOPICALLY RESOLVED SUB-PARSEC ORBIT OF A SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bon, E.; Jovanovic, P.; Bon, N.; Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Marziani, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Padova (Italy); Shapovalova, A. I. [Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian AS, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachaevo-Cherkesia 369167 (Russian Federation); Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Yugoslavia Branch, Belgrade (Serbia); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2012-11-10

    One of the most intriguing scenarios proposed to explain how active galactic nuclei are triggered involves the existence of a supermassive binary black hole (BH) system in their cores. Here, we present an observational evidence for the first spectroscopically resolved sub-parsec orbit of a such system in the core of Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. Using a method similar to those typically used for spectroscopic binary stars, we obtained radial velocity curves of the supermassive binary system, from which we calculated orbital elements and made estimates about the masses of the components. Our analysis shows that periodic variations in the light and radial velocity curves can be accounted for by an eccentric, sub-parsec Keplerian orbit with a 15.9 year period. The flux maximum in the light curve corresponds to the approaching phase of the secondary component toward the observer. According to the obtained results, we speculate that the periodic variations in the observed H{alpha} line shape and flux are due to shock waves generated by the supersonic motion of the components through the surrounding medium. Given the large observational effort needed to reveal this spectroscopically resolved binary orbital motion, we suggest that many such systems may exist in similar objects even if they are hard to find. Detecting more of them will provide us with insight into the BH mass growth process.

  7. Evolution of binary supermassive black holes and the final-parsec problem

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    I review the evolution of binary supermassive black holes and focus on the stellar-dynamical mechanisms that may help to overcome the final-parsec problem - the possible stalling of the binary at a separation much larger than is required for an efficient gravitational wave emission. Recent N-body simulations have suggested that a departure from spherical symmetry in the nucleus of the galaxy may keep the rate of interaction of stars with the binary at a high enough level so that the binary continues to shrink rather rapidly. However, a major problem of all these simulations is that they do not probe the regime where collisionless effects are dominant - in other words, the number of particles in the simulation is still not sufficient to reach the asymptotic behaviour of the system. I present a novel Monte Carlo method for simulating both collisional and collisionless evolution of non-spherical stellar systems, and apply it for the problem of binary supermassive black hole evolution. I show that in triaxial gal...

  8. A Good Hard Look at Growing Supermassive Black Holes in the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, W. Niel; Chandra Deep Fields Team

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive cosmic X-ray surveys with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and now NuSTAR observatories have revolutionized our ability to find and study distant active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the main sites of supermassive black hole growth in the Universe. I will describe some of the resulting discoveries about the demographics, physics, and ecology of distant AGNs with an emphasis on the deepest Chandra surveys, the Chandra Deep Fields. Some specific topics covered will include (1) robust X-ray spectral and variability characterization of the AGNs producing most of cosmic accretion power; (2) the demographics of AGNs in the first galaxies as revealed by direct detection and stacking; (3) AGN/galaxy interactions as investigated via the host properties of X-ray AGNs; and (4) the cosmic balance of power between supermassive black holes and stars. I will also briefly describe other remarkable discoveries coming from the deepest X-ray surveys; e.g., measurements of the evolving X-ray binary populations of normal and starburst galaxies. I will end by discussing some key outstanding questions and new observations and missions aiming to answer them.

  9. A strongly magnetized pulsar within grasp of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, N; Pons, J A; Turolla, R; Torres, D F; Israel, G L; Possenti, A; Burgay, M; Vigano', D; Perna, R; Stella, L; Ponti, G; Baganoff, F; Haggard, D; Papitto, A; Camero-Arranz, A; Zane, S; Minter, A; Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Schoedel, R; Feroci, M; Mignani, R; Gotz, D

    2013-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius (Sgr) A*. Young, massive stars within 0.5 pc of SgrA* are evidence of an episode of intense star formation near the black hole a few Myr ago. Some of them might have left behind a young neutron star traveling deep into SgrA*'s gravitational potential. However, no neutron star closer than ~200 parsec from the supermassive black hole has been detected so far. On 2013 April 25, a short X-ray burst was observed from the direction of the Galactic center. Thanks to the superb spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we could pinpoint the associated, persistent pulsating X-ray source at an angular distance of 2.4+/-0.3 arcsec from SgrA*. Using a series of Chandra and Swift observations we have refined the spin period and its derivative (P=3.7635443(3) and \\dot{P}=7.6(2)x10^{-12} s/s), confirmed by radio observations performed with the Green Bank (GBT) and Parkes single dish antennas, that also measured a Dispersion Measure of DM=1750 +...

  10. Music from the heavens - Gravitational waves from supermassive black hole mergers in the EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Salcido, Jaime; Theuns, Tom; McAlpine, Stuart; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A; Schaye, Joop; Regan, John

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the expected event rate of gravitational wave signals from mergers of supermassive black holes that could be resolved by a space-based interferometer, such as the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), utilising cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE suite. These simulations assume a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmogony with state-of-the-art subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. They have been shown to reproduce the observed galaxy population with unprecedented fidelity. We combine the merger rates of supermassive black holes in EAGLE with a model to calculate the gravitational waves signals from the intrinsic parameters of the black holes. The EAGLE models predict $\\sim2$ detections per year by a gravitational wave detector such as eLISA. We find that these signals are largely dominated by mergers between $10^5 \\textrm{M}_{\\odot} h^{-1}$ seed mass black holes merging at redshifts between $z\\sim2.5...

  11. The Destruction of Protogalaxies by Pop III Supernovae: Prompt Chemical Enrichment and Supermassive Black Hole Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel J; Smidt, Joseph; Meiksin, Avery; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L

    2013-01-01

    The first primitive galaxies formed from accretion and mergers by z ~ 15, and were primarily responsible for cosmological reionization and the chemical enrichment of the early cosmos. But a few of these galaxies may have formed in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner UV fluxes that sterilized them of H_2, preventing them from forming stars or expelling heavy elements into the IGM prior to assembly. At masses of 10^8 Ms and virial temperatures of 10^4 K, these halos began to rapidly cool by atomic lines, perhaps forming 10^4 - 10^6 Ms Pop III stars and, later, the seeds of supermassive black holes. We have modeled the explosion of a supermassive Pop III star in the dense core of a line-cooled protogalaxy with the ZEUS-MP code. We find that the supernova (SN) expands to a radius of ~ 1 kpc, briefly engulfing the entire galaxy, but then collapses back into the potential well of the dark matter. Fallback fully mixes the interior of the protogalaxy with metals, igniting a violent starburst and fueling the rapid gro...

  12. Vector Boson Scattering, Triple Gauge-Boson Final States, and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration searched for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. ATLAS has also searched for the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs. All results have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings and have been compared to the latest theory predictions.

  13. Search for a Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruckert, Benjamin

    2009-11-23

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN the most modern proton-proton collider and data taking will start in 2009, with a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 7 TeV. The ATLAS detector, which is one of two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider, is able to detect a Standard Model Higgs boson if it exists. This is one of the main tasks of the ATLAS experiment. This thesis deals with a Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson. The Monte Carlo study is based on physics events generated at the nominal centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider of {radical}(s) = 14 TeV. Large parts of this analysis have been done using the global Grid infrastructure of the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A mass range of the Higgs boson of m{sub H} = 130 - 190 GeV has been taken into account. In this mass range, the Higgs boson dominantly decays into a pair of W bosons, leading to initially three W bosons: WH{yields}WWW. Two orthogonal analysis channels have been investigated in detailed studies of the background properties. The first channel considers the leptonic decay of two W bosons, such that the leptons are of opposite charge. The third W boson then decays hadronically. The analysis is based on one-dimensional cuts, where the best cuts found are strict cuts on the transverse momenta of the leptons, a cut on the invariant mass of the jets, as well as a cut on the transverse jet momenta and the missing transverse energy. The second decay channel studied is dedicated to the leptonic decay of all three W bosons. Again, cuts on the transverse momenta of the leptons and the jets have been proven to be efficient, as well as the use of the spatial correlation of the decay products of the Higgs boson. The invariant mass of the leptons with opposite sign has been emerged as a very efficient cut to reject dominant diboson background contributions. The discovery reach of both channels separately as well as the combination has been calculated using

  14. A Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $W$ Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Martin Johannes [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2011-05-01

    We present a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson using data collected with the CDF II detector from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The search is performed in the WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ channel. The two quarks usually fragment into two jets, but sometimes a third jet can be produced via gluon radiation, so we have increased the standard two-jet sample by including events that contain three jets. We reconstruct the Higgs boson using two or three jets depending on the kinematics of the event. We find an improvement in our search sensitivity using the larger sample together with this multijet reconstruction technique. Our data show no evidence of a Higgs boson, so we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the WH production rate. We set limits between 3.36 and 28.7 times the standard model prediction for Higgs boson masses ranging from 100 to 150 GeV/c2.

  15. Matter of Life & Death : The impact of environmental conditions on the origins of stars and supermassive black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Borm, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that some very large supermassive black holes (SMBHs) already existed less than 1 Gyr after the Big Bang. Explaining the formation and growth of the 'seeds' of these SMBHs is quite challenging. We explore the formation of such seeds in the direct collapse scenario. Us

  16. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  17. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Heeck

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z′ not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for h→μτ at CMS, the two-body decay mode τ→μZ′ opens up and for MZ′<2mμ gives better constraints than τ→3μ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  18. Boson Stars Alternatives to primordial black holes?

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Schunck, Franz E.

    2000-01-01

    The present surge for the astrophysical relevance of boson stars stems from the speculative possibility that these compact objects could provide a considerable fraction of the non-baryonic part of dark matter within the halo of galaxies. For a very light `universal' axion of effective string models, their total gravitational mass will be in the most likely range of \\sim 0.5 M_ødot of MACHOs. According to this framework, gravitational microlensing is indirectly ``weighing" the axion mass, resulting in \\sim 10^{-10} eV/c^2. This conclusion is not changing much, if we use a dilaton type self-interaction for the bosons. Moreover, we review their formation, rotation and stability as likely candidates of astrophysical importance.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: General relativistic boson stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, Franz E

    2008-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that (fundamental) scalar fields may exist in Nature. The gravitational collapse of such a boson cloud would lead to a boson star (BS) as a new type of a compact object. Similarly as for white dwarfs and neutron stars, there exists a limiting mass, below which a BS is stable against complete gravitational collapse to a black hole. According to the form of the self-interaction of the basic constituents and the spacetime symmetry, we can distinguish mini-, axidilaton, soliton, charged, oscillating and rotating BSs. Their compactness prevents a Newtonian approximation, however, modifications of general relativity, as in the case of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory as a low energy limit of strings, would provide them with gravitational memory. In general, a BS is a compact, completely regular configuration with structured layers due to the anisotropy of scalar matter, an exponentially decreasing 'halo', a critical mass inversely proportional to constituent mass, an effective radius, and a ...

  20. Multi-boson production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has completed in 2012 its first running phase and the experiments have collected data sets of pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with an integrated luminosity of about 5ifb and 20ifb, respectively. Analyses of these data sets have produced a rich set of results in the electroweak sector of the standard model. This presentation reviews the run-1 analysis of the inclusive and exclusive di-boson production processes from ATLAS and CMS, and the interpretation of the differential production cross sections in the framework of anomalous gauge boson couplings. Emphasis will be given to most recent results.

  1. Hyperquarks and bosonic preon bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael L.; Buchmann, Alfons J.

    2009-11-01

    In a model in which leptons, quarks, and the recently introduced hyperquarks are built up from two fundamental spin-(1)/(2) preons, the standard model weak gauge bosons emerge as preon bound states. In addition, the model predicts a host of new composite gauge bosons, in particular, those responsible for hyperquark and proton decay. Their presence entails a left-right symmetric extension of the standard model weak interactions and a scheme for a partial and grand unification of nongravitational interactions based on, respectively, the effective gauge groups SU(6)P and SU(9)G. This leads to a prediction of the Weinberg angle at low energies in good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, using evolution equations for the effective coupling strengths, we calculate the partial and grand unification scales, the hyperquark mass scale, as well as the mass and decay rate of the lightest hyperhadron.

  2. Hyperquarks and bosonic preon bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    In a model in which leptons, quarks, and the recently introduced hyperquarks are built up from two fundamental spin 1/2 preons, the standard model weak gauge bosons emerge as preon bound states. In addition, the model predicts a host of new composite gauge bosons, in particular those responsible for hyperquark and proton decay. Their presence entails a left-right symmetric extension of the standard model weak interactions and a scheme for a partial and grand unification of nongravitational interactions based on respectively the effective gauge groups SU(6)_P and SU(9)_G. This leads to a prediction of the Weinberg angle at low energies in good agreement with experiment. Furthermore, using evolution equations for the effective coupling strengths, we calculate the partial and grand unification scales, the hyperquark mass scale, as well as the mass and decay rate of the lightest hyperhadron.

  3. Simulating Bosonic Baths with Error Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M. P.; Cramer, M.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    We derive rigorous truncation-error bounds for the spin-boson model and its generalizations to arbitrary quantum systems interacting with bosonic baths. For the numerical simulation of such baths, the truncation of both the number of modes and the local Hilbert-space dimensions is necessary. We derive superexponential Lieb-Robinson-type bounds on the error when restricting the bath to finitely many modes and show how the error introduced by truncating the local Hilbert spaces may be efficiently monitored numerically. In this way we give error bounds for approximating the infinite system by a finite-dimensional one. As a consequence, numerical simulations such as the time-evolving density with orthogonal polynomials algorithm (TEDOPA) now allow for the fully certified treatment of the system-environment interaction.

  4. Bound States in Boson Impurity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Wu, Ying-Hai; González-Tudela, A.; Cirac, J. I.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of bound states involving multiple particles underlies many interesting quantum physical phenomena, such as Efimov physics or superconductivity. In this work, we show the existence of an infinite number of such states for some boson impurity models. They describe free bosons coupled to an impurity and include some of the most representative models in quantum optics. We also propose a family of wave functions to describe the bound states and verify that it accurately characterizes all parameter regimes by comparing its predictions with exact numerical calculations for a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian. For that model, we also analyze the nature of the bound states by studying the scaling relations of physical quantities, such as the ground-state energy and localization length, and find a nonanalytical behavior as a function of the coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how to test our theoretical predictions in experimental platforms, such as photonic crystal structures and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  5. Path Integral Bosonization of Massive GNO Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Q H

    1997-01-01

    We show the quantum equivalence between certain symmetric space sine-Gordon models and the massive free fermions. In the massless limit, these fermions reduce to the free fermions introduced by Goddard, Nahm and Olive (GNO) in association with symmetric spaces $K/G$. A path integral formulation is given in terms of the Wess-Zumino-Witten action where the field variable $g$ takes value in the orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic representations of the group $G$ in the basis of the symmetric space. We show that, for example, such a path integral bosonization is possible when the symmetric spaces $K/G$ are $SU(N) the relation between massive GNO fermions and the nonabelian solitons, and explain the restriction imposed on the fermion mass matrix due to the integrability of the bosonic model.

  6. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  7. Extending exchange symmetry beyond bosons and fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    We study quantum many-body states of particles subject to a more general exchange symmetry than the behavior under pairwise exchange obeyed by bosons and fermions. We refer to these hypothetical particles as immanons because the scalar product of states with the generalized exchange symmetry is the immanant of the matrix containing all mutual scalar products of the occupied single-particle states, a generalization of the determinant and permanent applied for fermions and bosons. Immanons are shown to obey a partial Pauli principle that forbids the occupation of single-particle states above certain threshold numbers. This has measurable consequences for their tendency to favor or oppose multiple occupation of single-particle modes, and it links conjectured mathematical properties of immanants to the expected outcome of a physical Gedanken experiment.

  8. Measurement of the W boson mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-11-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass using data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron during 1994-1995. We identify W bosons by their decays to eν final states. We extract the W mass MW by fitting the transverse mass and transverse electron momentum spectra from a sample of 28 323 W-->eν decay candidates. We use a sample of 3563 dielectron events, mostly due to Z-->ee decays, to constrain our model of the detector response. From the transverse mass fit we measure MW=80.44+/-0.10(stat)+/-0.07(syst) GeV. Combining this with our previously published result from data taken in 1992-1993, we obtain MW=80.43+/-0.11 GeV.

  9. Search for additional neutral gauge bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; Nešić, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R. G.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V. D.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.; DØ Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    We have searched for a heavy neutral gauge boson, Z‧, using the decay channel Z‧ → ee. The data were collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron during the 1992-1993 p overlinep collider run at s=1.8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 15±1 pb -1. Limits are set on the cross section times brancing ratio for the process p overlinep → Z‧ → ee as a function of the Z‧ mass. We exclude the existence of a Z‧ of mass less than 490 GeV/c 2, assuming a Z‧ with the same coupling strengths to quarks and leptons as the standard model Z boson.

  10. Bottleneck Accumulation of Hybrid Magnetoelastic Bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhko, Dmytro A.; Clausen, Peter; Melkov, Gennadii A.; L'vov, Victor S.; Pomyalov, Anna; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Chumak, Andrii V.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Serga, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    An ensemble of magnons, quanta of spin waves, can be prepared as a Bose gas of weakly interacting quasiparticles. Furthermore, the thermalization of the overpopulated magnon gas through magnon-magnon scattering processes, which conserve the number of particles, can lead to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate at the bottom of a spin-wave spectrum. However, magnon-phonon scattering can significantly modify this scenario and new quasiparticles are formed—magnetoelastic bosons. Our observations of a parametrically populated magnon gas in a single-crystal film of yttrium iron garnet by means of wave-vector-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy evidence a novel condensation phenomenon: A spontaneous accumulation of hybrid magnetoelastic bosonic quasiparticles at the intersection of the lowest magnon mode and a transversal acoustic wave.

  11. Interference Phenomenon for Different Chiral Bosonization Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Everton M C; Abreu, Everton M C; Wotzasek, Clovis

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between different chiral bosonization schemes (CBS) in the context of the soldering formalism\\cite{MS}, that considers the phenomenon of interference in the quantum field theory\\cite{ABW}. This analysis is done in the framework put forward by Siegel\\cite{WS} and by Floreanini and Jackiw\\cite{FJ} (FJ). We propose a field redefinition that discloses the presence of a noton, a non dynamical field, in Siegel's formulation for chiral bosons. The presence of a noton in the Siegel CBS is a new and surprising result, that separates dynamics from symmetry by diagonalising the Siegel action into the FJ and the noton action. While the first describes the chiral dynamics, the noton carries the symmetry contents, acquiring dynamics upon quantization and is fully responsible for the Siegel anomaly. The diagonal representation proposed here is used to study the effect of quantum interference between gauged rightons and leftons.

  12. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Heeck, Julian

    2016-01-01

    New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z' not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for $h\\to\\mu\\tau$ at CMS, the two-body decay mode $\\tau \\to \\mu Z'$ opens up and for $M_{Z'} < 2 m_\\mu$ gives better constraints than $\\tau\\to 3\\mu$ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  13. Computing matrix permanent with collective boson operators

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Joonsuk

    2016-01-01

    Computing permanents of matrices are known to be a classically hard problem that the computational cost grows exponentially with the size of the matrix increases. So far, there exist a few classical algorithms to compute the matrix permanents in deterministic and in randomized ways. By exploiting the series expansion of products of boson operators regarding collective boson operators, a generalized algorithm for computing permanents is developed that the algorithm can handle the arbitrary matrices with repeated columns and rows. In a particular case, the formula is reduced to Glynn's form. Not only the algorithm can be used for a deterministic direct calculation of the matrix permanent but also can be expressed as a sampling problem like Gurvits's randomized algorithm.

  14. Triggering on W, Z Boson Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Fehr, Armin

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger performs well for the hadronisation of isolated quarks or gluons, but is not optimised for $\\text{W}^\\pm$ and $\\text{Z}^0$ jets. This can be done with substructure techniques. As the W and Z bosons are highly boosted, the pair of quarks from their decay is heavily collimated and cannot be separated. The result is one single large jet with substructure. As it has two regions in the jet with high energy density (cores), while quarks have only one and gluons have two but a low mass, the existence of two cores plus a mass cut can be used to trigger on the hadronic decay of W and Z. In this project, it was investigated whether an offline tagger for W and Z bosons can be used as a trigger. Trimming, calibration and a tighter mass cut were applied to the jets and the trigger and offline reconstruction performance were compared.

  15. Bosonic Analogue of Dirac Composite Fermi Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mross, David F; Alicea, Jason; Motrunich, Olexei I

    2016-09-23

    We introduce a particle-hole-symmetric metallic state of bosons in a magnetic field at odd-integer filling. This state hosts composite fermions whose energy dispersion features a quadratic band touching and corresponding 2π Berry flux protected by particle-hole and discrete rotation symmetries. We also construct an alternative particle-hole symmetric state-distinct in the presence of inversion symmetry-without Berry flux. As in the Dirac composite Fermi liquid introduced by Son [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015)], breaking particle-hole symmetry recovers the familiar Chern-Simons theory. We discuss realizations of this phase both in 2D and on bosonic topological insulator surfaces, as well as signatures in experiments and simulations.

  16. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-04

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model.

  17. Quantum fields and poisson processes II: Interaction of boson-boson and boson-fermion fields with a cut-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, J.; Gaveau, B.; Rideau, G.

    1985-05-01

    Quantum field evolutions are written as expectation values with respect to Poisson processes in two simple models: interaction of two boson fields (with conservation of the number of particles in one field) and interaction of a boson with a fermion field. The introduction of a cut-off ensures that the expectation values are well-defined.

  18. Quantum fields and Poisson processes. Pt. 2. Interaction of boson-boson and boson-fermion fields with a cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, J. (Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique et Mathematique); Gaveau, B.; Rideau, G. (Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Dept. de Mathematiques)

    1985-05-01

    Quantum field evolutions are written as expectation values with respect to Poisson processes in two simple models; interaction of two boson fields (with conservation of the number of particles in one field) and interaction of a boson with a fermion field. The introduction of a cutt-off ensures that the expectation values are well-defined.

  19. The Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole: How Good a Case Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, Andreas; Hüttemann, Andreas; Kiefer, Claus; Britzen, Silke; Zajaček, Michal; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Stöckler, Manfred; Valencia-S, Monica; Karas, Vladimir; García-Marín, Macarena

    2017-05-01

    The compact and, with {˜ }4.3± 0.3× 10^6 M_{\\odot }, very massive object located at the center of the Milky Way is currently the very best candidate for a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in our immediate vicinity. The strongest evidence for this is provided by measurements of stellar orbits, variable X-ray emission, and strongly variable polarized near-infrared emission from the location of the radio source Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) in the middle of the central stellar cluster. Simultaneous near-infrared and X-ray observations of SgrA* have revealed insights into the emission mechanisms responsible for the powerful near-infrared and X-ray flares from within a few tens to one hundred Schwarzschild radii of such a putative SMBH. If SgrA* is indeed a SMBH it will, in projection onto the sky, have the largest event horizon and will certainly be the first and most important target for very long baseline interferometry observations currently being prepared by the event horizon telescope (EHT). These observations in combination with the infrared interferometry experiment GRAVITY at the very large telescope interferometer and other experiments across the electromagnetic spectrum might yield proof for the presence of a black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The large body of evidence continues to discriminate the identification of SgrA* as a SMBH from alternative possibilities. It is, however, unclear when the ever mounting evidence for SgrA* being associated with a SMBH will suffice as a convincing proof. Additional compelling evidence may come from future gravitational wave observatories. This manuscript reviews the observational facts, theoretical grounds and conceptual aspects for the case of SgrA* being a black hole. We treat theory and observations in the framework of the philosophical discussions about "(anti)realism and underdetermination", as this line of arguments allows us to describe the situation in observational astrophysics with respect to supermassive

  20. Mergers of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Gas-rich Environments: Models of Event Rates and Electromagnetic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu

    2011-12-01

    Supermassive black holes permeate the observable Universe, residing in the nuclei of all or nearly all nearby massive galaxies and powering luminous quasars as far as ten billion light years away. These monstrous objects must grow through a combination of gas accretion and mergers of less massive black holes. The direct detection of the mergers by future gravitational-wave detectors will be a momentous scientific achievement, providing tests of general relativity and revealing the cosmic evolution of supermassive black holes. An additional --- and arguably equally rewarding --- challenge is the concomitant observation of merging supermassive black holes with both gravitational and electromagneticwaves. Such synergistic, "multi-messenger" studies can probe the expansion history of the Universe and shed light on the details of accretion astrophysics. This thesis examines the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries and the observable signatures of these events. First, we consider the formation scenarios for the earliest supermassive black holes. This investigation is motivated by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey observation of a quasar that appears to be powered by a supermassive black hole with a mass of billions of solar masses, already in place one billion years after the Big Bang. Second, we develop semianalytic, time-dependent-models for the thermal emission from circumbinary gas disks around merging black holes. Our calculations corroborate the qualitative conclusion of a previous study that for black hole mergers detectable by a space-based gravitational-wave observatory, a gas disk near the merger remnant may exhibit a dramatic brightening of soft X-rays on timescales of several years. Our results suggest that this "afterglow" may become detectable more quickly after the merger than previously estimated. Third, we investigate whether these afterglow episodes could be observed serendipitously by forthcoming wide-field, high-cadence electromagnetic surveys

  1. Minority Serving Institutions Reporting System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The database will be used to track SSA's contributions to Minority Serving Institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Tribal Colleges...

  2. Top and Electroweak bosons and Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Vryonidou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    I review recent progress in the computation of processes involving top quarks in the framework of Standard Model Effective Theory at NLO in QCD. In particular I discuss the impact of higher-dimensional operators on top pair production in association with a photon, a Z boson and a Higgs. Results are obtained within the automated framework of MadGraph5_aMC@NLO.

  3. Measurement of the W boson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-08-01

    The authors present a measurement of the W boson mass in W {yields} e{nu} decays using 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, they measure M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  4. Observation of the E(38)-boson

    CERN Document Server

    Abraamyan, Kh U; Baznat, M I; Gudima, K K; Nazarenko, M A; Reznikov, S G; Sorin, A S

    2012-01-01

    The first results of the search for the E(38)-boson are presented. The search was conducted in the effective mass spectra of photon pairs produced in the d(2.0 GeV/n) + C, d(3.0 GeV/n) + Cu and p(4.6 GeV) + C reactions. The experimental data was obtained at internal beams of the JINR Nuclotron.

  5. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  6. Neutrino and Z gauge boson physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios, F. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-Merida, A.P. 73, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Perez, M. A. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV, A.P. 14-740, 07000, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2013-06-12

    We present a short review of the physics of neutrino-photon interactions and the rare decays of the Z and Z Prime gauge bosons. In particular, we emphasize on processes induced by the anomalous trilinear and quartic vertices VVV and VVVV, where V=Z,Z Prime or a photon, within the Standard Model (SM), the 331 model and some extensions of the SM. We also include the phenomenological and experimental limits reported for these couplings.

  7. Coherent quantum effects through dispersive bosonic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Sai-Yun; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Serafini, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    The coherent evolution of two atomic qubits mediated by a set of bosonic field modes is investigated. By assuming a specific encoding of the quantum states in the internal levels of the two atoms we show that entangling quantum gates can be realised, with high fidelity, even when a large number of mediating modes is involved. The effect of losses and imperfections on the gates' operation is also considered in detail.

  8. Lie Superalgebras arising from bosonic representation

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Naihuan

    2012-01-01

    A 2-toroidal Lie superalgebra is constructed using bosonic fields and a ghost field. The superalgebra contains $osp(1|2n)^{(1)}$ as a distinguished subalgebra and behaves similarly to the toroidal Lie superalgebra of type $B(0, n)$. Furthermore this algebra is a central extension of the algebra $osp(1|2n)\\otimes \\mathbb C[s, s^{-1}, t,t^{-1}]$.

  9. Production of electroweak bosons at colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matthias U Mozer

    2012-10-01

    The collider experiments at the Tevatron and LHC are accumulating samples of electroweak bosons of unprecedented size. These huge samples can be used to observe rare processes, such as diboson production which have the potential to show enhancements due to new physics. Alternatively, the great statistical power of the samples allows for detailed studies of electroweak production mechanisms and correspondingly QCD and the proton structure.

  10. Higgs boson mass and new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezrukov, Fedor [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). RIKEN-BNL Research Center; Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques

    2012-05-15

    We discuss the lower Higgs boson mass bounds which come from the absolute stability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum and from the Higgs inflation, as well as the prediction of the Higgs boson mass coming from asymptotic safety of the SM. We account for the 3-loop renormalization group evolution of the couplings of the Standard Model and for a part of two-loop corrections that involve the QCD coupling {alpha}{sub s} to initial conditions for their running. This is one step above the current state of the art procedure (''one-loop matching-two-loop running''). This results in reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs boson mass bounds and predictions, associated with the Standard Model physics, to 1-2 GeV. We find that with the account of existing experimental uncertainties in the mass of the top quark and {alpha}{sub s} (taken at 2{sigma} level) the bound reads M{sub H} {>=} M{sub min} (equality corresponds to the asymptotic safety prediction), where M{sub min}=129{+-}6 GeV. We argue that the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in this range would be in agreement with the hypothesis of the absence of new energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, whereas the coincidence of M{sub H} with M{sub min} would suggest that the electroweak scale is determined by Planck physics. In order to clarify the relation between the Fermi and Planck scale a construction of an electron-positron or muon collider with a center of mass energy {proportional_to}200+200 GeV (Higgs and t-quark factory) would be needed.

  11. Discovery of the intermediate W boson

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Press conference on 25 January 1983 when the announcement was made of the discovery of the intermediate W boson at CERN. From right to left: Carlo Rubbia, spokesman of the UA1 experiment; Simon van der Meer, responsible for developing the stochastic cooling technique; Herwig Schopper, Director- General of CERN; Erwin Gabathuler, Research Director at CERN, and Pierre Darriulat, spokesman of the UA2 experiment, whose results confirmed those from Carlo Rubbia's experiment.

  12. Production of Spin-Two Gauge Bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Konitopoulos, Spyros; Savvidy, George

    2008-01-01

    We considered spin-two gauge boson production in the fermion pair annihilation process and calculated the polarized cross sections for each set of helicity orientations of initial and final particles. The angular dependence of these cross sections is compared with the similar annihilation cross sections in QED with two photons in the final state, with two gluons in QCD and W-pair in Electroweak theory.

  13. High energy bosons do not propagate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkov, M.A., E-mail: Kurkov@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Lizzi, Fedele, E-mail: fedele.lizzi@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Vassilevich, Dmitri, E-mail: dvassil@gmail.com [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, S.P. (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    We discuss the propagation of bosons (scalars, gauge fields and gravitons) at high energy in the context of the spectral action. Using heat kernel techniques, we find that in the high-momentum limit the quadratic part of the action does not contain positive powers of the derivatives. We interpret this as the fact that the two-point Green functions vanish for nearby points, where the proximity scale is given by the inverse of the cutoff.

  14. Measurement of the W boson mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-10-02

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in W-->e(nu) decays using 1 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W-->e(nu) candidate events, we measure M(W)=80.401+/-0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  15. Multi-Boson Interactions at the Run 1 LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Daniel R. [Fermilab; Meade, Patrick [YITP, Stony Brook; Pleier, Marc-Andre [Brookhaven

    2016-10-24

    This review article covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion (VBF) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The data was taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering (VBS) yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which both have reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory (EFT) is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.

  16. Academic Training Lecture: Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Regular Programme 21, 22, 23 & 24 June 2010 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders by Dr. Karl Jakobs (University of Freiburg) In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and ...

  17. Multi-Boson Interactions at the Run 1 LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Daniel R; Pleier, Marc-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This review article covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion (VBF) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The data was taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering (VBS) yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which both have reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory (EFT) is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.

  18. Multi-Boson Interactions at the Run 1 LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Daniel R.; Pleier, Marc-Andre

    2017-09-20

    This review article covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion (VBF) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The data was taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering (VBS) yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which both have reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory (EFT) is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.

  19. Bosonic lasers: The state of the art (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavokin, Alexey; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Bosonic lasers represent a new generation of coherent light sources. In contrast to conventional, fermionic, lasers they do not require inversion of electronic population and do not rely on the stimulated emission of radiation. Bosonic lasers are based on the spontaneous emission of light by condensates of bosonic quasiparticles. The first realization of bosonic lasers has been reported in semiconductor microcavities where bosonic condensates of exciton-polaritons first studied several decades ago by K. B. Tolpygo can be formed under optical or electronic pumping. In this paper we overview the recent progress in the research area of polaritonics, address the perspective of realization of polariton devices: from bosonic cascade lasers to spin transistors and switches.

  20. Non-Abelian 3d Bosonization and Quantum Hall States

    CERN Document Server

    Radicevic, Djordje; Turner, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Bosonization dualities relate two different Chern-Simons-matter theories, with bosonic matter on one side replaced by fermionic matter on the other. We first describe a more general class of non-Abelian bosonization dualities. We then explore the non-relativistic physics of these theories in the quantum Hall regime. The bosonic theory lies in a condensed phase and admits vortices which are known to form a non-Abelian quantum Hall state. We ask how this same physics arises in the fermionic theory. We find that a condensed boson corresponds to a fully filled Landau level of fermions, while bosonic vortices map to fermionic holes. We confirm that the ground state of the two theories is indeed described by the same quantum Hall wavefunction.

  1. On the structure, mass and thermodynamics of the Zo bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, A. S.; Vayenas, C. G.

    2016-12-01

    In a recent work we have shown that the mass of W± bosons can be computed from first principles by modeling these bosons as relativistic rotational bound states consisting of e±-νe pairs, and by employing the de Broglie wavelength equation together with Newton's universal gravitational law but with gravitational instead of rest masses (Vayenas et al., 2016). Here, we present similar calculations for the Zo boson which we model as a bound state of e+-νe-e- with an electron antineutrino at the center of the rotating ring. This appears consistent with the fact that Zo bosons are known to decay primarily to e+-e- pairs. The above models contain no adjustable parameters. The computed Zo boson mass (91.72 GeV /c2), as well as the ratio of the masses of Zo and W± bosons, differ by less than 0.6% and 0.9% respectively from the experimental values.

  2. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  3. Graviton as a Grand United Gauge Boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2015-04-01

    To any type of charge corresponds a kind of inertial mass. Such a mass-charge duality explains the availability in the neutrino of the naturally united rest mass and charge equal to all its mass and charge consisting of the electric, weak, strong and a range of other the innate components. From their point of view, we discuss a new theory of a grand unification. In this theory, the gravitational field is a naturally united field of the unified system of the most diverse combinations of the electric photons, magnetic monophotons, weak bosons and the strong gluons where the four pairs of forces of a different nature are united. Some consequences and laboratory confirmations of the discussed theory have been listed, in which graviton is predicted as a grand united gauge boson. Therefore, the gravitons constitute a natural light testifying in favor of gravitational force. They show that to each type of light corresponds a kind of force. Thereby, the suggested field theory that unites all gauge bosons in gravitons gives the possibility to directly look on the nature of gravitational matter elucidating the interratio of intragraviton forces and the problem of elementary particle fundamental symmetries.

  4. W Boson Mass Measurement at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-03-27

    This is the closeout report for the grant for experimental research at the energy frontier in high energy physics. The report describes the precise measurement of the W boson mass at the CDF experiment at Fermilab, with an uncertainty of ≈ 12 MeV, using the full dataset of ≈ 9 fb-1 collected by the experiment up to the shutdown of the Tevatron in 2011. In this analysis, the statistical and most of the experimental systematic uncertainties have been reduced by a factor of two compared to the previous measurement with 2.2 fb-1 of CDF data. This research has been the culmination of the PI's track record of producing world-leading measurements of the W boson mass from the Tevatron. The PI performed the first and only measurement to date of the W boson mass using high-rapidity leptons using the D0 endcap calorimeters in Run 1. He has led this measurement in Run 2 at CDF, publishing two world-leading measurements in 2007 and 2012 with total uncertainties of 48 MeV and 19 MeV respectively. The analysis of the final dataset is currently under internal review in CDF. Upon approval of the internal review, the result will be available for public release.

  5. Higgs boson: the winner takes it all?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in 2012, the Higgs boson has been in the spotlight for both experimentalists and theorists. In addition to its confirmed role in the mass mechanism, recent papers have discussed its possible role in the inflation of the universe and in the matter-antimatter imbalance. Can a single particle be responsible for everything?   “Since 2012 we have known that the Higgs boson exists, but its inner properties are yet to be completely uncovered,” says Gian Giudice, a member of the CERN Theory Unit. “Precise measurements of its decay modes are still ongoing and the LHC Run 2 will be essential to understand the nature of this particle at a deeper level.” What we know is that this boson is not “yet another particle” among the hundreds that we deal with every day in physics labs. In agreement with the Standard Model theory, the recent experimental data confirms that the particle discovered by the CERN experiments is the key pa...

  6. Statistical benchmark for BosonSampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Kuipers, Jack; Urbina, Juan-Diego; Mayer, Klaus; Tichy, Malte Christopher; Richter, Klaus; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Boson samplers—set-ups that generate complex many-particle output states through the transmission of elementary many-particle input states across a multitude of mutually coupled modes—promise the efficient quantum simulation of a classically intractable computational task, and challenge the extended Church-Turing thesis, one of the fundamental dogmas of computer science. However, as in all experimental quantum simulations of truly complex systems, one crucial problem remains: how to certify that a given experimental measurement record unambiguously results from enforcing the claimed dynamics, on bosons, fermions or distinguishable particles? Here we offer a statistical solution to the certification problem, identifying an unambiguous statistical signature of many-body quantum interference upon transmission across a multimode, random scattering device. We show that statistical analysis of only partial information on the output state allows to characterise the imparted dynamics through particle type-specific features of the emerging interference patterns. The relevant statistical quantifiers are classically computable, define a falsifiable benchmark for BosonSampling, and reveal distinctive features of many-particle quantum dynamics, which go much beyond mere bunching or anti-bunching effects.

  7. ATLAS measurements of vector boson production

    CERN Document Server

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell­Yan production of W and Z/gamma* bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center­of­mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. In the 8 TeV data, we present recent measurements in the di­lepton mass range up to the TeV scale, double­differentially in dilepton mass and rapidity(­separation). The measurements are compared to state­of­the­art calculations at NNLO in QCD and constrain the photon content of the proton. First precise inclusive measurements of W and Z production at 13 TeV are presented. W/Z and W charge ratios profit from a cancellation of experimental uncertainties. The angular distributions of the Drell­Yan lepton pairs around the Z­boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic of the Z­boson production mechanisms. We present a measurement of the complete set of angular coefficients describing these distributions...

  8. ATLAS measurement of Electroweak Vector Boson production

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00453010; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/γ∗ bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our un- derstanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements of the double differential cross-sections in dilepton mass and rapidity. The measurements are compared to state of calculations at NNLO in QCD and constrain the photon content of the proton. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic of the Z-boson production mechanisms. The complete set of angular coefficients describing these dis- tributions is presented and compare to theoretical predictions highlighting different approaches of the QCD and EW modelling. First precise inclusive measurements of W and Z production at 13 TeV are presented. W/Z and W+/W− ratios profit from a cancellation of experimental uncertainties.

  9. The Higgs Boson Search and Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    We present a brief account of the search for the Higgs boson at the three major colliders that have operated over the last three decades: LEP, the Tevatron, and the LHC. The experimental challenges encountered stemmed from the distinct event phenomenology as determined by the colliders energy and the possible values for the Higgs boson mass, and from the capability of these colliders to deliver as much collision data as possible to fully explore the mass spectrum within their reach. Focusing more on the hadron collider searches during the last decade, we discuss how the search for the Higgs boson was advanced through mastering the experimental signatures of standard theory backgrounds, through the comprehensive utilization of the features of the detectors involved in the searches, and by means of advanced data analysis techniques. The search culminated in 2012 with the discovery, by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, of a Higgs-like particle with mass close to 125 GeV, confirmed more recently to have propertie...

  10. Search for a Higgs Boson Decaying to Two W Bosons at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    We present a search for a Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector. We find no evidence for production of a Higgs boson with mass between 110 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, and determine upper limits on the production cross section. For the mass of 160 GeV/c{sup 2}, where the analysis is most sensitive, the observed (expected) limit is 0.7 pb (0.9 pb) at 95% Bayesian credibility level which is 1.7 (2.2) times the standard model cross section.

  11. Search for a Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester Iii, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-01-16

    We present a search for a Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb;(-1) collected with the CDF II detector. We find no evidence for production of a Higgs boson with mass between 110 and 200 GeV/c;(2), and determine upper limits on the production cross section. For the mass of 160 GeV/c;(2), where the analysis is most sensitive, the observed (expected) limit is 0.7 pb (0.9 pb) at 95% Bayesian credibility level which is 1.7 (2.2) times the standard model cross section.

  12. Higgs boson measurements and extended scalar sector searches in bosonic final states

    CERN Document Server

    Zenz, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Searches for additional Higgs-like bosons in the H to WW and H to ZZ decay channels are reported, for boson masses in the range 145 $< m_H <$ 1000 GeV. The results are based upon proton-proton collision data samples at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 and 13 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several final states of the WW and ZZ decays are analyzed. Upper limits for the search for a heavy BSM resonance and the combined upper limits at 95$\\%$ confidence level on the products of the cross section and branching fraction. These data are also used to constrain the SM Higgs boson total decay width, finding observed and expected limits at the 95$\\%$ confidence level (CL).

  13. Higgs-Boson Production in Association with Heavy Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Associated production of a Higgs boson with a heavy, i.e. top or bottom, quark-anti-quark pair provide observation channels for Higgs bosons at the LHC which can be used to measure the respective Yukawa couplings. For the light supersymmetric Higgs boson we present SUSY-QCD corrections at the one-loop level, which constitute a significant contribution to the cross section.

  14. Can a Higgs boson be produced at the LHC?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhi-Guang; ZHENG Hua; HUANG Li-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is designed to simulate,by using the mean free path method,the probability of Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).The probability that the colliding particles could get close to a given distance with different colliding energies is discussed in this model.Calculated results imply that the probability of producing a Higgs boson is near zero according to the existing theoretical mechanism for Higgs boson production.

  15. Measurements of vector boson fusion with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, Chris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single $W$ and $Z$ boson production in a vector-boson-fusion topology using ATLAS data collected at the LHC. The measurements include the fiducial cross sections in $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ and 8 TeV $pp$ collisions of $W$ and $Z$ production with jets produced via the electroweak interaction, of which vector-boson fusion is a component, and with jets produced via the strong process. Differential measurements are also shown.

  16. OVERVIEW OF HIGGS BOSON STUDIES AT THE TEVATRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zivkovic, Lidija [Institute of Physics, Zemun, Serbia

    2014-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p¯p Collider collected data between 2002 and 2011, accumulating up to 10 fb-1 of data. During that time, an extensive search for the standard model Higgs boson was performed. Combined results from the searches for the standard model Higgs boson with the final dataset are presented, together with results on the Higgs boson couplings and spin and parity.

  17. Trapped Three Interacting Bosons with a Short-Ranged Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2006-01-01

    A system of three bosons trapped by a parabolic confinement and interacting with a short-ranged interaction has been investigated by the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix. We report a calculation for the energy spectrum of the low-lying states of a system of three interacting bosons. The important feature of the low-lying states of three interacting bosons trapped by a parabolic confinement is obtained via an analysis of the energy spectrum.

  18. Studies of Higgs bosons decaying to fermions with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Salerno, Daniel Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This note reviews the latest results of searches for a Higgs boson decaying to fermions, including both Standard Model (SM) searches from Run I at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and Run II at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV and di-Higgs boson production from Run II. The measurements of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions from Run I of the LHC, both in final states and initial states are also presented.

  19. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in association with a W boson at D0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Savanna Marie [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2013-01-01

    I present a search for the standard model Higgs boson, H, produced in association with a W boson in data events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing energy, and two or three jets. The data analysed correspond to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at a center-of-momentum energy of √s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider. This search uses algorithms to identify the signature of bottom quark production and multivariate techniques to improve the purity of H → b$\\bar{b}$ production. We validate our methodology by measuring WZ and ZZ production with Z → b$\\bar{b}$ and find production rates consistent with the standard model prediction. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we determine a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 4.8 times the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7 times the standard model production cross section. I also present a novel method for improving the energy resolution for charged particles within hadronic signatures. This is achieved by replacing the calorimeter energy measurement for charged particles within a hadronic signature with the tracking momentum measurement. This technique leads to a ~ 20% improvement in the jet energy resolution, which yields a ~ 7% improvement in the reconstructed dijet mass width for H → b$\\bar{b}$ events. The improved energy calculation leads to a ~ 5% improvement in our expected 95% C.L. upper limit on the Higgs boson production cross section.

  20. Hunting A Wandering Supermassive Black Hole in M31 Halo -- Hermitage of Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Yohei; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko

    2014-01-01

    In the hierarchical structure formation scenario, galaxies enlarge through multiple merging events with less massive galaxies. In addition, the Magorrian relation indicates that almost all galaxies are occupied by a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass $10^{-3}$ of its spheroidal component. Consequently, SMBHs are expected to wander in the halos of their host galaxies following a galaxy collision, although evidence of this activity is currently lacking. We investigate a current plausible location of an SMBH wandering in the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). According to theoretical studies of $N$-body simulations, some of the many substructures in the M31 halo are remnants of a minor merger occurring about 1 Gyr ago. First, to evaluate the possible parameter space of the infalling orbit of the progenitor, we perform numerous parameter studies using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cluster. To reduce uncertainties in the predicted position of the expected SMBH, we then calculate the time evolution ...