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Sample records for superlattice active region

  1. InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice photodiode array inter-pixel region blue-shift by femtosecond (fs) laser anneal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sona; Das, Utpal

    2017-09-01

    A post-growth blue-shift in the band gap of an undoped InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (5.5 μm cutoff wavelength), as a result of 775 nm, 150 fs laser annealing, is presented. A band gap blue-shift of ∼72 meV in the {{{p}}}+- and p-layer etched inter-pixel region, laser annealed superlattice is achieved. Using an inter-diffusion model, the dominant group-III and group-V diffusion coefficients are found to be 1.33× {10}-21 {{{m}}}2 {{{s}}}-1 and 4.8× {10}-22 {{{m}}}2 {{{s}}}-1 respectively. Confirmation of the unaltered condition of the superlattice in a Ti/Au masked pixel area establishes this blue-shifted superlattice band gap to be the reason behind the improved inter-pixel isolation resulting from the fs laser annealing technique.

  2. Misfit Strain in Superlattices Controlling the Electron-Lattice Interaction via Microstrain in Active Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Poccia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature superconductivity (HTS emerges in quite different electronic materials: cuprates, diborides, and iron-pnictide superconductors. Looking for unity in the diversity we find in all these materials a common lattice architecture: they are practical realizations of heterostructures at atomic limit made of superlattices of metallic active layers intercalated by spacers as predicted in 1993 by one of us. The multilayer architecture is the key feature for the presence of electronic topological transitions where the Fermi surface of one of the subbands changes dimensionality. The superlattice misfit strain between the active and spacer layers is shown to be a key variable to drive the system to the highest critical temperature that occurs at a particular point of the 3D phase diagram (, where is the charge transfer or doping. The plots of as a function of misfit strain at constant charge transfer in cuprates show a first-order quantum critical phase transition where an itinerant striped magnetic phase competes with superconductivity in the proximity of a structural phase transition, that is, associated with an electronic topological transition. The shape resonances in these multigap superconductors is associated with the maximum .

  3. Dispersion regions overlapping for bulk and surface polaritons in a magnetic-semiconductor superlattice

    CERN Document Server

    Fesenko, Volodymyr I; Tuz, Vladimir R

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary dispersion features of both bulk and surface polaritons in a finely-stratified magnetic-semiconductor structure which is under an action of an external static magnetic field in the Voigt geometry are discussed in this letter. It is shown that the conditions for total overlapping dispersion regions of simultaneous existence of bulk and surface polaritons can be reached providing a conscious choice of the constitutive parameters and material fractions for both magnetic and semiconductor subsystems.

  4. Heterojunction and superlattice detectors for infrared to ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2016-07-01

    The interest in Infrared and Ultraviolet detectors has increased immensely due to the emergence of important applications over a wide range of activities. Detectors based on free carrier absorption known as Hetero-junction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors and variations of these heterojunction structures to be used as intervalence band detectors for a wide wavelength region are presented. Although this internal photoemission concept is valid for all semiconductor materials systems, using a well-studied III-V system of GaAs/AlxGa1-x As to cover a wide wavelength range from UV to far-infrared (THz) is an important development in detector technology. Using the intervalence band (heavy hole, light hole and split off) transitions for high operating temperature detection of mid Infrared radiation is also discussed. A promising new way to extend the detection wavelength threshold beyond the standard threshold connected with the energy gap in a GaAs/AlxGa1-x As system is also presented. Superlattice detector technology, which is another promising detector architecture, can be optimized using both Type I and Type II heterostructures. Here the focus will be on Type II Strained Layer (T2SL) Superlattice detectors. T2SL Superlattices based on InAs/(In,GA)Sb have made significant improvements demonstrating focal plane arrays operating around 80 K and with multiple band detection capability. A novel spectroscopic method to evaluate the band offsets of both heterojunction and superlattice detectors is also discussed.

  5. Superlattice Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama

    2002-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated a significant enhancement in thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) at 300K, of about 2.4 in p-type Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 superlattices, using the concept of phonon-blocking electron-transmitting superlattice structures [1]. The phonon blocking arises from a complex localization-like behavior for phonons in nano-structured superlattices and the electron transmission is facilitated by optimal choice of band-offsets in these semiconductor hetero-structures. We will also discuss the ZT 1.2 results in n-type Bi2Te3/Bi2Te3-xSex superlattices and our initial understanding on the reasons behind the less-than-dramatic performance of these materials compared to the p-type superlattices. Due to the high ZT of the material, devices potentially offer high coefficient of performance (COP) in solid-state refrigeration. The thin-film devices, resulting from rather simple microelectronic processing, allow high cooling power densities to be achieved for a variety of high-power electronic applications. We have obtained 32K and 40K sub-ambient cooling at 298K and 353K, respectively, in these superlattice micro-thermoelements with potential localized active-cooling power densities approaching 700 W/cm2. In addition to high-performance (in terms of COP) and power densities, these thin-film microdevices are also extremely fast-acting, within 10 microsec and about a factor of 23,000 better than bulk thermoelectric technology. Thus, these are of significance for preventing thermal run-away in high-power electronics. We will present results to demonstrate this concept with infrared imaging of cooling/heating with superlattice micro-devices. We will also discuss outstanding issues such as heat removal from the heat sink towards the full exploitation of this technology. In addition, we will compare the state-of-the-art with other thin-film superlattice materials and device concepts. [1] R. Venkatasubramanian, E. Siivola, T. Colpitts, and B.C. O’Quinn, Thin

  6. Superlattice Optical Bistability Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    multilayer heterojunction and superlattice device applications. 2.0 Growth Studies The MBE growth of mercury compound is still relatively new and novel...These superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a MBE system specifically designed to handle mercury . MBE is an ultrahigh vacuum evaporative...therefore the growth process is not as well understood as that of III-V semiconductor - compounds . In HgTe-CdTe superlattices the CdTe deposition is

  7. Phoxonic Hybrid Superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Redondo, Elena; Huesmann, Hannah; El Boudouti, El-Houssaine; Tremel, Wolfgang; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Fytas, George

    2015-06-17

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the direction-dependent elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation in a supported film of hybrid PMMA (poly[methyl-methacrylate])-TiO2 superlattice (SL). In the direction normal to the layers, this one-dimensional periodic structure opens propagation band gaps for both hypersonic (GHz) phonons and near-UV photons. The high mismatch of elastic and optical impedance results in a large dual phoxonic band gap. The presence of defects inherent to the spin-coating fabrication technique is sensitively manifested in the band gap region. Utilizing Brillouin light scattering, phonon propagation along the layers was observed to be distinctly different from propagation normal to them and can, under certain conditions (SL thickness and substrate elasticity), reveal the nanomechanical properties of the constituent layers. Besides the first realization of unidirectional phoxonic behavior, hybrid (soft-hard) periodic materials are a promising simple platform for opto-acoustic interactions and applications such as filters and Bragg mirrors.

  8. Low-frequency noise behavior at reverse bias region in InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes on mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, T.; Kutluer, K.; Muti, A.; Salihoglu, Ö.; Aydinli, A.; Turan, R.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a relationship between the noise characterization and activation energy of InAs/GaSb superlattice Mid-Wavelength-Infrared photodiodes for different passivation materials applied to the device. The noise measurements exhibited a frequency dependent plateau (i.e. 1/f-noise characteristic) for unpassivated as well as Si3N4 passivated samples whereas 1/f-type low noise suppression (i.e. frequency independent plateau) with a noise current reduction of more than one order of magnitude was observed for SiO2 passivation. For reverse bias values below -0.15V, the classical Schottky-noise calculation alone did not appear to describe the noise mechanism in a SL noise behavior, which shows a divergence between theoretically and experimentally determined noise values. We identify that, the additional noise appears, with and without passivation, at the surface activation energy of < 60 meV and is inversely proportional to the reverse bias. This is believed to be caused by the surface dangling-bonds (as well as surface states) whose response is controlled by the applied reverse bias. The calculated noise characteristics showed a good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures…

  10. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  11. Magnetism in lanthanide superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Sarthour, R.S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of heavy rare-earth superlattices have revealed the stabilization of novel magnetic phases chat are not present in bulk materials. The most striking result is the propagation of the magnetic ordering through nonmagnetic spacer materials. Here we describe some recent X......-ray magnetic resonant scattering studies of light rare-earth superlattices, which illuminate the mechanism of interlayer coupling, and provide access to different areas of Physics. such as the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. Magnetic X-ray diffraction is found to be particularly well suited...... to the study of the modulated magnetic structures in superlattices, and provides unique information on the conduction-electron spin-density wave responsible for the propagation of magnetic order. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. High Coefficient of Performance HgCdTe And Metallic Superlattice-Based Thermoelectric Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of nanoscale superlattices (SLs) as the active elements of high efficiency thermoelectric coolers. Recent models predict that the...

  13. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young SJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100 substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively.

  14. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100) substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively. PMID:20672085

  15. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.;

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  16. Deep Green And Monolithic White LEDs Based On Combination Of Short-Period InGaN/GaN Superlattice And InGaN QWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Chernyakov, A. E.; Zakgeim, A. L.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Hytch, M.

    2011-12-01

    This work presents the results of the investigation of approaches to the synthesis of the active region of LED with extended optical range. Combination of short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice and InGaN quantum well was applied to extend optical range of emission up to 560 nm. Monolithic white LED structures containing two blue and one green QWs separated by the short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice were grown with external quantum efficiency up to 5-6%.

  17. Magnetic Graphene Nanohole Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Decai; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of nano-holes (NHs) patterned in graphene using first principles calculations. We show that superlattices consisting of a periodic array of NHs form a new family of 2D crystalline "bulk" magnets whose collective magnetic behavior is governed by inter-NH spin-spin interaction. They exhibit long-range magnetic order well above room temperature. Furthermore, magnetic semiconductors can be made by doping magnetic NHs into semiconducting NH superlattices. Our findings offer a new material system for fundamental studies of spin-spin interaction and magnetic ordering in low dimensions, and open up the exciting opportunities of making engineered magnetic materials for storage media and spintronics applications.

  18. Jaynes Cummings Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A classical realization of the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model, describing the interaction of a two-level atom with a quantized cavity mode, is proposed based on light transport in engineered waveguide superlattices. The optical setting enables to visualize in Fock space dynamical regimes not yet accessible in quantum systems, providing new physical insights into the deep strong coupling regime of the JC model. In particular, bouncing of photon number wave packets in Hilbert space and revivals of populations are explained as generalized Bloch oscillations in an inhomogeneous tight-binding lattice.

  19. Magnetic Rare-Earth Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Gibbs, D.; Böni, P.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic structures of several single‐crystal, magnetic rare‐earth superlattice systems grown by molecular‐beam epitaxy are reviewed. In particular, the results of recent neutron diffraction investigations of long‐range magnetic order in Gd‐Y, Dy‐Y, Gd‐Dy, and Ho‐Y periodic superlattices...... are presented. In the Gd‐Y system, an antiphase domain structure develops for certain Y layer spacings, whereas modified helical moment configurations are found to occur in the other systems, some of which are commensurate with the chemical superlattice wavelength. References are made to theoretical interaction...

  20. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C., E-mail: cwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C., E-mail: jccao@mail.sim.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  1. Aging in Magnetic Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Pleimling, Michel; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Aging phenomena can be observed in non-equilibrium systems with slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic magnetic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. The Curie temperature of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. In-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry and SQUID. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, DMR-0904999, and MRSEC.

  2. Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, S. Y.; Allotey, F. K. A.; Adjepong, S. K.

    1993-10-01

    Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice has been studied for acoustic wave whose wavelength lambda = 2pi/q is smaller than the mean free path of the electrons l (where ql approaches 1). Unlike the homogeneous bulk material where Weinreich relation is independent of the wave number q in the superlattice we observe a dependence on q i.e. spatial dispersion. In the presence of applied constant field E a threshold value was obtained where the acoustoelectric current changes direction.

  3. Defect enhanced spin and valley polarizations in silicene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Lu, Wei-Tao; Li, Yun-Fang; Han, Hai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    We studied the effect of a defect of superlattice on the spin and valley dependent transport properties in silicene, where there is an abnormal barrier in height. It is found that the transmission resonance is greatly suppressed, because the symmetry of superlattice structure is destroyed by the defect. The spin-up and spin-down electrons near the K and K ‧ valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices and defects. Therefore, the conductances are strongly dependent on the spin and valley of electron. By adjusting the defect strength properly, the spin and valley polarizations could be dramatically enhanced in a wide energy region. Furthermore, the result suggests an application of the structure as a defect-controlled switch.

  4. Electronic states of InSe/GaSe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoç, Ş.; Allahverdi, K.; Ibrahim, Z.

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of recent publications revealed an increasing interest in epitaxial growth of InSe/GaSe superlattice. Within the effective mass theory we carried out self-consistent calculations of the confined and itinerant electronic states, potential profile and charge density distribution of InSe/GaSe superlattice, where the InSe layers are the well and the GaSe layers the barrier. Calculations were performed for three types of doping: uniform, modulated in the well, and modulated in the barrier. It has been found that the Coulomb interaction in the well and barrier forces the formation of localized states in the barrier region. The possibility of an insulator-metal transition in InSe/GaSe superlattice is predicted for modulation doping in the barrier and for a doping level n = 10 19cm-3. A decrease of the barrier height has been found for modulation doping in the well.

  5. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrilli, L.; Poletto, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Aims: Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Methods: Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R⊙, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H i Lyα line and the O vi doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 Å. Results: Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two types of outflows at different latitudes, both possibly originating in the same negative polarity area of the AR. We also analyzed the behavior of the Si xii 520 Å line along the UVCS slit in an attempt to reveal changes in the Si abundance when different regions are traversed. Although we found some evidence for a Si enrichment in the AR outflows, alternative interpretations are also plausible. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that outflows from ARs are detectable in the intermediate corona throughout the whole AR lifetime. This confirms that outflows contribute to the slow wind.

  6. Superconducting superlattices 2: Native and artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozovic, I.; Pavuna, D. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This volume is composed of 26 papers presented at the symposium. Topics covered include the following: high-{Tc} superlattices: intrinsic and artificial; low-{Tc} superlattices and multilayers; and theory.

  7. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Zangrilli, L

    2016-01-01

    We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R_sun, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H I Lyman alpha line and the O VI doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 A. Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two t...

  8. Controlling Chaos Probability of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a Weak Optical Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; LUO Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    @@ The spatial chaos probability of a Bose-Einstein condensate perturbed by a weak optical superlattice is studied. It is demonstrated that the spatial chaotic solution appears with a certain probability in a given parameter region under a random boundary condition. The effects of the lattice depths and wave vectors on the chaos probability are illustrated, and different regions associated with different chaos probabilities are found. This suggests a feasible scheme for suppressing and strengthening chaos by adjusting the optical superlattice experimentally.

  9. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Rongke; Huang Andong [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Li Da; Zhang Zhidong, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research and International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-10-19

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  10. Effect of compensation doping on the electrical and optical properties of mid-infrared type-Ⅱ InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yong-Bin; Xu Yun; Zhang Yu; Yu Xiu; Song Guo-Feng; Chen Liang-Hui

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the electrical and optical properties of mid-infrared type-Ⅱ InAs/GaSb superlattices with different beryllium concentrations in the InAs layer of the active region. Dark current, resistancearea product, absorption coefficient and quantum efficiency characteristics are thoroughly examined. The superlattice is residually n-type and it becomes slightly p-type by varying beryllium-doping concentrations, which improves its electrical performances. The optical performances remain almost unaffected with relatively low p-doping levels and begin to deteriorate with increasing p-doping density. To make a compromise between the electrical and optical performances,the photodetector with a doping concentration of 3 × 1015 cm-3 in the active region is believed to have the best overall performances.

  11. Multiferroicity in Perovskite Manganite Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong-Mei; Jiang, Xue-Fan; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Multiferroic properties of short period perovskite type manganite superlattice ((R1MnO3)n/(R2MnO3)n (n=1,2,3)) are considered within the framework of classical Heisenberg model using Monte Carlo simulation. Our result revealed the interesting behaviors in Mn spins structure in superlattice. Apart from simple plane spin cycloid structure which is shown in all manganites including bulk, film, and superlattice here in low temperature, a non-coplanar spiral spin structure is exhibited in a certain temperature range when n equals 1, 2 or 3. Specific heat, spin-helicity vector, spin correlation function, spin-helicity correlation function, and spin configuration are calculated to confirm this non-coplanar spiral spin structure. These results are associated with the competition among exchange interaction, magnetic anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11447136

  12. Perovskite Superlattices as Tunable Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, H. M.; Harshavardhan, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that superlattices that comprise alternating epitaxial layers of dissimilar paraelectric perovskites can exhibit large changes in permittivity with the application of electric fields. The superlattices are potentially useful as electrically tunable dielectric components of such microwave devices as filters and phase shifters. The present superlattice approach differs fundamentally from the prior use of homogeneous, isotropic mixtures of base materials and dopants. A superlattice can comprise layers of two or more perovskites in any suitable sequence (e.g., ABAB..., ABCDABCD..., ABACABACA...). Even though a single layer of one of the perovskites by itself is not tunable, the compositions and sequence of the layers can be chosen so that (1) the superlattice exhibits low microwave loss and (2) the interfacial interaction between at least two of the perovskites in the superlattice renders either the entire superlattice or else at least one of the perovskites tunable.

  13. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  14. Complex band structure and superlattice electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J. N.; McGill, T. C.

    1981-04-01

    The complex band structures of the bulk materials which constitute the alternating layer (001) semiconductor-semiconductor superlattice are investigated. The complex bands near the center of the Brillouin zone in the [001] direction are studied in detail. The decay lengths of superlattice states whose energies lie in the bulk band gaps of one of the semiconductors are determined from the dispersion curves of these bands for imaginary k-->. This method is applied using a tight-binding band-structure calculation to two superlattices: the AlAs-GaAs superlattice and the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. The decay lengths of AlAs-GaAs superlattice conduction-band minimum states are found to be substantially shorter than those for the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. These differences in the decay of the states in the two superlattices result in differences in the variation of the conduction-band effective masses with the thickness of the AlAs and CdTe layers. The conduction-band effective masses increase more rapidly with AlAs thickness in the AlAs-GaAs superlattice than with CdTe thickness in the CdTe-HgTe superlattice.

  15. Phonon-induced polariton superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, Jr., M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Santos, P. V.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that the coherent interaction between microcavity polaritons and externally stimulated acoustic phonons forms a tunable polariton superlattice with a folded energy dispersion determined by the phonon population and wavelength. Under high phonon concentration, the strong confinement of the...... of the optical and excitonic polariton components in the phonon potential creates weakly coupled polariton wires with a virtually flat energy dispersion....

  16. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au) 14 tabs.; 58 ills., 96 refs.

  17. Influence of Fermi velocity engineering on electronic and optical properties of graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aram, Tahereh Nemati [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Neel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Asgari, Asghar, E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, using Kronig–Penney model, the electronic states in graphene-based superlattices with various substrates and considering exact electron Fermi velocity values are investigated. The analysis of our results clearly indicates that the difference between Fermi velocity values of gaped and gapless graphene regions determines the patency rate of band gap. Also, using transfer matrix method (TMM) the absorbance spectrum of mentioned structures is calculated. The more important result is that the absorbance of these structures is significantly near zero. - Highlights: • The electronic states in graphene superlattices with various substrates are investigated. • The exact electron Fermi velocity values are considered. • Using TMM the absorbance spectrum of two graphene-based superlattices is calculated. • The widest (narrowest) energy band gap belong to quartz–SiC (quartz–h-BN) superlattice.

  18. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  19. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  20. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in superlattices.

  1. Self-Organized Growth of Alloy Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, E.; Floro, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lagally, M.G.; Liu, F.; Tersoff, J.; Venezuela, P.

    1998-10-19

    We predict theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the spontaneous formation of a superlattice during crystal growth. When a strained alloy grows by "step flow", the steps at the surface form periodic bunches. The resulting modulated strain biases the incorporation of the respective alloy components at different steps in the bunch, leading to the formation of a superlattice. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy for SiGe grown on Si give clear evidence for such spontaneous superlattice formation.

  2. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  3. Spin-dependent optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Dai, Han-Ning; Sun, Hui; Reingruber, Andreas; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-07-01

    We propose and implement a lattice scheme for coherently manipulating atomic spins. Using a vector light shift and a superlattice structure, we demonstrate experimentally its capability on addressing spins in double wells and square plaquettes with subwavelength resolution. The quantum coherence of spin manipulations is verified through measuring atom tunneling and spin exchange dynamics. Our experiment presents a building block for engineering many-body quantum states in optical lattices for realizing quantum simulation and computation tasks.

  4. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is investigated experimentally. The interwell exciton is similar to the first Wannier-Stark localized exciton of an electrically biased superlattice. However, in the present case the localization is mediated by th...

  5. Thermodynamics and Magnetocaloric properties of Fe/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Michalski, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2011-03-01

    We explore MC properties of tailored Fe/Cr superlattices involving simple 3d metals. Our multilayers are fabricated by pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on maximizing magnetic entropy changes near room temperature. We use nanostructuring to tailor magnetic interaction and exploit geometrical confinement in order to fit the FM to paramagnetic transition temperature of the FM constituent films. In concert this leads to an optimized global metamagnetic transition maximizing the isothermal entropy change. Thermodynamic and MC properties of such Fe/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Entropy changes are deduced via the Maxwell relation in single phase regions and via the Clausis-Clapeyron relations at first order metamagnetic transitions, X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC Grant No. 0820521.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of germanene/MoS2 monolayer and silicene/MoS2 monolayer superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodan; Wu, Shunqing; Zhou, Sen; Zhu, Zizhong

    2014-03-01

    Superlattice provides a new approach to enrich the class of materials with novel properties. Here, we report the structural and electronic properties of superlattices made with alternate stacking of two-dimensional hexagonal germanene (or silicene) and a MoS2 monolayer using the first principles approach. The results are compared with those of graphene/MoS2 superlattice. The distortions of the geometry of germanene, silicene, and MoS2 layers due to the formation of the superlattices are all relatively small, resulting from the relatively weak interactions between the stacking layers. Our results show that both the germanene/MoS2 and silicene/MoS2 superlattices are manifestly metallic, with the linear bands around the Dirac points of the pristine germanene and silicene seem to be preserved. However, small band gaps are opened up at the Dirac points for both the superlattices due to the symmetry breaking in the germanene and silicene layers caused by the introduction of the MoS2 sheets. Moreover, charge transfer happened mainly within the germanene (or silicene) and the MoS2 layers (intra-layer transfer), as well as some part of the intermediate regions between the germanene (or silicene) and the MoS2 layers (inter-layer transfer), suggesting more than just the van der Waals interactions between the stacking sheets in the superlattices.

  7. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2017-09-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  8. Magnetic Helicity Injection in Solar Active Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    We present the evolution of magnetic field and its relationship with magnetic (current) helicity in solar active regions from a series of photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Huairou Solar Observing Station, longitudinal magnetograms by MDI of SOHO and white light images of TRACE. The photospheric current helicity density is a quantity reflecting the local twisted magnetic field and is related to the remaining magnetic helicity in the photosphere, even if the mean current helicity density brings the general chiral property in a layer of solar active regions. As new magnetic flux emerges in active regions, changes of photospheric current helicity density with the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona from the subatmosphere can be detected, including changes in sign caused by the injection of magnetic helicity of opposite sign. Because the injection rate of magnetic helicity and photospheric current helicity density have different means in the solar atmosphere,the injected magnetic helicity is probably not proportional to the current helicity density remaining in the photosphere. The evidence is that rotation of sunspots does not synchronize exactly with the twist of photospheric transverse magnetic field in some active regions (such as, delta active regions). They represent different aspects of magnetic chirality. A combined analysis of the observational magnetic helicity parameters actually provides a relative complete picture of magnetic helicity and its transfer in the solar atmosphere.

  9. Regional characteristics, opportunity perception and entrepreneurial activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuetzer, Michael; Obschonka, Martin; Brixy, Udo

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to better understand the link between regional characteristics and individual entrepreneurship. We combine individual-level Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data for Western Germany with regional-level data, using multilevel analysis to test our hypotheses. We find no direct lin...... creation, the economic context and an entrepreneurial culture have an effect on the individual perception of founding opportunities, which in turn predicted start-up intentions and activity. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York....... between regional knowledge creation, the economic context and an entrepreneurial culture on the one side and individual business start-up intentions and start-up activity on the other side. However, our findings point to the importance of an indirect effect of regional characteristics as knowledge...

  10. Organized Subsurface Flows near Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, D. A.; Hindman, B. W.; Toomre, J.; Thompson, M. J.

    2004-04-01

    Local helioseismic techniques, such as ring analysis and time-distance helioseismology, have already shown that large-scale flows near the surface converge towards major active regions. Ring analysis has further demonstrated that at greater depths some active regions exhibit strong outflows. A critique leveled at the ring-analysis results is that the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) inversion kernels on which they are based have negative sidelobes near the surface. Such sidelobes could result in a surface inflow being misidentified as a diverging outflow at depth. In this paper we show that the Optimally Located Averages (OLA) inversion technique, which produces kernels without significant sidelobes, generates flows markedly similar to the RLS results. Active regions are universally zones of convergence near the surface, while large complexes evince strong outflows deeper down.

  11. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  12. REGIONALIZATION OF MANAGEMENT PROCESS BY INNOVATIVE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sibirskaia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In current market conditions, the economy and Russia's accession to international trade scholars and experts from various fields of knowledge paying special attention to a huge set of regional problems. The growing role of regional research determines the level of establishing effective mechanisms for the implementation of the economic interests of actors as well as economic development and improving the quality of human life is the priority objectives of federal, regional and local authorities. Today, the Russian economic science faces a global goal - to develop ways and means of transformation of the Russian economy and bring it to a path of sustainable, innovative development, providing new quality of life. Achieving this goal must surely be a central task of the Russian economics and politics, as in the near future and the long term In article authors opened the maintenance of determinants of innovative development of the territory, mediated by strengthening of regionalization of management by innovative activity: condition of resource and innovative potential; the developed forms and nature of interaction between public authorities of regional level, local community and business; applied forms of integration of subjects of managing for realization of their innovative potential due to expansion of opportunities of participation in the perspective directions of scientific and technical, economic and social development; system of the incentives developing favorable conditions for introduction and development of innovative technologies, and also increases in the enterprise activity, formed by the external institutional environment; regional economic policy as instrument of increase of efficiency of innovative activity.

  13. ON THE FORMATION OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Robert F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nordlund, Ake, E-mail: stein@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: aake@nbi.dk [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding 'piggy-back' in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  14. Optical constants of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahen, K. B.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The optical properties of GaAs-Al sub x Ga sub 1-xAs superlattices are calculated as a function of the frequency and superlattice structure. The comutations are performed using a partition method which combines the vectors k.p method with the pseudopotential technique. The influence of the super-structure on the electronic properties of the systems is accounted for by appropriate quantization conditions. The anisotropy and structure dependence of the dielectric constant result mainly from the contribution of the gamma region while the contributions of the other regions of the Brillouin zone are rather insensitive to the superlattice structure. The superlattice index of refraction values are shown to attain maxima at the various quantized transition energies, where for certain structures, the difference between the refractive indices of the superlattices and its corresponding Al sub x Ga sub 1-xAs alloy can be as large as 2%. In general results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Revisiting HOPG superlattices: Structure and conductance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sumati; Kolekar, Sadhu; Deshpande, Aparna

    2017-04-01

    Superlattices observed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been studied extensively by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The interest in the study of graphite superlattices has seen a resurgence since the discovery of graphene. Single layer graphene, bilayer graphene, and few layer graphene can now be grown on different substrates. The adherence of graphene to various substrates often leads to a periodic out-of-plane modulation and superlattices due to lattice mismatch. In this paper, we report STM imaging and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) of different kinds of superlattices on HOPG characterized by a variation in lattice periodicities. Our study also shows evidence of the displacement of the topmost HOPG layer by scanning different areas of the same superlattice. A correlation between the lattice periodicity with its conductance properties is derived. The results of this work are important for understanding the origin of the superlattice structure on HOPG. Investigation of such superlattices may open up possible ways to modify two dimensional electron systems to create materials with tailored electronic properties.

  16. Exact Surface States in Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    We develop an analytical method to derive exact surface states in photonic superlattices. In a kind of infinite bichromatic superlattices satisfying some certain conditions, we analytically obtain their in-gap states, which are superpositions of finite numbers of unstable Bloch waves. By using the unstable in-gap states, we construct exactly several stable surface states in various photonic superlattices. We analytically explore the parametric dependence of these exact surface states. Our analysis provides an exact demonstration for the existence of surface states and would be also helpful to understand surface states in other lattice systems.

  17. Earthquake Activity in the North Greenland Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tine B.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Voss, Peter H.

    2017-04-01

    Many local and regional earthquakes are recorded on a daily basis in northern Greenland. The majority of the earthquakes originate at the Arctic plate boundary between the Eurasian and the North American plates. Particularly active regions away from the plate boundary are found in NE Greenland and in northern Baffin Bay. The seismograph coverage in the region is sparse with the main seismograph stations located at the military outpost, Stations Nord (NOR), the weather station outpost Danmarkshavn (DAG), Thule Airbase (TULEG), and the former ice core drilling camp (NEEM) in the middle of the Greenland ice sheet. Furthermore, data is available from Alert (ALE), Resolute (RES), and other seismographs in northern Canada as well as from a temporary deployment of BroadBand seismographs along the north coast of Greenland from 2004 to 2007. The recorded earthquakes range in magnitude from less than 2 to a 4.8 event, the largest in NE Greenland, and a 5.7 event, the largest recorded in northern Baffin Bay. The larger events are recorded widely in the region allowing for focal mechanisms to be calculated. Only a few existing focal mechanisms for the region can be found in the ISC bulletin. Two in NE Greenland representing primarily normal faulting and one in Baffin Bay resulting from reverse faulting. New calculations of focal mechanisms for the region will be presented as well as improved hypocenters resulting from analysis involving temporary stations and regional stations that are not included in routine processing.

  18. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jingli; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgGa δ doped AlGaN SLs. Mg acceptor activation energy was significantly reduced from 0.378 to 0.331 eV by using MgGa δ doping in SLs instead of traditional doping in alloys. This new process was confirmed to be able to realize high p-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN. PMID:28290480

  19. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  20. Infrared Photometry of Solar Active Regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Sobotka; Μ. V'azquez; Μ. S'anchez Cuberes; J. A. Bonet; A. Hanslmeier

    2000-09-01

    Simultaneous time series of broad-band images of two active regions close to the disk center were acquired at the maximum (0.80 m) and minimum (1.55 m) continuum opacities. Dark faculae are detected in images obtained as weighted intensity differences between both wave-length bands. The elements of quiet regions can be clearly distinguished from those of faculae and pores in scatter plots of brightness temperatures. There is a smooth transition between faculae and pores in the scatter plots. These facts are interpreted in terms of the balance between the inhibition of convective energy transport and the lateral radiative heating.

  1. Acoustic Oscillation Properties of Active Region 12193

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa; Pesnell, William D.; Hill, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are dynamic objects occurring randomly and yet unannounced in nature. In order to find an efficient detection method, we require a greater breadth of knowledge of the system. One path to such a method is to observe the solar atmosphere in a region around a flare in different wavelengths of light and acoustic frequency bands. This provides information from different altitudes in the solar atmosphere and allows us to study the temporal evolution of each altitude through the flaring event. A more complete understanding of the time evolution may lead to yet undiscovered precursors of the flare. In this project, we study Active Region 12192 using acoustic observations near an X3 flare occurring on October 24, 2014 at 21:41UT. Our wavelet analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region, to study the frequency bands. In order to study the power distribution in regions around the flare and to search for any correlation we apply several methods. One method we partition sub-regions in our main flaring region and take a survey of the oscillations for each frequency band within power maps. Another method we average the FFT to take measurements within the p-modes (2-4 mHz) and chromospheric (4-6 mHz) frequencies. The application of these methods should be able to get us closer to tracking waveforms within power maps.

  2. MgO/Cu2O Superlattices: Growth of Epitaxial Two-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M. J.; Wadekar, P. V.; Hsieh, W. C.; Huang, H. C.; Lin, C. W.; Chou, J. W.; Liao, C. H.; Chang, C. F.; Seo, H. W.; You, S. T.; Tu, L. W.; Lo, I. K.; Ho, N. J.; Yeh, S. W.; Liao, H. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    Alternated stacking of dissimilar layers can produce novel superlattice materials with multiple functionalities. The majority of such work reported in literature on epitaxial superlattices has been on alternating layers with the same space group (SG) and crystal structure (CS), whereas superlattices with the same CS but different SG have not been studied as much. We have grown superlattices with two well-known oxide materials, viz. cuprite (Cu2O, CS = cubic and SG = Pn bar{3} m) and magnesium oxide (MgO, CS = cubic, SG = Fm bar{3} m). An MgO buffer layer grown near 650°C at the film-substrate interface was found to be essential to achieving reasonable long-range atomic order. Grazing-angle x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and electron diffraction analyses as well as transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the interface abruptness, smoothness, and general crystallinity of the individual layers. Interdiffusion between MgO and Cu2O near interfacial regions places a limit of 250°C on the growth temperature for fabrication of superlattices with reasonably sharp interfaces.

  3. Magnetic structure of holmium-yttrium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; Cowley, R.A.;

    1993-01-01

    that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity: the structural coherence length parallel to the growth direction is typically almost-equal-to 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined and extend over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were......We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of a series of holmium-yttrium superlattices and a 5000 angstrom film of holmium, all grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution x-ray diffraction with detailed modeling, we show...... determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The moments on the Ho3+ ions in the superlattices form a basal-plane helix. From an analysis of the superlattice structure factors of the primary magnetic satellites, we are able to determine separately the contributions made by the holmium and yttrium...

  4. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1996-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is theoretically and experimentally investigated. We identify the experimental conditions for the observation of interwell excitons and find a distinct excitonic state energetically located between the Is exciton ...

  5. Polyadic Cantor superlattices with variable lacunarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggard, D L; Jaggard, A D

    1997-02-01

    Reflection and transmission properties of polyadic fractal superlattices are formulated, solved analytically, and characterized for variations in stage of growth, fractal dimension, and lacunarity. This is the first time to our knowledge that the effect of lacunarity on wave interactions with such structures has been considered. The results are summarized by families of reflection data that we denote twist plots. A new doubly recursive computational technique efficiently provides the reflection and transmission coefficients for a large class of Cantor superlattices with numerous interfaces.

  6. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINChang; ZHANGXiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in supedattices.

  7. HgTe-CdTe SUPERLATTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D; Mcgill, T.

    1984-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic properties of HgTe-CdTe superlattices. The band gap as a function of layer thickness, effective masses normal to the layer plane and tunneling length are compared to the corresponding (Hg, Cd)Te alloys. We find that the superlattice possesses a number of properties that may make it superior to the corresponding alloy as an infrared material.

  8. Controllable spin and valley polarized current through a superlattice of normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Z.; Hajati, Y.; Rezaeipour, S.; Baher, S.

    2017-02-01

    The spin and valley transports in a superlattice of normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction are studied theoretically. Transport properties in particular valley-resolved conductance, spin and valley polarization have been computed by the Landauer Buttiker formula. We achieve fully valley and spin polarized current in the superlattice N/F/N structure. Our findings also imply that by increasing the number of ferromagnetic barriers, the onset of fully spin and valley polarized current always occur for lower values of staggered potential(Δz/E) and length of the ferromagnetic region (Kf L) in the silicene supelattice structure as compared with N/F/N silicene junction. Fully spin and valley polarizations make silicene superlattice a suitable candidate for spin-valleytronics applications.

  9. Wannier-Stark localization and terahertz electroluminescence of natural SiC superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankin, V. I.; Andrianov, A. V.; Petrov, A. G.; Zakhar' in, A. O. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    We report on efficient terahertz electroluminescence in the region of 1.5-2 THz from high electric field biased 6H-SiC n{sup +}−n{sup −}−n{sup +} structures with a natural superlattice at 7 K. The properties of the terahertz emission allow it to be attributed to spontaneous radiation resulting from electron Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattice. The use of the unique object, namely, natural superlattice of SiC allowed us to demonstrate a whole series of remarkable effects of Wannier-Stark localization and to get the intensive terahertz emission under steady-state electrical excitation of Bloch oscillations.

  10. Recurrent solar jets in active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Archontis, V; Gontikakis, C; 10.1051/0004-6361/200913752

    2010-01-01

    We study the emergence of a toroidal flux tube into the solar atmosphere and its interaction with a pre-existing field of an active region. We investigate the emission of jets as a result of repeated reconnection events between colliding magnetic fields. We perform 3D simulations by solving the time-dependent, resistive MHD equations in a highly stratified atmosphere. A small active region field is constructed by the emergence of a toroidal magnetic flux tube. A current structure is build up and reconnection sets in when new emerging flux comes into contact with the ambient field of the active region. The topology of the magnetic field around the current structure is drastically modified during reconnection. The modification results in a formation of new magnetic systems that eventually collide and reconnect. We find that reconnection jets are taking place in successive recurrent phases in directions perpendicular to each other, while in each phase they release magnetic energy and hot plasma into the solar at...

  11. Temperature-Dependent X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Infrared Superlattices Grown by MBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Reyner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained-layer superlattices (SLSs are an active research topic in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and infrared focal plane array communities. These structures undergo a >500 K temperature change between deposition and operation. As a result, the lattice constants of the substrate and superlattice are expected to change by approximately 0.3%, and at approximately the same rate. However, we present the first temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements of SLS material on GaSb and show that the superlattice does not contract in the same manner as the substrate. In both InAs/InAs0.65Sb0.35 and In0.8Ga0.2As/InAs0.65Sb0.35 SLS structures, the apparent out-of-plane strain states of the superlattices switch from tensile at deposition to compressive at operation. These changes have ramifications for material characterization, defect generation, carrier lifetime, and overall device performance of superlattices grown by MBE.

  12. Strong reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in superlattices and quantum dot superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, V. M.; Nika, D. L.; Cocemasov, A. I.; Isacova, C. I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal transport is theoretically investigated in the planar Si/Ge superlattices and Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices. The phonon states in the considered nanostructures are obtained using the Face-centered Cubic Cell model of lattice dynamics. A significant reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is revealed in both considered structures in a wide range of temperatures from 100 K to 400 K. This effect is explained by the removal of the high-energy and high-velocity phonon modes from the heat flux due to their localization in superlattice segments and the phonon scattering on the interfaces. The obtained results show prospects of the planar superlattices and quantum-dot superlattices for thermoelectric and thermo-insulating applications.

  13. Direct spectroscopic identification of the magnetic structure of the interface of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.L., E-mail: clchen@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institutes of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Dong, C.L., E-mail: dong.cl@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chern, G. [Department of Physics, National Chung-Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Kumar, K. [Department of Science, Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT Dublin), Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Lin, H.J.; Chen, C.T. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, C.L. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan (China); Fujimori, A. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of interfacial layer of superlattices is studied with XAS. • Magnetic property of interface in superlattices is studied by XMCD. • Antiparallel coupling between two ferrimagnetic layers is characterized. • MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-like interface formed in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} superlattices is identified. • Interfacial layer critically affects the magnetic properties of the superlattices. - Abstract: In this study, Fe and Mn L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) are performed on a series of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} superlattices with various layer thicknesses to investigate the effect of the interface on the magnetic properties of the superlattices. XAS and XMCD spectral analyses indicate the presence of antiparallel interlayer magnetic coupling between the layers of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which are both ferrimagnetic, in the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} superlattices. Results suggest that interlayer magnetic coupling between the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in the superlattice is affected by the magnetic property of the interface region. The magnetic response of the superlattices is dominated by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at high Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer thicknesses and by the interface as the thickness declines. Findings reveal the formation of an interface that is likely composed of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The interface critically influences the magnetic properties of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} superlattices.

  14. Ultrasound focusing images in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukihiro; Tamura, Shin-ichiro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-03-04

    We study theoretically ultrasound focusing in periodic multilayered structures, or superlattices, by solving the wave equation with the Green function method and calculating the transmitted ultrasound amplitude images of both the longitudinal and transverse modes. The constituent layers assumed are elastically isotropic but the periodically stacked structure is anisotropic. Thus anisotropy of ultrasound propagation is predicted even at low frequencies and it is enhanced significantly at higher frequencies due to the zone-folding effect of acoustic dispersion relations. An additional effect studied is the interference of ultrasound (known as the internal diffraction), which can be recognized when the propagation distance is comparable to the ultrasound wavelength. Numerical examples are developed for millimetre-scale Al/polymer multilayers used recently for imaging experiment with surface acoustic waves. (author)

  15. PHASE TRANSITION PROPERTIES OF A TWO COMPONENT FINITE MAGNETIC SUPERLATTICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIAO-GUANG; LIU NING-NING; PAN SHAO-HUA; YANG GUO-ZHEN

    2000-01-01

    We study an (l, n) finite superlattice, which consists of two alternative magnetic materials(components) of l and n atomic layers, respectively. Based on the Ising model, we examine the phase transition properties of the magnetic superlattice. By transfer matrix method we derive the equation for Curie temperature of the superlattice. Numerical results are obtained for the dependence of Curie temperature on the thickness and exchange constants of the superlattice.

  16. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K V [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  17. Magnetic Energy Spectra in Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, Valentyna

    2010-01-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) of different flare rate observed at the solar disk center from January 1997 until December 2006 are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to the flare productivity. Data from {\\it SOHO}/MDI instrument recorded in the high resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs of higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, $\\alpha$, of the energy spectrum, $E(k) \\sim k^{-\\alpha}$, and the total spectral energy $W=\\int E(k)dk$ are comparably correlated with the flare index, $A$, of an active region. The correlations are found to be stronger than that found between the flare index and total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of $\\alpha$ and $W$ as $A=10^b (\\alpha W)^c$, with $b=-7.92 \\pm 0.58$ and $c=1.85 \\pm 0.13$. We found ...

  18. Anisotropy in layered half-metallic Heusler alloy superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadani, Javad G.; Munira, Kamaram; Sivakumar, Chockalingam; Butler, William H. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Romero, Jonathon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Ma, Jianhua; Ghosh, Avik W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We show that when two Heusler alloys are layered in the [001], [110], or [111] directions for various thicknesses to form a superlattice, the Slater-Pauling rule may still be satisfied and the resulting superlattice is often half-metallic with gaps comparable to or larger than those of its constituents. In addition, uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is induced because of the differences in the electronic structure of the two Heuslers in the superlattice. Various full-full, full-half, and half-half Heusler superlattices are studied, and potential half-metallic superlattices with perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy are identified.

  19. Magnetic properties of rare earth superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, C J T

    2001-01-01

    Single-crystal Tm/Y and Tm/Lu superlattices have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their chemical structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction. Magnetisation measurements have revealed a more complicated phase diagram than that of pure Tm. Application of a field along the c-direction gave rise to an extra transition, and transitions were detected for the superlattices when the field was applied along the b-axis. In neutron diffraction studies, c-axis longitudinally modulated magnetic structures were found for both Tm/Y and Tm/Lu, which propagate coherently through the non-magnetic layers. In the case of Tm/Lu superlattices, there is evidence for ordering of the basal plane components.

  20. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Aliasghar

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig-Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  1. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, Aliasghar, E-mail: aashokri@tpnu.ac.ir

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig–Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  2. Ballistic miniband conduction in a graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Menyoung; Wallbank, John R.; Gallagher, Patrick; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-09-01

    Rational design of long-period artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids. The moiré pattern in highly aligned graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures is a lateral superlattice with high electron mobility and an unusual electronic dispersion whose miniband edges and saddle points can be reached by electrostatic gating. We investigated the dynamics of electrons in moiré minibands by measuring ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic field, known as the transverse electron focusing effect. At low temperatures, we observed caustics of skipping orbits extending over hundreds of superlattice periods, reversals of the cyclotron revolution for successive minibands, and breakdown of cyclotron motion near van Hove singularities. At high temperatures, electron-electron collisions suppress focusing. Probing such miniband conduction properties is a necessity for engineering novel transport behaviors in superlattice devices.

  3. Energy Band Calculations for Maximally Even Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Richard; Byrd, Jason

    2007-03-01

    Superlattices are multiple-well, semiconductor heterostructures that can be described by one-dimensional potential wells separated by potential barriers. We refer to a distribution of wells and barriers based on the theory of maximally even sets as a maximally even superlattice. The prototypical example of a maximally even set is the distribution of white and black keys on a piano keyboard. Black keys may represent wells and the white keys represent barriers. As the number of wells and barriers increase, efficient and stable methods of calculation are necessary to study these structures. We have implemented a finite-element method using the discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) to calculate E versus k for these superlattices. Use of the FE-DVR method greatly reduces the amount of calculation necessary for the eigenvalue problem.

  4. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  5. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Ferreira, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov–Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born–von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov–Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  6. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Ferreira, W P; Farias, G A; Ferreira, R

    2017-04-26

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  7. Theory of Semiconducting Superlattices and Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Core excitons ir. superlattices We have developed the first theory of Hjalmarsor.- Frenke ’ core excitons in superlattices, and applied it to strained...technique has been described are accelerated. A kinetic tempcrature TK is defined as by Kirkpatrick et al.31 and uses thr Monte Carlo algo- the average...classical kinetic energy of the atoms, rithm of Metropolis et al.32 Monte Carlo steps are taken 3/2kTK=(l/N)4rn’mlv,, where i=1,2, . . . ,n is the

  8. FABRICATION OF PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WITH SUPERLATTICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng; Chen Haihua; Zhang Jizhong; Wei Hongmei; Gu Zhongze

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique was used to fabricate three-dimensional photonic crystals with superlattices. The super structure was fabricated by assembling monodispersed microspheres in the grooves of the scales of morpho butterfly, which makes the photonic crystal being composed of two kinds of different photonic structures (natural groove structure of butterfly wing and artificial microspherical colloids arrangement). The superstructural photonic crystal exhibits some unique optical properties different from both the butterfly wing and the colloidal crystal. The approach exhibited here provides a new way for fabricate photonic crystals with superlattices.

  9. Tunneling in quantum superlattices with variable lacunarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatoro, Francisco R. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Monsoriu, Juan A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jmonsori@fis.upv.es

    2008-05-19

    Fractal superlattices are composite, aperiodic structures comprised of alternating layers of two semiconductors following the rules of a fractal set. The scattering properties of polyadic Cantor fractal superlattices with variable lacunarity are determined. The reflection coefficient as a function of the particle energy and the lacunarity parameter present tunneling curves, which may be classified as vertical, arc, and striation nulls. Approximate analytical formulae for such curves are derived using the transfer matrix method. Comparison with numerical results shows good accuracy. The new results may be useful in the development of band-pass energy filters for electrons, semiconductor solar cells, and solid-state radiation sources up to THz frequencies.

  10. Resonant x-ray scattering in perovskite manganite superlattice. Observation of 'orbital superlattice'

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyama, T; Ohsumi, H; Murakami, Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Izumi, M; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) measurement of superlattices which consist of La sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 5 MnO sub 3 and La sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 0 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 0 MnO sub 3 multilayers. An interference technique made it possible to observe RXS reflections from ferro-type orbital ordering in the superlattices. RXS can reveal the local circumstances around specific atoms in materials regulated atomically. In this experiment, we observed that the superlattice is actually composed of two kinds of layers with different lattice distortion states, presenting 'orbital superlattices', in which layers with different orbital states are stacked alternately in an atomic scale. (author)

  11. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  12. Complex Network for Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Farhad; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we developed a complex network of solar active regions (ARs) to study various local and global properties of the network. The values of the Hurst exponent (0.8-0.9) were evaluated by both the detrended fluctuation analysis and the rescaled range analysis applied on the time series of the AR numbers. The findings suggest that ARs can be considered as a system of self-organized criticality (SOC). We constructed a growing network based on locations, occurrence times, and the lifetimes of 4227 ARs recorded from 1999 January 1 to 2017 April 14. The behavior of the clustering coefficient shows that the AR network is not a random network. The logarithmic behavior of the length scale has the characteristics of a so-called small-world network. It is found that the probability distribution of the node degrees for undirected networks follows the power law with exponents of about 3.7-4.2. This indicates the scale-free nature of the AR network. The scale-free and small-world properties of the AR network confirm that the system of ARs forms a system of SOC. Our results show that the occurrence probability of flares (classified by GOES class C> 5, M, and X flares) in the position of the AR network hubs takes values greater than that obtained for other nodes.

  13. Interface bands in carbon nanotube superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskolski, W.; Pelc, M. [Instytut Fizyki UMK, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Santos, H.; Chico, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ayuela, A. [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales (Facultad de Quimicas), and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), 20080 Donostia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    We study the electronic band structure of several carbon nanotube superlattices built of two kinds of intermolecular junctions: (12, 0)/(6, 6) and (8, 0)/(14, 0). In particular, we focus on the energy bands originating from interface states. We find that in case of the metallic (12, 0)/(6, 6) superlattices, the interface bands change periodically their character from bonding- to antibonding-like vs. increasing length of the (6, 6) tube. We show that these changes are related to the decay of the charge density Friedel oscillations in the metallic (6, 6) tube. However, when we explore other chiralities without rotational symmetry, no changes in bondingantibonding character are observed for semiconductor superlattices, as exemplified in the case of (8, 0)/(14, 0) superlattices. Our results indicate that unless metallic tubes are employed in the junctions, the bonding-antibonding crossings are not present (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Role of Ge Switch in Phase Transition: Approach using Atomically Controlled GeTe/Sb2Te3 Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Juniji; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander; Shima, Takayuki; Chong, Tow Chong; Zhao, Rong; Koon Lee, Hock; Shi, Luping

    2008-07-01

    Germanium-antimony-tellurite (GST) is a very attractive material not only for rewritable optical media but also for realizing solid state devices. Recently, the study of the switching mechanism between the amorphous and crystal states has actively been carried out experimentally and theoretically. Now, the role of the flip-flop transition of a Ge atom in a distorted simple-cubic unit cell is the center of discussion. Turning our viewpoint towards a much wider region beyond a unit cell, we can understand that GeSbTe consists of two units: one is a Sb2Te3 layer and the other is a Ge2Te2 layer. On the based of this simple model, we fabricated the superlattice of GST alloys and estimated their thermal properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this paper, we discuss the proof of the Ge switch on the basis of thermo-histories.

  15. Effective negative refractive index in ferromagnet-semiconductor superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkanyan, Roland H; Niarchos, Dimitris G

    2006-06-12

    Problem of anomalous refraction of electromagnetic waves is analyzed in a superlattice which consists of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and nonmagnetic semiconductor. Effective permittivity and permeability tensors are derived in the presence of an external magnetic field parallel to the plane of the layers. It is shown that in the case of the Voigt configuration, the structure behaves as a left-handed medium with respect to TE-type polarized wave, in the low-frequency region of propagation. The relative orientation of the Poynting vector and the refractive wave vector is examined in different frequency ranges. It is shown that the frequency region of existence for the backward mode can be changed using external magnetic field as tuning parameter.

  16. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R., E-mail: shane.johnson@asu.edu [Center for Photonics Innovation and School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Steenbergen, E. H. [U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXAN, Wright Patterson, Ohio 45433 (United States); Synowicki, R. A. [J. A. Woollam Co., Inc., 645 M. Street, Suite 102, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  17. Regional characteristics, opportunity perception and entrepreneurial activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuetzer, Michael; Obschonka, Martin; Brixy, Udo

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to better understand the link between regional characteristics and individual entrepreneurship. We combine individual-level Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data for Western Germany with regional-level data, using multilevel analysis to test our hypotheses. We find no direct link...

  18. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  19. Exchange bias in Fe/Cr double superlattices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. S.; Felcher, G. P.; Inomata, A.; Goyette, R.; Nelson, C.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30

    Utilizing the oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Cr superlattices, we have constructed ''double superlattice'' structures where a ferromagnetic (F) and an antiferromagnetic (AF) Fe/Cr superlattice are coupled through a Cr spacer. The minor hysteresis loops in the magnetization are shifted from zero field, i.e., the F superlattice is exchange biased by the AF one. The double superlattices are sputter-deposited with (211) epitaxy and possess uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of the bias field is satisfactorily described by the classic formula for collinear spin structures. The coherent structure and insensitivity to atomic-scale roughness makes it possible to determine the spin distribution by polarized neutron reflectivity, which confirms that the spin structure is collinear. The magnetic reversal behavior of the double superlattices suggests that a realistic model of exchange bias needs to address the process of nucleating local reverse domains.

  20. Dimensional control of cobalt spin state in oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Woon; Choi, W. S.; Okamoto, S.; Sohn, C. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Lee, H. N.; Kim, K. W.; Moon, S. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2013-03-01

    Perovskite cobalt oxide is a very intriguing system with various spin states owing to the delicate balance between crystal field splitting and Hund exchange energy. In this talk, we show that its spin state can be altered through dimensional control, enabled by digital synthesis of perovskite cobalt oxide superlattices. We employed a few unit cells of LaCoO3 as an active magnetic layer, separated by LaAlO3 spacer layer. High quality [(LaCoO3) n (LaAlO3) n ]8 (n = 2, 6, and 10) superlattices were fabricated using pulsed laser epitaxy. Spectroscopic tools including x-ray absorption spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy revealed clear evolution of the electronic structure and resultant spin state by changing dimensionality. Specifically, the spin state changed from a high to a low spin state with a larger optical band gap, as the dimension reduced from 3D to 2D. Dynamic mean field calculation supported the critical role of dimensionality on the spin state and electronic structure of LaCoO3.

  1. Broadband Midwave Infrared InAs/GaSb Superlattice Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Russell; Provence, Sydney; Norton, Dennis; Prineas, John; Boggess, Thomas

    Broadband (3.0 μm to 5.0 μm) emission is reported from InAs/GaSb superlattice light-emitting diodes grown via molecular beam epitaxy . Stacked active regions, each with a different emission wavelength, were connected with tunnel junctions, resulting in multiple emission wavelengths in a monolithic structure. Eight active regions provided eight overlapping emission spectra, simulating a broadband spectrum. Chips with mesas of sizes ranging from 24 μm x 24 μm to 400 μm x 400 μm were fabricated and wire bonded to a leadless chip carrier (LCC). The LCC was mounted in a liquid nitrogen cryostat. At low input currents, distinct peaks were observed at 3.3 μm, 3.6 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.2 μm, 4.5 μm, 4.9 μm, and 5.3 μm. At high input currents a continuous spectrum was observed with a peak near 3.8 μm and with a full-width at half-maximum of 1.42 μm. In quasi-continuous operation at 77 K, radiances exceeding 0.35 W/cm2-sr in a Lambertian profile were achieved. Current dependent electroluminescent spectra measured at liquid nitrogen temperatures demonstrate the blending of the various colors from each stage into one smooth spectrum at high currents.

  2. Enhancing Carrier Injection Using Graded Superlattice Electron Blocking Layer for UVB Light-Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2014-12-01

    We have studied enhanced carrier injection by having an electron blocking layer (EBL) based on a graded superlattice (SL) design. Here, we examine, using a selfconsistent 6 × 6 k.p method, the energy band alignment diagrams under equilibrium and forward bias conditions while also considering carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates). The graded SL is based on AlxGa1-xN (larger bandgap) Al0:5Ga0:5N (smaller bandgap) SL, where x is changed from 0.8 to 0.56 in steps of 0.06. Graded SL was found to be effective in reducing electron leakage and enhancing hole injection into the active region. Due to our band engineering scheme for EBL, four orders-of-magnitude enhancement were observed in the direct recombination rate, as compared with the conventional bulk EBL consisting of Al0:8Ga0:2N. An increase in the spatial overlap of carrier wavefunction was obtained due to polarization-induced band bending in the active region. An efficient single quantum-well ultraviolet-B light-emitting diode was designed, which emits at 280 nm. This is the effective wavelength for water disinfection application, among others.

  3. Strain compensated superlattices on m-plane gallium nitride by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Bonef, Bastien; Young, Erin C.; Nookala, Nishant; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Speck, James S.

    2017-08-01

    The results of tensile strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and compressive strained InGaN/GaN superlattices (SLs) grown by Ammonia MBE (NH3-MBE) are presented. A combination of atom probe tomography and high-resolution X-ray diffraction confirms that periodic heterostructures of high crystallographic quality are achieved. Strain induced misfit dislocations (MDs), however, are revealed by cathodoluminescence (CL) of the strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and InGaN/GaN structures. MDs in the active region of a device are a severe problem as they act as non-radiative charge recombination centers, affecting the reliability and efficiency of the device. Strain compensated SL structures are subsequently developed, composed of alternating layers of tensile strained AlGaN and compressively strained InGaN. CL reveals the absence of MDs in such structures, demonstrating that strain compensation offers a viable route towards MD free active regions in III-Nitride SL based devices.

  4. Statistical analysis of acoustic wave parameters near active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, M Cristina Rabello; Scherrer, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyse the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call `nearby regions'), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disc locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring diagram analysis of all active regions observed by HMI during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhancement (the `acoustic halo effect') is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes...

  5. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  6. The dependence of the tunneling characteristic on the electronic energy bands and the carrier’s states of Graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Shen, G. Z.; Ao, Z. M.; Xu, Y. W.

    2016-09-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the carrier tunneling properties in graphene superlattice generated by the Thue-Morse sequence and Kolakoski sequence are investigated. The positions and strength of the transmission can be modulated by the barrier structures, the incident energy and angle, the height and width of the potential. These carriers tunneling characteristic can be understood from the energy band structures in the corresponding superlattice systems and the carrier’s states in well/barriers. The transmission peaks above the critical incident angle rely on the carrier’s resonance in the well regions. The structural diversity can modulate the electronic and transport properties, thus expanding its applications.

  7. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    OpenAIRE

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss r...

  8. Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Brooks, David H.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Williams, David R.; Harra, Hirohisa

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track t...

  9. Superlattices: problems and new opportunities, nanosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Superlattices were introduced 40 years ago as man-made solids to enrich the class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The field metamorphosed to quantum wells and quantum dots, with ever decreasing dimensions dictated by the technological advancements in nanometer regime. In recent years, the field has gone beyond semiconductors to metals and organic solids. Superlattice is simply a way of forming a uniform continuum for whatever purpose at hand. There are problems with doping, defect-induced random switching, and I/O involving quantum dots. However, new opportunities in component-based nanostructures may lead the field of endeavor to new heights. The all important translational symmetry of solids is relaxed and local symmetry is needed in nanosolids.

  10. Ultrafast structural dynamics of perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Zhavoronkov, N.; Elsaesser, T. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany); Bargheer, M. [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond X-ray diffraction provides direct insight into the ultrafast reversible lattice dynamics of materials with a perovskite structure. Superlattice (SL) structures consisting of a sequence of nanometer-thick layer pairs allow for optically inducing a tailored stress profile that drives the lattice motions and for limiting the influence of strain propagation on the observed dynamics. We demonstrate this concept in a series of diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution, giving detailed information on the ultrafast lattice dynamics of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic superlattices. Anharmonically coupled lattice motions in a SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SRO/PZT) SL lead to a switch-off of the electric polarizations on a time scale of the order of 1 ps. Ultrafast magnetostriction of photoexcited SRO layers is demonstrated in a SRO/SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) SL. (orig.)

  11. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  12. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  13. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  14. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  15. Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C L Roy

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to report a study of tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices (SSL); specially, we have analysed diverse features of transmission coefficient of SSL. The SSL we have considered is Ga0.7Al0.3As–GaAs which has been drawing considerable attention during the recent past on account of some typical features of its band structure. We have indicated how our results would help fabrication of ultra high speed devices.

  16. Dynamic square superlattice of Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Tuckerman, Laurette

    2014-11-01

    Faraday waves are computed in a 3D container using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. A new dynamic superlattice pattern is described which consists of a set of square waves arranged in a two-by-two array. The corners of this array are connected by a bridge whose position oscillates in time between the two diagonals.

  17. Space-weather MDI Active Region Patches (SMARPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobra, Monica

    2017-08-01

    We are developing a new data product from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) called Space-weather MDI Active Region Patches (SMARPs). The SMARP data series provide maps of the photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations, or active regions, for their entire lifetime. These concentrations are automatically detected in the photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field data using a method described in Turmon et al. (2010) and, thus, are necessarily different from NOAA's definition of an active region. As such, these regions are assigned their own identification number, or SMARP number, which is also linked to a NOAA active region number should it exist. In addition, keywords in the SMARP data series include parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic field distribution. These parameters may be useful for active region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. These parameters are calculated per patch and are available on a 96 minute cadence.The SMARP data product is designed to provide seamless coverage with its counterpart, the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARPs), described in Bobra et al. (2014). Together, the SMARP and SHARP data series provide continuous coverage of tracked active regions for two solar cycles from 1996 to the present day. The SMARP data series, which runs from April 1996 to October 2010, contains 9496 unique active regions tracked throughout their lifetime. The SHARP data series, which runs from May 2010 to the present day, contains (as of May 30, 2017) 3883 unique active regions tracked throughout their lifetime. In addition, the two series contain 118 unique active regions during the overlap period between May and October 2010. SMARP data will be available at jsoc.stanford.edu and the photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field maps will be available in either of two different coordinate

  18. Global Dynamics of Subsurface Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Jouve, L; Aulanier, G

    2012-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced in the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an \\Omega-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to the ones of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We moreover emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call "magnetic necklace" and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also ...

  19. SDO/HMI survey of emerging active regions for helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Schunker, H; Birch, A C; Burston, R B; Gizon, L

    2016-01-01

    Observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have the potential for allowing the helioseismic study of the formation of hundreds of active regions, which would enable us to perform statistical analyses. Our goal is to collate a uniform data set of emerging active regions observed by the SDO/HMI instrument suitable for helioseismic analysis up to seven days before emergence. We restricted the sample to active regions that were visible in the continuum and emerged into quiet Sun largely avoiding pre-existing magnetic regions. As a reference data set we paired a control region (CR), with the same latitude and distance from central meridian, with each emerging active region (EAR). We call this data set, which is currently comprised of 105 emerging active regions observed between May 2010 and November 2012, the SDO Helioseismic Emerging Active Region (SDO/HEAR) survey. To demonstrate the utility of a data set of a large number of emerging active regions, we measure the relative east-west velocity of the ...

  20. MBE growth and characterisation of light rare-earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy growth techniques which have already successfully produced a range of heavy rare-earth superlattices have now been extended to produce superlattices of two light rare-earth elements, Nd/Pr, as well as superlattices and alloy films of a heavy/light system, Ho/Pr. High......-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis shows the Nd/Pr superlattices to be of high structural quality, while the Ho/Pr superlattices are significantly less so. In the Ho/Pr superlattices, Pr is found to retain its bulk dhcp crystal structure even in thin layers (down to 6 atomic planes thick) sandwiched between...... thick layers of hcp Ho. In addition, neutron diffraction studies of the He/Pr superlattices have shown that the helical Ho magnetic order is not coherent through the dhcp Pr layers, in contrast to previous hcp/hcp superlattices Ho/Y, Ho/Lu and Ho/Er. The series of Ho:Pr alloy films has shown structural...

  1. Wave-function reconstruction in a graded semiconductor superlattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Meinhold, D.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstruct a test wave function in a strongly coupled, graded well-width superlattice by resolving the spatial extension of the interband polarisation and deducing the wave function employing non-linear optical spectroscopy. The graded gap superlattice allows us to precisely control the dista...

  2. Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Levin, Rebecca L.; Sass, Sarah M.; Heller, Wendy; Gregory A. Miller

    2008-01-01

    Depression and anxiety often involve high levels of trait anger and disturbances in anger expression. Reported anger experience and outward anger expression have recently been associated with left-biased asymmetry of frontal cortical activity, assumed to reflect approach motivation. However, different styles of anger expression could presumably involve different brain mechanisms and/or interact with psychopathology to produce various patterns of brain asymmetry. The present study explored the...

  3. Tailored inter and intra layer exchange coupled superlattices for optimized magnetocaloric effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Michalski, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2012-02-01

    We explore Magnetocaloric (MC) properties of Fe/Cr superlattices with tailored inter- and intra-layer interaction using simple 3d metals. Our multilayers are fabricated by pulsed-laser deposition with emphasis on maximizing magnetic entropy changes near room temperature. NanostructuringootnotetextT. Mukherjee, S. Sahoo, R. Skomski, D. J. Sellmyer, and Ch. Binek, Phys. Rev. B 79, 144406 (2009). allows tailoring ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling. This in concert with finite size scaling of the ferromagnetic Fe films has the potential to lead to optimized MC materials. Thermodynamic and MC properties of such Fe/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Entropy changes are deduced via the Maxwell relation in single phase regions, X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties.

  4. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  5. Performance degradation of superlattice MOSFETs due to scattering in the contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pengyu; Huang, Jun Z.; Jiang, Zhengping; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Povolotskyi, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Ideal, completely coherent quantum transport calculations had predicted that superlattice MOSFETs (SL-MOSFET) may offer steep subthreshold swing performance below 60 mV/dec to around 39 mV/dec. However, the high carrier density in the superlattice source suggests that scattering may significantly degrade the ideal device performance. Such effects of electron scattering and decoherence in the contacts of SL-MOSFETs are examined through a multi-scale quantum transport model developed in NEMO5. This model couples the NEGF-based quantum ballistic transport in the channel to a quantum mechanical density of states dominated reservoir, which is thermalized through strong scattering with local quasi-Fermi levels determined by drift-diffusion transport. The simulations show that scattering increases the electron transmission in the nominally forbidden minigap, therefore, degrading the subthreshold swing (S.S.) and the ON/OFF DC current ratio. This degradation varies with both the scattering rate and the length of the scattering dominated regions. Different SL-MOSFET designs are explored to mitigate the effects of such deleterious scattering. Specifically, shortening the spacer region between the superlattice and the channel from 3.5 nm to 0 nm improves the simulated S.S. from 51 mV/dec. to 40 mV/dec.

  6. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...

  7. Plasmon nanoparticle superlattices as optical-frequency magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-07-02

    Nanocrystal superlattices have emerged as a new platform for bottom-up metamaterial design, but their optical properties are largely unknown. Here, we investigate their emergent optical properties using a generalized semi-analytic, full-field solver based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Attention is given to superlattices composed of noble metal and dielectric nanoparticles in unary and binary arrays. By varying the nanoparticle size, shape, separation, and lattice geometry, we demonstrate the broad tunability of superlattice optical properties. Superlattices composed of spherical or octahedral nanoparticles in cubic and AB(2) arrays exhibit magnetic permeabilities tunable between 0.2 and 1.7, despite having non-magnetic constituents. The retrieved optical parameters are nearly polarization and angle-independent over a broad range of incident angles. Accordingly, nanocrystal superlattices behave as isotropic bulk metamaterials. Their tunable permittivities, permeabilities, and emergent magnetism may enable new, bottom-up metamaterials and negative index materials at visible frequencies.

  8. Transverse magnetic mode along THz waveguides with biased superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceituno, P. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: paceitun@ull.es; Hernandez-Cabrera, A. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain); Vasko, F.T. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS Ukraine, Pr. Nauki 41, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine)

    2008-05-15

    We study the propagation of transverse magnetic modes arising from a waveguide consisting on a GaAs-based superlattice located at vacuum-dielectric interface. The transverse mode is generated by the ultrafast intersubband response of the superlattice subjected to a high-frequency electric field. The superlattice is also subjected to a homogeneous bias potential to get a biased superlattice with equipopulated levels. The heterostructure is analyzed through the tight-binding approximation, and considering the level broadening caused by different scattering processes (homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms). We pay special attention to the dispersion relations of the complex dielectric permittivity because of real and imaginary parts of this function play a key role in wide miniband superlattices.

  9. Theory of silicon superlattices - Electronic structure and enhanced mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, J. A.; Krishnamurthy, S.

    1983-01-01

    A realistic tight-binding band-structure model of silicon superlattices is formulated and used to study systems of potential applied interest, including periodic layered Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterostructures. The results suggest a possible new mechanism for achieving enhanced transverse carrier mobility in such structures: reduced transverse conductivity effective masses associated with the superlattice band structure. For electrons in 100-line-oriented superlattices, a reduced conductivity mass arises intrinsically from the lower symmetry of the superlattice and its unique effect on the indirect bulk silicon band gap. An order of magnitude estimate of the range of mobility enhancement expected from this mechanism appears to be consistent with preliminary experimental results on Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) superlattices.

  10. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR REGIONAL INNOVATION ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Lukyanova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues of human resource development regarding an innovation activity. Concepts of labor and human resources have been surveyed. An integral index for assessment of human resources for regional innovation activity has been developed and assessment of the Russian regions has been made on the basis of it. Development tendencies of modern human resources for innovation activity in Russia have been revealed.

  12. Strong Earthquake Activity and Its Relation to Regional Neotectonic Movement in Sichuan-Yunnan Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Youjin; Qin Jiazheng

    2001-01-01

    Based on analyzing space inhomogeneous image of strong earthquake activity, the image of source rupture and the mechanical property of the source fault in Sichuan-Yunnan region, the relations among the strong earthquake activity, active fault, modern movement status of active blocks and structural background of the deep media have been discussed, and the characteristics of strong earthquake activity and possible mechanism have been also discussed.

  13. Enhancement of radiation tolerance with the use of a doping superlattice solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Michael A.; Forbes, David V.; Hubbard, Seth M.

    2014-03-01

    Solar cells utilizing doping superlattices in the active region of the device have been proposed as an alternative design to increase radiation hardness. Multiple diodes are connected together in parallel, where each diode can be as thin or thick as the design requires. Thinning the doped layers reduces the diffusion length requirements ensuring efficient carrier collection and maintenance of short circuit current. Experimental comparisons between nipi and a conventional pin solar cells that were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at fluences from 4x1014 to 2x1015 e-/cm2 show much more efficient maintenance of efficiency for the nipi design, maintaining nearly 100% efficiency up to a final dose of 2x1015 e-/cm2. Further simulations have indicated that the efficient maintenance of voltage and fill factor are likely due to traps created in the nipi solar cell during the fabrication process. Beginning of life voltage and efficiency values can be improved significantly by limiting the trap density, while this has a minor impact on the efficiency comparison between a nipi and conventional device with respect to radiation.

  14. Determinants of Foreign Technological Activity in German Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettmann, Eva; Lacasa, Iciar Dominguez; Günther, Jutta;

    This paper analyses the determinants of spatial distribution of foreign technological activity across 96 German regions (1996-2009). We identify foreign inventive activity by applying the ‘cross-border-ownership concept’ to transnational patent applications. The descriptive analysis shows...... that foreign technological activity more than doubled during the observation period with persistent spatial heterogeneity in Germany. Using a pooled count data model, we estimate the effect of various sources for externalities on the extent of foreign technological activity across regions. Our results show...... that foreign technological activity is attracted by technologically specialised sectors of regions. In contrast to existing findings this effect applies both to foreign as well as domestic sources of specialisation. We show that the relation between specialization and foreign technological activity is non...

  15. Phonon thermal transport in silicene-germanene superlattice: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Hong, Yang; Chan, Paddy K. L.; Zhang, Jingchao

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) hybrid materials have drawn enormous attention in thermoelectric applications. In this work, we apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the phonon thermal transport in silicene-germanene superlattice. A non-monotonic thermal conductivity of silicene-germanene superlattice with period length is revealed, which is due to the coherent-incoherent phonon conversion and phonon confinement mechanisms. We also calculate the thermal conductivity of a Si-Ge random mixing monolayer, showing a U-shaped trend. Because of the phonon mode localizations at Ge concentration of 80%, thermal conductivity varies dramatically at low doping regions. By changing the total length (L total), the infinite-length thermal conductivities of pure silicene, pure germanene, silicene-germanene superlattice, and Si-Ge random mixing monolayer are extracted as 16.08, 15.95, 5.60 and 4.47 W/m-K, respectively. The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of the silicene-germanene is also evaluated, showing a small thermal rectification. At L total = 274.7 nm, the TBC of silicene to germanene is 620.49 MW/m2-K, while that of germanene to silicene is 528.76 MW/m2-K.

  16. Stratigraphy of a diamond epitaxial three-dimensional overgrowth using doping superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, F.; Fiori, A.; Araujo, D.; Eon, D.; Villar, M. P.; Bustarret, E.

    2016-05-01

    The selective doped overgrowth of 3D mesa patterns and trenches has become an essential fabrication step of advanced monolithic diamond-based power devices. The methodology here proposed combines the overgrowth of plasma-etched cylindrical mesa structures with the sequential growth of doping superlattices. The latter involve thin heavily boron doped epilayers separating thicker undoped epilayers in a periodic fashion. Besides the classical shape analysis under the scanning electron microscope relying on the appearance of facets corresponding to the main crystallographic directions and their evolution toward slow growing facets, the doping superlattices were used as markers in oriented cross-sectional lamellas prepared by focused ion beam and observed by transmission electron microscopy. This stratigraphic approach is shown here to be applicable to overgrown structures where faceting was not detectable. Intermediate growth directions were detected at different times of the growth process and the periodicity of the superlattice allowed to calculate the growth rates and parameters, providing an original insight into the planarization mechanism. Different configurations of the growth front were obtained for different sample orientations, illustrating the anisotropy of the 3D growth. Dislocations were also observed along the lateral growth fronts with two types of Burger vector: b 01 1 ¯ = /1 2 [ 01 1 ¯ ] and b 112 = /1 6 [ 112 ] . Moreover, the clustering of these extended defects in specific regions of the overgrowth prompted a proposal of two different dislocation generation mechanisms.

  17. Nonlinear THz response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichao; Andersen, David R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the third order THz nonlinear response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices in the presence of an elliptically-polarized excitation field using the time dependent perturbation theory. For a one-dimensional Kronig-Penney potential of infinite length, the nonlinear response can be described perturbatively by a low energy \\mathbf{k}\\centerdot \\mathbf{p} N-photon coupling model. Remarkably, as shown by Burset et al the energy dispersion of the metallic band in the direction parallel to the superlattice wavevector is independent of the applied superlattice potential while the energy dispersion in the direction perpendicular to the superlattice wavevector depends strongly on the superlattice parameters. As a result, we predict novel behavior for the nonlinear response of single layer metallic acGNR superlattices to an applied elliptically-polarized electric field. Our work shows that the superlattice potential, periodicity, Fermi level, excitation field polarization state, and temperature all play a significant role in the resulting THz nonlinear conductances.

  18. Phonon modes of MgB2: super-lattice structures and spectral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarco, Jose A; Chou, Alison; Talbot, Peter C; Mackinnon, Ian D R

    2014-11-28

    Micrometre-sized MgB2 crystals of varying quality, synthesized at low temperature and autogenous pressure, are compared using a combination of Raman and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy. These data, which include new peak positions in both spectroscopies for high quality MgB2, are interpreted using DFT calculations on phonon behaviour for symmetry-related structures. Raman and IR activity additional to that predicted by point group analyses of the P6/mmm symmetry are detected. These additional peaks, as well as the overall shapes of calculated phonon dispersion (PD) models are explained by assuming a double super-lattice, consistent with a lower symmetry structure for MgB2. A 2× super-lattice in the c-direction allows a simple correlation of the pair breaking energy and the superconducting gap by activation of corresponding acoustic frequencies. A consistent physical interpretation of these spectra is obtained when the position of a phonon anomaly defines a super-lattice modulation in the a-b plane.

  19. Transfer Matrix for Fibonacci Dielectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡祥宝

    2001-01-01

    The transfer matrices, which transfer the amplitudes of the electric fields of second- and third-harmonic waves from one side of the interface to the other, are defined for layers joined coherently, and the total transfer matrices for several sequential interfaces can be simply obtained by multiplication of the matrices. Using the transfer matrix method, the interacting processes of second- and third-harmonic waves in a one-dimensional finite Fibonacci dielectric superlattice are investigated. Applying the numerical procedure described in this letter, the dependence of the second- and third-harmonic fields on sample thickness is obtained. The numerical results agree with the quasi-phase-matching theory.

  20. Einstein's Photoemission from Quantum Confined Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 83th Birthday of Late Professor B. R. Nag, D.Sc., formerly Head of the Departments of Radio Physics and Electronics and Electronic Science of the University of Calcutta, a firm believer of the concept of theoretical minimum of Landau and an internationally well known semiconductor physicist, to whom the second author remains ever grateful as a student and research worker from 1974-2004. In this paper, an attempt is made to study, the Einstein's photoemission (EP) from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum well heavily doped superlattices (QWHDSLs) with graded interfaces in the presence of quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion relations within the frame work of k · p formalism. The EP from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum wells of heavily doped effective mass superlattices respectively has been presented under magnetic quantization. Besides the said emissions, from the quantum dots of the aforementioned heavily doped SLs have further investigated for the purpose of comparison and complete investigation in the context of EP from quantum confined superlattices. Using appropriate SLs, it appears that the EP increases with increasing surface electron concentration and decreasing film thickness in spiky manners, which are the characteristic features of such quantized hetero structures. Under magnetic quantization, the EP oscillates with inverse quantizing magnetic field due to Shuvnikov-de Haas effect. The EP increases with increasing photo energy in a step-like manner and the numerical values of EP with all the physical variables are totally band structure dependent for all the cases. The most striking features are that the presence of poles in the dispersion relation of the materials in the absence of band tails create the complex energy spectra in the corresponding HD constituent materials of such quantum confined superlattices and effective electron

  1. Magnetic Bloch oscillations in nanowire superlattice rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, D S

    2004-05-14

    The recent growth of semiconductor nanowire superlattices encourages hope that Bloch-like oscillations in such structures formed into rings may soon be observed in the presence of a time-dependent magnetic flux threading the ring. These magnetic Bloch oscillations are a consequence of Faraday's law; the time-dependent flux produces an electromotive force around the ring, thus leading to the Bloch-like oscillations. In the spectroscopic domain, generalized Wannier-Stark states are found that are manifestations of the emf-induced localization of the states.

  2. Active Pesticide Production Points, Region 9, 2013, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Active Pesticide Producing Establishments in USEPA Region 9 (AZ, CA, HI and NV) that reported production for the year 2013. Pesticide...

  3. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-12-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions (one of them recurrent) inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with other available differently defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in Active Regions NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. The quantity 1/4π{B}n\\cdot{B}p is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear to the difference between the potential (Bp) and the non-potential magnetic field (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density shows clear changes before the powerful solar flares in Active Region NOAA 11158, which is consistent with the change in magnetic fields in the flaring lower atmosphere.

  4. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-01-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with the possible different defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in active region NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. It is noticed that the quantity 1/4pi Bn.Bp is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear on the difference between the potential magnetic field (Bp) and non-potential one (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density changes obviously before the powerful solar flares in the active region NOAA 11158, it is consistent with the change of magnetic fields in the lower atmosphere with flares.

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z. [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Leake, J. E. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Archontis, V. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Linton, M. G. [U.S. Naval Research Lab, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Kliem, B. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  6. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nuruzzaman Haque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1 has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p<0.001. Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP, containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons’ active ageing level in Thailand.

  7. Determinants of Foreign Technological Activity in German Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettmann, Eva; Lacasa, Iciar Dominguez; Günther, Jutta

    This paper analyses the determinants of spatial distribution of foreign technological activity across 96 German regions (1996-2009). We identify foreign inventive activity by applying the ‘cross-border-ownership concept’ to transnational patent applications. The descriptive analysis shows......-linear and that it is influenced by sectoral heterogeneity. Externalities related to technological diversification attract foreign R&D only into ‘higher order’ regions....

  8. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Nuruzzaman Haque

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male...

  9. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  10. Influence of Deviation on Optical Transmission through Aperiodic Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hai-Long; YANG Xiang-Bo; LAN Sheng; HU Wei

    2007-01-01

    We propose a deviation model and study the influences of the relative error and sensitivity of a machine on the transmission coefficients (TCs) of Fibonacci superlattices. It is found that for a system with fewer layers, the influence of deviation can be ignored. When superlattices become more complicated, they may be fabricated by a machine with suitable relative error and possess the designed value of TC. However, when the number of system layers exceeds some critical value, superlattices should be manufactured only by precise machines. The influence of the sensitivity is also discussed.

  11. Raman fingerprint of aligned graphene/h-BN superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Axel; Park, Jaesung; Yang, Huafeng; Elias, Daniel; Mayorov, Alexander S; Yu, Geliang; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Gorbachev, Roman V; Lazzeri, Michele; Geim, Andre K; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2013-11-13

    Graphene placed on hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) experiences a superlattice (Moiré) potential, which leads to a strong reconstruction of graphene's electronic spectrum with new Dirac points emerging at sub-eV energies. Here we study the effect of such superlattices on graphene's Raman spectrum. In particular, the 2D Raman peak is found to be exquisitely sensitive to the misalignment between graphene and h-BN lattices, probably due to the presence of a strain distribution with the same periodicity of the Moiré potential. This feature can be used to identify graphene superlattices with a misalignment angle smaller than 2°.

  12. Sculptured 3D twister superlattices embedded with tunable vortex spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Denz, Cornelia; Joseph, Joby

    2011-09-01

    We present diverse reconfigurable complex 3D twister vortex superlattice structures in a large area embedded with tunable vortex spirals as well as dark rings, threaded by vortex helices. We demonstrate these tunable complex chiral vortex superlattices by the superposition of relatively phase engineered plane waves. The generated complex 3D twister lattice vortex structures are computationally as well as experimentally analyzed using various tools to verify the presence of phase singularities. Our observation indicates the application-specific flexibility of our approach to tailor the transverse superlattice spatial irradiance profile of these longitudinally whirling vortex-cluster units and dark rings.

  13. A Preliminary Study of Active Region Canopies With AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, Scott; Saar, S.; Muglach, K.

    2013-01-01

    Active region canopies are areas frequently accompanying active regions which have extensive horizontal magnetic fields. The large-scale canopy fields have a significant effect on the kinds of structures which can exist beneath them, and how they evolve. Using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), we developed methods to automatically identify these regions. A Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis is consistent with the idea that the long, hotter active region loops overlie quite cool, small-scale features ("fibrils"). We suggest that the overlying loops restrict the growth of underlying structures to mostly very short, cool features. We also studied evolution of canopy regions over time. In several cases, a large quiescent filament formed out of the former canopy region over the course of a few solar rotations, confirming previous suggestions. The canopy remains visible for several rotations after its active regions have begun to decay; in this time, the fibril magnetic fields gradually align in such a way as to form a filament channel. Further analysis of our large canopy database should uncover more information on the frequency and characteristics of these canopy-to-filament evolutions, as well as other canopy properties. This work is supported by the NSF REU program at SAO (grant ATM-0851866) and contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed Martin to SAO for SDO research.

  14. Thoughts on the development of active regional public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ademar Arthur Chioro Dos; Sóter, Ana Paula Menezes; Furtado, Lumena Almeida Castro; Pereira, Silvana Souza da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Decentralization and regionalization are strategic themes for reforms in the health system. This paper analyzes the complex process of health regionalization being developed in Brazil. This paper identifies that the normative framework from the Brazilian National Health System, SUS has made advances with respect to its institutionalization and overcoming the initial centrality involved in municipalization. This has strengthened the development of regionalization and the intergovernmental agreement on health but the evidence points to the need to promote a revision. Based on document analysis, literature review and the views given by the authors involved in management in SUS as well as generating radically different views, the challenges for the construction of a regionalization that is active, is debated. We also discuss: its relations with planning and the dimensioning of service networks, the production of active care networks and shared management spaces, the inter-federative agreements and regional regulations, the capacity to coordinate regional systems and financing and the impact of the political dimension and electoral cycles. Regionalization (and SUS itself) is an open book, therefore ways and possibilities on how to maintain an active form of regionalization can be recommended.

  15. Microcavities with distributed Bragg reflectors based on ZnSe/MgS superlattice grown by MOVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, T.; Yoshida, H.; Yogo, T.; Tanaka, S.; Suemune, I.

    2000-12-01

    Monolithic II-VI semiconductor microcavities for the blue-green region grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy have been demonstrated. ZnSe/MgS-superlattice (ZnSe/MgS-SL) layers were used for the distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). The DBR with only 5 periods showed the high reflectivity of 92% at the wavelength of 510 nm due to the large difference of refractive indices between ZnSe and MgS layers. In a monolithic II-VI microcavity structure based on these DBRs, a clear cavity resonance mode was observed in the blue-green region for the first time.

  16. Aging in Co/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Pleimling, M.; Binek, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    Aging phenomena are observed in various systems brought into non-equilibrium and subsequently showing slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. TC of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Non-ergodic behavior sets in at a tunable temperature T^* in a range of some 100K above zero. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. Non-equilibrium spin states are set via low field cooling in 5mT in-plane magnetic field to below T^*. Next various in-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times tw, respectively. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by Teledyne-Isco, NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  17. Thermodynamics of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Sahoo, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2008-03-01

    Progress in ultra thin film growth has resulted in many novel surface and interface induced properties of artificial heterostuctures. Here, we study magnetic superlattices of ultrathin Co and Cr films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy methodology at a base pressure below 1x10-10 mbar. Our approach is based on controlling two distinct magnetic degrees of freedom. First, the critical temperature, Tc, of individual Co films is tailored via geometrical confinement of the correlation length perpendicular to the film. Various thickness dependent values, Tc(d), between zero and the bulk Curie temperature of 1388 K are realized. Second, the Tc-tailored Co films are antiferromagnetically coupled through Cr interlayer films. The oscillating coupling strength is tailored via the Cr interlayer thickness. The resulting thermodynamic properties of such Co/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Particular emphasis is laid on tailoring magnetic entropy changes in the vicinity of room temperature. X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties.

  18. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Regional Activities. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional library activities which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Importance of Information Resources in National Development with Particular Reference to the Asian Scene" (Yogendra P. Dubey, India); (2) "Report of the Activities of the Regional…

  19. Fuzzy statistic and comprehensive evaluating study for activity characterization of the active region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the theory and method of the fuzzy mathematics areused to probe the connection between the activity of the active region and characterizat ion of the sunspot groups, to build the subordinating function according to the rela tionship between them and to evaluate comprehensively the activity of the active region on t he solar disk. The precise prediction of activity of the active regions has been obta ined by data reduction and analysis. The predicting accuracy is higher th an 95% . Forecast results indicate that the method of the fuzzy comprehensive evaluatio n is a good one for the solar activity prediction.

  20. Performance improvement of blue light-emitting diodes with an AlInN/GaN superlattice electron-blocking layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Fang; Yao Guang-Rui; Song Jing-Jing; Ding Bin-Bin; Xiong Jian-Yong; Su Chen; Zheng Shu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with an AlInN/GaN superlattice (SL) electron-blocking layer (EBL) are analyzed numerically.The cartier concentrations in the quantum wells,energy band diagrams,electrostatic fields,and internal quantum efficiency are investigated.The results suggest that the LED with an AlInN/GaN SL EBL has better hole injection efficiency,lower electron leakage,and smaller electrostatic fields in the active region than the LED with a conventional rectangular AlGaN EBL or a A1GaN/GaN SL EBL.The results also indicate that the efficiency droop is markedly improved when an AlInN/GaN SL EBL is used.

  1. Unsupervised segmentation of task activated regions in fmRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Rasmus; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become a central measuring modality to quantify functional activiation of the brain in both task and rest. Most analysis used to quantify functional activation requires supervised approaches as employed in statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to extract...... of task activated functional units in multi-subject fMRI data that exploits that regions of task activation are consistent across subjects and can be more reliably inferred than regions that are not activated. We develop a non-parametric Gaussian mixture model that apriori assumes activations are smooth...... using a Gaussian Process prior while assuming the segmented functional maps are the same across subjects but having individual time-courses and noise variances. To improve inference we propose an enhanced split-merge procedure. We find that our approach well extracts the induced activity of a finger...

  2. Band gap engineering of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) short-period superlattices via built-in electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, D. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Using density-functional-theory calculations combined with hybrid functional, we investigate the band gaps and built-in electric fields of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) short-period superlattices. The band gap of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) superlattice can be tuned from 1.9 eV to 0 eV by varying the thickness of both the ZnSnN2 and ZnO regions. Compared to the III-nitride superlattices, stronger built-in electric fields, induced by the polarizations, form inside the ZnSnN2/ZnO superlattices. The lowest electron and uppermost hole states are mainly localized at the two opposite interfaces of the superlattice, but the tails of the lowest electron states extend over several atomic layers. Based on the electrostatic argument, we demonstrate that variations of the band gap are approximately described by a geometric factor. The influence of the in-plane strain is also discussed. The results will be valuable in the design of ZnSnN2/ZnO heterostructures for electronics and optoelectronics applications.

  3. Activated region fitting: a robust high-power method for fMRI analysis using parameterized regions of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeda, Wouter D; Waldorp, Lourens J; Christoffels, Ingrid; Huizenga, Hilde M

    2009-08-01

    An important issue in the analysis of fMRI is how to account for the spatial smoothness of activated regions. In this article a method is proposed to accomplish this by modeling activated regions with Gaussian shapes. Hypothesis tests on the location, spatial extent, and amplitude of these regions are performed instead of hypothesis tests of individual voxels. This increases power and eases interpretation. Simulation studies show robust hypothesis tests under misspecification of the shape model, and increased power over standard techniques especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. An application to real single-subject data also indicates that the method has increased power over standard methods.

  4. Quantum Transport: The Link between Standard Approaches in Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    Theories describing electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices can essentially be divided in three disjoint categories: (i) transport in a miniband; (ii) hopping between Wannier-Stark ladders; and (iii) sequential tunneling. We present a quantum transport model, based on nonequilibrium...

  5. Plasmonic Enhanced Type-II Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  6. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992 - 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeggli, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to address a blind-spot in our knowledge of solar active region statistics. To the best of our knowledge there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all active regions reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ class active regions (including all sub-groups e.g. $\\beta\\gamma$, $\\beta\\delta$) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity, however, an increase in the $\\alpha$ fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the $\\beta$ fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and is statistically significant at the 2-$\\sigma$ level. Over 30% of all active regions observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications $\\gamma$ and/or $\\del...

  7. Development of Type-II superlattice VLWIR detectors in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Jumpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), requires the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity up to the very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to exhibit performance that is theoretically predicted to be higher than that of HgCdTe additionally the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal, which is to realize the FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we first fabricated the 320 × 256 (QVGA format) InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, and the large-format 640 × 512 (VGA format) T2SL FPA is followed because the other missions, using an infrared imager, require the large-format FPA. The noise-equivalent delta temperature measured with F1.4 optics was 0.15 K for QVGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K. It was 0.35 K for VGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K, but there is non-uniformity, and further improvements are necessary to achieve high performance FPAs.

  8. The soliton properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete driftmodel and by the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electrondensity are presented. The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrodingerequation and analysed. It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinearSchrodinger equation. The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  9. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...band solar cell incorporating low dimensional structures made with dilute nitrogen alloys of III-V semiconductors is investigated theoretically and

  10. Experimental evidence of delocalized states in random dimer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Bellani, V.; Díez, E.; Hey, R.; Toni, L.; Tarricone, L.; Parravicini, G.B.; Domínguez-Adame Acosta, Francisco; Gómez-Alcalá, R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices with intentional correlated disorder by means of photoluminescence and vertical dc resistance. The results are compared to those obtained in ordered and uncorrelated disordered superlattices. We report the first experimental evidence that spatial correlations inhibit localization of states in disordered low-dimensional systems, as our previous theoretical calculations suggested, in contrast to the earlier belief that all eigensta...

  11. An electric field-driven MIT in strongly-correlated thin-film superlattices: an inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalov, Petar; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    Using an inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory (IDMFT) approach to the single-band Hubbard model we investigate the properties of thin-film superlattices made up of alternating strongly (U1) and weakly (U2 U2), superlattice parameters (L1 ,L2) and transverse electric field on the correlation driven Mott-Hubbard metal-to-insulator transition. We find that when the periodicity of the superlattice is such that the strongly correlated regions are below a certain thickness, the MIT is suppressed due to proximity effects. This work was partially funded by the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research (FWO - Vlaanderen) under FWO Grant G.0520.10 and by the SITOGA FP7 project. Most of the calculations were performed on KU Leuven's ThinKing HPC cluster.

  12. Bimanual passive movement: functional activation and inter-regional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Emiliano; Cherubini, Andrea; Sabatini, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intra-regional activation and inter-regional connectivity during passive movement. During fMRI, a mechanic device was used to move the subject's index and middle fingers. We assessed four movement conditions (unimanual left/right, bimanual symmetric/asymmetric), plus Rest. A conventional intra-regional analysis identified the passive stimulation network, including motor cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, plus the cerebellum. The posterior (sensory) part of the sensory-motor activation around the central sulcus showed a significant modulation according to the symmetry of the bimanual movement, with greater activation for asymmetric compared to symmetric movements. A second set of fMRI analyses assessed condition-dependent changes of coupling between sensory-motor regions around the superior central sulcus and the rest of the brain. These analyses showed a high inter-regional covariation within the entire network activated by passive movement. However, the specific experimental conditions modulated these patterns of connectivity. Highest coupling was observed during the Rest condition, and the coupling between homologous sensory-motor regions around the left and right central sulcus was higher in bimanual than unimanual conditions. These findings demonstrate that passive movement can affect the connectivity within the sensory-motor network. We conclude that implicit detection of asymmetry during bimanual movement relies on associative somatosensory region in post-central areas, and that passive stimulation reduces the functional connectivity within the passive movement network. Our findings open the possibility to combine passive movement and inter-regional connectivity as a tool to investigate the functionality of the sensory-motor system in patients with very poor mobility.

  13. Bimanual passive movement: functional activation and inter-regional coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Macaluso

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate intra-regional activation and inter-regional connectivity during passive movement. During fMRI, a mechanic device was used to move the subject's index and middle fingers. We assessed four movement conditions (unimanual left/right, bimanual symmetric/asymmetric, plus Rest. A conventional intra-regional analysis identified the passive stimulation network, including motor cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, plus the cerebellum. The posterior (sensory part of the sensory-motor activation around the central sulcus showed a significant modulation according to the symmetry of the bimanual movement, with greater activation for asymmetric compared to symmetric movements. A second set of fMRI analyses assessed condition-dependent changes of coupling between sensory-motor regions around the superior central sulcus and the rest of the brain. These analyses showed a high inter-regional covariation within the entire network activated by passive movement. However, the specific experimental conditions modulated these patterns of connectivity. Highest coupling was observed during the Rest condition, and the coupling between homologous sensory-motor regions around the left and right central sulcus was higher in bimanual than unimanual conditions. These findings demonstrate that passive movement can affect the connectivity within the sensory-motor network. We conclude that implicit detection of asymmetry during bimanual movement relies on associative somatosensory region in post-central areas, and that passive stimulation reduces the functional connectivity within the passive movement network. Our findings open the possibility to combine passive movement and inter-regional connectivity as a tool to investigate the functionality of the sensory-motor system in patients with very poor mobility.

  14. TARPs: Tracked Active Region Patches from SoHO/MDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe progress toward creating a retrospective MDI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated TARPs (Tracked Active Region Patches). The TARPs are being developed as a backward-looking extension (covering approximately 3500 regions spanning 1996-2010) to the HARP (HMI Active Region Patch) data product that has already been released for HMI (2010-present). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is designed to be a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. TARPs from MDI are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and pseudo-continuum intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that the faculae/sunspots are part of. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. The final data product is indexed by a nominal AR number and time. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Additionaly, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu, Hoeksema et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HARPs (from HMI) and the MDI TARPs. We anticipate that this will allow a consistent catalog spanning both instruments. We envision several uses for the TARP data product, which will be

  15. Coherent quantum transport features in carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, R.; Henley, S. J.; Silva, S. R. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-10-01

    Whilst resonant transmission is well understood and can be fully harnessed for crystalline superlattices, a complete picture has not yet emerged for disordered superlattices. It has proven difficult to tune resonant transmission in disordered diamond-like carbon (DLC) superlattices as conventional models are not equipped to incorporate significant structural disorder. In this work, we present concurrent experimental and theoretical analysis which addresses resonant transmission in DLC superlattices. Devices were fabricated by growing alternate layers of DLC with different percentages of sp3 hybridized carbon.Coherent quantum transport effects were demonstrated in these structurally disordered DLC superlattices through distinct current modulation with negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements. A model was developed using tight-binding calculations assuming a random variation of the hopping integral to simulate structural (bond-length) disorder. Calculations of the I-V characteristics compliment the interpretation of the measurements and illustrate that while DLC superlattice structures are unlike their classical counterparts, the near-field structural order will help with the confinement of quantised states. The present model provides an empirical guide for tailoring the properties of future devices, giving rise to much hope that carbon electronics operating at high frequencies over large areas can now be developed.

  16. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma, Affa; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances.

  17. Elementary Bipoles, the Building Blocks of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara F.; Mkhitaryan, M.

    2013-07-01

    New magnetic flux even in very small active regions appears as a succession of tiny bipolar magnetic fields that successively and concurrently appear in tight clusters. These smallest observable bipoles were initially called “elementary bipoles” when first seen in videomagnetograms from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (Martin, S. F. 1990, “Elementary Bipoles of Active Regions and Ephemeral Active Regions” Societa Astronomica Italiana, Memorie 61, 293). The magnetic flux of each pole of elementary bipole is approximately the same and measures 1018 Mx or less depending on both the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the magnetograph with which the measurements are made. The two poles initially occur very close together and rapidly move in opposite directions with a typical speed of 3 km/sec. The elementary bipoles within a cluster tend to emerge with similar orientations. The most common orientation of the elementary bipoles at any given time determines the “orientation” of a whole simple bipolar region. In this paper we illustrate and compare 6 clusters of elementary bipoles during the development of a large active region less than 2 days old when observed in Hα at the Dutch Open Telescope along with HMI/SDO. Each cluster of elementary bipoles behaves like a single simple bipolar active region. However the clusters are so close together that the magnetic flux of each bipolar cluster merges or cancels with adjacent clusters. The study of elementary bipoles provides a means of simplifying our understanding of the development of complex active regions depending on both the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the magnetograph with which the measurements are made.

  18. Helium line formation and abundance in a solar active region

    CERN Document Server

    Mauas, P J D; Falchi, A; Falciani, R; Teriaca, L N; Cauzzi, G

    2004-01-01

    An observing campaign (SOHO JOP 139), coordinated between ground based and SOHO instruments, has been planned to obtain simultaneous spectroheliograms of the same active region in several spectral lines. The chromospheric lines CaII K, Halpha and Na D as well as HeI 10830, 5876, 584 and HeII 304 AA lines have been observed.These simultaneous observations allow us to build semi-empirical models of the chromosphere and low transition region of an active region, taking into account the estimated total number of photoionizing photons impinging on the target active region and their spectral distribution. We obtained a model that matches very well all the observed line profiles, using a standard value for the He abundance ([He]=0.1) and a modified distribution of microturbulence. For this model we study the influence of the coronal radiation on the computed helium lines. We find that, even in an active region, the incident coronal radiation has a limited effect on the UV He lines, while it results of fundamental im...

  19. Kink waves in an active region dynamic fibril

    CERN Document Server

    Pietarila, A; Hirzberger, J; Solanki, S K

    2011-01-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred Gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  20. Kink Waves in an Active Region Dynamic Fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarila, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 Å observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  1. Determinants of Regional Entrepreneurial Activity in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Dvouletý

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following study is focused on analysis of registered businesses in the 14 regions of the Czech Republic during the period of years 1995-2013. The aim of the study was to quantify factors that affect entrepreneurial activity expressed as rate of registered businesses per capita. Based on the previous empirical studies, the determinants were selected and hypothesis stated. Formed hypothesis investigated positive impact of GDP per capita, unemployment rate and R&D institutions on rate of registered business activity. To evaluate them, data were obtained from the Czech Statistical Office and formed into dataset. Firstly, panel regressions estimated with fixed effects method were employed and secondly, Granger causality tests to evaluate the relationship between entrepreneurial activity and GDP per capita were used. Regression estimates proved positive relationship between entrepreneurial activity in Czech regions and GDP per capita, unemployment rate and support activities of R&D institutions. Positive impact was also confirmed for population density, average age, share of tertiary educated population and real R&D expenditures. Testing Granger causality proved dual causality between entrepreneurial activity and GDP per capita confirming that GDP per capita as good predictor of economic development of Czech regions. Finally, economic growth motivates Czech individuals to enter entrepreneurial activity.

  2. Photospheric Magnetic Evolution in the WHI Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, B. T.; McTiernan, J. M.; Christe, S.

    2012-01-01

    Sequences of line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms recorded by the Michelson Doppler Imager are used to quantitatively characterize photospheric magnetic structure and evolution in three active regions that rotated across the Sun s disk during the Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI), in an attempt to relate the photospheric magnetic properties of these active regions to flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Several approaches are used in our analysis, on scales ranging from whole active regions, to magnetic features, to supergranular scales, and, finally, to individual pixels. We calculated several parameterizations of magnetic structure and evolution that have previously been associated with flare and CME activity, including total unsigned magnetic flux, magnetic flux near polarity-inversion lines, amount of canceled flux, the "proxy Poynting flux," and helicity flux. To catalog flare events, we used flare lists derived from both GOES and RHESSI observations. By most such measures, AR 10988 should have been the most flare- and CME-productive active region, and AR 10989 the least. Observations, however, were not consistent with this expectation: ARs 10988 and 10989 produced similar numbers of flares, and AR 10989 also produced a few CMEs. These results highlight present limitations of statistics-based flare and CME forecasting tools that rely upon line-of-sight photospheric magnetic data alone.

  3. ON THE ACTIVE REGION BRIGHT GRAINS OBSERVED IN THE TRANSITION REGION IMAGING CHANNELS OF IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skogsrud, H.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Pontieu, B. De [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si iv 1394 and 1403 Å lines, reveal ubiquitous bright “grains” which are short-lived (two to five minute) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.″5–1.″7 that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s{sup −1}. In this paper, we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in Hα. We find that the grains show the strongest emission in the ascending phase of the DF, that the emission is strongest toward the top of the DF, and that the grains correspond to a blueshift and broadening of the Si iv lines. We note that the SJI 1400 grains can also be observed in the SJI 1330 channel which is dominated by C ii lines. Our observations show that a significant part of the active region transition region dynamics is driven from the chromosphere below rather than from coronal activity above. We conclude that the shocks that drive DFs also play an important role in the heating of the upper chromosphere and lower transition region.

  4. Ion beam studies in strained layer superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, A P; Bhattacharya, D P; Dev, B N; Ghosh, S; Goswami, D K; Lakshmi-Bala, S; Nageswara-Rao, S V S; Satyam, P V; Siddiqui, A M; Srivastava, S K; Turos, A

    2002-01-01

    The potential device application of semiconductor heterostructures and strained layer superlattices has been highlighted. Metal organic chemical vapour deposition grown In sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 3 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 7 As/InP lattice-matched structure has been irradiated by 130 MeV Ag sup 1 sup 3 sup + and studied by RBS/Channelling using 3.5 MeV He sup 2 sup + ions. Ion irradiation seems to have induced a finite tensile strain in the InGaAs layer, indicating thereby that ion beam mixing occurs at this energy. Other complementary techniques like high resolution XRD and STM are needed to conclude the structural modifications in the sample.

  5. Nonreciprocal Multiferroic Superlattices with Broken Parity Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Weiyi

    Multiferroic materials are characterized by the coexistence of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic (or antiferromagnetic) orders, the coupling to lattice vibration can be invoked either through piezoelectric or piezomagnetic effects. In this paper, the polaritonic band structures of multiferroic superlattices composed of oppositely polarized domains are investigated using the generalized transfer matrix method. For the primitive cell with broken parity symmetry, the polaritonic band structure is asymmetrical with respect to the forward and backward propagation directions (nonreciprocality). In particular, the band extreme points move away from the Brillouin zone center. This asymmetry in band-gap positions and widths can be used to design compact one-way optical isolators, while the extremely slow light velocities near the asymmetrical upper edges of lower bands includes the essential ingredients for designing slow light devices.

  6. Magnetocaloric properties of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured materials aiming on refrigeration applications are experimentally realized by molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of Co/Cr superlattices using mean-field theoretical concepts as guiding principles.footnotetextT. Mukherjee, S. Sahoo, R. Skomski, D. J. Sellmyer, and Ch. Binek, Phys. Rev. B 79, 144406-1-9 (2009). Magnetocaloric properties are deduced from measurements of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization of our samples. More generally, the potential of artificial antiferromagnets for near room-temperature refrigeration is explored. The effects of intra-plane and inter-plane exchange interactions on the magnetic phase diagram in Ising-type model systems are revisited in mean-field considerations with special emphasis on tailoring magnetocaloric properties. The experimental results are discussed in light of our theoretical findings, and extrapolations for future improved nanostructures are provided. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  7. Magnetic Field in Superlattices Semiconductors of Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a study on the super-semiconductor networks, using the Kronig-Penney model for the effective mass approximation, and then the calculations for the application of the magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the layers of super lattices crystals. The magnetic field applied parallel to the layers, was used to adjust the resonance of a higher energy subband of a well by thermal excitation with a lower energy subband of the adjacent well, increasing energy levels in its tunneling rate. We use the formalism of Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics. Introducing the calculations in a systematic way in superlattices for each semiconductor quantum well to assess their energy spectrum systematically studied.

  8. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors.   In our FY12 IRAD “Strained Layer Superlattice Infrared Detector Array...

  9. METHODOLOGICAL ESSENTIAL PRINCIPLES OF REGIONAL INVESTMENT ACTIVITY FINANCEMENT MECHANIZM IMPROVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    V.V. Morozov

    2005-01-01

    The strategy principles and main directions of regional investment activity financement mechanism improvement are formulated and worked out in the article. The contemporary conditions are analyzed, the factors are researched, the priority directions are defined, the suggestions on the better use of investment sources are worked out, and on this base the suggestions on the investment process activization in the territorial systems are worked out.

  10. The Evolution of Dark Canopies Around Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y -M; Muglach, K

    2011-01-01

    As observed in spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, transition region, and low corona, active regions are surrounded by an extensive "circumfacular" area which is darker than the quiet Sun. We examine the properties of these dark moat- or canopy-like areas using \\ion{Fe}{9} 17.1 nm images and line-of-sight magnetograms from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}. The 17.1 nm canopies consist of fibrils (horizontal fields containing EUV-absorbing chromospheric material) clumped into featherlike structures. The dark fibrils initially form a quasiradial or vortical pattern as the low-lying field lines fanning out from the emerging active region connect to surrounding network and intranetwork elements of the opposite polarity. The area occupied by the 17.1 nm fibrils expands as supergranular convection causes the active region flux to spread into the background medium; the outer boundary of the dark canopy stabilizes where the diffusing flux encounters a unipolar region of the opposite sign. The dark f...

  11. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Hérick de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey, we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making

  12. LOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHEST REGION THROUGH ACTIVITIES IN ITC DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela\tENACHESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Economic areas with high technology are key drivers in sustainable regional development, including unemployment and consequently decreasing population migration in the region. Northeast Region is the largest development region of Romania in terms of number of inhabitants and the owned area. On 01/01/2014, according to balance employment, labor resources of the region were numbered 2,428,700, which represent 49.6% of employed population. The registered unemployment rate at 31 August 2014 was 6.5%, with 82 thousand unemployed registered. In terms of participation in the main economic activities, civilian employment in agriculture, forestry and fishing is predominant (40.1% while in service, civilian employment is 37.1%, while industry and construction is 22.8%. The paper aims to analyze the situation that the potential employment and development opportunities for the Northeast region through activities in the field of ITC domain. Unfortunately, this area was the worst in most indicators, the use of computers and the internet to the turnover of companies and investments in the IT & C and unfortunately in terms of employment population that is under 50%

  13. Resonant behaviour of GaAs LO phonons in a GaAs-AlAs superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulin; T, A. Gant; M, Delaney; M, V. Klein; J, Klem; H, Morkoc

    1988-03-01

    Resonant Raman scattering from GaAs LO phonons in a 59Å GaAs/20Å AlAs superlattice was studied. The relevant intersubband energies were determined. The results suggest that all of the exciton transitions from the hole subbands HH1, LH1, HH2, HH3, LH2 and HH4 to the electron subbands CB1 and CB2 in the energy region covered by our incident dye laser were observed and a justificative analysis may involve effects due to valence band mixing and to 3D electronic miniband structure.

  14. Enhanced ULF electromagnetic activity detected by DEMETER above seismogenic regions

    CERN Document Server

    Athanasiou, M; David, C; Anagnostopoulos, G

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present results of a comparison between ultra low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation, recorded by an electric field instrument (ICE) onboard the satellite DEMETER in the topside ionosphere, and the seismicity of regions with high and lower seiismic activity. In particular we evaluated the energy variations of the ULF Ez-electric field component during a period of four years (2006-2009), in order to examine check the possible relation of ULF EM radiation with seismogenic regions located in central America, Indonesia, Eastern Mediterranean Basin and Greece. As a tool of evaluating the ULF Ez energy variations we used Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) techniques. The results of our analysis clearly show a significant increase of the ULF EM energy emmited from regions of highest seismic activity at the tectonic plates boundaries. We interpret these results as suggesting that the highest ULF EM energy detected in the topside ionosphere is originated from seismic processes within Earth's...

  15. Active region upflows: 2. Data driven MHD modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Galsgaard, K; Vanninathan, K; Huang, Z; Presmann, M

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims. This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods. We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential three dimensional magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple one-dimensional hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local Correlation Tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive three-dimensional MagnetoHydro-Dynamic code. Resu...

  16. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  17. Helicity of Solar Active Regions from a Dynamo Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Piyali Chatterjee

    2006-06-01

    We calculate helicities of solar active regions based on the idea that poloidal flux lines get wrapped around a toroidal flux tube rising through the convection zone, thereby giving rise to the helicity. We use our solar dynamo model based on the Babcock–Leighton -effect to study how helicity varies with latitude and time.

  18. Dynamic Precursors of Flares in Active Region NOAA 10486

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. B. Korsós; N. Gyenge; T. Baranyi; A. Ludmány

    2015-03-01

    Four different methods are applied here to study the precursors of flare activity in the Active Region NOAA 10486. Two approaches track the temporal behaviour of suitably chosen features (one, the weighted horizontal gradient WGM, is the generalized form of the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, GM; the other is the sum of the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, GS, for all sunspot pairs). WGM is a photospheric indicator, that is a proxy measure of magnetic non-potentiality of a specific area of the active region, i.e., it captures the temporal variation of the weighted horizontal gradient of magnetic flux summed up for the region where opposite magnetic polarities are highly mixed. The third one, referred to as the separateness parameter, Sl−f, considers the overall morphology. Further, GS and Sl−f are photospheric, newly defined quick-look indicators of the polarity mix of the entire active region. The fourth method is tracking the temporal variation of small X-ray flares, their times of succession and their energies observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager instrument. All approaches yield specific pre-cursory signatures for the imminence of flares.

  19. The active region in galactic nuclei a spinar model

    CERN Document Server

    Pacini, F

    1978-01-01

    Shows that in the spinar model for active galactic nuclei the physical parameters of the central region are unequivocally determined by observational qualities. In homogeneous models the energy output via the inverse Compton effect should be of the same order as the primary emission. (5 refs).

  20. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, J. H. [Department of Physics, Shijiazhuang University, Shijiazhuang 050035 (China); Xu, C. L. [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China)

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  1. Unwinding motion of a twisted active-region filament

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X L; Liu, J H; Kong, D F; Xu, C L

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the structures of active-region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active-region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on June 22, 2010. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament is consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5$\\pi$ obtained by using time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active-region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magn...

  2. Unwinding Motion of a Twisted Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Liu, J. H.; Kong, D. F.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  3. Crossover from Incoherent to Coherent Phonon Scattering in Epitaxial Oxide Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-08

    of the superlattices. Figure 3a shows a high-resolution, short-angular-range θ–2θ X - ray diffraction (XRD) scan of a (STO)6/(CTO)6 superlattice...function of interface density. We do so by synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides and systematically varying the interface density, with unit-cell precision, using two

  4. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expressio...

  5. Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 22-April-2013 to 21-April-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design...15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots , Optoelectronic Applications, Charge Transfer, Superlattices, Density Functional Theory, Coupling...FA2386-13-1-4074 “ Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation” April 21, 2014 PI and Co-PI

  6. Active faulting in the Birjand region of NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. T.; Khatib, M. M.

    2006-08-01

    We use satellite imagery and field observations to investigate the distribution of active faults around Birjand in eastern Iran to determine how the transition between conjugate zones of faulting can be accommodated by diffuse active faulting. In the south of the study area, right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Sistan Suture Zone end in thrusts which die away westward from the strike-slip faults. These thrust terminations appear to allow a northward change to E-W thrusting in central parts of the study area. The introduction of E-W thrusting is, in turn, likely to facilitate a change to E-W left-lateral faulting north of the study region. The relatively diffuse pattern of active faulting at Birjand relates to the regional transition between N-S and E-W strike-slip faulting in northeast Iran, which involves a change from nonrotational to rotational deformation. The change from N-S to E-W faulting is likely to result from the orientation of preexisting structures in Iran and western Afghanistan, which are roughly parallel to the active fault zones. The features described at Birjand also show the influence of preexisting structure on the location and style of active faulting at a local scale, with the position of individual faults apparently controlled by inherited geological weaknesses. Very few modern earthquakes have occurred in the region of Birjand and yet destructive events are known from the historical record. The large number of active faults mapped in this study pose a substantial seismic hazard to Birjand and surrounding regions.

  7. On the Magnetic Field Strength of Active Region Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Pillet, V Martinez; Casini, R; Sainz, R Manso; Shimizu, T

    2009-01-01

    We study the vector magnetic field of a filament observed over a compact Active Region Neutral Line. Spectropolarimetric data acquired with TIP-II (VTT, Tenerife, Spain) of the 10830 \\AA spectral region provide full Stokes vectors which were analyzed using three different methods: magnetograph analysis, Milne-Eddington inversions and PCA-based atomic polarization inversions. The inferred magnetic field strengths in the filament are of the order of 600 - 700 G by all these three methods. Longitudinal fields are found in the range of 100 - 200 G whereas the transverse components become dominant, with fields as large as 500 - 600 G. We find strong transverse fields near the Neutral Line also at photospheric levels. Our analysis indicates that strong (higher than 500 G, but below kG) transverse magnetic fields are present in Active Region filaments. This corresponds to the highest field strengths reliably measured in these structures. The profiles of the Helium 10830 \\AA lines observed in this Active Region filam...

  8. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2007-09-01

    Recent hydrostatic simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high-temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. These static models, however, cannot account for the lower temperature emission. In addition, there is ample observational evidence that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR 8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in four different Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider impulsive heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high-temperature solar corona. At EUV wavelengths the simulated emission shows more coronal loops, but the agreement between the simulation and the observation is still not acceptable.

  9. Decreased replication origin activity in temporal transition regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zeqiang; Hughes, Christina M; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; Norio, Paolo; Sen, Ranjan; Fiering, Steven; Allis, C David; Bouhassira, Eric E; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2009-11-30

    In the mammalian genome, early- and late-replicating domains are often separated by temporal transition regions (TTRs) with novel properties and unknown functions. We identified a TTR in the mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, which contains replication origins that are silent in embryonic stem cells but activated during B cell development. To investigate which factors contribute to origin activation during B cell development, we systematically modified the genetic and epigenetic status of the endogenous Igh TTR and used a single-molecule approach to analyze DNA replication. Introduction of a transcription unit into the Igh TTR, activation of gene transcription, and enhancement of local histone modifications characteristic of active chromatin did not lead to origin activation. Moreover, very few replication initiation events were observed when two ectopic replication origin sequences were inserted into the TTR. These findings indicate that the Igh TTR represents a repressive compartment that inhibits replication initiation, thus maintaining the boundaries between early and late replication domains.

  10. PATTERNS OF ACTIVITY IN A GLOBAL MODEL OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Viall, N. M., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: Nicholeen.M.Viall@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    In this work we investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of frequencies. What differs is the average frequency of the distributions. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes with a magnetic field extrapolation to create a model active region and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is not to reproduce a particular set of observations in detail, but to recover some typical properties and patterns observed in active regions. Our key findings are the following. (1) Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. (2) Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. (3) All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line of sight passes through coronal loop footpoints. (4) There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a timescale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies are operating across active regions. (5) Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  11. Study and assessment of clusters activity effect on regional economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babkin A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cluster approach, i.e., forming basic innovative and industrial clusters is widely applied in modern Russian conditions for the development of the economy. These actions are considered as effective measures for implementing the economic policy stimulating regional development by federal and regional authorities. The analysis we carried out showed that the quantitative approach for assessing the efficiency of cluster creation and performance is still insufficiently used. In this paper we establish and quantitatively estimate the influence cluster have on the regional economy using regression analysis with an example of a number of Russian regional clusters. Expanding the practice of creation and the state support of clusters taking into account the revealed quantitative dependences estimating their efficiency is suggested. We have advanced the hypothesis that clustering has a positive influence on regional economy, and confirmed this influence by means of quantitative methods using representative datasets. Our study of course had a selective character as it is not possible to carry out the calculations for all the existing clusters and cluster initiatives of Russia and discuss the results within a single article. At the same time, following the analysis we performed, we concluded that it is effective to initiate cluster creation in Russian regions. It is shown that cluster activity is capable to have of having a positive impact on GRP growth and the budgetary income in the region. Along with that, we note the dissimilarities in the multiplying influence of clusters on the regional development, its dependence on territorial and branch specifics that will be the direction for a further indepth study.

  12. Quasi-Dirac points in one-dimensional graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Tseng, P.; Hsueh, W.J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw

    2016-08-26

    Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) with energy different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) have been found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. Surprisingly, the minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. This is remarkable as the minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs. - Highlights: • Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) are found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. • The QDP is different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) in graphene superlattices. • The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. • The minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. • The minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs.

  13. Numerical Investigation of InGaN Light-Emitting Diode with Al/In-Graded p-AlGaN/InGaN Superlattice Electron-Blocking Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Si-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Wen; Fan, Guang-Han

    2017-02-01

    Three kinds of InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diode with different electron-blocking layers (EBLs) have been investigated numerically. The energy band diagrams, light-current curves, voltage-current curves, electrostatic fields, carrier concentrations in the quantum wells, electron current densities, radiative recombination rates in active region, and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) are reported. The results show that, when the conventional AlGaN EBL is replaced by a p-AlGaN/InGaN superlattice EBL or graded p-Al y Ga1- y N/In x Ga1- x N superlattice EBL, respectively, the light output power at 200 mA can be increased by 46.0% and 52.8%, the turn-on voltage can be decreased from 3.2 V to 3.0 V, the IQE can be increased by 45.6% and 53.8% at 200 mA, and the efficiency droop can be reduced from 31.2% to 21.6%. These improvements are mainly attributed to the properly modified energy band structures which favor carrier injection.

  14. Modeling the Subsurface Evolution of Active Region Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y

    2009-01-01

    I present results from a set of 3D spherical-shell MHD simulations of the buoyant rise of active region flux tubes in the solar interior which put new constraints on the initial twist of the subsurface tubes in order for them to emerge with tilt angles consistent with the observed Joy's law for the mean tilt of solar active regions. Due to the asymmetric stretching of the $\\Omega$-shaped tube by the Coriolis force, a field strength asymmetry develops with the leading side having a greater field strength and thus being more cohesive compared to the following side. Furthermore, the magnetic flux in the leading leg shows more coherent values of local twist $\\alpha \\equiv {\\bf J} \\cdot {\\bf B} / B^2$, whereas the values in the following leg show large fluctuations and are of mixed signs.

  15. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  16. Soft electron beams in solar active and flare region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, V.V.; Mandelshtam, S.L.; Oparin, S.N.; Urnov, A.M.; Zhitnik, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the experimental data obtained from the high resolution X-ray spectra for solar flares and active regions the suprathermal electron model (SEM) was proposed. This model suggests the existance of the multi-temperature structure of the solar plasma emitting Fe and Ca X-rays and the presence of additional electrons with low energies (no more than 10 keV) and small densities of about 1-5 percent relative to the thermal component.

  17. Size-Flux Relation in Solar Active Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of the relationship between integral area and corre-sponding total magnetic flux for solar active regions. It is shown that some of theserelationships are satisfied to simple power laws. Fractal examination showed thatsome of these power laws can not be justified inside the simple models of stationarymagnetic flux tube aggregation. All magnetic fluxes and corresponding areas werecalculated using the data measured with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope of theHuairou Solar Observing Station in Beijing.

  18. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P.; Slayter, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myos...

  19. High Power VCSEL Device with Periodic Gain Active Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High power vertical cavity surface emitting lasers(VCSEKLs) with large aperture have been fabricated through improving passivation, lateral oxidation and heat dissipation techniques. Different from conventional three quantum well structures, a periodic gain active region with nine quantum wells was incorporated into the VCSEL structure, with which high efficiency and high power operation were expected. The nine quantum wells were divided into three groups with each of them located at the antinodes of the ca...

  20. On the Active Region Bright Grains Observed in the Transition Region Imaging Channels of IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Skogsrud, H; De Pontieu, B

    2015-01-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si IV 1394 and 1403 {\\AA} lines, reveal ubiquitous bright "grains" which are short-lived (2-5 min) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.5-1.7" that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s$^{-1}$. In this paper we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in H{\\alpha}. We find that the grains show ...

  1. Impulsively Driven Waves And Flows In Coronal Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Wang, T.; Davila, J. M.; Liu, W.

    2012-05-01

    Recent SDO/AIA and Hinode EIS observations indicate that both (super) fast and slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) magnetic structures. Evidence for fast (100-300 km/s) impulsive flows is found in spectroscopic and imaging observations of AR loops. The super-fast waves were observed in magnetic funnels of ARs. The observations suggest that waves and flow are produced by impulsive events, such as (micro) flares. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulations of impulsively generated flows and waves in coronal loops of a model bi-polar active region (AR). The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with impulsively driven flow at the coronal base of the AR in localized magnetic field structures. We model the excitation of the flows in hot (6MK) and cold (1MK) active region plasma, and find slow and fast magnetosonic waves produced by these events. We also find that high-density (compared to surrounding corona) loops are produced as a result of the upflows. We investigate the parametric dependence between the properties of the impulsive flows and the waves. The results of the 3D MHD modeling study supports the conjecture that slow magnetosonic waves are often produced by impulsive upflows along the magnetic field, and fast magnetosonic waves can result from impulsive transverse field line perturbations associated with reconnection events. The waves and flows can be used for diagnostic of AR structure and dynamics.

  2. Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Brooks, David H; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Williams, David R; Harra, Hirohisa

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track the evolution of coronal plasma. The evolution of the emission observed with XRT and EIS during these events is generally consistent with loops that have been heated and are cooling. We have analyzed the most energetic heating event observed during this period, a small GOES B-class flare, in some detail and present some of the spectral signatures of the event, such as relative Doppler shifts at one of the loop footpoints and enhanced line widths during the rise phase of the event. While the analysis of these transient even...

  3. Local Helioseismology of Emerging Active Regions: A Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, Alexander G; Ilonidis, Stathis

    2016-01-01

    Local helioseismology provides a unique opportunity to investigate the subsurface structure and dynamics of active regions and their effect on the large-scale flows and global circulation of the Sun. We use measurements of plasma flows in the upper convection zone, provided by the Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline developed for analysis of solar oscillation data obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to investigate the subsurface dynamics of emerging active region NOAA 11726. The active region emergence was detected in deep layers of the convection zone about 12 hours before the first bipolar magnetic structure appeared on the surface, and 2 days before the emergence of most of the magnetic flux. The speed of emergence determined by tracking the flow divergence with depth is about 1.4 km/s, very close to the emergence speed in the deep layers. As the emerging magnetic flux becomes concentrated in sunspots local converging flows are observed beneath the for...

  4. Superlattice-Induced Insulating States and Valley-Protected Orbits in Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Luo, J. Y.; Fatemi, V.; Fang, S.; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J. D.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Kaxiras, E.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.

    2016-09-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene (TBLG) is one of the simplest van der Waals heterostructures, yet it yields a complex electronic system with intricate interplay between moiré physics and interlayer hybridization effects. We report on electronic transport measurements of high mobility small angle TBLG devices showing clear evidence for insulating states at the superlattice band edges, with thermal activation gaps several times larger than theoretically predicted. Moreover, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and tight binding calculations reveal that the band structure consists of two intersecting Fermi contours whose crossing points are effectively unhybridized. We attribute this to exponentially suppressed interlayer hopping amplitudes for momentum transfers larger than the moiré wave vector.

  5. Surface Recombination Noise in InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Tunay; Kutluer, Kutlu; Muti, Abdullah; Salihoglu, Ömer; Aydinli, Atila; Turan, Rasit

    2013-03-01

    The standard Schottky noise approach alone is not sufficient to describe the noise mechanism in an InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetector at reverse negative bias. The additional noise identified appears at surface activation energies below 60 meV and is inversely proportional to the reverse bias. In order to satisfactorily explain the experimental data, we hereby propose the existence of a surface recombination noise that is a function of both the frequency and bias. The calculated noise characteristics indeed show good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨决宽; 陈云飞; 颜景平

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  8. Interlayer diffusion studies of a Laves phase exchange spring superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kohn, A; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C

    2011-03-23

    Rare earth Laves phase (RFe(2)) superlattice structures grown at different temperatures are studied using x-ray reflectivity (XRR), x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The optimized molecular beam epitaxy growth condition is matched with the XRR simulation, showing minimum diffusion/roughness at the interfaces. Electron microscopy characterization reveals that the epitaxial growth develops from initial 3D islands to a high quality superlattice structure. Under this optimum growth condition, chemical analysis by electron energy loss spectroscopy with high spatial resolution is used to study the interface. The analysis shows that the interface roughness is between 0.6 and 0.8 nm and there is no significant interlayer diffusion. The locally sharp interface found in this work explains the success of simple structural models in predicting the magnetic reversal behavior of Laves exchange spring superlattices.

  9. Rabi Oscillations in Realistic Superlattice with Finite Bloch Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wen-Bin; ZHANG Ping; LUO Ying; ZHAO Xian-Geng

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical processes taking place in nanodevices by high-frequency dc-ac fields. We found that Rabi oscillations between minibands are clearly identified under theoretical resonant conditions derived by an ideal two-band superlattice model, the resonant conditions have broadened, and the amount of broadening is about four times of the Rabi oscillation frequency. We also want to elucidate the role of different mechanisms that could lead to loss of quantum coherence. Our results show how the dephasing effects of disorder of interface roughness and doping fluctuation that after some periods destroy coherent oscillations, such as Rabi oscillations,can be reduced dramatically if we apply a bias static electric field to the superlattice system. The doping fluctuation dephasing effect is much stronger than that of interface roughness in the coherent process of realistic superlattices.

  10. The magnetic structure of holmium-erbium superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMorrow, D.F. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Simpson, J.A.; Cowley, R.A.; Jehan, D.A.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R. [Oxford Physics, Clarendon Lab. (United Kingdom); Thurston, T.R.; Gibbs, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of completing crystal-field anisotropies on magnetic order has been investigated in a series of Ho/Er superlattices using neutron and resonant x-ray magnetic diffraction techniques. The neutron diffraction reveals that for temperatures in the interval T{sub N}(Er) {le} T {le} T{sub N}(Ho) the Ho basal-plane order propagates coherently through the paramagnetic Er, and that below T{sub N}(Er) the longitudinal component of the Er moments fails to order across the Ho block. The magnetic superlattice peaks observed in the x-ray scattering display an anomalous energy dependence: a sharp resonance is found at L{sub III}(Ho), with no resonance visible at L{sub III}(Er). These results are discussed with reference to models of exchange in metallic superlattices.

  11. SiGe superlattice nanocrystal infrared and Raman spectra: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsattar, Mudar A.

    2012-02-01

    Infrared and Raman vibrational spectrum are calculated using ab initio density functional theory for SiGe superlattice nanocrystal of approximately 1.6 nm length. After obtaining the optimum positions of atoms via geometrical optimization using density functional theory, coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock equations are solved iteratively to obtain vibrational spectrum. Frequencies of vibrations are analyzed against intensities, reduced masses, and vibrational force constants. A scale factor of 0.81 is suggested to correct the frequencies of the present calculations that are obtained using STO-3 G basis functions. Results show that SiGe nanocrystals have complex and rich vibrational spectrum that can be generally divided into three regions. The highest reduced masses are in the first region where Si and Ge atoms are the main contributors to vibrations with a smaller number of vibrations attributed to hydrogen atoms. The highest intensity lines in SiGe superlattice nanocrystals are in the middle region where most of the modes of vibration can be excited. The third region is characterized by high force constants. The first region shows a redshift of the original Ge-Si bond vibration from the calculated bulk 418 cm-1 to the present nanocrystal 395 cm-1. Hydrogen vibrations interferences are found in the same redshift region that might induce uncertainties in the experimentally measured redshift. Si-H and Ge-H vibrations are observed mainly in the second and third region and less frequently in the first region. These vibrations include modes of vibration such as symmetric, asymmetric, wagging, scissor, rocking, and twisting modes.

  12. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  13. Holocene fire activity in the Carpathian region: regional climate vs. local controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, Gabriela; Feurdean, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Introduction. Fire drives significant changes in ecosystem structure and function, diversity, species evolution, biomass dynamics and atmospheric composition. Palaeodata and model-based studies have pointed towards a strong connection between fire activity, climate, vegetation and people. Nevertheless, the relative importance of these factors appears to be strongly variable and a better understanding of these factors and their interaction needs a thorough investigation over multiple spatial (local to global) and temporal (years to millennia) scales. In this respect, sedimentary charcoal, associated with other proxies of climate, vegetation and human impact, represents a powerful tool of investigating changes in past fire activity, especially in regions with scarce fire dataset such as the CE Europe. Aim. To increase the spatial and temporal coverage of charcoal records and facilitate a more critical examination of the patterns, drivers and consequences of biomass burning over multiple spatial and temporal scales in CE Europe, we have investigated 6 fossil sequences in the Carpathian region (northern Romania). These are located in different geographical settings, in terms of elevation, vegetation composition, topography and land-use. Specific questions are: i) determine trends in timing and magnitude of fire activity, as well as similarities and differences between elevations; ii) disentangle the importance of regional from local controls in fire activity; iii) evaluate ecological consequences of fire on landscape composition, structure and diversity. Methods. We first determine the recent trends in fire activity (the last 150 years) from charcoal data and compare them with instrumental records of temperature, precipitation, site history and topography for a better understanding of the relationship between sedimentary charcoal and historical fire activity. We then statistically quantify centennial to millennial trends in fire activity (frequency, magnitude) based on

  14. Electric and magnetic superlattices in trilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Salah; Chan, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one dimensional Kronig-Penney type of periodic electric and vector potential on ABC-trilayer graphene superlattices are investigated. The energy spectra obtained with periodic vector potentials shows the emergence of extra Dirac points in the energy spectrum with finite energies. For identical barrier and well widths, the original as well as the extra Dirac points are located in the ky = 0 plane. An asymmetry between the barrier and well widths causes a shift in the extra Dirac points away from the ky = 0 plane. Extra Dirac points having same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point as well as finite energy Dirac points are generated in the energy spectrum when periodic electric potential is applied to the system. By applying electric and vector potential together, the symmetry of the energy spectrum about the Fermi level is broken. A tunable band gap is induced in the energy spectrum by applying both electric and vector potential simultaneously with different barrier and well widths.

  15. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'Yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  16. Intrinsic noncollinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yartseva, N.S., E-mail: yartseva@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, UD of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Yartsev, S.V. [ZAO NPO “Spektr”, 14 Berezovskiy 623700 (Russian Federation); Demangeat, C. [UFR de Physique et d’Ingéniérie, Université de Strasbourg, 3 rue de l’Université, 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic moments distribution in Fe{sub 3}Cr{sub n} superlattice series with fixed middle Fe monolayer and number of Cr monolayers (MLs) n from 1 to 45 is computed in the framework of collinear and noncollinear Periodic Anderson model. The superlattices are composed of layers in (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) plane with ideal interface. The total energy shows that noncollinear orientation of the magnetic moments remains the ground state for all superlattices with Cr thickness above 5 MLs. Distribution of the magnetic moments for Fe/Cr(0 0 1) superlattices depends on parity of the Cr MLs. For odd numbers Cr magnetic moments are canted and symmetrically distributed between the neighboring Fe slabs. The values of Cr moments are enhanced at the interface and weakened to the bulk in the middle. For even numbers of Cr MLs quasi-helicoidal magnetic moments distribution consisting of two interleaved spirals is found. The moments are screwing sequentially from Fe/Cr interface to perpendicular orientation, keeping the angles and moments for some successive MLs, and then continue screwing towards the next interface. In Fe/Cr(1 1 0) superlattices the magnetic moments of two nonequivalent atoms in the monolayer are canted to each other near Fe/Cr interface and then swing the direction on perpendicular to the fixed Fe moments. - Highlights: • Frustration destroys the collinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices. • Spin spiral were investigated within basic noncollinear Periodic Anderson Model. • Total energy of the spin spiral is generally more stable than collinear magnetization. • Neither step nor alloying at the Fe/Cr interface is necessary for Spin Spiral stability. • The two interleaved spirals calculated are similar to Fishman’s helical state.

  17. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, A. C.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime 10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Certain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called ``minifilaments,'' erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancellation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted; and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sights of magnetic-field cancelation. Thus our findings support that, at least in many cases, AR coronal jets result from the same physical processes that produce coronal jets in quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. FM was supportedby the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at

  18. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  19. Low absorption loss p-AlGaN superlattice cladding layer for current-injection deep ultraviolet laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, M.; Kuhn, C.; Ziffer, E.; Simoneit, T.; Rass, J.; Wernicke, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, V.; Knauer, A.; Einfeldt, S.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    Current injection into AlGaN-based laser diode structures with high aluminum mole fractions for deep ultraviolet emission is investigated. The electrical characteristics of laser diode structures with different p-AlGaN short period superlattice (SPSL) cladding layers with various aluminum mole fractions are compared. The heterostructures contain all elements that are needed for a current-injection laser diode including cladding and waveguide layers as well as an AlGaN quantum well active region emitting near 270 nm. We found that with increasing aluminum content in the p-AlGaN cladding, the diode turn-on voltage increases, while the series resistance slightly decreases. By introducing an SPSL instead of bulk layers, the operating voltage is significantly reduced. A gain guided broad area laser diode structure with transparent p-Al{sub 0.70}Ga{sub 0.30}N waveguide layers and a transparent p-cladding with an average aluminum content of 81% was designed for strong confinement of the transverse optical mode and low optical losses. Using an optimized SPSL, this diode could sustain current densities of more than 4.5 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  1. Active Region Oscillations: Results from SOHO JOP 097

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, E.; Fleck, B.; Muglach, K.; Sütterlin, P.

    2001-05-01

    We present here an analysis of data obtained in a sunspot region, using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO. These data were obtained in the context of the Joint Observing Program (JOP) 97 which, together with CDS, included the Michelson Doppler Imaging (MDI) instrument on SOHO, the TRACE satellite and various ground based observatories, e.g. the DOT on La Palma. Using the lines of Fe XVI 335, Mg IX 368, He I 584, O III 599, Mg X 624 and O V 624 of CDS time series data were obtained in the pore and plage regions of sunspots associated with active regions AR 9166, 9166 and 9169 between September 19-29 2000. In addition to the time series datasets we also obtained 240 arcsec x 240 arcsec raster images of the sunspot regions examined. Using different time series analysis techniques we analyse the different periods of oscillation found in time series datasets and present the results here. This research is part of the European Solar Magnetometry Network supported by the EC through the TMR programme.

  2. Raman-induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Optical Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junru; Huang, Wujie; Shteynas, Boris; Burchesky, Sean; Top, Furkan; Jamison, Alan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme for spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of ultracold atoms. Instead of internal (hyperfine) states, two lowest bands in an optical superlattice were used as pseudospins. A Raman process was implemented to provide coupling between pseudospin and momentum. With single internal state and far-detuned beams used, our new scheme will allow convenient generalisation to a wide range of atoms. Pseudospin interaction is tuneable by controlling the superlattice, allowing us to study many-body phenomena in SOC systems such as the stripe phase.

  3. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  4. The solition properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete drift model and by the nonlinear schroedinger equation,the spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electron density are presented.The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and analysed.It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  5. Spin-dependent terahertz oscillator based on hybrid graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, E.; Miralles, K.; Domínguez-Adame, F. [GISC, Departamento Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gaul, C., E-mail: cgaul@pks.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    We theoretically study the occurrence of Bloch oscillations in biased hybrid graphene systems with spin-dependent superlattices. The spin-dependent potential is realized by a set of ferromagnetic insulator strips deposited on top of a gapped graphene nanoribbon, which induce a proximity exchange splitting of the electronic states in the graphene monolayer. We numerically solve the Dirac equation and study Bloch oscillations in the lowest conduction band of the spin-dependent superlattice. While the Bloch frequency is the same for both spins, we find the Bloch amplitude to be spin dependent. This difference results in a spin-polarized ac electric current in the THz range.

  6. Photon BLOCH oscillations in porous silicon optical superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, V; del Río, J A; Malpuech, G; Zamfirescu, M; Kavokin, A; Coquillat, D; Scalbert, D; Vladimirova, M; Gil, B

    2004-03-01

    We report the first observation of oscillations of the electromagnetic field in an optical superlattice based on porous silicon. These oscillations are an optical equivalent of well-known electronic Bloch oscillations in crystals. Elementary cells of our structure are composed by microcavities whose coupling gives rise to the extended collective modes forming optical minigaps and minibands. By varying thicknesses of the cavities along the structure axis, we have created an effective electric field for photons. A very high quality factor of the confined optical state of the Wannier-Stark ladder may allow lasing in porous silicon-based superlattices.

  7. Binding Graphene Sheets Together Using Silicon: Graphene/Silicon Superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a superlattice consisting of graphene and monolayer thick Si sheets and investigate it using a first-principles density functional theory. The Si layer is found to not only strengthen the interlayer binding between the graphene sheets compared to that in graphite, but also inject electrons into graphene, yet without altering the most unique property of graphene: the Dirac fermion-like electronic structure. The superlattice approach represents a new direction for exploring basic science and applications of graphene-based materials.

  8. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  9. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  10. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy of a Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, S.E., E-mail: sb534@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ulfig, R.M.; Clifton, P.H. [Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Kappers, M.J.; Barnard, J.S.; Humphreys, C.J.; Oliver, R.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The electronic characteristics of semiconductor-based devices are greatly affected by the local dopant atom distribution. In Mg-doped GaN, the clustering of dopants at structural defects has been widely reported, and can significantly affect p-type conductivity. We have studied a Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattice using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Pyramidal inversion domains were observed in the TEM and the compositional variations of the dopant atoms associated with those defects have been studied using APT. Rarely has APT been used to assess the compositional variations present due to structural defects in semiconductors. Here, TEM and APT are used in a complementary fashion, and the strengths and weaknesses of the two techniques are compared. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Mg-rich regions of approximately 5 nm in size were revealed in Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattices using atom probe tomography (APT). {yields} Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the superlattice sample showed pyramidal inversion domains, concluded to be the same Mg-rich features observed by APT. {yields} The information gained from both the 3D APT study and the 2D TEM characterisation was then compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each technique in analysing nanoscale features in nitride materials.

  11. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  12. Formation and evolution of an active region filament

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Pillet, V Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Several scenarios explaining how filaments are formed can be found in literature. In this paper, we analyzed the observations of an active region filament and critically evaluated the observed properties in the context of current filament formation models. This study is based on multi-height spectropolarimetric observations. The inferred vector magnetic field has been extrapolated starting either from the photosphere or from the chromosphere. The line-of-sight motions of the filament, which was located near disk center, have been analyzed inferring the Doppler velocities. We conclude that a part of the magnetic structure emerged from below the photosphere.

  13. FIP Bias Evolution in a Decaying Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Démoulin, P; Yardley, S L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Long, D M; Green, L M

    2015-01-01

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR) 11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR from 2012 January 4-6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR's decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing time scales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Final...

  14. Region-based active contour with noise and shape priors

    CERN Document Server

    Lecellier, François; Fadili, Jalal; Aubert, Gilles; Revenu, Marinette; Saloux, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to combine formally noise and shape priors in region-based active contours. On the one hand, we use the general framework of exponential family as a prior model for noise. On the other hand, translation and scale invariant Legendre moments are considered to incorporate the shape prior (e.g. fidelity to a reference shape). The combination of the two prior terms in the active contour functional yields the final evolution equation whose evolution speed is rigorously derived using shape derivative tools. Experimental results on both synthetic images and real life cardiac echography data clearly demonstrate the robustness to initialization and noise, flexibility and large potential applicability of our segmentation algorithm.

  15. Peptides of the constant region of antibodies display fungicidal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA of antibodies (Fc-peptides exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents.

  16. Coronal loops above an Active Region - observation versus model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a high-resolution numerical simulation of the solar corona above a stable active region. The aim is to test the field-line braiding mechanism for a sufficient coronal energy input. We also check the applicability of scaling laws for coronal loop properties like the temperature and density. Our 3D-MHD model is driven from below by Hinode observations of the photosphere, in particular a high-cadence time series of line-of-sight magnetograms and horizontal velocities derived from the magnetograms. This driving applies stress to the magnetic field and thereby delivers magnetic energy into the corona, where currents are induced that heat the coronal plasma by Ohmic dissipation. We compute synthetic coronal emission that we directly compare to coronal observations of the same active region taken by Hinode. In the model, coronal loops form at the same places as they are found in coronal observations. Even the shapes of the synthetic loops in 3D space match those found from a stereoscopic reconstruction ...

  17. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  18. THE MAGNETIC CLASSIFICATION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS 1992–2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeggli, S. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Norton, A. A., E-mail: sarah.jaeggli@nasa.gov [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity; however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  19. Transient activity in the loop prominence system of a flare active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagare, S. P.; Nagabhushana, B. S.; Aleem, P. S. M.

    1989-09-01

    Solar limb observations of the activity in a loop prominence system associated with an active region were obtained on February 2, 1984. The activity was observed for a total duration of over seven hours of which the maximum phase lasted for about an hour. From a series of Ca II K prominence spectroheliograms taken during this phase, the individual loops appear to experience a sequence of activity; the brightening of kernel, brightening of portions of the loop, motion of the enhanced brightenings along the legs of the loop and a diffuse appearance of the loop at the end phase. The details of these phenomena and other associated activity are described.

  20. Vertical Hole Transport and Carrier Localization in InAs /InAs1 -xSbx Type-II Superlattice Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, B. V.; Klem, J. F.; Kadlec, E. A.; Kim, J. K.; Goldflam, M. D.; Hawkins, S. D.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Coon, W. T.; Fortune, T. R.; Shaner, E. A.; Flatté, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    Heterojunction bipolar transistors are used to measure vertical hole transport in narrow-band-gap InAs /InAs1 -xSbx type-II superlattices (T2SLs). Vertical hole mobilities (μh) are reported and found to decrease rapidly from 360 cm2/V s at 120 K to approximately 2 cm2/V s at 30 K, providing evidence that holes are confined to localized states near the T2SL valence-miniband edge at low temperatures. Four distinct transport regimes are identified: (1) pure miniband transport, (2) miniband transport degraded by temporary capture of holes in localized states, (3) hopping transport between localized states in a mobility edge, and (4) hopping transport through defect states near the T2SL valence-miniband edge. Region (2) is found to have a thermal activation energy of ɛ2=36 meV corresponding to the energy range of a mobility edge. Region (3) is found to have a thermal activation energy of ɛ3=16 meV corresponding to the hopping transport activation energy. This description of vertical hole transport is analogous to electronic transport observed in disordered amorphous semiconductors displaying Anderson localization. For the T2SL, we postulate that localized states are created by disorder in the group-V alloy of the InAs1 -xSbx hole well causing fluctuations in the T2SL valence-band energy.

  1. Modeling of the Interminiband Absorption Coefficient in InGaN Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Giannoccaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model to estimate minibands and theinterminiband absorption coefficient for a wurtzite (WZ indium gallium nitride (InGaN self-assembled quantum dot superlattice (QDSL is developed. It considers a simplified cuboid shape for quantum dots (QDs. The semi-analytical investigation starts from evaluation through the three-dimensional (3D finite element method (FEM simulations of crystal mechanical deformation derived from heterostructure lattice mismatch under spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects. From these results, mean values in QDs and barrier regions of charge carriers’ electric potentials and effective masses for the conduction band (CB and three valence sub-bands for each direction are evaluated. For the minibands’ investigation, the single-particle time-independent Schrödinger equation in effective mass approximation is decoupled in three directions and resolved using the one-dimensional (1D Kronig–Penney model. The built-in electric field is also considered along the polar axis direction, obtaining Wannier–Stark ladders. Then, theinterminiband absorption coefficient in thermal equilibrium for transverse electric (TE and magnetic (TM incident light polarization is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule implementation based on a numerical integration into the first Brillouin zone. For more detailed results, an absorption coefficient component related to superlattice free excitons is also introduced. Finally, some simulation results, observations and comments are given.

  2. Ion-bombardment-enhanced diffusion during the growth of sputtered superlattice thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E.

    1978-08-15

    A technique is presented for determining the enhancement in solid-state diffusion caused by low-energy ion bombardment. In this technique, superlattice films are grown under varying conditions of ion bombardment and the amplitude of the resulting composition modulation wave is determined by analyzing x-ray diffraction satellite peaks surrounding the central Bragg peaks. The amplitude is in turn related to the enhanced diffusion coefficient D* (x) which may be expressed as D*/sub 0/ exp(-x/delta) where delta is a characteristic diffusion length of the ion-bombardment-produced defects. This approach was confirmed experimentally using InSb/GaSb superlattice structures grown by multitarget sputtering, each sample having equilayer thicknesses between 12 and 30 A. D* was found to increase as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Measured values of D* averaged over the enhanced diffusion region were on the order of 10/sup -17/ cm/sup 2//sec compared to a thermal interdiffusion coefficient of approximately 10/sup -22/ cm/sup 2//sec at the film growth temperature of 250 /sup 0/C.

  3. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  4. Superlattice conductivity sign change induced by intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.; Ionkina, E. S.

    2016-07-01

    The current density in a superlattice exposed to a quantizing electric field and the terahertz field has been calculated. The calculations have been carried out taking into account inelastic scattering of charge carriers by phonons. The possibility of an absolute negative conductivity, i.e., the emergence of electric current opposing the direction of the quantizing electric field, has been demonstrated.

  5. Strong impact of impurity bands on domain formation in superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    The formation of electric field domains in doped semiconductor superlattices is described within a microscopic model. Due to the presence of impurity bands in low-doped samples the current-voltage characteristic is essentially different compared to medium-doped samples. (C) 1998 Published by Else...

  6. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    Neutron-scattering techniques have been used to investigate the magnetic properties of three Tb/Ho superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. It is revealed that for temperatures in the range T = 10 to T-N(Ho)approximate to 130 K, there is a basal-plane ferromagnetic alignment of Tb moments...

  7. The structural and magnetic properties of holmium/scandium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho/Sc superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal the novel existence of more than one a lattice parameter. Examining the magnetic properties, it is found that the Ho 4f...

  8. Magnetic structures of holmium-lutetium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swaddling, P.P.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.;

    1996-01-01

    Alloys and superlattices of Ho and Lu have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their magnetic structures determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The 4f moments in the alloys form a helix at all compositions with the moments aligned in the basal plane perpendicular to the wave vector...

  9. Bypassing of a barrier by dissociated and superlattice dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhushan, Karihaloo

    1975-01-01

    Very simple procedures are used to calculate the upper and lower bounds for the applied stress required for the leading extended (superlattice) dislocation in a group of n coplanar screw dislocations of like sign with Burgers vector b to bypass a noncoplanar perfect screw dislocation with Burgers...... vector mb (m...

  10. Type-II superlattice photodiodes: an alternative for VLWIR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gail J.; Houston, Shanee; Szmulowicz, Frank; Mahalingam, Krishnamur; Haugan, Heather; Wei, Yajun; Gin, Aaron; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2003-09-01

    In the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) band, λ>14 microns, the detector materials are currently limited to extrinsic semiconductors. These extrinsic materials can be either heavily doped bulk semiconductor, like silicon or germanium, or a doped quantum well heterostructure. An alternative choice that provides the opportunity for higher temperature operation for VLWIR sensing is an intrinsic material based on a type-II InAs/Ga(In)Sb superlattice. There are many possible designs for these superlattices which will produce the same narrow band gap by adjusting individual layer thicknesses, indium content or substrate orientation. The infrared properties of various compositions and designs of these type-II superlattices have been studied. In the past few years, excellent results have been obtained on photoconductive and photodiode samples designed for infrared detection beyond 15 microns. An overview of the status of this material system will be presented. In addition, the latest experimental results for superlattice photodiodes with cut-off wavelengths as long as 30 microns will be covered.

  11. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.;

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  12. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    A grand challenge of modern science has been the ability to predict and design the properties of new materials. This approach to the a priori design of materials presents a number of challenges including: predictable properties of the material building blocks, a programmable means for arranging such building blocks into well understood architectures, and robust models that can predict the properties of these new materials. In this dissertation, we present a series of studies that describe how optical properties in DNA-programmed nanoparticle superlattices can be predicted prior to their synthesis. The first chapter provides a history and introduction to the study of metal nanoparticle arrays. Chapter 2 surveys and compares several geometric models and electrodynamics simulations with the measured optical properties of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. Chapter 3 describes silver nanoparticle superlattices (rather than gold) and identifies their promise as plasmonic metamaterials. In chapter 4, the concept of plasmonic metallurgy is introduced, whereby it is demonstrated that concepts from materials science and metallurgy can be applied to the optical properties of mixed metallic plasmonic materials, unveiling rich and tunable optical properties such as color and asymmetric reflectivity. Chapter 5 presents a comprehensive theoretical exploration of anisotropy (non-spherical) in nanoparticle superlattice architectures. The role of anisotropy is discussed both on the nanoscale, where several desirable metamaterial properties can be tuned from the ultraviolet to near-infrared, and on the mesoscale, where the size and shape of a superlattice is demonstrated to have a pronounced effect on the observed far-field optical properties. Chapter 6 builds upon those theoretical data presented in chapter 5, including the experimental realization of size and shape dependent properties in DNA-programmed superlattices. Specifically, nanoparticle spacing is explored as a parameter that

  13. Growth and Annealing Study of Mg-Doped AlGaN and GaN/AlGaN Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-Zhu; LI Jin-Min; WANG Zhan-Guo; WANG Xiao-Liang; HU Guo-Xin; RAN Jun-Xue; WANG Xin-Hua; GUO Lun-Chun; XIAO Hong-Ling; LI Jian-Ping; ZENG Yi-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mg-doped AlGaN and GaN/AlGaN superlattices are grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD).Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatments are carried out on the samples. Hall and high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements are used to characterize the electrical and structural prosperities of the as-grown and annealed samples, respectively. The results of hall measurements show that after annealing, the Mg-doped AlGaN sample can not obtain the distinct hole concentration and can acquire a resistivity of 1.4×103 Ωcm. However, with the same annealing treatment, the GaN/AlGaN superlattice sample has a hole concentration of 1.7×1017 cm-3 and a resistivity of 5.6Ωcm. The piezoelectric field in the GaN/AlGaN superlattices improves the activation efficiency of Mg acceptors, which leads to higher hole concentration and lower p-type resistivity.

  14. In-depth survey of sunspot and active region catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Clette, Frédéric; Baranyi, Tunde

    2011-08-01

    When consulting detailed photospheric catalogs for solar activity studies spanning long time intervals, solar physicists face multiple limitations in the existing catalogs: finite or fragmented time coverage, limited time overlap between catalogs and even more importantly, a mismatch in contents and conventions. In view of a study of new sunspot-based activity indices, we have conducted a comprehensive survey of existing catalogs. In a first approach, we illustrate how the information from parallel catalogs can be merged to form a much more comprehensive record of sunspot groups. For this, we use the unique Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), which is already a composite of several ground observatories and SOHO data, and the USAF/Mount Wilson catalog from the Solar Optical Observing Network (SOON). We also describe our semi-interactive cross-identification method, which was needed to match the non-overlapping solar active region nomenclature, the most critical and subtle step when working with multiple catalogs. This effort, focused here first on the last two solar cycles, should lead to a better central database collecting all available sunspot group parameters to address future solar cycle studies beyond the traditional sunspot index time series Ri.

  15. Regional variation in myofilament length-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Olivier; Lacampagne, Alain

    2011-07-01

    The Frank-Starling law is an important regulatory mechanism of the heart that links the end-diastolic volume with the systolic ejection fraction. This beat-to-beat regulation of the heart, underlined at the cellular level by higher myofilament calcium sensitivity at longer sarcomere length, is known as length-dependent activation or stretch sensitization of activation. However, the heart is structurally and functionally heterogeneous and asymmetrical. Specifically, contractile properties are not uniform within the left ventricle partly due to transmural differences in action potential waveforms and calcium homeostasis. The present review will focus on the role of the contractile machinery in the transmural contractile heterogeneity and its adaptation to changes in muscle strain. The expression of different myosin isoforms, the level of titin-based passive tension, and thin and thick sarcomeric regulatory proteins are considered to explain the regional cellular contractile properties. Finally, the importance of transmural heterogeneity of length-dependent activation and the consequences of its modification on the heart mechanics are discussed. Despite extensive research since the characterization of the Frank-Starling law, the molecular mechanisms by which strain information is transduced to the contractile machinery have not been fully determined yet.

  16. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  17. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Thiago Hérick de; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-06-27

    To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. By using data from the Health section of 2008's Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil's National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making. Apresentar estimativas nacionais sobre o deslocamento a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho no Brasil e em 10 de suas regiões metropolitanas. Utilizando dados do Suplemento sobre Saúde da Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios de 2008, estimamos a frequência de pessoas empregadas que se deslocam a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho estratificada por sexo, e segundo faixa etária, escolaridade, renda domiciliar per capita, residência em área urbana ou rural, regiões metropolitanas e macrorregiões do país. Adicionalmente, estimamos a distribuição da mesma frequ

  18. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Laboratory for Optical Spectroscopy of Nanostructures, Department of Experimental Physics, Wrocław University of Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, Wrocław (Poland); Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M. [Technische Physik, University of Würzburg and Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Höfling, S. [Technische Physik, University of Würzburg and Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, KY16 9SS, St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  19. Statistical region-based active contours with exponential family observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lecellier, François; Fadili, Jalal; Aubert, Gilles; Revenu, Marinette

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on statistical region-based active contour models where image features (e.g. intensity) are random variables whose distribution belongs to some parametric family (e.g. exponential) rather than confining ourselves to the special Gaussian case. Using shape derivation tools, our effort focuses on constructing a general expression for the derivative of the energy (with respect to a domain) and derive the corresponding evolution speed. A general result is stated within the framework of multi-parameter exponential family. More particularly, when using Maximum Likelihood estimators, the evolution speed has a closed-form expression that depends simply on the probability density function, while complicating additive terms appear when using other estimators, e.g. moments method. Experimental results on both synthesized and real images demonstrate the applicability of our approach.

  20. Seismic Halos Around Active Regions: An MHD Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2007-01-01

    Comprehending the manner in which magnetic fields affect propagating waves is a first step toward the helioseismic construction of accurate models of active region sub-surface structure and dynamics. Here, we present a numerical method to compute the linear interaction of waves with magnetic fields embedded in a solar-like stratified background. The ideal Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) equations are solved in a 3-dimensional box that straddles the solar photosphere, extending from 35 Mm within to 1.2 Mm into the atmosphere. One of the challenges in performing these simulations involves generating a Magneto-Hydro-Static (MHS) state wherein the stratification assumes horizontal inhomogeneity in addition to the strong vertical stratification associated with the near-surface layers. Keeping in mind that the aim of this effort is to understand and characterize linear MHD interactions, we discuss a means of computing statically consistent background states. Results from a simulation of waves interacting with a flux tub...

  1. Data-driven Simulations of Evolving Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M.; DeRosa, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of coronal field evolution in response to photospheric driving. In the simulations, the coronal field evolves according to magnetofriction, which ensures that the model field evolves toward a non-linear force-free state. Unlike static field extrapolation methods, this approach takes into account the history of the photospheric field evolution. This allows for the formation of flux ropes as well as current sheets between magnetic domains of connectivity. Using time sequences of HMI magnetograms as the bottom boundary condition, we apply this method to model the emergence and evolution of various active regions. Comparisons of the models with AIA observations and with HMI vector magnetogram inversions will be discussed.

  2. SIGN SINGULARITY AND FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; De Vita, G. [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Kazachenko, M. D.; Krucker, S.; Welsch, B. T.; Fisher, G. H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley 94720, California (United States); Primavera, L.; Servidio, S.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Vecchio, A., E-mail: sorriso@fis.unical.it [INGV, Sede di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 30C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares and the presence of correlation with Extreme-Ultra-Violet and X-ray flux suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small-scale properties of the current structures.

  3. Recent earthquake activity in Trichonis region and its tectonic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. DELIBASIS

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY. - The aftershock activity associated with the central Greece
    (Trichonis Lake earthquake of |une-Dec. 1975, has been studied, with emphasis
    on the time and magnitude distribution. It has been found that the value of b,
    in Gutenberg - R i c h t e r ' s relationship was near the same for the primary as
    well as the secondary or second order aftershocks of the sequences, but depends
    upon the focal depth.
    A correlation between the calculated focal mechanisms and the associated
    stress components to the distribution pattern of meizoseismic effects as well
    as to the geological structure of the seismic region was found.
    The seismic region lies at the top of an anticline which was found moving
    downwards, apparently due to compressional stresses.
    Within the series of three earthquakes the progress of the destruction of
    the buildings was observed and reported. The interest is concentrated to modern
    buildings out of reinforced concrete and infill brick walls. The relatively unexpected
    rather bad performance of the later case of buildings was compared to that
    of the traditional small houses out of brick or stone masonry, the behaviour of
    which may be considered as better from what it was expected.

  4. Slow magnetosonic waves and fast flows in active region loops

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Recent EUV spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (~100-300 km/s) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux-tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magn...

  5. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, D Y; Chelpanov, A A; Kochanov, A A; Anfinogentov, S A; Chupin, S A; Myshyakov, I I; Tomin, V E

    2015-01-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet -- optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1--2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe ix 171A line. High frequency oscillations (5--7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle i...

  6. Deflection and Rotation of CMEs from Active Region 11158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Christina; Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Yashiro, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    Between 13 and 16 February 2011, a series of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupted from multiple polarity inversion lines within active region 11158. For seven of these CMEs we employ the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) flux rope model to determine the CME trajectory using both Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and coronagraph images. We then use the model called Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT) for nonradial CME dynamics driven by magnetic forces to simulate the deflection and rotation of the seven CMEs. We find good agreement between ForeCAT results and reconstructed CME positions and orientations. The CME deflections range in magnitude between 10^{circ } and 30^{circ}. All CMEs are deflected to the north, but we find variations in the direction of the longitudinal deflection. The rotations range between 5^{circ} and 50^{circ} with both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Three of the CMEs begin with initial positions within 2^{circ} from one another. These three CMEs are all deflected primarily northward, with some minor eastward deflection, and rotate counterclockwise. Their final positions and orientations, however, differ by 20^{circ} and 30^{circ}, respectively. This variation in deflection and rotation results from differences in the CME expansion and radial propagation close to the Sun, as well as from the CME mass. Ultimately, only one of these seven CMEs yielded discernible in situ signatures near Earth, although the active region faced toward Earth throughout the eruptions. We suggest that the differences in the deflection and rotation of the CMEs can explain whether each CME impacted or missed Earth.

  7. Effect of post-annealing temperatures on thin-film transistors with ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} superlattice channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Ye Kyun [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Seong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyung Koun, E-mail: chohk@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Oxide-based thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated using ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} superlattice channels deposited by atomic layer deposition. Here, a post-annealing treatment was performed at various temperatures (200–550 °C) and the properties of the oxide TFTs were evaluated. An annealing temperature up to 250 °C showed enhanced TFT performance, while further increases in the annealing temperature resulted in an abruptly invisible switching property due to the high conductivity of the channel layers. With respect to annealing temperature, increased electrical conductivity in the superlattice films was attributed to the increase of conducting crystalline layers due to the inter-diffusion behavior between the ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. The formation of the conducting layer was related to substitution by Al{sup 3+} ions into Zn{sup 2+} sites in the inter-diffusion region. The ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} superlattice TFT with the best field effect mobility, 30.2 cm{sup 2}/Vs, was observed for an annealing temperature of 250 °C. - Highlights: • Thin-film transistors (TFTs) of ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} superlattice channel were studied. • Effect of annealing temperature of the TFTs was investigated. • Electrical properties of superlattice TFTs were tuned by post-annealing. • Increased conductivity was attributed to the interdiffusion within channels. • Annealing temperature affected microstructure and electrical properties.

  8. Institutional Capacity of Innovation Activity Development in theRegion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Aleksandrovich Rumyantsev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study under the theme of development of institutions of innovation sphere, transfer of scientific results to the real sector of the economy. The purpose of the study is to reveal institutional capacities of strengthening the implementation of research findings, drawing on the functional properties of institutions with regard to innovation activities. The methodology is to apply well-known methodological principles to the solution of emerging challenges (software-based method for fundamental scientific result implementation, sectoral research organizations in the new management environment and statistical records of process innovations by analogy with product innovations. The article puts forward and justifies the proposal for strategic innovation as the institution of communicating the results of fundamental research to social practice by integrating into a single process the results of oriented fundamental research, applied research, engineering development, development and other works, which are realized in the form of a material object or service of a high technology level. The distinguishing feature of strategic innovation is a future-oriented outlook and the solution of long-term objectives. Russian scientific achievements can become the basis for strategic innovation development. The article gives examples of possible research field where strategic innovation can be developed and demonstrates an innovative implementation mechanism in the format of specialized research-and-production program which combines government and business participation. The paper gives arguments and development ways of the institution of sectoral research organizations as providers of state technological policy in sectors and regions; coordination of import substitution; centers of communication establishment with engineering companies; analytical and predictive research. The study justifies the expediency of developing an

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  10. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT and Köhler theory (KT to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method.

    Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to

  11. Piezoelectrics by Design: A Route through Short-period Perovskite Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Hena; Saha-Dasgupta, T

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory, we study piezoelectricity in short-period superlattices made with combination of ferroelectric and paraelectric components and exhibiting polar discontinuities. We show that piezoelectric response of such a superlattice can be tuned both in terms of sign and magnitude with a choice of its components. As these superlattices with nonswitchable polarization do not undergo ferroelectric transitions, we predict them to exhibit a robust piezoelectric response with weaker temperature dependence compared to their bulk counterparts.

  12. 77 FR 24952 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... ICR (August 26, 2009; 74 FR 43118). The last collection request anticipated the program progressing... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze... organizations and facilities potentially regulated under the regional haze rule. Title: Regional...

  13. Picosecond luminescence approach to vertical transport in GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud, B.; Chomette, A.; Lambert, B.; Regreny, A.; Romestain, R.; Edel, P.

    1986-03-01

    Picosecond luminescence of GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices has been measured at 5 K. Asymetrical structures where one larger well is introduced at 9000 Å from the surface are studied. It is then possible to estimate the mean transfer time of photoexcited carriers through 9000 Å of superlattice. This time is found to be about 4 nsec in a 40/40 Å superlattice and 800 psec in a 30/30 Å one. This evidences the rather high mobility of small period superlattices in the growth direction.

  14. A GaAssolarAlAs superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnerl, S.; Pesahl, S.; Schomburg, E.; Grenzer, J.; Renk, K. F.; Pellemans, H. P. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pavel'ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Yu.; Ignatov, A. A.; Melzer, B.; Ustinov, V.; Ivanov, S.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a GaAs/AlAs, wide-miniband, superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses (operated at room temperature); the autocorrelator is based on the THz radiation-induced reduction of current through the superlattice. THz radiation (frequency 7.2 THz) from the FELIX (free-electron laser for infrared experiments) was coupled into the superlattice with an antenna system. We measured the current reduction for two time-delayed pulses and found that the signal decreased when the time delay was smaller than the pulse duration. With this superlattice autocorrelator we were able to resolve laser pulses that had a duration of a few picoseconds.

  15. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K. V., E-mail: malyshev@bmstu.ru [Electronics and Laser Technology Department, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-28

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh–Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F{sup 0}{sub 11}(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional “cubic” diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  16. Quasi free-standing silicene in a superlattice with hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2013-11-12

    We study a superlattice of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride by first principles calculations and demonstrate that the interaction between the layers of the superlattice is very small. As a consequence, quasi free-standing silicene is realized in this superlattice. In particular, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved. Due to the wide band gap of hexagonal boron nitride, the superlattice realizes the characteristic physical phenomena of free-standing silicene. In particular, we address by model calculations the combined effect of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and an external electric field, which induces a transition from a semimetal to a topological insulator and further to a band insulator.

  17. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  18. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F011(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional "cubic" diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  19. SIZE ENTERPRISES’ INFLUENCE FOR INNOVATION ACTIVITY IN REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM IN POMORSKIE REGION IN 2009-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Świadek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In transition countries, company’s size has a big impact on economy processes, including innovation activity in industry. The main objective of the study was to search for the impact of class size of enterprises on their innovation activity within the regional industrial system in Pomorskie region, and consequently determine the boundary conditions for the model structure of regional innovation networks, which take into account the specificity of region, allowing a skillful creation of innovation policy. Methodological part of the study was based on probit modeling (probability theory.

  20. On Magnetic Activity Band Overlap, Interaction, and the Formation of Complex Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an phenomenological picture of the how the $\\sim$11-year sunspot cycle of Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22-year magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particular susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown---producing flares and coronal mass ejections of most severe magnitude.

  1. Magnetic structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region

    CERN Document Server

    Sasso, C; Solanki, S K

    2013-01-01

    While the magnetic field in quiescent prominences has been widely investigated, less is known about the field in activated prominences. We introduce observational results on the magnetic field structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region. We study, in particular, its magnetic structure and line-of-sight flows during its early activated phase, shortly before it displays signs of rotation. We invert the Stokes profiles of the chromospheric He I 10830 A triplet and the photospheric Si I 10827 A line observed in this filament by the VTT on Tenerife. Using these inversion results we present and interpret the first maps of velocity and magnetic field obtained in an activated filament, both in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Up to 5 different magnetic components are found in the chromospheric layers of the filament, while outside the filament a single component is sufficient to reproduce the observations. Magnetic components displaying an upflow are preferentially located towards the centre of...

  2. Oscillations in the Flaring Active Region NOAA 11272

    CERN Document Server

    Cuellar, S M Conde; Montaña, C E Cedeño

    2016-01-01

    We studied waves seen during the class C1.9 flare that occurred in Active Region NOAA 11272 on SOL2011-08-17. We found standing waves with periods in the 9- and 19-minute band in six extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths of the SDO/AIA instrument. We succeeded in identifying the magnetic arc where the flare started and two neighbour loops that were disturbed in sequence. The analysed standing waves spatially coincide with these observed EUV loops. To study the wave characteristics along the loops, we extrapolated field lines from the line-of-sight magnetograms using the force-free approximation in the linear regime. We used atmosphere models to determine the mass density and temperature at each height of the loop. Then, we calculated the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds using densities $10^8 \\lesssim n_i \\lesssim 10^{17}$ cm$^{-3}$ and temperatures $10^3 \\lesssim T \\lesssim 10^7$ K. The brightness asymmetry in the observed standing waves resembles the Alfv{\\'e}n speed distribution along the loops, but the atmosphe...

  3. Evidence of Twisted flux-tube Emergence in Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Poisson, Mariano; Démoulin, Pascal; Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2015-01-01

    Elongated magnetic polarities are observed during the emergence phase of bipolar active regions (ARs). These extended features, called magnetic tongues, are interpreted as a consequence of the azimuthal component of the magnetic flux in the toroidal flux-tubes that form ARs. We develop a new systematic and user-independent method to identify AR tongues. Our method is based on determining and analyzing the evolution of the AR main polarity inversion line (PIL). The effect of the tongues is quantified by measuring the acute angle [ tau] between the orientation of the PIL and the direction orthogonal to the AR main bipolar axis. We apply a simple model to simulate the emergence of a bipolar AR. This model lets us interpret the effect of magnetic tongues on parameters that characterize ARs ( e.g. the PIL inclination and the tilt angles, and their evolution). In this idealized kinematic emergence model, tau is a monotonically increasing function of the twist and has the same sign as the magnetic helicity. We syste...

  4. Contracting and Erupting Components of Sigmoidal Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rui; Török, Tibor; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Haimin

    2012-01-01

    It is recently noted that solar eruptions can be associated with the contraction of coronal loops that are not involved in magnetic reconnection processes. In this paper, we investigate five coronal eruptions originating from four sigmoidal active regions, using high-cadence, high-resolution narrowband EUV images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO}). The magnitudes of the flares associated with the eruptions range from the GOES-class B to X. Owing to the high-sensitivity and broad temperature coverage of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO, we are able to identify both the contracting and erupting components of the eruptions: the former is observed in cold AIA channels as the contracting coronal loops overlying the elbows of the sigmoid, and the latter is preferentially observed in warm/hot AIA channels as an expanding bubble originating from the center of the sigmoid. The initiation of eruption always precedes the contraction, and in the energetically mild events (B and C flares), ...

  5. Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2013-01-01

    We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

  6. Interchange reconnection between an active region and a corona hole

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, L; Yan, X L; Xue, Z K

    2013-01-01

    With the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we present a magnetic interaction between an isolated coronal hole (CH) and an emerging active region (AR). The AR emerged nearby the CH and interacted with it. Bright loops constantly formed between them, which led to a continuous retreat of the CH boundaries (CHBs). Meanwhile, two coronal dimmings respectively appeared at the negative polarity of the AR and the east boundary of the bright loops, and the AR was partly disturbed. Loop eruptions followed by a flare occurred in the AR. The interaction was also accompanied by many jets and an arc-shaped brightening that appeared to be observational signatures of magnetic reconnection at the CHBs. By comparing the observations with the derived coronal magnetic configuration, it is suggested that the interaction between the CH and the AR excellently fitted in with the model of interchange reconnection. It appears t...

  7. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargill, P. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW, UKAND (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ∼ T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  8. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Patsourakos, S

    2008-01-01

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of ...

  9. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Demoulin, P; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Green, L M; Steed, K; Carlyle, J

    2013-01-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EIS instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359 arcsec x 485 arcsec. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the AR age, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP b...

  10. Study of solar active regions based on BOAO vector magnetograms

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Y J; Yun, H S; Cho, E A

    1999-01-01

    In this study we present the study of solar active regions based on BOAO vector magnetograms and $H\\alpha$ filtergrams. With the new calibration method we analyzed BOAO vector magnetograms taken from the SOFT observational system to compare with those of other observing systems. In this study it has been demonstrated that (1) our longitudinal magnetogram matches very well the corresponding Mitaka's magnetogram to the extent that the maximum correlation yields r=0.962 between our re-scaled longitudinal magnetogram and the Mitaka's magnetogram; (2) according to a comparison of our magnetograms of AR 8422 with those taken at Mitaka solar observatory their longitudinal fields are very similar to each other while transverse fields are a little different possibly due to large noise level; (3) main features seen by our longitudinal magnetograms of AR 8422 and AR 8419 and the corresponding Kitt Peak magnetograms are very similar to each other; (4) time series of our vector magnetograms and H-alpha observations of AR ...

  11. Evolution of the magnetic field distribution of active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacie, S.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Long, D. M.; Baker, D.; Janvier, M.; Yardley, S. L.; Pérez-Suárez, D.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: Although the temporal evolution of active regions (ARs) is relatively well understood, the processes involved continue to be the subject of investigation. We study how the magnetic field of a series of ARs evolves with time to better characterise how ARs emerge and disperse. Methods: We examined the temporal variation in the magnetic field distribution of 37 emerging ARs. A kernel density estimation plot of the field distribution was created on a log-log scale for each AR at each time step. We found that the central portion of the distribution is typically linear, and its slope was used to characterise the evolution of the magnetic field. Results: The slopes were seen to evolve with time, becoming less steep as the fragmented emerging flux coalesces. The slopes reached a maximum value of -1.5 just before the time of maximum flux before becoming steeper during the decay phase towards the quiet-Sun value of -3. This behaviour differs significantly from a classical diffusion model, which produces a slope of -1. These results suggest that simple classical diffusion is not responsible for the observed changes in field distribution, but that other processes play a significant role in flux dispersion. Conclusions: We propose that the steep negative slope seen during the late-decay phase is due to magnetic flux reprocessing by (super)granular convective cells.

  12. Oscillations in the Flaring Active Region NOAA 11272

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Cuellar, S. M.; Costa, J. E. R.; Cedeño Montaña, C. E.

    2016-11-01

    We studied waves seen during the class C1.9 flare that occurred in Active Region NOAA 11272 on SOL2011-08-17. We found standing waves with periods in the 9- and 19-minute band in six extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths of the SDO/AIA instrument. We succeeded in identifying the magnetic arc where the flare started and two neighbour loops that were disturbed in sequence. The analysed standing waves spatially coincide with these observed EUV loops. To study the wave characteristics along the loops, we extrapolated field lines from the line-of-sight magnetograms using the force-free approximation in the linear regime. We used atmosphere models to determine the mass density and temperature at each height of the loop. Then, we calculated the sound and Alfvén speeds using densities 108 ≲ ni ≲ 10^{17} cm^{-3} and temperatures 103 ≲ T ≲ 107 K. The brightness asymmetry in the observed standing waves resembles the Alfvén speed distribution along the loops, but the atmospheric model we used needs higher densities to explain the observed periods.

  13. Data-driven coronal evolutionary model of active region 11944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent availability of systematic measurements of vector magnetic fields and Doppler velocities has allowed us to utilize a data-driven approach for modeling observed active regions (AR), a crucial step for understanding the nature of solar flare initiation. We use a sequence of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the SDO to drive magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in the the vicinity of AR 11944, where an X1.2 flare on January 7 2014 occurred. To drive the coronal field we impose a time-dependent boundary condition based on temporal sequences of magnetic and electric fields at the bottom of the computational domain, i.e. the photosphere. To derive the electric fields we use a recently improved poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD), which we call the ``PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal'' or PDFI technique. We investigate the results of the simulated coronal evolution, compare those with EUV observations from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and discuss what we could learn from them. This work is a a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin and is a part of Coronal Global Evolutionary (CGEM) Model, funded jointly by NASA and NSF.

  14. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  15. Evolution of the Magnetic Field Distribution of Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dacie, Sally; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Long, David; Baker, Deb; Janvier, Miho; Yardley, Stephanie; Pérez-Suárez, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Although the temporal evolution of active regions (ARs) is relatively well understood, the processes involved continue to be the subject of investigation. We study how the magnetic field of a series of ARs evolves with time to better characterise how ARs emerge and disperse. Methods. We examine the temporal variation in the magnetic field distribution of 37 emerging ARs. A kernel density estimation plot of the field distribution was created on a log-log scale for each AR at each time step. We found that the central portion of the distribution is typically linear and its slope was used to characterise the evolution of the magnetic field. Results. The slopes were seen to evolve with time, becoming less steep as the fragmented emerging flux coalesces. The slopes reached a maximum value of ~ -1.5 just before the time of maximum flux before becoming steeper during the decay phase towards the quiet Sun value of ~ -3. This behaviour differs significantly from a classical diffusion model, which produces a slope...

  16. [HPV vaccination: active offer in an Italian region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Elisa; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Aquilani, Silvia; Aversa, Anna Maria; Bartolomei, Giuseppina; Calenda, Maria Gabriella; Catapano, Raffaele; Compagno, Silvio; Della Rovere, Piera; Fraioli, Angelo; Ieraci, Roberto; Reggiani, Daniela; Sgricia, Stefano; Spadea, Antonietta; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus is responsible for 4.8% of cancers, and is the main cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer can be reduced by mean of secondary prevention (PAP-test, HPV-DNA test), while through primary prevention (anti-HPV vaccine) the incidence of other HPV-attributable cancers can also be reduced. In Italy, anti-HPV vaccination is part of the immunization schedule in girls since 2008, and in 2017 it was extended to boys. However, vaccine coverage is decreasing nationwide. This study aims to examine anti-HPV vaccination practices in Health care services of Lazio Region, Italy. Questionnaires were sent or administered directly to those in charge of vaccinations. Data, collected from 11/12 (92%) Lazio Local Health Units and from 116 vaccination centers, show a remarkable diversity in the offer: 41% of the centers open only 1-2 days/week, 42% only in the morning, and only 7% are open on Saturday. Vaccination is available by reservation only in 62% of the centers, while vaccines are not administered to ≥18 years subjects in 33%; 93% of the centers call actively the girls in the target cohort, while 70% and 94% recall the patients who had not received the first or the second dose of vaccine, respectively. Collaboration with family physicians and/or pediatricians was declared by 80% of the centers. Vaccine coverage could probably be improved by addressing the highlighted critical issues and applying best practices widely.

  17. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  18. Simulation of the Formation of a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Rempel, M.; Title, A. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B vprop rhov1/2. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  19. Terahertz resonances due to edge magnetoplasmons in a wide armchair graphene ribbon with a weak superlattice potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Balev

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A strong modulation of the resonance frequencies and the gaps of edge magnetoplamons (EMPs, in the ribbon at the ν = 2 quantum Hall effect regime with a superlattice and a smooth steplike electrostatic lateral potential, due to a modulation of the interedge distance is shown. We obtain that, in a wide range of the interedge distances, within THz region the EMPs show wide frequency gaps and at peculiar frequencies the response of the system should manifest resonances. For the latter frequencies the group velocities are nullified.

  20. Short-wavelength infrared photodetector with InGaAs/GaAsSb superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuan; Xu, Qingqing; Yu, Chengzhang; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, our recent study on InGaAs/GaAsSb Type II photodetector for extended short wavelength infrared detection is reported. The high quality InGaAs/GaAsSb superlattices (SLs) was grown successfully by molecular beam epitaxy. The full width of half maximum of the SLs peak is 39". Its optical properties were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) at different temperature. The dependences of peak energy on temperature were measured and analyzed. The photodetector with InGaAs/GaAsSb absorption regions has a Quantum Efficiency (QE) product of 12.51% at 2.1um and the 100% cutoff wavelength is at 2.5um, at 300K under zero bias. The dominant mechanism of the dark current is discussed.

  1. Photoacoustic transformation of Bessel light beams in magnetoactive superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mityurich, G. S., E-mail: George-mityurich@mail.ru [Belarusian Trade and Economics University of Consumer Cooperatives (Belarus); Chernenok, E. V.; Sviridova, V. V.; Serdyukov, A. N. [Gomel State University (Belarus)

    2015-03-15

    Photoacoustic transformation of the TE mode of a Bessel light beam (BLB) has been studied for piezoelectric detection in short-period superlattices formed by magnetoactive crystals of bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20}) and bismuth silicate (Bi{sub 12}SiO{sub 20}) types. It is shown that the resulting signal amplitude can be controlled using optical schemes of BLB formation with a tunable cone angle. A resonant increase in the signal amplitude has been found in the megahertz range of modulation frequencies and its dependences on the BLB modulation frequency, geometric sizes of the two-layer structure and piezoelectric transducer, radial coordinate of the polarization BLB mode, and dissipative superlattice parameters are analyzed.

  2. Isolated structures in two-dimensional optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xin-Hao; Yang, Bao-Guo; Xu, Xia; Tang, Peng-Ju; Zhou, Xiao-Ji

    2017-10-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices". Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  3. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind; Andersen, Brian Møller; Bruun, Georg Morten;

    2011-01-01

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations...... for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites....... For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate...

  4. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Jonas R. F., E-mail: jonas.iasd@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC) - Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  5. Nonlinear thermoelectric efficiency of superlattice-structured nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbaschi, Hossein; Lovén, John; Courteaut, Klara; Wacker, Andreas; Leijnse, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate nonlinear ballistic thermoelectric transport in a superlattice-structured nanowire. By a special choice of nonuniform widths of the superlattice barriers—analogous to antireflection coating in optical systems—it is possible to achieve a transmission which comes close to a square profile as a function of energy. We calculate the low-temperature output power and power-conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric generator based on such a structure and show that the efficiency remains high also when operating at a significant power. To provide guidelines for experiments, we study how the results depend on the nanowire radius, the number of barriers, and on random imperfections in barrier width and separation. Our results indicate that high efficiencies can indeed be achieved with today's capabilities in epitaxial nanowire growth.

  6. Coupled bloch-phonon oscillations in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorsy; Bartels; Kurz; Kohler; Hey; Ploog

    2000-07-31

    We investigate coherent Bloch oscillations in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs superlattices with electronic miniband widths larger than the optical phonon energy. In these superlattices the Bloch frequency can be tuned into resonance with the optical phonon. Close to resonance a direct coupling of Bloch oscillations to LO phonons is observed which gives rise to the coherent excitation of LO phonons. The density necessary for driving coherent LO phonons via Bloch oscillations is about 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the density necessary to drive coherent LO phonons in bulk GaAs. The experimental observations are confirmed by the theoretical description of this phenomenon [A.W. Ghosh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1084 (2000)].

  7. Resonant tunnelling in a Fibonacci bilayer graphene superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sinha, C. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Biswas, R. [Department of Physics, PK College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-02-15

    The transmission coefficients (TCs) and angularly averaged conductance for quasi-particle transport are studied for a bilayer graphene superlattice arranged according to the Fibonacci sequence. The transmission is found to be symmetric around the superlattice growth direction and highly sensitive to the direction of the quasi-particle incidence. The transmission spectra are fragmented and appear in groups due to the quasi-periodicity of the system. The average conductance shows interesting structures sharply dependent on the height of the potential barriers between two graphene strips. The low-energy conductance due to Klein transmission is substantially modified by the inclusion of quasi-periodicity in the system. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Phonons in Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Milekhin, A G; Pchelyakov, O P; Schulze, S; Zahn, D R T

    2001-01-01

    Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots obtained by means of molecular-beam epitaxy were investigated by means of light Raman scattering under resonance conditions. These structures are shown to have oscillation properties of both two-dimensional and zero-dimensional objects. Within spectrum low-frequency range one observes twisted acoustic phonons (up to 15 order) typical for planar superlattices. Lines of acoustic phonons are overlapped with a wide band of continuous emission. Analysis of frequencies of Ge and Ge-Si optical phonons shows that Ge quantum dots are pseudoamorphous ones and mixing of Ge and Si atoms is a negligible one. One detected low-frequency shift of longitudinal optical phonons at laser excitation energy increase (2.54-2.71 eV)

  9. Isolated Structures in Two-Dimensional Optical Superlattice

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Xinhao; Xu, Xia; Tang, Pengju; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-01-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices." Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  10. Resonance Raman Scattering Studies of Gallium - - Aluminum-Arsenide Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Thomas Andrew

    We have made resonance Raman scattering studies of folded LA phonons and quantized LO phonons in several GaAs-AlAs superlattices. The motivation for this work was to study the electronic structure and the electron -phonon interaction in these structures. The samples were not intentionally doped. The Raman spectra of optic phonons were usually taken at a temperature of 10 K or less. The folded acoustic phonon work was taken at temperatures ranging from 200-300 K in order to enhance the scattering by the thermal factor. Two samples in particular have received very close attention: sample 2292 (50 A GaAs- 20 A AlAs) and sample 3250 (20 A GaAs- 50 A AlAs). In sample 2292 we have made resonance studies of the folded LA phonons and the GaAs -like confined LO_2 mode near the second heavy hole exciton. The results on the folded acoustic phonons show a very strong resonance enhancement for the second order folded phonons, but very little for the first order. An interference between two different scattering channels (the n = 1 light hole and the n = 2 heavy hole subbands) seems to be responsible for this effect. The resonance profile for the LO_2 confined optic phonon in sample 2292 shows 4 peaks in the region from 1.8 eV to 2.05 eV. We have studied the dependence of this resonance profile on the power density. A higher power density was achieved by using the same laser power with a tighter focus. At the higher power density the peak at 1.93 eV (formerly the strongest peak present) vanished. This "bleaching" effect is related to screening due to the higher carrier density. In sample 3250 we have studied the polarization dependence of the resonance profiles of four peaks (LO _2, LO_4, LO_6, and an interface mode) near the lowest direct gap. The A_1 symmetry confined LO modes are seen in both polarized and depolarized geometries, in violation of the usual selection rule (polarized). A mechanism is proposed to explain this result, which has been previously observed by other

  11. Heterogenous Material Integration and Band Engineering With Type II Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    of chemical vapor deposited graphene transferred to SiO2 . Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 122108 (2011). 113 Ferrari, A. C. Raman spectroscopy of graphene ...extrinsic performance limits of graphene devices on SiO2 . Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 206-209 (2008). 130 Fang, T., Konar, A., Xing, H. & Jena, D. Mobility...AlSb strained layer superlattices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS crystal growth, characterization, semiconductor fabrication, infrared detectors, graphene

  12. Transparent conducting oxides: a δ-doped superlattice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Valentino R; Seo, Sung S Ambrose; Lee, Suyoun; Kim, Jun Sung; Choi, Woo Seok; Okamoto, Satoshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-08-11

    Metallic states appearing at interfaces between dissimilar insulating oxides exhibit intriguing phenomena such as superconductivity and magnetism. Despite tremendous progress in understanding their origins, very little is known about how to control the conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using optical spectroscopic measurements and density-functional theory (DFT) simulations, we examine the effect of SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layer thickness on the optical transparency and carrier distribution in La δ-doped STO superlattices. We experimentally observe that these metallic superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light; a direct consequence of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti 3d states. In superlattices with relatively thin STO layers, we predict that three-dimensional conduction would occur due to appreciable overlap of quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring δ-doped layers. These results highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in optoelectronic devices by providing a unique route for creating novel transparent conducting oxides.

  13. Interface disorder and transport properties in HTC/CMR superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, N.; Guimpel, J.; Sirena, M.; Steren, L.B.; Campillo, G.; Saldarriaga, W.; Gomez, M.E

    2004-08-01

    The physical properties of superlattices are affected by interface disorder, like roughness and interdiffusion. X-ray diffraction allows its measurement through modeling and structure refinement. The high-T{sub c} RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (RBCO) and colossal magnetoresistance La{sub x}A{sub 1-x}MnO{sub 3} (LAMO) perovskites are interesting superlattice partners given their similar lattice parameters and because the combination of magnetic and superconducting properties is interesting for both basic and applied research. We have investigated the structural and transport properties of YBCO/La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} and GdBCO/La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.04}MnO{sub 3} superlattices grown by sputtering on (1 0 0)MgO. We find a roughness of 1 RBCO unit cell and a 30% interdiffusion in the same length from the interfaces for all samples. The superconducting behavior is found strongly dependent on the LAMO layer thickness.

  14. Shape-Anisotropy Driven Symmetry Transformations in Nanocrystal Superlattice Polymorphs

    KAUST Repository

    Bian, Kaifu

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Theory of THz harmonic generation in semiconductor superlattices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mauro F.; Winge, David O.; Wacker, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Superlattices are artificial structures with a wide range of applications and open possibilities for controlling and study transport and optical [M.F. Pereira Jr., Phys. Rev. B 52, (1995)] properties of semiconductors. In this work, we start from the full Nonequilibrium Greens Functions approach [A. Wacker et a, IEEE Journal of Sel. Top. in Quantum Electron.,19 1200611, (2013),T. Schmielau and M.F. Pereira, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 231111, (2009)] to obtain Voltage-Current curves and compare them with experiments. By adjusting the numerical solutions of the corresponding Dyson equations to a simple model, analytical solutions are given for the nonlinear response of a biased superlattice under sub-THz radiation. The frequency multiplication process leading to multiple harmonicgeneration is described. This hybrid approach leads to predictive simulations and may have important application for a new generation of devices where the superlattices are used as both sources and detectors and may be particular useful for high resolution transient spectroscopy [A.A. Yablokov et at, IEEE Transactions on THz Science and Technology 5, 845 (2015)].

  16. Manganite/Cuprate Superlattice as Artificial Reentrant Spin Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Junfeng

    2016-05-04

    Emerging physical phenomena at the unit-cell-controlled interfaces of transition-metal oxides have attracted lots of interest because of the rich physics and application opportunities. This work reports a reentrant spin glass behavior with strong magnetic memory effect discovered in oxide heterostructures composed of ultrathin manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and cuprate La2CuO4 (LCO) layers. These heterostructures are featured with enhanced ferromagnetism before entering the spin glass state: a Curie temperature of 246 K is observed in the superlattice with six-unit-cell LSMO layers, while the reference LSMO film with the same thickness shows much weaker magnetism. Furthermore, an insulator-metal transition emerges at the Curie temperature, and below the freezing temperature the superlattices can be considered as a glassy ferromagnetic insulator. These experimental results are closely related to the interfacial spin reconstruction revealed by the first-principles calculations, and the dependence of the reentrant spin glass behavior on the LSMO layer thickness is in line with the general phase diagram of a spin system derived from the infinite-range SK model. The results of this work underscore the manganite/cuprate superlattices as a versatile platform of creating artificial materials with tailored interfacial spin coupling and physical properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskin, Menderes

    2011-05-01

    We study the ground-state phases of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice in two dimensions, including the superfluid phase and the Mott and charge-density-wave insulators. First, we discuss the single-particle Hofstadter problem, and show that the presence of a checkerboard superlattice gives rise to a magnetic flux-independent energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Then, we consider the many-particle problem, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-Mott and superfluid-charge-density-wave insulator phase transition boundaries. Finally, since the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice is in many ways similar to that of the extended Bose-Hubbard model, we comment on the effects of magnetic field on the latter model, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-insulator phase transition boundaries as well. This work is supported by Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (FP7-PEOPLE-IRG-2010-268239).

  18. Spectral properties of Fibonacci superlattices formed using armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A. M.; Litvynchuk, S. I.; Bagliuk, S. V.; Lazarenko, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss and analyze the dependence spectra of the transmission coefficient T on the quasiparticle energy E of one variety of graphene-based Fibonacci superlattices (SL). The SL is built from armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNR), and the quasi-periodicity is produced by metal-like (MGNR) and semiconductor (SCGNR) ribbons, placed along the lattice growth axis in accordance with the Fibonacci sequence, which are used as individual SL elements. It is shown that the difference in the values of quantized transverse quasi-momentum of electrons in MGNR and SCGNR is enough to form an effective quasi-periodic modulation in the examined structure (no additional factors required), and the optimal nanoribbon width range for this purpose is determined. We also analyzed the dependence of the spectral properties of the test structure on the geometric parameters of the superlattice, and the external electrostatic potential. We paid particular attention to the fact that each Fibonacci generation had a Dirac superlattice band gap. The results of the study can be useful in the determination of optimal parameters for graphene-based nanoelectronic devices.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of strontium titanate superlattices incorporating niobium oxide nanolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2014-04-22

    A novel superlattice structure based on epitaxial nanoscale layers of NbOx and Nb-doped SrTiO3 is fabricated using a layer-by-layer approach on lattice matched LAO substrates. The absolute Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the [(NbOx) a/(Nb-doped SrTiO3)b]20 superlattices (SLs) were found to increase with decreasing layer thickness ratio (a/b ratio), reaching, at high temperatures, a power factor that is comparable to epitaxial Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STNO) films (∼0.7 W m-1 K-1). High temperature studies reveal that the SLs behave as n-type semiconductors and undergo an irreversible change at a varying crossover temperature that depends on the a/b ratio. By use of high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, the irreversible changes are identified to be due to a phase transformation from cubic NbO to orthorhombic Nb2O5, which limits the highest temperature of stable operation of the superlattice to 950 K. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of thin films and superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bentall, M J

    2002-01-01

    Thin layers of rare earth elements and Laves phase superlattices were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Their structure and magnetic properties have been probed using x-ray and neutron scattering, magnetisation measurements and high resolution electron microscopy. When holmium is grown on yttrium, the x-ray scattering from layers with a thickness below T sub c ' 115 A is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer with the same in-plane lattice parameter as the yttrium substrate to within 0.05%. For layers above T sub c ' there is a sharp reduction in misfit strain which is probably due to the creation of edge dislocations. When gadolinium is grown on yttrium, no sharp change of strain of the thin layer was observed up to a thickness of 2920 A. This is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer, and a failure to nucleate dislocations. For the Laves phase superlattices, a study of the x-ray scattering near several Bragg reflections revealed the presence of numerous superlattice peaks, showing that the samples exhib...

  1. Reversible solvent vapor-mediated phase changes in nanocrystal superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-04-26

    Colloidal nanocrystals are being explored for use in a variety of applications, from solar cells to transistors to medical diagnostics and therapy. Ordered assemblies of nanocrystals, or superlattices, are one particularly interesting class of these materials, in which the nanocrystals serve as modular building blocks to construct nanostructures by self-assembly with spatial and temporal complexity and unique properties. From a fundamental perspective, the nanocrystals are simple molecular models that can be manipulated and studied to test statistical mechanical and thermodynamic models of crystallization and disorder. An article by Bian et al. in this issue of ACS Nano reports surprising new phase behavior in semiconductor nanocrystal superlattices: reversible transitions between non-close-packed body-centered cubic (bcc) and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, and close-packed face-centered cubic (fcc) structures, observed by real-time in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements, upon solvent vapor exposure and increased interparticle separation. These studies offer new insight and raise new questions about superlattice structure and the forces that control self-assembly. Accompanying computer simulations show that ligand-ligand interactions are important. Furthermore, it appears that ligand-coated nanocrystals have more in common with soft microphase-separated materials, like diblock copolymers and surfactant assemblies, than previously realized.

  2. Shape-anisotropy driven symmetry transformations in nanocrystal superlattice polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Kaifu; Choi, Joshua J; Kaushik, Ananth; Clancy, Paulette; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Hanrath, Tobias

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment.

  3. The SMM UV observations of Active Region 5395

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Gurman, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft was used extensively to study the spatial morphology and time variability of solar active regions in the far UV (at approx. wavelength of 1370 A) since July 1985. The normal spatial resolution of UVSP observations in this 2nd-order mode is 10 sec., and the highest temporal resolution is 64 milliseconds. To make a full-field, 4 min. by 4 min. image this wavelength using 5 sec. raster steps takes about 3 minutes. UVSP can also make observations of the Sun at approx. wavelength of 2790 with 3 sec. spatial resolution when operated in its 1st-order mode; a full-field image at this wavelength (a so-called SNEW image) takes about 8 minutes. UVSP made thousands of observations (mostly in 2nd-order) of AR 5395 during its transit across the visible solar hemisphere (from 7 to 19 March, inclusive). During this period, UVSP's duty cycle for observing AR 5395 was roughly 40 percent, with the remaining 60 percent of the time being fairly evenly divided between aeronomy studies of the Earth's atmosphere and dead time due to Earth occultation of the Sun. UVSP observed many of the flares tagged to AR 5395, including 26 GOES M-level flares and 3 X-level flares, one of which produced so much UV emission that the safety software of UVSP turned off the detector to avoid damage due to saturation. Images and light curves of some of the more spectacular of the AR 5395 events are presented.

  4. Recurrent Jets Occurred Nearby Active Region NOAA 11931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-kun, Hu; Zhi, Xu; Zhi-ke, Xue; Xiao-li, Yan; Yuan-deng, Shen; Ning, Wu; Jun, Lin

    2016-10-01

    According to the 171 Å observation of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) in 2013 December 25∼26, a series of homologous jets were continuously found in the southwestern area of the active region NOAA 11931, from which 12 typical jets were selected and studied in this paper. The magnetic field structures in most jets had an obviously untwisting motion in the ejection process, though a few of them didn't have. The process of some jets was divided into two phases: the slow ejection without untwisting, and the rapid untwisting ejection. Before some jets started, a bright point grew along the bottom of magnetic arcade, and extended from the end remote from the jet to the end proximate to the jet, and there were two parts of magnetic structures near the bottom of magnetic arcade untwisted simultaneously in the ejection process. During the final one jet, two magnetic arcades appeared successively in the southeastern end of the magnetic structure on the jet bottom, while a small magnetic loop emerged in the northwestern end. Compared with the line-of-sight magnetogram of SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI), in about 4 h before the first jet appeared, a pair of magnetic dipoles emerged from the bottom of magnetic structure, and continuously lifted during the whole jet event. Although overall the bottom magnetic field emerged before and after the 12 jets, but for each individual jet, the variation of the bottom magnetic field was different from one another: in some jets, the magnetic field near the magnetic arcade on the jet bottom exhibited both magnetic emergence and cancellation; but in other jets, the magnetic field near the jet bottom exhibited only an obvious emergence or cancellation.

  5. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Active-region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, A.; Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding coronal heating remains a central problem in solar physics. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how energy is transferred to and deposited in the corona. We summarize past observational studies that attempted to identify the heating mechanism and point out the difficulties in reproducing the observations of the solar corona from the heating models. The aim of this paper is to study whether the observed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission in individual coronal loops in solar active regions can provide constraints on the volumetric heating function, and to develop a diagnostic for the heating function for a subset of loops that are found close to static thermal equilibrium. We reconstruct the coronal magnetic field from Solar Dynamics Observatory/HMI data using a nonlinear force-free magnetic field model. We model selected loops using a one-dimensional stationary model, with a heating rate dependent locally on the magnetic field strength along the loop, and we calculate the emission from these loops in various EUV wavelengths for different heating rates. We present a method to measure a power index β defining the dependence of the volumetric heating rate EH on the magnetic field, {E}H\\propto {B}β , and controlling also the shape of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints. The diagnostic is based on the dependence of the electron density on the index β. This method is free from the assumptions of the loop filling factor but requires spectroscopic measurements of the density-sensitive lines. The range of applicability for loops of different length and heating distributions is discussed, and the steps to solving the coronal heating problem are outlined.

  6. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. II. Clustering via dictionary learning

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Kevin R; Li, Jimmy J; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01

    Separating active regions that are quiet from potentially eruptive ones is a key issue in Space Weather applications. Traditional classification schemes such as Mount Wilson and McIntosh have been effective in relating an active region large scale magnetic configuration to its ability to produce eruptive events. However, their qualitative nature prevents systematic studies of an active region's evolution for example. We introduce a new clustering of active regions that is based on the local geometry observed in Line of Sight magnetogram and continuum images. We use a reduced-dimension representation of an active region that is obtained by factoring (i.e. applying dictionary learning to) the corresponding data matrix comprised of local image patches. Two factorizations can be compared via the definition of appropriate metrics on the resulting factors. The distances obtained from these metrics are then used to cluster the active regions. We find that these metrics result in natural clusterings of active regions...

  7. 1eV吸收带边GaInAs/GaNAs超晶格太阳能电池的阱层设计%Well layer design for 1eV absorption band edge of GaInAs/GaNAs super-lattice solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海啸; 郑新和; 吴渊渊; 甘兴源; 王乃明; 杨辉

    2013-01-01

    使用In, N分离的GaInAs/GaNAs超晶格作为有源区是实现高质量1eV带隙GaInNAs基太阳能电池的重要方案之一。为在实验上生长出高质量相应吸收带边的超晶格结构,本文采用计算超晶格电子态常用的Kronig-Penney模型比较了不同阱层材料选择下,吸收带边为1 eV的GaInAs/GaNAs超晶格相关参数的对应关系以及超晶格应变状态。结果表明:GaNAs与GaInAs作为超晶格阱层材料在实现1 eV的吸收带边时具有不同的考虑和要求;在固定1 eV的吸收带边时, GaNAs材料作为阱层可获得较好的超晶格应变补偿,将有利于生长高质量且充分吸收的太阳能电池有源区。%The GaInAs/GaNAs super-lattice with a feature of space separation of In and N constituents as an active region, is one of the most important ways to achieve 1 eV GaInNAs-based solar cells. To experimentally realize the high-quality super-lattice structure with the required band-gap, Kronig-Penney model is used to obtain the barrier thickness dependence on the well thickness and its composition. Meanwhile, the strain state of GaInAs/GaNAs SLs with various well choices is also discussed. Results show that when both the GaNAs and GaInAs act as the well layers the super-lattice can achieve 1 eV band-gap, and when the GaN0.04As0.96 is considered to act as the well layer, the entire GaInAs/GaNAs SLs have smaller strain accumulations as compared with the case of Ga0.7In0.3As as the well layer in the super-lattice structure.

  8. ON THE ROLE OF ROTATING SUNSPOTS IN THE ACTIVITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemareddy, P.; Ambastha, A. [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Udaipur-313001 (India); Maurya, R. A., E-mail: vema@prl.res.in, E-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in, E-mail: ramajor@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-10

    We study the role of rotating sunspots in relation to the evolution of various physical parameters characterizing the non-potentiality of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 and its eruptive events using the magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and multi-wavelength observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the evolutionary study of HMI intensity and AIA channels, it is observed that the AR consists of two major rotating sunspots, one connected to a flare-prone region and another with coronal mass ejection (CME). The constructed space-time intensity maps reveal that the sunspots exhibited peak rotation rates coinciding with the occurrence of major eruptive events. Further, temporal profiles of twist parameters, namely, average shear angle, {alpha}{sub av}, {alpha}{sub best}, derived from HMI vector magnetograms, and the rate of helicity injection, obtained from the horizontal flux motions of HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, correspond well with the rotational profile of the sunspot in the CME-prone region, giving predominant evidence of rotational motion causing magnetic non-potentiality. Moreover, the mean value of free energy from the virial theorem calculated at the photospheric level shows a clear step-down decrease at the onset time of the flares revealing unambiguous evidence of energy release intermittently that is stored by flux emergence and/or motions in pre-flare phases. Additionally, distribution of helicity injection is homogeneous in the CME-prone region while in the flare-prone region it is not and often changes sign. This study provides a clear picture that both proper and rotational motions of the observed fluxes played significant roles in enhancing the magnetic non-potentiality of the AR by injecting helicity, twisting the magnetic fields and thereby increasing the free energy, leading to favorable conditions for the observed transient activity.

  9. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  10. Spin Filtering in a Nanowire Superlattice by Dresselhause Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samad Javidan

    2011-01-01

    @@ An InAs/GaSb nanowire Superlattice using GaAs for the impure layers is proposed.Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling eliminates spin degeneracy, induces one miniband in the superlattices to split into two minibands and leads to complete spin polarization and excellent filtering by optimizing the well and barrier widths and GaAs layer distances.

  11. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-07-27

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices.

  12. High mobility half-metallicity in the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)8 superlattice

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2013-01-28

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. Structural relaxation within the generalized gradient approximation results in no significant tiltings or rotations of oxygen octahedra, but in distinct distortions in the SrTiO3 region. Taking into account the onsite Coulomb interaction, we find that the Mn spins order ferromagnetically, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic state of bulk LaMnO3. Most importantly, the interface strain combined with charge transfer across the interface induces half-metallicity within the MnO2 layers. The superlattice is particulary interesting for spintronics applications because the half-metallic states are characterized by an extraordinary high mobility.

  13. Nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney type graphene superlattice in terahertz regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijuan; Yuan, Rui-Yang; Zhao, Xin; Lv, Jing; Yan, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney (KP) type graphene superlattice is demonstrated. The single-, triple- and quintuple-frequencies of the fifth-order nonlinear responses are investigated for different frequencies and temperatures with the angle φ along the periodicity of the superlattice toward the external field tuning from 0 to π/2. The results show that the fifth-order nonlinear optical conductance of graphene superlattice is enhanced in the terahertz regime when φ = 0, i.e. an external field is applied along the periodicity of the superlattice. The fifth-order nonlinear optical conductances at φ = 0 for different frequencies and temperatures are calculated. The results show that the nonlinear optical conductance is enhanced in low frequency and low temperature. Our results suggest that KP type graphene superlattices are preferred structures for developing graphene-based nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics devices.

  14. ON THE CHARACTERIZATION OF METALLIC SUPERLATTICE STRUCTURES BY X—RAY DIFFRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINGXU; WenxueYU; 等

    1999-01-01

    To solve the problem on the microstructural characterization of metallic superlattices,taking the NiFe/Cu superlattices as example,we show that the sturctures of metallic superlattices can be characterized exactly by combining low-angle X-ray diffraction with high-angle X-ray diffraction.First,we determine exactly the total film thickness by a straightforward and precise method based on a modified Bragg law from the subsidiary maxima around the low-angle X-ray diffraction peak.Then.by combining with the simulation of high-angle X-ray diffraction.we obtain the sturctural parameters such as the superlattice period,the sublayer and buffer thickness,This characterization procedure is also applicable to other types of metallic superlattices.

  15. REGIONAL PREFERENCES AND FEATURES OF FINANCIAL LEASING ACTIVITIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Farkcutdinova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the problems of Russian financial leasing activisation, of financial leasing as a special management instrument which operativeness of management and comparativeness of different economic structures, including region.

  16. USFWS Region 6 2006 Chronic Wasting Disease Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an overview of how FY06 CWD funds were expended within region 6. Funds were focused on management implementation, including surveillance,...

  17. USFWS Region 6 2004 Chronic Wasting Disease Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an overview of how FY04 CWD funds were expended within region 6. It describes planning efforts for CWD surveillance, response, risk-needs...

  18. USFWS Region 6 2005 Chronic Wasting Disease Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an overview of how FY05 CWD funds were expended within region 6. Funds were focused on surveillance and response planning, management...

  19. Wavefront depinning in semiconductor superlattices due to discrete-mapping failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Zheng Zhi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the wavefronts depinning in current biased,infinitely long semiconductor superlattice systems by the method of discrete mapping and show that the wavefront depinning corresponds to the discrete mapping failure.For parameter values near the lower critical current in both discrete drift model (DD model) and discrete drift-diffusion model (DDD model),the mapping failure is determined by the important mapping step from the bottom of branch γ to branch α.For the upper critical parameters in DDD model,the key mapping step is from branch γ to the top of the corresponding branch α,and we may need several active wells to describe the wavefronts.

  20. On the Role of Rotating Sunspots in the Activity of Solar Active Region NOAA 11158

    CERN Document Server

    Vemareddy, P; Maurya, R A

    2012-01-01

    We study the role of rotating sunspots in relation to the evolution of various physical parameters characterizing the non-potentiality of the active region NOAA 11158 and its eruptive events using the magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and multi-wavelength observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the evolutionary study of HMI intensity and AIA channels, it is observed that the AR consists of two major rotating sunspots one connected to flare-prone region and another with CME. The constructed space-time intensity maps reveal that the sunspots exhibited peak rotation rates coinciding with the occurrence of the major eruptive events. Further, temporal profiles of twist parameters, viz., average shear angle, $\\alpha_{\\rm av}$, $\\alpha_{\\rm best}$, derived from HMI vector magnetograms and the rate of helicity injection, obtained from the horizontal flux motions of HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, corresponded well with ...

  1. The phonon-polariton spectrum of one-dimensional Rudin-Shapiro photonic superlattices with uniaxial polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of the optical-phonon-associated polaritonic modes that appear under oblique light incidence in 1D superlattices made of photonic materials are studied. The investigated systems result from the periodic repetition of quasiregular Rudin-Shapiro (RS) multilayer units. It is assume that the structure consists of both passive non-dispersive layers of constant refraction index and active layers of uniaxial polar materials. In particular, we consider III-V wurtzite nitrides. The optical axis of these polaritonic materials is taken along the growth direction. Maxwell equations are solved using the transfer matrix technique for all admissible values of the incidence angle.

  2. DC Leakage behavior and Conduction Mechanism in (BiFeO3)m(SrTiO3)m Superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Leakage current behavior of (BiFeO3)m(SrTiO3)m superlattice structures was studied and analyzed at different temperatures (303-473K) in the light of various models. While bulk limited Poole-Frenkel emission was observed to dominate the leakage current in the temperature range of 303 - 383 K, the space charge limited conduction was observed up to 473 K. With a Poole-Frenkel emission type of conduction, the activation energy range of 0.06 - 0.2 eV was calculated. The physical parameters, calcul...

  3. Probing equilibrium by nonequilibrium dynamics: Aging in Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic aging phenomena are investigated in a structurally ordered Co/Cr superlattice through measurements of magnetization relaxation, magnetic susceptibility, and hysteresis at various temperatures above and below the onset of collective magnetic order. We take advantage of the fact that controlled growth of magnetic multilayer thin films via molecular beam epitaxy allows tailoring the intra and inter-layer exchange interaction and thus enables tuning of magnetic properties including the spin-fluctuation spectra. Tailored nanoscale periodicity in Co/Cr multilayers creates mesoscopic spatial magnetic correlations with slow relaxation dynamics when quenching the system into a nonequilibrium state. Magnetization relaxation in weakly correlated spin systems depends on the microscopic spin-flip time of about 10 ns and is therefore a fast process. The spin correlations in our Co/Cr superlattice bring the magnetization dynamics to experimentally better accessible time scales of seconds or hours. In contrast to spin-glasses, where slow dynamics due to disorder and frustration is a well-known phenomenon, we tune and increase relaxation times in ordered structures. This is achieved by increasing spin-spin correlation between mesoscopically correlated regions rather than individual atomic spins, a concept with some similarity to block spin renormalization. Magnetization transients are measured after exposing the Co/Cr heterostructure to a magnetic set field for various waiting times. Scaling analysis reveals an asymptotic power-law behavior in accordance with a full aging scenario. The temperature dependence of the relaxation exponent shows pronounced anomalies at the equilibrium phase transitions of the antiferromagnetic superstructure and the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition of the Co layers. The latter leaves only weak fingerprints in the equilibrium magnetic behavior but gives rise to a prominent change in nonequilibrium properties. Our findings suggest that

  4. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  5. Electrodeposition and electrochemical reduction of epitaxial metal oxide thin films and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhen

    The focus of this dissertation is the electrodeposition and electrochemical reduction of epitaxial metal oxide thin films and superlattices. The electrochemical reduction of metal oxides to metals has been studied for decades as an alternative to pyrometallurgical processes for the metallurgy industry. However, the previous work was conducted on bulk polycrystalline metal oxides. Paper I in this dissertation shows that epitaxial face-centered cubic magnetite (Fe3O4 ) thin films can be electrochemically reduced to epitaxial body-centered cubic iron (Fe) thin films in aqueous solution on single-crystalline Au substrates at room temperature. This technique opens new possibilities to produce special epitaxial metal/metal oxide heterojunctions and a wide range of epitaxial metallic alloy films from the corresponding mixed metal oxides. Electrodeposition, like biomineralization, is a soft solution processing method which can produce functional materials with special properties onto conducting or semiconducting solid surfaces. Paper II in this dissertation presents the electrodeposition of cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe3-xO4, 0 of cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe3-xO4, 0superlattices on Au single-crystalline substrates, which can be potentially used in spintronics and memory devices. Paper III in this dissertation reports the electrodeposition of crystalline cobalt oxide (Co3O4) thin films on stainless steel and Au single-crystalline substrates. The crystalline Co3O4 thin films exhibit high catalytic activity towards the oxygen evolution reaction in an alkaline solution. A possible application of the electrodeposited Co 3O4 is the fabrication of highly active and low-cost photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells.

  6. Cholesterol superlattice modulates CA4P release from liposomes and CA4P cytotoxicity on mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Berenice; Zhu, Weiwei; Haloupek, Nicole B; Lee, Janet; Zellhart, Elizabeth; Sugár, István P; Kiani, Mohammad F; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2012-05-02

    Liposomal drugs are a useful alternative to conventional drugs and hold great promise for targeted delivery in the treatment of many diseases. Most of the liposomal drugs on the market or under clinical trials include cholesterol as a membrane stabilizing agent. Here, we used liposomal CA4P, an antivascular drug, to demonstrate that cholesterol content can actually modulate the release and cytotoxicity of liposomal drugs in a delicate and predictable manner. We found that both the rate of the CA4P release from the interior aqueous compartment of the liposomes to the bulk aqueous phase and the extent of the drug's cytotoxicity undergo a biphasic variation, as large as 50%, with liposomal cholesterol content at the theoretically predicted C(r), e.g., 22.0, 22.2, 25.0, 33.3, 40.0, and 50.0 mol % cholesterol for maximal superlattice formation. It appears that at C(r), CA4P can be released from the liposomes more readily than at non-C(r), probably due to the increased domain boundaries between superlattice and nonsuperlattice regions, which consequently results in increased cytotoxicity. The idea that the increased domain boundaries at C(r) would facilitate the escape of molecules from membranes was further supported by the data of dehydroergosterol transfer from liposomes to MβCD. These results together show that the functional importance of sterol superlattice formation in liposomes can be propagated to distal targeted cells and reveal a new, to our knowledge, mechanism for how sterol content and membrane lateral organization can control the release of entrapped or embedded molecules in membranes.

  7. The intermediate line region in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, T P; Czerny, B; Hryniewicz, K; Ferland, G J

    2016-01-01

    We show that the recently observed suppression of the gap between the broad line region (BLR) and the narrow line region (NLR) in some AGN can be fully explained by an increase of the gas density in the emitting region. Our model predicts the formation of the intermediate line region (ILR) that is observed in some Seyfert galaxies by the detection of emission lines with intermediate velocity full width half maximum (FWHM) $\\sim$ 700 - 1200 km s$^{-1}$. These lines are believed to be originating from an ILR located somewhere between the BLR and NLR. As it was previously proved, the apparent gap is assumed to be caused by the presence of dust beyond the sublimation radius. Our computations with the use of {\\sc cloudy} photoionization code, show that the differences in the shape of spectral energy distribution (SED) from the central region of AGN, do not diminish the apparent gap in the line emission in those objects. A strong discontinuity in the line emission vs radius exists for all lines at the dust sublimat...

  8. Electric-current Neutralization, Magnetic Shear, and Eruptive Activity in Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong; Török, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Leake, James E.

    2017-09-01

    The physical conditions that determine whether or not solar active regions (ARs) produce strong flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are not yet well understood. Here, we investigate the association between electric-current neutralization, magnetic shear along polarity inversion lines (PILs), and eruptive activity in four ARs: two emerging and two well-developed ones. We find that the CME-producing ARs are characterized by a strongly non-neutralized total current, while the total current in the ARs that did not produce CMEs is almost perfectly neutralized. The difference in the PIL shear between these two groups is much less pronounced, which suggests that the degree of current neutralization may serve as a better proxy for assessing the ability of ARs to produce CMEs.

  9. Changes in regional activity are accompanied with changes in inter-regional connectivity during 4 weeks motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liangsuo; Wang, Binquan; Narayana, Shalini; Hazeltine, Eliot; Chen, Xiying; Robin, Donald A; Fox, Peter T; Xiong, Jinhu

    2010-03-08

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) and fMRI were used to test whether changes in the regional activity are accompanied by changes in the inter-regional connectivity as motor practice progresses. Ten healthy subjects were trained to perform finger movement task daily for 4 weeks. Three sessions of fMRI images were acquired within 4 weeks. The changes in inter-regional connectivity were evaluated by measuring the effective connectivity between the primary motor area (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), basal ganglia (BG), cerebellum (CB), and posterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (pVLPFC). The regional activities in M1 and SMA increased from pre-training to week 2 and decreased from week 2 to week 4. The inter-regional connectivity generally increased in strength (with SEM path coefficients becoming more positive or negative) as practice progressed. The increases in the strength of the inter-regional connectivity may reflect long-term reorganization of the skilled motor network. We suggest that the performance gain was achieved by dynamically tuning the inter-regional connectivity in the motor network.

  10. Activization of the state policy on euro-regional cooperation in the sphere of the interstate regional governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Pak

    2016-09-01

    Research objective is the justification of the need of activization of the state policy on Euro-regional cooperation in the sphere of the interstate regional governance. During the research it is recognized that the realization of the state policy on the basis of the considered principles, tools, functions, factors and methods has to execute a main objective of the interstate regional control which is exercised in the sphere of Euro-regional cooperation and to promote adjustment of close mutually beneficial relations of Ukraine and neighboring states, to increase competitiveness of the Ukrainian territories and the most effective use of capacity of the Ukrainian regions in the course of activity of Euro-regions. Finally, such state policy has to be focused on the maintenance of the sufficient standard of living of the population, on ensuring integrity and unity of the social and economic space of the country, on formation of the conditions of sustainable and industrial and innovative development of regions, which will provide its harmonious integration into the European environment.

  11. Activization of the state policy on euro-regional cooperation in the sphere of the interstate regional governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Pak

    2016-09-01

    Research objective is the justification of the need of activization of the state policy on Euro-regional cooperation in the sphere of the interstate regional governance. During the research it is recognized that the realization of the state policy on the basis of the considered principles, tools, functions, factors and methods has to execute a main objective of the interstate regional control which is exercised in the sphere of Euro-regional cooperation and to promote adjustment of close mutually beneficial relations of Ukraine and neighboring states, to increase competitiveness of the Ukrainian territories and the most effective use of capacity of the Ukrainian regions in the course of activity of Euro-regions. Finally, such state policy has to be focused on the maintenance of the sufficient standard of living of the population, on ensuring integrity and unity of the social and economic space of the country, on formation of the conditions of sustainable and industrial and innovative development of regions, which will provide its harmonious integration into the European environment.

  12. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Kevin R; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01

    Complexity of an active region is related to its flare-productivity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from the magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region fr...

  13. Antibody constant region peptides can display immunomodulatory activity through activation of the Dectin-1 signalling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabrielli

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a synthetic peptide with sequence identical to a CDR of a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for difucosyl human blood group A exerted an immunomodulatory activity on murine macrophages. It was therapeutic against systemic candidiasis without possessing direct candidacidal properties. Here we demonstrate that a selected peptide, N10K, putatively deriving from the enzymatic cleavage of the constant region (Fc of human IgG(1, is able to induce IL-6 secretion and pIkB-α activation. More importantly, it causes an up-regulation of Dectin-1 expression. This leads to an increased activation of β-glucan-induced pSyk, CARD9 and pIkB-α, and an increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. The increased activation of this pathway coincides with an augmented phagocytosis of non opsonized Candida albicans cells by monocytes. The findings suggest that some Fc-peptides, potentially deriving from the proteolysis of immunoglobulins, may cause an unexpected immunoregulation in a way reminiscent of innate immunity molecules.

  14. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C

  15. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jonathan J., Jr.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    Selective layer disordering in an intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is demonstrated. The SiNx capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. Additionally, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. Patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III-nitride-based intersubband devices.

  16. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  17. Quantitative analysis of interfacial strain in InAs/GaSb superlattices by aberration-corrected HRTEM and HAADF-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy; Haugan, Heather J; Brown, Gail J; Eyink, Kurt G

    2013-04-01

    The strain distribution across interfaces in InAs/GaSb superlattices grown on (100)-GaSb substrates is investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. Atomic resolution images of interfaces were obtained by conventional high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), using the negative spherical-aberration imaging mode, and by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), using the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging mode. The local atomic displacements across interfaces were determined from these images using the peak pair algorithm, from which strain maps were calculated with respect to a reference lattice extracted from the GaSb substrate region. Both techniques yield consistent results, which reveal that the InAs-on-GaSb interface is nearly strain balanced, whereas the GaSb-on-InAs interface is in tensile strain, indicating that the prevalent bond type at this interface is Ga-As. In addition, the GaSb layers in the superlattice are compressively strained indicating the incorporation of In into these layers. Further analysis of the HAADF-STEM images indicates an estimated 4% In content in the GaSb layers and that the GaSb-on-InAs interface contributes to about 27% of the overall superlattice strain. The strain measurements in the InAs layers are in good agreement with the theoretical values determined from elastic constants. Furthermore, the overall superlattice strain determined from this analysis is also in good agreement with the measurements determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction.

  18. Dynamics of alkyl chains in monolayer protected metal clusters and their superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, R [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mitra, S [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Johnson, M [Institute Lau-Langevin, BP156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Pradeep, T [Department of Chemistry and SAIF, IITm, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Alkyl chains dynamics in monolayer protected metal cluster (MPC) systems of gold and silver have been studied by the quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Isolated MPCs investigated are 6, 12 and 18 carbon n-alkyl chain thiolate protected 4 nm diameter gold clusters while the superlattices are their silver analogues. Evolution of dynamics with temperature is found to be very different in the isolated clusters and their superlattices. While continuous evolution of the dynamics of the monolayer was observed in isolated MPCs, it is abrupt in superlattice systems and occurs at a temperature consistent with the superlattice melting detected in calorimetry measurements. A model where the chain undergoes uniaxial rotational diffusion with additional body axis fluctuation was found to describe the data consistently. For the superlattice systems, the chains are found to be held by strong inter-chain interactions below the superlattice melting. The data from the planar silver thiolate systems show similar behavior like the superlattice systems, consistent with the calorimetric data.

  19. The Role of Ligand Packing Frustration in Body-Centered Cubic (bcc) Superlattices of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Yu, Yixuan; Bosoy, Christian A; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Korgel, Brian A

    2015-07-02

    This paper addresses the assembly of body centered-cubic (bcc) superlattices of organic ligand-coated nanocrystals. First, examples of bcc superlattices of dodecanethiol-capped Au nanocrystals and oleic acid-capped PbS and PbSe nanocrystals are presented and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These superlattices tend to orient on their densest (110) superlattice planes and exhibit a significant amount of {112} twinning. The same nanocrystals deposit as monolayers with hexagonal packing, and these thin films can coexist with thicker bcc superlattice layers, even though there is no hexagonal plane in a bcc lattice. Both the preference of bcc in bulk films over the denser face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattice structure and the transition to hexagonal monolayers can be rationalized in terms of packing frustration of the ligands. A model is presented to calculate the difference in entropy associated with capping ligand packing frustration in bcc and fcc superlattices.

  20. Progress in MBE grown type-II superlattice photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Li, Jian V.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of GaSb/InAs type-II superlattice diodes grown and fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory designed for infrared absorption in the 8-12(mu)m range. Recent devices have produced detectivities as high as 8x10 to the tenth power Jones with a differential resistance-area product greater than 6 Ohmcm(sup 2) at 80K with a long wavelength cutoff of approximately 12(mu)m. The measured quantum efficiency of these front-side illuminated devices is close to 30% in the 10-11(mu)m range without antireflection coatings.

  1. Zener tunneling of light waves in an optical superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Gaburro, Zeno; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2005-04-01

    We report on the observation of Zener tunneling of light waves in spectral and time-resolved transmission measurements, performed on an optical superlattice made of porous silicon. The structure was designed to have two photonic minibands, spaced by a narrow frequency gap. A gradient in the refractive index was introduced to create two optical Wannier-Stark ladders and, at a critical value of the optical gradient, tunneling between energy bands was observed in the form of an enhanced transmission peak and a characteristic time dependence of the transmission.

  2. Theory of the Fermi-level energy in semiconductor superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscombe, J.H. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA)); Aggarwal, R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)); Reed, M.A. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (USA)); Frensley, W.R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (USA)); Luban, M. (Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Ames Lab., IA (USA))

    1991-09-15

    A theoretical study of the properties of the Fermi level in semiconductor superlattices (SL's) is made which is based upon the carrier occupation of the minibands in thermal equilibrium. We find, for a fixed carrier density and temperature, that the SL Fermi level can differ significantly from that obtained using commonly employed three-dimensional approximations, depending upon the relative spacings and widths of the minibands, with the SL Fermi level being higher than the corresponding bulk value. We find that the SL Fermi level is a sensitive function of the relative widths of the quantum wells and barriers.

  3. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  4. Electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hemeng; Li, Changan; Song, Yun [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Tianxing, E-mail: txma@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Li-Gang, E-mail: sxwlg@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Hai-Qing [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices using transfer matrix method. By introducing two kinds of gradient potentials of square barriers along electrons propagation direction, we find that Bloch oscillations up to terahertz can occur. Wannier-Stark ladders, as the counterpart of Bloch oscillation, are obtained as a series of equidistant transmission peaks, and the localization of the electronic wave function is also signature of Bloch oscillation. Furthermore, the period of Bloch oscillation decreases linearly with increasing gradient of barrier potentials.

  5. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy of quantum wells and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach-Ashkenasy, N.; Kronik, L.; Shapira, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rosenwaks, Y.; Hanna, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Leibovitch, M.; Ram, P. [Physics Department, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) has been employed to monitor optical transitions in quantum well and superlattice structures at room temperature. Excellent agreement is found between theoretical predictions of heavy hole and electron energy level positions and the observed transitions. The results show that using this technique, the complete band diagram of the quantum structure may be constructed. SPS emerges as a powerful tool capable of monitoring optical transitions above the lowest one in a simple to interpret, contactless, and nondestructive way. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. The Location of ICT activities in EU regions. Implications for regional policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Barrios

    2008-01-01

    estimaciones econométricas sobre la localización de las empresas en la industria de las TIC a través de las regiones de la UE. El trabajo considera específicamente el caso de la localización de las multinacionales. Los resultados de los determinantes de la localización de las empresas parece diferir ampliamente dependiendo del sector de las TIC considerado, como del tipo de empresa considerada. A partir de estos resultados se deriva un número de implicaciones de política.

  7. Control of Magnetism via Layer Thickness Modification in the LaMnO3/SrMnO3 Digital Superlattices and the Prediction of a Spin-Polarized 2DEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Birabar; Satpathy, Sashi

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of layer thickness on the magnetic properties in the (LMO)2n/(SMO)n superlattices using density-functional calculations. The change in the magnetic properties is shown to be controlled by the leakage of the Mn-eg electrons from the LMO side to the SMO side. For n = 1 superlattice, the weak potential barrier allows the Mn-eg electrons to spread across the entire superlattice, so that a uniform ferromagnetic behavior is obtained through carrier mediated Zener double exchange. For larger n, the strong potential barrier restricts the eg electron transfer to few layers adjacent to the interface, thus leaving the magnetism unchanged and bulk like away from the interface, while modifying the magnetism in the interfacial region. Finally, taking the example of a delta doped superlattice, (SMO)/(LMO)1/(SMO), we predict the formation of a spin-polarized two dimensional electron gas. The 2DEG, generated due to the confinement of the La (d) electrons in the direction normal to the interface, mediates a ferromagnetic alignment of the Mn-t2g spins via double exchange which in turn spin polarizes the 2DEG. Work supported by the US Department of Energy 1. B. R. K. Nanda and S. Satpathy, arXiv:0810.2126; B. R. K. Nanda and S. Satpathy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 127201 (2008)

  8. Temperature and Density Structure of a Recurring Active Region Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Mulay, Sargam M; Mason, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and Hinode/EIS. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity and filling factor obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations. A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet-spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The plasma along the line-of-sight in the jet-spire and jet-footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK. We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII ($\\lambda$186/$\\lambda$195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6x$10^{10}$ $cm^{-3}$) and the footpoint (1.1x$10^{11}$ $cm^{-3}$). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km/s. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. There is no in...

  9. Elastic superlattices with simultaneously negative effective mass density and shear modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Mora, I. S.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Pérez-Rodríguez, F.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of superlattices with layers of rubber and polyurethane foam, which can be either conventional or auxetic. Phononic dispersion calculations show a second pass band for transverse modes inside the lowest band gap of the longitudinal modes. In such a band, the superlattices behave as a double-negative elastic metamaterial since the effective dynamic mass density and shear modulus are both negative. The pass band is associated to a Fabry-Perot resonance band which turns out to be very narrow as a consequence of the high contrast between the acoustic impedances of the superlattice components.

  10. Physical properties of ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system in electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Wei; Lo Veng-Cheong; Bai Bao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the differential operator technique, a transverse Ising model (TIM) in the effective-field theory is developed to study the physical properties of a ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system. The effects of an external electric field on the polarization, susceptibility and pyroelectric coefficient of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system are discussed in detail. The susceptibility of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system decreases with the increase of the electric field, implying that the polarization is weak.

  11. The intensive terahertz electroluminescence induced by Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, Vladimir; Andrianov, Alexandr; Petrov, Alexey; Zakhar'in, Alexey; Lepneva, Ala; Shkrebiy, Pavel

    2012-10-09

    : We report on efficient terahertz (THz) emission from high-electric-field-biased SiC structures with a natural superlattice at liquid helium temperatures. The emission spectrum demonstrates a single line, the maximum of which shifts linearly with increases in bias field. We attribute this emission to steady-state Bloch oscillations of electrons in the SiC natural superlattice. The properties of the THz emission agree fairly with the parameters of the Bloch oscillator regime, which have been proven by high-field electron transport studies of SiC structures with natural superlattices.

  12. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...... density approximation (LDA) with a semi-empirical correction for the ‘‘LDA gap error’’. A similarity is observed between the results of calculations for an InGaN/GaN superlattice (with one monolayer of InGaN) and the experimental results. This indicates that the fabricated InN quantum wells may contain...

  13. Effect of the degree of disorder on electronic and optical properties in random superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E. G.; Su, W. P.; Ting, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional tight-binding calculation is developed and used to study disorder effects in a realistic random superlattice. With increasing disorder, a tendency of possible indirect-direct band-gap transition is suggested. Direct evidence of mobility edges between localized and extended states in three-dimensional random systems is given. As system disorder increases, the optical absorption intensities increase dramatically from five to forty-five times stronger than the ordered (GaAs)(sub 1)/(AlAs)(sub 1) superlattice. It is believed that the degree of disorder significantly affects electronic and optical properties of GaAs/AlAs random superlattices.

  14. Optical Properties of Self-Organized PbS Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Chang-Hui; YAO Lian-Zeng; MU Ji-Mei; SHI Gang; ZHANG Li-De

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dot superlattices has been demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1 - 10 μm in size made from PbS quantum dots 3 - 6 nm in diameter are revealed in transmissionelectron microscope micrographs, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra have been recorded. The ordering of the superlattices is crucial for the understanding of the fundamental properties of quantum-dot arrays, as well as for their optimal utilization in optical and electronic applications.

  15. Fuzzy statistic and comprehensive evaluating study for activity characterization of the active region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Zhengzhong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Vorphal, J. A., Flares associated with emerging flux regions, Solar Phys., 197 3, 28: 115.[2] Zi, M. Y., Multi-element analysis, Progre ss in Geophysics, 1994, 9(Suppl.): 110-115.[3] Wang, J. L., Zhang, G. Q., On the progress of long-term and medium-ter m solar activity forecast, Progress in Geophysics, 1994, 9(Suppl.): 1-13.[4] Liu, X. Z., Li, W., Solar active region classification and flare forec ast, Acta Astrophysica Sinica (in Chinese), 1987, 7: 55.[5] Zhang, G. Q., Wang, J. I., Li, D. Q., A new scheme used for the short -term prediction of X-ray flares, Publ. of the BAO, 1994, 24: 24-31.[6] Han, Z. Z., Fang, N. S., Application of the Fuzzy Mathematics (in Chin ese), Nanjing: Southeast University Press, 1993.[7] Preliminary Report and Forecast of Solar Geophysical Data, 1980- 1990 , 696-799.[8] Zhu, Z. Y., Zhou, A. H., Zhou, S. R., The prediction of SID's using t he slowly varying component of the solar radio flux at 3.2 cm, Solar-Terrestria l Predictions Proceedings, 1980, 4: G114-117.[9] Zhou, S. R., 22Max global character research of solar-terrestrial sys tem, The Journal of Purple Mountain Observatory (in Chinese), 1990, 9: 187-194. [10]Solar-Geophysical Data prompt reports, Part I, USA, 1991-1992, 1998-1999.[11]Zirin, H., Liggett, M. A., Delta spots and great flares, Solar Physics, 19 87, 113: 267-283.

  16. Transcriptional activation by the E1A regions of adenovirus types 40 and 41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.E. van; Gilardi, P.; Perricaudet, M.; Rozijn, Th. H.; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to establish whether the poor growth of the two fastidious adenoviruses types 40 and 41 (Ad40 and Ad41) in HeLa cells is due to a reduced trans-activation by the early region to (E1A), we have determined the trans-activating effect of this region on the expression of the chloramphenicol ace

  17. Polarization switching in vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers observed at constant active region temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Regalado, J.; Chilla, J. L. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Brusenbach, P.

    1997-06-01

    Polarization switching in gain-guided, vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers was studied as a function of the active region temperature. We show that polarization switching occurs even when the active region temperature is kept constant during fast pulse low duty cycle operation. This temperature independent polarization switching phenomenon is explained in terms of a recently developed model.

  18. Temperature and density structure of a recurring active region jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Zanna, Giulio Del; Mason, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by the Atmosphereic Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet that are obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations, such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity, and filling factor. Methods: A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The resulting EIS DEM curves were compared to those obtained with AIA-XRT. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The predicted total count rates for each AIA channel were compared with the observed count rates. The effects of varying elemental abundances and the temperature range for the DEM inversion were investigated. Spectroscopic diagnostics were used to obtain an electron number density distribution for the jet spire and the jet footpoint. Results: The plasma along the line of sight in the jet spire and jet footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK (log T [K] = 6.3). We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII (λ186/λ195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6 × 1010 cm-3) and the footpoint (1.1 × 1011 cm-3). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km s-1. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. The synthetic spectra contributing to each AIA channel confirms the multi-thermal nature of the AIA channels in both regions. There is no indication of high temperatures, such as emission from Fe XVII (λ254.87) (log T [K] = 6.75) seen in the jet spire. In the case of the jet footpoint, synthetic spectra predict weak contributions from Ca XVII (λ192.85) and Fe XVII (λ254.87). With further investigation, we confirmed

  19. Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (a Brazilian regional center for nuclear sciences) - activities report - 1999; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares - relatorio de atividades - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-01

    The annual activities report of 1999 of nuclear sciences regional center - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: institutional relations; sectorial actions - logistic support and training, laboratory of radiation protection and dosimetry, laboratory of metrology, laboratory of chemical characterization; technical and scientific events; and financial resources and perspectives for 2000.

  20. Kinematic active region formation in a three-dimensional solar dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R

    2013-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological technique for modelling the emergence of active regions within a three-dimensional, kinematic dynamo framework. By imposing localised velocity perturbations, we create emergent flux-tubes out of toroidal magnetic field at the base of the convection zone, leading to the eruption of active regions at the solar surface. The velocity perturbations are calibrated to reproduce observed active region properties (including the size and flux of active regions, and the distribution of tilt angle with latitude), resulting in a more consistent treatment of flux-tube emergence in kinematic dynamo models than artificial flux deposition. We demonstrate how this technique can be used to assimilate observations and drive a kinematic 3D model, and use it to study the characteristics of active region emergence and decay as a source of poloidal field. We find that the poloidal components are strongest not at the solar surface, but in the middle convection zone, in contrast with the common assumption...

  1. Low dark current N structure superlattice MWIR photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Muti, Abdullah; Turan, Rasit; Ergun, Yuksel; Aydinli, Atilla

    2014-06-01

    Commercially available read out integrated circuits (ROICs) require the FPA to have high dynamic resistance area product at zero bias (R0A) which is directly related to dark current of the detector. Dark current arises from bulk and surface contributions. Recent band structure engineering studies significantly suppressed the bulk contribution of the type-II superlattice infrared photodetectors (N structure, M structure, W structure). In this letter, we will present improved dark current results for unipolar barrier complex supercell superlattice system which is called as "N structure". The unique electronic band structure of the N structure increases electron-hole overlap under bias, significantly. N structure aims to improve absorption by manipulating electron and hole wavefunctions that are spatially separated in T2SLs, increasing the absorption while decreasing the dark current. In order to engineer the wavefunctions, we introduce a thin AlSb layer between InAs and GaSb layers in the growth direction which also acts as a unipolar electron barrier. Despite the difficulty of perfect lattice matching of InAs and AlSb, such a design is expected to reduce dark current. Experiments were carried out on Single pixel with mesa sizes of 100 × 100 - 700 × 700 μm photodiodes. Temperature dependent dark current with corresponding R0A resistance values are reported.

  2. Weak Topological Insulators in PbTe/SnTe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Liu, Junwei; Fu, Liang; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Chaoxing

    2014-03-01

    It is desirable to realize topological phases in artificial structures by engineering electronic band structures. In this paper, we investigate (PbTe)m(SnTe)2n-m superlattices along the [001] direction and find a robust weak topological insulator phase for a large variety of layer numbers m and 2 n - m . We confirm this topologically non-trivial phase by calculating Z2 topological invariants and topological surface states based on the first-principles calculations. We show that the folding of Brillouin zone due to the superlattice structure plays an essential role in inducing topologically non-trivial phases in this system. This mechanism can be generalized to other systems in which band inversion occurs at multiple momenta, and gives us a brand-new way to engineer topological materials in artificial structures. We acknowledge support from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China and the National Natural Science Foundation of China. LF is supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-16

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.

  4. Type-ii binary superlattices for infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razeghi, M.; Mohseni, H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston (United States); Brown, G. J. [WPAFB, Colombus (United States)

    2001-12-01

    III-V quantum wells and superlattices based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb, and related compounds have attracted many attentions due to their unique band alignments and physical properties. Recently, novel electronic and optoelectronic heterostructures have been proposed from this material system for hundred gigahertz logic circuits, terahertz transistors. RTDs, infrared lasers, and infrared detectors. In this paper we will describe the ongoing research at the Center for Quantum Devices to develop the theory, modeling, growth, characterization, and device fabrication techniques for this material system. We have demonstarted the first uncooled infrared detectors from type-II superlattices. The measured detectivity is more than 1 x 10{sup 8} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W at 10.6 {mu}m at room temperature which is higher than the commercially available uncooled photon detectors at similar wavelength. In paralle, we have demonstraed the first high-performance p-i-n type-II photodiode in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range operating at T=80K. The devices with cutoff wavelength of 16 mm showed a responsivity of 3.5 A/W at 80 K leading to a detectivity of {approx}1.51x10{sup 10} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W. Similar devices with cutoff wavelengths up to 25 {mu}m was demonstrated at 80 K. To enhance this technology further, we plan to move from quantum wells to quantum wire and quantum dots.

  5. Microemulsion-based synthesis of copper nanodisk superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhao, Yanbao; Guo, Wenjing; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-06-01

    Nanocrystal superlattices (NCSs) comprised of self-assembled copper nanodisks were successfully synthesized in quaternary W/O microemulsions containing Span 80-Tween 80, liquid paraffin and n-butanol. Morphologies, structure and thermal properties of the Cu nanocrystals were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). The reaction conditions which effect the growth of the Cu nanodisks were explored, and a mechanism for the formation of the Cu NCSs is proposed. XRD and TEM studies show that the as-synthesized Cu nanodisks exhibit a cubic crystal structure, and FT-IR and TG analysis show that the surfaces of the Cu nanodisks are covered with surfactants, which assist in the formation of the superlattice and prevent the oxidation of the Cu nanocrystals. Variation of the reaction parameters such as mass ratio of the surfactants and the presence of oleic acid is found to have a significant effect on the formation of the Cu nanodisks.

  6. Commensurability oscillations in a two-dimensional lateral superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John; Long, Andrew; Grant, David; Chowdhury, Suja

    2000-03-01

    We have calculated and measured conduction in a two-dimensional electron gas subject to a weak two-dimensional periodic potential and a normal magnetic field. Simulations with a potential Vx \\cos(2π x/a) + Vy \\cos(2π y/a) show the usual commensurability oscillations in ρ_xx(B) with Vx alone. The introduction of Vy suppresses these oscillations, rather than introducing the additional oscillations in ρ_yy(B) expected from previous perturbation theories. We explain this in terms of drift of the guiding center of cyclotron motion along contours of an effective potential: open orbits of the guiding center contribute to conduction but closed orbits do not. All orbits are closed in a symmetric superlattice with |V_x| = |V_y| and commensurability oscillations are therefore quenched. Experiments on etched superlattices confirm this picture. Conventional lattice-matched samples give a symmetric potential and weak oscillations; the symmetry is broken by the piezoelectric effect in stressed samples, leading to strong oscillations. Periodic modulation of the magnetic field can be treated in the same way, which explains previous experimental results.

  7. Magnetic domain wall energy in Ni/Co superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Nishimura, Takashi; Harimoto, Shotaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu, E-mail: shiratsuchi@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2014-12-15

    The magnetic domain wall energy density σ{sub W} of a Ni/Co superlattice possessing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was determined using the magnetic domain theory derived by Kooy and Enz (1960). To determine σ{sub W}, we obtained the saturation magnetization, magnetic domain period, and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy by individual measurements. Using the magnetic domain period and the ferromagnetic layer thickness, we first determined the dipolar length. The estimated dipolar length was about 15–25 nm, which is in good agreement with the change in the magnetization curve with the ferromagnetic layer thickness. By using the dipolar length and saturation magnetization, the σ{sub W} was calculated to be 4–7 erg/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: • Magnetic domain wall energy of a Ni/Co superlattice was determined experimentally. • The magnetic domain wall energy was estimated to be 4–8 erg/cm{sup 2}. • Using estimated value, the magnetization curves were reproduced well. • The estimated value is reasonable compared with the other ferromagnetic materials.

  8. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-01-01

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (Kueff) over 6 Merg/cm3 is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and Kueff of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  9. Fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-02-01

    Wannier-Mott excitons in a semiconductor layered superlattice (SL) are investigated analytically for the case that the period of the superlattice is much smaller than the 2D exciton Bohr radius. Additionally we assume the presence of a longitudinal external static electric field directed parallel to the SL axis. The exciton states and the optical absorption coefficient are derived in the tight-binding and adiabatic approximations. Strong and weak electric fields providing spatially localized and extended electron and hole states, respectively, are studied. The dependencies of the exciton states and the exciton absorption spectrum on the SL parameters and the electric field strength are presented in an explicit form. We focus on the fine structure of the ground quasi-2D exciton level formed by the series of closely spaced energy levels adjacent from the high frequencies. These levels are related to the adiabatically slow relative exciton longitudinal motion governed by the potential formed by the in-plane exciton state. It is shown that the external electric fields compress the fine structure energy levels, decrease the intensities of the corresponding optical peaks and increase the exciton binding energy. A possible experimental study of the fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption is discussed.

  10. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q L; Zhang, X M; Miyazaki, T; Mizukami, S

    2015-01-19

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (K(u)(eff)) over 6 Merg/cm(3) is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and K(u)(eff) of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  11. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the "Present MAG4" technique and each of three alternative techniques, called "McIntosh Active-Region Class," "Total Magnetic Flux," and "Next MAG4." We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4).

  12. COLLAGENOLYTIC ACTIVITY IN TISSUE EXTRACT OF PARBORLASIA CORRUGATUSFROM ANTARCTIC REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Raksha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms have been recognized as rich sources of bioactive compounds with valuable biotechnology po- tential. Enzymes extracted from marine hydrobionts have gained much attention because of their unique quite specific proper- ties that determined their profound applications in chemical, medical, food industries and molecular biology experiments. In this regard, our work focused on investigation of proteolytic potential of marine hydrobionts. At first, tissue extract of Antarc- tic hydrobiont Parborlasia corrugatus was separated by gel filtration chromatography on a Superdex-75 PG. Further zymography with using gelatin as substrate revealed the presence of clear band that can indicate about active enzymes. It had been shown the presence of collagenolytic activity in all eight fractions obtained after chromatographic separation of tissue extract. Tryp- sin-like (L-BApNA hydrolyzing was found only in first fraction. Our results let us assume that P. corrugatus can be regarded as potential source of enzymes for practical use. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(9.000: 354-358

  13. Carnosine: effect on aging-induced increase in brain regional monoamine oxidase-A activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-03-01

    Aging is a natural biological process associated with several neurological disorders along with the biochemical changes in brain. Aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of carnosine (0.5-2.5μg/kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) on aging-induced changes in brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity with its kinetic parameters. The results of the present study are: (1) The brain regional mitochondrial MAO-A activity and their kinetic parameters (except in Km of pons-medulla) were significantly increased with the increase of age (4-24 months), (2) Aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity including its Vmax were attenuated with higher dosages of carnosine (1.0-2.5μg/kg/day) and restored toward the activity that observed in young, though its lower dosage (0.5μg/kg/day) were ineffective in these brain regional MAO-A activity, (3) Carnosine at higher dosage in young rats, unlike aged rats significantly inhibited all the brain regional MAO-A activity by reducing their only Vmax excepting cerebral cortex, where Km was also significantly enhanced. These results suggest that carnosine attenuated the aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity by attenuating its kinetic parameters and restored toward the results of MAO-A activity that observed in corresponding brain regions of young rats.

  14. Regions important for the adhesin activity of Moraxella catarrhalis Hag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafontaine Eric R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Moraxella catarrhalis Hag protein, an Oca autotransporter adhesin, has previously been shown to be important for adherence of this respiratory tract pathogen to human middle ear and A549 lung cells. Results The present study demonstrates that adherence of M. catarrhalis isogenic hag mutant strains to the human epithelial cell lines Chang (conjunctival and NCIH292 (lung is reduced by 50–93%. Furthermore, expressing Hag in a heterologous Escherichia coli background substantially increased the adherence of recombinant bacteria to NCIH292 cells and murine type IV collagen. Hag did not, however, increase the attachment of E. coli to Chang cells. These results indicate that Hag directly mediates adherence to NCIH292 lung cells and collagen, but is not sufficient to confer binding to conjunctival monolayers. Several in-frame deletions were engineered within the hag gene of M. catarrhalis strain O35E and the resulting proteins were tested for their ability to mediate binding to NCIH292 monolayers, middle ear cells, and type IV collagen. These experiments revealed that epithelial cell and collagen binding properties are separable, and that residues 385–705 of this ~2,000 amino acid protein are important for adherence to middle ear and NCIH292 cells. The region of O35E-Hag encompassing aa 706 to 1194 was also found to be required for adherence to collagen. In contrast, β-roll repeats present in Hag, which are structural features conserved in several Oca adhesins and responsible for the adhesive properties of Yersinia enterocolitica YadA, are not important for Hag-mediated adherence. Conclusion Hag is a major adherence factor for human cells derived from various anatomical sites relevant to pathogenesis by M. catarrhalis and its structure-function relationships differ from those of other, closely-related autotransporter proteins.

  15. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kevin R.; Li, Jimmy J.; Delouille, Véronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The flare productivity of an active region is observed to be related to its spatial complexity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. Aims: We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. Methods: We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region from its surrounding part. Results: We find relationships between the complexity of an active region as measured by its Mount Wilson classification and the intrinsic dimension of its image patches. Partial correlation patterns exhibit approximately a third-order Markov structure. CCA reveals different patterns of correlation between continuum and magnetogram within the sunspots and in the region surrounding the sunspots. Conclusions: Intrinsic dimension has the potential to distinguish simple from complex active regions. These results also pave the way for patch-based dictionary learning with a view toward automatic clustering of active regions.

  16. Colors of active regions on comet 67P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.-B.; Sierks, H.; Besse, S.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Lara, L.; Scholten, F.; Preusker, F.; Lazzarin, M.; Pajola, M.; La Forgia, F.

    2015-10-01

    The OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) scientific imager (Keller et al. 2007) is successfully delivering images of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its both wide angle camera (WAC) and narrow angle camera (NAC) since ESA's spacecraft Rosetta's arrival to the comet. Both cameras are equipped with filters covering the wavelength range of about 200 nm to 1000 nm. The comet nucleus is mapped with different combination of the filters in resolutions up to 15 cm/px. Besides the determination of the surface morphology in great details (Thomas et al. 2015), such high resolution images provided us a mean to unambiguously link some activity in the coma to a series of pits on the nucleus surface (Vincent et al. 2015).

  17. Research on the Dividing Method for Present-Day Regional Active Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoliang; Jiang Zaisen; Chen Bing; Wang Qi; Zhang Xi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new idea that combines Quasi-Accurate Detection of gross errors (QUAD) with discontinuous deformation positive analysis, is brought forward to divide the regional active blocks. The method can improve the demarcation of active blocks for areas lacking with observation data and offer a new train of through for the complete study of the regional deformation of active blocks. In addition, using the Sichuan-Yunnan area as example, the practice process of the method is introduced briefly.

  18. On the non-Kolmogorov nature of flare-productive solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mandage, Revati S

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic power spectral analysis is performed on 53 solar active regions, observed from August 2011 to July 2012. Magnetic field data obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, inverted as Active Region Patches, are used to study the evolution of the magnetic power index as each region rotates across the solar disk. Active regions are classified based on the number, and sizes, of solar flares they produce, in order to study the relationship between flare productivity and the magnetic power index. The choice of window size and inertial range plays a key role in determining the correct magnetic power index. The overall distribution of magnetic power indices has a range of $1.0-2.5$. Flare-quiet regions peak at a value of 1.6, however flare-productive regions peak at a value of 2.2. Overall, the histogram of the distribution of power indices of flare-productive active regions is well separated from flare-quiet active regions. Only 12\\% of flare-quiet regions exhibit an index greater than 2, whereas 90...

  19. Controlling Nanocrystal Superlattice Symmetry and Shape-Anisotropic Interactions through Variable Ligand Surface Coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-03-09

    The assembly of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) into superstructures with long-range translational and orientational order is sensitive to the molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface. We illustrate how ligand coverage on colloidal PbS NCs can be exploited as a tunable parameter to direct the self-assembly of superlattices with predefined symmetry. We show that PbS NCs with dense ligand coverage assemble into face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices whereas NCs with sparse ligand coverage assemble into body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattices which also exhibit orientational ordering of NCs in their lattice sites. Surface chemistry characterization combined with density functional theory calculations suggest that the loss of ligands occurs preferentially on {100} than on reconstructed {111} NC facets. The resulting anisotropic ligand distribution amplifies the role of NC shape in the assembly and leads to the formation of superlattices with translational and orientational order. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Simple theoretical analysis of the Einstein’s photoemission from quantum confined superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Saha, A.; De, D.; Ghatak, K. P.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we study the Einstein's photoemission from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe quantum well superlattices (QWSLs) with graded interfaces and quantum well effective mass superlattices in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated dispersion relations in the respective cases. Besides, the same has been studied from the afore-mentioned quantum dot superlattices and it appears that the photoemission oscillates with increasing carrier degeneracy and quantizing magnetic field in different manners. In addition, the photoemission oscillates with film thickness and increasing photon energy in quantum steps together with the fact that the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation will introduce new physical ideas and new experimental findings under different external conditions. The influence of band structure is apparent from all the figures and we have suggested three applications of the analyses of this paper in the fields of superlattices and microstructures.

  1. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz;

    2013-01-01

    with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed for different types of superlattices: InN/GaN, InGaN/GaN, and InN/InGaN/GaN with single monolayers of InN and/or InGaN. The superlattices are simulated by band structure calculations based on the local......Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...

  2. High-Detectivity Type-II Superlattice Detectors for 6-14 um Infrared Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  3. High Electric Field Quantum Transport: Submillimeter Wave AC Stark Localization in Vertical and Lateral Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    superlattices. These experiments have opened the arena of photon assisted transport to semiconductor devices and paved the way for future teraherz: electronics based on quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures.

  4. Engineering the electronic structure of graphene superlattices via Fermi velocity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene superlattices have attracted much research interest in the last years, since it is possible to manipulate the electronic properties of graphene in these structures. It has been verified that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic structure of the system. The electronic structure in the vicinity of these points has been studied for a gapless and gapped graphene superlattice and for a graphene superlattice with a spatially modulated energy gap. In each case a different behavior was obtained. In this work we show that via Fermi velocity engineering it is possible to tune the electronic properties of a graphene superlattice to match all the previous cases studied. We also obtained new features of the system never observed before, reveling that the electronic structure of graphene is very sensitive to the modulation of the Fermi velocity. The results obtained here are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  5. Huge spin-transfer torque in a magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    Huge spin-transfer torque (STT) in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) achieved by superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The magnitude of the STT depends on the number of cells in the superlattice barrier and the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. The result shows that the STT of the novel superlattice-barrier MTJ can reach values up to four orders of magnitude greater than those of traditional single-barrier stacks based on three cells superlattice by designing the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. In addition, the spin-transfer torque of the proposed MTJ can also be thousands of magnitude greater than those of traditional double-barrier MTJs.

  6. Harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG LiFang; XIE WeiXia; ZHAO HaiTao; FAN WeiLi

    2009-01-01

    We report a harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in air/argon mixture at atmospheric pressure.The bifurcation scenario of harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern with the applied voltage increasing is given.The phase diagram of the pattern types as a function of the applied voltage and the air-concentration is obtained.The hysteresis of pattern transitions at the upward and downward stage of the applied voltage is observed.The correlation measurements indicate that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern is an interleaving of two different transient sublattices.The spatial power spectrum demonstrates that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern has two separate wave vectors.Both small wave vector qh and big wave vector Kh,belong to the harmonic mode,and they obey a triad resonant interaction q1h + q2h,=Kh.

  7. Interwell and intrawell magnetoexcitons in GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timofeev, V. B.; Filin, A. I.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect (interwell) excitons in superlattices (SLs) with different barrier widths (different tunneling coupling) is experimentally investigated in a strong enough magnetic field with the use of photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), reflectance spec...

  8. Thermal conductivity measurement of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattice thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; YANG Juekuan; ZHUANG Ping; CHEN Minhua; ZHU Jian; CHEN Yunfei

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattices with different period lengths were measured from 100 to 320 K using 3ω method.In this temperature range, the thermal conductivities were found to decrease with an increase in temperature. For the period length-dependant thermal conductivity, the minimum value does exist at a certain period length, which demonstrates that at a short period length, superlattice thermal conductivity increases with a decrease in the period length. When the period is longer than a certain period length, the interface thermal resistance dominates in phonon transport. The experimental and theoretical results confirmed the previous predictions from the lattice dynamics analysis, i.e. with the increase in period length, the dominant mechanisms of phonon transport in superlattices will shift from wave mode to particle mode. This is crucial for the cutoff of the phonons and lays a sound foundation for the design of superlattice structures.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of holmium-scandium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho-Sc alloys and superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy have been investigated using x-ray and neutron-diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal that the alloy samples have different a lattice parameters for the Sc-seed layer and the Ho:Sc alloy grown on top...... of the seed layer; while the superlattices have different a lattice parameters for the Sc seed, and for both the Ho and Sc in the superlattice layers. The structural characteristics are related to the large lattice mismatches (of the order 7%) between the constituent elements. The magnetic moments....... It is found that a good description of the dependence of T-N upon concentration is given by a virtual-crystal model where the peak in the conduction-electron susceptibility varies linearly between that of the pure constituents. In the superlattices, the moments also form a basal-plane helix at T...

  10. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  11. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  12. PROSPECTS AND TRENDS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INVESTMENT AND INNOVATION ACTIVITY OF THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko O. P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficient investment and innovation activity in the region is one of the key factors of its successful development. It is the process of implementation of the results of intellectual work in different types of property and intellectual values that have monetary value invested in the objects of entrepreneurial and other activities. The article considers the concept of the "investment and innovation policy" in the region. The importance of the investment and innovation potential of the region is substantiated. The factors that determine its state and development are considered. The approaches to the analysis of formation and implementation of the investment and innovation capacity in the region are defined. There was presented the legal framework regulating the investment and innovation activities of the Krasnodar Territory. The basic problems of the development of the innovative activity of the Krasnodar region, requiring the operative solutions were revealed. The basic foundations and organizations involved in the innovation of the Krasnodar region were presented. The main tool of the innovation policy of the Krasnodar region has been defined by the regional innovation center including the following elements of the infrastructure: a business- incubator of the innovative type, an engineering center and a center of prototyping. There was presented the characteristic of the main activities of the infrastructure of the Regional Innovation Centre. The information on the creation of the innovative Internet portal of the Krasnodar region and the creation of regional crowdfunding platforms on its base were cited. The dynamics of the main indicators of the innovative activity in the Russian Federation, the Southern Federal District and the Krasnodar region are given

  13. Structure property relationships of nitride superlattice hard coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitin

    Today, more than 40% of all cutting tools used in machining applications are covered with coatings. Coatings improve wear resistance, increase tool life, enable use at higher speed, and broaden the application range. Superlattices, where thin layers (typically deposited in an alternating fashion, are widely used commercially. Importantly, the hardness value of a superlattice (e.g. TiN/AlN) can significantly exceed the rule of mixture value. Superlattice coatings built from crystallographically dissimilar materials are not widely studied but hold promise for improvements in performance by allowing for both hardness and toughness to be simultaneously optimized. This is what this thesis is concerned with: a structure-property comparison of isostructural superlattices with corresponding non-isostructural superlattices. In order to grow both isostructural and non-isostructural superlattices from the same set of materials, it is necessary to grow monolithic films in different phases. Towards this end, the synthesis of different phases of AlN, (Ti,Al)N, TaN, and TiN was investigated. Films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in two different chambers that had different base pressures to study the effect of background gases on the phases and orientations of the films. Growth of AlN and (Ti,Al)N films is strongly affected in a chamber that had a base pressure of 10-6 Torr, but the films adopt their stable nitride structures in a chamber with the lower base pressure of 10-8 Torr. TaN adopts either the cubic rock salt structure or its stable hexagonal structure, depending on the growth temperature, while TiN grows as rock salt in all conditions. Single crystal epitaxial superlattices were then grown with different compositions, periodicities, and crystallographic orientations to compare the effect of chemistry, nanostructure, and crystallographic texture on hardness. Finally, the structure-property relationships of non-isostructural (cubic/hexagonal) superlattices are

  14. Characterizing Composition Modulations in InAs/AIAs Short-Period Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Lee, S.R.; Mascarenhas, A.; Millunchick, J. Mirecki; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1999-04-26

    The formation of quantum wires has much interest due to their novel electronic properties which may lead to enhanced optoelectronic device performance and greater photovoltaic efficiencies. One method of forming these structures is through spontaneous lateral modulation found during the epitaxial growth of III/V alloys. In this paper, we report and summarize our investigations on the formation of lateral moduation in the MBE grown InAlAs/InP(001) system. This system was grown as a short-period superlattice where n-monolayers of InAs are deposited followed by m-Monolayers of AlAs (with n and m~2) and this sequence is repeated to grown a low strain InAlAs ternary alloy on InP(001) that exhibits lateral modulation. Films were grown under a variety of condition (growth temperature, effective alloy composition, superlattice period, and growth rate). These films have been extensively analyzed using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microcharacterization, in addition to photon-based spectroscopes. Here we present results of several microstructural characterizations using a wide range of TEM-based techniques, and compare them to results from the other methods to obtain a unified understanding of composition modulation. Two strong points consistently emerge: 1) The lateral modulation wavelength is insensitive to growth temperature and effective alloy composition, but the strength of the lateral modulation is greatest near an effective alloy composition of In(0.46)Al(0.54)As, which corresponds to a slightly tensile global strain with respect to InP. 2) The composition variation for the strongly modulated films is as much as 0.38 InAs mole fraction. In addition, for these strongly modulated films, the modulation wave is asymmetric showing strongly peaked, narrower InAs-rich regions separated by flat AlAs-rich regions. We discuss these results and their possible implications in addition to detailing the techniques used

  15. Transport in weakly-coupled superlattices: A quantitative approach for photon-assisted tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1997-01-01

    Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters.......Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters....

  16. Electron transport across a quantum wire embedding a saw-tooth superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuan-Ping; Yan Xiao-Hong; Lu Mao-Wang; Deng Yu-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By developing the recursive Green function method, the transport properties through a quantum wire embedding a finite-length saw-tooth superlattice are studied in the presence of magnetic field. The effects of magnetic modulation and the geometric structures of the superlattice on transmission coefficient are discussed. It is shown that resonant electron gas. The transmission spectrum can be tailored to match requirements through adjusting the size of saw-tooth quantum dot and field strength.

  17. Photonic band structure of one-dimensional aperiodic superlattices composed of negative refraction metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Michał H.; Salejda, Włodzimierz; Klauzer-Kruszyna, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Karol

    2007-05-01

    The dispersion relation for polarized light transmitting through a one-dimensional superlattice composed of aperiodically arranged layers made of ordinary dielectric and negative refraction metamaterials is calculated with finite element method. Generalized Fibonacci, generalized Thue-Morse, double-periodic and Rudin-Shapiro superlattices are investigated, using their periodic approximants. Strong dispersion of metamaterials is taken into account. Group velocities and effective refraction indices in the structures are calculated. The self-similar structure of the transmission spectra is observed.

  18. Tunable Negative Differential Resistance in Planer Graphene Superlattice Resonant Tunneling Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Sattari-Esfahlan, S. M.; Fouladi-Oskuei, J.; S. Shojaei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the controllable negative differential resistance (NDR) in a proposed planar graphene superlattice structure. High value of peak to valley ratio (PVR) is predicted. This is significant because of appearance of NDR with high PVR at low biases. Our finding is important since beside the other potential applications of the graphene, proposes implementation of the graphene based superlattice in electronic devices such as resonant tunneling diode and filters.

  19. Moire superlattice effects in graphene/boron-nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallbank, John R.; Chen, Xi; Fal' ko, Vladimir I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Mucha-Kruczynski, Marcin [Department of Physics, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride feature a moire superlattice for graphene's Dirac electrons. Here, we review the effects generated by this superlattice, including a specific miniband structure featuring gaps and secondary Dirac points, and a fractal spectrum of magnetic minibands known as Hofstadter's butterfly. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Supersolid Phase in One-Dimensional Hard-Core Boson Hubbard Model with a Superlattice Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Huai-Ming; LIANG Ying

    2008-01-01

    The ground state of the one-dimensional hard-core boson Hubbard model with a superlattice potential is studied by quantum Monte Carlo methods. We demonstrate that besides the CDW phase and the Mort insulator phase, the supersolid phase emerges due to the presence of the superlattice potential, which reflects the competition with the hopping term. We also study the densities of sublattices and have a clear idea about the distribution of the bosons on the lattice.

  1. Self-Organization of PbS into Quantum Dots Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dots superlattices is demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1-10m m in size made from PbS quantum dots 4nm in diameter are shown in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) micrograph, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen from the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM).

  2. Study on band gap structure of Fibonacci quantum superlattices by using the transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, V.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.; Marí, B.; Monsoriu, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    The scattering properties of particles in a one-dimensional Fibonacci sequence based potential have been analyzed by means of the Transfer Matrix Method. The electronic band gaps are examined comparatively with those obtained using the corresponding periodic potentials. The reflection coefficient shows self-similar properties for the Fibonacci superlattices. Moreover, by using the generalized Bragg's condition, the band gaps positions are derived from the golden mean involved in the design of the superlattice structure.

  3. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium-Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Minority carrier lifetimes in undoped and Beryllium -doped Type-2 Ga-free, InAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattices (SLS) with...is unlimited. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices The views, opinions and/or findings contained in...Brook University W-5510 Melville Library West Sayville, NY 11796 -3362 1 ABSTRACT Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained

  4. Manganites in Perovskite Superlattices: Structural and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, Jiwuer

    2016-07-13

    Perovskite oxides have the general chemical formula ABO3, where A is a rare-earth or alkali-metal cation and B is a transition metal cation. Perovskite oxides can be formed with a variety of constituent elements and exhibit a wide range of properties ranging from insulators, metals to even superconductors. With the development of growth and characterization techniques, more information on their physical and chemical properties has been revealed, which diversified their technological applications. Perovskite manganites are widely investigated compounds due to the discovery of the colossal magnetoresistance effect in 1994. They have a broad range of structural, electronic, magnetic properties and potential device applications in sensors and spintronics. There is not only the technological importance but also the need to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the unusual magnetic and transport properties that drive enormous attention. Manganites combined with other perovskite oxides are gaining interest due to novel properties especially at the interface, such as interfacial ferromagnetism, exchange bias, interfacial conductivity. Doped manganites exhibit diverse electrical properties as compared to the parent compounds. For instance, hole doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is a ferromagnetic metal, whereas LaMnO3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. Since manganites are strongly correlated systems, heterojunctions composed of manganites and other perovskite oxides are sunject to complex coupling of the spin, orbit, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom and exhibit unique electronic, magnetic, and transport properties. Electronic reconstructions, O defects, doping, intersite disorder, magnetic proximity, magnetic exchange, and polar catastrophe are some effects to explain these interfacial phenomena. In our work we use first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of manganite based superlattices. Firstly, we investigate the electronic

  5. SLC Analysis on Earthquake Activity in the Regions of Sichuan and Yunnan of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yuan; Zhou Huilan; Ma Yanlu

    2000-01-01

    Using the method of Single-link Cluster (SLC), analyzing the pattern of time sliding of SLCparameters, the earthquake activity in the western Sichuan-Yunnan of China is studiedcombining with the regional earthquake catalogue since 1970 and the tectonic background.Comparing with the high level of earthquake activity in 1970's and the low in 1980's, theearthquake activity is in general at the middle level in 1990's. This paper suggests that SLCmethod, which considers the temporal and spatial relationship among earthquake events,could be adopted to analyze the trend of regional earthquake activity, it is very useful forstudying seismic activity.

  6. Quantitative analysis of interfacial strain in InAs/GaSb superlattices by aberration-corrected HRTEM and HAADF-STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy, E-mail: Krishnamurthy.Mahalingam.ctr@wpafb.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Eyink, Kurt G. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The strain distribution across interfaces in InAs/GaSb superlattices grown on (100)-GaSb substrates is investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. Atomic resolution images of interfaces were obtained by conventional high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), using the negative spherical-aberration imaging mode, and by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), using the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging mode. The local atomic displacements across interfaces were determined from these images using the peak pair algorithm, from which strain maps were calculated with respect to a reference lattice extracted from the GaSb substrate region. Both techniques yield consistent results, which reveal that the InAs-on-GaSb interface is nearly strain balanced, whereas the GaSb-on-InAs interface is in tensile strain, indicating that the prevalent bond type at this interface is Ga–As. In addition, the GaSb layers in the superlattice are compressively strained indicating the incorporation of In into these layers. Further analysis of the HAADF-STEM images indicates an estimated 4% In content in the GaSb layers and that the GaSb-on-InAs interface contributes to about 27% of the overall superlattice strain. The strain measurements in the InAs layers are in good agreement with the theoretical values determined from elastic constants. Furthermore, the overall superlattice strain determined from this analysis is also in good agreement with the measurements determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. - Highlights: ►The strain distribution across interfaces in InAs–GaSb superlattices is examined. ► The GaSb-on-InAs interfaces are tensile, accounting for 27% of the overall strain. ► The InAs-on-GaSb interfaces are strain neutral. ► The GaSb layers are in compressive strain due to indium incorporation of about 4%. ► The strain in InAs layers is tensile, and is close to the bulk value of about 1%.

  7. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  8. High-temperature crystallization of nanocrystals into three-dimensional superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liheng; Willis, Joshua J.; McKay, Ian Salmon; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Qin, Jian; Cargnello, Matteo; Tassone, Christopher J.

    2017-08-01

    Crystallization of colloidal nanocrystals into superlattices represents a practical bottom-up process with which to create ordered metamaterials with emergent functionalities. With precise control over the size, shape and composition of individual nanocrystals, various single- and multi-component nanocrystal superlattices have been produced, the lattice structures and chemical compositions of which can be accurately engineered. Nanocrystal superlattices are typically prepared by carefully controlling the assembly process through solvent evaporation or destabilization or through DNA-guided crystallization. Slow solvent evaporation or cooling of nanocrystal solutions (over hours or days) is the key element for successful crystallization processes. Here we report the rapid growth (seconds) of micrometre-sized, face-centred-cubic, three-dimensional nanocrystal superlattices during colloidal synthesis at high temperatures (more than 230 degrees Celsius). Using in situ small-angle X-ray scattering, we observe continuous growth of individual nanocrystals within the lattices, which results in simultaneous lattice expansion and fine nanocrystal size control due to the superlattice templates. Thermodynamic models demonstrate that balanced attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions dictated by the ligand coverage on nanocrystal surfaces and nanocrystal core size are responsible for the crystallization process. The interparticle interactions can also be controlled to form different superlattice structures, such as hexagonal close-packed lattices. The rational assembly of various nanocrystal systems into novel materials is thus facilitated for both fundamental research and for practical applications in the fields of magnetics, electronics and catalysis.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of the lattice thermal conductivity of Kr/Ar superlattice nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yunfei; Li Deyu; Yang Juekuan; Wu Yonghua; Lukes, J.R.; Majumdar, Arun

    2004-06-15

    The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method has been used to calculate the lattice thermal conductivities of Ar and Kr/Ar nanostructures in order to study the effects of interface scattering, boundary scattering, and elastic strain on lattice thermal conductivity. Results show that interface scattering poses significant resistance to phonon transport in superlattices and superlattice nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the Kr/Ar superlattice nanowire is only about ((1)/(3)) of that for pure Ar nanowires with the same cross-sectional area and total length due to the additional interfacial thermal resistance. It is found that nanowire boundary scattering provides significant resistance to phonon transport. As the cross-sectional area increases, the nanowire boundary scattering decreases, which leads to increased nanowire thermal conductivity. The ratio of the interfacial thermal resistance to the total effective thermal resistance increases from 30% for the superlattice nanowire to 42% for the superlattice film. Period length is another important factor affecting the effective thermal conductivity of the nanostructures. Increasing the period length will lead to increased acoustic mismatch between the adjacent layers, and hence increased interfacial thermal resistance. However, if the total length of the superlattice nanowire is fixed, reducing the period length will lead to decreased effective thermal conductivity due to the increased number of interfaces. Finally, it is found that the interfacial thermal resistance decreases as the reference temperature increases, which might be due to the inelastic interface scattering.

  10. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  11. Evolving random fractal Cantor superlattices for the infrared using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Lin, Lan; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Ordered and chaotic superlattices have been identified in Nature that give rise to a variety of colours reflected by the skin of various organisms. In particular, organisms such as silvery fish possess superlattices that reflect a broad range of light from the visible to the UV. Such superlattices have previously been identified as 'chaotic', but we propose that apparent 'chaotic' natural structures, which have been previously modelled as completely random structures, should have an underlying fractal geometry. Fractal geometry, often described as the geometry of Nature, can be used to mimic structures found in Nature, but deterministic fractals produce structures that are too 'perfect' to appear natural. Introducing variability into fractals produces structures that appear more natural. We suggest that the 'chaotic' (purely random) superlattices identified in Nature are more accurately modelled by multi-generator fractals. Furthermore, we introduce fractal random Cantor bars as a candidate for generating both ordered and 'chaotic' superlattices, such as the ones found in silvery fish. A genetic algorithm is used to evolve optimal fractal random Cantor bars with multiple generators targeting several desired optical functions in the mid-infrared and the near-infrared. We present optimized superlattices demonstrating broadband reflection as well as single and multiple pass bands in the near-infrared regime.

  12. Thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, P.D., E-mail: pabloborges@ufv.br [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tec., Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Petersen, J.E.; Scolfaro, L. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Leite Alves, H.W. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, Caixa Postal 110, São João Del Rei 36300-000, MG (Brazil); Myers, T.H. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Doping in a manner that introduces anisotropy in order to reduce thermal conductivity is a significant focus in thermoelectric research today. By solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in the constant scattering time (τ) approximation, in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory, we compare the Seebeck coefficient (S) and figure of merit (ZT) of bulk PbTe to PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures and PbTe doping superlattices (SLs) with periodically doped planes. Bismuth and Thallium were used as the n- and p-type impurities, respectively. The effects of carrier concentration are considered via chemical potential variation in a rigid band approximation. The impurity bands near the Fermi level in the electronic structure of PbTe SLs are of Tl s- and Bi p-character, and this feature is independent of the doping concentration or the distance between impurity planes. We observe the impurity bands to have a metallic nature in the directions perpendicular to the doping planes, yet no improvement on the values of ZT is found when compared to bulk PbTe. For the PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures, the calculated S presents good agreement with recent experimental data, and an anisotropic behavior is observed for low carrier concentrations (n<10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}). A large value of ZT{sub ||} (parallel to the growth direction) of 3.0 is predicted for n=4.7×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and T=700 K, whereas ZT{sub p} (perpendicular to the growth direction) is found to peak at 1.5 for n=1.7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Both electrical conductivity enhancement and thermal conductivity reduction are analyzed. - Graphical abstract: Figure of merit for PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructure along the [0 0 1] direction, P.D. Borges, J.E. Petersen, L. Scolfaro, H.W. Leite Alves, T.H. Myers, Improved thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of IV

  13. Two-dimensional Confinement of Heavy Fermions in Artificial Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    Low dimensionality and strong electron-electron Coulomb interactions are both key parameters for novel quantum states of condensed matter. A metallic system with the strongest electron correlations is reported in rare-earth and actinide compounds with f electrons, known as heavy-fermion compounds, where the effective mass of the conduction electrons are strikingly enhanced by the electron correlations up to some hundreds times the free electron mass. To date the electronic structure of all heavy-fermion compounds is essentially three-dimensional. We realized experimentally a two-dimensional heavy fermion system, adjusting the dimensionality in a controllable fashion. We grew artificial superlattices of CeIn 3 (m)/ LaIn 3 (n), in which m -layers of heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeIn 3 and n -layers of a non-magnetic isostructual compound LaIn 3 are stacked alternately, by a molecular beam epitaxy. By reducing the thickness of the CeIn 3 layers, the magnetic order was suppressed and the effective electron mass was further enhanced. The Néel temperature becomes zero at around m = 2 , concomitant with striking deviations from the standard Fermi liquid low-temperature electronic properties. Standard Fermi liquid behaviors are, however, recovered under high magnetic field. These behaviors imply new ``dimensional tuning'' towards a quantum critical point. We also succeeded to fabricate artificial superlattices of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn 5 and non-magnetic divalent Yb-compound YbCoIn 5 . Superconductivity survives even in CeCoIn 5 (3)/ YbCoIn 5 (5) films, while the thickness of CeCoIn 5 layer, 2.3 nm, is comparable to the c -axis coherence length ξc ~ 2 nm. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T. Shibauchi, T. Terashima and Y. Matsuda.superconductivity is realized in the artificial superlattices. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T

  14. Structural and electronic properties of germanene/MoS2 monolayer and silicene/MoS2 monolayer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodan; Wu, Shunqing; Zhou, Sen; Zhu, Zizhong

    2014-01-01

    Superlattice provides a new approach to enrich the class of materials with novel properties. Here, we report the structural and electronic properties of superlattices made with alternate stacking of two-dimensional hexagonal germanene (or silicene) and a MoS2 monolayer using the first principles approach. The results are compared with those of graphene/MoS2 superlattice. The distortions of the geometry of germanene, silicene, and MoS2 layers due to the formation of the superlattices are all r...

  15. Enhacement of the role of public regulation in financing of innovative activity of the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.V. Zhavoronkova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The purpose of the article is to suggest the mechanism which will define the priorities in financing the innovative activity and distributing the assets attracted by the regional authorities among submitted projects. The results of the analysis. The results of the research show that the main factors which hinder the innovative activity of businesses in Ukraine are limitation in financial resources, defects of lawmaking, the necessity of strict expenditure optimization and economic factors such as risks and a long payback period. The main task of the innovative management on a regional level is to choose and apply the most optimal management mechanisms of innovative processes for certain economic conditions and to further ensure the rational use of the resources available in the region. To focus the means of encouragement for the businesses in the region to improve their innovative activity, the authors suggest the financing mechanism of the innovative activity of the regional businesses which consists in attracting public / utility company «Agency of the regional council development» (created in 2014 and conferring such additional powers: to ensure complete and timely asset incoming in compliance with the determined priority of innovative activity trends; to carry out credit operations, the right to be a guarantor and to allocate assets on deposits in bank institutions. The scheme of financing mechanism of the innovative activity by the Agency of the regional development was worked out. The algorithm of the choice of innovative projects for civil financing at the expense of the accumulated assets which determines the indicator of priority financing according to a parameter that identifies the hierarchy of scientific-technological priorities was grounded; the latter will be used on a branch and regional level and real branch potential of the economic activity is taken into account; the algorithm is adjusted to the degree

  16. Magnetic Complexity in Eruptive Solar Active Regions and Associated Eruption Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Georgoulis, M K

    2007-01-01

    Using an efficient magnetic complexity index in the active-region solar photosphere, we quantify the preflare strength of the photospheric magnetic polarity inversion lines in 23 eruptive active regions with flare/CME/ICME events tracked all the way from the Sun to the Earth. We find that active regions with more intense polarity inversion lines host statistically stronger flares and faster, more impulsively accelerated, CMEs. No significant correlation is found between the strength of the inversion lines and the flare soft X-ray rise times, the ICME transit times, and the peak $Dst indices of the induced geomagnetic storms. Corroborating these and previous results, we speculate on a possible interpretation for the connection between source active regions, flares, and CMEs. Further work is needed to validate this concept and uncover its physical details.

  17. Definition of regional dependence of activity antioxidative enzymes means of the dispersive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly T. Bykov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In article application of the dispersive analysis for an estimation of dependence of activity antioxidative enzymes from region of constant residing, age, sex and the disease diagnosis is considered.

  18. Waste production and regional growth of marine activities an econometric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramati, Maria Caterina

    2016-11-15

    Coastal regions are characterized by intense human activity and climatic pressures, often intensified by competing interests in the use of marine waters. To assess the effect of public spending on the regional economy, an econometric model is here proposed. Not only are the regional investment and the climatic risks included in the model, but also variables related to the anthropogenic pressure, such as population, economic activities and waste production. Feedback effects of economic and demographic expansion on the pollution of coastal areas are also considered. It is found that dangerous waste increases with growing shipping and transportation activities and with growing population density in non-touristic coastal areas. On the other hand, the amount of non-dangerous wastes increases with marine mining, defense and offshore energy production activities. However, lower waste production occurs in areas where aquaculture and touristic industry are more exploited, and accompanied by increasing regional investment in waste disposal.

  19. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks--cubes and octahedrons--when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  20. Dynamical Axion Field in a Magnetic Topological Insulator Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    We propose that the dynamical axion field can be realized in a magnetic topological insulator superlattice or a topological paramagnetic insulator. The magnetic fluctuations of these systems produce a pseudoscalar field which has an axionic coupling to the electromagnetic field, and thus it gives a condensed-matter realization of the axion electrodynamics. Compared to the previously proposed dynamical axion materials where a long range antiferromagnetic order is required, the systems proposed here have the advantage that only an uniform magnetization or a paramagnetic state is needed for the dynamic axion. We further propose several experiments to detect such a dynamical axion field. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  1. Kinetics of electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, A.J.; Turner, J.A.; Peterson, M.W.

    1988-05-05

    A kinetic model has been developed that quantitatively describes electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes into liquid solutions. The model permits electron transfer from all quantum levels as well as from surface states; it also takes into account recombination in the bulk, space charge layer, and surfaces states, and band-edge movement. The model calculations define the values of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and hot electron thermalization among the various energy levels in the supperlattice quantum wells that are necessary to achieve hot electron transfer from excited quantum states. The question of whether hot electron transfer is manifested by a dependence of the photocurrent action spectra on acceptor redox potential is examined in detail.

  2. Plasmon modes of a massive Dirac plasma, and their superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rashi; Thakur, Anmol; Vignale, Giovanni; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-05-01

    We explore the collective density oscillations of a collection of charged massive Dirac particles, in one, two, and three dimensions, and their one-dimensional (1D) superlattice. We calculate the long-wavelength limit of the dynamical polarization function analytically, and use the random phase approximation to obtain the plasmon dispersion. The density dependence of the long-wavelength plasmon frequency in massive Dirac systems is found to be different compared to systems with parabolic and gapless Dirac dispersion. We also calculate the long-wavelength plasmon dispersion of a 1D metamaterial made from 1D and 2D massive Dirac plasma. Our analytical results will be useful for exploring the use of massive Dirac materials as electrostatically tunable plasmonic metamaterials and can be experimentally verified by infrared spectroscopy, as in the case of graphene [L. Ju et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 630 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.146].

  3. Electronic and magnetic properties of zincblende half-metal superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Pask, J; Yang, L H; Dag, S

    2003-11-05

    Zincblende half-metallic compounds such as CrAs, with large magnetic moments and high Curie temperatures, are promising materials for spintronic applications. They explore layered materials, consisting of alternating layers of zincblende half-metals, by first principles calculations, and find that superlattices of (CrAs){sub 1}(MnAs){sub 1} and (CrAs){sub 2}(MnAs){sub 2} are half-metallic with magnetic moments of 7.0{mu}{sub B} and 14.0{mu}{sub B} per unit cell, respectively. They discuss the nature of the bonding and half-metallicity in these materials and, based on the understanding acquired, develop a simple expression for the magnetic moment in such materials. They explore the range of lattice constants over which half-metallicity is manifested, and suggest corresponding substrates for growth in thin film form.

  4. Photon transport enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in disordered superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Pin-Chun; McMillan, James; Tsai, Min-An; Lu, Ming; Panoiu, Nicolae; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    One of the daunting challenges in optical physics is to accurately control the flow of light at the subwavelength scale, by patterning the optical medium one can design anisotropic media. The light transport can also be significantly affected by Anderson localization, namely the wave localization in a disordered medium, a ubiquitous phenomenon in wave physics. Here we report the photon transport and collimation enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in chip-scale dispersion engineered anisotropic media. We demonstrate a new type of anisotropic photonic structure in which diffraction is nearly completely arrested by cascaded resonant tunneling through transverse guided resonances. By perturbing the shape of more than 4,000 scatterers in these superlattices we add structural disordered in a controlled manner and uncover the mechanism of disorder-induced transverse localization at the chip-scale. Arrested spatial divergence is captured in the power-law scaling, along with exponential asymmetric mode profil...

  5. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  6. Tunable anisotropic superfluidity in an optical kagome superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Tao; Eggert, Sebastian; Pelster, Axel

    2015-07-01

    We study the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on the kagome lattice with a broken sublattice symmetry. Such a superlattice structure can naturally be created and tuned by changing the potential offset of one sublattice in the optical generation of the frustrated lattice. The superstructure gives rise to a rich quantum phase diagram, which is analyzed by combining quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the generalized effective potential Landau theory. Mott phases with noninteger filling and a characteristic order along stripes are found, which show a transition to a superfluid phase with an anisotropic superfluid density. Surprisingly, the direction of the superfluid anisotropy can be tuned by changing the particle number, the hopping strength, or the interaction. Finally, we discuss characteristic signatures of anisotropic phases in time-of-flight absorption measurements.

  7. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallo, Eugenio; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb2Te3 have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  8. Transport properties of graphene under periodic and quasiperiodic magnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Tao, E-mail: luweitao@lyu.edu.cn [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Wang, Shun-Jin [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Li, Wen [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China)

    2013-08-15

    We study the transmission of Dirac electrons through the one-dimensional periodic, Fibonacci, and Thue–Morse magnetic superlattices (MS), which can be realized by two different magnetic blocks arranged in certain sequences in graphene. The numerical results show that the transmission as a function of incident energy presents regular resonance splitting effect in periodic MS due to the split energy spectrum. For the quasiperiodic MS with more layers, they exhibit rich transmission patterns. In particular, the transmission in Fibonacci MS presents scaling property and fragmented behavior with self-similarity, while the transmission in Thue–Morse MS presents more perfect resonant peaks which are related to the completely transparent states. Furthermore, these interesting properties are robust against the profile of MS, but dependent on the magnetic structure parameters and the transverse wave vector.

  9. Influence of impurity on electronic properties of carbon nanotube superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Shokri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, electronic properties of single-wall armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs superlattices, n(12,0/m(6,6 and n(12,0/m(11,0 are investigated. For this reason, the topological defects of pentagon–heptagon pairs at interfaces of carbon hexagonal network appear. These defects break the symmetry of the system, and then change the electrical properties. The calculations include two parts: investigation of the structures in the absence and presence of the impurity effect, which are calculated by the nearest-neighbor tight binding model . Out numerical results can be useful in designing nanoelectronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  10. An organic donor/acceptor lateral superlattice at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Roberto; Ecija, David; Fernandez, Gustavo; Gallego, José María; Sanchez, Luis; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2007-09-01

    A precise control of the nanometer-scale morphology in systems containing mixtures of donor/acceptor molecules is a key factor to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices. Here we report on a scanning tunneling microscopy study of the first stages of growth of 2-[9-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)anthracen-10(9H)-ylidene]-1,3-dithiole, as electron donor, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, as electron acceptor, on a Au(111) substrate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Due to differences in bonding strength with the substrate and different interactions with the Au(111) herringbone surface reconstruction, mixed thin films spontaneously segregate into a lateral superlattice of interdigitated nanoscale stripes with a characteristic width of about 10-20 nm, a morphology that has been predicted to optimize the efficiency of organic solar cells.

  11. Spin-polarized transport in graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin-Xin; Xie Yue-E; OuYang Tao; Chen Yuan-Ping

    2012-01-01

    By the Green's function method,we investigate spin transport properties of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon superlattice (ZGNS) under a ferromagnetic insulator and edge effect.The exchange splitting induced by the ferromagnetic insulator eliminates the spin degeneracy,which leads to spin-polarized transport in structure.Spin-dependent minibands and minigaps are exhibited in the conductance profile near the Fermi energy.The location and width of the miniband are associated with the geometry of the ZGNS.In the optimal structure,the spin-up and spin-down minibands can be separated completely near the Fermi energy.Therefore,a wide,perfect spin polarization with clear stepwise pattern is observed,i.e.,the perfect spin-polarized transport can be tuned from spin up to spin down by varying the electron energy.

  12. Titanium-based silicide quantum dot superlattices for thermoelectrics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelli, Guillaume; Stein, Sergio Silveira; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent; Dilhaire, Stefan; Pernot, Gilles

    2015-07-10

    Ti-based silicide quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) are grown by reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition. They are made of titanium-based silicide nanodots scattered in an n-doped SiGe matrix. This is the first time that such nanostructured materials have been grown in both monocrystalline and polycrystalline QDSLs. We studied their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the size and the density of the quantum dots. The thermoelectric properties of the QDSLs are measured and compared to equivalent SiGe thin films to evaluate the influence of the nanodots. Our studies revealed an increase in their thermoelectric properties-specifically, up to a trifold increase in the power factor, with a decrease in the thermal conductivity-making them very good candidates for further thermoelectric applications in cooling or energy-harvesting fields.

  13. Synthetic Human β-Globin 5'HS2 Constructs Function as Partially Active Locus Control Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); D. Talbot; N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTransgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we

  14. A 3-Step Algorithm Using Region-Based Active Contours for Video Objects Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Jehan-Besson

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a 3-step algorithm for the automatic detection of moving objects in video sequences using region-based active contours. First, we introduce a very full general framework for region-based active contours with a new Eulerian method to compute the evolution equation of the active contour from a criterion including both region-based and boundary-based terms. This framework can be easily adapted to various applications, thanks to the introduction of functions named descriptors of the different regions. With this new Eulerian method based on shape optimization principles, we can easily take into account the case of descriptors depending upon features globally attached to the regions. Second, we propose a 3-step algorithm for detection of moving objects, with a static or a mobile camera, using region-based active contours. The basic idea is to hierarchically associate temporal and spatial information. The active contour evolves with successively three sets of descriptors: a temporal one, and then two spatial ones. The third spatial descriptor takes advantage of the segmentation of the image in intensity homogeneous regions. User interaction is reduced to the choice of a few parameters at the beginning of the process. Some experimental results are supplied.

  15. A statistical study of the subsurface structure and eruptivity of solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chia-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of 77 solar active regions (ARs) is conducted to investigate the existence of identifiable correlations between the subsurface structural disturbances and the activity level of the active regions. The disturbances examined in this study are $$, $$, and $$. where $\\Gamma_1$ and $c$ are the thermodynamic properties of first adiabatic index and sound speed modified by magnetic field, respectively. The averages are over three depth layers: $0.975-0.98 R_\\odot$, $0.98-0.99 R_\\odot$ and $0.99-0.995 R_\\odot$ to represent the structural disturbances in that layer. The level of the surface magnetic activity is measured by the Magnetic Activity Index (MAI) of active region and the relative and absolute MAI differences (rdMAI and dMAI) between the active and quiet regions. The eruptivity of each active region is quantified by its Flare Index, total number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and total kinetic energy of the CMEs. The existence and level of the correlations are evaluated by scatter plots ...

  16. Designing magnetic superlattices that are composed of single domain nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Forrester

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The complex nature of the magnetic interactions between any number of nanosized elements of a magnetic superlattice can be described by the generic behavior that is presented here. The hysteresis characteristics of interacting elliptical nanomagnets are described by a quasi-static method that identifies the critical boundaries between magnetic phases. A full dynamical analysis is conducted in complement to this and the deviations from the quasi-static analysis are highlighted. Each phase is defined by the configuration of the magnetic moments of the chain of single domain nanomagnets and correspondingly the existence of parallel, anti-parallel and canting average magnetization states.Results: We give examples of the phase diagrams in terms of anisotropy and coupling strength for two, three and four magnetic layers. Each phase diagrams character is defined by the shape of the magnetic hysteresis profile for a system in an applied magnetic field. We present the analytical solutions that enable one to define the “phase” boundaries between the emergence of spin-flop, anti-parallel and parallel configurations. The shape of the hysteresis profile is a function of the coupling strength between the nanomagnets and examples are given of how it dictates a systems magnetic response. Many different paths between metastable states can exist and this can lead to instabilities and fluctuations in the magnetization.Conclusion: With these phase diagrams one can find the most stable magnetic configurations against perturbations so as to create magnetic devices. On the other hand, one may require a magnetic system that can easily be switched between phases, and so one can use the information herein to design superlattices of the required shape and character by choosing parameters close to the phase boundaries. This work will be useful when designing future spintronic devices, especially those manipulating the properties of CoFeB compounds.

  17. Negative Magnetoresistance in Silicon Doped AlAs-GaAs Short Period Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougam, A. B.; Sicart, J.; Robert, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We report the negative magnetoresistance effect observed in GaAs-AlAs short period superlattices doped selectively in GaAs or in AlAs or doped uniformly. This doping technique introduces deep donor states with different thermal activation energies. Consequently, the low temperature electron concentration is different in samples doped at the same silicon concentration. We find the magnetic correction to the conductivity increasing with the free carrier density. The low magnetic field data are interpreted in the framework of a weak localization model derived from the Kawabata theory in 3D anisotropic systems. The theory of effective mass in superlattices is applied and we find that the inelastic scattering time does not depend on the doping modulation. Nous présentons des résultats de magnétorésistance négative obtenus avec des superréseaux à courte période de GaAs-AlAs dopés au silicium sélectivement dans GaAs ou AlAs et uniformément dopés. Ce type de dopage permet d'introduire des niveaux donneurs d'énergie d'activation thermique différents. Ceci permet d'obtenir à basse température des concentrations d'électrons différentes à partir d'une concentration initiale de dopant identique pour tous les échantillons. Nous mettons ainsi en évidence une correction magnétique à la conductivité qui augmente avec la densité de porteurs libres. Les mesures à faible champ sont interprétées en termes de faible localisation à partir du modèle de Kawabata 3D dans lequel l'anisotropie de masse effective du superréseau est introduite. Nous trouvons que le temps de diffusion inélastique ne dépend pas de la modulation de dopage.

  18. Time-resolved photoluminescence of type-II quantum dots and isoelectronic centers in Zn-Se-Te superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C.-K.; Cartwright, A. N.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally and time-resolved photoluminescence of a ZnTe /ZnSe superlattice reveals a smooth transition of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime from ˜100ns at 2.35eV to less than a few nanoseconds at 2.8eV. The significant increase of the lifetime in the low energy region is strong evidence to support the formation of type-II quantum dots (QDs), since in these nanostructures the spatial separation of carriers is increased. The shorter lived emission above 2.5eV is attributed to excitons bound to Te isoelectronic centers in the ZnSe matrix. The smooth transition of the PL lifetime confirms that clusters of these Te atoms evolve into type-II ZnTe /ZnSe QDs.

  19. Investigation of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of GaAs/AlAs Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran

    The thermal conductivities of superlattices are essential to improve the properties of thermoelectrics and optoelectronics; however, limited results in relation to both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities have been reported. A convenient, effective, and accurate experimental method is required to improve the current research on the thermal properties of superlattices. We conducted an experimental research study on two GaAs/AlAs superlattice samples with a total superlattice layer thickness of 2 microm using a combination of the 2-omega and 3-omega techniques. The samples have period thicknesses of 4 nm and 10 nm, respectively. To explore the thermal conductivities of the substrate and insulation layer of the superlattice samples indirectly, a controlled sample with the same structure, but without a superlattice layer, is used. We obtained the thermal conductivities of the GaAs substrate and insulation layer (SiO2 thin film) using the 3-omega technique and FEM simulation model. We also explored the deviation of the experimental results of the 2-omega technique from the Fourier's Law through the controlled sample. These parameters obtained from the controlled sample are used in the data analysis in the following superlattice research. In the superlattice study, we combine the 3-omega and 2-omega techniques to characterize the anisotropic thermal conductivity of GaAs/AlAs superlattice from the same wafer. The in-plane thermal conductivity, cross-plane thermal conductivity, and anisotropy are obtained from the same wafer by comparing the experimental results with the FEM simulated results. This combination works fine in general and demonstrates a significant reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of equivalent bulk materials. Superlattices with different period thicknesses but the same total superlattice thickness present a significant difference in both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the superlattices. However, we

  20. High quantum efficiency Type-II superlattice N-structure photodetectors with thin intrinsic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Yuksel; Hostut, Mustafa; Tansel, Tunay; Muti, Abdullah; Kilic, Abidin; Turan, Rasit; Aydinli, Atilla

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of InAs/AlSb/GaSb based N-structure superlattice pin photodiode. In this new design, AlSb layer in between InAs and GaSb layers acts as an electron barrier that pushes electron and hole wave functions towards the GaSb/InAs interface to perform strong overlap under reverse bias. Experimental results show that, with only 20 periods of intrinsic layers, dark current density and dynamic resistance at -50 mV bias are measured as 6x10-3 A/cm2 and 148 Ωcm2 at 77K, respectively. Under zero bias, high spectral response of 1.2A/W is obtained at 5 μm with 50% cut-off wavelengths (λc) of 6 μm. With this new design, devices with only 146 nm thick i-regions exhibit a quantum efficiency of 42% at 3 μm with front-side illimunation and no anti-reflection coatings.

  1. Investigation of resonant Raman scattering in type II GaAs/AlAs superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, H

    2001-01-01

    GAMMA-related Type I outgoing RR spectra within several theoretical models. Thereby, the mechanisms of the Type II RR scattering, the origins of the RR lineshape and the polarisation dependence, are fully explained, clarifying the spectral features observed in the GaAs zone-centre optic phonon region. The Type II resonance also allows the observation of zone boundary (X-point) phonons from intervalley (IV) scattering. A model of the IV electron-phonon interaction involving X conduction band electrons and zone boundary phonons in Type II SLs is presented. With the predicted SL selection rules for IV scattering, the simultaneous observation of both the zone-boundary longitudinal acoustic and optic phonons can be understood and the spectral features quantitatively explained. As a consequence of the band alignment in GaAs/AIAs superlattices (SLs) and the indirect nature of bulk AIAs, quantum confinement can be used to engineer a Type II system. This produces an electron population in the AIAs longitudinal (X sub ...

  2. Perceived built environment and physical activity in U.S. women by sprawl and region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troped, Philip J; Tamura, Kosuke; Whitcomb, Heather A; Laden, Francine

    2011-11-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated relationships between the perceived built environment and physical activity among adults. However, little is known about whether these associations differ by U.S. region and level of urban sprawl. To examine associations between the perceived built environment and physical activity in U.S. women by region and urban sprawl. Nurses' Health Study II participants (N=68,968) completed four perceived neighborhood environment survey items in 2005. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations with meeting physical activity recommendations, adjusting for demographic and weight-status variables, and stratifying by region and sprawl. Data analyses were completed in 2011. Perceived proximity to shops/stores was positively associated with physical activity across regions and levels of sprawl (ORs=1.21-1.46). Perceived access to recreation facilities was also a positive physical activity correlate in most region-sprawl strata, with strongest relationships found in the West (ORs=1.31-1.70). Perceived crime and presence of sidewalks did not show statistically significant associations with physical activity in most region-sprawl strata, although ORs for perceived crime showed a consistent pattern of negative associations (ORs=0.60-0.95). A higher number of positive environmental attributes was associated with a greater odds of meeting physical activity recommendations. Findings indicate that perceived proximity to shops/stores and access to recreation facilities are important correlates of physical activity for women, irrespective of region or sprawl. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Distance analysis of the Emerging Active Region NOAA 10790

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkov, S

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of Active Region NOAA 10790 by means of time--distance helioseismology. Shallow regions of increased sound speed at the location of increased magnetic activity are observed, with regions becoming deeper at the locations of sunspot pores. We also see a long-lasting region of decreased sound speed located underneath the region of the flux emergence, possibly relating to a temperature perturbation due to magnetic quenching of eddy diffusivity, or to a dense flux tube. We detect and track an object in the subsurface layers of the Sun characterised by increased sound speed which could be related to emerging magnetic flux and thus obtain a provisional estimate of the speed of emergence of around $1 {\\rm km s^{-1}}$.

  4. A Rapidly Evolving Active Region NOAA 8032 observed on April 15th, 1997

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shibu K. Mathew; Ashok Ambastha

    2000-09-01

    The active region NOAA 8032 of April 15, 1997 was observed to evolve rapidly. The GOES X-ray data showed a number of sub-flares and two C-class flares during the 8-9 hours of its evolution. The magnetic evolution of this region is studied to ascertain its role in flare production. Large changes were observed in magnetic field configuration due to the emergence of new magnetic flux regions (EFR). Most of the new emergence occured very close to the existing magnetic regions, which resulted in strong magnetic field gradients in this region. EFR driven reconnection of the field lines and subsequent flux cancellation might be the reason for the continuous occurrence of sub-flares and other related activities.

  5. Perspectives from ab-initio and tight-binding: Applications to transition metal compounds and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Vijay Shankar

    The experimental and theoretical study of transition metal compounds have occupied condensed matter physicists for the best part of the last century. The rich variety of physical behaviour exhibited by these compounds owes its origin to the subtle balance of the energy scales at play for the d orbitals. In this thesis, we study three different systems comprised of transition metal atoms from the third, the fourth, and the fifth group of the periodic table using a combination of ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) computations and effective tight-binding models for the electronic properties. We first consider the electronic properties of artificially fabricated perovskite superlattices of the form [(SrIrO3)m / SrTiO3] with integer m denoting the number of layers of SrIrO3. After discussing the results of experiments undertaken by our collaborators, we present the results of our DFT calculations and build tight-binding models for the m = 1 and m = 2 superlattices. The active ingredient is found to be the 5d orbitals with significant spin-orbit coupling. We then study the energies of magnetic ground states within DFT and compare and contrast our results with those obtained for the bulk Ruddlesden-Popper iridates. Together with experimental measurements, our results suggest that these superlattices are an exciting venue to probe the magnetism and metal-insulator transitions that occur from the intricate balance of the spin-orbit coupling and electron interactions, as has been reported for their bulk counterparts. Next, we consider alpha-RuCl3, a honeycomb lattice compound. We first show using DFT calculations in conjunction with experiments performed by our collaborators, how spin-orbit coupling in the 4d orbitals of Ru is essential to understand the insulating state realized in this compound. Then, in the latter half of the chapter, we study the magnetic ground states of a two-dimensional analogue of alpha-RuCl3 in weak and strong-coupling regimes obtained from

  6. Problems and Perspectives on the Evaluation of Regional and National Computer-Related Educational Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Betty

    Although the importance of systematic evaluation of educational policy and practice is well established, various problems confound the intention of evaluating regional or national activity with regard to computer-related activities in education. At least two of these problems relate to a general conception of the appropriate entry points for…

  7. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  8. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus activity in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, 2003-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Paige Adams

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003-2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas.

  9. Regional Brain Activation during Meditation Shows Time and Practice Effects: An Exploratory FMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baron Short

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Meditation involves attentional regulation and may lead to increased activity in brain regions associated with attention such as dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether DLPFC and ACC were activated during meditation. Subjects who meditate were recruited and scanned on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Subjects meditated for four sessions of 12 min and performed four sessions of a 6 min control task. Individual and group t-maps were generated of overall meditation response versus control response and late meditation response versus early meditation response for each subject and time courses were plotted. For the overall group (n = 13, and using an overall brain analysis, there were no statistically significant regional activations of interest using conservative thresholds. A region of interest analysis of the entire group time courses of DLPFC and ACC were statistically more active throughout meditation in comparison to the control task. Moreover, dividing the cohort into short (n = 8 and long-term (n = 5 practitioners (>10 years revealed that the time courses of long-term practitioners had significantly more consistent and sustained activation in the DLPFC and the ACC during meditation versus control in comparison to short-term practitioners. The regional brain activations in the more practised subjects may correlate with better sustained attention and attentional error monitoring. In summary, brain regions associated with attention vary over the time of a meditation session and may differ between long- and short-term meditation practitioners.

  10. The Role of Small-Scale Processes in Solar Active Region Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Karen; Mackay, Duncan

    2017-08-01

    Active regions are locations of intense magnetic activity on the Sun, whose evolution can result in highly energetic eruptive phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Therefore, fast and accurate simulation of their evolution and decay is essential in the prediction of Space Weather events. In this talk we present initial results from our new model for the photospheric evolution of active region magnetic fields. Observations show that small-scale processes appear to play a role in the dispersal and decay of solar active regions, for example through cancellation at the boundary of sunspot outflows and erosion of flux by surrounding convective cells. Our active region model is coupled to our existing model for the evolution of small-scale photospheric magnetic features. Focusing first on the active region decay phase, we consider the evolution of its magnetic field due to both large-scale (e.g. differential rotation) and small-scale processes, such as its interaction with surrounding small-scale magnetic features and convective flows.This project is funded by The Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, through their Research Incentives Grant scheme.

  11. Study of the magnetospheres of active regions on the sun by radio astronomy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogod, V. M.; Kal'tman, T. I.; Peterova, N. G.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    In the 1990s, based on detailed studies of the structure of active regions (AR), the concept of the magnetosphere of the active region was proposed. This includes almost all known structures presented in the active region, ranging from the radio granulation up to noise storms, the radiation of which manifests on the radio waves. The magnetosphere concept, which, from a common point of view, considers the manifestations of the radio emission of the active region as a single active complex, allows one to shed light on the relation between stable and active processes and their interrelations. It is especially important to identify the basic ways of transforming nonthermal energy into thermal energy. A dominant role in all processes is attributed to the magnetic field, the measurement of which on the coronal levels can be performed by radio-astronomical techniques. The extension of the wavelength range and the introduction of new tools and advanced modeling capabilities makes it possible to analyze the physical properties of plasma structures in the AR magnetosphere and to evaluate the coronal magnetic fields at the levels of the chromosphere-corona transition zone and the lower corona. The features and characteristics of the transition region from the S component to the B component have been estimated.

  12. Evaluation of the functional activity of activated sludge from local waste water treatment plant in the Arctic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il'inskiy V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers characteristics of the activated sludge in the local wastewater treatment plant (LWTP and its ability to purify fully domestic sewage water in the Far North. Biochemical process of destruction of organic pollutants is influenced by a microbial complex functioning in aeration tanks. Taking into account climatic conditions of the region where the organic matter degradation processes are slowed, and lack of control over the operation, efficiency and occupational safety of LWTPs, it seems to be important to study the physiological characteristics of the bacteria used in bioremediation, and their ability to maximize the purifying domestic sewage in the Arctic region. Undue intervention in the biosphere systems leads to disruption of the balance of internal and external ecosystems communications. The goal of research is studying structural determination and functioning of activated sludge bacteriocenosis of LWTP TOPAS-5 (GK "Topol-ECO" in certain physical and chemical conditions of the habitat, and establishing completeness of cleaning process in this treatment plant. The paper considers the structure (quantitative and qualitative composition and function of LWTP activated sludge bacteriocenosis functioning in the Arctic region. The estimation of the activated sludge of full waste water treatment process of the LWTP has been given. The research's results have allowed to identify and determine the bacterial count of physiological groups of microorganisms purified domestic sewage; to isolate from activated sludge the bioflocculant-producing microorganisms' on the experimental medium; to evaluate efficiency of LWTP work in the Arctic region

  13. The lightning activity associated with the dry and moist convections in the Himalayan Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penki, R. K.; Kamra, A. K.

    2013-06-01

    Lightning activity in the dry environment of northwest India and Pakistan (NW) and in the moist environment of northeast India (NE) has been examined from the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor data obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite during 1995-2010. In the NW region, seasonal variation of flash rate is annual with a maximum in July but is semi-annual with a primary maximum in April and a secondary maximum in September, in the NE region. On diurnal scale, flash rate is the maximum in the afternoons, in both the NE and NW regions. The correlation of flash rate with convective parameters, viz. surface temperature, convective available potential energy (CAPE) and outgoing long-wave radiation is better with convective activity in the NW than in the NE region. Mean value of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm is ~ 26% higher and is highly correlated with flash rate in NW as compared to that in NE. Results indicate that CAPE is ~ 120 times more efficient in NW than in the NE region for production of lightning. The empirical orthogonal function analysis of flash rate, surface temperature, and CAPE shows that variance of lightning activity in these regions cannot be fully explained by the variance in the surface temperature and CAPE alone, and that some other factors, such as orographic lifting, precipitation, topography, etc., may also contribute to this variance in these mountainous regions. Further, the increase in CAPE due to orographic lifting in the Himalayan foothills in the NE region may contribute to ~ 7.5% increase in lightning activity. Relative roles of the thermally induced and moisture-induced changes in CAPE are examined in these regions. This study merely raises the questions, and that additional research is required for explaining the fundamental reasons for the reported observations here.

  14. Regional distribution pattern of groundwater heavy metals resulting from agricultural activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, J.; Mahvi, A. H.; Jahed, G. R.; Babaei, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    Contaminations of groundwater by heavy metals due to agricultural activities are growing recently. The objective of this study was to evaluate and map regional patterns of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in groundwater on a plain with high agricultural activities. The study was conducted to investigate the concentration of heavy metals and distribution in groundwater in regions of Shush Danial and Andimeshk aquifers in the southern part of Iran. Presently, groundwater is the only appropriate and widely used source of drinking water for rural and urban communities in this region. The region covers an area of 1,100 km2 between the Dez and Karkhe rivers, which lead to the Persian Gulf. For this study, the region was divided into four sub-regions A, B, C and D. Additionally, 168 groundwater samples were collected from 42 water wells during the earlier months of 2004. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS-Flame) was used to measure the concentration of heavy metals in water samples and the Surfer software was used for determination of the contour map of metal distribution. The results demonstrated that in all of the samples, Cd and Zn concentrations were below the EPA MCLG and EPA secondary standard, respectively. However, the Cu contents of 4.8 % of all samples were higher than EPA MCL. It is also indicated that the concentrations of metals were more pronounced at the southern part of the studied region than at the others. The analysis of fertilizers applied for agricultural activities at this region also indicated that a great majority of the above-mentioned heavy metals were discharged into the environment. Absence of confining layers, proximity to land surface, excess agricultural activities in the southern part and groundwater flow direction that is generally from the north to the southern parts in this area make the southern region of the Shush plain especially vulnerable to pollution by heavy metals than by other contaminants.

  15. Comparison of Helioseismic Far-Side Active Region Detections with STEREO Far-Side EUV Observations of Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, P. C.; Qiu, J.; Lindsey, C.

    2017-10-01

    Seismic maps of the Sun's far hemisphere, computed from Doppler data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are now being used routinely to detect strong magnetic regions on the far side of the Sun (http://jsoc.stanford.edu/data/farside/). To test the reliability of this technique, the helioseismically inferred active region detections are compared with far-side observations of solar activity from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), using brightness in extreme-ultraviolet light (EUV) as a proxy for magnetic fields. Two approaches are used to analyze nine months of STEREO and HMI data. In the first approach, we determine whether new large east-limb active regions are detected seismically on the far side before they appear Earth side and study how the detectability of these regions relates to their EUV intensity. We find that while there is a range of EUV intensities for which far-side regions may or may not be detected seismically, there appears to be an intensity level above which they are almost always detected and an intensity level below which they are never detected. In the second approach, we analyze concurrent extreme-ultraviolet and helioseismic far-side observations. We find that 100% (22) of the far-side seismic regions correspond to an extreme-ultraviolet plage; 95% of these either became a NOAA-designated magnetic region when reaching the east limb or were one before crossing to the far side. A low but significant correlation is found between the seismic signature strength and the EUV intensity of a far-side region.

  16. Adaptive integration of local region information to detect fine-scale brain activity patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, the spatial resolution of fMRI data is continuously growing. This pro- vides us the possibility to detect the fine-scale patterns of brain activities. The es- tablished univariate and multivariate methods to analyze fMRI data mostly focus on detecting the activation blobs without considering the distributed fine-scale pat- terns within the blobs. To improve the sensitivity of the activation detection, in this paper, multivariate statistical method and univariate statistical method are com- bined to discover the fine-grained activity patterns. For one voxel in the brain, a local homogenous region is constructed. Then, time courses from the local ho- mogenous region are integrated with multivariate statistical method. Univariate statistical method is finally used to construct the interests of statistic for that voxel. The approach has explicitly taken into account the structures of both activity pat- terns and existing noise of local brain regions. Therefore, it could highlight the fine-scale activity patterns of the local regions. Experiments with simulated and real fMRI data demonstrate that the proposed method dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection of fine-scale brain activity patterns which contain the subtle information about experimental conditions.

  17. Low level of attention to health inequalities in prevention planning activities of the Italian Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Corrado; Massimi, Azzurra; Di Thiene, Domitilla; Rosso, Annalisa; D'Andrea, Elvira; Vacchio, Maria Rosaria; Villari, Paolo; Marzuillo, Carolina

    2016-02-19

    Health promotion and prevention activities should tackle health inequalities to reduce disparities in health among disadvantaged populations. This study aimed to assess the extent to which the Italian Regions considered health inequalities during the planning of prevention activities, to detect geographical differences and to identify the possible determinants of differences in attention to health inequalities. The 19 Regional Prevention Plans (RPPs) developed by Italian Regions within the National Prevention Plan (NPP) 2010-2013 were assessed using a specific tool to address the level of attention to health inequalities. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify regional characteristics associated with a higher level of attention to health inequalities. Of the 702 projects included in the 19 RPPs, only 56 (8.0 %) specifically addressed issues related to health inequalities. The results of the multivariate analysis showed that a higher level of attention was associated with the macroarea of intervention 'prevention in high-risk groups', with the higher quality of the Strategic Plan Section of the RPP and with the higher percentage of migrants in the Region in 2010. Moreover, projects that addressed the topic of health inequalities were more likely to be developed in the Northern Regions, in Regions with a lower level of 'linking social capital' and with a Higher Regional Health Care Expenditure (RHCE) as a percentage of Regional Gross Domestic Product (RGDP) in 2010. The level of attention to health inequalities in the regional planning process of prevention activities 2010-2013 in Italy is low. The results of this study supported the new round of prevention planning in Italy, and highlight the urgent need to increase the number of policies and interventions able to reduce health inequalities.

  18. Dispersion relation for localized magnetic polaritons propagating at the junction of two ferromagnetic/ non-magnetic superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R T Tagiyeva

    2004-09-01

    Localized magnetic polaritons are investigated in the systems consisting of two magnetic superlattices, coupled by a ferromagnetic contact layer. The general dispersion relation for localized magnetic polaritons are derived in the framework of the electromagnetic wave theory in the Voigt geometry by the `transfer' matrix method. The numerical calculations were carried out for different parameters of the superlattices and contact layer and then discussed.

  19. Formation of Solar Delta Active Regions:Twist and Writhe of Magnetic Ropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the process of formation of delta configuration in some well-known super active regions based on photospheric vector magnetogram observations. It is found that the magnetic field in the initial developing stage of some delta active regions shows a potential-like configuration in the solar atmosphere,the magnetic shear develops mainly near the magnetic neutral line with magnetic islands of opposite polarities, and the large-scale photospheric twisted field forming gradually later. Some results are obtained: (1) The analysis of magnetic writhe of whole active regions cannot be limited in the strong field of sunspots, because the contribution of the fraction of decayed magnetic field is non-negligible. (2) The magnetic model of kink magnetic ropes, supposed to be generated in the subatmosphere,is not consistent with the evolution of large-scale twisted photospheric transverse magnetic field and not entirely consistent with the relationship with magnetic shear in some delta active regions. (3) The proposition is that the large-scale delta active regions are formed from contribution by small-scale non-potential magnetic flux bundles generated in the subatmosphere.

  20. Diagnosing Coronal Heating in a Survey of Active Regions using the Time Lag Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, Nicholeen; Klimchuk, James A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we examine 15 different active regions observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory and analyze their nanoflare properties using the time lag method. The time lag method is a diagnostic of whether the plasma is maintained at a steady temperature, or if it is dynamic, undergoing heating and cooling cycles. An important aspect of our technique is that it analyses both observationally distinct coronal loops as well as the much more prevalent diffuse emission surrounding them. Warren et al. (2012) first studied these same 15 active regions, which are all quiescent and exhibit a broad range of characteristics, including age, total unsigned magnetic flux, area, hot emission, and emission measure distribution. We find that widespread cooling is a generic property of both loop and diffuse emission from all 15 active regions. However, the range of temperatures through which the plasma cools varies between active regions and within each active region, and only occasionally is there full cooling from above 7 MK to well below 1 MK. We find that the degree of cooling is not well correlated with slopes of the emission measure distribution measured by Warren et al. (2012). We show that these apparently contradictory observations can be reconciled with the presence of a distribution of nanoflare energies and frequencies along the line of sight, with the average delay between successive nanoflare events on a single flux tube being comparable to the plasma cooling timescale. Warren, H. P., Winebarger, A. R., & Brooks, D. H. 2012, ApJ, 759, 141