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Sample records for superintendent turnover varied

  1. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  2. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  3. Why Superintendents Turn over

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Jason A.; Andersen, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Although superintendent turnover can hinder district reform and improvement, research examining superintendent exits is scarce. This study identifies factors contributing to superintendent turnover in California by matching original superintendent and school board survey data with administrative data and information hand-collected from news…

  4. Alaskan Superintendent Turnover: Is There a Correlation between Anticipated Turnover and the Organizational Culture of School Boards in the State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, David M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a particular type of school board culture is predictive of Alaskan public school superintendents' intention to leave their positions. Cameron and Quinn's four types of organizational culture--hierarchy, market, clan, and adhocracy--serve as the model for the study, which surveyed Alaska's…

  5. Myth of the Revolving-Door Superintendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, Gerald; Cooper, Bruce; Fusarelli, Lance; Alborano, James; Padilla, Arthur; Ghosh, Sujit

    2002-01-01

    Review of research on superintendent turnover finds that median tenure between 1990 and 1994 was 6.5 years; turnover has not increased significantly since 1975; turnover is related to the school-district enrollment size; turnover is not related to a district's location, that is rural, small town, suburban, urban. Concludes that the superintendency…

  6. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eStief

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen (O2 levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient O2 levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (~100 µmol O2 L-1 and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient O2 levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate, N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h-1, NH4+ (up to 2.0 nmol N h-1, and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h-1. Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for N2 production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient O2 levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean.

  7. Anaerobic nitrogen turnover by sinking diatom aggregates at varying ambient oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host...... anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40......% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7...

  8. Longevity of Women Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Kim C.

    2014-01-01

    Public schools are facing a leadership crisis regarding the lack of women superintendents in the United States. Although, historically, women have dominated the positions of classroom teachers and outnumbered men in receiving administrative leadership certificates, there is a disproportion in the number of men and women superintendents leading the…

  9. Accountability Starts with the Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Kenneth E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes how Lawndale District, near Los Angeles, developed a system of accountability starting with the superintendent. Describes the subgoals and objectives developed by the superintendent in cooperation with the Board of Trustees and members of the community. (JF)

  10. Archetypes of Outstanding Female Superintendents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Carole; Pankake, Anita; Schroth, Gwen

    This report documents a study of women superintendents. Specifically, the study identified professional and personal characteristics and styles of leadership to develop archetypes of six outstanding female superintendents in Texas. The intent of the research was also to reveal similarities between and among these superintendents that could provide…

  11. An Investigation of Ethical Leadership Perspectives among Ohio School District Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Denver J.; Johnson, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ethical leadership perspectives of Ohio public school superintendents. Secondly, this study examined to what extent ethical leadership perspectives of Ohio public school superintendents vary according to school district characteristics. Furthermore, the study examined to what extent do ethical…

  12. A Radical Role for Superintendents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    To buffer education's instructional core, superintendents increasingly have been diverted from teaching and learning and pressured to become operations managers and political beings fostering confidence in schools and communities. Today's superintendents should become responsible for helping their communities develop a common language about…

  13. Attracting Principals to the Superintendency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Howley

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Responding to a perceived shortage of school superintendents in Ohio as well as elsewhere in the nation, this study examined the conditions of the job that make it attractive or unattractive as a career move for principals. The researchers surveyed a random sample of Ohio principals, receiving usable responses from 508 of these administrators. Analysis of the data revealed that principals perceived the ability to make a difference and the extrinsic motivators (e.g., salary and benefits associated with the superintendency as conditions salient to the decision to pursue such a job. Furthermore, they viewed the difficulties associated with the superintendency as extremely important. Among these difficulties, the most troubling were: (1 increased burden of responsibility for local, state, and federal mandates; (2 need to be accountable for outcomes that are beyond an educator’s control; (3 low levels of board support, and (4 excessive pressure to perform. The researchers also explored the personal and contextual characteristics that predisposed principals to see certain conditions of the superintendency as particularly attractive or particularly troublesome. Only two such characteristics, however, proved to be predictive: (1 principals with fewer years of teaching experience were more likely than their more experienced counterparts to rate the difficulty of the job as important to the decision to pursue a position as superintendent, and (2 principals who held cosmopolitan commitments were more likely than those who did not hold such commitments to view the salary and benefits associated with the superintendency as important. Findings from the study provided some guidance to those policy makers who are looking for ways to make the superintendency more attractive as a career move for principals. In particular, the study suggested that policy makers should work to design incentives that address school leaders’ interest in making a difference at the

  14. Superintendents Say: Much Done, Much to Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Dick

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 1,200 school district superintendents concerning accomplishments and problems of technology in education. Responses from 205 superintendents reveal that administrators work hard to integrate technology into schools. (SI)

  15. Does Superintendents' Leadership Styles Influence Principals' Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Theresa D.

    2014-01-01

    Educational leaders across the United States face changes affecting the educational system related to federal and state mandates. The stress of those changes may be related to superintendents' longevity. The superintendent position has a mobility rate that is quite high. Every superintendent is different and may have a different leadership style…

  16. Size Up Your Superintendent's "Style."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akenhead, James

    1984-01-01

    Describes a method used by the board of an Ohio school district for assessing a superintendent's personal style. The commercially developed Persona Matrix system enabled five evaluators to determine whether the manager was of the promoting, analyzing, controlling, or supporting type. (TE)

  17. Superintendent Leadership: Focusing on District Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tanya A.; Adams, Jeffery S.; Smith, Dwayne E.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning project focusing on superintendent leadership and stakeholder influence of school district culture. Current research findings suggest the importance of superintendent leadership in assessing, influencing, and enhancing school district culture. Multiple scholars wrote literature in the area of…

  18. The Interim Superintendent: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Gary; Nix, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the vitally important role that the superintendent plays in the overall functioning and wellbeing of any school district, the filling of that position should never be done in haste. Due to the importance of this process and the time it requires, school districts often employ an interim superintendent. In this single case study, one…

  19. Superintendent Leadership: Focusing on District Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tanya A.; Adams, Jeffery S.; Smith, Dwayne E.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning project focusing on superintendent leadership and stakeholder influence of school district culture. Current research findings suggest the importance of superintendent leadership in assessing, influencing, and enhancing school district culture. Multiple scholars wrote literature in the area of…

  20. Superintendent Leadership Style: A Gendered Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Dawn C.; Crippen, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Using a blend of social constructionism, critical feminism, and dialogue theory, the discourse of nine Manitoba superintendents is examined to determine if it illustrates particular gendered assumptions regarding superintendents' leadership style. Qualitative inquiry and analysis methods were utilized to identify emerging themes, or topics of…

  1. Norwegian Superintendents as Mediators of Change Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2014-01-01

    The underlying theoretical argument in this article views municipal school superintendents in the Nordic context as middle managers in organizational theory terminology. Empirical support for this discussion emerges from national data collected among Norwegian school superintendents in 2009. Findings show that the actual work and leadership…

  2. Measuring the Performance of School Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansar

    2015-01-01

    School superintendent has a strategic role in the effort to improve the quality of education, referred to the responsibility to give service and assistance for the teachers and headmasters which will affect the improvement of learning quality in school. Yet, the strategic role and function of superintendent, in fact, is still reflecting its ideal…

  3. Examination of Illinois Superintendents' Perceptions of the Illinois School Superintendent Content-Area Standards and Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demory, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of the Illinois school superintendent content area standards and performance indicators. This study is significant because it provides an opportunity for rigorous reflection in identifying Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of superintendent behaviors that…

  4. Perceptions of School Superintendents and Board Presidents on Improved Pupil Performance and Superintendent Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Josephine

    2011-01-01

    It is well documented that the demands on school superintendents have not only become more taxing but have also changed in recent years. The superintendent needs to possess a high degree of knowledge and skills in a diverse number of areas, including psychology, finances, personnel, and general education while functioning at a very high level in…

  5. Internal Accountability and District Achievement: How Superintendents Affect Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Kimberly L.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative survey study was designed to determine whether superintendent accountability behaviors or agreement about accountability behaviors between superintendents and their subordinate central office administrators predicted district student achievement. Hierarchical multiple regression and analyses of covariance were employed,…

  6. Review of "Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak out"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Catherine; Dworkin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The report, Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak Out, describes findings of a survey of 246 Ohio school superintendents about critical issues facing the state's educational system. In particular, the intent of the study was to examine how superintendents might do more with fewer resources. The authors conclude that Ohio districts…

  7. Perceptions of Mentoring: Examining the Experiences of Women Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Scarlett M.; Calhoun, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive mixed methods study gathered both quantitative and qualitative data on the mentoring experiences of women superintendents in a Southeastern state. The quantitative participants included 39 women superintendents from this state and the qualitative portion of the study was comprised of eight female superintendents purposefully…

  8. Effects of Mentorship on Assistant Superintendents and Their Emotional Intelligence, Challenges, and the Desire to Become a Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Latoya Y.; Thomas, Stephanie P.; Hunter, Tanesha N.; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mentorship and its effect on assistant superintendents' emotional intelligence, challenges, and the desire to become a superintendent. The 149 participants surveyed in this study were assistant superintendents in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in Long Island, New York and Westchester County, New York. An…

  9. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B.; Hubble, Michael W.; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D.; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). The purpose of this study was to quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. Methods A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a 6 month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for 3 categories of agency staff mix: all paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed), and all-volunteer. Results The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=10.2%, mixed=12.3%, all-volunteer=12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n=25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$86,452.05, mixed=$9,766.65, and all-volunteer=$0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$7,161.38, mixed=$1,409.64, and all-volunteer=$0). Conclusions Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study’s mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings

  10. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B; Hubble, Michael W; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). To quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a six-month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data-collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for three categories of agency staff mix: all-paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed) staff, and all-volunteer staff. The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix (all-paid = 10.2%, mixed = 12.3%, all-volunteer = 12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n = 25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $86,452.05, mixed = $9,766.65, and all-volunteer = $0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $7,161.38, mixed = $1,409.64, and all-volunteer = $0). Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study's mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings provide estimates of two key

  11. The Functional Allocation of the Superintendent's Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Albert C.; And Others

    1967-01-01

    The amount of time a school superintendent spends in the various functions of his job is studied. The data used were those collected by Robert Utter and Gordon Anderson in 76 school districts in the Metropolitan School Study Council and the Associated Public School Systems during 1964-65. Included were school systems ranging in size from 975 to…

  12. Classroom Assessment: Some Propositions for Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylone, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers superintendents five assessment propositions for their consideration, each of which would likely provoke spirited and productive discussions at district administrative councils or at school staff meetings. These propositions are: (1) Teachers should anchor lessons and activities to specific outcomes (e.g., expectations,…

  13. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  14. Peer Visits and Revisits in the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Deep, thoughtful conversations about how superintendents can improve their leadership practice are rare. Those that are anchored in classroom observation data, guided by structured protocols and common understandings of what matters in instruction, and that take place in a collegial atmosphere with high levels of trust and vulnerability are even…

  15. A Superintendent in Cultural Transition: An Autoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, David

    2013-01-01

    This research illustrates a personalized account of the unique transition from a third grade classroom directly to a superintendency in a public school located on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation. This self-study is about me as the subject as well as the researcher in the cultural context of a school district with an 89% Native American student…

  16. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  17. Public School Superintendent Philosophies and Their Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, John

    2012-01-01

    Postmodernism is a philosophical description that encompasses philosophy, the arts, a period of history, and many other aspects of today's existence. This dissertation examines the extent to which Indiana public school superintendents use postmodern philosophy as opposed to modern philosophy to inform their practice. This was accomplished by…

  18. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Superintendents

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-13

    This podcast highlights the importance of ensuring that comprehensive school district plans are in place to manage food allergies. It also identifies some key actions school superintendents can take to support students with food allergies, and highlights CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/13/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  19. Hispanic Superintendents in Illinois: Current Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The trends and challenges faced by Hispanic superintendents in Illinois are stated and analyzed throughout the study in both literature and practice. The examined items centered on the issues of hiring experiences and other barriers associated with the acquisition and longevity of the superintendency in Illinois. Data for the study were collected…

  20. How to Make Waves without Capsizing Your Superintendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    Recounts one superintendent's reorganization of his top-management team to comprise fewer members and achieve better racial and gender balance. Presents administrator selection principles, such as choosing only people sharing the superintendent's educational values, looking for competence in different packages, and selecting a majority of team…

  1. Superintendents Describe Their Leadership Styles: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Superintendents from eight southeastern United States school districts self-described their leadership styles across the choices of autocratic, laissez-faire, democratic, situational, servant, or transformational. When faced with this array of choices, the superintendents chose with arguable equitableness, indicating that successful leaders can…

  2. Stress and Burnout among Superintendents of Public Residential Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, Gary V.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated burnout levels and coping strategies of 162 superintendents of public residential facilities for mentally retarded persons. Results indicated that mean overall burnout scores tended to be lower than those reported for other human service employees. Superintendents tended to favor direct/active strategies for coping with stressors.…

  3. Exploring the Relevant Antecedents of Superintendent Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Understanding antecedents to superintendent leadership development is crucial for the continued improvement of schools. This qualitative study seeks to identify skills superintendents consider critical to their position, antecedents that developed those skills, and provide an increased understanding of the methods needed for developing current and…

  4. The Relationship of Organizational Commitment and Superintendent Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between superintendent job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Surveys were sent electronically to superintendents (N = 470) of Texas mid-size schools to collect data to test for relationships of variables and constructs associated with job satisfaction and components of…

  5. Superintendents as Sensemakers in the Design of Sustainable Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocko, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of the superintendent in the design decision-making process of sustainable school buildings was examined in this study to determine whether superintendents who have more knowledge and commitment to sustainability have a greater influence on green building practices within their school districts than those who do not. Utilizing a…

  6. Perceptions of Innovations: An Examination of South Carolina Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of South Carolina public school superintendents regarding individual and organizational attitudes toward innovation. Specific characteristics of South Carolina public school superintendents and public school districts, including enrollment, poverty level, school report card grades, age,…

  7. The Relationship of Organizational Commitment and Superintendent Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between superintendent job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Surveys were sent electronically to superintendents (N = 470) of Texas mid-size schools to collect data to test for relationships of variables and constructs associated with job satisfaction and components of…

  8. Identifying the Professional Development Needs of School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneut, Gene; Tobin, James; Ayers, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Superintendents of schools face increased leadership demands from diverse constituents, challenges due to current conditions, and opportunities posed by evolving trends and reforms. Superintendents are in the key position to make systemic school improvements a major priority, to allocate resources to promote their progress and importance, and to…

  9. In Superintendent Searches, Discretion Is the Better Part of Valor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Raj K.

    1989-01-01

    Confidentiality during a superintendent search is essential in order to attract the best candidates. Board members should use confidentiality as a selling tool; use discretion during onsite visits; and make their decision quickly. (MLF)

  10. An Examination of Self-Perceived Transformational Leadership Behaviors of Texas Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Walter Lloyd; Mixon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This study examined self-perceived transformational leadership behaviors among Texas superintendents. The purpose of this study was to examine if relationships existed between superintendents' self-perceived transformational leadership style, district size, teaching, principal, and superintendent years of experience. A review of the literature…

  11. Women in the Superintendency: Barking up the Wrong Chain of Command?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Mimi; Macdonald, R. Timothy

    The U.S. may be experiencing a shortage of qualified applicants for the superintendency. Highly qualified candidates often do not want the job. Underrepresentation of women in the superintendency confounds the problem. This study was conducted to determine the most commonly exercised path to the superintendency in the Northwest. Career…

  12. Superintendents' Beliefs about Barriers That Can Influence Their District Technology Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of superintendents' beliefs about technology leadership barriers and about how superintendents actually engage in technology leadership practices. There is currently limited research available on the topic from a district superintendent's perspective. Qualitative data from focus group…

  13. Attitudes of Superintendents of Ohio Comprehensive High Schools toward Adult Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E.; Krill, Thomas L.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the knowledge of superintendents of Ohio comprehensive high schools toward adult vocational agricultural education. A summary of the demographic data revealed that 63 percent of the superintendents administered programs of adult vocational agriculture. Concepts on the survey with which superintendents agreed and…

  14. New York State Superintendent Job Satisfaction in an Era of Reduced Resources and Increased Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate New York State school superintendent job satisfaction and the potential contributing factors to their job satisfaction in an era of reduced resources and increased accountability. This survey was sent to 684 superintendents throughout New York State and completed by 280 superintendents. Sharp, Malone…

  15. Technology Leadership Is Just Good Leadership: Dispositions of Tech Savvy Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott; Sauers, Nick

    2015-01-01

    This study describes core dispositions of school district superintendents who have been identified as technology savvy leaders by a prominent educational technology newspaper. The superintendents in this study described how they accomplished their technology initiatives and offered suggestions for other superintendents who aspire to be more…

  16. A Study of the Mentoring Program for First Year School Superintendents in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolsey, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring first-year superintendents in Missouri began as an informal process with the pairing of a veteran superintendent (mentor) with a first-year superintendent (protege) by the Missouri Association of School Administrators (MASA). The adoption of the Career Continuous Professional Certification by the Missouri State Board of Education…

  17. Laying the Groundwork for a Reconception of the Superintendency from Feminist Postmodern Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Reviews 50 years of superintendency literature. Offers a possible reconciliation of the superintendency by juxtaposing the traditional with ideas from feminist and postmodern literature. Recognizing postmodern paradoxes allows questioning of the traditional superintendency and leads to more caring, socially committed leadership strategies.…

  18. Technology Leadership Is Just Good Leadership: Dispositions of Tech Savvy Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott; Sauers, Nick

    2015-01-01

    This study describes core dispositions of school district superintendents who have been identified as technology savvy leaders by a prominent educational technology newspaper. The superintendents in this study described how they accomplished their technology initiatives and offered suggestions for other superintendents who aspire to be more…

  19. Effective Strategies That Urban Superintendents Use That Improve the Academic Achievement for African-American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Cardenas

    2013-01-01

    The roles of urban superintendents are crucial to improving the educational outlook for the neediest students, specifically the African-American males. The roles and responsibilities of the urban school superintendent today are more numerous, complex, and demanding than in the past. The expectations of today's urban superintendents are to be…

  20. New York State Superintendent Job Satisfaction in an Era of Reduced Resources and Increased Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate New York State school superintendent job satisfaction and the potential contributing factors to their job satisfaction in an era of reduced resources and increased accountability. This survey was sent to 684 superintendents throughout New York State and completed by 280 superintendents. Sharp, Malone…

  1. Sexual Politics in the California Public K-12 Superintendency and District Office Personnel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Jennifer W.

    2012-01-01

    A review of literature suggests women superintendents face several disadvantages gaining access to positions as public school district superintendents. This study focused on (1) which characteristics applied to the prediction of women superintendents in California public K-12 system; (2) if the predecessor's sex predicted for the successor's sex;…

  2. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last twenty years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium dependent protein kinases that in turn a...

  3. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Hayek,Lee-Ann C.; Brent Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify i...

  4. Accountability Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Superintendent, Principal, and Teacher Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERRYENGLERT,PH.D.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A key assumption of NCLB appears to be that assessment data in and of itself can foster or promote change. Specifically, the supposition is that by requiring assessment data to be reported yearly, schools will be motivated - and will have the ability - to address those areas where student achievement is lagging. This assumption rests on the notion that educator competence in understanding and utilizing such data will result in academic success. Testing this assumption with empirical evidence is an important component of researching the efficacy of current accountability policies and practices in general. Over the past three years we have been involved in a series of empirical examinations of accountability. Each of these studies has been aimed at gathering varied perspectives on and about accountability, ranging from superintendents to principals to teachers. Our research examines education accountability at three interconnected layers: district administrators, principals, and teachers. This nested data set (superintendents were surveyed, as were their principals, and their principals’ teachers allows for not only an examination of the perceptions and reflections of the members of each group but also for an evaluation of the consistency of those beliefs across the members of the educational community. This study will present findings from research projects that speak to each of these levels, focusing on how each understands education accountability and how those meanings are consistent across groups and to what degree.

  5. How Rural School Superintendents in Illinois Impact Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonSchnase, Kyle T.

    2010-01-01

    Since the passage of The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, a superintendent's role has been redefined and more focus has been placed on student achievement. Research demonstrates that rural public schools are faced with an educational crisis. Rural districts are faced with an epidemic of declining enrollments/budgets, increased drop-out rates, low…

  6. Boot Camp for Education CEOs: The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlen, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy is the most prominent and most controversial training institute for school chiefs. The Academy is the flagship program of the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the smallest of a triumvirate of corporate foundations that are at the heart of the billionaire campaign to remake public education in the image…

  7. Follow This Map into the New World of Superintendent Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    School boards desiring to attract top-flight superintendent candidates need to create an appropriate executive compensation package, including salary, benefits, perquisites, and symbols of professional status. This article provides package guidelines from insurance and leave allowance to mortgages and moving expenses. An inset touts Chicago's…

  8. Finnish Superintendents: Leading in a Changing Education Policy Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Mika; Kanervio, Pekka; Björk, Lars G.

    2014-01-01

    Finland's education system is regarded as one of the most effective in the world. Shared values of the Finnish welfare society continue to influence national education policies that determine how education is organized, governed, and led. Findings from a national study of the superintendency, however, suggest recent demographic and financial…

  9. Strategies Used by Superintendents in Developing Leadership Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies public school superintendents across the nation use to develop executive leadership teams. Extensive research has been conducted in private for profit and medical settings, however relatively little research on leading teams has been conducted in the public education sector. Research based…

  10. Just Do It: Women Superintendents Speak to Aspiring Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method study using surveys and in-depth interviews was conducted with women school superintendents in four Midwestern states during the 1999-2000 school year to understand how they perceive their leadership skills, their uses of power in their positions, and how they generally talk about the job. Results of how the women perceived their…

  11. An Examination of Superintendent Salaries and Compensation Packages in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The salaries and compensation packages of women in the United States fall short of those to men holding similar employment positions. This study will look specifically at the salaries and compensation packages of current Kentucky school superintendents and investigate whether or not there exists discrepencies among them along gender lines. The…

  12. School Board Presidents' Perceptions of the Superintendent Selection Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    School districts face enormous challenges with recent reductions in fiscal resources due to cuts in California's state budget and an average tenure for a school superintendent of only 3 years. School boards are challenged to find a leader who can address the needs of the school district during these difficult times. As numerous school…

  13. Managing Change: The Superintendent as Line Director of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Susan; Shulman, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of a superintendent and his district instructional staff in managing change in a New York City school district. An individual case study was used to examine leadership and instructional improvement in a context with administrative and teaching staff limitations and an unprecedented influx of newly…

  14. Superintendent: Here's How I Stay Friends with the Board President.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Sidney A.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests ways that the superintendent and the board president can work cooperatively, including communicating regularly, planning the agenda together, conducting "postgame analysis" with the president, letting the president run meetings and handle arguments or difficult board members, praising the president publicly, and maintaining open…

  15. An Examination of Superintendent Salaries and Compensation Packages in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The salaries and compensation packages of women in the United States fall short of those to men holding similar employment positions. This study will look specifically at the salaries and compensation packages of current Kentucky school superintendents and investigate whether or not there exists discrepencies among them along gender lines. The…

  16. Student Assessment: What Do Superintendents Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan D.; Dexter, Robin R.; Berube, William G.; Beck, Craig H.

    2005-01-01

    Moore reviewed the literature on accountability and assessment in order to design a questionnaire to survey superintendents across Wyoming on their existing and needed knowledge about student assessment. Results on the presence or absence of gaps in knowledge that is deemed important by respondents and/or the literature can be used by colleges and…

  17. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: Superintendent's Hiring Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobaie, Mohammed Fahad

    2016-01-01

    This paper will seek to analyze of the case "Superintendent's Hiring Dilemma" by Hoy and Tarter (2004) using multiple leadership perspectives. The last section of this analysis of the case study will provide the most effective leadership recommendations for the key players.

  18. A Superintendent's Manifesto: School Wellness and Personal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Lambert, Marsha L.

    2010-01-01

    As superintendent, the author works diligently to meet the demands by the West Virginia legislature, catalyzed by the aggressive role of West Virginia's First Lady Gayle Manchin, to fight child obesity. Recently, the state department of education agreed to enter the fight to curb the serious obesity and health problems among the children in the…

  19. The Brave New World of the Interim Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the vital role the superintendent plays in the overall functioning and well-being of any school district, the filling of the top leadership post with a permanent appointment never should be done in haste. The process of advertising, reviewing applications, conducting background checks, interviewing candidates, negotiating contracts,…

  20. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  1. School Superintendents' Perceptions of Ethically Just Responses to a Teacher Sexting Vignette: Severity of Administrator Response, Superintendent Personality, and Offender Gender and Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the perceived ethics of the decisions superintendents make in response to a situation with a teacher that was value-laden, potentially volatile, and potentially affected by the teachers' gender or ethnicity. Superintendents (N = 123) each read one of 12 versions of a vignette depicting a sexting incident between a…

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  3. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...

  4. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... of employee turnover. Drawing on a unique longitudinal dataset of 2,926 Danish manufacturing firms that combine individual-level data with firm-level data, the paper shows that job turnover has a substantial negative effect on total productivity but that the firm’s size, its capital intensity, and its age...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  5. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... of employee turnover. Drawing on a unique longitudinal dataset of 2,926 Danish manufacturing firms that combine individual-level data with firm-level data, the paper shows that job turnover has a substantial negative effect on total productivity but that the firm’s size, its capital intensity, and its age...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  6. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...... after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had...

  7. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  8. Examining direct service worker turnover in three long-term care industries in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Farida K; Bukach, Ashley M; Dawson, Nicole; Gitter, Robert; Judge, Katherine S

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to examine direct service worker turnover and its predictors across three provider types: nursing homes, home health agencies, and providers of services for the developmentally disabled. Stratified random sampling procedures were used to select provider types across five geographic regions in Ohio. Data were collected from administrative staff. Findings indicated that annual direct service worker turnover did not significantly vary by provider type (mean = 33%). Predictors of turnover related to job burnout, negative social support, and region. Policymakers can promote practices to lower direct service worker turnover such as addressing burnout and increasing support.

  9. A Survey of the Perceptions of Texas Superintendents and School Board Members Attending the Fall 2008 TASA/TASB Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jerry Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and the difference between perceptions of Texas school superintendents and school board members. In addition the study provided research to identify skills for superintendent preparation programs at the university level that are essential for strong superintendent and board relations. The study revealed ways to…

  10. Perceptions of Superintendents and Board Chairpersons in South Dakota and Wyoming Regarding Gender-Based Differences in Instructional Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton Hughes, Paige

    2010-01-01

    Women have traditionally been underrepresented as school district superintendents. Male superintendents are often thought to have skill in managing facilities and budgets while women have often been viewed as better instructional leaders. This study used surveys to research whether or not superintendents themselves perceive their skills…

  11. To Test or Not to Test? Drug Testing Teachers: The View of the Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMitchell, Todd A.; Kossakoski, Stephen; Baldasaro, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: School superintendents are charged with maintaining the safety and security of the schools in their district. One major recognized threat to the security and safety of students and staff is the use of illegal drugs. Superintendents are responding to the constitutionality of student drug-testing policies by implementing drug-testing…

  12. School Superintendents' Perceptions of Schools Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.; Fink, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Superintendents' perceptions regarding the effect of health insurance status on academics, the role schools should play in the process of obtaining health insurance, and the benefits/barriers to assisting students in enrolling in health insurance were surveyed. Superintendents' basic knowledge of health insurance, the link between…

  13. An Examination of Ideology among Selected K12 Christian School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, Jimmy L.

    2013-01-01

    This research project focused on explaining the decision making process of K12 Christian school superintendents whose schools belong to the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) organization. In spite of their similar religious and philosophical beliefs, ACSI K12 Christian school superintendents differed significantly in…

  14. Effective Communication and Creating Professional Learning Communities Is a Valuable Practice for Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Ann Toler; Newsome, Edward, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    As the chief executive officer, the superintendent must demonstrate high quality performance at every level in order to impact student achievement. In order to be an effective superintendent, the individual must have knowledge and skills in educational leadership and be able to articulate information clearly and precisely about the school…

  15. An Examination of the Decision-Making Processes Used by Superintendents in Reducing School District Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of importance of Harvey et al.'s (1997) 13 problem-solving strategies for making retrenchment decisions on school district budgets as perceived by California superintendents of medium-sized school districts. Methodology: The subjects in the present study were 86 superintendents of…

  16. 28 CFR 6.1 - Consent of warden or superintendent required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERAL PENAL AND CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS § 6.1 Consent of warden or superintendent required. The introduction or attempt to introduce into or upon the grounds of any Federal penal or correctional institution... consent of the warden or superintendent of such Federal penal or correctional institution is...

  17. A Qualitative Study of Superintendent Leadership Experiences during a Top-Down Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Johane

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate common experiences of superintendents as they responded to realignment of leadership responsibilities during an organizational change initiated by mayoral control. To discover the shared essence of changes in leadership responsibilities experienced by superintendents, individuals "told their stories" to…

  18. A Study of Female Central Office Administrators and Their Aspirations to the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ava J.; Pankake, Anita; Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Mills, Shirley; Simonsson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the motivations of females aspiring to school superintendency positions in Texas. We report on a reanalysis of data from two previous studies and how the findings build an understanding of previously documented obstacles and barriers female candidates encounter in their journey toward the superintendency.…

  19. Managing More than the Money: Superintendents' Perceptions of Their Leadership during Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi-Lewis, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Research on the process and effects of school budget development by superintendents during the current economic crisis is limited. This study sought to determine the job satisfaction, efficacy, and longevity of school superintendents during economic crises. Using data from an original survey instrument TRIPLEM (Managing More than the Money…

  20. Stories of Social Justice from Superintendents of Color: Intersections of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosilez, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Current literature on public school superintendents of color emphasize how these leaders leverage personal characteristics of resiliency, networking, and a commitment to equity to overcome obstacles to entry and retention in the superintendency. However, this literature fails to address with detail the nature of the resistance these administrators…

  1. The Glass Cliff: An Examination of the Female Superintendency in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Blanche Boyd

    2013-01-01

    South Carolina public school districts are confronted with a series of difficult circumstances and rely more on female superintendents than the national average. The investigation of female South Carolina superintendents was guided by the glass cliff conceptual framework. The glass cliff represents situations where females are promoted over males…

  2. The Superintendent's Leadership Role in School Improvement: Relationships between Authenticity and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James J.; Dunaway, David M.; Hancock, Dawson R.; Wang, Chuang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between superintendent leadership and the operational processes of school improvement. School district superintendents (N = 226) from six southeastern states were surveyed concerning their leadership authenticity and school improvement practices. Descriptive statistics, analyzes of…

  3. Washington Superintendents' Perceptions of the Knowing-Doing Gap and Implications for Organizational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the perceived barriers which prevent school superintendents in the state of Washington from closing the gap between knowing core leadership practices that increase student academic performance and the superintendent's ability to act on this knowledge by implementing them. The theoretical frames established were…

  4. If You Ax the Superintendent, Don't Chop Off Your Vital Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariya, Sally Banks

    1984-01-01

    The employment contract is the key item in superintendent firing, and thus, it should include provisions for termination. Terminations can misfire if the board does not carry out contractual obligations. Eight points of advice are included for boards that are contemplating firing a superintendent. (MD)

  5. The Role of the Superintendent in Closing the Achievement Gap in Diverse Small School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Howell, Jr.; Harris, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, narrative study was to investigate the role of the superintendent in leading the district to be more culturally proficient, resulting in the narrowing of the achievement gap in culturally diverse small districts. Eight superintendents of small school districts were purposefully selected based on their district size…

  6. Stage of Ego Development and Leadership Capacity: A Study of Twelve Illinois School District Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christina Kay

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study investigated stage of ego development and "leadership capacity" in a purposeful, stratified sample of 12 Illinois school district superintendents. The purpose of this study was to determine the following: 1) are postconventional stages of ego development evidenced in school superintendents; 2) do the…

  7. A Qualitative Study of Superintendent Leadership Experiences during a Top-Down Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Johane

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate common experiences of superintendents as they responded to realignment of leadership responsibilities during an organizational change initiated by mayoral control. To discover the shared essence of changes in leadership responsibilities experienced by superintendents, individuals "told their stories" to…

  8. The Short Tenure of A Woman Superintendent: A Clash of Gender and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the two-year tenure of a woman superintendent in a small southern city. Placed against the background of local community politics and school district politics it shows that women in the superintendency still face issues of gender stereotyping that influence the way they are perceived as leaders of school systems. A feminist…

  9. Business Ethics & Employee Turnover: CAFE Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sapovadia, Vrajlal; Patel, Sweta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Business ethics is in discussion for its importance universally, so is the employee turnover in business. Unethical practices are unwanted, so is the high employee turnover. Unethical practices and high employee turnover in business is ubiquitous. No consensus exists on defining ethics. Employee turnover is well defined, but there is no consensus on when employee turnover is disadvantageous for the company. The Golden Rule or ethic of reciprocity, a maxim states that either ...

  10. Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate a correlated spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring unnatural fine-tunings of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently ``observed'' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP. Recent claims by Bekenstein that fine-structure-constant variability does not imply detectable violations of the equivalence principle are shown to be untenable.

  11. Conference preview: Interview with Detective Chief Superintendent John Carnochan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This year's UNICEF Baby Friendly Conference in November will be as diverse as ever, with speakers touching on all aspects of infant feeding and care for new mothers and their babies. One speaker will be Detective Chief Superintendent John Carnochan, Head of the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit. Nearly four decades in the police force have taught John that early years intervention and support for vulnerable mothers, in particular, are at the heart of violence reduction, and that to reduce homicide rates we must invest resources in health professionals to support the early years.

  12. CEO Turnover and Market Reaction in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doddy Setiawan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research examines Chief Executive Officer (CEO turnover and market reaction in Indonesia. The sample of this research consists of 213 CEO turnover announcements for Indonesia Stock Exchange during 2000–2010 period. T-tests were used to investigate the effect of CEO turnover announcement on abnormal stock return during the event windows periods. The results of this research show that there is positive reaction on the CEO turnover announcements. This research considers both routine and non routine CEO turnover processes. This research finds that both turnover processes have information content to investor. This research also finds positive reaction on the announcements of outsider incoming CEO, while investors do not react on the announcement of insider incoming CEO. Thus, this research provides evidence that CEO turnover announcement have information content.   Keywords: CEO turnover, stock price, turnover process, the origin of incoming CEO

  13. Firm-level innovation activity, employee turnover and HRM practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Qin, Zhihua; Wang, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between employee turnover, HRM practices and innovation in Chinese firms in five high technology sectors. We estimate hurdle negative binomial models for count data on survey data allowing for analyses of the extensive as well as intensive margins of firms....... Innovating firms are more likely to have adopted high performance HRM practices, and the impact of employee turnover varies with the number of HRM practices implemented by the firm......' innovation activities. Innovation is measured both by the number of ongoing projects and new commercialized products. The results show that higher R&D employee turnover is associated with a higher probability of being innovative, but decreases the intensity of innovation activities in innovating firms...

  14. Job turnover and labor turnover : a taxonomy of employment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Wolter H.J.; Hamermesh, Daniel S.

    1994-01-01

    We present an organized set of stylized facts on the relations among flows of workers,changes in employment and changes in the numer of jobs at the firm level. Job turnover isusually measured by comparing stocks of employment in each firm at two points in time andadding up the absolute employment ch

  15. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Deog Yoon [College of Medicine, Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays.

  16. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  17. A literature review of nursing turnover costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Jones, Cheryl B

    2013-04-01

    To report the findings of a literature review of studies examining nursing staff turnover costs published between 1990 and 2010. Nurse turnover is a global concern that is both costly for health-care organizations and, in the context of the work environment, affects quality and safety. We reviewed past literature and describe the conceptualization of nurse turnover, evaluate the methodologies and calculation of costs, identify the reported range of turnover costs and provide suggestions for future study. We report inconsistencies in past studies in terms of the conceptualization and measurement of nurse turnover and turnover rates, the methodologies for gathering data and the data sources used, the approaches for calculating turnover costs and the resulting nursing staff turnover costs estimated. Past studies reached different conclusions about nurse turnover. We still need to explore the actual costs and benefits of nurse turnover and retention. This study should be helpful for nurse executives as they build a business case to address nurse turnover in their organizations, and for policy-makers as they develop policies about turnover. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  19. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  20. Search Consultants: Boon or Bane to Non-Traditional Candidates for the Superintendency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chion-Kenney, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Women and minorities are still underrepresented in the superintendency. Search consultants can tackle discrimination by helping a school board consider desirable administrator competencies and personality traits and by advancing outstanding "nontraditional" candidates. Candidates should take consultants' advice about networking, resume…

  1. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  2. Supervisory turnover in outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K; Broome, Kirk M; Edwards, Jennifer R; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover.

  3. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  4. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Ann C Hayek

    Full Text Available Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  5. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  6. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  7. The costs of turnover in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Spector, William D.; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. Objectives To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. Data and sample 902 nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Medicare enrollment files, Census and Area Resource File (ARF). Research Design We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable (IV) limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. Results The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The IV estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (p=0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10 percentage point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. Conclusion The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs. PMID:19648834

  8. The costs of turnover in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Spector, William D; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. DATA AND SAMPLE: Nine hundred two nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set, Medicare enrollment files, Census, and Area Resource File. We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The instrumental variable estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (P = 0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10% point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs.

  9. Examining the African American K-12 Public Superintendency from a Critical Race Theory Perspective: Counter-Stories about Hiring and Retention Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Anthony Gene

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, research has shown concern about the pool of African American candidates for the superintendency. Nationally, African American candidates make up two percent of superintendents and fourteen percent of the teaching force, the pool from which superintendents are traditionally chosen. Increasing demands to meet the needs of…

  10. Job Satisfaction of Female and Male Superintendents: The Influence of Job Facets and Contextual Variables as Potential Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip; Kowalski, Theodore J.; McCord, Robert S.; Petersen, George J.

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive multiple regression approach was used to assess the job satisfaction of female and male public school superintendents taking part in a decennial survey conducted by AASA. Self-reported job satisfaction of public school superintendents was regressed on their affective reactions to specific job facets (supervision, co-workers, and…

  11. Looking beyond School Walls: Examining the Impact of Superintendent Longevity on Teachers' Perceptions of Their Working Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Derrick D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if superintendent longevity significantly impacted teachers' perceptions of their working conditions. In addition, the study sought to determine if there were differences in perceptions among teachers whose superintendent was beginning (1 or fewer years in current position), emerging (between 2 to 6 years…

  12. Elements of Organizational Culture Superintendents Perceive as Important to Create and Maintain a Successful Organization in Times of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marylou K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the elements of culture public school superintendents perceive to be most important in creating and sustaining successful organizations in times of crisis. In addition, it was the purpose of this study to identify and describe the leadership strategies superintendents use to create…

  13. Superintendent Perceptions of the Success and Failure of School Construction Referendums from 2008-2010 in the State of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Walter Albert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the perceptions of superintendents who have conducted both successful and unsuccessful school construction referendums in the state of Indiana from 2008-2010. This research will serve as a guide for superintendents who will undergo a school construction referendum, especially in Indiana. This study will…

  14. Elements of Organizational Culture Superintendents Perceive as Important to Create and Maintain a Successful Organization in Times of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marylou K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the elements of culture public school superintendents perceive to be most important in creating and sustaining successful organizations in times of crisis. In addition, it was the purpose of this study to identify and describe the leadership strategies superintendents use to create…

  15. Feminist Theory and the Media Representation of a Woman-of-Color Superintendent: Is the World Ready for Cyborgs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yoshiko

    2000-01-01

    Discusses recent feminist theory, in particular feminist theory related to "cyborg" identity and examines some media representations of a woman-of-color superintendent. Suggests that the cyborg image offers alternative ways to consider the issue of diversity and educational leadership, including the superintendency. (Author/SLD)

  16. Comparison of Latino and Non-Latino Superintendents' Positive Psychological Functioning and Resilience in School Districts within North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present research study was to investigate and compare the positive psychological functioning between Latino and non-Latino superintendents currently in schools within North America. The primary focus of the research was to determine if the psychological capital and resilience measures of Latino superintendents were significantly…

  17. Can transformational managers control turnover intention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massad A. Alatawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation and research purpose: Employee turnover is a complex phenomenon that has negative consequences for organisations. The purpose of this study was to measure the correlation between transformational leadership style and turnover intention to control the employee turnover rate in organisations.Research method: This study utilised a two-stage clustering method and web-based survey research with a correlational design to collect the data. A total of 356 responses were collected from 14 clusters in Southern California; however, the final selected data for analysis came from 210 subjects with a cluster-sampling design of (14 × 15.Main findings and managerial implications: This study concluded that the transformational leadership style has a negative correlation with turnover intention. Managers who adopt this style of leadership can expect lower rates of turnover; thus, they can stay competitive in an unstable economy and achieve enhanced productivity, improved performance and reduction in expenses.

  18. Predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Turnover of nurse faculty is an increasingly important issue in nursing as the available number of qualified faculty continues to decrease. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover is important to academic administrators to retain and recruit qualified nursing faculty. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty working in departments and schools of nursing in Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive, public and private, not-for-profit institutions. The multidimensional model of organizational commitment was used to frame this study. The predictor variables explored were organizational climate, organizational commitment, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict. The work roles examined were research, teaching, and service. Logistical regression was performed to examine the predictors of turnover intention. Organizational climate intimacy and disengagement, affective and continuance organizational commitment, and role ambiguity were shown to predict turnover intention in nurse faculty. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Chronic Teacher Turnover in Urban Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacey Guin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the characteristics of elementary schools that experience chronic teacher turnover and the impacts of turnover on a school’s working climate and ability to effectively function. Based on evidence from staff climate surveys and case studies, it is clear that high turnover schools face significant organizational challenges. Schools with high teacher turnover rates have difficulty planning and implementing a coherent curriculum and sustaining positive working relationships among teachers. The reality of these organizational challenges is particularly alarming, given that high turnover schools are more likely to serve low-income and minority students. The negative relationship between teacher turnover and school functioning, and the fact that turbulent schools are disproportionately likely to serve lowincome and minority students have important implications for both district and school-level policies. Specifically: Teacher turnover rates are one indicator of school health, which school districts should consider when focusing on school improvements. Districts need to begin by developing the means to identify individual schools that experience high levels of teacher turnover. Current district policies in implementing professional development for teachers in low-performing schools are inefficient when teachers do not remain in the schools in which they are trained. In order for low-performing schools to improve, districts need to consider providing incentive programs so that high quality teachers apply for, and remain in, these schools. Future research is needed to address the causal link between turnover, organizational functioning and student outcomes. Additionally, there is a need for research examining district policies that may facilitate teacher turnover within a district, including how districts place and transfer teachers, as well as how teachers’ salaries are budgeted.

  20. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  1. Incomplete Spring Turnover in Small Deep Lakes in SE Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    of monitoring lakes is acknowledged by the state of Michigan, annual surveys are rare due to budget constraints. More frequent monitoring would allow us to determine whether lack of turnover varies annually and what combination of factors increases the probability of turnover in small deep lakes.

  2. Empirical Prediction of Turnovers in NFL Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel R. Bock

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Turnovers in the National Football League (NFL occur whenever a team loses possession of the ball due to a fumble, or an interception. Turnovers disrupt momentum of the offensive team, and represent lost opportunities to advance downfield and score. Teams with a positive differential turnover margin in a given game win 70 % of the time. Turnovers are statistically rare events, occurring apparently randomly. These characteristics make them difficult to predict. This investigation advances the hypothesis that turnovers are predictable in NFL football. Machine learning models are developed to learn the concept: At any point within a football game, what is the likelihood that a turnover will be observed on the next play from scrimmage? NFL play-by-play data for 32 teams spanning seven full seasons were used to train the models. Results presented suggest evidence to support the working hypothesis. Under certain conditions, both fumbles and interceptions can be anticipated at low false discovery rates (less than 15 % . When a turnover is predicted on the impending play from scrimmage, a high degree of confidence is associated with that prediction. The ability to anticipate catastrophic in-game events may lead to their management and control, ultimately improving the performance of individual athletes and their teams. This investigation contributes to the sports science literature by demonstrating the predictability of in-game events often considered to be essentially random in their occurrence. To the author’s knowledge, direct prediction of turnovers has not previously appeared in the literature, which has focused on retrospective statistical analyses of turnover margin in football games.

  3. Nursing home spending, staffing, and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Castle, Nicholas G; Phillips, Charles D

    2007-01-01

    Recent work on nursing home staffing and turnover has stressed the importance of ownership and resources. However, few studies have examined spending behaviors, which might also influence staffing levels and staff turnover rates. This study investigates whether spending behaviors measured by financial ratios are associated with staffing levels and staff turnover in nursing homes. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,014 Texas homes. Data were from the 2002 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. First, we examined differences in financial ratios by ownership type. Next, the effect of 10 financial ratios on staffing levels and turnover rates for registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses, and certified nursing assistants was examined using robust regression models. Descriptive data indicated that expense ratios related to resident care activities and staff development were significantly higher among not-for-profit than for-profit homes. Higher profits were associated with lower staffing levels, but not higher turnover rates. Administrative expenses (a measure of management capacity) had a negative impact both on staffing levels and staff turnover for licensed vocational nurses and certified nursing assistants, but they did not affect registered nurse staffing. Employee benefit expenses exhibited a positive impact on registered nurse and licensed vocational nurse staffing levels. The addition of information on financial ratios to models predicting staffing indicators reduced the effect of ownership on these indicators. Solutions to the staffing and turnover problem should focus on more effective management practices. Certain levels of administrative and staff benefit expenses may be necessary to improve professional staff recruitment and reduce both staffing and turnover costs. Differences in these financial ratios may partially explain the role played by ownership in determining staffing levels and turnover.

  4. Global turnover of histone post-translational modifications and variants in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zee Barry M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs on the N-terminal tails of histones and histone variants regulate distinct transcriptional states and nuclear events. Whereas the functional effects of specific PTMs are the current subject of intense investigation, most studies characterize histone PTMs/variants in a non-temporal fashion and very few studies have reported kinetic information about these histone forms. Previous studies have used radiolabeling, fluorescence microscopy and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine rates of histone turnover, and have found interesting correlations between increased turnover and increased gene expression. Therefore, histone turnover is an understudied yet potentially important parameter that may contribute to epigenetic regulation. Understanding turnover in the context of histone modifications and sequence variants could provide valuable additional insight into the function of histone replacement. Results In this study, we measured the metabolic rate of labeled isotope incorporation into the histone proteins of HeLa cells by combining stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC pulse experiments with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In general, we found that most core histones have similar turnover rates, with the exception of the H2A variants, which exhibit a wider range of rates, potentially consistent with their epigenetic function. In addition, acetylated histones have a significantly faster turnover compared with general histone protein and methylated histones, although these rates vary considerably, depending on the site and overall degree of methylation. Histones containing transcriptionally active marks have been consistently found to have faster turnover rates than histones containing silent marks. Interestingly, the presence of both active and silent marks on the same peptide resulted in a slower turnover rate than either mark alone on that same

  5. The validation of the turnover intention scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris F.C. Bothma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Turnover intention as a construct has attracted increased research attention in the recent past, but there are seemingly not many valid and reliable scales around to measure turnover intention.Research purpose: This study focused on the validation of a shortened, six-item version of the turnover intention scale (TIS-6.Motivation for the study: The research question of whether the TIS-6 is a reliable and a valid scale for measuring turnover intention and for predicting actual turnover was addressed in this study.Research design, approach and method: The study was based on a census-based sample (n= 2429 of employees in an information, communication and technology (ICT sector company (N= 23 134 where the TIS-6 was used as one of the criterion variables. The leavers (those who left the company in this sample were compared with the stayers (those who remained in the employ of the company in this sample in respect of different variables used in the study.Main findings: It was established that the TIS-6 could measure turnover intentions reliably (α= 0.80. The TIS-6 could significantly distinguish between leavers and stayers (actual turnover, thereby confirming its criterion-predictive validity. The scale also established statistically significant differences between leavers and stayers in respect of a number of the remaining theoretical variables used in the study, thereby also confirming its differential validity. These comparisons were conducted for both the 4-month and the 4-year period after the survey was conducted.Practical/managerial implications: Turnover intention is related to a number of variables in the study which necessitates a reappraisal and a reconceptualisation of existing turnover intention models.Contribution/value-add: The TIS-6 can be used as a reliable and valid scale to assess turnover intentions and can therefore be used in research to validly and reliably assess turnover intentions or to

  6. AN ECONOMETRIC APPROACH ABOUT VOLUNTARY TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADALET EREN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes individual and organizational variables that affect voluntary turnover are determined in the special defence and security companies. A binomial logistic regression model is used to estimate voluntary turnover.  Binomial Logistic regression, reliability test (scale alfa, variance (ANOVA, Post-hoc/Tukey, correlation (Pearson and other basic statistical techniques  with SPSS 13 statistical packet program was used in the analyzes ofresearch data. The study finds that; situation of suppose working, number of child, number of death child, number of home’s moving, support of rent, total monthly income of household, last work’s region, number of prizes, affect voluntary turnover are determined.

  7. Improvements to Kramers Turnover Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pollak, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The Kramers turnover problem, that is obtaining a uniform expression for the rate of escape of a particle over a barrier for any value of the external friction was solved in the eighties. Two formulations were given, one by Melnikov and Meshkov (MM) (J. Chem. Phys. 85, 1018 (1986)), which was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion of the particle in the presence of friction. The other, by Pollak, Grabert and Haenggi (PGH) (J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4073 (1989)), valid also for memory friction, was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion along the collective unstable normal mode of the particle. Both theories did not take into account the temperature dependence of the average energy loss to the bath. Increasing the bath temperature will reduce the average energy loss. In this paper, we analyse this effect, using a novel perturbation theory. We find that within the MM approach, the thermal energy gained from the bath diverges, the average energy gain becomes infinite, implying an essential failure o...

  8. Variability in root production, phenology, and turnover rate among 12 temperate tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M Luke; Adams, Thomas S; Smithwick, Erica A H; Eissenstat, David M

    2014-08-01

    The timing of fine root production and turnover strongly influences both the seasonal potential for soil resource acquisition among competing root systems and the plant fluxes of root carbon into soil pools. However, basic patterns and variability in the rates and timing or fine root production and turnover are generally unknown among perennial plants species. We address this shortfall using a heuristic model relating root phenology to turnover together with three years of minirhizotron observations of root dynamics in 12 temperate tree species grown in a common garden. We specifically investigated how the amount and the timing of root production differ among species and how they impact estimates of fine root turnover. Across the 12 species, there was wide variation in the timing of root production with some species producing a single root flush in early summer and others producing roots either more uniformly over the growing season or in multiple pulses. Additionally, the pattern and timing of root production appeared to be consistent across years for some species but varied in others. Root turnover rate was related to total root production (P phenology. Overall, we suggest that more detailed observations of root phenology and production will improve fidelity of root turnover estimates. Future efforts should link patterns of root phenology and production with whole-plant life history traits and variation in annual and seasonal climate.

  9. Empirical Prediction of Turnovers in NFL Football

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bock, Joel

    ... are predictable in NFL football. Machine learning models are developed to learn the concept: At any point within a football game, what is the likelihood that a turnover will be observed on the next p...

  10. Superintendents' Perceptions of the School Improvement Planning Process in the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, David M.; Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang; Hancock, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study of school improvement planning in the southeastern USA was to establish the current view of the process through the eyes of the district superintendents. The answers to the questions were consistently mixed. Generally, the presence of school improvement planning is prevalent in the large majority of districts. However,…

  11. Examination of Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership Profiles of Illinois Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ty

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the transformational leadership and emotional intelligence profiles of current Illinois superintendents. Demographic characteristics related to age, gender, degree, experience, and district size, type, and location were also examined. As schools are asked to "do more with less," the impact of leaders who demonstrate…

  12. Superintendent Leadership and Community Engagement: A Study of Convergence as Perceived by Community Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, Salvatore P.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the community in public education is rooted in the earliest beginnings of the American educational system. This exploratory and quantitative study examined what the superintendent does to lead the school district regarding community engagement, and also examined community member perceptions of that engagement. This was based on…

  13. The Examination of Four Illinois Female Superintendents and Their Transformational Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Redell, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female school superintendents and their leadership practices. Particular attention is given to their leadership practices, professional development, mentoring, and barriers. The conceptual framework for this research study was based on the transformational leadership model. According to Bass and Avolio, the…

  14. Superintendents' Perceptions of the School Improvement Planning Process in the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, David M.; Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang; Hancock, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study of school improvement planning in the southeastern USA was to establish the current view of the process through the eyes of the district superintendents. The answers to the questions were consistently mixed. Generally, the presence of school improvement planning is prevalent in the large majority of districts. However,…

  15. Politics First: Examining the Practice of the Multi-District Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniella; McHenry-Sorber, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, multiple states have implemented a form of regional school district consolidation referred to as multi-district unions. Their organizational structure enables districts to retain individual school boards within regional local education agencies, all of which are overseen by a superintendent and a central board. However, no…

  16. The Effects of Authentic Vision Statement on Challenges Experienced by First Year Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdos, Monica

    2011-01-01

    A new superintendent in a new school district (NSND) can be a challenging position. The literature review asserts that many challenges faced by NSNDs are due to the absence of a shared vision. Challenges can be listed as work stoppage, personnel, financial, fighting ghosts, homecoming procession and many other aspects of running a district.…

  17. School Communications 2.0: A Social Media Strategy for K-12 Principals and Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel Dean

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multiple-case study was two-fold: 1) to describe, analyze, and interpret the experiences of school principals and superintendents who use multiple social media tools such as blogs, microblogs, social networking sites, podcasts, and online videos with stakeholders as part of their comprehensive communications…

  18. Strategies Utilized by Superintendents and Mathematics District Personnel That Impact Minority Student Outcomes in Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Jared Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the constructs from effective instruction from the literature on teacher education to understand the impact of school district strategies on algebra outcomes for minority students. The purpose of this study was to examine the strategies utilized by superintendents and district personnel and the impact of these identified…

  19. Superintendents & District Senior Leadership Teams: A Multi-Case Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevak, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to understand how superintendents create and lead their senior leadership teams. Research on senior teams in the private sector suggests that studying top teams, rather than CEOs alone, provides better predictions of organizational outcomes (Finkelstein, Hambrick, and Cannella, Jr., 2009). While many…

  20. Salaries of New Superintendents: A Public Relations Concern for Many Public School Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Salaries for new superintendents form a highly visible factor that has direct implications for school-community public relations. To provide a means for guiding school board members and to provide a format for justifying salaries, a model is presented that serves both purposes. Within this model, attention is afforded to specifying a relevant…

  1. Of Horses and Men: Superintendent Asbury's Deadly Assault on the Crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Carrie Moran

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Superintendent Calvin Asbury's campaign to convert members of the Crow Tribe to Christianity. Presents Joe Medicine Crow, who was a child during the campaign that began in 1919, as he describes the historical and continuing effects on the Tribe. Explains that federal policy included selling tribal lands to non-Indians, prohibiting…

  2. Superintendent-Business Executive Collaboration in Intermediary Organizations: Moral Agency and Democratic Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey V.; McKee, Tiffany; Martin, Staci

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes collaboration between business executives and superintendents to influence local/regional K-12 educational change. Specifically, we examine participant like-mindedness about the ethics and appropriate focus of K-12 intermediary collaboration, the extent of democratic functioning, and key individuals to involve. Data…

  3. Factors Supporting Implementation of Executive Coaching as Embedded Professional Learning for Superintendents in New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuciforo, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of school superintendent has become increasingly complex. As school district leaders deal with new curriculum standards, increased accountability, and limited financial resources, they are in need of quality professional development tailored to their needs. This qualitative study explores personal, cultural, and structural factors that…

  4. Working Through the "Riddle of the Heart": Perspectives of Women Superintendents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, C. Cryss

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a qualitative study focused on specific success strategies gathered in interviews with women superintendents. Interpretations that cut across the narratives are expressed through the metaphoric framework provided by Carlos Castaneda's principles of power that govern the "riddle of the heart," or caring ethic. Successful women…

  5. The Examination of Four Illinois Female Superintendents and Their Transformational Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Redell, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female school superintendents and their leadership practices. Particular attention is given to their leadership practices, professional development, mentoring, and barriers. The conceptual framework for this research study was based on the transformational leadership model. According to Bass and Avolio, the…

  6. Performance Standards for School Superintendents. ERIC Digest Series Number EA34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Amy

    This digest discusses the issue of performance standards for school superintendents. School districts are discovering that developing performance standards for administrators can be cost effective, reduce crisis management, set and maintain direction, and give the community a standard for measuring school success. Several aspects of the issue on…

  7. Superintendent-Business Executive Collaboration in Intermediary Organizations: Moral Agency and Democratic Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey V.; McKee, Tiffany; Martin, Staci

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes collaboration between business executives and superintendents to influence local/regional K-12 educational change. Specifically, we examine participant like-mindedness about the ethics and appropriate focus of K-12 intermediary collaboration, the extent of democratic functioning, and key individuals to involve. Data…

  8. Superintendents' Perceptions of the School Improvement Planning Process in the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, David M.; Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang; Hancock, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study of school improvement planning in the southeastern USA was to establish the current view of the process through the eyes of the district superintendents. The answers to the questions were consistently mixed. Generally, the presence of school improvement planning is prevalent in the large majority of districts. However,…

  9. Violence Prevention in Georgia's Rural Public School Systems: Perceptions of School Superintendents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Chet

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses by superintendents in 81 of Georgia's 114 rural school districts covered violence prevention policies; use of searches, videocamera surveillance, metal detectors, security alarm systems, dress codes, and law enforcement officers on campus; incidence of removal of weapons and various forms of violence; student discipline programs;…

  10. Minnesota Superintendents' Perceptions of Their Role and Influence in School Board Agenda Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, DeeDee Currier

    This study of the school board agenda-setting role among 30 Minnesota superintendents interprets their perceptions in relation to environmental contexts, group demands, issues control, and district enrollment size. A microperspective of David Easton's political systems model provided the guiding conceptual framework. Respondents were interviewed…

  11. California Women and the Strategies Utilized on the Path to the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify leadership strategies utilized and the barriers encountered by females in pursuit of the role of superintendent. This study also intended to identify the strategies women used to overcome these barriers. Methodology: This study utilized descriptive research. Descriptive research involves gathering…

  12. Border Crossing: A Black Woman Superintendent Builds Democratic Community in Unfamiliar Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the earlier research on women in leadership has told the stories of White women. Since there are very low numbers of superintendents of color both male and female nationwide, there have been very few stories reported of women leaders of color (Brunner & Grogan, 2007). This article describes the leadership issues involved when one Black…

  13. 8 CFR 299.3 - Forms available from Superintendent of Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Documents, who is authorized to print these forms for sale to the public. Prices are set by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, and are subject to change without notice. A small supply.... Form No. GPO Stock No. (S/N) Price per 100/pad G-28 027-002-00218-1 14.00 G-325A 027-002-00277-6...

  14. The Outsiders: Can a New Breed of Noneducator Superintendents Transform Urban School Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Sol

    2001-01-01

    The urban school systems of four nontraditional superintendents (Harold Levy, Roy Romer, Paul Vallas, and Alan Bersin) include the nation's three largest (New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago) districts and San Diego. Some of these chief executives are managing more successfully than others; all four are facing difficult obstacles. (MLH)

  15. A Qualitative Study of High Student Achievement in a Rural Appalachian Region: Perceptions of Selected Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Regina

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study was based on grounded theory and used purposive sampling for selecting participants. The sample for this study included 12 of the 16 superintendents in this region. This rural Appalachian region has historically outperformed the remainder of the southeastern state on reading and math achievement tests at the elementary and…

  16. The Perceived Quality of Life among School District Superintendents in Illinois Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of quality of life among Illinois male and female superintendents, and to determine demographic differences. Frisch's Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) was used, which measured perceived levels of importance, satisfaction and weighted satisfaction (importance and satisfaction) in sixteen…

  17. A Comparative Character Analysis of Dagny Taggard in Ayn Rand's "Atlas Shrugged" and the Woman Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Queinnise; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2009-01-01

    Over the years women have played crucial roles in societal leadership. Within the past decade more women have emerged in taking positions of leadership in many areas concerning U.S. education in particularly the highest public position in education, Superintendent. Obtaining, sustaining, and maintaining high positions of power for any career woman…

  18. The Perceived Quality of Life among School District Superintendents in Illinois Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of quality of life among Illinois male and female superintendents, and to determine demographic differences. Frisch's Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) was used, which measured perceived levels of importance, satisfaction and weighted satisfaction (importance and satisfaction) in…

  19. Accountability Narratives of Rural School Superintendents and Administrators: Moving from Two- to Three-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, David; Ylimaki, Rose M.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the broader political sphere as it affects superintendents and other constituents of rural districts. The current landscape of education reform focuses on accountability--particularly at the policy level of both state and federal education agencies. This article draws on the literature and an empirical study that examined…

  20. California Women and the Strategies Utilized on the Path to the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify leadership strategies utilized and the barriers encountered by females in pursuit of the role of superintendent. This study also intended to identify the strategies women used to overcome these barriers. Methodology: This study utilized descriptive research. Descriptive research involves gathering…

  1. Strategies Utilized by Superintendents and Mathematics District Personnel That Impact Minority Student Outcomes in Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Jared Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the constructs from effective instruction from the literature on teacher education to understand the impact of school district strategies on algebra outcomes for minority students. The purpose of this study was to examine the strategies utilized by superintendents and district personnel and the impact of these identified…

  2. Moving from Oversight to Insight: One Community's Journey with Its Superintendent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, John E.

    2000-01-01

    The superintendent of Coventry (Rhode Island) Schools explains how he converted annual town meetings from uncivil, interminable budget-slashing sessions to expressions of community support for student-centered reforms and a construction/renovation bond issue. The board grasped assessment difficulties by taking state-mandated tests for…

  3. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention.

  4. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line.

  5. A Study On Employee Turnover At Prime Star Fashions, Tirupur

    OpenAIRE

    SHEELAVATHY, R.; HEMALATHA, Mrs.

    2015-01-01

    Employee turnover means number of incoming and outgoing worker from an organization or company. In other words we can say when a new employee takes place of old employee it is called employee turnover in a period of time. The main objective of perusing the study is to assess the main reasons for employee turnover, to know the retention techniques to avoid the employee turnover, to know about the effectiveness of supervising at Prime Star Fashions, Tirupur. The reason for the employee turnover...

  6. A Study On Employee Turnover At Prime Star Fashions, Tirupur

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Employee turnover means number of incoming and outgoing worker from an organization or company. In other words we can say when a new employee takes place of old employee it is called employee turnover in a period of time. The main objective of perusing the study is to assess the main reasons for employee turnover, to know the retention techniques to avoid the employee turnover, to know about the effectiveness of supervising at Prime Star Fashions, Tirupur. The reason for the employee turnover...

  7. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  8. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100~MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of ''Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum'' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in HII regions, Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application ...

  9. Predicting nursing turnover with catastrophe theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Cheryl M

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study comparing an innovative nonlinear model and a traditional linear model for accuracy in prediction of nursing turnover. An international, sustained nursing shortage creates a need to target accurately the staff population at risk for turnover. Existing linear methodology is cumbersome with the number of variables needed, while producing inadequate results. Nonlinear modelling methods offer increased simplicity and accuracy in predictability. A correlational survey with a longitudinal cohort prospective study was carried out in 2005-2006 with a convenience sample of 1033 Registered Nurses from the Midwest region of the United States of America. At time 1, 756 usable questionnaires were returned and 496 at time 2. Data analysis included analyses of a cusp catastrophe model, a cube-shaped four-dimensional figure with a top that provided a down-turning slope area (the catastrophe/cusp zone). This fluid, dynamic cusp version employed the smallest number of control and dependent variables. The exceedingly small turnover sample preempted the use of the computerized program Cuspfit; a proven quasi-quantitative methodology demonstrated 80.4% predictability in the cusp catastrophe model overall and 53.6% correct predictions of actual terminations, particularly in nurses with turnover were accurate predictor variables; job tension was not. Catastrophe models are useful in predicting nursing turnover. Future nursing researchers should act on this evidence to benefit forthcoming studies and the profession.

  10. Does Judge Turnover Affect Judicial Performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Alice; Tagliapietra, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Italy is among the countries with the highest litigation rate and those with the highest duration of trials. This article shows that judge turnover contributes negatively to delays in Italian courts and outlines possible policies for improvement. In Italy, judges can voluntarily move from one...... office to another after three years of mandate, and the law prescribes their transfer after ten years to guarantee their independence. Flaws in the process managing the backlog of outbound judges and the existence of asynchrony between outbound and inbound transfers produce a chain of delays...... to the disposition of court cases. Using a novel dataset on Court of Appeal Districts in Italy (2008–2012), we provide evidence of a strong negative relation between high turnover rates and judicial performance. We find that marginal increases in judge turnover rates lead to a statistically significant decrease...

  11. Nursing home staffing, turnover, and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H

    2003-09-01

    This study examined the predictors of total nurse and registered nurse (RN) staffing hours per resident day separately in all free-standing California nursing homes (1,555), using staffing data from state cost reports in 1999. This study used a two-stage least squares model, taking into account nursing turnover rates, resident case mix levels, and other factors. As expected, total nurse and RN staffing hours were negatively associated with nurse staff turnover rates and positively associated with resident case mix. Facilities were resource dependent in that a high proportion of Medicare residents predicted higher staffing hours, and a higher proportion of Medicaid residents predicted lower staffing hours and higher turnover rates. Nursing assistant wages were positively associated with total nurse staffing hours. For-profit facilities and high-occupancy rate facilities had lower total nurse and RN staffing hours. Medicaid reimbursement rates and multifacility organizations were positively associated with RN staffing hours.

  12. Creating a more quit-friendly national workforce? Individual layoff history and voluntary turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul R; Trevor, Charlie O; Feng, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Although Bureau of Labor Statistics data reveal that U.S. employers laid off over 30 million employees since 1994, virtually no research has addressed the behavior of layoff victims upon reemployment. In a first step, we investigate how layoffs shape voluntary turnover behavior in subsequent jobs. Utilizing a recently developed fixed effects specification of survival analysis, we find that a layoff history is positively associated with quit behavior. This effect is partially mediated by underemployment and job satisfaction in the postlayoff job. The remaining direct effect is consistent with the notion that layoffs produce a psychological spillover to postlayoff employment, which then manifests in quit behavior. We also find that layoff effects on turnover attenuate as an individual's layoffs accumulate and vary in magnitude according to the turnover "path" followed by the leaver.

  13. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  14. The professional learning community as perceived by Israeli school superintendents, principals and teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Chen

    2012-12-01

    A professional learning community (PLC) facilitates collaborative learning among colleagues at all levels in their common working environment. PLCs are particularly useful in schools, with teachers and principals meeting regularly to solve problems relating to teaching and learning. Being a means of improving student achievement, PLCs have received growing support from researchers and practitioners alike, yet some professionals are still exploring ways to develop learning networks focusing on teaching and learning issues. The purpose of this study was to examine Israeli teachers', principals', and superintendents' perceptions of inhibiting and fostering factors of the PLC. In this qualitative, topic-oriented study, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 15 teachers from elementary, middle and secondary schools and their respective principals (15) and superintendents (15). Generating themes was inductive, grounded in the perspectives articulated by participants. The principals and the teachers indicated that overload, a lack of resources and top-down commands were PLC-inhibiting factors. The superintendents saw the principal's leadership style as a main PLC-fostering factor. Understanding how these three echelons in the school system perceive the inhibiting and fostering factors of a PLC could indicate whether and how this collaborative learning process can be nurtured and sustained in schools.

  15. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. (Univ. of Toledo, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  16. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  17. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  18. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  19. Staff turnover: occasional friend, frequent foe, and continuing frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, C R

    1999-09-01

    Turnover appears to be a relatively simple concept. However, considerable confusion results when discussing turnover because of differences in how it is defined--what is counted, how it is counted, and how the rate of turnover is expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to turnover's cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some which can be corrected and some which cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role.

  20. Turnover of regulated nurses in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Charlene H; Wodchis, Walter P; McGilton, Katherine S

    2014-07-01

    To describe the relationship between nursing staff turnover in long-term care (LTC) homes and organisational factors consisting of leadership practices and behaviours, supervisory support, burnout, job satisfaction and work environment satisfaction. The turnover of regulated nursing staff [Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs)] in LTC facilities is a pervasive problem, but there is a scarcity of research examining this issue in Canada. The study was conceptualized using a Stress Process model. Distinct surveys were distributed to administrators to measure organisational factors and to regulated nurses to measure personal and job-related sources of stress and workplace support. In total, 324 surveys were used in the linear regression analysis to examine factors associated with high turnover rates. Higher leadership practice scores were associated with lower nursing turnover; a one score increase in leadership correlated with a 49% decrease in nursing turnover. A significant inverse relationship between leadership turnover and nurse turnover was found: the higher the administrator turnover the lower the nurse turnover rate. Leadership practices and administrator turnover are significant in influencing regulated nurse turnover in LTC. Long-term care facilities may want to focus on building good leadership and communication as an upstream method to minimize nurse turnover. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... inventory) or in the average number of month's supply on hand. Turnover or number of month's supply is calculated only on current-use inventory. Performance goals, i.e., a six months investment or a turnover...

  2. Organizational-level study of the impact of past turnover on future turnover in the Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaiya Mohamed Al Balushi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Turnover phenomena attracted researchers from all over the world for generations. Most of this research was directed towards turnover antecedents with a few scattered conceptual and empirical studies related to turnover consequences. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of past turnover on future turnover in public organizations, in addition to test the mediation role of organizational climate in this relationship. Public schools as separate identities were the best choice as the study sample. Data were collected through questionnaires from 142 public schools in all educational regions in Oman. Two-step structural equation modeling approach, and nested model comparison were used for data analysis. The results revealed that: (1 past turnover predicts future turnover, significantly; (2 organizational climate fails to mediate this relationship. The study added to the body of knowledge by confirming Staw’s hypothesis relating past turnover to future turnover in the Omani context. Human resource professionals and educational administration practitioners may play an important role in decreasing future turnover by tackling and decreasing past turnover, in addition to improving the relationship climate in schools. The study is limited to public schools in Oman and further studies about turnover consequences in the Arabic context are needed to affirm the results.

  3. Tropical Estuarine Macrobenthic Communities Are Structured by Turnover Rather than Nestedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Carlinda Raílly; Hepp, Luiz Ubiratan; Patrício, Joana; Molozzi, Joseline

    2016-01-01

    Turnover (i.e., species substitution) and nestedness (i.e., subsets of species from more diverse locations), the two main mechanisms used to explain the beta diversity of biological communities, have different implications for biodiversity conservation. To better understand how these mechanisms contribute to beta diversity, we tested the following hypotheses: (i) greater dissimilarity in community composition occurs between estuarine zones than other hierarchical level studied; (ii) beta diversity in these communities develops by turnover in estuaries with a lower degree of anthropogenic impact, but by nestedness in estuaries with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact; and (iii) the structuring mechanism is independent of season. We studied two tropical estuaries (dry and wet seasons) that vary in terms of land-use of the drainage basins. Subtidal benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled along the estuarine gradient in each of the two estuaries. The additive partitioning approach to species diversity was used to determine the hierarchical scale with the greatest dissimilarity in community composition. General beta diversity was measured using the Sorensen dissimilarity index, partitioning the turnover and nestedness components. The greatest dissimilarity in the composition of the communities occurred between the zones along the estuarine gradient in both seasons (dry = 58.6%; wet = 46.3%). In the estuary with a lower degree of anthropogenic influence, benthic macroinvertebrate diversity was generated by turnover regardless of the season. In the estuary with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact, beta diversity was structured by turnover during the dry season and a combination of both mechanisms during the wet season. We conclude that turnover is the principal mechanism responsible for beta diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate communities in tropical estuaries.

  4. Mentoring Programs for Newly Appointed Public School Superintendents: An Analysis of the Need for Ethical Decision-Making as a Critical Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    This research study examines the various decision-making processes that superintendents may encounter within the field. The degree to which public school superintendents and public school systems are being held accountable has increased in recent years. The recent unethical decisions made within the last decade in both the public and private…

  5. Fringe Benefits for Superintendents in Public Schools, 1981-82. Part 1 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    To help school boards and superintendents assess fringe benefit packages in their districts, this fourth biennial survey presents data on nonsalary compensation for public school superintendents in a national stratified sample of 1,036 of the nation's 11,313 public school systems. Arrayed in 38 tables, the data are classified by district…

  6. A Qualitative Multi-Case Study of the Influence of Personal and Professional Ethics on the Leadership of Public School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of personal and professional ethics on the leadership of public school superintendents. A multi-case, qualitative research design was used to gather data from four practicing public school superintendents. Transformational leadership theory and the three pillars of ethics of leadership…

  7. Application of Q-Methodology and Relational Leadership to Understanding Superintendent and Board Members' Relations Using Emotional and Multiple Intelligences Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Martha A.

    2010-01-01

    Media reports and scholarly literature identify conflicts between superintendents and school board members as a crisis in local school governance. Reformers advocate for more training of superintendents and board members, but little research has been conducted on how the diversity in board makeup may contribute to this crisis. The purpose of this…

  8. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors' substance use disorder-impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, having organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors' work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds.

  9. Review of nursing turnover research, 1977-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T W; Bame, S I; Robinson, C D

    1998-12-01

    Turnover represents a major problem for health care services in terms of cost and quality of care given. As a result, turnover has been the subject of a large number of investigations. However, the variety of study populations, research methodologies, and inconsistent definitions and measurements of turnover lead to difficulties when attempting to compare studies. The purpose of this paper is to present: (1) a summary of turnover study methods and procedures, and (2) a summary of socio-demographic, organizational, and social support factors associated with turnover of nursing staff.

  10. Measuring temporal turnover in ecological communities

    OpenAIRE

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Dornelas, Maria; Magurran, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (project BioTIME 250189) and the Royal Society. MD acknowledges funding from the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology Scotland (MASTS). MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions. 1.Range migrations in response to climate change, invasive species and the emergence of novel ecosystems highlight the importance of temporal turnover in community composition as a...

  11. High bone turnover in Irish professional jockeys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waldron-Lynch, F

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARY: Professional jockeys are routinely exposed to high impact trauma and sustain fractures frequently. We found that jockeys restrict their caloric intake in order to maintain regulation weights, and that bone turnover is high. There are significant health and safety implications for the racing industry. INTRODUCTION: Professional jockeys routinely sustain fractures from high impact falls. Jockeys maintain a low percentage body fat and a low body mass index (BMI) to achieve low weight targets in order to race. We evaluated dietary habits and bone metabolism in jockeys. METHODS: Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 27 male jockeys of the 144 jockeys licensed in Ireland. Fourteen (52%) had BMD T score below -1.0, of whom 12 consented to clinical review, nutritional survey, endocrine studies, and bone turnover markers (BTM). BTM were compared to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 16). RESULTS: BMI was 20.6 +\\/- 1.7 kg\\/m(2); previous fracture frequency was 3.2 +\\/- 2.0 per rider. All had normal endocrine axes. The jockeys\\' diet as determined by a 7-day dietary recall was deficient in energy, calcium, and vitamin D intake. Compared with the control group, the jockey group had evidence of increased bone turnover. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of the professional jockeys in Ireland have low-normal BMD, low BMI, and high bone turnover that may result from weight and dietary restrictions. These factors seem to have a deleterious effect on their bone health and predispose the jockeys to a high fracture risk that should be remediated.

  12. Stock Option Compensation and Managerial Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Georgiana NASTASESCU

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the association between managerial turnover and equity-based compensation. I investigate whether stock options act to bond executives to their firms and whether retention of managers is a motivation of companies in designing CEO incentive contracts. The results show that stock options do negatively influence the probability of a CEO leaving the company. The monetary cost of losing the value of equity-based compensation package keeps the manager with his company. I also fin...

  13. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  14. PERAN STRES KERJA DAN KEPUASAN KERJA UNTUK MENGURANGI TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Nazenin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk menguji pengaruh variabel stres kerja dan kepuasan kerja pada turnover intention karyawan tetap bagian produksi. Sampel penelitian ini adalah 86 responden, menggunakan metode Slovin dengan teknik probability sampling dengan jenis proportionate random sampling. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, menunjukkan bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif signifikan pada turnover intention. Kemudian, kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif signifikan. Penelitian ini menyimpulkan, bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif dan signifikan pada turnover intention karyawan dan kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif dan signifikan terhadap turnover intention karyawan. Implikasi manajerial yang bisa dilakukan adalah dengan pengurangan tingkat stres karyawan dan membuat program untuk tujuan menekan turnover intention, seperti kesempatan promosi dan meningkatkan reward karyawan. The purpose of this study conducted to examine the effect of work stress and job satisfaction on turnover intention of employee in production department. The sample was 86 respondent, using Slovin method with proportionate random sampling technique. The result showed that job stress has a positive effect on turnover intention while job satisfaction has a negative effect on turnover intention. This study conclude that job stress has positive and significant impact on employee turnover intention and job satisfaction significantly and negatively related to turnover intention of employees. Therefore, it is recommended to managerial level people to reduce stress levels in employees and to create a program for pressing turnover intention, such as promotional opportunities and improve employee rewards.

  15. PERAN STRES KERJA DAN KEPUASAN KERJA UNTUK MENGURANGI TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Nazenin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk menguji pengaruh variabel stres kerja dan kepuasan kerja pada turnover intention karyawan tetap bagian produksi. Sampel penelitian ini adalah 86 responden, menggunakan metode Slovin dengan teknik probability sampling dengan jenis proportionate random sampling. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, menunjukkan bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif signifikan pada turnover intention. Kemudian, kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif signifikan. Penelitian ini menyimpulkan, bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif dan signifikan pada turnover intention karyawan dan kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif dan signifikan terhadap turnover intention karyawan. Implikasi manajerial yang bisa dilakukan adalah dengan pengurangan tingkat stres karyawan dan membuat program untuk tujuan menekan turnover intention, seperti kesempatan promosi dan meningkatkan reward karyawan. The purpose of this study conducted to examine the effect of work stress and job satisfaction on turnover intention of employee in production department. The sample was 86 respondent, using Slovin method with proportionate random sampling technique. The result showed that job stress has a positive effect on turnover intention while job satisfaction has a negative effect on turnover intention. This study conclude that job stress has positive and significant impact on employee turnover intention and job satisfaction significantly and negatively related to turnover intention of employees. Therefore, it is recommended to managerial level people to reduce stress levels in employees and to create a program for pressing turnover intention, such as promotional opportunities and improve employee rewards.

  16. Spatial and environmental correlates of species richness and turnover patterns in European cryptocephaline and chrysomeline beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Freijeiro,Andrea; Baselga, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite some general concordant patterns (i.e. the latitudinal richness gradient), species richness and composition of different European beetle taxa varies in different ways according to their dispersal and ecological traits. Here, the patterns of variation in species richness, composition and spatial turnover are analysed in European cryptocephaline and chrysomeline leaf beetles, assessing their environmental and spatial correlates. The underlying rationale to use environmental and...

  17. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: turnover rates and their association with client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Modisette, Kathryn C; Ihnes, Pamela C; Godley, Susan H

    2012-03-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (N = 249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. In addition, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Turnover capacity of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase for phenol and monosubstituted phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, M.D.; Heck, P.E. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and other peroxidases are susceptible to mechanism-based inactivation during the oxidation of phenolic substrates. The turnover capacity of CIP was quantified for phenol and 11 monosubstituted phenols under conditions in which enzyme inactivation by mechanisms involving hydrogen peroxide alone were minimized. Turnover capacities varied by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the substituent. On a mass basis, the enzyme consumption corresponding to the lowest turnover capacities is considerable and may influence the economic feasibility of proposed industrial applications of peroxidases. Within a range of substituent electronegativity values, molar turnover capacities correlated well (r{sup 2} = 0.89) with substituent effects quantified by radical {sigma} values and semiquantitatively with homolytic O-H bond dissociation energies of the phenolic substrates, suggesting that phenoxyl radical intermediates are probably involved in the suicide inactivation of CIP. The correlation range in each case did not include phenols with highly electron-withdrawing (nitro and cyano) substituents because they are not oxidized by CIP, nor phenols with highly electron-donating (hydroxy and amino) substituents because they led to virtually complete inactivation of the enzyme with minimal substrate removal.

  19. Turnover capacity of coprinus cinereus peroxidase for phenol and monosubstituted phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken; Heck

    1998-05-01

    Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and other peroxidases are susceptible to mechanism-based inactivation during the oxidation of phenolic substrates. The turnover capacity (defined as the molar or mass concentration of substrate oxidized per unit concentration of enzyme inactivated) of CIP was quantified for phenol and 11 monosubstituted phenols under conditions in which enzyme inactivation by mechanisms involving hydrogen peroxide alone were minimized. Turnover capacities varied by nearly 2 orders of magnitude (absolute values on the order of 10(5)-10(6) on a molar basis), depending on the substituent. On a mass basis, the enzyme consumption corresponding to the lowest turnover capacities is considerable and may influence the economic feasibility of proposed industrial applications of peroxidases. Within a range of substituent electronegativity values, molar turnover capacities correlated well (r2 = 0.89) with substituent effects quantified by radical sigma values and semiquantitatively with homolytic O-H bond dissociation energies of the phenolic substrates, suggesting that phenoxyl radical intermediates are probably involved in the suicide inactivation of CIP. The correlation range in each case did not include phenols with highly electron-withdrawing (nitro and cyano) substituents because they are not oxidized by CIP, nor phenols with highly electron-donating (hydroxy and amino) substituents because they led to virtually complete inactivation of the enzyme with minimal substrate removal. In the latter case we conclude that inactivation of CIP during the oxidation of hydroxy- and amino-substituted phenols occurs by a different mechanism than that of the other phenolic substrates.

  20. Turnover in health care: the mediating effects of employee engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collini, Stevie A; Guidroz, Ashley M; Perez, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the interaction between interpersonal respect, diversity climate, mission fulfilment and engagement to better predict turnover in health care. Registered nurse turnover has averaged 14% and current nursing shortages are expected to spread. Few studies have studied employee engagement as a mediator between organisational context and turnover. Study participants were employees working within 185 departments across ten hospitals within a large healthcare organisation in the USA. Although a total of 5443 employees work in these departments, employee opinion survey responses were aggregated by department before being linked to turnover rates gathered from company records. Engagement fully mediated the relationship between respect and turnover and the relationship between mission fulfilment and turnover. Diversity climate was not related to turnover. Turnover in health care poses a significant threat to the mission of creating a healing environment for patients and these results demonstrate that workplace respect and connection to the mission affect turnover by decreasing engagement. The findings demonstrated that to increase engagement, and improve turnover rates in health care, it would be beneficial for organisations, and nurse management to focus on improving mission fulfilment and interpersonal relationships. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EMPLOYEE TURNOVER AND THE LACATION OF HOTELS: THE CASE OF KUŞADASI AND İZMİR IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    GÜZEL , Assoc. Prof. Cengiz DEMİR  Assist. Prof.

    2007-01-01

    Turnover rates and reasons vary significantly within and without organizations. Employee turnover in the hospitality industry often averages as much as 200% to 300% per year. Statistically speaking, this means that the entire staff of a hospitality operation turns over two to three times per year (Woods,1997: 141). Hotel industry is a labor-intensive industry, and labor costs on goods and services produced are very high. It means that labor expenses have an important share on total expenses (...

  2. Biochemical Markers of Joint Tissue Turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Sondergaard, Bodil Cecilie; Christiansen, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    Recent disappointments in late stage developments of anti-osteoarthritic drugs have reinforced efforts to develop better biomarkers for application in both the drug development process as well as in the routine management of these patients. Here we provide a brief review of biochemical tests...... available for the study of tissue turnover in each of the three compartments of the articular joint, that is the bone, the cartilage, and the synovium. Finally, we provide some perspective to future developments in biomarker discovery and discuss the potential impact such technologies could have on the drug...

  3. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of thei...

  4. Discrepancy in fine root turnover estimates between diameter-based and branch-order-based approaches: a case study in two temperate tree species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jing-jue; GU Jia-cun; WANG Zheng-quan

    2012-01-01

    Fine root turnover plays a key role in carbon (C) budgets and nutrients cycles in forest ecosystems.However,the difference between branch-order-based and diameter-based approaches in estimating fine root turnover is still unclear.We studied root biomass turnover based on multiplying root standing biomass by turnover rate (inverse of median root longevity) in two Chinese temperate tree species,Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr.and Larix gmelinii Rupr.The minirhizotron (MR) technique was used to estimate longevities for first and second order roots,and total roots (Rtotal) apparent on the MR tube surface.The corresponding biomass for each root group was estimated by soil monolith.The difference in biomass turnover between Rtotal and the sum of the first and second order roots was used to represent the discrepancy between diameter-and order-based approaches.First order roots had shorter life spans and higher biomass turnover rates than the second order roots in both species.Biomass turnover estimated by the order-based method for F.mandshurica and L.gmelinii were 155.4 g·m-2·a-1 and 158.9 g·m-2·a-1,respectively,in comparison with 99.5 g·m-2·a-1 and 117.7 g·m-2·a-1 estimated by the diameter-based method,indicating that the diameter-based approach underestimated biomass turnover.The most probable reason was that the order-based method enhanced separation of the heterogeneous root population into relatively homogenous root groups with varying turnover rates.We conclude that separating fine root pool into different branch orders can improve the accuracy of estimates for fine root turnover,as well as the understanding of the belowground C allocation and nutrient cycling at ecosystem level.

  5. The effectiveness of coach turnover and the effect on home team advantage, team quality and team ranking.

    OpenAIRE

    A-L. BALDUCK; A. PRINZIE; M. BUELENS

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of coach turnover on team performance is widely discussed in the literature due to the indirect impact of a team’s performance on a club’s revenues. This study examines the effect of coach turnover within a competition season by focusing on the change in team quality and the change in home team advantage under the new coach. The change in team quality or home team advantage can vary according to the team (team specific) or might be an independent quantity (non-team specific)...

  6. Pitfalls in quantifying species turnover: the residency effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Chase Burns

    2014-01-01

    The composition of ecological communities changes continuously through time and space. Understanding this turnover in species composition is a central goal in biogeography, but quantifying species turnover can be problematic. Here, I describe an underappreciated source of bias in quantifying species turnover, namely ‘the residency effect’, which occurs when the contiguous distributions of species across sampling domains are small relative to census intervals. I present the results of a simula...

  7. Why Don't You Run the Schools More Like a Business?: Lessons for Students in Superintendent Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    It would exacerbate the tragedy of the current economic situation if no lessons were learned from it which would contribute to future growth and prosperity. That applies equally to the business sector and to the education sector. This is not to imply that many current, effective superintendents do not ask the very questions posed in this essay;…

  8. ". . . So Go the Days of Their Lives." A Descriptive Study of the Superintendency. OSSC Bulletin Vol. 22, No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitner, N. J.

    The study reported is a replication of Henry Mintzberg's study of five executives at work to determine the scope of their job-related activities. For this study superintendents in three suburbs contiguous to a large midwestern city were observed at work for one week, including evening meetings when they were scheduled. An attempt was made to…

  9. Righting Past Wrongs: A Superintendent's Social Justice Leadership for Dual Language Education along the U.S.-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David; Izquierdo, Elena; Knight, David S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of superintendents in adopting and developing dual language education and other equity-oriented reforms that support the unique needs of Latina/o emergent bilinguals is a relatively unexplored area in educational leadership and policy research. Drawing upon theories of social justice leadership, this article examines how one…

  10. Resurrecting Pragmatism as a Philosophical Frame for Understanding, Researching, and Developing Performance in the Small District Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Gary; McClellan, Rhonda; Hyle, Adrienne E.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose that pragmatism is a perspective with great promise for understanding and researching the work of small district superintendents and developing the abilities of both pre-service students and in-service practitioners to do that work. They maintain, based on their reading of focus group interviews with small…

  11. TOWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, REPORT TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS BY THE SCHOOL-COMMUNITY COMMITTEE FOR EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JACOBSON, NATHAN; AND OTHERS

    TO IMPROVE EDUCATION IN NEW YORK CITY, THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF A GROUP OF EDUCATORS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS INCLUDED (1) GIVING NEW TEACHERS BETTER ORIENTATION, EASIER-TO TEACH CLASSES, AND REDUCED CLERICAL WORK, (2) WEEKLY JOINT PLANNING BY ALL TEACHERS ON A GRADE LEVEL, (3) CLOSER SUPERVISION OF PRINCIPALS BY ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS, (4) THE…

  12. An Autoethnography of a First-Time School District Superintendent: Complicated by Issues of Race, Gender, and Persistent Fiscal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Ardella Jones

    2011-01-01

    This inquiry used autoethnography methodology in a self-narrative format that places the self within the position of a first time Superintendent as an African American woman. The design of this research will allow the reader to travel with me through my experiences to obtain information about the challenges and obstacles of the superintendent…

  13. The Considerations of the Superintendent in the Development of the School Budget during Times of Fiscal Constraint: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    John Smith is the superintendent of Green Hill Public Schools. This case study follows John through the whole budget process from July 2011 to July 2012. An interpretative perspective was used to tell his story. Ten interviews were given from October 2011 to July 2012. Newspaper articles and the minutes from meetings were analyzed and used as…

  14. Endogenous Turnover of Cyanogenic Glycosides in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picmanova, Martina

    Amongst the vast multitude of plant secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) occupy an important place as sophisticated defence compounds, releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon herbivore attack – a process known as cyanogenesis. Beside this wellestablished function, there is st......Amongst the vast multitude of plant secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) occupy an important place as sophisticated defence compounds, releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon herbivore attack – a process known as cyanogenesis. Beside this wellestablished function...... through the formation of β- cyanoalanine, or, potentially, in an alternative endogenous turnover pathway circumventing the release of HCN. The investigation of the latter is the primary focus of this PhD project. Scattered data from the literature indicated that CNglcs co-occur in plants...... revealed the formation of glycosides of amides, carboxylic acids and "anitriles", including their di- and triglycosides, evidently derived from CNglcs. Based on results common to the three phylogenetically unrelated plant species, a recycling endogenous turnover pathway for CNglcs was suggested in which...

  15. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  16. Strategies for adapting to high rates of employee turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowday, R T

    1984-01-01

    For many organizations facing high rates of employee turnover, strategies for increasing employee retention may not be practical because employees leave for reasons beyond the control of management or the costs of reducing turnover exceed the benefits to be derived. In this situation managers need to consider strategies that can minimize or buffer the organization from the negative consequences that often follow from turnover. Strategies organizations can use to adapt to uncontrollably high employee turnover rates are presented in this article. In addition, suggestions are made for how managers should make choices among the alternative strategies.

  17. Turnover intentions and voluntary turnover: the moderating roles of self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Weeks, Kelly P; Moffitt, Karen R

    2005-09-01

    This article explores moderators of the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover behavior to better explain why some employees translate intentions into behavior and other employees do not. Individual differences in self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion were examined. Results indicate that self-monitoring and risk aversion moderate the intentions-turnover link. Specifically, the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover is stronger for low self-monitors and those lower in risk aversion. Locus of control moderated the relationship in 1 of 2 samples such that the relationship was stronger for those with an internal locus of control. Proactive personality, however, did not directly moderate the relationship between intentions and turnover behaviors.

  18. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwood I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of their local indigenous pathologies to treat it in a better manner.

  19. Time Varying Feature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  20. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter–mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40–70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9–47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay

  1. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  2. Bone mass and turnover in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Gam, A; Egsmose, C

    1993-01-01

    Physical inactivity accelerates bone loss. Since patients with fibromyalgia are relatively physically inactive, bone mass and markers of bone metabolism were determined in 12 premenopausal women with fibromyalgia and in healthy age matched female control subjects. No differences were found...... in lumbar bone mineral density, femoral neck bone mineral density, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, ionized calcium and phosphate. The urinary excretion of both hydroxyproline and calcium relative to urinary creatinine excretion was significantly higher in patients with fibromyalgia, p = 0.......01. This was linked to lower urinary creatinine excretion (p = 0.02) probably reflecting lower physical activity in the patients with fibromyalgia. We conclude that bone mass and turnover are generally not affected in premenopausal women with fibromyalgia....

  3. Performance and turnover intentions: a social exchange perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biron, M.; Boon, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Prior research has yielded mixed results regarding the relationship between performance and turnover intentions. Drawing from social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that the performance-turnover intentions association may be contingent upon individuals' exchange re

  4. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  5. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  6. Organisational commitment and turnover intentions in humanitarian organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnmaalen, Julia; Heyse, Liesbet; Voordijk, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted staff turnover is a prominent HRM problem in humanitarian organisations. In the profit sector, HRM tools such as pay, benefits, socialisation and training have proven to be effective in increasing organisational commitment and decreasing staff turnover. This study explores whether such tool

  7. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  8. Organizational commitment and turnover intentions in humanitarian organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnmalen, Julia; Heyse, Liesbet; Voordijk, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted staff turnover is a prominent HRM problem in humanitarian organisations. In the profit sector, HRM tools such as pay, benefits, socialisation and training have proven to be effective in increasing organisational commitment and decreasing staff turnover. This study explores whether such

  9. Organisational commitment and turnover intentions in humanitarian organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnmaalen, Julia; Heyse, Liesbet; Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted staff turnover is a prominent HRM problem in humanitarian organisations. In the profit sector, HRM tools such as pay, benefits, socialisation and training have proven to be effective in increasing organisational commitment and decreasing staff turnover. This study explores whether such

  10. Reducing staff turnover: a case study of dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T W; Robinson, C D

    1998-01-01

    A multivariate logistic analysis of 42 Texas dialysis facilities indicated that younger, white, short tenure, an LVN/LPN, with less support from family and friends for emotional concerns, and less supervisor support significantly increased the likelihood of turnover (p staff turnover of these dialysis facilities increases costs and impedes the delivery of quality patient care. Managerial strategies to increase staff retention are suggested.

  11. Pitfalls in quantifying species turnover: the residency effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Chase Burns

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of ecological communities changes continuously through time and space. Understanding this turnover in species composition is a central goal in biogeography, but quantifying species turnover can be problematic. Here, I describe an underappreciated source of bias in quantifying species turnover, namely ‘the residency effect’, which occurs when the contiguous distributions of species across sampling domains are small relative to census intervals. I present the results of a simulation model that illustrates the problem theoretically and then I demonstrate the problem empirically using a long-term dataset of plant species turnover on islands. Results from both exercises indicate that empirical estimates of species turnover may be susceptible to significant observer bias, which may potentially cloud a better understanding of how the composition of ecological communities changes through time.

  12. Regulatory mechanisms of skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle protein turnover is a relatively slow metabolic process that is altered by various physiological stimuli such as feeding/fasting and exercise. During exercise, catabolism of amino acids contributes very little to ATP turnover in working muscle. With regards to protein turnover......, there is now consistent data from tracer studies in rodents and humans showing that global protein synthesis is blunted in working skeletal muscle. Whether there is altered skeletal muscle protein breakdown during exercise remains unclear. The blunting of protein synthesis is believed to be mediated...... downstream of changes in intracellular Ca(2+) and energy turnover. In particular, a signaling cascade involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin-eEF2 kinase-eEF2 is implicated. The possible functional significance of altered protein turnover in working skeletal muscle during exercise is discussed. Further work...

  13. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  14. Geographical variation in mutualistic networks: similarity, turnover and partner fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøjelsgaard, Kristian; Jordano, Pedro; Carstensen, Daniel W; Olesen, Jens M

    2015-03-07

    Although species and their interactions in unison represent biodiversity and all the ecological and evolutionary processes associated with life, biotic interactions have, contrary to species, rarely been integrated into the concepts of spatial β-diversity. Here, we examine β-diversity of ecological networks by using pollination networks sampled across the Canary Islands. We show that adjacent and distant communities are more and less similar, respectively, in their composition of plants, pollinators and interactions than expected from random distributions. We further show that replacement of species is the major driver of interaction turnover and that this contribution increases with distance. Finally, we quantify that species-specific partner compositions (here called partner fidelity) deviate from random partner use, but vary as a result of ecological and geographical variables. In particular, breakdown of partner fidelity was facilitated by increasing geographical distance, changing abundances and changing linkage levels, but was not related to the geographical distribution of the species. This highlights the importance of space when comparing communities of interacting species and may stimulate a rethinking of the spatial interpretation of interaction networks. Moreover, geographical interaction dynamics and its causes are important in our efforts to anticipate effects of large-scale changes, such as anthropogenic disturbances.

  15. How Serious of a Problem is Staff Turnover in Substance Abuse Treatment? A Longitudinal Study of Actual Turnover1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T.; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P.

    2010-01-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19 and 50 percent (Johnson & Roman, 2002; Gallon, Gabriel, & Knudsen, 2003; Knudsen et al., 2003; McLellan et al., 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a two year time span (2008–2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. PMID:20675097

  16. How serious of a problem is staff turnover in substance abuse treatment? A longitudinal study of actual turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P

    2010-10-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19% and 50% (J.A. Johnson & P.M. Roman, 2002; S.L. Gallon, R.M. Gabriel, J.R.W. Knudsen, 2003; H.K. Knudsen, J.A. Johnson, & P.M. Roman, 2003; A.T. McLellan, D. Carise, & H.D. Kleber, 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a 2-year time span (2008-2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups, the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential challenge stressor-hindrance stressor relationships with job attitudes, turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsakoff, Nathan P; LePine, Jeffery A; LePine, Marcie A

    2007-03-01

    In this article, a 2-dimensional work stressor framework is used to explain inconsistencies in past research with respect to stressor relationships with retention-related criteria. Results of meta-analyses of 183 independent samples indicated that whereas hindrance stressors had dysfunctional relationships with these criteria (negative relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and positive relationships with turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior), relationships with challenge stressors were generally the opposite (positive relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and negative relationships with turnover intentions and turnover). Results also suggested that the differential relationships between challenge stressors and hindrance stressors and the more distal criteria (withdrawal behavior and turnover) were due, in part, to the mediating effects of job attitudes. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. varying elastic parameters distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The experimental identication of mechanical properties is crucial in mechanics for understanding material behavior and for the development of numerical models. Classical identi cation procedures employ standard shaped specimens, assume that the mechanical elds in the object are homogeneous, and recover global properties. Thus, multiple tests are required for full characterization of a heterogeneous object, leading to a time consuming and costly process. The development of non-contact, full- eld measurement techniques from which complex kinematic elds can be recorded has opened the door to a new way of thinking. From the identi cation point of view, suitable methods can be used to process these complex kinematic elds in order to recover multiple spatially varying parameters through one test or a few tests. The requirement is the development of identi cation techniques that can process these complex experimental data. This thesis introduces a novel identi cation technique called the constitutive compatibility method. The key idea is to de ne stresses as compatible with the observed kinematic eld through the chosen class of constitutive equation, making possible the uncoupling of the identi cation of stress from the identi cation of the material parameters. This uncoupling leads to parametrized solutions in cases where 5 the solution is non-unique (due to unknown traction boundary conditions) as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. First the theory is outlined and the method is demonstrated in 2D applications. Second, the method is implemented within a domain decomposition framework in order to reduce the cost for processing very large problems. Finally, it is extended to 3D numerical examples. Promising results are shown for 2D and 3D problems.

  19. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Angela L; Salyers, Michelle P; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M

    2010-09-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature.

  20. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  1. Organizational culture, job satisfaction, and clinician turnover in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles B; Brazil, Kevin; Wakefield, Dorothy; Lerer, Trudy; Tennen, Howard

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how organizational culture and job satisfaction affect clinician turnover in primary care pediatric practices. One hundred thirty clinicians from 36 primary care pediatric practices completed the Primary Care Organizational Questionnaire (PCOQ), which evaluates interactions among members of the practice and job-related attributes measuring 8 organizational factors, along with a separate 3-item instrument measuring job satisfaction. Random effects logistic models were used to assess the associations between job satisfaction, the organizational factors from the PCOQ, and clinician turnover over the subsequent year. All 8 measured organizational factors from the PCOQ, particularly perceived effectiveness, were associated with job satisfaction. Five of the 8 organizational factors were also associated with clinician turnover. The effects of the organizational factors on turnover were substantially reduced in a model that included job satisfaction; only 1 organizational factor, communication between clinicians and nonclinicians, remained significant (P = .05). This suggests that organizational culture affects subsequent clinician turnover primarily through its effect on job satisfaction. Organizational culture, in particular perceived effectiveness and communication, affects job satisfaction, which in turn affects clinician turnover in primary care pediatric practices. Strategies to improve job satisfaction through changes in organizational culture could potentially reduce clinician turnover.

  2. The curvilinear effect of work engagement on employees' turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesens, Gaëtane; Stinglhamber, Florence; Marmier, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown the positive consequences of work engagement for both organisations and employees experiencing it. For instance, research has demonstrated that work-engaged employees have lower levels of turnover intentions than non-engaged employees. However, in this research, we examined whether there is a dark side of work engagement. More precisely, we investigated whether the relationship between work engagement and employees' turnover intentions might be non-linear. Based on two different samples, our results indicated that the relationship between work engagement and employees' turnover intentions is curvilinear. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  3. Turnover Rate of Popularity Charts in Neutral Models

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, T S

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown recently that in many different cultural phenomena the turnover rate on the most popular artefacts in a population exhibit some regularities. A very simple expression for this turnover rate has been proposed by Bentley et al. and its validity in two simple models for copying and innovation is investigated in this paper. It is found that Bentley's formula is an approximation of the real behaviour of the turnover rate in the Wright-Fisher model, while it is not valid in the Moran model.

  4. Employee turnover and productivity among small business entities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the problems of employee turnover on productivity among small business entities in Nigeria, and recommend remedial actions. Employee turnover is the separation of employees from employers and replacement with other employees. Productive manpower is a critical element for the economic survival of any small business entity. The survey research design was used for the study. The sample comprised of 320 respondents. Data generated were analyzed by using descriptive, and Z-test statistical techniques. It was found that employee turnover adversely affects productivity in small business entities.

  5. Analysis of the Role of Insulin Signaling in Bone Turnover Induced by Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinyi; Liu, Hui; Yu, Xiuhua; Wang, Yan; Yang, Chen; Xu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The role of insulin signaling on the mechanism underlying fluoride induced osteopathology was studied. We analyzed the expression of genes related with bone turnover and insulin signaling in rats treated by varying dose of fluoride with or without streptozotocin (STZ) in vivo. Furthermore, insulin receptor (InR) expression in MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblast cell line) was interfered with small interfering RNA (siRNA), and genes related with osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were investigated in cells exposed to fluoride in vitro for 2 days. The in vivo study indicated the possible role of insulin in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride. Fluoride activated the InR and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling, which were involved in the mechanism underlying fluoride induced bone turnover. The TGFβ1 and Wnt10/β-catenin pathway took part in the mechanism of bone lesion induced by fluoride, and insulin probably modulated the TGFβ1 and β-catenin to exert action on bone turnover during the development of bone lesion. The in vitro study showed the concomitant decrease of OPG, osterix and OCN with inhibition of InR expression in osteoblast, and three genes still was low in cells co-treated with fluoride and InR siRNA, which suggested that fluoride probably stimulated the expression of OPG, osterix and OCN through InR signaling. In conclusion, insulin played the important role in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride through mediating InR receptor signaling, and IGF1 signaling probably exerted action on bone turnover caused by overdose of fluoride.

  6. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  7. Osteocalcin: an emerging biomarker for bone turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Rathore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteocalcin (OC is produced by osteoblasts during bone formation. OC is excreted into urine by glomerular filtration and can be found as fragments in urine. The presence of three vitamin K-dependent and #947;-carboxyglutamic acid residues is critical for osteocalcin's structure, which appears to regulate the maturation of bone mineral. Recent bone biology research have highlighted the importance of bone not only as a structural scaffold to support the human body, but also as a regulator of a metabolic processes that are independent of mineral metabolism. Circulating osteocalcin is present either as carboxylated or as undercarboxylated forms. Increased serum level of osteocalcin is linked with increased bone mineral density. The importance of the bone and ndash;kidney relation in physiologic regulation of mineral ion has also been extensively studied and documented. Several workers have uncovered the role of insulin as an additional factor involved in the skeletal remodelling process. Evidences are available which shows that osteoblastic insulin signalling is important for glucose metabolism. The measurement of OC in urine samples could be used as an index of bone turnover in monitoring bone metabolism. In this review, we have tried to explain different roles of OC, however further studies are required to elucidate the metabolic and hormonal role of OC in human body. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 3670-3674

  8. Accelerated extracellular matrix turnover during exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Jannie M B; Knox, Alan J; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) contribute significantly to disease progression. However, the effect on tissue structure and turnover is not well described. There is an urgent clinical need for biomarkers of disease activity associated with disease...... progression. Extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover reflects activity in tissues and consequently assessment of ECM turnover may serve as biomarkers of disease activity. We hypothesized that the turnover of lung ECM proteins were altered during exacerbations of COPD. METHODS: 69 patients with COPD hospitalised......, respectively), and degradation of elastin (ELM7 and EL-NE) and versican (VCANM). RESULTS: Circulating levels of C3M, C4M, C6M, ELM7, and EL-NE were elevated during an exacerbation of COPD as compared to follow-up (all P

  9. Work-life balance, job satisfaction and turnover intention amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-life balance, job satisfaction and turnover intention amongst information ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... White employees had signifi cantly stronger experiences of job satisfaction and ...

  10. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  11. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  12. Exposure to negative acts and risk of turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas; Hansen, Jørgen V.; Høgh (Hogh), Annie;

    2016-01-01

    -year (instead of a 1-year) follow-up period the association between bullying and turnover remained statistically significant in office workers even after adjusting for depressive symptoms (OR 2.10, 95 % CI 1.17-3.76). We found no statistically significant associations between threats of violence......PURPOSE: To investigate whether self-reported exposure to negative acts in the workplace (bullying and threats of violence) predicted turnover in three occupational groups (human service and sales workers, office workers and manual workers). METHODS: Survey data on 2766 respondents were combined...... exposure to negative acts (bullying and threats of violence) and risk of turnover. When participants were stratified by occupational group and analyses were adjusted for age, gender, tenure and psychosocial working conditions, we found that exposure to bullying predicted risk of turnover in office workers...

  13. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K.; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Huebner, Christian A.; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication(1). Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements

  14. DAMPAK WORK FAMILY CONFLICT PEKERJA WANITA TERHADAP ABSEN DAN TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendut Sukarno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis Model Konseptual Work Family Conflict dalam kaitannya dengan absen dan Turnover. Diharapkan dapat membantu Pimpinan perusahaan dalam mengelola konflik antar kepentingan perusahaan dan keluarga, agar tidak berdampak terhadap meningkatnya absensi dan turnover . Sampel dalam penelitian ini adalah karyawan wanita yang bekerja di 20 bank swasta di Surabaya sebagai responden sebanyak 150 orang. Teknik analisis yang digunakan  adalah Structural Equation Modeling [SEM] dengan program AMOS 4,0. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa faktor work-family conflict berpengaruh terhadap faktor absen tidak dapat diterima. Faktor work-family conflict berpengaruh terhadap faktor turnover tidak dapat diterima, serta faktor absen berpengaruh terhadap faktor turnover dapat diterima.

  15. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and

  16. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K.; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Huebner, Christian A.; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication(1). Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements

  17. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  18. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  19. Report: Remedial Project Manager Turnover at Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2001-M-000015, June 15, 2001. We determined that EPA Region III did not have formal procedures in place to mitigate continuity problems caused by turnover of EPA personnel in the Superfund program.

  20. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  1. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  2. Turnover osseo e sistema biologico RANKL/OSTEOPROTEGERINA nell’osteomalacia oncogenica: studio longitudinale di 5 casi

    OpenAIRE

    Rendina, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    L’osteomalacia oncogenica (TIO) è una rara patologia paraneoplastica nella quale il tumore causale, in genere di origine mesenchimale, produce un fattore circolante che è in grado di determinare un quadro clinico di osteomalacia o rachitismo vitamina D – resistente. La TIO rappresenta un modello sperimentale unico per la caratterizzazione funzionale in vivo della relazione esistente tra i vari parametri del turnover osseo (parametri di neoapposizione e di riassorbimento), il sistema biologico...

  3. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Musashi; Ariella Coler-Reilly; Teruaki Nagasawa; Yoshiki Kubota; Satomi Kato; Yoko Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid ...

  4. Employee turnover in a financial institution / van Zyl M.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zyl, Marie-Antoinette

    2011-01-01

    With recognition of turnover as a financial issue increasing, companies are searching for strategies to confront the problem in ways that generate a good return on investment. Successfully managing turnover is a matter of understanding its costs, causes and cures. In service–oriented industries such as banking, people are considered among the most important assets of a firm. Forward–thinking banks are looking for ways to leverage people, along with processes and technology, to achieve their o...

  5. Diabetes, Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover, Diabetes Control, and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Starup-Linde, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone marker...

  6. Plant species persistence and turnover on small Bahamian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Lloyd W

    2003-06-01

    I conducted surveys of the plant species occupying 136 small islands in the Exuma Cays and 58 small islands near Andros, Bahamas. Most species occurred on relatively few islands, and most islands contained relatively few species. Identities of the most common species differed between the two archipelagos. Comparisons with earlier surveys revealed species extinctions and immigrations. Turnover was relatively low on both a per island and a per species basis on both archipelagos, although significant spatial variation in turnover rates between archipelagos was found. Most islands experienced no turnover; islands on which turnover did occur were larger and had higher species richness. Likewise, most species did not turnover, although much variation existed in turnover rates among those that did. Experimental introductions of two species to very small islands naturally devoid of vegetation revealed that these islands could support plant life. One species survived on eight of ten islands for >9 years, including the effects of a moderate (class 2) hurricane. This hurricane caused substantial damage and loss of plant biomass, but resulted in no species extinctions on 30 small islands. Data for the small islands in this region, now spanning almost a decade, reveal that most populations are persistent over periods of years to decades, rarely going extinct or immigrating. Even moderate hurricanes seem to have little impact on species compositions.

  7. Long-period astronomical forcing of mammal turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Jan A; Abdul Aziz, Hayfaa; Alvarez Sierra, M Angeles; Hilgen, Frederik J; van den Hoek Ostende, Lars W; Lourens, Lucas J; Mein, Pierre; van der Meulen, Albert J; Pelaez-Campomanes, Pablo

    2006-10-12

    Mammals are among the fastest-radiating groups, being characterized by a mean species lifespan of the order of 2.5 million years (Myr). The basis for this characteristic timescale of origination, extinction and turnover is not well understood. Various studies have invoked climate change to explain mammalian species turnover, but other studies have either challenged or only partly confirmed the climate-turnover hypothesis. Here we use an exceptionally long (24.5-2.5 Myr ago), dense, and well-dated terrestrial record of rodent lineages from central Spain, and show the existence of turnover cycles with periods of 2.4-2.5 and 1.0 Myr. We link these cycles to low-frequency modulations of Milankovitch oscillations, and show that pulses of turnover occur at minima of the 2.37-Myr eccentricity cycle and nodes of the 1.2-Myr obliquity cycle. Because obliquity nodes and eccentricity minima are associated with ice sheet expansion and cooling and affect regional precipitation, we infer that long-period astronomical climate forcing is a major determinant of species turnover in small mammals and probably other groups as well.

  8. Comparative evaluation of labelling patterns and turnover of lipids, tagged by 15 (p-/sup 123/I-phenyl-)pentadecanoic and 1-/sup 14/C-palmitic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N.; Sauer, W.; Reichmann, K.; Winkler, C. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin); Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J. (Essen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Strahlenbiologie)

    1984-06-15

    Uptake and turnover of chloroform/methanol extractable tissue lipids labelled in vivo simultaneously with 15(p-/sup 123/I-phenyl-)pentadecanoic and 1-/sup 14/C-palmitic acid were compared. Lipid turnover studies were performed in fasted pentobarbital-anaesthetized Wistar rats in tissues with highly varying free fatty acid turnover rates. In all tissues investigated, i.e. heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney, both tracers labelled nearly identical lipid fractions. The main tracer uptake was found in free fatty acids, phospholipids, diglycerides and triglycerides. A highly significant correlation of uptake and turnover in main tissue lipid fractions indicated an essentially identical metabolic pathway of both tracers in intermediary tissue lipid metabolism. Concordant tracer uptake and turnover patterns in tissue of lipids with highly varying fatty acid metabolic rates suggested that intrinsic metabolic activity of the tissue and respective lipid fraction was the major determinant of metabolic handling of both iodophenyl fatty- and palmitic acid. Thus, the feasibility of iodophenylpentadecanoic acid as free fatty acid tracer for studying tissue lipid metabolism is demonstrated. 21 refs.

  9. A case study into labour turnover within an NHS Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, David; Hall, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    This paper investigates turnover in a British NHS Trust, to find out why staff left and whether factors identified in the literature with regards to improving turnover were pertinent to the organization. The research also investigated staff groups with high turnover--staff with less than 12 months service, and the unqualified nursing staff group--to ascertain whether there were any reasons for leaving or areas of dissatisfaction particular to these groups. The outcomes of the research complied with much of the published research with some interesting differences. The main reasons for leaving were identified as moving house, promotion or career development and taking up education and training opportunities elsewhere. There was no evidence of 'level of pay', commonly given as a significant influence behind turnover, as a reason for leaving. It was also found that the retention strategies identified in the published research were mainly applicable to the research, with evidence to support the improvement of line management skills, training and development, career development, appraisal, communications and induction in order to reduce turnover. There was less evidence for introducing work-life balance policies, improving communications, pay and working relationships as retention strategies. Recommendations for future management of labour turnover within the NHS Trust and elsewhere are made, with observations about the validity of some existing models. The core contribution of this research is in adding to the body of knowledge about labour turnover issues. This is of value to those working in the UK health-care and wider public sector. Specific recommendations for future research are made.

  10. Bouncing universes with varying constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, John D [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Kimberly, Dagny [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Magueijo, Joao [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-21

    We investigate the behaviour of exact closed bouncing Friedmann universes in theories with varying constants. We show that the simplest BSBM varying alpha theory leads to a bouncing universe. The value of alpha increases monotonically, remaining approximately constant during most of each cycle, but increasing significantly around each bounce. When dissipation is introduced we show that in each new cycle the universe expands for longer and to a larger size. We find a similar effect for closed bouncing universes in Brans-Dicke theory, where G also varies monotonically in time from cycle to cycle. Similar behaviour occurs also in varying speed of light theories.

  11. Bouncing Universes with Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Magueijo, J; Barrow, John D.; Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of exact closed bouncing Friedmann universes in theories with varying constants. We show that the simplest BSBM varying-alpha theory leads to a bouncing universe. The value of alpha increases monotonically, remaining approximately constant during most of each cycle, but increasing significantly around each bounce. When dissipation is introduced we show that in each new cycle the universe expands for longer and to a larger size. We find a similar effect for closed bouncing universes in Brans-Dicke theory, where $G$ also varies monotonically in time from cycle to cycle. Similar behaviour occurs also in varying speed of light theories.

  12. Myofibrillar protein turnover: the proteasome and the calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, D E; Neti, G; Mares, S W; Thompson, V F

    2008-04-01

    Metabolic turnover of myofibrillar proteins in skeletal muscle requires that, before being degraded to AA, myofibrillar proteins be removed from the myofibril without disrupting the ability of the myofibril to contract and develop tension. Skeletal muscle contains 4 proteolytic systems in amounts such that they could be involved in metabolic protein turnover: 1) the lysosomal system, 2) the caspase system, 3) the calpain system, and 4) the proteasome. The catheptic proteases in lysosomes are not active at the neutral pH of the cell cytoplasm, so myofibrillar proteins would have to be degraded inside lysosomes if the lysosomal system were involved. Lysosomes could not engulf a myofibril without destroying it, so the lysosomal system is not involved to a significant extent in metabolic turnover of myofibrillar proteins. The caspases are not activated until initiation of apoptosis, and, therefore, it is unlikely that the caspases are involved to a significant extent in myofibrillar protein turnover. The calpains do not degrade proteins to AA or even to small peptides and do not catalyze bulk degradation of the sarcoplasmic proteins, so they cannot be the only proteolytic system involved in myofibrillar protein turnover. Research during the past 20 yr has shown that the proteasome is responsible for 80 to 90% of total intracellular protein turnover, but the proteasome degrades peptide chains only after they have been unfolded, so that they can enter the catalytic chamber of the proteasome. Thus, although the proteasome can degrade sarcoplasmic proteins, it cannot degrade myofibrillar proteins until they have been removed from the myofibril. It remains unclear how this removal is done. The calpains degrade those proteins that are involved in keeping the myofibrillar proteins assembled in myofibrils, and it was proposed over 30 yr ago that the calpains initiated myofibrillar protein turnover by disassembling the outer layer of proteins from the myofibril and releasing

  13. Turnover of recently assimilated carbon in arctic bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, L E; Subke, J A; Sommerkorn, M; Heinemeyer, A; Williams, M

    2011-10-01

    Carbon (C) allocation and turnover in arctic bryophytes is largely unknown, but their response to climatic change has potentially significant impacts on arctic ecosystem C budgets. Using a combination of pulse-chase experiments and a newly developed model of C turnover in bryophytes, we show significant differences in C turnover between two contrasting arctic moss species (Polytrichum piliferum and Sphagnum fuscum). (13)C abundance in moss tissues (measured up to 1 year) and respired CO(2) (traced over 5 days) were used to parameterise the bryophyte C model with four pools representing labile and structural C in photosynthetic and stem tissue. The model was optimised using an Ensemble Kalman Filter to ensure a focus on estimating the confidence intervals (CI) on model parameters and outputs. The ratio of aboveground NPP:GPP in Polytrichum piliferum was 23% (CI 9-35%), with an average turnover time of 1.7 days (CI 1.1-2.5 days). The aboveground NPP:GPP ratio in Sphagnum fuscum was 43% (CI 19-65%) with an average turnover time of 3.1 days (CI 1.6-6.1 days). These results are the first to show differences in C partitioning between arctic bryophyte species in situ and highlight the importance of modelling C dynamics of this group separately from vascular plants for a realistic representation of vegetation in arctic C models.

  14. [Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Paula Buck de Oliveira; Perroca, Marcia Galan; Jericó, Marli de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%), and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8%) The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%), for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%). The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff.

  15. Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Buck de Oliveira Ruiz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. METHOD This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. RESULTS The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%, and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8% The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%, for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%. CONCLUSION The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff.

  16. Decay times in turnover statistics of single enzymes

    CERN Document Server

    Lindén, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The first passage times for enzymatic turnovers in non-equilibrium steady state display a statistical symmetry property related to non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems, that makes it possible to extract the chemical driving force from single molecule trajectories in non-equilibrium steady state. Below, we show that this system violates the general expectation that the number of decay constants needed to fit a first passage time distribution reflects the number of states in the escape problem. In fact, the structure of the kinetic mechanism makes half of the decay times vanish identically from the turnover time distribution. The terms that cancel out correspond to the eigenvalues of a certain sub-matrix of the master equation matrix for the first exit time problem. We discuss how these results make modeling and data analysis easier for such systems, and how the turnovers can be measured.

  17. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger J W

    2015-03-11

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases.

  18. Estimation of Employee Turnover with Competing Risks Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzenda Wioletta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Employee turnover accompanies every business organization, regardless of the industry and size. Nowadays, many companies struggle with problems related to the lack of sufficient information about the nature of employee turnover processes. Therefore, comprehensive analysis of these processes is necessary. This article aims to examine the turnover of employees from a big manufacturing company using competing risks models with covariates and without covariates. This technique allows to incorporate the information about the type of employment contract termination. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard model enables the researcher to analyse simultaneously multiple factors that affect employment duration. One of the major observations is that employee remuneration level differentiates most strongly the risk of job resignation.

  19. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  20. Views and experiences of community pharmacists and superintendent pharmacists regarding the New Medicine Service in England prior to implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Katharine M; Thornley, Tracey; Boyd, Matthew J; Boardman, Helen F

    2014-01-01

    The New Medicine Service (NMS) was introduced to community pharmacies in England in October 2011. The NMS aims to improve adherence to new medicines in patients with selected long term conditions. The service consists of two follow-up consultations within 1 month in addition to usual care. This study explored community pharmacist and superintendent pharmacist views and experiences of the NMS in the 5 weeks prior to its implementation to identify potential facilitators and barriers to its success. The study also investigated participant experiences of the introduction and provision of existing pharmacy services in order to contrast with the implementation of the NMS. This study consisted of four focus groups with a total of 15 community pharmacists representing locums and employees of small, medium and large chain pharmacies. In addition, 5 semi-structured interviews were conducted with superintendent pharmacists representing independent, small chain, supermarket and large multiple pharmacies. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Both pharmacists and superintendent pharmacists were positive about the NMS and identified potential benefits for patients and the pharmacy profession. Awareness of the service was high, however, some confusion between the NMS and changes to Medicine Use Reviews was evident in all focus groups due to their similarity and coincidental implementation. This confusion was not observed in the interviews with superintendent pharmacists. Participants identified pharmacists' positive attitude, the similarity to current practice and the self-accreditation procedure as potential facilitators to service implementation. Potential barriers identified included a perceived lack of interest and awareness by GPs of the service, and the payment structure. Participants were concerned about the speed of implementation, and the absence of some materials needed prior to the start of the service. Participants were enthusiastic

  1. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: Statistical behavior and its modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  2. Public schools’ characteristics and teacher turnover in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairuddin Idris

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Teachers are the backbone of the educational systems and their turnover may threaten the whole educational system in any country. In Oman, teacher turnover is a neglected area of study and this article may help in shedding some light on teacher turnover phenomenon in Oman. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of school characteristics (e.g., school size, gender, time-shift, education type, and school location on the turnover intentions of teachers in public schools in Oman. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data from 214 public schools in Oman. 142 schools from all educational regions in Oman were participated in this study. Data analyses tools for this study were descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation, in addition to independents t-test and analysis of variance. The study revealed that teacher intentions to transfer to other schools are influenced by almost all the studied school characteristics. Policy makers and human resource recruiters in Ministry of Education should be aware of teachers’ preferences for certain schools to avoid teachers’ shortage in non-preferred schools. Further studies about the influence of school time-shift and teachers’ intentions to quit or transfer are needed to affirm the results in this study. This is the first study about the influence of school characteristics on teacher turnover in public schools in Oman. Thus, the value of this study stems from the uniqueness of this study which may serve as an eye opening indicator about teacher turnover in Oman.

  3. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: statistical behavior and its modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  4. Work climate perception and turnover intention among Korean hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J-I; Chang, H

    2009-03-01

    To examine the impact of work climate perception (WCP) on turnover intention among public hospital personnel in Korea. With increased competition and high staff turnover in hospitals, managers focus on human resource management. Positive work climate is considered as a strategy to retain valued staff, but previous studies have shown occupationally different relationships between turnover intention and work environment characteristics as perceived by staff. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted of employees (n = 852) in four public hospitals in Korea to gather information about WCP, intention to leave and demographics. The work climate was measured by 32 items categorized into 13 factors in five dimensions. For each occupation, logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the significant factors of WCP that influenced turnover intention. Positive WCP inversely influenced turnover intention. For all occupations, the most significant factor was 'workgroup friendliness and warmth' (OR = 0.01-0.21). For the nursing group, an additional significant factor was 'adherence to job standard' (OR = 0.63). In contrast, there were different significant factors for other hospital staff: 'workgroup esprit de corps' (OR = 0.16) and 'role clarity' (OR = 0.19) for physicians, 'adherence to job standard' (OR = 3.08) and 'role adaptation' (OR = 2.23) for paramedicals, and 'flexibility and innovation' (OR = 0.14) and 'interdepartmental cooperation' (OR = 0.19) for administrators. Nurses with perceptions of work climate emphasizing 'workgroup friendliness and warmth' and 'adherence to job standard' had lower turnover intention. Physicians, paramedicals and administrators have different WCPs. To retain qualified personnel, hospitals should focus on human relations, maintaining a consideration for occupation-specific characteristics.

  5. Nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, T; Bechtel, G A

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a framework. During exit interviews, a convenience sample of 34 employees completed an attitudes and beliefs survey regarding their work environment. Findings were mixed; 39.6 percent of the employees stated positive personal relationships were a strength of the organization, although 24.3 percent resigned because of personal/staff conflicts. Financial concerns were not a major factor in their resignations. The study suggests that decreasing nonlicensed employee stress and increasing their personal satisfaction with patient care may decrease employee turnover.

  6. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role of

  7. Substance abuse-specific knowledge transfer or loss? Treatment program turnover versus professional turnover among substance abuse clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T; Laschober, Tanja C; Curtis, Sara L

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the extent to which substance abuse (SA) clinician turnover is associated with SA-specific knowledge loss due to change in professions (professional turnover) versus SA-specific knowledge transfer due to movement from one SA clinical setting to another (treatment program turnover). For this study, clinicians had to have voluntarily left their current treatment program. Eligible clinicians completed a quantitative survey while employed and a qualitative post-employment exit interview 1 year later. Compared to those that exited the SA profession (n = 99), clinicians who changed treatment programs (n = 120) had greater SA-specific formal knowledge and were more likely to be personally in recovery. No differences were found between the two groups in terms of SA-specific practical knowledge.

  8. Changes in turnover and vacancy rates of care workers in England from 2008 to 2010: panel analysis of national workforce data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Ismail, Mohamed; Manthorpe, Jill

    2016-09-01

    The combination of growing demand for long-term care and higher expectations of care staff needs to be set in the context of long-standing concerns about the sustainability of recruitment and retention of front-line staff in the United Kingdom. Organisational and work environment factors are associated with vacancy levels and turnover rates. The aim of the current analysis was to investigate changes in turnover and vacancy rates over time experienced by a sample of social care employers in England. Taking a follow-up approach offers potentially more accurate estimates of changes in turnover and vacancy rates, and enables the identification of any different organisational characteristics which may be linked to reductions in these elements over time. The study constructed a panel of 2964 care providers (employers) using 18 separate data sets from the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care during 2008-2010. The findings indicate slight reductions in vacancy rates but the presence of enduring, high turnover rates among direct care workers over the study period. However, the experience of individual employers varied, with home-care providers experiencing significantly higher turnover rates than other parts of the sector. These findings raise questions around the quality and motivations of new recruits and methods of reducing specific vacancy levels. At a time of increased emphasis on care at home, it is worthwhile examining why care homes appear to have greater stability of staff and fewer vacancies than home-care agencies.

  9. Varying c and Particle Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Chimento, L P; Pavón, D; Chimento, Luis P; Jakubi, Alejandro S; Pavon, Diego

    2001-01-01

    We explore what restrictions may impose the second law of thermodynamics on varying speed of light theories. We find that the attractor scenario solving the flatness problem is consistent with the generalized second law at late time.

  10. Large-Scale Patterns of Turnover and Basal Area Change in Andean Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundo, Cecilia; Aguilar, Manuel; Aguirre, Nikolay; Aquirre, Zhofre; Álvarez, Esteban; Cuesta, Francisco; Farfán-Ríos, William; García-Cabrera, Karina; Grau, Ricardo; Linares-Palomino, Reynaldo; Malizia, Lucio R.; Cruz, Omar Melo; Osinaga, Oriana; Reynel, Carlos; Silman, Miles R.

    2015-01-01

    General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment) and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century. PMID:25973977

  11. Seasonal species interactions minimize the impact of species turnover on the likelihood of community persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Rohr, Rudolf P; Fortuna, Miguel A; Selva, Nuria; Bascompte, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Many of the observed species interactions embedded in ecological communities are not permanent, but are characterized by temporal changes that are observed along with abiotic and biotic variations. While work has been done describing and quantifying these changes, little is known about their consequences for species coexistence. Here, we investigate the extent to which changes of species composition impact the likelihood of persistence of the predator-prey community in the highly seasonal Białowieza Primeval Forest (northeast Poland), and the extent to which seasonal changes of species interactions (predator diet) modulate the expected impact. This likelihood is estimated extending recent developments on the study of structural stability in ecological communities. We find that the observed species turnover strongly varies the likelihood of community persistence between summer and winter. Importantly, we demonstrate that the observed seasonal interaction changes minimize the variation in the likelihood of persistence associated with species turnover across the year. We find that these community dynamics can be explained as the coupling of individual species to their environment by minimizing both the variation in persistence conditions and the interaction changes between seasons. Our results provide a homeostatic explanation for seasonal species interactions and suggest that monitoring the association of interactions changes with the level of variation in community dynamics can provide a good indicator of the response of species to environmental pressures.

  12. Species turnover in tropical montane forest avifauna links to climatic correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Feng Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined avifauna richness and composition in Taiwan’s tropical montane forests, and compared to historical records dated 22 years ago. A richness attrition of 44 species caused a discrepancy of 30.2%, and an estimated yearly turnover of 2.2%. More resident species that were narrower or lower in elevation distribution, insectivores/omnivores, small to medium-sized, forest/open-field dwelling, and canopy/ground foragers, vanished; whereas piscivores, carnivores, riparian- and shrub-dwellers, ground and mid-layer foragers, and migrants suffered by higher proportions. Occurrence frequencies of persistent species remained constant but varied among ecological groups, indicating an increased homogeneity for smaller-sized insectivores/omnivores dwelling in the forest canopy, shrub, or understory. While the overall annual temperature slightly increased, a relatively stable mean temperature was replaced by an ascending trend from the mid-1990s until 2002, followed by a cooling down. Mean maximum temperatures increased but minimums decreased gradually over years, resulting in increasing temperature differences up to over 16 °C. This accompanied an increase of extreme typhoons affecting Taiwan or directly striking these montane forests during the last decade. These results, given no direct human disturbances were noted, suggest a link between the species turnover and recent climate change, and convey warning signs of conservation concerns for tropical montane assemblages.

  13. Large-scale patterns of turnover and Basal area change in Andean forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Báez

    Full Text Available General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century.

  14. Soil carbon stabilization and turnover at alley-cropping systems, Eastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinski, T.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    Alley-cropping system is seen as a viable land-use practice for mitigation of greenhouse gas CO2, energy-wood production and soil carbon sequestration. The extent to which carbon is stored in soil varies between ecosystems, and depends on tree species, soil types and on the extent of physical protection of carbon within soil aggregates. This study investigates soil carbon sequestration at alley-cropping systems presented by alleys of fast growing tree species (black locust and poplar) and maize, in Brandenburg, Eastern Germany. Carbon accumulation and turnover are assessed by measuring carbon fractions differing in decomposition rates. For this purpose soil samples were fractionated into labile and recalcitrant soil-size fractions by wet-sieving: macro (>250 µm), micro (53-250 µm) and clay + silt (water extractable OC, and microbial C. Litter decomposition was evaluated by litter bags experiment. Soil CO2 flux was measured by LiCor automated device LI-8100A. No differences for the total and stable (clay+silt, treatment. While cold water-extractable carbon was significantly higher at maize alley compared to black locust alley. This may indicate faster turnover of organic matter at maize alley due to tillage, which influenced greater incorporation of plant residues into the soil, greater soil respiration and microbial activity.

  15. Large-scale patterns of turnover and Basal area change in Andean forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Selene; Malizia, Agustina; Carilla, Julieta; Blundo, Cecilia; Aguilar, Manuel; Aguirre, Nikolay; Aquirre, Zhofre; Álvarez, Esteban; Cuesta, Francisco; Duque, Álvaro; Farfán-Ríos, William; García-Cabrera, Karina; Grau, Ricardo; Homeier, Jürgen; Linares-Palomino, Reynaldo; Malizia, Lucio R; Cruz, Omar Melo; Osinaga, Oriana; Phillips, Oliver L; Reynel, Carlos; Silman, Miles R; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment) and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century.

  16. Exploring correlates of turnover among nursing assistants in the National Nursing Home Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, April; Dobbs, Debra; Andel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    High turnover of nursing assistants (NAs) has implications for the quality of nursing home care. Greater understanding of correlates of NA turnover is needed to provide insight into possible retention strategies. This study examined nursing home organizational characteristics and specific job characteristics of staff in relation to turnover of NAs. Cross-sectional data on 944 nationally representative nursing homes were derived from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. Using a 3-month turnover rate, 25% of the facilities with the lowest turnover rates were classified as low turnover, 25% of the facilities with the highest turnover were classified as high turnover, and the remaining 50% of the facilities were classified as moderate turnover. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine organizational and job characteristics associated with low and high turnover compared with moderate turnover. One organizational characteristic, staffing levels at or greater than 4.0 hours per patient day, was associated with greater odds of low NA turnover and reduced odds of high NA turnover. Job characteristics including higher wages and union membership were associated with greater odds of low NA turnover, whereas wages, fully paid health insurance, employee assistance benefits, and involvement in resident care planning were associated with reduced odds of high NA turnover. The results of this study suggest that job characteristics of NA staff may be particularly important for turnover. Specifically, the provision of competitive wages and benefits (particularly health insurance) and involvement of NAs in resident care planning could potentially reduce NA turnover, as could maintaining high levels of nurse staffing.

  17. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  18. Reducing employee turnover through customer contact center job quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der Z.; Bloemer, J.; Henseler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of customer contact centers (CCCs), high-quality jobs for employees of such centers remain a challenge, as evidenced by the high employee turnover rates in this industry. This study, therefore, conceptualizes and operationalizes a CCC job quality construct to determine its i

  19. Bibliography of Military and Non-Military Personnel Turnover Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    satisfaction and productivity. The authors wish to express their appreciation to SRA Gerald P. Yates and Ms. Kathleen Donahue for their assistance in...Chicago, IL: St. Clair Press, 1974. Karp , H. B., & Nickson, J. W., Jr. Motivator-hygiene deprivation as a predictor of job turnover. Personnel

  20. Consistent assignment of nurse aides: association with turnover and absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2013-01-01

    Consistent assignment refers to the same caregivers consistently caring for the same residents almost every time caregivers are on duty. This article examines the association of consistent assignment of nurse aides with turnover and absenteeism. Data came from a survey of nursing home administrators, the Online Survey Certification and Reporting data, and the Area Resource File. The measures were from 2007 and came from 3,941 nursing homes. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine turnover and absenteeism. An average of 68% of nursing homes reported using consistent assignment, with 28% of nursing homes using nurse aides consistent assignment at the often recommended level of 85% (or more). Nursing homes using recommended levels of consistent assignment had significantly lower rates of turnover and of absenteeism. In the multivariate analyses, consistent assignment was significantly associated with both lower turnover and lower absenteeism (p assignment is a practice recommended by many policy makers, government agencies, and industry advocates. The findings presented here provide some evidence that the use of this staffing practice can be beneficial.

  1. Reduce home care aide turnover: give aides real jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Kennedy, E

    1998-08-01

    What do home care aides want even more than a raise? Consistent, full-time work hours. That's what one agency found out in its attempt to decrease employee turnover. There are other steps agencies can take, too, to keep their aides coming back.

  2. Endogenous surfactant turnover in preterm infants measured with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); R.H.Th. van Beek (Ron); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe studied surfactant synthesis and turnover in vivo in preterm infants using the stable isotope [U-13C]glucose, as a precursor for the synthesis of palmitic acid in surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC). Six preterm infants (birth weight, 916 +/- 244 g; gesta

  3. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  4. Relationships between Emotional Labor, Job Performance, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robyn E.; Groth, Markus; Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the emotional labor strategies surface acting and deep acting and organizational outcomes, specifically, employees' overall job performance and turnover. Call center employees from two large financial service organizations completed an online survey about their use of surface and deep acting.…

  5. Turnover of nursing employees in a Gauteng hospital group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Japie Greyling

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The South African nursing profession is in a crisis as professional nurses leave the country in search of lucrative work overseas.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate individual determinants of voluntary turnover to identify a risk-group profile.Motivation for the study: Nursing employers should have a clearer understanding of the dynamics around nurses’ turnover behaviour and embark on strategies to retain their talent.Research design, approach and method: A survey measuring voluntary turnover was conducted among 262 professional and assistant nurses in three selected hospitals in Gauteng province using the McCarthy, Tyrrell and Cronin (2002 instrument. Pearson’s chi square with Yates’s continuity correction tested the relationship among the variables presented in a contingency table, in other words the risk group and each of the individual determinants.Main findings: Discontent with salaries was the major determinant of the nurses’ resignation. Organisational causes were nursing practices, the work environment, physical-emotional costs and employment opportunities after resignation.Practical/managerial implications: Hospital management could indeed establish a good rapport with nursing staff while facilitating respectful and ethical conduct by doctors towards nursing staff. Putting into place effective labour practices and business strategies could improve job satisfaction in the workplace.Contribution/value-add: This study contributed to a greater understanding of the personal and organisational determinants of the turnover of nurses in South African hospitals.

  6. Factors Affecting Turnover Intention among Nurses in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayalew, Firew; Kols, Adrienne; Kim, Young-Mi; Schuster, Anne; Emerson, Mark R; Roosmalen, J van; Stekelenburg, Jelle; Woldemariam, Damtew; Gibson, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing turnover is essential to address health worker shortages in the public sector and improve the quality of services. This study examines factors associated with Ethiopian nurses' intention to leave their jobs. METHODS: Survey respondents (a sample of 425 nurses at 122 facilities)

  7. Chinese Teachers' Work Stress and Their Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    This survey study employed qualitative dominant mixed research to explore the sources of teacher stress in China and the possible reasons for Chinese teachers' turnover intention. The data were collected in Jilin Province of China, and 510 teachers participated in the survey. Quantitatively, 40.4% of the surveyed teachers reported that they…

  8. On the Suboptimality of Full Turnover-Based Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yugang); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the past thirty years the full turnover-based storage policy as described by Hausman et al. (1976, Management Science 22(6)) has been widely claimed to outperform the commonly used ABC class-based storage policy, in terms of the resulting average storage and retrieval machine travel

  9. Strong nurse leadership still undermined by high turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    An effective, well-led health and social care system is dependent on having strong clinical leadership at board level. Not my words, but those of Christine McKenzie, lead of the RCN's executive nurse network, in response to the latest findings of Nursing Standard's annual survey of turnover among directors of nursing.

  10. Ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia turnover in a longleaf pine forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Elucidation of the patterns and controls of carbon (C) flow and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests has been hindered by a poor understanding of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia (EFM) dynamics. In this study, EFM standing biomass (based on soil ergosterol concentrations), production (based on ergosterol accrual in ingrowth cores), and turnover rate (the quotient of annual production and average standing biomass estimates) were assessed in a 25-yr-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation where C flow was manipulated by foliar scorching and N fertilization for 5 yr before study initiation. In the controls, EFM standing biomass was 30 ± 7 g m(-2) , production was 279 ± 63 g m(-2)  yr(-1) , and turnover rate was 10 ± 3 times yr(-1) . The scorched × fertilized treatment had significantly higher EFM standing biomass (38 ± 8 g m(-2) ), significantly lower production (205 ± 28 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a trend of decreased turnover rate (6 ± 1 times yr(-1) ). The EFM turnover estimates, which are among the first reported for natural systems, indicate that EFM are a dynamic component of ecosystems, and that conventional assessments have probably underestimated the role of EFM in C flow and nutrient cycling.

  11. Some Determinants of Employee Turnover in a Psychiatric Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zautra, Alex J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Used research from illness-prevention and job-enrichment approaches to enhancing quality of work environments to create instruments assessing number of job stressors and level of task interest on psychiatric hospital units. Instruments successfully predicted employee turnover during one year. Job stress and interaction between job stress and task…

  12. Chinese Teachers' Work Stress and Their Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    This survey study employed qualitative dominant mixed research to explore the sources of teacher stress in China and the possible reasons for Chinese teachers' turnover intention. The data were collected in Jilin Province of China, and 510 teachers participated in the survey. Quantitatively, 40.4% of the surveyed teachers reported that they…

  13. The Key to Lowering Staff Turnover Is in the Hiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Dora

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of using a preemployment test to help screen job candidates for those qualities that lead to cost-effective long-term employment. Gives an example of how to determine the cost of staff turnover at any child-care facility. (ET)

  14. Chemical Elements in Mulch and Litterfall of Beech Ecosystems and Their Total Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyana I. Lyubenovа

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The beech communities on the territory of Bulgaria had been objects of regional, local as well as large scale national investigations aiming their classification, determination of their ecological characteristics, conservation status, habitats etc. They are included as objects of the intensive monitoring of forest ecosystems in Bulgaria also. The investigations of chemical content of the litter – fall in these forests were conducted until now. The novelty of the present research is investigation of these elements in the mulch and the ratio between the established quantities calculation. The main goal is the biological turnover special features characterization of the investigated elements which give us a chance to define the investigated ecosystems state and functioning. The indexes as litter – mulch and acropetal coefficients were used for this aim. The content of macroelements as N, Ca and K and microelements as Pb, Zn, Mn and Fe in soils, mulch and in different litter fall fractions have been calculated. The investigation was carried out on three sample plots. During the investigation was established that the soils are characterized with acid reaction, high content of Fe, N and Mn and low content of Ca and K. The concentration of Zn and Pb are high also. The calculated average store of investigated elements in litter – fall is 81.312 kg.ha1 and in the mulch 314 kg.ha1. According to the acropetal coefficient N is accumulated mainly in the acorns, K – in the annual phytomass fractions and Ca – in the perennial fractions. The leaves and the acorns fraction accumulate Mn, and cupolas Fe. The litter – mulch coefficient vary from 1,6 (Mn to 4,2 (Pb. The tendencies of Zn and Ca turnovers acceleration are discovered, while the turnover of more investigated elements is inhibited. The litter – mulch coefficient for Zn and Ca is 0,8 and 1,4 accordingly, i.е. corresponding to the intensive type of turnovers which is not typical for the

  15. A behavioral study of daily mean turnover times and first case of the day start tardiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihan; Dexter, Franklin; Yang, Kai

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has identified 2 psychological biases in operating room (OR) decisions on the day of surgery: risk attitude of the decision-maker at the OR control desk and decisions made by OR staff to increase clinical work per unit time during the hours they are assigned. Resulting decisions are worse than random chance at reducing overutilized time. To isolate the second bias from decisions at the OR control desk, previous studies of the second bias have analyzed decisions made in non-OR locations and on nights/weekends. Another way to isolate the second bias from decisions at the OR control desk is to study facilities with negligible overutilized OR time. We examined the second bias using data from such a facility. One year of data was collected from a 5-OR hospital. Allocated OR time that minimized the inefficiency of use of OR time was determined first to confirm there was virtually no overutilized OR time. A structural equation model was then built to evaluate the relations among variables while controlling for other correlations. We tested the hypothesis that nonoperative times were no longer on days with little versus relatively large workload. The extra ORs were not cost efficient (i.e., the mean potential improvement varied among days from 21.1% ± 0.2% [SE] to 38.9% ± 0.2%), resulting in very little overutilized OR time. However, conditioned on the preceding tactical decision of running extra ORs, the allocated OR time during the studied period was that which minimized the inefficiency of use of OR time. As the preceding results showed that the facility was suitable for the behavioral study, the behavioral study was performed, and the hypothesized relation confirmed. Each 1-hour decrease in the daily estimated (total) duration of elective cases resulted in a managerially unimportant decrease in the mean turnover times (0.41 ± 0.21 minutes, P = 0.053). Excluding turnovers when there were >2 turnovers occurring simultaneously, there was no

  16. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  17. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Flint, Anndrea

    2014-08-19

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going studies. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no studies that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new studies. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  18. A Social Network Perspective on Turnover Intentions : The Role of Distributive Justice and Social Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltis, Scott M.; Agneessens, Filip; Sasovova, Zuzana; Labianca, Giuseppe (Joe)

    Organizations are increasingly concerned about retaining human talent, particularly within knowledge-based industries where turnover is expensive. Our study employs a social network perspective to explore the influence of employees' formal and informal workplace relationships on their turnover

  19. The Impact of School Accountability Laws on Measures of Trust between Indiana Public School Superintendents and Teacher Union Leaders within the Forum of Mandatory Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of the school accountability laws "No Child Left Behind" and Indiana's Public Law 221 on Superintendents' perception of their relationship with the Teachers' Union Leader in their mandatory discussion meetings. Both school accountability laws contain provisions for the Indiana's Department of Education to…

  20. A Better Leveled Playing Field for Assessing Satisfactory Job Performance of Superintendents on the Basis of High-Stakes Testing Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip; Cox, Edward P.; Buckman, David G.

    2014-01-01

    To assess satisfactory job performance of superintendents on the basis of school districts' high-stakes testing outcomes, existing teacher models were reviewed and critiqued as potential options for retrofit. For these models, specific problems were identified relative to the choice of referent groups. An alternate referent group (statewide…

  1. Fringe Benefits for Superintendents in Public Schools, 1979-80. Part 1 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    Displayed in 38 tables, the data in this third biennial survey of public school superintendents' fringe benefits are designed to help school boards and administrators assess their non-cash compensation packages. A national sample of 797 school districts--stratified by district enrollment size, expenditure per pupil, and geographic region--supplied…

  2. Making the Case for the Outlier: Researcher Reflections of an African-American Female Deputy Superintendent Who Decided to Close the Achievement Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Karen Stansberry

    2012-01-01

    This article presents researcher reflections of a case study of a Black female deputy superintendent who made the value-driven decision to close the achievement gap in her district. I posit that she is an outlier because she is Black and female in a predominantly white male field of practice, she effectively closed the achievement gap through her…

  3. Perception of the Use of Leadership Frames by Male and Female Superintendents in Texas by Subordinate Top-Ranking School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, C. Steven

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to broadly examine and analyze gender differences in the leadership styles of Texas public school superintendents by analyzing their subordinates' responses on Bolman and Deal's (1991) Leadership Orientations (Other) survey. Approximately 25% (n = 484) of the high-ranking administrators within the 198 selected school…

  4. The Edmonton Public Schools Story: Internationally Renowned Superintendent Angus McBeath Chronicles His District's Successes and Failures. Policy Brief. No. S2007-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Angus

    2007-01-01

    This publication is a transcript of Superintendent Angus McBeath's presentation to legislators and media at an Issues and Ideas Forum hosted by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Lansing, Michigan. McBeath discusses education reform in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, including: (1) Basic Elements of Reform; (2) School Employee Union Involvement;…

  5. The effect of manager exclusion on nurse turnover intention and care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Marci D; Erickson, Rebecca J; Diefendorff, James M; Bromley, Gail

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about how exclusionary practices (i.e., ignored, ostracized) by managers differ across demographics and influence nursing outcomes. This study examines whether managerial exclusion varies by generation, race, and gender, and the extent to which these variables, in turn, relate to turnover intention and perceived patient care among a sample of 747 nurses working in hospitals in a midwestern health system. Exclusion did not differ across most demographic groups, though men reported less exclusion than women. Younger nurses of the Millennial generation, those feeling excluded, and those with fewer years of experience reported lower quality patient care. Managerial exclusion, being a nurse of color, and less experience were associated with stronger intentions to leave. Nursing leaders should attend to factors that may contribute to racial minorities seeking other jobs, diminish younger nurses' ability to provide high-quality care, and minimize practices that might lead nurses to feel excluded.

  6. To leave or not to leave : When receiving interpersonal citizenship behavior influences an employee's turnover intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regts, Gerdien; Molleman, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Given that few studies have examined relational bases for voluntary employee turnover, the purpose of the article is to examine whether work relationships explain employee turnover intention. Adopting a social relational perspective on employee turnover, we investigated the effect of receiving inter

  7. To leave or not to leave : When receiving interpersonal citizenship behavior influences an employee's turnover intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regts, Gerdien; Molleman, Eric

    Given that few studies have examined relational bases for voluntary employee turnover, the purpose of the article is to examine whether work relationships explain employee turnover intention. Adopting a social relational perspective on employee turnover, we investigated the effect of receiving

  8. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 17176

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2011-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, but recent evidence calls into question this assumption. Using a unique identification strategy that employs grade-level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 600,000 New York City 4th…

  9. To leave or not to leave : When receiving interpersonal citizenship behavior influences an employee's turnover intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regts, Gerdien; Molleman, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Given that few studies have examined relational bases for voluntary employee turnover, the purpose of the article is to examine whether work relationships explain employee turnover intention. Adopting a social relational perspective on employee turnover, we investigated the effect of receiving inter

  10. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish A. Malik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a pulse-chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of root-associated soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h and DNA (30 h turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 d, while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs had the slowest turnover (42 d. PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings.

  11. Time-varying Crash Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunoua, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    We estimate a continuous-time model with stochastic volatility and dynamic crash probability for the S&P 500 index and find that market illiquidity dominates other factors in explaining the stock market crash risk. While the crash probability is time-varying, its dynamic depends only weakly on re...

  12. Mass Varying Neutrinos in Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi-Torres, F; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2010-01-01

    We study limits for the mass varying neutrino model, using constrains from supernova neutrinos placed by the r-process condition, $Y_e<0.5$. Also, we use this model in a supernova environment to study the regions of survival probability in the oscillation space parameter ($\\tan^2\\theta$ and $\\Delta m^2_0$), considering the channel $\

  13. Time-varying Crash Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunoua, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    We estimate a continuous-time model with stochastic volatility and dynamic crash probability for the S&P 500 index and find that market illiquidity dominates other factors in explaining the stock market crash risk. While the crash probability is time-varying, its dynamic depends only weakly...... on return variance once we include market illiquidity as an economic variable in the model....

  14. Esmaklassiline Karlovy Vary / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" võitis 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivalil kaks auhinda - ametliku kõrvalvõistlusprogrammi "East of the West" eripreemia "Special mention" ja Euroopa väärtfilmikinode keti Europa Cinemas preemia. Ka Asko Kase lühifilmi "Zen läbi prügi linastumisest ning teistest auhinnasaajatest ning osalejatest

  15. Optimistlik Karlovy Vary / Jaan Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Jaan, 1938-2017

    2007-01-01

    42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivali auhinnatud filmidest (žürii esimees Peter Bart). Kristallgloobuse sai Islandi-Saksamaa "Katseklaasilinn" (režii Baltasar Kormakur), parimaks režissööriks tunnistati norralane Bard Breien ("Negatiivse mõtlemise kunst"). Austraallase Michael James Rowlandi "Hea õnne teekond" sai žürii eripreemia

  16. Eestlased Karlovy Varys / J. R.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" osaleb 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivali võistlusprogrammis "East of the West" ja Asko Kase lühimängufilm "Zen läbi prügi" on valitud festivali kõrvalprogrammi "Forum of Independents"

  17. Esmaklassiline Karlovy Vary / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" võitis 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivalil kaks auhinda - ametliku kõrvalvõistlusprogrammi "East of the West" eripreemia "Special mention" ja Euroopa väärtfilmikinode keti Europa Cinemas preemia. Ka Asko Kase lühifilmi "Zen läbi prügi linastumisest ning teistest auhinnasaajatest ning osalejatest

  18. Store turnover as a predictor of food and beverage provider turnover and associated dietary intake estimates in very remote Indigenous communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycherley, Thomas; Ferguson, Megan; O'Dea, Kerin; McMahon, Emma; Liberato, Selma; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Determine how very-remote Indigenous community (RIC) food and beverage (F&B) turnover quantities and associated dietary intake estimates derived from only stores, compare with values derived from all community F&B providers. F&B turnover quantity and associated dietary intake estimates (energy, micro/macronutrients and major contributing food types) were derived from 12-months transaction data of all F&B providers in three RICs (NT, Australia). F&B turnover quantities and dietary intake estimates from only stores (plus only the primary store in multiple-store communities) were expressed as a proportion of complete F&B provider turnover values. Food types and macronutrient distribution (%E) estimates were quantitatively compared. Combined stores F&B turnover accounted for the majority of F&B quantity (98.1%) and absolute dietary intake estimates (energy [97.8%], macronutrients [≥96.7%] and micronutrients [≥83.8%]). Macronutrient distribution estimates from combined stores and only the primary store closely aligned complete provider estimates (≤0.9% absolute). Food types were similar using combined stores, primary store or complete provider turnover. Evaluating combined stores F&B turnover represents an efficient method to estimate total F&B turnover quantity and associated dietary intake in RICs. In multiple-store communities, evaluating only primary store F&B turnover provides an efficient estimate of macronutrient distribution and major food types. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  20. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russian steppe soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hammes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC, from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded. We use soils sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. BC stocks (initially 2.5 kg m-2 decreased 25% with cessation of biomass burning. BC turnover in the soil was 293 y (best estimate; range 212–541 y, much faster than inert/passive carbon in soil models. Such results provide a new constraint on theories of soil carbon stabilization. Most importantly, BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils; other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  1. The effects of autonomy and empowerment on employee turnover: test of a multilevel model in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W

    2011-11-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data collected from 817 employees on 115 teams indicates that psychological empowerment mediates the main effect of autonomy orientation and the interactive effect of autonomy support and its differentiation on a team member's voluntary turnover. The findings have meaningful implications for the turnover and self-determination literatures as well as for managers who endeavor to prevent voluntary turnover in teams.

  2. Staff Turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (Act) Teams: The Role of Team Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Wholey, Douglas R; Cain, Cindy; Natafgi, Nabil

    2017-03-01

    Staff turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams can result in interrupted services and diminished support for clients. This paper examines the effect of team climate, defined as team members' shared perceptions of their work environment, on turnover and individual outcomes that mediate the climate-turnover relationship. We focus on two climate dimensions: safety and quality climate and constructive conflict climate. Using survey data collected from 26 ACT teams, our analyses highlight the importance of safety and quality climate in reducing turnover, and job satisfaction as the main mediator linking team climate to turnover. The findings offer practical implications for team management.

  3. Stoichiometry and Turnover of the Stator and Rotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yusuke V; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related fluorescent proteins are utilized to monitor and analyze a wide range of biological processes in living cells. Stepwise photobleaching experiments can determine the stoichiometry of protein complexes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments can reveal in vivo dynamics of biomolecules. In this chapter, we describe methods to detect the subcellular localization, stoichiometry, and turnovers of stator and rotor components of the Salmonella flagellar motor.

  4. The Link between HR Attributions and Employees’ Turnover Intentions

    OpenAIRE

    Tandung, Juliana Caesaria

    2016-01-01

    Human Resources Management (HRM) is part of the organizational functions that contribute to the effectiveness of a firm’s performance, and brings an organization a competitive advantage through the implementation of its Human Resources (HR) practices. HR practices adopted by management are perceived or attributed subjectively by individual employees, and can in turn affect the employees’ attitudes and behavior (e.g. Job satisfaction and turnover intention). The purpose of this study is to con...

  5. Who nominates the board? - Implications on board diversity and turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Viskari, Milla

    2014-01-01

    This thesis assesses whether the type of nomination poses implications on board diversity in terms of age, gender, nationality and education, as well as turnover on a Finnish and Swedish data. The existing research on director selection and especially nomination committees is rather limited, and thus the research aims at contributing to the topic. The reviewed time period concerns 2008 to 2012, and altogether 55 Finnish and 55 Swedish public companies are included in the study, thus resul...

  6. Carbon turnover and sequestration potential of fodder radish cover crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutegi, James; Petersen, Bjørn Molt; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2013-01-01

    We studied fodder radish carbon turnover as affected by soil tillage in Foulum, Denmark. Actively growing fodder radish monoliths from direct-drilled (DD) and conventionally tilled (CT) plots were extracted and labelled regularly with 14C isotope across their entire growth period. At the end......- to 45-cm-depth increments for determination of 14C distribution and retention. Carbon-14 declined significantly with increasing soil depth at each sampling for the two tillage practices (P

  7. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organisation. Methods A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover.

  8. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  9. Prediction of Employee Turnover in Organizations using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Punnoose

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Employee turnover has been identified as a key issue for organizations because of its adverse impact on work place productivity and long term growth strategies. To solve this problem, organizations use machine learning techniques to predict employee turnover. Accurate predictions enable organizations to take action for retention or succession planning of employees. However, the data for this modeling problem comes from HR Information Systems (HRIS; these are typically under-funded compared to the Information Systems of other domains in the organization which are directly related to its priorities. This leads to the prevalence of noise in the data that renders predictive models prone to over-fitting and hence inaccurate. This is the key challenge that is the focus of this paper, and one that has not been addressed historically. The novel contribution of this paper is to explore the application of Extreme Gradient Boosting (XGBoost technique which is more robust because of its regularization formulation. Data from the HRIS of a global retailer is used to compare XGBoost against six historically used supervised classifiers and demonstrate its significantly higher accuracy for predicting employee turnover.

  10. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  11. Species Turnover through Time: Colonization and Extinction Dynamics across Metacommunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvoloni, Felipe Micali; Feres, Reinaldo José Fazzio; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Island biogeography and metacommunity theory often use equilibrium assumptions to predict local diversity, yet nonequilibrium dynamics are common in nature. In nonequilibrium communities, local diversity fluctuates through time as the relative importance of colonization and extinction change. Here, we test the prevalence and causes of nonequilibrium dynamics in metacommunities of mites associated with rubber trees distributed over large spatial (>1,000 km) and temporal (>30-60 generations) scales in Brazil. We measured colonization and extinction rates to test species turnover and nonequilibrium dynamics over a growing season. Mite metacommunities exhibited nonequilibrium dynamics for most months of the year, and these dynamics tracked climatic conditions. Monthly shifts in temperature of more than 1°C resulted in nonequilibrium dynamics, as did mean temperatures outside of two critical ranges. Nonequilibrium dynamics were caused by a change in colonization with temperature change and changes in both colonization and extinction with absolute temperature. Species turnover showed different trends; high relative humidity increased both colonization and extinction rates, increasing turnover but not nonequilibrium dynamics. Our study illustrates that testing nonequilibrium dynamics can provide new insights into the drivers of colonization, extinction, and diversity fluctuations in metacommunities.

  12. Computational model of collagen turnover in carotid arteries during hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, P; Peña, E; Tarbell, J M; Martínez, M A

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that biological tissues adapt their properties because of different mechanical and chemical stimuli. The goal of this work is to study the collagen turnover in the arterial tissue of hypertensive patients through a coupled computational mechano-chemical model. Although it has been widely studied experimentally, computational models dealing with the mechano-chemical approach are not. The present approach can be extended easily to study other aspects of bone remodeling or collagen degradation in heart diseases. The model can be divided into three different stages. First, we study the smooth muscle cell synthesis of different biological substances due to over-stretching during hypertension. Next, we study the mass-transport of these substances along the arterial wall. The last step is to compute the turnover of collagen based on the amount of these substances in the arterial wall which interact with each other to modify the turnover rate of collagen. We simulate this process in a finite element model of a real human carotid artery. The final results show the well-known stiffening of the arterial wall due to the increase in the collagen content.

  13. Internal Control of Enterprise Capital Turnover under the Integration Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminska Tetiana H.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to build methods of internal control of the capital turnover, which would meet modern integration processes in Ukraine and in the world. First of all it states that internal control should ensure realisation of interests of the enterprise owner. It marks out that despite the existing methods, the enterprise control should be started not with assets, but from the sources of their formation – own capital and obligations, and only then go to the enterprise property control. The author offers relevant methods of capital turnover control, which takes into account its stages – acquisition, production and sales – and gives practical recommendations on its use at enterprises. Special attention is paid to the capital turnover control at the stage of production, which should keep track of both quantitative and qualitative parameters. Acquisition and sales control, except for internal controllers, is carried out by marketing, logistics and other services. Generalisation of results of the control should be done in forms that, on the one hand, have evidential force and, on the other, accessible for comprehension and use in the process of making managerial decisions by managers of various levels.

  14. KEAHLIAN AUDITOR DAN TURNOVER INTENTION SEBAGAI MEDIASI DETERMINAN KINERJA AUDITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceacilia Srimindarti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine the effect of locus of control and organizational commitment on auditors’ performance as well as to examine whether auditors’ expertise and turnover intention mediate the effect of locus of control and organizational commitment on auditors’ performance. Samples of this study were auditors who worked at audit firms in Semarang. Samples were selected using the purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using SEM with AMOS program. This study found that locus of control had a negative effect on auditors’ performance, organizational commitment had a positive effect on auditors’ performance, and auditors’ expertise and turnover intention had no effect on auditors’ performance. Furthermore, locus of control had a negative effect on auditors’ expertise, and organizational commitment had a negative effect on turnover intention. Based on this result, managers of public accounting firm (partners should provide some trainings to the auditors who had the external locus of control so that they can achieve the standardized performances. They should also confirm the company’s values to the auditor to increase emotional attachment to the company as well as try to comply to the demands of the company thus its performance will be in accordance with company’s expectations.

  15. Staff Turnover as a Possible Threat to Knowledge Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhartová Lucie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on labour turnover as a potential threat to knowledge loss. Labour turnover results in an organizations inability to ensure knowledge continuity. In this study, induction was used to identify factors within organizations that determine employees’ exit from organizations. The verifiability of these factors was tested by means of correlation and regression. Subsequently, the presented causes of employee turnover were specified as potential threat to knowledge loss. In the current knowledge economy, employees in an organization are considered the key competitive advantage and the most important asset. If an employee leaves an organization, they take the knowledge they have acquired with them. The loss of knowledge is a potential threat to an organizations existence, especially if an employee with valuable knowledge leaves to join a competitor. Therefore, this paper deals with knowledge continuity as a probable means of eliminating this threat. Dependencies between selected qualitative variables were tested to determine their impact on organizations. The study concludes by indicating that, today‘s knowledge-based organizations must be aware of the main causes and consequences of employee fluctuation so as to maintain their competitiveness in times of economic crisis.

  16. The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Michael C; Shao, Lian; Katz, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    Although researchers have theorized that there exists a curvilinear relationship between job performance and voluntary turnover, their research has been tested in the United States or culturally similar Switzerland. Through a study of the performance-turnover relationship from a multinational service-oriented organization in 24 countries, we demonstrate that the general relationship between performance and turnover is similar across countries but the details of that relationship change across countries. Using 4 cultural dimensions--in-group collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and performance orientation--we find that cultural factors alter the overall probability of voluntary turnover and influence the degree of curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship. Our findings have implications for research on the performance-turnover relationship, turnover research, and practice.

  17. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2013-02-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted that there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this article examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The costs of nursing turnover: evidence from the British National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A M; Phillips, V L; Normand, C

    1996-11-01

    This article reports empirical evidence on the costs of nursing and other staff turnover in the National Health Service. It begins by considering the possible costs and benefits associated with turnover. It then examines current turnover rates in the NHS and existing estimates of the direct administrative costs and the short-term productivity losses associated with turnover. Using these estimates, it compares the cost-effectiveness of a policy which uses across-the-board pay increases to reduce turnover with one which targets pay rises to certain groups only. Next, possible indirect costs of turnover are evaluated using data collected from a large cross-section of providers and other sources. No relationship is found between turnover rates and crude measures of patient service or staff morale measures. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the main findings and some suggestions for future research.

  19. Zinc transport in rabbit tissues. Some hormonal aspects of the turnover of zinc in female reproductive organs, liver and body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, J E; Lutwak-Mann, C

    1972-02-01

    1. To investigate the influence of hormonal conditions upon the kinetics of zinc transport, specific radioactivity of (65)Zn was determined in certain tissues and fluids from unmated or pregnant rabbits during the first half of gestation. 2. Compartmental analysis was used to find the simplest mathematical model that simulated satisfactorily tracer behaviour. Models were fitted to experimental results by a numerical procedure using a computer. 3. The kinetics of zinc exchange in most tissues investigated could adequately be described by a three-compartment model, in which total tissue zinc content was divided into a rapidly exchanging pool, with a turnover time of about 1h, and a slowly exchanging pool, the turnover time of which was in liver 15h, in peak-stage corpus luteum 8h, and in the other tissues 30-70h. 4. In rabbit endometrium zinc transport varied with hormonal conditions, the turnover rate being higher in non-pregnant than pregnant endometrium. 5. Uptake of (65)Zn by uterine fluid was slow, and in the free-lying embryos (blastocysts) slower still, in keeping with uterine fluid acting as carrier of zinc into the unimplanted embryos. 6. In placental tissue zinc transport varied with gestational stage. Foetal placenta exchanged zinc with blood plasma four times faster than maternal placenta. In foetuses zinc turnover time and flux equalled that of the slow zinc compartment in foetal placenta. 7. Corpus luteum on days 5-6 of gestation showed peak specific radioactivity and zinc flux values, which exceeded those of all other tissues. 8. In liver the slow zinc compartment had a higher rate of turnover than corresponding compartments in tissues other than peak-stage corpus luteum, but no hormone-dependent changes were observed. 9. Zinc uptake by erythrocytes was the slowest of all examined.

  20. Inferring Species Richness and Turnover by Statistical Multiresolution Texture Analysis of Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Matteo; Mangoubi, Rami S.; Linkov, Igor; Lowry, Nathan C.; Desai, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    Shannon entropy of pixel intensity.To test our approach, we specifically use the green band of Landsat images for a water conservation area in the Florida Everglades. We validate our predictions against data of species occurrences for a twenty-eight years long period for both wet and dry seasons. Our method correctly predicts 73% of species richness. For species turnover, the newly proposed KL divergence prediction performance is near 100% accurate. This represents a significant improvement over the more conventional Shannon entropy difference, which provides 85% accuracy. Furthermore, we find that changes in soil and water patterns, as measured by fluctuations of the Shannon entropy for the red and blue bands respectively, are positively correlated with changes in vegetation. The fluctuations are smaller in the wet season when compared to the dry season. Conclusions/Significance Texture-based statistical multiresolution image analysis is a promising method for quantifying interseasonal differences and, consequently, the degree to which vegetation, soil, and water patterns vary. The proposed automated method for quantifying species richness and turnover can also provide analysis at higher spatial and temporal resolution than is currently obtainable from expensive monitoring campaigns, thus enabling more prompt, more cost effective inference and decision making support regarding anomalous variations in biodiversity. Additionally, a matrix-based visualization of the statistical multiresolution analysis is presented to facilitate both insight and quick recognition of anomalous data. PMID:23115629

  1. Inferring species richness and turnover by statistical multiresolution texture analysis of satellite imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Convertino

    richness, or [Formula: see text] diversity, based on the Shannon entropy of pixel intensity.To test our approach, we specifically use the green band of Landsat images for a water conservation area in the Florida Everglades. We validate our predictions against data of species occurrences for a twenty-eight years long period for both wet and dry seasons. Our method correctly predicts 73% of species richness. For species turnover, the newly proposed KL divergence prediction performance is near 100% accurate. This represents a significant improvement over the more conventional Shannon entropy difference, which provides 85% accuracy. Furthermore, we find that changes in soil and water patterns, as measured by fluctuations of the Shannon entropy for the red and blue bands respectively, are positively correlated with changes in vegetation. The fluctuations are smaller in the wet season when compared to the dry season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Texture-based statistical multiresolution image analysis is a promising method for quantifying interseasonal differences and, consequently, the degree to which vegetation, soil, and water patterns vary. The proposed automated method for quantifying species richness and turnover can also provide analysis at higher spatial and temporal resolution than is currently obtainable from expensive monitoring campaigns, thus enabling more prompt, more cost effective inference and decision making support regarding anomalous variations in biodiversity. Additionally, a matrix-based visualization of the statistical multiresolution analysis is presented to facilitate both insight and quick recognition of anomalous data.

  2. Harmonic functions with varying coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dziok

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex-valued harmonic functions that are univalent and sense preserving in the open unit disk can be written in the form f = h + g ‾ $f=h+\\overline{g}$ , where h and g are analytic. In this paper we investigate some classes of univalent harmonic functions with varying coefficients related to Janowski functions. By using the extreme points theory we obtain necessary and sufficient convolution conditions, coefficients estimates, distortion theorems, and integral mean inequalities for these classes of functions. The radii of starlikeness and convexity for these classes are also determined.

  3. Linearized Bekenstein Varying Alpha Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pina-Avelino, P; Oliveira, J C

    2004-01-01

    We study the simplest class of Bekenstein-type, varying $\\alpha$ models, in which the two available free functions (potential and gauge kinetic function) are Taylor-expanded up to linear order. Any realistic model of this type reduces to a model in this class for a certain time interval around the present day. Nevertheless, we show that no such model is consistent with all existing observational results. We discuss possible implications of these findings, and in particular clarify the ambiguous statement (often found in the literature) that ``the Webb results are inconsistent with Oklo''.

  4. Linearized Bekenstein varying α models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, P. P.; Martins, C. J.; Oliveira, J. C.

    2004-10-01

    We study the simplest class of Bekenstein-type, varying α models, in which the two available free functions (potential and gauge kinetic function) are Taylor-expanded up to linear order. Any realistic model of this type reduces to a model in this class for a certain time interval around the present day. Nevertheless, we show that no such model is consistent with all existing observational results. We discuss possible implications of these findings, and, in particular, clarify the ambiguous statement (often found in the literature) that “the Webb results are inconsistent with Oklo.”

  5. Time-varying cosmological term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; D'oleire, M.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of time-varying cosmological term using the Lagrangian formalism characterized by a scalar field ϕ with standard kinetic energy and arbitrary potential V(ϕ). This model is applied to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW)cosmology. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by a special ansats to solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation and a particular potential for the scalar field and barotropic perfect fluid. We present the evolution on this cosmological term with different scenarios.

  6. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  7. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  8. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  9. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  10. Impact and determinants of nurse turnover: a pan-Canadian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Shamian, Judith; Li, Xiaoqiang; Hayes, Laureen J

    2010-11-01

    As part of a large study of nursing turnover in Canadian hospitals, the present study focuses on the impact and key determinants of nurse turnover and implications for management strategies in nursing units. Nursing turnover is an issue of ever-increasing priority as work-related stress and job dissatisfaction are influencing nurses' intention to leave their positions. Data sources included the nurse survey, unit managers, medical records and human resources databases. A broad sample of hospitals was represented with nine different types of nursing units included. Nurses turnover is a major problem in Canadian hospitals with a mean turnover rate of 19.9%. Higher levels of role ambiguity and role conflict were associated with higher turnover rates. Increased role conflict and higher turnover rates were associated with deteriorated mental health. Higher turnover rates were associated with lower job satisfaction. Higher turnover rate and higher level of role ambiguity were associated with an increased likelihood of medical error. Managing turnover within nursing units is critical to high-quality patient care. A supportive practice setting in which role responsibilities are understood by all members of the caregiver team would promote nurse retention. Stable nurse staffing and adequate managerial support are essential to promote job satisfaction and high-quality patient care. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eliana; Rös, Matthias; Bonilla, María Argenis; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  12. Nonrandom community assembly and high temporal turnover promote regional coexistence in tropics but not temperate zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Amy L; Inouye, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    A persistent challenge for ecologists is understanding the ecological mechanisms that maintain global patterns of biodiversity, particularly the latitudinal diversity gradient of peak species richness in the tropics. Spatial and temporal variation in community composition contribute to these patterns of biodiversity, but how this variation and its underlying processes change across latitude remains unresolved. Using a model system of sessile marine invertebrates across 25 degrees of latitude, from the temperate zone to the tropics, we tested the prediction that spatial and temporal patterns of taxonomic richness and composition, and the community assembly processes underlying these patterns, will differ across latitude. Specifically, we predicted that high beta diversity (spatial variation in composition) and high temporal turnover contribute to the high species richness of the tropics. Using a standardized experimental approach that controls for several confounding factors that hinder interpretation of prior studies, we present results that support our predictions. In the temperate zone, communities were more similar across spatial scales from centimeters to tens of kilometers and temporal scales up to one year than at lower latitudes. Since the patterns at northern latitudes were congruent with a null model, stochastic assembly processes are implicated. In contrast, the communities in the tropics were a dynamic spatial and temporal mosaic, with low similarity even across small spatial scales and high temporal turnover at both local and regional scales. Unlike the temperate zone, deterministic community assembly processes such as predation likely contributed to the high beta diversity in the tropics. Our results suggest that community assembly processes and temporal dynamics vary across latitude and help structure and maintain latitudinal patterns of diversity.

  13. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Martínez

    Full Text Available The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  14. Local Varying-Alpha Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper we demonstrated how the simplest model for varying alpha may be interpreted as the effect of a dielectric material, generalized to be consistent with Lorentz invariance. Unlike normal dielectrics, such a medium cannot change the speed of light, and its dynamics obey a Klein-Gordon equation. This work immediately suggests an extension of the standard theory, even if we require compliance with Lorentz invariance. Instead of a wave equation, the dynamics may satisfy a local algebraic relation involving the permittivity and the properties of the electromagnetic field, in analogy with more conventional dielectric (but still preserving Lorentz invariance). We develop the formalism for such theories and investigate some phenomenological implications. The problem of the divergence of the classical self-energy can be solved, or at least softened, in this framework. Some interesting new cosmological solutions for the very early universe are found, including the possibility of a bounce, inflation and e...

  15. Varying constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. It is thus of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We thus detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, Solar system observations, meteorites dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describ...

  16. Exploration of Periodically Varying Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Flocchini, Paola; Santoro, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    We study the computability and complexity of the exploration problem in a class of highly dynamic graphs: periodically varying (PV) graphs, where the edges exist only at some (unknown) times defined by the periodic movements of carriers. These graphs naturally model highly dynamic infrastructure-less networks such as public transports with fixed timetables, low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite systems, security guards' tours, etc. We establish necessary conditions for the problem to be solved. We also derive lower bounds on the amount of time required in general, as well as for the PV graphs defined by restricted classes of carriers movements: simple routes, and circular routes. We then prove that the limitations on computability and complexity we have established are indeed tight. In fact we prove that all necessary conditions are also sufficient and all lower bounds on costs are tight. We do so constructively presenting two worst case optimal solution algorithms, one for anonymous systems, and one for those w...

  17. Time-Varying Fundamental Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Keith

    2003-04-01

    Recent data from quasar absorption systems can be interpreted as arising from a time variation in the fine-structure constant. However, there are numerous cosmological, astro-physical, and terrestrial bounds on any such variation. These includes bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (from the ^4He abundance), the Oklo reactor (from the resonant neutron capture cross-section of Sm), and from meteoretic lifetimes of heavy radioactive isotopes. The bounds on the variation of the fine-structure constant are significantly strengthened in models where all gauge and Yukawa couplings vary in a dependent manner, as would be expected in unified theories. Models which are consistent with all data are severly challenged when Equivalence Principle constraints are imposed.

  18. Weighted approximation with varying weight

    CERN Document Server

    Totik, Vilmos

    1994-01-01

    A new construction is given for approximating a logarithmic potential by a discrete one. This yields a new approach to approximation with weighted polynomials of the form w"n"(" "= uppercase)P"n"(" "= uppercase). The new technique settles several open problems, and it leads to a simple proof for the strong asymptotics on some L p(uppercase) extremal problems on the real line with exponential weights, which, for the case p=2, are equivalent to power- type asymptotics for the leading coefficients of the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. The method is also modified toyield (in a sense) uniformly good approximation on the whole support. This allows one to deduce strong asymptotics in some L p(uppercase) extremal problems with varying weights. Applications are given, relating to fast decreasing polynomials, asymptotic behavior of orthogonal polynomials and multipoint Pade approximation. The approach is potential-theoretic, but the text is self-contained.

  19. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  20. Index Fund Selections with GAs and Classifications Based on Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, Yukiko; Motoyama, Takaaki; Yamazaki, Genji

    It is well known that index fund selections are important for the risk hedge of investment in a stock market. The`selection’means that for`stock index futures’, n companies of all ones in the market are selected. For index fund selections, Orito et al.(6) proposed a method consisting of the following two steps : Step 1 is to select N companies in the market with a heuristic rule based on the coefficient of determination between the return rate of each company in the market and the increasing rate of the stock price index. Step 2 is to construct a group of n companies by applying genetic algorithms to the set of N companies. We note that the rule of Step 1 is not unique. The accuracy of the results using their method depends on the length of time data (price data) in the experiments. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a more`effective rule’for Step 1. The rule is based on turnover. The method consisting of Step 1 based on turnover and Step 2 is examined with numerical experiments for the 1st Section of Tokyo Stock Exchange. The results show that with our method, it is possible to construct the more effective index fund than the results of Orito et al.(6). The accuracy of the results using our method depends little on the length of time data (turnover data). The method especially works well when the increasing rate of the stock price index over a period can be viewed as a linear time series data.

  1. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  2. Adipocyte Triglyceride Turnover Is Independently Associated With Atherogenic Dyslipidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayn, Keith; Bernard, Samuel; Spalding, Kirsty; Arner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Inappropriate storage of fatty acids as triglycerides in adipocytes and their removal from adipocytes through lipolysis and subsequent oxidation may cause the atherogenic dyslipidemia phenotype of elevated apolipoprotein B levels and subsequent hypertriglyceridemia. We tested whether turnover of triglycerides in fat cells was related to dyslipidemia. Methods and Results The age of triglycerides (reflecting removal) and triglyceride storage in adipocytes was determined under free living conditions by measuring incorporation of atmospheric 14C into these lipids within the adipocytes in 47 women and 26 men with a large interindividual variability in body mass index. Because limited 14C data were available, triglyceride age was also determined in 97 men and 233 women by using an algorithm based on adipocyte lipolysis, body fat content, waist‐to‐hip ratio, and insulin sensitivity. This cohort consisted of nonobese subjects since obesity per se is related to all components in the algorithm. Triglyceride turnover (age and storage) was compared with plasma levels of apolipoproteins and lipids. Plasma levels of apolipoprotein B and triglycerides were positively related to triglyceride age in adipocytes, when measured directly using radiocarbon analyses (r=0.45 to 0.47; PTriglyceride storage showed no independent correlation (partial r=0.02 to 0.11; P=0.42 to 0.91). Algorithm‐based values for adipocyte removal of triglycerides were positively associated with plasma triglycerides and apolipoprotein B (r=0.44 to 0.45; Ptriglycerides (as indicated by a high triglyceride age in fat cells) is independently associated with circulating apolipoprotein B and triglycerides. This suggests a hitherto unknown role of triglyceride turnover in adipocytes for the development and/or maintenance of atherogenic dyslipidemia. PMID:23316323

  3. Teacher Dispute Resolution Procedures in Virginia: Demographic Characteristics and Opinions of Neutral Chairpersons, School Division Superintendents, Attorneys, and Teacher Association Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Bunch, Ardene D. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the opinions of respondents regarding dispute resolution procedures utilized by public school teachers as described in sections 22.1- 312 of the Code of Virginia. In this study, demographic and opinion data were collected from individuals selected to serve as neutral chairpersons of fact-finding panels, school division superintendents or designees, local teacher association presidents, Virginia Education Association UniServ directors, and attorneys....

  4. Synthesis, modification and turnover of proteins during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2010-01-01

    Iterations in the rate and extent of protein synthesis, accuracy, post-translational modifications and turnover are among the main molecular characteristics of aging. A decline in the cellular capacity through proteasomal and lysosomal pathways to recognize and preferentially degrade damaged proteins leads to the accumulation of abnormal proteins during aging. The consequent increase in molecular heterogeneity and impaired functioning of proteins is the basis of several age-related pathologies, such as cataracts, sarcopenia and neurodegerative diseases. Understanding the proteomic spectrum and its functional implications during aging can facilitate developing effective means of intervention, prevention and therapy of aging and age-related diseases.

  5. Evolutionary Turnover of Kinetochore Proteins: A Ship of Theseus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinnenberg, Ines A; Henikoff, Steven; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-07-01

    The kinetochore is a multiprotein complex that mediates the attachment of a eukaryotic chromosome to the mitotic spindle. The protein composition of kinetochores is similar across species as divergent as yeast and human. However, recent findings have revealed an unexpected degree of compositional diversity in kinetochores. For example, kinetochore proteins that are essential in some species have been lost in others, whereas new kinetochore proteins have emerged in other lineages. Even in lineages with similar kinetochore composition, individual kinetochore proteins have functionally diverged to acquire either essential or redundant roles. Thus, despite functional conservation, the repertoire of kinetochore proteins has undergone recurrent evolutionary turnover.

  6. Species turnover and geographic distance in an urban river network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouquette, James R.; Dallimer, Martin; Armsworth, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    of the habitat or topographic features of the landscape and the means of dispersal of the organism. River networks, in particular in human-modified landscapes, are a striking example of such a situation. Here, we use data for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms across an urban river network to examine...... patterns of species turnover and to determine whether these patterns differ between different taxonomic groups. LocationSheffield area, UK. MethodsAquatic (macroinvertebrates, diatoms) and terrestrial (birds, plants, butterflies) organisms were surveyed at 41 sites across an urban river network. We...

  7. Grassland Degradation Alters Soil Carbon Turnover through Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, C.; Prober, S. M.; Chappell, A.; Farrell, M.; Baldock, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem degradation is widespread and changes in aboveground plant communities alter belowground soil processes. In Australia, grassy eucalyptus woodlands dominated by kangaroo grasses (Themeda trianda) were widely cleared during European settlement for agriculture, with only fragments remaining of this now threatened ecosystem. As remnant grassland fragments are used for livestock grazing, Themeda transitions through states of degradation, starting with red grasses (Bothriochloa spp) and then proceeding to less productive, increasingly degraded states dominated by either annual exotic weeds or native wallaby grasses (Rytidosperma spp) and spear grasses (Austrastipa spp). The aim of our experiment was to determine how soil organic matter dynamics (including erosion, root biomass, C storage and turnover) have been altered by the transition from deeply-rooted Themeda grass systems to more shallowly-rooted annual exotic weeds and wallaby/spear grass states. We sampled soils in five depth-based increments (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-100 cm) across this ecosystem transition at five sites across New South Wales, Australia. Caseium-137 analysis indicated erosion rates were similar among all ecosystems and were consistent with levels for grasslands in the region. Compared to the remnant Themeda grass systems, the degraded states had lower root biomass, lower carbon stocks and C:N ratios in the coarse fraction (> 50 μm), lower fungal : bacterial ratios, higher available phosphate, higher alkyl : O-alkyl C ratios, and faster mineralization of synthetic root-exudate carbon. All these metrics indicate the surprising finding of more microbially processed OM and faster turnover of newly added C in the degraded sites. Compared to one another, the two degraded sites differed in both C and N turnover, with the exotic weeds having higher dissolved organic N, inorganic N, and coarse fraction N, higher fine fraction C stocks, and greater microbial biomass. These differences likely

  8. Influence of orlistat on bone turnover and body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, A; Westergren Hendel, H; Andersen, T

    2001-01-01

    of bone mineral and body composition included total bone mineral content (TBMC), total bone mineral density (TBMD), lumbar spine BMC and BMD, forearm BMC and BMD, fat mass (FM), fat free-mass (FFM), percentage fat mass (FM%) as well as a DXA estimate of the body weight. Body composition (FM, FFM and FM...... biochemical variables except s-osteocalcin changed significantly after 1 y in the OLS group, disclosing a pattern of an incipient negative vitamin D balance, a secondary increase in PTH-secretion, and an increase in bone turnover with the emphasis on an increase in resorption parameters (fU-OHpr/creat, f...

  9. Transformational leadership moderates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention among community mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Miller, Elizabeth A; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention, and transformational leadership was negatively related to both emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Transformational leadership moderated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, indicating that having a transformational leader may buffer the effects of providers' emotional exhaustion on turnover intention. Investing in transformational leadership development for supervisors could reduce emotional exhaustion and turnover among public sector mental health providers.

  10. Turnover, staffing, skill mix, and resident outcomes in a national sample of US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, Alison M; Han, Kihye; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Johantgen, Meg; Gartrell, Kyungsook

    2013-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship of staff turnover to selected nursing home quality outcomes, in the context of staffing and skill mix. Staff turnover is a serious concern in nursing homes as it has been found to adversely affect care. When employee turnover is minimized, better care quality is more likely in nursing homes. Data from the National Nursing Home Survey, a nationally representative sample of US nursing homes, were linked to Nursing Home Compare quality outcomes and analyzed using logistic regression. Nursing homes with high certified nursing assistant turnover had significantly higher odds of pressure ulcers, pain, and urinary tract infections even after controlling for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership. Nurse turnover was associated with twice the odds of pressure ulcers, although this was attenuated when staffing was controlled. This study suggests turnover may be more important in explaining nursing home (NH) outcomes than staffing and skill mix and should therefore be given greater emphasis.

  11. Boundaryless Career Attitudes, Employability and Employee Turnover: Perspective from Malaysian Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Sei Chan; Ong Lin Dar

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop a research framework for examining the relationship between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions and whether employability mediates these relationships. From the literature reviews, the authors found a notable gap in the boundary less career literature and established employability as a mediating variable between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions. High employee turnover within the hospitality industry has beco...

  12. Income distribution, turnover speed and profit rate in Japan, Chile, Netherlands and United States

    OpenAIRE

    Maito, Esteban Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the valorization process in Chile, Japan, Netherlands and United States, estimating advanced constant and variable capital, turnover speed, capital composition and profit rate on total advanced capital. Furthermore, it analyzes the role of turnover speed in the valorization process. In core countries, turnover speed of capital tends to be higher due to a larger development of productive forces. Thus, in Netherlands, United States and Japan there is higher labor share, repr...

  13. Organizational turnover as endogenous precursor of industry dynamics and organizational dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Cattani, Gino; Pennings, Johannes M.; Wezel, Filippo Carlo

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of organizational turnover on firm survival within the Dutch accounting service industry during the period 1880-1986. We address three issues: (1) estimating the effect of organizational turnover on organizational dissolution; (2) showing the significance of propinquity in isolating that effect; (3) exposing population dynamics through different levels of analysis. The results of our analysis confirm that turnover is an important endogenous force shaping the evol...

  14. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification.

  15. From food to offspring down: tissue-specific discrimination and turn-over of stable isotopes in herbivorous waterbirds and other avian foraging guilds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Hahn

    Full Text Available Isotopic discrimination and turn-over are fundamental to the application of stable isotope ecology in animals. However, detailed information for specific tissues and species are widely lacking, notably for herbivorous species. We provide details on tissue-specific carbon and nitrogen discrimination and turn-over times from food to blood, feathers, claws, egg tissues and offspring down feathers in four species of herbivorous waterbirds. Source-to-tissue discrimination factors for carbon (δ¹³C and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ¹⁵N showed little variation across species but varied between tissues. Apparent discrimination factors ranged between -0.5 to 2.5‰ for δ¹³C and 2.8 to 5.2‰ for δ¹⁵N, and were more similar between blood components than between keratinous tissues or egg tissue. Comparing these results with published data from other species we found no effect of foraging guild on discrimination factors for carbon but a significant foraging-guild effect for nitrogen discrimination factors.Turn-over of δ¹³C in tissues was most rapid in blood plasma, with a half-life of 4.3 d, whereas δ¹³C in blood cells had a half-life of approximately 32 d. Turn-over times for albumen and yolk in laying females were similar to those of blood plasma, at 3.2 and 6.0 d respectively. Within yolk, we found decreasing half-life times of δ¹³C from inner yolk (13.3 d to outer yolk (3.1 d, related to the temporal pattern of tissue formation.We found similarities in tissue-specific turn-over times across all avian species studied to date. Yet, while generalities regarding discrimination factors and tissue turn-over times can be made, a large amount of variation remains unexplained.

  16. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Musashi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid crystal gel was also applied topically to human facial skin, and analysis was conducted using before-and-after photographs of age spots, measurements of L* values that reflect degree of skin pigmentation, single-layer samples of the stratum corneum obtained via tape-stripping, and measurements of trans-epidermal water loss that reflect the status of the skin’s barrier function. The results suggested that cost-effective creams containing as low as 5% liquid crystal gel might be effective and safely sold as skin care products targeting age spots and other problems relating to uneven skin pigmentation.

  17. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Malinsky, Jan; Stahlschmidt, Wiebke; Loibl, Martin; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Frommer, Wolf B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, Widmar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether the stable segregation of proteins and lipids within the yeast plasma membrane serves a particular biological function. We show that 21 proteins cluster within or associate with the ergosterol-rich membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC). However, proteins of the endocytic machinery are excluded from MCC. In a screen, we identified 28 genes affecting MCC appearance and found that genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and vesicle transport are significantly overrepresented. Deletion of Pil1, a component of eisosomes, or of Nce102, an integral membrane protein of MCC, results in the dissipation of all MCC markers. These deletion mutants also show accelerated endocytosis of MCC-resident permeases Can1 and Fur4. Our data suggest that release from MCC makes these proteins accessible to the endocytic machinery. Addition of arginine to wild-type cells leads to a similar redistribution and increased turnover of Can1. Thus, MCC represents a protective area within the plasma membrane to control turnover of transport proteins. PMID:19064668

  18. Keratins Stabilize Hemidesmosomes through Regulation of β4-Integrin Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Kristin; Cheng, Fang; Wiche, Gerhard; Eriksson, John E; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal integrity and wound healing depend on remodeling of cell-matrix contacts including hemidesmosomes. Mutations in β4-integrin and plectin lead to severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Whether mutations in keratins K5 or K14, which cause EB simplex, also compromise cell-matrix adhesion through altering hemidesmosomal components is not well investigated. In particular, the dependence of β4-integrin endocytosis and turnover on keratins remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the absence of keratins causes loss of plectin-β4-integrin interaction and elevated β4-integrin phosphorylation at Ser1354 and Ser1362. This triggered a caveolin-dependent endocytosis of β4-integrin but not of other integrins through Rab5 and Rab11 compartments in keratinocytes. Expressing a phospho-deficient β4-integrin mutant reduces β4-integrin endocytosis and rescues plectin localization in keratin-free cells. β4-integrin phosphorylation in the absence of keratins resulted from elevated Erk1/2 activity downstream of increased EGFR and PKCα signaling. Further, increased Erk1/2 phosphorylation and altered plectin localization occur in keratin-deficient mouse epidermis in vivo. Strikingly, expression of the K14-R125P EBS mutant also resulted in plectin mislocalization and elevated β4-integrin turnover, suggesting disease relevance. Our data underscore a major role of keratins in controlling β4-integrin endocytosis involving a plectin-Erk1/2-dependent mechanism relevant for epidermal differentiation and pathogenesis.

  19. Critical Role of Histone Turnover in Neuronal Transcription and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Ian; Wenderski, Wendy; Noh, Kyung-Min; Bagot, Rosemary C; Tzavaras, Nikos; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Elsässer, Simon J; Guo, Yin; Ionete, Carolina; Hurd, Yasmin L; Tamminga, Carol A; Halene, Tobias; Farrelly, Lorna; Soshnev, Alexey A; Wen, Duancheng; Rafii, Shahin; Birtwistle, Marc R; Akbarian, Schahram; Buchholz, Bruce A; Blitzer, Robert D; Nestler, Eric J; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shen, Li; Molina, Henrik; Allis, C David

    2015-07-01

    Turnover and exchange of nucleosomal histones and their variants, a process long believed to be static in post-replicative cells, remains largely unexplored in brain. Here, we describe a novel mechanistic role for HIRA (histone cell cycle regulator) and proteasomal degradation-associated histone dynamics in the regulation of activity-dependent transcription, synaptic connectivity, and behavior. We uncover a dramatic developmental profile of nucleosome occupancy across the lifespan of both rodents and humans, with the histone variant H3.3 accumulating to near-saturating levels throughout the neuronal genome by mid-adolescence. Despite such accumulation, H3.3-containing nucleosomes remain highly dynamic-in a modification-independent manner-to control neuronal- and glial-specific gene expression patterns throughout life. Manipulating H3.3 dynamics in both embryonic and adult neurons confirmed its essential role in neuronal plasticity and cognition. Our findings establish histone turnover as a critical and previously undocumented regulator of cell type-specific transcription and plasticity in mammalian brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  1. Nitrogen turnover in drying sediments of an Amazon floodplain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschorreck, Matthias

    2005-05-01

    In the Amazon floodplain large areas are subject to annual cycles of drying and rewetting. The turnover of nitrogen in the periodically drying sediments is an important regulator of floodplain fertility. In the present study the transition of a lake sediment from flooded to dry conditions was studied with respect to microbial nitrogen turnover. Soil nitrogen pools, as well as the activity and abundance of denitrifying and nitrifying bacteria, were investigated during one dry season. During the first weeks after drying, most of the inorganic nitrogen vanished from the sediment. The process was inhibited by a nitrification inhibitor, showing that coupled nitrification-denitrification was responsible for the nitrogen loss. Assimilation by plants or microbes, as well as leaching, were not important mechanisms of nitrogen loss. During a period of only 10 days, 59% of the total denitrification and 94% of the total N2O emission during the dry period occurred. Cell numbers of denitrifiers were not correlated with activities. Denitrification was not correlated with other sediment variables but was regulated by the patchy distribution of reduced and oxidized zones in the uppermost centimeters of the sediment. This heterogeneity was probably introduced by the bioturbation of small insects, which was restricted to a rather short time period shortly after drying.

  2. Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention: Implications for Nursing Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe main purpose of this study was to explore the status of occupational stress among hospital nurses in Isfahan, Iran. It also aimed to examine the relationship between nurses’ occupational stress and their intention to leave the hospital. MethodsThe study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from 296 nurses. Respondents were asked to rate the intensity of 30 common occupational stressors using a five-point scale. ResultsA third of hospital nurses rated their occupational stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of promotion, job insecurity and lack of management support. More than 35% of nurses stated that they are considering leaving the hospital, if they could find another job opportunity. Occupational stress was positively associated with nurses’ turnover intentions. ConclusionHospital managers should develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to reduce occupational stress and consequently nurses’ turnover intention.

  3. HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTICES AS DETERMINANTS OF EMPLOYEE TURNOVER: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aminu Bawa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume of literature on the causes of employee turnover continues to grow. In spite of this, attempts to distinguish between the causes of voluntary and involuntary turnover in organizations, though recognized for quite some time, receive little attention from researchers. The two phenomena seem to be influenced by a different set of factors. There are clear-cut theoretical and empirical reasons for this assertion. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between human resource (HR practices and employee turnover in Malaysia where companies are generally experiencing labour shortage and labour turnover. Using data collected from a census of managers, the study utilized Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and simple regression and tested hypotheses developed to investigate the relationship between HR practices and employee voluntary and involuntary turnover. The results show that (1 staffing process and employee monitoring were effective in reducing involuntary turnover, and (2 none of the HR practices were effective in reducing voluntary turnover. In other words, workers continue to leave or quit irrespective of the type of HR practices implemented. The paper concludes that economic factors such as availability of alternative jobs are most likely relevant in explaining the turnover process. Based on these findings, various strategies were suggested which have wider managerial and policy implications for the management of turnover in similar settings.

  4. Diet-tissue discrimination factors (Δ(13) C and Δ(15) N) and turnover rate in somatic tissues of a neotropical detritivorous fish on C3 and C4 diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, P A; Manetta, G I; Benedito, E

    2016-07-01

    In this study, diet-tissue discrimination factors and turnover rates were determined from the somatic tissues of a detritivorous fish Prochilodus lineatus. The carbon (Δ(13) C) and nitrogen (Δ(15) N) diet-tissue discrimination factors varied for all feed rations with a range of Δ(13) C values between -1·9 and 3·6‰ and Δ(15) N between 3·3 and 5·7‰. Carbon turnover rate in the blood was 23·1 days for the C3 ration and 34·7 days for the C4 ration, in the liver was 9·9 days under the C3 ration and nitrogen turnover rate was the same (23·1 days) in the liver for both C4 and C3 -C4 rations, and 13·9 days in the muscle for C3 -C4 ration.

  5. Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium: manipulating meat tenderness by increasing the turnover of intramuscular connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purslow, P P; Archile-Contreras, A C; Cha, M C

    2012-03-01

    Controlled reduction of the connective tissue contribution to cooked meat toughness is an objective that would have considerable financial impact in terms of added product value. The amount of intramuscular connective tissue in a muscle appears connected to its in vivo function, so reduction of the overall connective tissue content is not thought to be a viable target. However, manipulation of the state of maturity of the collagenous component is a biologically viable target; by increasing connective tissue turnover, less mature structures can be produced that are functional in vivo but more easily broken down on cooking at temperatures above 60°C, thus improving cooked meat tenderness. Recent work using cell culture models of fibroblasts derived from muscle and myoblasts has identified a range of factors that alter the activity of the principal enzymes responsible for connective tissue turnover, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Fibroblasts cultured from 3 different skeletal muscles from the same animal show different cell proliferation and MMP activity, which may relate to the different connective tissue content and architecture in functionally different muscles. Expression of MMP by fibroblasts is increased by vitamins that can counter the negative effects of oxidative stress on new collagen synthesis. Preliminary work using in situ zymography of myotubes in culture also indicates increased MMP activity in the presence of epinephrine and reactive oxidative species. Comparison of the relative changes in MMP expression from muscle cells vs. fibroblasts shows that myoblasts are more responsive to a range of stimuli. Muscle cells are likely to produce more of the total MMP in muscle tissue as a whole, and the expression of latent forms of the enzymes (i.e., pro-MMP) may vary between oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers within the same muscle. The implication is that the different muscle fiber composition of different muscles eaten as meat may influence the

  6. Turnover rate of blood glucose in diabetic KK mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, K; Sakaguchi, T; Ui, M

    1981-07-01

    Metabolic rate constants for blood glucose turnover were estimated based on the decay of [U-14C, 6-3H]glucose injected intravenously in genetically diabetic KK mice. Comparison was made with the rate constants similarly obtained with non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic ICR mice. Recycling of blood glucose via the Cori cycle, as estimated from the difference in the decay rate between 14C and 3H, was more active in KK mice than in non-diabetic and diabetic ICR mice. The Cori cycle activity was reduced by beta-adrenergic blockade in KK mice and was enhanced by alpha-blockade in ICR mice. It is concluded that predominance of beta-adrenergic functions in KK mice is responsible for activation of the Cori cycle as one of the mechanisms for metabolic resistance to endogenous insulin.

  7. Influence of orlistat on bone turnover and body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, A; Westergren Hendel, H; Andersen, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the pancreas lipase inhibitor orlistat (OLS) on calcium metabolism, bone turnover, bone mass, bone density and body composition when given for obesity as adjuvant to an energy- and fat-restricted diet. DESIGN: Randomized controlled double-blinded trial...... of treatment with OLS 120 mg three times daily or placebo for 1 y. SUBJECTS: Thirty obese subjects with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 36.9+/-3.7 kg/m(2) and a mean age of 41+/-11 y. Sixteen patients were assigned to OLS and 14 to placebo. MEASUREMENTS: Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements...... of bone mineral and body composition included total bone mineral content (TBMC), total bone mineral density (TBMD), lumbar spine BMC and BMD, forearm BMC and BMD, fat mass (FM), fat free-mass (FFM), percentage fat mass (FM%) as well as a DXA estimate of the body weight. Body composition (FM, FFM and FM...

  8. Ubiquitin-dependent trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa S Goo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in synaptic strength underlie the basis of learning and memory and are controlled, in part, by the insertion or removal of AMPA-type glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses. Once internalized, these receptors may be recycled back to the plasma membrane by subunit-specific interactions with other proteins or by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Alternatively, these receptors may be targeted for destruction by multiple degradation pathways in the cell. Ubiquitination, another post-translational modification, has recently emerged as a key signal that regulates the recycling and trafficking of glutamate receptors. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the role of ubiquitination in the trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors and plasticity of excitatory synapses.

  9. Bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Giuffrida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone complications occur frequently in Gaucher disease (GD and reduce the quality of life of these patients. Skeletal involvement is an important indication for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible and debilitating disease. Bone biomarkers have been used to assess disease status and the response to therapy in a number of bone disorders. Here, we examine the literature for evidence of abnormalities in bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 GD to assess whether they might be useful for the assessment of bone involvement in GD. We have found that bone biomarkers in GD show highly variable results which do not currently support their routine use for clinical assessment of bone status, as an indication for therapy initiation, or for monitoring the response to therapy. A greater understanding of bone markers and their relation to the bone manifestations of GD is required.

  10. Dynamics of axon fasciculation in the presence of neuronal turnover

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Mohanty, P K; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We formulate and characterize a model aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons mediated by contact axon-axon interactions. The growing axons are represented as interacting directed random walks in two spatial dimensions. To mimic axonal turnover in the mammalian olfactory system, the random walkers are injected and removed at specified rates. In the dynamical steady state, the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes obeys a scaling law. We identify several distinct time scales that emerge from the dynamics, are sensitive functions of the microscopic parameters of the model, and can exceed the average axonal lifetime by orders of magnitude. We discuss our findings in terms of an analytically tractable, effective model of fascicle dynamics.

  11. [New approved markers of bone turnover for osteoporosis in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takami; Masaki, Hideki

    2012-06-01

    Various markers of bone turnover are already under clinical use in Japan, and mostly for clinical investigation in some countries. Standard values including ranges and variations are summarized in the previous edition of the guideline. The information of additional new markers adapted by government is summarized including clinical features in the new edition 2012. Among the new markers, the methods for measurement for TRACP-5b and ucOC are developed in Japan. As P1NP and TRACP-5b levels are not affected by meals, biological variations are smaller compared with other markers. ucOC is unique because it is to evaluate vitamin K insufficiency for bone. New bone markers adapted in the Japanese guideline 2012 will facilitate clinicians to utilize of metabolic markers of bone for osteoporosis treatment.

  12. Examining the Job Search-Turnover Relationship: The Role of Embeddedness, Job Satisfaction, and Available Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Brian W.; Boswell, Wendy R.; Zimmerman, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined factors that may help explain under what conditions employee job search effort may most strongly (or weakly) predict subsequent turnover. As predicted, the job search-turnover relationship was stronger when employees had lower levels of job embeddedness and job satisfaction and higher levels of available alternatives. These…

  13. Why turnover matters in self-managing work teams : Learning, social integration, and task flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, G.S.; Bunderson, S.; Kuipers, B.

    This study considers how turnover in self-managing work teams influences the team interaction processes that promote effective task accomplishment. Drawing from research on self-managing work teams and group process, the authors propose that team turnover affects performance in self-managing teams

  14. The Effects of Autonomy and Empowerment on Employee Turnover: Test of a Multilevel Model in Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data…

  15. Happily ever after?: Explaining turnover and retirement intentions of older workers in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fleischmann (Maria); J.F. Ybema (Jan Fekke); F. Koster (Ferry)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractPurpose: This paper aims to provide an empirical test of theories proposed in the literature stating that turnover and retirement (two kinds of work withdrawal) involve different employee decisions. It also aims to provide a more general theoretical framework understanding turnover a

  16. Why turnover matters in self-managing work teams : Learning, social integration, and task flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, G.S.; Bunderson, S.; Kuipers, B.

    2010-01-01

    This study considers how turnover in self-managing work teams influences the team interaction processes that promote effective task accomplishment. Drawing from research on self-managing work teams and group process, the authors propose that team turnover affects performance in self-managing teams b

  17. Team turnover and task conflict: A longitudinal study on the moderating effects of collective experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuypers, A.P.A.; Günter, H.; van Emmerik, I.H.

    2015-01-01

    Team turnover can be harmful to a team in many ways. This study examined whether a team’s collective experience (team organizational tenure) attenuates the association between team turnover and task conflict changes. Differing from prior research, our study used a longitudinal design to assess the e

  18. Examining the Job Search-Turnover Relationship: The Role of Embeddedness, Job Satisfaction, and Available Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Brian W.; Boswell, Wendy R.; Zimmerman, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined factors that may help explain under what conditions employee job search effort may most strongly (or weakly) predict subsequent turnover. As predicted, the job search-turnover relationship was stronger when employees had lower levels of job embeddedness and job satisfaction and higher levels of available alternatives. These…

  19. A Study on the Employee Turnover Antecedents in ITES/BPO Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree Rekha, K. R.; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at testing a conceptual model connecting variables of the internal and external work environment to ITES/BPO employee turnover. Based on the gaps identified from the literature that no single model explains in a comprehensive way as to why, people choose to leave and the lack of turnover studies on call centers located in India.…

  20. Dynamic Effects of Teacher Turnover on the Quality of Instruction. Working Paper 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Rivkin, Steven G.; Schiman, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    It is widely believed that teacher turnover adversely affects the quality of instruction in urban schools serving predominantly disadvantaged children, and a growing body of research investigates various components of turnover effects. The evidence at first seems contradictory, as the quality of instruction appears to decline following turnover…

  1. An Exploratory Study of the Role of Human Resource Management in Models of Employee Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolina-Ozola, Iveta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the study results of the human resource management role in the voluntary employee turnover models. The mixed methods design was applied. On the basis of the results of the search and evaluation of publications, the 16 models of employee turnover were selected. Applying the method of content analysis, the…

  2. Full length RTN3 regulates turnover of tubular endoplasmic reticulum via selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grumati, Paolo; Morozzi, Giulio; Hölper, Soraya; Mari, Muriel; Harwardt, Marie-Lena I. E.; Yan, Riqiang; Müller, Stefan; Reggiori, Fulvio; Heilemann, Mike; Dikic, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ensures the correct biological activity of its distinct domains. In mammalian cells, the ER is degraded via a selective autophagy pathway (ER-phagy), mediated by two specific receptors: FAM134B, responsible for the turnover of ER sheets and SEC62 that

  3. Labour turnover and its effects on performance : an empirical test using firm data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, A.C.; Bax, E.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this article we test the hypothesis that the relationship between labour turnover and the economic performance of the firm is bell-shaped: a turnover level too low has a negative effect and likewise does a level too high. Our analysis is based on economic performance data of 110 offices of a temp

  4. Organizational turnover as endogenous precursor of industry dynamics and organizational dissolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattani, Gino; Pennings, Johannes M.; Wezel, Filippo Carlo

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of organizational turnover on firm survival within the Dutch accounting service industry during the period 1880-1986. We address three issues: (1) estimating the effect of organizational turnover on organizational dissolution; (2) showing the significance of propinquity

  5. Short-Term Effects of Midseason Coach Turnover on Team Performance in Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduck, Anne-Line; Buelens, Marc; Philippaerts, Renaat

    2010-01-01

    The present study addressed the issue of short-term performance effects of midseason coach turnover in soccer. The goal of this study was to examine this effect on subsequent short-term team performance. The purposes of this study were to (a) examine whether midseason coach turnover improved results in the short term, and (b) examine how team…

  6. Horizontal and vertical species turnover in tropical birds in habitats with differing land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekar, Rachakonda; Corlett, Richard T; Dayananda, Salindra; Goodale, Uromi Manage; Kilpatrick, Adam; Kotagama, Sarath W; Koh, Lian Pin; Goodale, Eben

    2017-05-01

    Large tracts of tropical rainforests are being converted into intensive agricultural lands. Such anthropogenic disturbances are known to reduce species turnover across horizontal distances. But it is not known if they can also reduce species turnover across vertical distances (elevation), which have steeper climatic differences. We measured turnover in birds across horizontal and vertical sampling transects in three land-use types of Sri Lanka: protected forest, reserve buffer and intensive-agriculture, from 90 to 2100 m a.s.l. Bird turnover rates across horizontal distances were similar across all habitats, and much less than vertical turnover rates. Vertical turnover rates were not similar across habitats. Forest had higher turnover rates than the other two habitats for all bird species. Buffer and intensive-agriculture had similar turnover rates, even though buffer habitats were situated at the forest edge. Therefore, our results demonstrate the crucial importance of conserving primary forest across the full elevational range available. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Short-Term Effects of Midseason Coach Turnover on Team Performance in Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduck, Anne-Line; Buelens, Marc; Philippaerts, Renaat

    2010-01-01

    The present study addressed the issue of short-term performance effects of midseason coach turnover in soccer. The goal of this study was to examine this effect on subsequent short-term team performance. The purposes of this study were to (a) examine whether midseason coach turnover improved results in the short term, and (b) examine how team…

  8. Nursing Home Staff Turnover: Impact on Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John; Men, Aiju

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We used data from a large sample of nursing homes to examine the association between staff turnover and quality. Design and Methods: The staff turnover measures came from primary data collected from 2,840 nursing homes in 2004 (representing a 71% response rate). Data collection included measures for nurse aides, licensed practical nurses,…

  9. Nurse turnover in New Zealand: costs and relationships with staffing practises and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Ashton, Toni; Rasmussen, Erling; Hughes, Frances; Finlayson, Mary

    2013-04-01

    To determine the rates and costs of nurse turnover, the relationships with staffing practises, and the impacts on outcomes for nurses and patients. In the context of nursing shortages, information on the rates and costs of nursing turnover can improve nursing staff management and quality of care. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected prospectively for 12 months. A re-analysis of these data used descriptive statistics and correlational analysis techniques. The cost per registered nurse turnover represents half an average salary. The highest costs were related to temporary cover, followed by productivity loss. Both are associated with adverse patient events. Flexible management of nursing resources (staffing below budgeted levels and reliance on temporary cover), and a reliance on new graduates and international recruitment to replace nurses who left, contributed to turnover and costs. Nurse turnover is embedded in staffing levels and practises, with costs attributable to both. A culture of turnover was found that is inconsistent with nursing as a knowledge workforce. Nurse managers did not challenge flexible staffing practices and high turnover rates. Information on turnover and costs is needed to develop strategies that retain nurses as knowledge-based workers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Academic Staff Turnover Intention in Madda Walabu University, Bale Zone, South-East Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimer, Ibrahim; Nega, Rahel; Ganfure, Gemechu

    2017-01-01

    Turnover is a voluntary cessation of membership of an organization by an employee. Employee retention is one of the challenges facing several organizations in both the developed and developing countries of the world. It is profitable to proactively react for possible staff turnover intentions. This research was carried out to determine the…

  11. Organizational turnover as endogenous precursor of industry dynamics and organizational dissolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattani, Gino; Pennings, Johannes M.; Wezel, Filippo Carlo

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of organizational turnover on firm survival within the Dutch accounting service industry during the period 1880-1986. We address three issues: (1) estimating the effect of organizational turnover on organizational dissolution; (2) showing the significance of propinquity

  12. Cereal aphid colony turnover and persistence in winter wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linton Winder

    Full Text Available An understanding of spatial and temporal processes in agricultural ecosystems provides a basis for rational decision-making with regards to the management and husbandry of crops, supporting the implementation of integrated farming strategies. In this study we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of aphid pests (Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum within winter wheat fields. Using an intensive sampling programme we investigated distributions at both the small (single shoot and large (field scales. Within two fields, a grid with 82 locations was established (area 120 m by 168 m. At each location, 25 shoots were individually marked and aphid counts by observation conducted on 21 and 22 occasions as the crop matured, resulting in 43,050 and 45,100 counts being conducted in the two fields respectively. We quantified field scale spatial distributions, demonstrating that spatial pattern generally emerged, with temporal stability being both species- and field- dependent. We then measured turnover of colonies at the small (individual shoot and large (field scales by comparing consecutive pairs of sampling occasions. Four turnover categories were defined: Empty (no aphids recorded on either occasion; Colonised (aphids recorded on the second occasion but not the first; Extinction (aphids recorded on the first occasion but not the second; Stable (aphids recorded on both occasions. At the field scale, population stability soon established, but, at the small scale there was a consistently high proportion of unoccupied shoots with considerable colonisation and extinction and low stability. The redistribution of aphids within the crop at the local scale is a vulnerability which could be used to disrupt population development--by mediating exposure to ground-active natural enemies and by incurring a metabolic cost caused by the physiological demands to re-establish on a nearby host plant.

  13. Microaneurysm turnover in the macula is a biomarker for development of clinically significant macular edema in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Luisa Ribeiro, Sandrina Nunes, José Cunha-VazAssociation for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image and Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, PortugalAbstract: The evolution and progression of diabetic retinopathy varies between individuals and does not necessarily progress to vision loss in every patient. However, it is difficult in clinical practice to predict the clinical course and to identify which eyes will develop vision-threatening complications, ie, clinically significant macular edema or proliferative retinopathy. There is a clear need to identify biomarkers of disease progression. Microaneurysm turnover computed automatically in digital color fundus photography images using the RetmarkerDR is a good biomarker for worsening of retinopathy and development of clinically significant macular edema. For long-term prediction (ten years, a microaneurysm formation rate higher than two per year predicts development of clinically significant macular edema. For short-term prediction (2 years, a microaneurysm turnover rate lower than nine indicates that development of clinically significant macular edema is highly unlikely.Keywords: biomarker, diabetes type 2, diabetic retinopathy, microaneurysms, retina

  14. Are nursing home survey deficiencies higher in facilities with greater staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Nancy B; Johantgen, Meg; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Han, Kihye

    2014-02-01

    To examine CNA and licensed nurse (RN+LPN/LVN) turnover in relation to numbers of deficiencies in nursing homes. A secondary data analysis of information from the National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) and contemporaneous data from the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Data were linked by facility as the unit of analysis to determine the relationship of CNA and licensed nurse turnover on nursing home deficiencies. The 2004 NNHS used a multistage sampling strategy to generate a final sample of 1174 nursing homes, which represent 16,100 NHs in the United States. This study focused on the 1151 NNHS facilities with complete deficiency data. Turnover was defined as the total CNAs/licensed nurse full-time equivalents (FTEs) who left during the preceding 3 months (full- and part-time) divided by the total FTE. NHs with high turnover were defined as those with rates above the 75th percentile (25.3% for CNA turnover and 17.9% for licensed nurse turnover) versus all other facilities. This study used selected OSCAR deficiencies from the Quality of Care, Quality of Life, and Resident Behavior categories, which are considered to be more closely related to nursing care. We defined NHs with high deficiencies as those with numbers of deficiencies above the 75th percentile versus all others. Using SUDAAN PROC RLOGIST, we included NNHS sampling design effects and examined associations of CNA/licensed nurse turnover with NH deficiencies, adjusting for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership in binomial logistic regression models. High CNA turnover was associated with high numbers of Quality of Care (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.10-2.13), Resident Behavior (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.12). Licensed nurse turnover was significantly related to Quality of Care deficiencies (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.50-2.82) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.25-2.33). When both CNA turnover and licensed nurse turnover were

  15. The relationship between family-to-work conflict of employee and co-workers' turnover intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakol Sharafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work conflict (FWC experienced by the employee also affects the turnover intention of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWC has an effect on the co-worker's turnover intention through the crossover of positive and negative work attitudes. Using a sample of 154 co-worker dyads, we found that the employee FWC was positively related to co-worker turnover intention through the crossover of (reduced work engagement. Results show that family matters at work, affecting employee. In addition, employee's job engagement was positively related to his (her co-worker job engagement and it was negatively related co-worker turnover intention and employee's FWC was not positively related to co-worker turnover intention trough the crossover of (reduced feelings of engagement.

  16. Roles of perceived exchange quality and organisational identification in predicting turnover intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores whether the perceived quality of the leader–member exchange and the general environment of exchange could predict turnover intention. It further examines the role of organisational identification as an explanatory variable mediating between exchange relationships and turnover intention. The authors used three-step hierarchical linear regressions on a data set collected in two time waves. The results supported the mediating role of organisational identification for the leader–member exchange and turnover intention relationship as well as the general environment of exchange and turnover intention relationship. Moreover, as was expected, the general exchange quality had a greater impact on organisational identification compared to the leader–member exchange quality. However, the findings did not confirm the expected trend in the case of two exchange variables predicting turnover intention.

  17. Perceived Work Conditions and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Meaning of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux-Nicolas, Caroline; Sovet, Laurent; Lhotellier, Lin; Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Perceived working conditions lead to various negative outcomes for employee behaviors, including turnover intentions. Although potential mediators for these relationships were previously identified, the importance of meaning of work has not yet been investigated. This study examines the role of this psychological resource as a mediator for the relationships between perceived working conditions and turnover intentions in a sample of 336 French workers from different job contexts. Results show that adverse working conditions were positively and significantly associated with turnover intentions. Meaning of work is negatively related to both perceived working conditions and turnover intentions. Mediation analyses for meaning of work demonstrated indirect effects of several adverse working conditions on turnover intentions. The role of meaning of work as a psychological resource for employees facing adverse working conditions is discussed, especially regarding its implications for research and practice within organizational contexts.

  18. Research on Turnover Intention and Countermeasure of Key Employees in Xuzhou Coal Mining Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Lehong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have a research of the turnover intention and countermeasure of key employees in xuzhou coal mining groups. Linear Structural Equation model (LISREL is used for the variable path analysis and a job satisfaction research has been done to reveale which variable is affect the key employee turnover entention significantly. Statistics show that the factors conversion cost, job satisfaction, compensation, opportunity, dull work, the colleague support degree, friends support degree have a significant influence on turnover intention of key employees. The staffs are dissatisfied with salary, welfare, promotion, communication in enterprise. The employee, who work in administer department, with high education background and no more than 5 year’s work experience and lower in administer level, no more than 2000 yuan income, have a stronger turnover intention. According to the results of the survey, the enterprise make a relevant management measures and achieved good effectiveness on prevent the key employees from turnovering.

  19. Antecedents and consequence of employee turnover intention: Empirical evidence from Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Gyensare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Guided by the theory of reasoned action, this study found support for the hypothesized inverse relationship between work-related factors and employee turnover intention on the one hand, and turnover intention and perceptions of accountable absence legitimacy on the other hand. Specifically, the higher employees’ turnover intent, the lower their perceptions about the accountability of their absence behavior and vice versa. The findings highlight the need to consider turnover intention as a salient construct that plays a dual role, first as a consequence variable to job satisfaction, affective and normative commitments, and next as an antecedent to accountable absence legitimacy in the workplace. The article concludes with a discussion on the significance of lessening employee turnover intent as a means of mitigating the perceptions of absence legitimacy in the workplace.

  20. Spatial and environmental correlates of species richness and turnover patterns in European cryptocephaline and chrysomeline beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freijeiro, Andrea; Baselga, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Despite some general concordant patterns (i.e. the latitudinal richness gradient), species richness and composition of different European beetle taxa varies in different ways according to their dispersal and ecological traits. Here, the patterns of variation in species richness, composition and spatial turnover are analysed in European cryptocephaline and chrysomeline leaf beetles, assessing their environmental and spatial correlates. The underlying rationale to use environmental and spatial variables of diversity patterns is to assess the relative support for niche- and dispersal-driven hypotheses. Our results show that despite a broad congruence in the factors correlated with cryptocephaline and chrysomeline richness, environmental variables (particularly temperature) were more relevant in cryptocephalines, whereas spatial variables were more relevant in chrysomelines (that showed a significant longitudinal gradient besides the latitudinal one), in line with the higher proportion of flightless species within chrysomelines. The variation in species composition was also related to environmental and spatial factors, but this pattern was better predicted by spatial variables in both groups, suggesting that species composition is more linked to dispersal and historical contingencies than species richness, which would be more controlled by environmental limitations. Among historical factors, Pleistocene glaciations appear as the most plausible explanation for the steeper decay in assemblage similarity with spatial distance, both in cryptocephalines and chrysomelines.

  1. Adjusting for calendar effects of real retail trade turnover time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Arnerić

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in economic activity are often influenced by calendar-based various factors. Such factors are non-working (non-trading days, leap years, public holidays and the like. Most economic series are observed on a monthly or quarterly basis, but months (aggregated into quarters are not comparable due to the different number of working and non-working days (different number of Mondays, Tuesdays, etc.. If the calendar effects are not properly adjusted, the identification of the ARIMA model for a given time series might not be correct, and the quality of seasonal adjustment is poor. An inappropriate calendar adjustment can generate false signals and negatively affect interpretation of adjusted data, which is particularly important for time series of retail sales and industrial productions. However, there is no general or unique procedure for correcting calendar effects in a pre-adjustment process of a time series. Therefore, this paper compares various regression models using alternative explanatory variables that take into account calendar effects and applied them to the time series of real retail trade turnover (RRT in Croatia (monthly data observed from January 2001 to December 2013. The paper seeks to define a new explanatory variable (a regressor with time varying ratio between the average number of working days and the average number of non-working days providing the most accurate correction of a RRT time series influenced by calendar effects. In addition, the assumption is that Saturdays and Sundays are working days of the week.

  2. Reach specificity in sediment E. coli population turnover and interaction with waterborne populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, Gregory; Jamieson, Rob; Bezanson, Greg; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth; Yost, Chris

    2014-10-15

    Sediment-borne Escherichia coli can elevate waterborne concentrations through sediment resuspension or hyporheic exchange. This study sought to correlate hydrological, sediment transport, and water quality variables with: (i) the temporal stability of sediment E. coli populations [concentrations, strain richness and similarity (Raup-Crick index)]; and (ii) the contribution of sediment E. coli to the water column as defined through a library-dependent microbial source tracking approach that matched waterborne E. coli isolates to sediment E. coli populations. Three monitoring locations differing in their hydrological characteristics and adjacent upland fecal sources (dairy operation, low-density residential, and tile-drained cultivated field) were investigated. Sediment E. coli population turnover was influenced by sediment transport at upstream, high-energy reaches, but not at the downstream low-energy reach. Sediment contributions to the water column averaged 13% and 18%, and fecal sources averaged 17% and 21% at the upstream sites adjacent to dairy operations and low-density residential areas, respectively. Waterborne E. coli at the downstream site had low matches to E. coli from reach sediments (1%), higher matches to the upstream sediments (27% and 12%), and an average of 14% matches to the tile drained field. The percentage of waterborne E. coli matching sediment-borne E. coli at each stream reach varied in correlations to hydrological and sediment transport variables, suggesting reach-specific differences in the role of sediment resuspension and hyporheic exchange on E. coli transport.

  3. Hybrid mathematical model of cardiomyocyte turnover in the adult human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A Elser

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%. OBJECTIVE: Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4-6% increasing to 15-22% with age that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. CONCLUSIONS: Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of

  4. Soil and vegetation carbon turnover times across forest biomes in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingsong; Niu, Shuli

    2017-04-01

    1. Resent studies reveal that terrestrial biosphere is now a net carbon (C) sink for atmospheric C dixoide (CO2), however, whether this C sink can persist with climate change is still uncertain. Such uncertainty comes not only from C input, but also largely from C turnover times in an ecosystem. Knowledge of C turnover times is critical for modelling C cycle and evaluating C sink potential. Our current understanding of how long C can be stored in soils and vegetation and what are their controlling factors are still poorly understood. 2. We used C stocks from 1087 plots in soils and 2753 plots in vegetation and investigated the spatial patterns and controlling factors of C turnover times across the forest transect in the eastern China. 3. Our results showed a clear latitudinal pattern of C turnover times, with the lowest turnover times in the low-latitude zones and highest values in the high-latitude. Mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) were the most important controlling factors on the soil C turnover times while forest age accounted for the most majority of variations in the vegetation C turnover times. Our findings also indicated that forest origin (planted forest, natural forest) was also responsible for the variations of vegetation C turnover times while forest type and soil properties were not the dominant controlling factors. 4. Our study highlights different dominant controlling factors on the soils and vegetation C turnover times and different mechanisms underlying above- and below-ground C turnover. The findings can help to better understand and reduce the large uncertainty in predictive models of the coupled carbon-climate system.

  5. Nursing staff turnover at a Swedish university hospital: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, Stina F; Kajermo, Kerstin N; Ekvall, Göran; Tomson, Göran

    2009-11-01

    The aim was to explore opinions on individual needs and other factors that may influence nursing staff turnover. High staff turnover is a great problem for many hospitals. It is shown to have a negative effect on the quality of nursing care and to increase hospital costs. In 2004 in a large university hospital in Sweden five focus group discussions (FGDs) including department heads (1), nursing managers (2) and members of nursing staff (2) were carried out. The questions to be addressed were 'Why do nurses leave?' and 'Why do nurses stay?' In addition, register data of staff turnover for 2002-2003 were analysed in relation to different facts about the units, such as number of employees, type of care and medical specialty. Categories of opinions identified in the FGDs were compared with results of the statistical analyses on the relationship between staff turnover and unit parameters to identify overall factors that may influence on nurse staff turnover. Four major factors were identified as having a possible influence on staff turnover: 'intrinsic values of motivation', 'work load', 'unit size 'and 'leadership'. Smaller units had lower staff turnover as well as outpatient units and day care. It was not possible to compare statements from participants from smaller units with those from participants from larger units. Two factors had diverging data, 'salary' and 'spirit of the time'. A surprising finding was the little mention of patient care in relation to staff turnover. It is important for managers to ensure that intrinsic values of nurses are met to minimise the risk for high turnover rates. Inpatient care must receive adequate staffing and nursing care could be organised into smaller units or work teams to avoid dissatisfaction and high turnover.

  6. Temporal Assemblage Turnovers of Foraminiferal Communities from the Caribbean, United Kingdom and Mediterranean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, Ashleigh; Wilson, Brent

    2016-04-01

    Temporal assemblage turnovers of intertidal foraminiferal communities were quantitatively determined using the assemblage turnover index (ATI), and contributing species were identified using the conditioned on-boundary index (CoBI). The live foraminiferal communities were examined as metacommunities (all stations) and assemblages (groups of stations defined by cluster analysis) over one and two year periods at Caroni Swamp, Claxton Bay (E Trinidad), Cowpen Marsh (NE England) and Bay of Cádiz (SW Spain). Major assemblage turnovers (when ATI > x + σ) of the Caroni Swamp metacommunity and assemblages coincided with seasonal changes from dry to wet conditions in 2011 and 2012. The abundant species (Ammonia tepida, Ammotium salsum, Arenoparella mexicana, Trochammina advena, Trochammina laevigata and Trochammina inflata) contributed the most to assemblage turnovers but showed no preference to either dry or wet conditions. At Claxton Bay major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity and mid assemblage coincided with seasonal change and calcareous species (A. tepida and Triloculina oblonga) increased during wet conditions and decreased during dry conditions, while agglutinated species (T. advena and A. salsum) fluctuated oppositely. At Cowpen Marsh major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity coincided with the start of summer and winter. Assemblages at higher elevations (mainly Jadammina macrescens and Haplophragmoides spp.) were responsible for the summer turnover, while the winter turnover was led by the assemblage at lower elevations (mainly Haynesina germanica, Elphidium earlandi, Elphidium williamsoni, Elphidium excavatum and Quinqueloculina spp.). At Bay of Cádiz, the foraminiferal assemblage at a tidal height of 1.5 to 1.7 m above the hydrographic zero was examined within three separate plots, and the seasonal occurrence of assemblage turnovers differed between plots. Thus, replicate samples and multiple plots may be necessary to overcome spatial

  7. Dynamics and turnover of lignins in soils: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, M.; Rumpel, C.; Dignac, M.-F.

    2009-04-01

    Lignins are amongst the most studied bio-macromolecules in natural environments, for their properties as biomarkers and their suggested influence on soil organic carbon dynamics. A large number of methods exists to characterize lignins, but the alkaline CuO oxidation is the most used for determining lignin fate in soils. The CuO oxidation products of lignins yield quantitative information (sum of V, S and C monomers) as well as qualitative information on the degradation of lignins (S/V, C/V, (Ad/Al)V,S…). The CuO-lignin products provide information on lignins but also on the environment and particularly on the present and past vegetation. Data from several studies were compiled in order to evaluate the relations between lignins in soils and various environmental parameters. The results of the multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) performed suggest that the lignin content in soils is directly related to the C and N contents, confirming its contribution to the pool of organic carbon. The lignin distribution appears also related to the climate and to the soil texture, which suggests the impact of these parameters on the lignin degradation and retention in soils, as observed for organic carbon (Burke et al., 1989). The total lignin content generally decreases with the soil depth and with the decreasing size of the granulometric fractions. Hence, the more lignins are degraded, the more they are associated with the finest fractions. In addition, it appears that lignin contents are linked to land-use. Thus, in accordance with the land cover, management type and amount of annual input, the forest soils are described by high contents of VSC, C and N, in contrast with the arable land. Lignins were often considered to greatly participate to the stock of slowly degradable and stable carbon in soils. However, several studies suggest that lignin turnover can be more rapid than that of the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), suggesting that they are not stabilized in soil. On the

  8. Listening to the Voices of Children in Foster Care: Youths Speak out about Child Welfare Workforce Turnover and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Kollar, Sharon; Trinkle, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Child welfare workforce turnover rates across private and public child welfare agencies are concerning. Although research about the causes of child welfare workforce turnover has been plentiful, empirical studies on the effects of turnover on child outcomes are sparse. Furthermore, the voices and experiences of youths within the system have been…

  9. Microbial communities mediating algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica M.; Murphy, Chelsea L.; Baker, Kristina; Zamor, Richard M.; Nikolai, Steve J.; Wilder, Shawn; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Algae encompass a wide array of photosynthetic organisms that are ubiquitously distributed in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Algal species often bloom in aquatic ecosystems, providing a significant autochthonous carbon input to the deeper anoxic layers in stratified water bodies. In addition, various algal species have been touted as promising candidates for anaerobic biogas production from biomass. Surprisingly, in spite of its ecological and economic relevance, the microbial community involved in algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions remains largely unexplored. Results Here, we characterized the microbial communities mediating the degradation of Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta), Chara sp. strain IWP1 (Charophyceae), and kelp Ascophyllum nodosum (phylum Phaeophyceae), using sediments from an anaerobic spring (Zodlteone spring, OK; ZDT), sludge from a secondary digester in a local wastewater treatment plant (Stillwater, OK; WWT), and deeper anoxic layers from a seasonally stratified lake (Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees, OK; GL) as inoculum sources. Within all enrichments, the majority of algal biomass was metabolized within 13–16 weeks, and the process was accompanied by an increase in cell numbers and a decrease in community diversity. Community surveys based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene identified different lineages belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (alpha, delta, gamma, and epsilon classes), Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes that were selectively abundant under various substrate and inoculum conditions. Within all kelp enrichments, the microbial communities structures at the conclusion of the experiment were highly similar regardless of the enrichment source, and were dominated by the genus Clostridium, or family Veillonellaceae within the Firmicutes. In all other enrichments the final microbial community was dependent on the inoculum source, rather than the type of algae utilized as substrate. Lineages enriched

  10. Microbial communities mediating algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Morrison

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Algae encompass a wide array of photosynthetic organisms that are ubiquitously distributed in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Algal species often bloom in aquatic ecosystems, providing a significant autochthonous carbon input to the deeper anoxic layers in stratified water bodies. In addition, various algal species have been touted as promising candidates for anaerobic biogas production from biomass. Surprisingly, in spite of its ecological and economic relevance, the microbial community involved in algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions remains largely unexplored. Results Here, we characterized the microbial communities mediating the degradation of Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta, Chara sp. strain IWP1 (Charophyceae, and kelp Ascophyllum nodosum (phylum Phaeophyceae, using sediments from an anaerobic spring (Zodlteone spring, OK; ZDT, sludge from a secondary digester in a local wastewater treatment plant (Stillwater, OK; WWT, and deeper anoxic layers from a seasonally stratified lake (Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees, OK; GL as inoculum sources. Within all enrichments, the majority of algal biomass was metabolized within 13–16 weeks, and the process was accompanied by an increase in cell numbers and a decrease in community diversity. Community surveys based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene identified different lineages belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (alpha, delta, gamma, and epsilon classes, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes that were selectively abundant under various substrate and inoculum conditions. Within all kelp enrichments, the microbial communities structures at the conclusion of the experiment were highly similar regardless of the enrichment source, and were dominated by the genus Clostridium, or family Veillonellaceae within the Firmicutes. In all other enrichments the final microbial community was dependent on the inoculum source, rather than the type of algae utilized as substrate

  11. The mediating effect of emotional intelligence between emotional labour, job stress, burnout and nurses' turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunyoung; Lee, Young Sook

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to construct and test the structural equation modelling on nurses' turnover intention including emotional labour, job stress, emotional intelligence and burnout in order to identify the mediating effect of emotional intelligence between those variables. Emotional labour, job stress and burnout increase turnover intention of nurses. However, emotional intelligence is negatively correlated with emotional labour and reduces job stress, burnout and turnover intention. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the goodness of fit of the hypothetical model of nurses' turnover intention. Research data were collected via questionnaires from 4 to 22 August 2014 and analysed using SPSS version 18.0 and AMOS version 20.0. The model fit indices for the hypothetical model were suitable for recommended. Emotional intelligence has decreasing effect on turnover intention through burnout, although its direct effect on turnover intention is not significant. Emotional intelligence has mediation effect between emotional labour and burnout. This study's results suggest that increasing emotional intelligence might critically decrease nurses' turnover intention by reducing the effect of emotional labour on burnout.

  12. Soil respiration and rates of soil carbon turnover differ among six common European tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lars; Elberling, Bo; Christiansen, Jesper Riis

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of tree species effects on soil organic carbon (C) turnover based on rigorous experimental designs is limited for common European deciduous tree species. We assessed soil respiration, and rates of C turnover in six tree species in a more than 30-year-old common garden experiment rep...... turnover indices that integrated the forest floor. The results suggests that specific traits of Norway spruce and these five common broadleaf forest species should be taken into account in the modelling of soil C stock dynamics over decades.......The knowledge of tree species effects on soil organic carbon (C) turnover based on rigorous experimental designs is limited for common European deciduous tree species. We assessed soil respiration, and rates of C turnover in six tree species in a more than 30-year-old common garden experiment...... of C turnover were estimated by (i) the ratio of estimated soil heterotrophic respiration (R h) to C stock in forest floor and top mineral soil, (ii) the ratio of litterfall C to forest floor C, (iii) foliar mass loss in litterbags, and (iv) mineral soil C turnover assessed by laboratory incubation...

  13. Analysis of risk factors of rapid thyroidal radioiodine-131 turnover in Graves' disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiguo; Tan, Jian; Wang, Renfei; Zhang, Guizhi; Jia, Qiang; Meng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Yueqian

    2017-08-15

    Rapid iodine-131((131)I) turnover in the thyroid gland is an important feature of Graves' disease (GD) and also a strong predictor of radioiodine therapy failure. The aim of this study was to explore the predictors of rapid (131)I turnover. The clinical data on 2543 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on present or absent with rapid (131)I turnover defined as a 4-hour to 24-hour (131)I uptake ratio of ≥1. Overall, 590 cases (23.2%) had a rapid (131)I turnover. In the univariate analysis, gender, age, FT3/FT4 concentration, disease duration, with or without antithyroid drugs (ATD), time of ATD, thyroid weight and thyroid textures displayed significant differences. Cutoff values of age, FT3 and thyroid weight to predict rapid (131)I turnover were 38 years, 35 pmol/l and 56 g by receiver operating characteristic curves. Binary logistic regression analysis further revealed higher probability of rapid (131)I turnover in patients with thyroid weight ≥56 g (odds ratio [OR]:3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.032-4.559), age rapid (131)I turnover in GD patients.

  14. On the controlling mechanism of the upper turnover states in the NTC regime

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi

    2015-12-18

    Using n-butane, n-heptane and iso-octane as representative fuels exhibiting NTC (negative temperature coefficient) behavior, comprehensive computational studies with detailed mechanisms and theoretical analysis were performed to investigate the upper stationary point, denoted as turnover states, on the NTC curve near the higher temperature regime, where the ignition delay τ exhibits a local maximum. It is found that the global behavior of the turnover states exhibits distinctive thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics under different pressures, in that the ignition delay at the turnover states shows an Arrhenius dependence on the temperature T and an approximate inverse quadratic power law dependence on the pressure P. These global behaviors imply that the temperature and pressure of the turnover states are not independent and can be correlated by Arrhenius dependence, as ln P ∝ 1/T. Further theoretical analyses demonstrate that such turnover states result from the competition between the low-temperature chain branching reactions and the decomposition of the intermediate species, and therefore correspond to a critical value, α, of the ratio of OH production from low-temperature chemistry. In addition, the ignition delay at the turnover state can be well correlated by the analytical expression derived by Peters et al., with the further demonstration that the pressure dependence of the turnover ignition delay mainly result from the H2O2 decomposition reaction. Comparison of the present results with the literature experimental data of n-heptane ignition delay time shows very good agreement.

  15. Does Enhancing Work-Time Control and Flexibility Reduce Turnover? A Naturally Occurring Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L; Hill, Rachelle

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the turnover effects of an organizational innovation (ROWE-Results Only Work Environment) aimed at moving away from standard time practices to focus on results rather than time spent at work. To model rates of turnover, we draw on survey data from a sample of employees at a corporate headquarters (N = 775) and institutional records of turnover over eight months following the ROWE implementation. We find the odds of turnover are indeed lower for employees participating in the ROWE initiative, which offers employees greater work-time control and flexibility, and that this is the case regardless of employees' gender, age, or family life stage. ROWE also moderates the turnover effects of organizational tenure and negative home-to-work spillover, physical symptoms, and job insecurity, with those in ROWE who report these situations generally less likely to leave the organization. Additionally, ROWE reduces turnover intentions among those remaining with the corporation. This research moves the "opting-out" argument from one of private troubles to an issue of greater employee work-time control and flexibility by showing that an organizational policy initiative can reduce turnover.

  16. Protein turnover and 3-methylhistidine excretion in non-pregnant, pregnant and gestational diabetic women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, W.L.; King, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Protein turnover was studied in nine non-pregnant (NP) women, eight pregnant (P) and two gestational diabetic (GDM) women. Whole body protein turnover, synthesis and catabolism rates were measured using a single oral dose of /sup 15/N-glycine followed by measurement of enrichment of urinary ammonia. Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion was measured for three consecutive days, including the day of the protein turnover study. Whole body protein turnover and synthesis rates did not differ between the P and NP women, although the synthesis rates tended to be higher in the P group. Gestational diabetic women appeared to have considerably higher rates of both turnover and synthesis. Pregnant women excreted significantly more urinary 3MH than did non-pregnant women. GDM women appeared to have lower 3MH excretion than the P women. Correlation between 3MH excretion and protein turnover rates was nearly significant (p = .06) in the NP women, but was poorly correlated (p = .43) in the P women, suggesting that muscles may be a less important site of whole body protein turnover in pregnancy than in the non-pregnant state.

  17. JOB INSECURITY, KEPUASAN KERJA DAN TURNOVER INTENTION: STUDI PADA KARYAWAN PT “X” DI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Kurniawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh job insecurity dan kepuasan kerja terhadap turnover intention pada karyawan PT “X” di Jakarta. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah survei dengan pendekatan korelasional. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah seluruh karyawan PT “X” di Jakarta yang berjumlah 210 karyawan. Sampel yang digunakan sebanyak 89 orang dengan teknik acak proposional. Penelitian ini membuktikan bahwa: 1 job insecurity (X1 dan kepuasan kerja (X2 secara serentak berpengaruh terhadap turnover intention (Y; 2 job insecurity berpengaruh positif terhadap turnover intention; 3 kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif terhadap turnover intention. Hasil Uji analisis jalur diperoleh besaran job insecurity terhadap kepuasan kerja sebesar -0,441 dan pengaruh job insecurity terhadap turnover intention sebesar -0,417. Penelitian ini juga membuktikan terdapat pengaruh tidak langsung antara job insecurity (X1 dengan turnover intention (Y yang dimoderatori oleh kepuasan kerja (X2 dengan nilai koefisien jalur px1x2 . pyx2 = -0,441 x -0,417 = 0,184 atau 18,4%. Adapun nilai R2 adalah sebesar 0,554 yang berarti bahwa turnover intention dipengaruhi oleh variabel job insecurity dan kepuasan kerja sebesar 55,4% dan sisanya 44,6% dipengaruhi oleh variabel lain yang tidak diteliti.

  18. Role of molecular turnover in dynamic deformation of a three-dimensional cellular membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Satoru; Eiraku, Mototsugu

    2017-05-29

    In cells, the molecular constituents of membranes are dynamically turned over by transportation from one membrane to another. This molecular turnover causes the membrane to shrink or expand by sensing the stress state within the cell, changing its morphology. At present, little is known as to how this turnover regulates the dynamic deformation of cellular membranes. In this study, we propose a new physical model by which molecular turnover is coupled with three-dimensional membrane deformation to explore mechanosensing roles of turnover in cellular membrane deformations. In particular, as an example of microscopic machinery, based on a coarse-graining description, we suppose that molecular turnover depends on the local membrane strain. Using the proposed model, we demonstrate computational simulations of a single vesicle. The results show that molecular turnover adaptively facilitates vesicle deformation, owing to its stress dependence; while the vesicle drastically expands in the case with low bending rigidity, it shrinks in that with high bending rigidity. Moreover, localized active tension on the membrane causes cellular migration by driving the directional transport of molecules within the cell. These results illustrate the use of the proposed model as well as the role of turnover in the dynamic deformations of cellular membranes.

  19. The relationship between clinician turnover and adolescent treatment outcomes: an examination from the client perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Funk, Rodney R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2013-04-01

    The turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff has been assumed to adversely impact treatment effectiveness, yet only limited research has empirically examined this assumption. Representing an extension of prior organizational-level analyses of the impact of staff turnover on client outcomes, this study examined the impact of SUD clinician turnover on adolescent treatment outcomes using a client perspective. Multilevel regression analysis did reveal that relative to those adolescents who did not experience clinician turnover, adolescents who experienced both direct and indirect clinician turnover reported a significantly higher percentage of days using alcohol or drugs at 6-month follow-up. However, clinician turnover was not found to have significant associations (negative or positive) with the other five treatment outcomes examined (e.g., substance-related problems, involvement in illegal activity). Thus, consistent with our prior findings, the current study provides additional evidence that turnover of SUD clinicians is not necessarily associated with adverse treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts Subset and Supernova Remnants Low Radio-Frequency Turnover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang

    2000-01-01

    Durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) are featured by >2s subset and <2s one, with initial corresponding energy ratio being 20:1. It is found that supernova remants(SNR 's) turnover frequencies peak at 100 and 500 MHz. After assuming that GRB's originate from hypernova and making an analysis on the evolution of GRB's, we find that the initial energy of two GRB subsets leads to a different radio-frequency turnover of their remnant spectra, which accords positively with the turnover-frequency ratio of SNR's.

  1. THE EFFECT OF JOB SATISFACTION ON IT EMPLOYEES TURNOVER INTENTION IN ISRAEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladelsky Limor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Employee voluntary turnover is very costly for companies, particularly for the Hi-Tech sector, where the costs of their IT labor force is expensive. Employees\\' voluntary turnover has substantial negative impacts on the companies especially costs, potential loss of valuable knowledge, skills and organizational knowledge.That is why it becomes a critical issue to take address. Studies have been carried out on the reasons which lead to this tendency, however the ability to explain and predict it remains restricted.The objective of this paper is to present the reasons for voluntary turnover of employees in the IT sector in Israel from the IT employees` perspective. A broad analysis of the field literature led to the following groups of causes affecting voluntary turnover: organizational causes: Human Resource Management (HRM related, organizational culture, job related, leadership and internal marketing related; extra organizational causes: individual and, respectively, labor market related causes. This could be approached as n light of this review this article will focus on one of the extra organizational causes of voluntary turnover, i.e. the effect of job satisfaction on voluntary turnover intention among IT employees in Hi-Tech companies in Israel. This correlation was researched in an extensive empirical study among two population groups: IT employees and IT managers and by using mixed method research (combination of quantitative and qualitative research.The findings that supported the literature show job satisfaction has a negative effect on voluntary turnover intention among IT employees in Hi-Tech companies in Israel. Additionally, it was found that job satisfaction indirectly affects voluntary turnover intentions and that emotional variables such as commitment, motivation and loyalty mediate voluntary turnover intention.This finding is supported partially in the literature which only pointed out commitment as a mediating factor in the

  2. Sexual selection affects local extinction and turnover in bird communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P.F.; Sorci, G.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Boulinier, T.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting extinction risks has become a central goal for conservation and evolutionary biologists interested in population and community dynamics. Several factors have been put forward to explain risks of extinction, including ecological and life history characteristics of individuals. For instance, factors that affect the balance between natality and mortality can have profound effects on population persistence. Sexual selection has been identified as one such factor. Populations under strong sexual selection experience a number of costs ranging from increased predation and parasitism to enhanced sensitivity to environmental and demographic stochasticity. These findings have led to the prediction that local extinction rates should be higher for species/populations with intense sexual selection. We tested this prediction by analyzing the dynamics of natural bird communities at a continental scale over a period of 21 years (1975-1996), using relevant statistical tools. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, we found that sexual selection increased risks of local extinction (dichromatic birds had on average a 23% higher local extinction rate than monochromatic species). However, despite higher local extinction probabilities, the number of dichromatic species did not decrease over the period considered in this study. This pattern was caused by higher local turnover rates of dichromatic species, resulting in relatively stable communities for both groups of species. Our results suggest that these communities function as metacommunities, with frequent local extinctions followed by colonization. Anthropogenic factors impeding dispersal might therefore have a significant impact on the global persistence of sexually selected species.

  3. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O' Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  4. Evidence for Sex Chromosome Turnover in Proteid Salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Stanley K; Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Green, David M; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of genomic and reproductive biology is to understand the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes. Species of the 2 genera of the Salamander family Proteidae - Necturus of eastern North America, and Proteus of Southern Europe - have similar-looking karyotypes with the same chromosome number (2n = 38), which differentiates them from all other salamanders. However, Necturus possesses strongly heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes that Proteus lacks. Since the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of Necturus were detectable only with C-banding, we hypothesized that we could use C-banding to find sex chromosomes in Proteus. We examined mitotic material from colchicine-treated intestinal epithelium, and meiotic material from testes in specimens of Proteus, representing 3 genetically distinct populations in Slovenia. We compared these results with those from Necturus. We performed FISH to visualize telomeric sequences in meiotic bivalents. Our results provide evidence that Proteus represents an example of sex chromosome turnover in which a Necturus-like Y-chromosome has become permanently translocated to another chromosome converting heteromorphic sex chromosomes to homomorphic sex chromosomes. These results may be key to understanding some unusual aspects of demographics and reproductive biology of Proteus, and are discussed in the context of models of the evolution of sex chromosomes in amphibians.

  5. A model of voluntary turnover among hospital CEOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, P A; Kimball, P A

    1995-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to hospital CEOs' voluntary decisions to leave their positions in 1990. Using a longitudinal design, we contrast 49 leavers with 1,362 stayers. We view turnover as influenced by both "push" factors that promote leaving (dissatisfaction with the position) and "hump" factors that need to be overcome (the cost of job change). Push factors giving rise to dissatisfaction include lower compensation, the predecessor's termination, and value incongruity between the CEO and the hospital. Testing the impact of key variables from Fiedler's contingency theory of leadership, we show that task-oriented leaders are relatively less satisfied when compared with relationship-oriented leaders. CEOs also express less satisfaction in low-situational control settings, a measure heavily influenced by perceived inadequate support from medical staff and subordinates. "Hump" factors that deterred leaving included family-related obstacles such as spouse's work or children's school, features mentioned most often by younger CEOs. The study suggests that boards should structure competitively paid positions with opportunities to generate support from the medical staff and subordinates. Recruiters for CEO positions are apprised of the importance of nonwork features in CEOs' willingness to consider new positions.

  6. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  7. Employee Turnover and Knowledge Management in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vnoučková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge economy regards employee knowledge as a most important asset. It is a priority task to ensure systematic knowledge continuity of those employees who are the holders of critical knowledge. The aim of the article is to analyse the causes of mobility of knowledge workers and categorise types of employees and mobility according to the future development of an employee’s career. The research areas, i.e. ensuring knowledge continuity and employee turnover were analysed based on the premise of significant relation between those two areas. The data were collected in organizations in the Czech Republic. Surveys were drawn across sectors to ensure representativeness of the outcomes. The outputs revealed two basic approaches to maintaining knowledge inside organizations. Employees can be divided into knowledge workers and remainder, who seek only security. A knowledge worker who decides to transfer is not motivated by the amount of salary (they do not mind a lower level of remuneration; on the contrary they suffer due to an unclear vision on the part of the organization, where they used to work; they cannot stay in conditions where there is no possibility to participate on personal growth. Future research in this area should focus on the return of investments in the knowledge and employee learning, training and retention.

  8. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  9. Modelling turnover of Cs-137 in two subarctic salmonid ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlinder, S.; Bergstroem, U. (Studsvik AB, Ecosafe, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Hammar, J. (Institute of Freshwater Research, Drottningholm (Sweden) Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoology); Notter, M. (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Solna (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The turnover of cesium-137 was simulated in two categories of subarctic, alpine lake ecosystems - a natural lake with Gammarus lacustris as major fish prey and a lake reservoir with introduced Mysis relicta as a new fish-food organism. The resulting concentrations of Cs-137 in two salmonid species - Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) - were calculated using a multi-compartment model. Observed data were taken from a major case study evaluating the distribution, pathways and major transport mechanisms of Chernobyl cesium through northern lake ecosystems in 1986-90. The aim of this study was to design a specific conceptual model for calculation of the levels of Cs-137 in fish from simple lake ecosystems, which could be adopted for other more complex types of lakes. A multi-compartment model of the ecosystem was designed and the equations were solved with the BIOPATH-code. The uncertainty of the results due to the uncertainty of input values was examined using the PRISM-system. The model gave good correlations to measured data for Cs-137 in water, zooplankton, macro invertebrates and fish in both lakes. The predicted levels in sediments were, however, considerably lower than the observed values. The inflow of Cs-137 from the drainage area to the two lakes was identified as the main contributor to the uncertainty of the long-term prognoses. 33 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U-{sup 14}C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production.

  11. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  12. Water turnover and core temperature on Mount Rainier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Slivka, Dustin S; Hansen, Kent; Ruby, Brent C

    2012-09-01

    Hydration is an important logistical consideration for persons performing in austere environments because water demands must be balanced with the burden of carrying water. Seven novice climbers participated in a study to determine the hydration kinetics and core temperatures associated with a successful summit of Mount Rainier. Ingestible radio-equipped thermometer capsules were swallowed to monitor core temperature, and an oral dose of deuterium (0.12 ± 0.02 g·kg⁻¹ body weight) was administered to determine hydration kinetics. Mean core temperature throughout the 5.5-hour climb to Camp Muir (3000 m) was 37.6 ± 0.3°C. Water turnover was 95.0 ± 17.5 mL·kg⁻¹·24 h⁻¹ over the duration of the 43-hour study. There was a trend for reduced body mass from before (75.9 ± 13.0 kg) to after (74.8 ± 12.5 kg) the climb (P = .06), and urine specific gravity increased from before (1.013 ± 0.002) to after (1.022 ± 0.006) the climb (P = .004). Hydration demands of climbing Mount Rainier are highly elevated despite modest fluctuations in core temperature. Participants experienced hypohydration but were able to maintain sufficient hydration to successfully summit Mount Rainier and return home safely. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bed occupancy, turnover intervals and MRSA rates in English hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joseph B; Kernohan, W George; Rush, Thomas

    This article (a follow on from an article concentrating on Northern Ireland) examines the relationship between percentage bed occupancy (PO), turnover interval (TI) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rates in the acute beds of specialist English hospital trusts and describes the TI and levels of bed occupancy. The data were collected from publicly available data: MRSA rates of blood-borne infection per 1000 bed days from the Department of Health; average length of stay from Hospital Episode Statistics; and percentage occupancy from the Department of Health Hospital Activity statistics were used. Pearson's Correlation coefficients were used as basis for inferential analysis. The mean TI for all trusts was as 0.94 days, median 0.95 days. Twenty percent of trusts had TIs, on average, of less than 0.58 days (13.9 hours) and 10% had a TI less than 0.32 days (7.6 hours). The mean PO was 84.98% and the median was 84.76%. Seventy percent of the trusts exceeded the recommended 82% bed occupancy. The inference from this study is that there is a relationship between TI and PO and rate of MRSA infection in specialist English hospitals and that PO rates are at a level which may interfere with good infection control procedures.

  14. Endocytic turnover of Rab8 controls cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Holst, Mikkel R.; Larsson, Elin; Hachimi, Mariam; Yau, Wai-Lok; Peränen, Johan; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adaptation of cell shape and polarization through the formation and retraction of cellular protrusions requires balancing of endocytosis and exocytosis combined with fine-tuning of the local activity of small GTPases like Rab8. Here, we show that endocytic turnover of the plasma membrane at protrusions is directly coupled to surface removal and inactivation of Rab8. Removal is induced by reduced membrane tension and mediated by the GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1, also known as ARHGAP26), a regulator of clathrin-independent endocytosis. GRAF1-depleted cells were deficient in multi-directional spreading and displayed elevated levels of GTP-loaded Rab8, which was accumulated at the tips of static protrusions. Furthermore, GRAF1 depletion impaired lumen formation and spindle orientation in a 3D cell culture system, indicating that GRAF1 activity regulates polarity establishment. Our data suggest that GRAF1-mediated removal of Rab8 from the cell surface restricts its activity during protrusion formation, thereby facilitating dynamic adjustment of the polarity axis. PMID:28137756

  15. Improving operating room turnover time: a systems based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ankeet S; Carlson, Grant W; Deckers, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Operating room (OR) turnover time (TT) has a broad and significant impact on hospital administrators, providers, staff and patients. Our objective was to identify current problems in TT management and implement a consistent, reproducible process to reduce average TT and process variability. Initial observations of TT were made to document the existing process at a 511 bed, 24 OR, academic medical center. Three control groups, including one consisting of Orthopedic and Vascular Surgery, were used to limit potential confounders such as case acuity/duration and equipment needs. A redesigned process based on observed issues, focusing on a horizontally structured, systems-based approach has three major interventions: developing consistent criteria for OR readiness, utilizing parallel processing for patient and room readiness, and enhancing perioperative communication. Process redesign was implemented in Orthopedics and Vascular Surgery. Comparisons of mean and standard deviation of TT were made using an independent 2-tailed t-test. Using all surgical specialties as controls (n = 237), mean TT (hh:mm:ss) was reduced by 0:20:48 min (95 % CI, 0:10:46-0:30:50), from 0:44:23 to 0:23:25, a 46.9 % reduction. Standard deviation of TT was reduced by 0:10:32 min, from 0:16:24 to 0:05:52 and frequency of TT≥30 min was reduced from 72.5to 11.7 %. P systems-based focus should drive OR TT design.

  16. GPU Generation of Large Varied Animated Crowds

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac Rudomin; Benjamín Hernández; Oriam de Gyves; Leonel Toledo; Ivan Rivalcoba; Sergio Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    ..We discuss several steps in the process of simulating and visualizing large and varied crowds in real time for consumer-level computers and graphic cards (GPUs). Animating varied crowds using a diversity of models and animations (assets) is complex and costly. One has to use models that are expensive if bought, take a long time to model, and consume too much memory and computing resources. We discuss methods for simulating, generating, animating and rendering crowds of varied aspect and a d...

  17. A new varied-time photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Ma, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Li, Hong; Chen, Wan-Jin; Yuan, Hong-chun; Li, Heng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed a new one-dimensional varied-time photonic crystals, i.e., the refractive indices of media $A$ and $B$ are the time functions. We consider the varied-time photonic crystals of refractive indices period variation and calculate the transmissivity and electronic field distribution with and without defect layer, which are different from the conventional photonic crystals, which transmissivity and electronic field distribution are static, but the varied-time...

  18. Inflationary Phase with Time Varying Fundamental Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, M S; Berman, Marcelo S.; Trevisan, Luis A.

    2002-01-01

    Following Barrow, and Barrow and collaborators, we find a cosmological JBD model, with varying speed of light and varying fine structure constant, where the deceleration parameter is -1,causing acceleration of the Universe.Indeed, we have an exponential inflationary phase. Plancks time, energy, length,etc.,might have had different numerical values in the past, than those available in the litterature, due to the varying values for speed of light, and gravitational constant.

  19. A new varied-time photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed a new one-dimensional varied-time photonic crystals, i.e., the refractive indices of media $A$ and $B$ are the time functions. We consider the varied-time photonic crystals of refractive indices period variation and calculate the transmissivity and electronic field distribution with and without defect layer, which are different from the conventional photonic crystals, which transmissivity and electronic field distribution are static, but the varied-time...

  20. Dynamics of psychological contracts with work engagement and turnover intention: the influence of organizational tenure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; de Cooman, R.; Mol, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the interrelations of the psychological contract with work engagement and turnover intention, which has hitherto been a largely overlooked topic in psychological contract research. Although previous research has mainly focused on how psychological contracts influence job atti