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Sample records for superheated drop bubble

  1. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly ... ing to which as the radiation deposits energy along its path inside the superheated liquid, ... resistance with change in pressure in a system. The frequency response of the ...

  2. Sound response of superheated drop bubble detectors to neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Size; Chen Zhe; Liu Chao; Ni Bangfa; Zhang Guiying; Zhao Changfa; Xiao Caijin; Liu Cunxiong; Nie Peng; Guan Yongjing

    2012-01-01

    The sound response of the bubble detectors to neutrons by using 252 Cf neutron source was described. Sound signals were filtered by sound card and PC. The short-time signal energy. FFT spectrum, power spectrum, and decay time constant were got to determine the authenticity of sound signal for bubbles. (authors)

  3. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released dur- ing the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by .... This noise level does not affect the characteristics or performance of the sensor–amplifier.

  4. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F. E-mail: francesco.derrico@yale.edu; Nath, R.; Holland, S.K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M.J

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35 deg.C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a {sup 252}Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  5. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Holland, S. K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35°C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a 252Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  6. Superheated drop as a neutron spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mala; Chatterjee, B. K.; Roy, B.; Roy, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to vaporise when exposed to energetic nuclear radiation since the discovery of bubble chamber. As the degree of superheat increases in a given liquid, less and less energetic neutrons are required to cause nucleation. This property of superheated liquids are being utilised to develope the neutron spectromer. A new principle of neutron spectrometry using Superheated liquid are developed and the developed principle has been tested by Am-Be neutron source.

  7. Superheated drop as a neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mala; Chatterjee, B. K.; Roy, B.; Roy, S. C.

    2000-09-01

    Superheated drops are known to vaporise when exposed to energetic nuclear radiation since the discovery of bubble chamber. The application of superheated drops in neutron research especially in neutron dosimetry is a subject of intense research for quite sometime. As the degree of superheat increases in a given liquid, less and less energetic neutrons are required to cause nucleation. This property of superheated liquid makes it possible to use it as a neutron spectrometer. Neutron detection efficiency of superheated drops made of R12 exposed to Am-Be neutron source has been measured over a wide range of temperature -17-60°C and the results have been utilised to construct the energy spectrum of the neutron source. This paper demonstrates that a suitable neutron spectrometer may be constructed by using a single liquid and varying the temperature of the liquid suitably at a closer grid.

  8. Superheated drop as a neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Mala; Chatterjee, B.K.; Roy, B. E-mail: biva@bosemain.boseinst.ernet.in; Roy, S.C

    2000-09-21

    Superheated drops are known to vaporise when exposed to energetic nuclear radiation since the discovery of bubble chamber. The application of superheated drops in neutron research especially in neutron dosimetry is a subject of intense research for quite sometime. As the degree of superheat increases in a given liquid, less and less energetic neutrons are required to cause nucleation. This property of superheated liquid makes it possible to use it as a neutron spectrometer. Neutron detection efficiency of superheated drops made of R12 exposed to Am-Be neutron source has been measured over a wide range of temperature -17-60 deg. C and the results have been utilised to construct the energy spectrum of the neutron source. This paper demonstrates that a suitable neutron spectrometer may be constructed by using a single liquid and varying the temperature of the liquid suitably at a closer grid.

  9. Practical neutron dosimetry with superheated drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R E; Lo, Y C

    1989-01-01

    The Superheated Drop Detector (SDD) is a new kind of neutron detector based on the same principle as that of the bubble chamber, except the superheated material is in drop form suspended by a gel or polymer as first described by Apfel (U.S. Patent 4,143,274). Previously, we have developed a theoretical model for the prediction of the threshold neutron energy to nucleate bubbles in our superheated materials and a model for the calculation of the energy dependent response function of SDD. The results of the theoretical calculations agree with the experimental measurements reasonably well. We found the measured response curve of one of our SDDs follows the same trend as the ideal ICRP dose equivalent response curve within 40% for neutrons of energy above 100 keV and within a factor of 10 below 100 keV. Therefore, it is possible to make a rem-response Superheated Drop Detector. We have further calibrated our SDD with 252Cf neutron sources (both bare and D2O moderated). The results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical predictions, which proves that our model is valid not only for monoenergetic neutrons but also for neutrons from a radioactive source. The principles of operation of our detector, which can be used in neutron dosimetry, area monitoring, and neutron spectrometry, are discussed.

  10. Bubble dynamics in a superheated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.

    1977-09-01

    The report presents an extensive literature survey on bubble dynamics. Growth of a single spherical bubble moving in a uniformly superheated liquid is considered. Equations of motion and energy are presented in the forms that take into consideration the interaction between the motion and the growth. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain a simultaneous solution of equations of motion and growth rate, and the solution is compared with available experimental results. Results for liquid sodium are presented for a range of pressures and Jakob numbers

  11. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1-10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200-400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  12. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  13. Semi-automatic bubble counting system for superheated droplet detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reina, Luiz C.; Bellido, Luis F.; Ramos, Paulo R.; Silva, Ademir X. da; Facure, Alessandro; Dantas, Jose E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron dose rate measurements are normally performed by means of PADC, CR-39 and TLD detectors. Although, none of these devices can give instant reading of the neutron dose, recently new kind of detectors are being developed, based on the formation of tiny drops in a superheated liquid suspended in a polymer or gel solution, called superheated droplet detector (SDD) or also as bubble detectors (BD), with no response for gamma radiation. This work describes the experimental setup and the developed procedures for acquiring and processing digital images obtained with bubble detector spectrometer (BDS), developed by Bubble Technology Industries, for personal neutron dosimeter and/or neutron energy fluence measurements in nuclear facilities. The results of the neutron measurements obtained during the F-18 production, at the RDS-111 cyclotron, are presented. These neutron measurements were the first ones with this type of BDS detectors in a particle accelerator facility in Brazil and it was very important to estimate neutron dose rate received by occupationally exposed individuals. (author)

  14. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study

  15. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  16. The active personnel dosimeter---APFEL enterprises superheated drop detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipe, N.E.; Donahue, R.J.; Busick, D.D.

    1991-03-01

    The Active Personnel Dosimeter (APD) provides a digital readout of events caused by neutrons interacting with superheated liquid droplets. The droplets are suspended in a gel held in a replaceable cartridge. Upon neutron interaction, the superheated droplet vaporizes, forming a bubble. The sound produced in this process is recorded by transducers that sense the accompanying pressure pulse. The APD electronically discriminates against spurious noise and vibration. Studies with the production prototype APDs indicate that the detector response is linear up to about 0.40 mSv, with large variations sometimes from predicted values and between cartridges at higher dose equivalents. The response to standard neutron sources (bare 252 Cf, PuBe, PuB, PuF, PuLi) is reported and compared with the expected response. Unirradiated cartridges self-nucleate when heated to temperatures of 46 degrees C. The APD is insensitive to low-energy photons but responds to high-energy photons and electrons. 8 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Thermal activation of superheated lipid-coated perfluorocarbon drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Paul A; Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2015-04-28

    This study explored the thermal conditions necessary for the vaporization of superheated perfluorocarbon nanodrops. Droplets C3F8 and C4F10 coated with a homologous series of saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines were formed by condensation of 4 μm diameter microbubbles. These drops were stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but they vaporized back into microbubbles at higher temperatures. The vaporization transition was measured as a function of temperature by laser light extinction. We found that C3F8 and C4F10 drops experienced 90% vaporization at 40 and 75 °C, respectively, near the theoretical superheat limits (80-90% of the critical temperature). We therefore conclude that the metastabilty of these phase-change agents arises not from the droplet Laplace pressure altering the boiling point, as previously reported, but from the metastability of the pure superheated fluid to homogeneous nucleation. The rate of C4F10 drop vaporization was quantified at temperatures ranging from 55 to 75 °C, and an apparent activation energy barrier was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. Interestingly, the activation energy increased linearly with acyl chain length from C14 to C20, indicating that lipid interchain cohesion plays an important role in suppressing the vaporization rate. The vaporized drops (microbubbles) were found to be unstable to dissolution at high temperatures, particularly for C14 and C16. However, proper choice of the fluorocarbon and lipid species provided a nanoemulsion that could undergo at least ten reversible condensation/vaporization cycles. The vaporization properties presented in this study may facilitate the engineering of tunable phase-shift particles for diagnostic imaging, targeted drug delivery, tissue ablation, and other applications.

  18. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Errico, F; Sannikov, A V; Silari, Marco

    2002-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Universite Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based oil the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction o...

  19. On the evaporation of superheated water drops formed by flashing of liquid jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutair, Sami; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The flash evaporation of superheated water in direct contact with its own vapor involves very high heat transfer rates and the existing solutions for the problems of heat diffusion in the superheated water drops underestimate the actual heat transfer rates, even when the gas-side heat transfer coefficient is assumed to be extremely high. This happens due to the poor thermal conductivity of the water which causes the heat transfer to be dominated by the heat flow within the liquid. Accommodation between the analytical results of the heat diffusion in superheated water and those obtained from the experimental measurements requires considering the effective thermal conductivity of the liquid owing to the violent nature of the flow, which is thought to be much larger than the mere molecular thermal conductivity. This paper presents initial attempts on modeling the liquid-side heat transfer process accompanying the surface evaporation of superheated water drops resulting from the flashing of superheated water jets. (authors)

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annenkova, E. A., E-mail: a-a-annenkova@yandex.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kreider, W. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, O. A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  1. Extreme Liquid Superheating and Homogeneous Bubble Nucleation in a Solid State Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn Victoria

    This thesis explains how extreme superheating and single bubble nucleation can be achieved in an electrolytic solution within a solid state nanopore. A highly focused ionic current, induced to flow through the pore by modest voltage biases, leads to rapid Joule heating of the electrolyte in the nanopore. At sufficiently high current densities, temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are achieved, ultimately leading to nucleation of a vapor bubble within the nanopore. A mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution within a nanopore is presented. This model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution is used to evaluate related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics. In particular, bubble nucleation is shown to be homogeneous and highly reproducible. These results are consistent with experimental data available from electronic and optical measurements of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a nanopore.

  2. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  3. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  4. Distinguishing between microscale gaseous bubbles and liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, there has been strong research interest in decorating surfaces with tiny bubbles and drops due to their potential applications in reducing slippage in micro and nanofluidic devices. Both nanobubbles and nanodrops are typically nucleated by exchanging fluids over a suitable substrate. However, the nucleation experiments present many challenges, such as reproducibility and the possibility of contamination. The use of one-use plastic syringes and needle cannulas in nucleation experiments can introduce polymeric contamination. A contaminated experiment may nucleate bubbles, drops or both. Moreover, it is surprisingly difficult to distinguish between bubbles and drops under the usual atomic force microscopy or optical techniques. Here we present an experimental study comparing bubbles and oil (PDMS) drops on an atomically smooth surface (HOPG). Instead of nucleating the objects via solvent exchange, we directly introduced bubbles via electrolysis, and oil drops by injecting a dilute solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that under careful AFM characterisation, liquid drops and gaseous bubbles respond differently to a change in imaging force, and moreover present different characteristic force curves.

  5. A three-dimensional numerical study on dynamics behavior of a rising vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid by lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Sun, Jiangang; Ang, Xueye; Li, Shanshan; Su, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid is studied by a 3D LBM. • The growth rate reaches a maximum value and then decrease until a certain value. • The vapor bubble will take place a larger deformation at high ratio of Re/Eo. • The bubble wake has a great influence on motion and deformation of vapor bubble. • Ratio of Re/Eo has an important influence on evolution of temperature field. - Abstract: In this paper, dynamics behaviors of a rising vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid are firstly studied by a hybrid three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model. In order to validate this model, two test cases regarding bubble rising in an isothermal system and vapor bubble growth in a superheated liquid are performed, respectively. The test results are consistent with existing results and indicate the feasibility of the hybrid model. The hybrid model is further applied to simulate growth and deformation of a rising vapor bubble in different physical conditions. Some physical parameters of vapor bubble such as equivalent diameter and growth rate are evaluated accurately by three-dimensional simulations. It is found that the growth rate of vapor bubble changes with time and temperature gradient. It reaches a maximum value at the initial stage and then decrease until a certain value. The growth and deformation of vapor bubble at different ratios of Re/Eo are discussed. The numerical results show the vapor bubble will take place a larger deformation at high ratio of Re/Eo at the middle and final stages. In addition, the hybrid model is also applied to predict the evolution of flow and temperature fields. The bubble wake has a great influence on the motion and deformation of vapor bubble during rising process. As far as the temperature field is concerned, a ratio of Re/Eo has an important influence on heat transfer and evolution of temperature field.

  6. A Study on the Violent Interactions of an Immiscible Drop impacting on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, Mohamad

    2014-05-01

    ABSTRACT A Study on the Violent Interactions of an Immiscible Drop Impacting on a Superheated Pool Mohamad Alchalabi The interactions between two immiscible liquids of different temperatures can be violent to the extent of causing harm to individuals, or damage to equipment, especially when used in the industry. Only a few studies investigated these interactions but they could not produce the violent interactions often reported by the industry, and therefore their results did not help much to develop clear understanding of the dynamics of these interactions. In this work, a high speed imaging system operated at 100,000 frames per second was utilized to record the events and phenomena taking place upon the impact of Perfluorohexane droplet at room temperature onto a hot soybean oil pool at temperatures as high as 300 ºC. The impact velocity was varied by varying the height of the droplet before it pinches off under its own weight. The recorded events identified the occurrence of vortex ring vapor explosions, weak and strong nucleate boiling, and film boiling. An impact velocity vs. oil temperature diagram identifying the regions in which each of these phenomena takes place was generated, and the dynamics driving their occurrences were explored. The vortex ring vapor explosions were found to become less violent as the impact velocity was increased, which was attributed to the existence of a smaller amount of liquid Perfluorohexane within the rings at high speed impacts, which does evaporate but does not expand violently. Weak nucleate boiling occurred at very high impact velocities relatively. As the temperature is increased, however, they start 5 turning into strong nucleate boiling. The strong nucleate boiling usually starts right upon impact, and when the temperature of the oil at one impact velocity is increased, it starts turning into film boiling, in which the liquid Perfluorohexane is covered by a vapor layer of its own vapor.

  7. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2016-03-29

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  8. Drops and bubbles in contact with solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The third volume in a series dedicated to colloids and interfaces, Drops and Bubbles in Contact with Solid Surfaces presents an up-to-date overview of the fundamentals and applications of drops and bubbles and their interaction with solid surfaces. The chapters cover the theoretical and experimental aspects of wetting and wettability, liquid-solid interfacial properties, and spreading dynamics on different surfaces, including a special section on polymers. The book examines issues related to interpretation of contact angle from nano to macro systems. Expert contributors discuss interesting pec

  9. Mapping coalescence of micron-sized drops and bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2017-02-01

    Emulsion formulation, solvent extraction and multiphase microfluidics are all examples of processes that require precise control of drop or bubble collision stability. We use a previously validated numerical model to map the exact conditions under which micron-sized drops or bubbles undergo coalescence in the presence of colloidal forces and hydrodynamic effects relevant to Brownian motion and low Reynolds number flows. We demonstrate that detailed understanding of how the equilibrium surface forces vary with film thickness can be applied to make accurate predictions of the outcome of a drop or bubble collision when hydrodynamic effects are negligible. In addition, we illuminate the parameter space (i.e. interaction velocity, drop deformation, interfacial tension, etc.) at which hydrodynamic effects can stabilise collisions that are unstable at equilibrium. Further, we determine conditions for which drop or bubble collisions become unstable upon separation, caused by negative hydrodynamic pressure in the film. Lastly, we show that scaling analyses are not applicable for constant force collisions where the approach timescale is comparable to the coalescence timescale, and demonstrate that initial conditions under these circumstances cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bubble formation during drop impact on a heated pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuansi; Alhazmi, Muath; Kouraytem, Nadia; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2017-11-01

    Ultra high-speed video imaging, at up to 200 kfps, is used to investigate a drop impinging onto a high temperature pool. The room-temperature perfluorohexane drop, which has a boiling temperature as low as 56 °C impacts on the soybean oil pool heated up to around 200 °C, which is overwhelmingly higher than the boiling temperature of the drop. The bottom of the drop is therefore covered by a layer of vapor which prevents contact between the two immiscible liquid surfaces, akin to the Leidenfrost effect However, as the pool temperature is reduced, one starts seeing contact and the dynamics transition into the vapor explosion regime. At the boundary of this regime we observe some entrapment of scattered or a toroidal ring of small bubbles. Experimental video data will be presented to show this novel phenomenon and explain how these bubbles are formed and evolve.

  11. Photoacoustic monitoring of steam bubble cavitation in water superheated by TEA CO II laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2006-02-01

    Using a TEA CO II laser for explosive surface boiling of bulk water, oscillatory acoustic transients from steam bubbles were recorded using a contact photoacoustic technique. Multiple well-resolved, high-amplitude multi-MHz spectral features representing high-order combination acoustic oscillations of steam bubbles were revealed in spectra obtained by means of numerical Fast Fourier Transformation of these transients. A potential parametric generation mechanism for these high-order combination oscillation modes of steam bubbles is discussed.

  12. Linear Oscillations of a Supported Bubble or Drop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejražka, Jiří; Vobecká, Lucie; Tihon, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 6 (2013), 062102 ISSN 1070-6631 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/11/0806 Grant - others:COST(XE) MP1106 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : oscillating bubble or drop * linear oscillations * lagrange equation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.040, year: 2013

  13. Growing bubbles and freezing drops: depletion effects and tip singularities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enriquez Paz y Puente, O.R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the author investigates the growth of gas bubbles in a supersaturated solution and the freezing of water drops when placed on a cold plate. Supersaturated solutions are common in nature and industry; perhaps the best know examples are carbonated drinks, such as beer or soda. These

  14. Dynamics of the central entrapped bubble during drop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhen; Channa, Murad Ali; Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2017-11-01

    When a drop impacts onto a liquid surface, it entraps a thin central air disk. The air is then brought towards the axis of symmetry by surface tension. This contraction dynamics is very challenging to capture, due to the small length scales (a few micrometers thin air disk) and time scales (contracting in a few hundred microseconds). We use the open source two-phase flow codes Gerris and Basilisk to study this air entrapment phenomenon. The effects of liquid properties such as viscosity and surface tension, and of the impact velocity were investigated. We focus on the morphology of the contracting air disk. The bubble is expected to contract into a single spherical bubble. However, in some cases, the air can be stretched vertically by the liquid inertia and split into two smaller bubbles. The convergence of capillary waves on the air disk towards the axis of symmetry can also make it rupture at the center, thus forming a toroidal bubble. In other cases, vorticity shedding can deform the contracting bubble, leading to more complex structures. A parameter space analysis based on the Reynolds and Weber numbers was then done to classify the different regimes and explain the transitions. Full affiliation:State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Environment and Control for Flight Vehicle,International Center for Applied Mechanics,School of Aerospace,Xi'an Jiaotong University.

  15. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.

    2017-04-18

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  16. The pressure drop characteristics of air-water bubbling flow for evaporative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghua; Amano, R. S.; Cui, Wenzhi; Li, Longjian

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a study on a novel water bubbling layer pressure drop and heat transfer experiment that was conducted to investigate the characteristics of pressure drop of air flow across the water bubbling layer. The attempt was to reduce the pressure drop while maintaining a higher value of the heat transfer coefficient. This type of heat transfer between water and merged tubes has potential application in evaporative cooling. To achieve the goal the pressure drop should be reduced by decreasing the bubble layer thickness through the water pump circulation. Pressure drops of air passing through the perforated plate and the water bubbling layer were measured for different heights of water bubbling layer, hole-plate area ratio of the perforated plate and the air velocity through the holes. Experimental data show that the increase of water bubbling layer height and air velocity both increase the pressure drop while the effect of the hole-plate area ratio of the perforated plate on the heat transfer coefficient is relatively complex. The measurements showed that even at a considerably lower height of water bubbling layer the heat transfer coefficient can exceed 5,000 W/m2-K. The heat transfer coefficients of 30 mm high water bubbling layer are higher than that of other higher water bubbling layers tested in the experiments

  17. Micro-bubble morphologies following drop impacts onto a pool surface

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-10-01

    When a drop impacts at low velocity onto a pool surface, a hemispheric air layer cushions and can delay direct contact. Herein we use ultra-high-speed video to study the rupture of this layer, to explain the resulting variety of observed distribution of bubbles. The size and distribution of micro-bubbles is determined by the number and location of the primary punctures. Isolated holes lead to the formation of bubble necklaces when the edges of two growing holes meet, whereas bubble nets are produced by regular shedding of micro-bubbles from a sawtooth edge instability. For the most viscous liquids the air film contracts more rapidly than the capillary-viscous velocity through repeated spontaneous ruptures of the edge. From the speed of hole opening and the total volume of micro-bubbles we conclude that the air sheet ruptures when its thickness approaches ?100.

  18. Bubbly flow pressure drop in a T junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, Fabien

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis reports a theoretical and experimental study of pressure evolution in the singularity of a T junction carrying a bubbly flow. The various involved phenomena are studied in the case of a single-phase flow. Thus, within the heart of the junction, the detailed study of the energy assessment leads to a kinetic modelling of pressure variations. In downstream branches, an integral model allows the prediction of flow restoration. A systematic experimental validation has been performed by using a two-component laser anemometry system, and through the determination of pressure lines. Then, the study has been extended to the case of bubbly flows. Obtained results are compared with experimental values of pressure evolution. By associating a phase segregation existing model, the problem of a bubbly flow in a T junction is then fully addressed [fr

  19. Detection and characterization of elongated bubbles and drops in two-phase flow using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, A.; Boeck, T.; Resagk, C.

    2017-08-01

    We report a method to detect and to measure the size and velocity of elongated bubbles or drops in a dispersed two-phase flow. The difference of the magnetic susceptibilities between two phases causes a force on the interface between both phases when it is exposed to an external magnetic field. The force is measured with a state-of-the-art electromagnetic compensation balance. While the front and the back of the bubble pass the magnetic field, two peaks in the force signal appear, which can be used to calculate the velocity and geometry parameters of the bubble. We achieve a substantial advantage over other bubble detection techniques because this technique is contactless, non-invasive, independent of the electrical conductivity and can be applied to opaque or aggressive fluids. The measurements are performed in an inclined channel with air bubbles and paraffin oil drops in water. The bubble length is in the range of 0.1-0.25 m and the bubble velocity lies between 0.02-0.22 m s-1. Furthermore we show that it is possible to apply this measurement principle for nondestructive testing (NDT) of diamagnetic and paramagnetic materials like metal, plastics or glass, provided that defects are in the range of 10‒2 m. This technique opens up new possibilities in industrial applications to measure two-phase flow parameters and in material testing.

  20. Capillarity and wetting phenomena drops, bubbles, pearls, waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gennes, Pierre-Gilles; Quéré, David

    2004-01-01

    As I glance out my window in the early morning, I can see beads of droplets gracing a spider web. The film of dew that has settled on the threads is unstable and breaks up spontaneously into droplets. This phenomenon has implications for the treatment of textile fibers (the process known as "oiling"), glass, and carbon. It is no less important when applying mascara! I take my morning shower. The moment I step out, I dry off by way of evaporation (which makes me feel cold) and by dewetting (the process by which dry areas form spontaneously and expand on my skin). As I rush into my car under a pelting rain, my attention is caught by small drops stuck on my windshield. I also notice larger drops rolling down and others larger still that, like snails, leave behind them a trail of water. I ask myself what the difference is between these rolling drops and grains of sand tumbling down an incline. I wonder why the smallest drops remain stuck. The answers to such questions do help car manufacturers treat the surface o...

  1. Shape Oscillations of a Bubble or Drop Attached to a Capillary Tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejražka, Jiří; Vobecká, Lucie; Orvalho, Sandra; Zedníková, Mária; Tihon, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 116, SEP 6 (2014), s. 359-371 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/11/0806; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble oscillations * pendant drop * eigenmode frequency Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2014

  2. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, Krassimir D.; Stanimirova, Rumyana D.; Kralchevsky, Peter A.; Marinova, Krastanka G.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B.J.; Cox, Andrew R.; Pelan, Eddie G.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are

  3. Bubble detectors in individual neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.; Votockova, I.

    1996-01-01

    Bubble detectors be able to fulfill requirements following from the ICRP 60 recommendations as far as individual neutron dosemeter is concerned. Particularly, the lowest limit of detection seems to be decreased down to about 10 μSv or even lower. At the moment there are two types of such detectors commercially available: bubble damage neutron detectors (BDNDs -Bubble Technology Industries, Chalk River) and superheated drop detectors (SDDs - Apfel Enterpr., New Haven). Both these types have been tested in our studies from the point of view of personal dosimetry. Particular attention is devoted their energetic dependences and their responses in the fields in which they should be wed to determine occupational exposures. (author)

  4. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  5. Drop impact on superheated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan; Staat, Hendrik J J; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-20

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface ("contact boiling"), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back ("gentle film boiling"), or both forms the Leidenfrost layer and ejects tiny droplets upward ("spraying film boiling"). We experimentally determine conditions under which impact behaviors in each regime can be realized. We show that the dimensionless maximum spreading γ of impacting droplets on the heated surfaces in both gentle and spraying film boiling regimes shows a universal scaling with the Weber number We (γ~We(2/5)), which is much steeper than for the impact on nonheated (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) surfaces (γ~We(1/4)). We also interferometrically measure the vapor thickness under the droplet. © 2012 American Physical Society

  6. Drop Impact on Superheated Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Tuan; Staat, Erik-Jan; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid’s boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface (“contact boiling”), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (“gentle film

  7. Universal scaling laws of top jet drop size and speed in bubble bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso

    2017-11-01

    The collapse of a bubble of radius Ro at the surface of a liquid generating a liquid jet and a subsequent first drop of radius R follows a universal flow pattern that can be universally scaled using the difference between the parent bubble radius and a critical radius R* =Oh*-2μ2 /(ρσ) below which no droplet is ejected for a given Newtonian liquid. Here, Oh* = 0.037 is the critical Ohnesorge number, where Oh = μ /(ρσRo) 1 / 2 ; ρ, σ and μ are the liquid density, surface tension and viscosity. Based on a flow singularity occurring for Ro =R* , a scaling analysis of the complex flow structure at the onset of jet ejection for Ro >R* leads to the diameter of the first emitted droplet and the initial ejection velocity: D =kd(Ro -R*) 5 / 4R* - 1 / 4 and V =kv σμ-1(Ro -R*) 3 / 4R* - 3 / 4 , respectively. A remarkable collapse of data taken from available literature since 1954 to 2017 furnishes the universal constants kd = 0.1 and kv = 1.6 , for negligible gravity effects.The role of gravity is subdominant and can be reflected by the exponential dependence of the scaling laws obtained on the Bond number. This work was supported by the Ministerio de Economy Competitividad, Plan Estatal 2013-2016 Retos, project DPI2016-78887-C3-1-R.

  8. Numerical investigation of the deformation mechanism of a bubble or a drop rising or falling in another fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Han; Yang Yongming; Hu Yüe; Zhang Huisheng; Zhang Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method for simulating the motion and deformation of an axisymmetric bubble or drop rising or falling in another infinite and initially stationary fluid is developed based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method in the frame of two incompressible and immiscible viscous fluids under the action of gravity, taking into consideration of surface tension effects. A comparison of the numerical results by this method with those by other works indicates the validity of the method. In the frame of inviscid and incompressible fluids without taking into consideration of surface tension effects, the mechanisms of the generation of the liquid jet and the transition from spherical shape to toroidal shape during the bubble or drop deformation, the increase of the ring diameter of the toroidal bubble or drop and the decrease of its cross-section area during its motion, and the effects of the density ratio of the two fluids on the deformation of the bubble or drop are analysed both theoretically and numerically. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  9. Capillary meniscus dynamometry - Method for determining the surface tension of drops and bubbles with isotropic and anisotropic surface stress distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Stanimirova, R.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Marinova, K.G.; Alexandrov, N.A.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Blijdenstein, T.B.J.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The stresses acting in interfacial adsorption layers with surface shear elasticity are, in general, anisotropic and non-uniform. If a pendant drop or buoyant bubble is covered with such elastic layer, the components of surface tension acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", σs

  10. Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    A goal of our ongoing research stream is to develop a multidisciplinary metatheory of bubbles. In this viewpoint paper we put forward a typology of bubbles by comparing four types of assets – entertainment, commodities, financial securities (stocks), and housing properties – where bubbles could a...

  11. Explosive Boiling of Superheated Cryogenic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Baidakov, V G

    2007-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the description of the kinetics of spontaneous boiling of superheated liquefied gases and their solutions. Experimental results are given on the temperature of accessible superheating, the limits of tensile strength of liquids due to processes of cavitation and the rates of nucleation of classical and quantum liquids. The kinetics of evolution of the gas phase is studied in detail for solutions of cryogenic liquids and gas-saturated fluids. The properties of the critical clusters (bubbles of critical sizes) of the newly evolving gas phase are analyzed for initial st

  12. Surface boiling of superheated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, P.

    1997-01-01

    A basic vaporization mechanism that possibly affects the qualitative and quantitative prediction of the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous superheated liquids was experimentally and analytically investigated. The studies are of relevance for the instantaneous failure of a containment vessel filled with liquefied gas. Even though catastrophical vessel failure is a rare event, it is considered to be a major technological hazard. Modeling the initial phase of depressurisation and vaporization of the contents is an essential step for the subsequent analysis of the spread and dispersion of the materials liberated. There is only limited understanding of this inertial expansion stage of the superheated liquid, before gravity and atmospheric turbulence begin to dominate the expansion. This work aims at a better understanding of the vaporization process and to supply more precise source-term data. It is also intended to provide knowledge for the prediction of the behavior of large-scale releases by the investigation of boiling on a small scale. Release experiments with butane, propane, R-134a and water were conducted. The vaporization of liquids that became superheated by sudden depressurisation was studied in nucleation-site-free glass receptacles. Several novel techniques for preventing undesired nucleation and for opening the test-section were developed. Releases from pipes and from a cylindrical geometry allowed both linear one-dimensional, and radial-front two-dimensional propagation to be investigated. Releases were made to atmospheric pressure over a range of superheats. It was found that, above a certain superheat temperature, the free surface of the metastable liquid rapidly broke up and ejected a high-velocity vapor/liquid stream. The zone of intense vaporization and liquid fragmentation proceeded as a front that advanced into the test fluids. No nucleation of bubbles in the bulk of the superheated liquid was observed. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  13. Surface boiling of superheated liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-01-01

    A basic vaporization mechanism that possibly affects the qualitative and quantitative prediction of the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous superheated liquids was experimentally and analytically investigated. The studies are of relevance for the instantaneous failure of a containment vessel filled with liquefied gas. Even though catastrophical vessel failure is a rare event, it is considered to be a major technological hazard. Modeling the initial phase of depressurisation and vaporization of the contents is an essential step for the subsequent analysis of the spread and dispersion of the materials liberated. There is only limited understanding of this inertial expansion stage of the superheated liquid, before gravity and atmospheric turbulence begin to dominate the expansion. This work aims at a better understanding of the vaporization process and to supply more precise source-term data. It is also intended to provide knowledge for the prediction of the behavior of large-scale releases by the investigation of boiling on a small scale. Release experiments with butane, propane, R-134a and water were conducted. The vaporization of liquids that became superheated by sudden depressurisation was studied in nucleation-site-free glass receptacles. Several novel techniques for preventing undesired nucleation and for opening the test-section were developed. Releases from pipes and from a cylindrical geometry allowed both linear one-dimensional, and radial-front two-dimensional propagation to be investigated. Releases were made to atmospheric pressure over a range of superheats. It was found that, above a certain superheat temperature, the free surface of the metastable liquid rapidly broke up and ejected a high-velocity vapor/liquid stream. The zone of intense vaporization and liquid fragmentation proceeded as a front that advanced into the test fluids. No nucleation of bubbles in the bulk of the superheated liquid was observed. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  14. Controlling the Mobility of the Fluid Interface of Moving Gas Bubbles or Liquid Drops by Using Micellar Solutions of Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity processes must rely on mechanisms other than buoyancy to move bubbles or droplets from one region to another in a continuous liquid phase. One suggested method is thermocapillary migration in which a temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase. A significant and as yet unresolved impediment to the use of thermocapillary migration to direct bubble or drop motion is that these migrations can be significantly retarded by the adsorption onto the fluid particle surface of surface active impurities unavoidably present in the continuous or (if the particle is a liquid) droplet phases. The focus of our research was to develop a theory for remobilizing fluid particle interfaces retarded by a surfactant impurity in an effort to make more viable the use of thermocapillary migrations for the management of bubbles and drops in microgravity. We postulated that a surfactant at high bulk concentration which kinetically exchanges rapidly with the surface can restore interface mobility. The scaling arguments along with a discussion of the previous literature is reviewed in the context of the scaling framework. The specific objectives of the research were twofold. The first was to prove the remobilization theory by studying a model problem. As the mechanism for remobilization is independent of the force which drives the particle, the fluid particle shape and the presence of fluid inertia, we chose the simplest model consisting of a spherical bubble rising steadily by buoyancy in creeping flow. We solved the hydrodynamic and surfactant transport equations for rapid kinetic exchange to demonstrate that as the concentration increases, the Marangoni retardation at first increases (the low k behavior) and then decreases (the high k behavior). The second objective was to develop a method to determine the kinetic rate constants of a surfactant molecule, since this information is necessary to select surfactants which will exchange rapidly enough relative to the

  15. Does capillarity influence chemical reaction in drops and bubbles? A thermodynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeld, A; Sefiane, K; Benielli, D; Steinchen, A

    2000-07-28

    After a brief introduction on the variables which describe the physico-chemical properties of a fluid surface, this paper compares, in a very simple way, the equilibrium constant of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions taking place in spherical micro-objects (uncharged and charged droplets and bubbles) and in media bordered by a flat interface. This quantity is by definition the exponential of the dimensionless standard chemical affinity whose values ( or = 0) may indicate the direction and the importance of the reaction (strictly true when the mixing term of the affinity is zero). The classical thermodynamic approach combined with the Laplace equation shows that: (i) high surface tension and high curvature influence the equilibrium constant, this effect being, however, much more important for bubbles than for droplets; (ii) charges on droplets reduce this effect; (iii) the constant of reaction taking place in the vapour in contact with a charged droplet depends significantly on the electric field pressure; (iv) reactions in droplets dispersed in the liquid phase are discussed and, in particular, capillarity seems to play a negligible role on reactions in micro-emulsions; (v) the surface amount of a gas bubble component transferred in the continuous liquid can be related to capillary quantities; (vi) expanding (or shrinking) bubble induced by a chemical reaction is analysed by using an extended Laplace law which includes the volumetric flow rate; (vii) the Laplace law is discussed in the frame of the choice of the dividing surface. Numerous actual examples from the atmosphere, sonochemistry and metallurgy illustrate the theory proposed. One of the interest, among other points, is that small objects (specially bubbles) give the potentiality to obtain, for steady or (near) equilibrium states, large amount of components which would not be possible when dealing with large reservoirs.

  16. Superheated emulsions in neutron spectrometry by varying ambient pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mala; Sawamura, Teruko

    2005-01-01

    The principle of present work lies on the dependence of the threshold neutron energy on the dimensionless quantity ''degree of metastability (ss)'' of superheated liquids. The response of the superheated emulsions consists of the drops of superheated liquid (C 2 Cl 2 F 4 , b.p. 3.77 deg. C) has been measured at different 'ss' by varying ambient pressure at different temperatures, in the presence of neutrons generated in Pb by a (γ,n) reaction from 45 MeV electron LINAC of Hokkaido University. To unfold the neutron energy spectrum, a relationship has been developed between the 'ss' of superheated liquids and the threshold neutron energy. The spectrum at the detector position has been calculated by the MCNP code and a comparison has been made with the experimental spectrum. The utilisation of 'ss' is more flexible as this relation can be applied to both positive and negative ambient pressures as well as at different ambient temperatures

  17. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when bubb...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy.......Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...

  18. Acoustic response of superheated droplet detectors to neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Size; Zhang Guiying; Ni Bangfa; Zhao Changjun; Zhang Huanqiao; Guan Yongjing; Chen Zhe; Xiao Caijin; Liu Chao; Liu Cunxiong

    2012-01-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is a hot field nowadays, a number of innovative techniques have emerged. The superheated droplet technique is relatively mature; however, it is recently revitalized in a number of frontier fields including the search for DM. In this work, the acoustic response of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) to neutrons was studied by using a 252 Cf neutron source, SDDs developed by the China Institute of Atomic Energy, a sound sensor, a sound card and a PC. Sound signals were filtered. The characteristics of FFT spectra, power spectra and time constants were used to determine the authenticity of the bubbles analyzed.

  19. Capillary meniscus dynamometry—method for determining the surface tension of drops and bubbles with isotropic and anisotropic surface stress distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Alexandrov, Nikola A; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-02-15

    The stresses acting in interfacial adsorption layers with surface shear elasticity are, in general, anisotropic and non-uniform. If a pendant drop or buoyant bubble is covered with such elastic layer, the components of surface tension acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", σ(s) and σ(φ), can be different and, then, the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) is inapplicable. Here, a method for determining σ(s) and σ(φ) is developed for axisymmetric menisci. This method, called 'capillary meniscus dynamometry' (CMD), is based on processing data for the digitized drop/bubble profile and capillary pressure. The principle of the CMD procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of DSA. Applying the tangential and normal surface stress balance equations, σ(s) and σ(φ) are determined in each interfacial point without using any rheological model. The computational procedure is fast and could be used in real time, during a given process. The method is applied to determine σ(s) and σ(φ) for bubbles and drops formed on the tip of a capillary immersed in solutions of the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Upon a surface compression, meridional wrinkles appear on the bubble surface below the bubble "equator", where the azimuthal tension σ(φ) takes negative values. The CMD method allows one to determine the local tensions acting in anisotropic interfacial layers (films, membranes), like those formed from proteins, polymers, asphaltenes and phospholipids. The CMD is applicable also to fluid interfaces (e.g. surfactant solutions), for which it gives the same surface tension as the conventional methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. a Theoretical Model of a Superheated Liquid Droplet Neutron Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mark Joseph

    Neutrons can interact with the atoms in superheated liquid droplets which are suspended in a viscous matrix material, resulting in the formation of charged recoil ions. These ions transfer energy to the liquid, sometimes resulting in the droplets vaporizing and producing observable bubbles. Devices employing this mechanism are known as superheated liquid droplet detectors, or bubble detectors. The basis of bubble detector operation is identical to that of bubble chambers, which have been well characterized by researchers such as Wilson, Glaser, Seitz, and others since the 1950's. Each of the microscopic superheated liquid droplets behaves like an independent bubble chamber. This dissertation presents a theoretical model which considers the three principal aspects of detector operation: nuclear reactions, charged particle energy deposition, and thermodynamic bubble formation. All possible nuclear reactions were examined and those which could reasonably result in recoil ions sufficiently energetic to vaporize a droplet were analyzed in detail. Feasible interactions having adequate cross sections include elastic and inelastic scattering, n-proton, and n-alpha reactions. Ziegler's TRansport of Ions in Matter (TRIM) code was used to calculate the ions' stopping powers in various compounds based on the ionic energies predicted by standard scattering distributions. If the ions deposit enough energy in a small enough volume then the entire droplet will vaporize without further energy input. Various theories as to the vaporization of droplets by ionizing radiation were studied and a novel method of predicting the critical (minimum) energy was developed. This method can be used to calculate the minimum required stopping power for the ion, from which the threshold neutron energy is obtainable. Experimental verification of the model was accomplished by measuring the response of two different types of bubble detectors to monoenergetic thermal neutrons, as well as to neutrons

  1. Dark matter searches using superheated liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bou-Cabo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct detection of dark matter is one of the most important topics in modern physics. It is estimated that 22% of universe matter is composed by dark matter in front of 0.4% of ordinary matter like stars, galaxies planets and all kind of known astrophysical objects. Several kinds of experiments are nowadays involved in detection of one of the more accepted particle candidates to be dark matter: WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. These detectors, using several kinds of techniques: Cryogenic semiconductors, scintillation materials like I Na or noble gas chambers among others, are reporting very interesting but inconclusive results. In this paper a review of detectors that are using the superheated liquid technique in bubble chambers in order to detect WIMPs is reported. Basically, we will report about Coupp (Chicagoland observatory for underground particle physics, PICO that is composed by Coupp and Picasso researchers having the aim to build a ton experiment and also about a new detector named MOSCAB (Materia oscura a bolle that recently published a first results of a test chamber that uses also superheated liquid technique but as a Geyser chamber.

  2. Superheating in coated niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T.; Wasserman, W.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Using muon spin rotation it is shown that the field of first flux penetration {H}{entry} in Nb is enhanced by about 30% if coated with an overlayer of Nb3Sn or MgB2. This is consistent with an increase from the lower critical magnetic field {H}{{c}1} up to the superheating field {H}{sh} of the Nb substrate. In the experiments presented here coatings of Nb3Sn and MgB2 with a thickness between 50 and 2000 nm have been tested. {H}{entry} does not depend on material or thickness. This suggests that the energy barrier at the boundary between the two materials prevents flux entry up to {H}{sh} of the substrate. A mechanism consistent with these findings is that the proximity effect recovers the stability of the energy barrier for flux penetration, which is suppressed by defects for uncoated samples. Additionally, a low temperature baked Nb sample has been tested. Here a 6% increase of {H}{entry} was found, also pushing {H}{entry} beyond {H}{{c}1}.

  3. Detection in superheated water chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chienthavorn, O

    1999-11-01

    Superheated water has been used successfully as an eluent in liquid chromatography and has been coupled to various modes of detection, ultraviolet (UV), fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). A number of compounds were examined on poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB), polybutadiene (PBD), and octadecylsilyl bonded silica (ODS) column with isothermal and temperature programmes. The PS-DVB column was mostly used throughout the project as it was the most stable. Not only pure water could serve as superheated water mobile phase; inorganic buffered water and ion-pairing reagent with a concentration of 1-3 mM of the buffer and reagent were also exploited. It was shown that the pH could be controlled during the separation without salt precipitation and the separations followed a conventional reversed-phase HPLC method. Results from fluorescence detection showed good separation of a series of vitamins, such as pyridoxine, riboflavin, thiamine, and some analgesics. The relationship of riboflavin using the detection was linear and the detection limit was seven times higher than that of a conventional method. Simultaneous separation and identification using superheated water chromatography-NMR was demonstrated. With using a stop flow method, NMR spectra of model drugs, namely barbiturates, paracetamol, caffeine and phenacetin were obtained and the results agreed with reference spectra, confirming a perfect separation. A demonstration to obtain COSY spectrum of salicylamide was also performed. The method was expanded to the coupling of superheated water LC to NMR-MS. Results from the hyphenated detection method showed that deuteration and degradation happened in the superheated water conditions. The methyl group hydrogens of pyrimidine ring of sulfonamide and thiamine were exchanged with deuterium. Thiamine was decomposed to 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol and both were deuterated under the conditions. (author)

  4. Lifetime of superheated steam components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoklossa, K.H.; Oude-Hengel, H.H.; Kraechter, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    The current evaluation schemes in use for judging the lifetime expectations of superheated steam components are compared with each other. The influence of pressure and temperature fluctuations, the differences in the strength of the wall, and the spread band of constant-strainrates are critically investigated. The distribution of these contributory effects are demonstrated in the hight of numerous measuring results. As an important supplement to these evaluation schemes a newly developed technique is introduced which is designed to calculate failure probabilities. (orig./RW) [de

  5. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  6. Utilization of virtual reality for reading the superheated emulsion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Sobrinho, Jose C.; Santo, Andre C.E.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Mol, Antonio C.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method based on Virtual Reality for reading the Superheated Emulsion Detector (Bubble Detector). The proposed method is an alternative to: automatic counters offered by the manufacturers of detectors, since they have a relatively high cost (acquisition, maintenance and periodic calibration), and visual counting of detectors, since it only has an advantage when there are a small number of bubbles. The method starts with the collection of detector's digital images in order to obtain a sequence of images to create an animation that is displayed with the help of Virtual Reality. To this end, it is modeled, using OpenGL graphics library, a virtual environment for visualizing and manipulating virtual detector. It is made, then a calibration of this virtual environment thus ensuring the correspondence of the model with reality. The reading of the detector (bubbles count) is made visually by the user with the assistance of stereo vision and a 3D cursor to navigation, marking and counting the bubbles. The user views a further auxiliary display that shows the three-dimensional cursor position, the labeled amount of bubbles and the measured dose. After testing, the following results were achieved: better precision in counting the bubbles compared with the 10% reported by the manufacturer of the automatic reader; achieving a low cost tool that requires no calibration constant in the process of maintenance and/or lifetime; minimizing the problem of manual counting for large number of bubbles and ease of use, because can be operated by a common user. (author)

  7. Nucleation efficiency of R134a as a sensitive liquid for superheated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    October 2010 physics pp. 675–682. Nucleation efficiency of R134a as a sensitive liquid for superheated drop emulsion detector. MALA DAS1,∗, R SARKAR2, P K ... 1NAP Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064,. India ..... [10] M J Harper, B W Baker and M E Nelson, Health Phys.

  8. Etude expérimentale des phénomènes de coalescence dans les systèmes bulles-gouttes Experimental Study of Coalescence Phenomena in Bubble-Drop Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roques H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A l'occasion d'une étude sur les séparations eau-hydrocarbures par flottation, nous avons été amenés à étudier expérimentalement les coalescences bulle-goutte, goutte-goutte et bulle-bulle dans le système triphasique eau-air-kérosène. Les 4 montages expérimentaux décrits nous ont permis d'étudier les aspects statiques (structure du complexe bulle-goutte qui se forme et dynamiques (temps de coalescence moyens bulle-goutte, goutte-goutte et bulle-bulle et d'étudier l'influence de composés transférables d'une phase à l'autre sur ces temps de coalescence moyens. Du point de vue statique, la configuration stable du complexe bulle d'air-goutte de kérosène correspond à la formation à l'interface eau-air d'un film d'hydrocarbure qui entoure la bulle d'air, Par contre, la fixation d'une bulle d'air à la périphérie d'une goutte de kérosène, selon la disposition classique dans la flottation des solides, ne s'observe ici que rarement et toujours de façon transitoire. D'un point de vue cinétique on observe que : - les coalescences bulle-bulle ou goutte-goutte sont toujours favorisées (les temps de coalescence moyens diminuent lorsqu'on introduit dans la phase gaz ou dans l'une des phases liquides un composé transférable dans l'autre phase liquide; - les coalescences bulle-goutte sont favorisées par la présence dans la phase gaz d'un composé transférable dans la phase continue aqueuse ou par la présence dans la phase dispersée liquide d'un composé transférable dans la phase continue aqueuse; - les coalescences bulle-goutte sont défavorisées par la présence dans la phase continue aqueuse d'un composé transférable sur les gouttes constituant la phase dispersée liquide. During a study of water-hydrocarbon separations by flotation, we were led to make an experimental examination of bubble-drop, drop-drop and bubble-bubble coalescences in a three-phase water-air-kerosene system. The four experimental arrangements

  9. Inhomogeneous seeding of quark bubbles in Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Garcia, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this proceedings contribution we briefly discuss about the consequences of the presence of Majorana dark matter in a dense neutron star environment focusing on a particularly interesting possible indirect effect, namely that of bubble nucleation. This is somewhat similar to current techniques developed for direct detection using bubble chamber or superheated droplet detectors.

  10. Atomization of Impinging Droplets on Superheated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Preston; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Water droplets impinging smooth superheated surfaces may be characterized by dynamic vapor bubbles rising to the surface, popping, and causing a spray of tiny droplets to erupt from the droplet. This spray is called secondary atomization. Here, atomization is quantified experimentally for water droplets impinging superheated superhydrophobic surfaces. Smooth hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces with varying rib and post microstructuring were explored. Each surface was placed on an aluminum heating block, and impingement events were captured with a high speed camera at 3000 fps. For consistency among tests, all events were normalized by the maximum atomization found over a range of temperatures on a smooth hydrophobic surface. An estimate of the level of atomization during an impingement event was created by quantifying the volume of fluid present in the atomization spray. Droplet diameter and Weber number were held constant, and atomization was found for a range of temperatures through the lifetime of the impinging droplet. The Leidenfrost temperature was also determined and defined to be the lowest temperature at which atomization ceases to occur. Both atomization and Leidenfrost temperature increase with decreasing pitch (distance between microstructures).

  11. Stationary phases for superheated water chromatography

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, S

    2002-01-01

    This project focused on the comparison of conventional liquid chromatography and superheated water chromatography. It examined the differences in efficiency and retention of a range of different stationary phases. Alkyl aryl ketones and eight aromatic compounds were separated on PBD-zirconia, Xterra RP 18, Luna C sub 1 sub 8 (2) and Oasis HLB columns using conventional LC and superheated water chromatography system. The retention indices were determined in the different eluents. On changing the organic component of the eluent from methanol to acetonitrile to superheated water considerable improvements were found in the peak shapes and column efficiencies on the PBD-zirconia and Oasis HLB columns. PS-DVB, PBD-zirconia and Xterra RP 18 columns have been used in efficiency studies. It was found that simply elevating the column temperature did not increase the efficiency of a separation in superheated water chromatography. The efficiency depended on flow rate, injection volume and also mobile phase preheating sys...

  12. Drying Western Red Cedar with Superheated Steam

    OpenAIRE

    Elustondo, Diego; Ahmed, Sheikh Ali; Oliveira, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study evaluated the possibility of drying 50-mm-thick western red cedar with superheated steam. Since there are no industrial facilities in Canada drying western red cedar with superheated steam, the study was designed to explore the potential of this technology in terms of lumber quality, moisture content distribution, and drying time. The experiments showed that the 50-mm-thick product can be dried in less than three days without jeopardizing lumber quality (in comparison w...

  13. Preliminary results on bubble detector as personal neutron dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.; Viswanathan, S.; Indira, R.

    2011-01-01

    The bubble detector is demonstrated as one of the best suitable neutron detectors for neutron dose rate measurements in the presence of high-intense gamma fields. Immobilisation of a volatile liquid in a superheated state and achieving uniform distribution of tiny superheated droplets were a practical challenge. A compact and reusable bubble detector with high neutron sensitivity has been developed at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research by immobilising the superheated droplets in a suitable polymer matrix. Two types of bubble detectors have been successfully developed, one by incorporating isobutane for measuring fast neutron and another by incorporating Freon-12 for both fast and thermal neutron. The performance of the detector has been tested using 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source and the results are described. (authors)

  14. Application of superheated emulsions in neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mala; Abe, Masashi; Sawamura, Teruko; Roy, S.C; Chatterjee, B.K.; Roy, B.

    2003-01-01

    'Superheated emulsions' are known to detect energetic radiations. The use of superheated emulsion as neutron spectrometry needs monoenergetic neutrons for the calibration. Because of the limitation of the availability of monoenergetic neutrons, the present work deals with the alternative method to find out the temperature-threshold neutron energy relationship for superheated emulsions. R-114 (C2C12F4, b.p.3.77degC) is used as the superheated liquid to unfold the neutron energy spectrum generated at Pb target by 45 MeV electron LINAC. The normalized response of the emulsion with temperature is obtained as an integrated spectrum, the derivative of which generates neutron energy spectrum. It is noted that R114 detector is insensitive to gamma rays at low temperature and it is only at 70degC to low energy. The present study gives an approach to the application of superheated emulsions in neutron spectrometry in a complex radiation field of both gamma rays and neutrons of different energy. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Superheated emulsions for the detection of special nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Errico, Francesco; Di Fulvio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    A novel solution for the detection and smuggling interdiction of special nuclear materials is presented here consisting of large detector modules which contain superheated emulsions and which are readout with an optical approach. The detectors can be produced to be fully sensitive to prompt fission neutrons and totally insensitive to the interrogation beam, whether X-rays or neutrons below a chosen energy threshold. Therefore, the detectors are able to operate while the selected interrogation beam is on and they will only pick up the signal from fission neutrons. A position-sensitive readout mechanism is used in our design, relying on the scattering of light by neutron-induced bubbles. A beam of coherent light crosses the active area of the detector, and local variations in scattered light due to the presence of bubbles are detected in real time by arrays of silicon planar photodiodes affixed along the whole length of the detector. The system may offer a variety of advantages compared to current approaches, such as the possibility of simultaneous irradiation and detection, i.e. a 100% duty cycle, without requiring complex signal analysis, and high signal-to-noise ratio, minimizing costly nuisance alarms, thanks to its inherent insensitivity to photons.

  16. Use of basic principle of nucleation in determining temperature-threshold neutron energy relationship in superheated emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Chatterjee, B K; Roy, S C

    2003-01-01

    Detection of neutrons through use of superheated emulsions has been known for about two decades. The minimum neutron energy (threshold) required to nucleate drops of a given liquid has a dependence on the temperature of the liquid. The basic principle of nucleation has been utilized to find the relationship between the operating temperature and threshold neutron energy for superheated emulsions made of R-114 liquid. The threshold energy thus determined for different temperatures has been compared with accurate experimental results obtained using monoenergetic neutron sources. The agreement is found to be satisfactory and confirms the applicability of the present simple method to other liquids.

  17. PICO Bubble Chambers for Dark Matter Searches: Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Russell; PICO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PICO collaboration uses bubble chambers to search for WIMP dark matter particles. The bubble chambers are operated in a moderately superheated state, providing superb rejection of the dominant gamma background, and are filled with fluorinated target fluids ideally suited for investigating spin-dependent WIMP-proton interactions. PICO currently operates a 2-liter (PICO-2L) and a 32-liter (PICO-60) bubble chamber at the SNOLAB deep underground laboratory. I will discuss recent activities by the PICO collaboration to understand and mitigate an anomalous background that has impacted previous dark matter searches, plans for the operating experiments, and prospects for a future ton-scale PICO bubble chamber.

  18. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Felis, Ivan; Mart?nez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. ...

  19. A superheated Bose-condensed gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Alexander L.; Fletcher, Richard J.; Smith, Robert P.; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2013-05-01

    Our understanding of various states of matter usually relies on the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. However, the transitions between different phases of matter can be strongly affected by non-equilibrium phenomena. Here we demonstrate and explain an example of non-equilibrium stalling of a continuous, second-order phase transition. We create a superheated atomic Bose gas, in which a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) persists above the equilibrium critical temperature, Tc, if its coupling to the surrounding thermal bath is reduced by tuning interatomic interactions. For vanishing interactions the BEC persists in the superheated regime for a minute. However, if strong interactions are suddenly turned on, it rapidly boils away. Our observations can be understood within a two-fluid picture, treating the condensed and thermal components of the gas as separate equilibrium systems with a tunable inter-component coupling. We experimentally reconstruct a non-equilibrium phase diagram of our gas, and theoretically reproduce its main features.

  20. On the thermodynamics and kinetics of superheated fluorocarbon phase-change agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Paul A; Borden, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Superheated nanodrops are a new class of submicron-diameter liquid emulsion particles comprising perfluoropropane (C 3 F 8 ), perfluorobutane (C 4 F 10 ) and perfluoropentane (C 5 F 12 ) that are being developed for ultrasound imaging and therapy. They can be formed by condensation of precursor lipid-coated, gas-filled microbubbles. Application of ultrasound or laser energy triggers the phase transformation back to a vapor bubble, and this process can be exploited for certain biomedical applications. The nanodrops are remarkably metastable in the liquid state under physiological conditions, even though they are highly superheated. In prior work, it was suggested that a high Laplace pressure in the lipid-coated nanodrop is responsible for its stability in the superheated state. Recent work by our group, however, points to the energy barrier for homogeneous nucleation as a more likely explanation. The purpose of this article is to review and discuss this mechanism in greater detail. We start with a brief description of basic fluorocarbon intermolecular forces. We then use the van der Waals equation of state to construct equilibrium phase diagrams and saturation curves. The effect of droplet Laplace pressure is superimposed onto these curves and compared to experimental data, where a poor correlation is observed. It is also shown that nanodrops with Laplace pressure are unstable to dissolution. The mechanism of homogeneous nucleation is then offered as an alternative explanation for the metastability of superheated nanodrops, with calculations that show good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermoeconomic optimization of subcooled and superheated vapor compression refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selbas, Resat; Kizilkan, Onder; Sencan, Arzu

    2006-01-01

    An exergy-based thermoeconomic optimization application is applied to a subcooled and superheated vapor compression refrigeration system. The advantage of using the exergy method of thermoeconomic optimization is that various elements of the system-i.e., condenser, evaporator, subcooling and superheating heat exchangers-can be optimized on their own. The application consists of determining the optimum heat exchanger areas with the corresponding optimum subcooling and superheating temperatures. A cost function is specified for the optimum conditions. All calculations are made for three refrigerants: R22, R134a, and R407c. Thermodynamic properties of refrigerants are formulated using the Artificial Neural Network methodology

  2. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  3. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2014-06-04

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  4. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  5. Leidenfrost drops cooling surfaces: theory and interferometric measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Sun, Chao; Colinet, Pierre; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid drop is placed on a highly superheated surface, it can be levitated by its own vapour. This remarkable phenomenon is referred to as the Leidenfrost effect. The thermally insulating vapour film results in a severe reduction of the heat transfer rate compared to experiments at lower

  6. Effect of pressure-drop rate on the isolation of cananga oil using instantaneous controlled pressure-drop process

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiawan, Magdalena; Sobolik, Vaclav; Al Haddad, Mazen; Allaf, Karim

    2008-01-01

    The isolation of Indonesian cananga oil was carried out by a new process, instantaneous controlled pressure drop (DIC). Dry cananga flowers (Cananga odorata Hook. fil. et Thomson, forma macrophylla) were exposed for a short time to saturated steam and then the pressure was abruptly decreased to a vacuum level (about 5 kPa). This abrupt pressure drop provokes auto-vaporization of the superheated volatile compounds, expansion and breaking of the cell walls and instantaneous cooling. In this ...

  7. Shaping drops with textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Quentin; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe

    2017-11-01

    When a drop impacts a substrate, it can behave differently depending on the nature of the surface and of the liquid (spreading, bouncing, resting, splashing ...). Understanding these behaviors is crucial to predict the drop morphology during and after impact. Whereas surface wettability has extensively been studied, the effect of surface roughness remains hardly explored. In this work, we consider the impact of a drop in a pure non-wetting situation by using superheated substrates i.e. in the Leidenfrost regime. The surface texture consists of a well-controlled microscopic defect shaped with photolithography on a smooth silicon wafer. Different regimes are observed, depending on the distance between the defect and the impact point and the defect size. Comparing the lamella thickness versus the defect height proves relevant as the transition criteria between regimes. Others characteristics of the drop behavior (direction of satellite droplet ejection, lamella rupture) are also well captured by inertial/capillary models. Drop impacts on multiple defects are also investigated and drop shape well predicted considering the interactions between the local flow and the defects.

  8. Cognitive Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Ciril Bosch-Rosa; Thomas Meissner; Antoni Bosch-Domènech

    2015-01-01

    Smith et al. (1988) reported large bubbles and crashes in experimental asset markets, a result that has been replicated by a large literature. Here we test whether the occurrence of bubbles depends on the experimental subjects' cognitive sophistication. In a two-part experiment, we first run a battery of tests to assess the subjects' cognitive sophistication and classify them into low or high levels of cognitive sophistication. We then invite them separately to two asset market experimen...

  9. Bubbling away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented

  10. Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Craig, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a number of noteworthy achievements in other fields, superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) and bubble chambers (BCs) have not been used for nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. This report examines these two radiation-detection technologies in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be ''adapted'' for use in national security applications. These technologies involve closely related approaches to radiation detection in which an energetic charged particle deposits sufficient energy to initiate the process of bubble nucleation in a superheated fluid. These detectors offer complete gamma-ray insensitivity when used to detect neutrons. They also provide controllable neutron-energy thresholds and excellent position resolution. SDDs are extraordinarily simple and inexpensive. BCs offer the promise of very high efficiency (∼75%). A notable drawback for both technologies is temperature sensitivity. As a result of this problem, the temperature must be controlled whenever high accuracy is required, or harsh environmental conditions are encountered. The primary findings of this work are listed and briefly summarized below: (1) SDDs are ready to function as electronics-free neutron detectors on demand for arms-control applications. The elimination of electronics at the weapon's location greatly eases the negotiability of radiation-detection technologies in general. (2) As a result of their high efficiency and sharp energy threshold, current BCs are almost ready for use in the development of a next-generation active assay system. Development of an instrument based on appropriately safe materials is warranted. (3) Both kinds of bubble detectors are ready for use whenever very high gamma-ray fields must be confronted. Spent fuel MPC and A is a good example where this need presents itself. (4) Both kinds of bubble detectors have the potential to function as low-cost replacements for conventional neutron detectors such as 3 He tubes. For SDDs

  11. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn V; Burns, Michael M; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  12. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  13. Accessible superheating and critical parameters of polyethylene siloxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, E.D.; Pavlov, P.A.; Popov, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Method of pulsed heating is applied to measure temperature of accessible superheating and critical parameters of polyethylene siloxanes PES-1, PES-4 and PES-5 used as coolants. The described method of P k and T k critical parameter determination is not so accurate as traditional ones. It should be used in reference to thermally instable compounds and in proximate measurements

  14. La moral de los superhéroes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Rozo Mila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Los superhéroes, el deber moral y la obligación; El caso de Spider-Man y los X-Men. Laura Victoria Bolaño Pérez; Universidad del Rosario, colección Ópera Prima, Bogotá, 2012, 309 págs.

  15. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-01-01

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super-heating

  16. Leverage bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  17. The life and death of film bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, S.; Villermaux, E.; Bourouiba, L.

    2017-11-01

    Following its burst, the fragmentation of a large bubble (film bubble) at the air-water interface can release hundreds of micrometer-sized film-drops in the air we breathe. This mechanism of droplet formation is one of the most prominent sources of sea spray. Indoor or outdoor, pathogens from contaminated water are transported by these droplets and have also been linked to respiratory infection. The lifetime and thickness of bubbles govern the number and size of the droplets they produce. Despite these important implications, little is known about the factors influencing the life and death of surface film bubbles. In particular, the fundamental physical mechanisms linking bubble aging, thinning, and lifetime remain poorly understood. To address this gap, we present the results of an extensive investigation of the aging of film-drop-producing bubbles in various ambient air, water composition, and temperature conditions. We present and validate a generalized physical picture and model of bubble cap thickness evolution. The model and physical picture are linked to the lifetime of bubbles via a series of cap rupture mechanisms of increasing efficiency.

  18. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  19. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  20. Superheated Droplet Detectors as CDM Detectors The SIMPLE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Limagne, D; Waysand, G

    1996-01-01

    Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) are becoming commonplace in neutron personnel dosimetry. Their total insensitivity to minimum ionizing radiation (while responsive to nuclear recoils of energies ~ few keV), together with their low cost, ease of production, and operation at room temperature and 1 atm makes them ideal for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) searches. SDD's are optimal for the exploration of the spin-dependent neutralino coupling due to their high fluorine content. The status of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) is presented. Under realistic background considerations, we expect an improvement in the present Cold Dark Matter sensitivity of 2-3 orders of magnitude after ~1 kg-y of data acquisition.

  1. Superheated Water-Cooled Small Modular Underwater Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Koroush Shirvan; Mujid Kazimi

    2016-01-01

    A novel fully passive small modular superheated water reactor (SWR) for underwater deployment is designed to produce 160 MWe with steam at 500ºC to increase the thermodynamic efficiency compared with standard light water reactors. The SWR design is based on a conceptual 400-MWe integral SWR using the internally and externally cooled annular fuel (IXAF). The coolant boils in the external channels throughout the core to approximately the same quality as a conventional boiling water reactor and ...

  2. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE DRUM BOILER SUPERHEATED STEAM TEMPERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravliov A.A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The control system of the temperature of the superheated steam of the drum boiler is examined. Main features of the system are the PI-controller in the external control loop and introduction of the functional component of the error signal of the external control loop with the negative feedback of the error signal between the prescribed value of steam flowrate and the signal of the steam flowrate in the exit of the boiler in the internal control loop.

  3. Superheated superconducting granules: a detector for particle physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1987-01-01

    A general introduction to superheated superconducting granules (SSG) detectors is given and some recent results on their basic properties are presented. Granules recently made by industrial producers exhibit good metastability properties and show sensitivity, better than naively expected, to photons and ionizing particles. The behaviour of SSG detectors at very low temperatures is also discussed. We finally sketch a critical review of proposed applications to the cross-disciplinary frontier between particle physics and astrophysics

  4. Blowing bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteel, K.

    1999-04-01

    The article, based on a series of interviews with column flotation equipment suppliers, reviews and comments on the progress of bubble generator design. Developments mentioned include the Air/Water sparger from Cominco, the SparJet and SlamJet from CPT, the CISA sparger from Sevala CISA, Microcel flotation columns from Birtley Engineering, Flotaire column flotation cells from LMC International, and the Variable Gap Sparger from MinnovEX. 1 fig., 2 photo.

  5. Bubble Detector Neutron Measurements on JET High Performance Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherendi, M.; Craciunescu, T.; Pantea, A.; Zoita, V. [Association EURATOM-MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Conroy, S.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Hellesen, C. [Association EURATOM-VR, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Association EURATOM-ENEA, RFX, Padova (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    A neutron diagnostics technique based on the bubble detectors has been successfully used for measurements during the JET experimental campaigns of 2008 and 2009. The main aim of these measurements was the determination of the neutron field characteristics in high performance discharges which employ high neutral beam powers ({approx}20 MW) and produce neutron yields in the range (3-5)*10{sup 16} neutrons per pulse. The neutron field parameters at a specific location above a narrow collimating channel in the ceiling of the JET Torus Hall have been measured simultaneously by two independent techniques (super-heated fluid detectors or 'bubble detectors' and time-of-flight). The bubble detector measurement location is situated at the end of a vertical collimated line of sight, behind the TOFOR time-of-flight spectrometer. The field-of-view of the neutron detectors can be varied by means of a pre-collimator. Spatial (radial and toroidal) distributions of the neutron fluence have been obtained using two-dimensional arrays containing up to 10 bubble detectors. The operation of the bubble detector array as a neutron pinhole camera having a radial resolution at the JET vacuum chamber mid-plane of about 55 mm was demonstrated in measurements using various openings of the pre-collimator. The comparison of the area integrated fluence determined by the bubble detector array with the TOFOR neutron flux has shown a good correlation factor of about 0.99. (authors)

  6. MOSCAB: a geyser-concept bubble chamber to be used in a dark matter search

    OpenAIRE

    Antonicci, A.; Ardid, M.; Bertoni, R.; Bruno, G.; Burgio, N.; Caruso, G.; Cattaneo, D.; Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Corcione, M.; Cretara, L.; Cundy, D.; Felis, I.; Frullini, M.; Fulgione, W.

    2017-01-01

    The MOSCAB experiment (Materia OSCura A Bolle) uses the "geyser technique", a variant of the superheated liquid technique of extreme simplicity. Operating principles of the new dark matter detector and technical solutions of the device are reported in detail. First results obtained in a series of test runs taken in laboratory demonstrate that we have successfully built and tested a geyser-concept bubble chamber that can be used in particle physics, especially in dark matter searches, and that...

  7. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  8. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  9. Bubbles & Squat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre Larsen, Signe

    Years Eve they arranged a similar event, and on their facebook event they wrote that ‘Your last training in 2016 might as well be a party’. The concept has been popular, and in the spring of 2017 it evolved into similar events such as ‘Cocktails & Kettlebells’. Our paper aims to contribute......In Denmark a new fitness chain has seen the light of day. It is called Repeat and on their facebook page it is presented as “A new breed of fitness. Metropolitan environment. Flexible terms & prices. Join the revolution.” As part of this ‘fitness revolution’ they introduced, in the autumn of 2016......, a new concept called ‘Bubbles & Squat’, where fitness training is combined with Champagne and a live DJ. One of the invitations for this event describes how “we spice up your friday training with live DJ and lots of refreshing bubbles, to make sure that you are ready for the weekend (...).” Before New...

  10. Proposals of counting method for bubble detectors and their intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Eduardo; Silva, Ademir X.; Bellido, Luis F.; Facure, Alessandro; Pereira, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The study of neutron's spectrometry and dosimetry has become significantly easier due to relatively new devices called bubble detectors. Insensitive to gamma rays and composed by superheated emulsions, they still are subjects of many researches in Radiation Physics and Nuclear Engineering. In bubble detectors, either exposed to more intense neutron fields or for a long time, when more bubbles are produced, the statistical uncertainty during the dosimetric and spectrometric processes is reduced. A proposal of this nature is set up in this work, which presents ways to perform counting processes for bubble detectors and an updated proceeding to get the irradiated detectors' images in order to make the manual counting easier. Twelve BDS detectors were irradiated by RDS111 cyclotron from IEN's (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear) and photographed using an assembly specially designed for this experiment. Counting was proceeded manually in a first moment; simultaneously, ImagePro was used in order to perform counting automatically. The bubble counting values, either manual or automatic, were compared and the time to get them and their difficult levels as well. After the bubble counting, the detectors' standardizes responses were calculated in both cases, according to BDS's manual and they were also compared. Among the results, the counting on these devices really becomes very hard at a large number of bubbles, besides higher variations in counting of many bubbles. Because of the good agreement between manual counting and the custom program, the last one revealed a good alternative in practical and economical levels. Despite the good results, the custom program needs of more adjustments in order to achieve more accuracy on higher counting on bubble detectors for neutron measurement applications. (author)

  11. Effects of superheated steam on the drying of rubberwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokwan Buaphud

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Rubberwood drying is the most time and energy consuming step in the processing of wood product. This research studied the effect of superheated steam drying on the drying time required and the physical and mechanical properties of rubberwood after drying. In this study, a cylindrical drying chamber with a length of 1.2 m and a diameter of 0.5 m was constructed and injected with superheated steam. The dimensions of the wood lumber were 1 m × 7.62 cm × 2.54 cm. The wood samples were impinged with alternating cycles of superheated steam and hot air at ratios of 6:1, 4:1 and 1:6 hours until the moisture content was less than 15% dry basis. The conditions inside the chamber were 110ºC and ambient pressure. Continuous superheated steam and continuous hot air were also used for comparisons. The drying rate and the temperature profile for each process were determined.Initial acceptability of the dried wood was conducted using the prong test and visual inspection. Results showed that if the drying rate was too fast, the dried wood did not pass the prong test due to stress buildup. Therefore, an optimum drying condition was developed based on minimizing defects and reducing the drying time. For the optimum condition, the following schedule was carried out: (1 saturated steam at 100ºC was used during the first 4 hours of drying to prevent the wood surface from drying too quickly which would minimize the moisture gradient between the center and wood surface, (2 superheated steam at 105ºC and 110ºC was used in alternating cycle with hot air (80ºC during the main drying stages to rapidly remove the free water and majority of the bound water inside the wood, and (3 hot air was used continuously during the final stages of drying to reduce the relative humidity inside the chamber making it possible for the removal of the residual bound water. This process successfully reduced the drying time to less than 2 days without causing any defects which compared

  12. Superhéroes y la web 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Quintanal Pérez, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Se puede conseguir incentivar el proceso de aprendizaje en Bachillerato de una asignatura, Física y Química, considerada tradicionalmente como “dura”, empleando estrategias metodológicas y herramientas tecnológicas adecuadas, como las que proporciona la Web 2.0. Si, además, unimos dichas aplicaciones, como por ejemplo, SlideShare, Scribd y YouTube, con una temática interesante y cotidiana, los superhéroes del mundo del cómic, por ejemplo, de Marvel, la respuesta de los estudiantes puede ser b...

  13. Pressure Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  14. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is being done? The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research related to the neurological conditions that cause foot drop in its laboratories at the National ...

  15. Superheated Water-Cooled Small Modular Underwater Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel fully passive small modular superheated water reactor (SWR for underwater deployment is designed to produce 160 MWe with steam at 500ºC to increase the thermodynamic efficiency compared with standard light water reactors. The SWR design is based on a conceptual 400-MWe integral SWR using the internally and externally cooled annular fuel (IXAF. The coolant boils in the external channels throughout the core to approximately the same quality as a conventional boiling water reactor and then the steam, instead of exiting the reactor pressure vessel, turns around and flows downward in the central channel of some IXAF fuel rods within each assembly and then flows upward through the rest of the IXAF pins in the assembly and exits the reactor pressure vessel as superheated steam. In this study, new cladding material to withstand high temperature steam in addition to the fuel mechanical and safety behavior is investigated. The steam temperature was found to depend on the thermal and mechanical characteristics of the fuel. The SWR showed a very different transient behavior compared with a boiling water reactor. The inter-play between the inner and outer channels of the IXAF was mainly beneficial except in the case of sudden reactivity insertion transients where additional control consideration is required.

  16. Beer tapping: dynamics of bubbles after impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantič-Lugo, V.; Cayron, A.; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, F.

    2015-12-01

    Beer tapping is a well known prank where a bottle of beer is impacted from the top by a solid object, usually another bottle, leading to a sudden foam overflow. A description of the shock-driven bubble dynamics leading to foaming is presented based on an experimental and numerical study evoking the following physical picture. First, the solid impact produces a sudden downwards acceleration of the bottle creating a strong depression in the liquid bulk. The existing bubbles undergo a strong expansion and a sudden contraction ending in their collapse and fragmentation into a large amount of small bubbles. Second, the bubble clouds present a large surface area to volume ratio, enhancing the CO2 diffusion from the supersaturated liquid, hence growing rapidly and depleting the CO2. The clouds of bubbles migrate upwards in the form of plumes pulling the surrounding liquid with them and eventually resulting in the foam overflow. The sudden pressure drop that triggers the bubble dynamics with a collapse and oscillations is modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The bubble dynamics from impact to collapse occurs over a time (tb ≃ 800 μs) much larger than the acoustic time scale of the liquid bulk (tac = 2H/c ≃ 80 μs), for the experimental container of height H = 6 cm and a speed of sound around c ≃ 1500 m/s. This scale separation, together with the comparison of numerical and experimental results, suggests that the pressure drop is controlled by two parameters: the acceleration of the container and the distance from the bubble to the free surface.

  17. Two-dimensional modeling of water spray cooling in superheated steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimian Vahid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Spray cooling of the superheated steam occurs with the interaction of many complex physical processes, such as initial droplet formation, collision, coalescence, secondary break up, evaporation, turbulence generation, and modulation, as well as turbulent mixing, heat, mass and momentum transfer in a highly non-uniform two-phase environment. While it is extremely difficult to systematically study particular effects in this complex interaction in a well defined physical experiment, the interaction is well suited for numerical studies based on advanced detailed models of all the processes involved. This paper presents results of such a numerical experiment. Cooling of the superheated steam can be applied in order to decrease the temperature of superheated steam in power plants. By spraying the cooling water into the superheated steam, the temperature of the superheated steam can be controlled. In this work, water spray cooling was modeled to investigate the influences of the droplet size, injected velocity, the pressure and velocity of the superheated steam on the evaporation of the cooling water. The results show that by increasing the diameter of the droplets, the pressure and velocity of the superheated steam, the amount of evaporation of cooling water increases. .

  18. Recent Developments in Superheated Steam Processing of Foods-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfy, Anto; Kiran, B V; Jeevitha, G C; Hebbar, H Umesh

    2016-10-02

    Although the use of superheated steam has been known for quite a long time, only in the recent past has it emerged as a viable technology for food processing. Superheated steam, having higher enthalpy, can quickly transfer heat to the material being processed, resulting in its rapid heating. The major advantages of using superheated steam for food processing are better product quality (color, shrinkage, and rehydration characteristics), reduced oxidation losses, and higher energy efficiency. This review provides a comprehensive overview of recent studies on the application of superheated steam for food-processing operations such as drying, decontamination and microbial load reduction, parboiling, and enzyme inactivation. The review encompasses aspects such as the effect of superheated steam processing on product quality, mathematical models reported for superheated steam drying, and the future scope of application in food processing. Recent studies on process improvisation, wherein superheated steam is used at low pressure, in fluidized bed mode, sequential processing with hot air/infrared, and in combination with micro droplets of water have also been discussed.

  19. Shape Oscillations of an Oil Drop Rising in Water : Effect of Surface Contamination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abi Chebel, N.; Vejražka, Jiří; Masbernat, O.; Risso, F.

    Roč. 702, JUL 10 ( 2012 ), s. 533-542 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/11/0806 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble dynamics * drops * drops and bubbles Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2012

  20. Rewetting of a low superheated rod with saturated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portillo, O.; Reyes, R.; Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The study of the rewetting of a superheated surface has application in several technological fields. It is related to the control mechanism for loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in nuclear reactors. An adsorption model as the precursory mechanism for rewetting of a superheated surface is extended from its application to non-polar liquids to a polar fluid, and modeling calculations are compared with experimental data found in the literature. The adsorption model is based on interfacial forces acting at the tip of the rewetting front, the three-phase region. In this region, solid, liquid and vapor interfaces generate a contact angle that depends on the degree of superheat and describes the velocity of rewetting. The contact angle is a function of interfacial forces calculated through the disjoining pressure of the adsorbed film precursory of the rewetting. The influences of van der Waals and electrostatic intermolecular forces in the film thickness are analyzed. The authors find that the order of magnitude of the film thickness in the controlling region is of a few angstroms: thus, only van der Waals intermolecular forces define the interactions. For the prediction of the velocity of rewetting the temperature profile along the rod's surface is required and a one-dimensional and a two-dimensional heat conduction balances are solved. The thermophysical properties in the adsorption model are predicted by ASPEN PLUS data bank and from ASME steam tables. Variations of the predicted values have a strong influence on the results. The surface boundary condition on the rod contains an evaporative heat transfer coefficient that is calculated from the fitted experimental rewetting velocities and the two-dimensional temperature field in the rod. Using this calculation scheme the values of the evaporative heat transfer coefficient are obtained in the normal range of values. Therefore the adsorption model gives results that are consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Principles of superheated superconducting granules as a detector for dark matter and neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Czapek, G.; Diggelmann, U.; Furlan, M.; Gabutti, A.; Janos, S.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schmiemann, K.

    1993-01-01

    The interest in superconducting devices for particle detection is based on the very small quantum energies involved as compared to conventional ionization and semiconductor detectors. The use of superheated superconducting granules (SSG) as a particle detector is reviewed. Physical properties and experimental applications of SSG are discussed. The dynamic responses of the phase transition of superheated superconducting Sn, In, Al and Zn single granules (20-50μm in diameter) due to an applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating threshold are presented. A status report on further experimental development is given. (orig.)

  2. Monitoring of Herbicides in Aquatic Environments using the Bubble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    method termed 'bubble-in-drop' single drop micro-extraction (BID-SDME) method for monitoring metolachlor and atrazine ... Lesotho receives most of its food supply ... It is neces- sary to develop cheaper methods that can aid in mitigating the costs faced in adopting the international methods for analysis and monitoring of ...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  4. Fama on Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    2016-01-01

    While Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an “irrational bubble,” he has never publicly expressed his opinion on “rational bubbles.” On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable...

  5. Fama on bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    . On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable. However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability. On data samples that include the 1990s...

  6. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D; Chen, C J; Crisler, M; Cwiok, T; Dahl, C E; Grimsted, A; Gupta, J; Jin, M; Puig, R; Temples, D; Zhang, J

    2017-06-09

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a ^{252}Cf neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19±6  keV (1σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3×10^{-7} bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF_{3}I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  7. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D.; Chen, C. J.; Crisler, M.; Cwiok, T.; Dahl, C. E.; Grimsted, A.; Gupta, J.; Jin, M.; Puig, R.; Temples, D.; Zhang, J.

    2017-06-01

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a Cf 252 neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19 ±6 keV (1 σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3 ×10-7 bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF3 I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  8. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  9. Searching for universal behaviour in superheated droplet detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    points and compositions, and employing different pulse analysis techniques, neutrons, α- particles, γ-rays etc., the .... namics [20], rc is the critical bubble radius and k is the nucleation parameter which has been found to be equal ... The recoil nuclei receive the maximum energy from the incident neu- tron through the elastic ...

  10. The initial phase of sudden releases of superheated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidli, J.

    1994-04-01

    The catastrophic failure of a pressure vessel containing a liquefied substance, leading to an instantaneous release of its whole contents is considered as one of the major technological hazards. Due to the rapid depressurization caused by vessel failure, the fluid becomes superheated and unstable. Part of the fluid will evaporate using its internal energy and the two-phase mixture forming will be accelerated. This flashing process can be very violent, as experiments and incidents actually happened have shown. In the past, a number of dispersion models were developed to predict the history of an instantaneous release. In most of these models the source term is considered to be a gas volume at rest and not a rapidly expanding aerosol, as could be observed. Furthermore, it is usually assumed that all of the remaining fluid is entrained into the expanding cloud and nothing is deposited on the ground to form a pool. This work concentrates on the initial phase of the sudden release of superheated liquids with the aim to gain a better understanding of the flashing process and of the physical mechanisms involved, leading to a reliable prediction of the source term. Therefore, more than 400 experiments with propane, butane, refrigerant 12 and 114 were conducted. The experiments were initiated by shattering spherical glass flasks of different sizes. The main parameters varied were the liquid superheat and the filling level of the vessel. Using high-speed video and movie recordings and very fast responding measurement devices, it was possible to study the initial phase of such releases during which gravity plays no role. For sufficiently large released internal energy, the initial evolution of the release was always spherical with a constant radial expansion velocity during he first milliseconds until instabilities appeared at the surface of the droplet/vapor cloud that was formed. For all the experimental conditions, the fraction of the initial liquid falling on the ground

  11. Cumulative distribution functions associated with bubble-nucleation processes in cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    Bubble-nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones liquid are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Waiting time, which is the lifetime of a superheated liquid, is determined for several system sizes, and the apparent finite-size effect of the nucleation rate is observed. From the cumulative distribution function of the nucleation events, the bubble-nucleation process is found to be not a simple Poisson process but a Poisson process with an additional relaxation time. The parameters of the exponential distribution associated with the process are determined by taking the relaxation time into account, and the apparent finite-size effect is removed. These results imply that the use of the arithmetic mean of the waiting time until a bubble grows to the critical size leads to an incorrect estimation of the nucleation rate. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  12. Air–water flow in a vertical pipe : Experimental study of air bubbles in the vicinity of the wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Descamps, M.N.; Oliemans, R.V.A.; Ooms, G.; Mudde, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    This study deals with the influence of bubbles on a vertical air–water pipe flow, for gas-lift applications. The effect of changing the bubble size is of particular interest as it has been shown to affect the pressure drop over the pipe. Local measurements on the bubbles characteristics in the wall

  13. High-Speed Interferometry Under Impacting Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth R.

    2017-08-31

    Over the last decade the rapid advances in high-speed video technology, have opened up to study many multi-phase fluid phenomena, which tend to occur most rapidly on the smallest length-scales. One of these is the entrapment of a small bubble under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. Here we have gone from simply observing the presence of the bubble to detailed imaging of the formation of a lubricating air-disc under the drop center and its subsequent contraction into the bubble. Imaging the full shape-evolution of the air-disc has required μm and sub-μs space and time resolutions. Time-resolved 200 ns interferometry with monochromatic light, has allowed us to follow individual fringes to obtain absolute air-layer thicknesses, based on the eventual contact with the solid. We can follow the evolution of the dimple shape as well as the compression of the gas. The improved imaging has also revealed new levels of detail, like the nature of the first contact which produces a ring of micro-bubbles, highlighting the influence of nanometric surface roughness. Finally, for impacts of ultra-viscous drops we see gliding on ~100 nm thick rarified gas layers, followed by extreme wetting at numerous random spots.

  14. The initial phase of sudden releases of superheated liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidli, J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1994-01-01

    Series of experiments were conducted with refrigerants-114, -12, propane and butane to investigate the initial phase of sudden releases of superheated liquids due to the catastrophic failure of the vessel containing them. The experiments were initiated by shattering spherical flasks of 100 to 2000 ml containing the liquefied, pressurized gases. The variable parameters were the initial superheat, the filling level, the height of the flask above ground, and the relative humidity of the surrounding air. It was found that the initial flashing process is not determined by homogeneous nucleation, but rather by surface instabilities which lead to an evaporation wave traveling from the initial surface towards the center of the released mass. Cloud shape and expansion velocity could be determined from high speed recordings covering the initial stage of the release during which gravity has no influence. When the internal energy was sufficient, it was observed that the expanding droplet/vapor cloud initially propagated spherically with a constant expansion velocity, until Rayleigh-Taylor type instabilities appeared at its surface. Information about the pool which can be formed on the ground, the pressure decay within the flask, the droplet size, and the cloud temperature was collected. The experimental findings for the expansion velocity, as well as for the pool fraction, were the base for a nondimensional analysis leading to correlations which describe the initial phase of such releases and can be used to define the ''source term'' for turbulent dispersion models. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 15 refs

  15. Microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Cláudia P; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2013-04-15

    The spent coffee grounds (SCG) are a food industry by-product that can be used as a rich source of polysaccharides. In the present work, the feasibility of microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from SCG was studied. Different ratios of mass of SCG to water, from 1:30 to 1:5 (g:mL) were used for a total volume of 80 mL. Although the amount of material extracted/batch (MAE1) increased with the increase of the concentration of the sample, the amount of polysaccharides achieved a maximum of 0.57 g/batch for 1:10. Glycosidic-linkage composition showed that all extraction conditions allowed to obtain mainly arabinogalactans. When the unextracted insoluble material was re-extracted under the same conditions (MAE2), a further extraction of polysaccharides was observed (0.34 g/batch for 1:10), mainly galactomannans. Also, a high amount of oligosaccharides, mainly derived from galactomannans, can be obtained in MAE2 (0.96 g/batch for 1:10). This technology allows to obtain galactomannans and arabinogalactans in proportions that are dependent on the operating conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-03

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them.

  17. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth and pressure recovery in a bubbly rhyolitic melt embedded in an elastic solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Nakano, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of gas exsolution and bubble expansion in a melt supersaturated in response to a sudden pressure drop. In our model, the melt contains a suspension of gas bubbles of identical sizes and is encased in a penny-shaped crack embedded in an elastic solid. The suspension is modeled as a three-dimensional lattice of spherical cells with slight overlap, where each elementary cell consists of a gas bubble surrounded by a shell of volatile-rich melt. The melt is then subjected to a step drop in pressure, which induces gas exsolution and bubble expansion, resulting in the compression of the melt and volumetric expansion of the crack. The dynamics of diffusion-driven bubble growth and volumetric crack expansion span 9 decades in time. The model demonstrates that the speed of the crack response depends strongly on volatile diffusivity in the melt and bubble number density and is markedly sensitive to the ratio of crack thickness to crack radius and initial bubble radius but is relatively insensitive to melt viscosity. The net drop in gas concentration in the melt after pressure recovery represents only a small fraction of the initial concentration prior to the drop, suggesting the melt may undergo numerous pressure transients before becoming significantly depleted of gases. The magnitude of pressure and volume recovery in the crack depends sensitively on the size of the input-pressure transient, becoming relatively larger for smaller-size transients in a melt containing bubbles with initial radii less than 10-5 m. Amplification of the input transient may be large enough to disrupt the crack wall and induce brittle failure in the rock matrix surrounding the crack. Our results provide additional basis for the interpretation of volume changes in the magma conduit under Popocatépetl Volcano during Vulcanian degassing bursts in its eruptive activity in April–May 2000.

  18. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  19. Numerical study of the bubbly flow regime in micro-channel flow boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvankar, Pramod; Dabiri, Sadegh

    2017-11-01

    Two-phase flow accompanied by boiling in micro-channel heat sinks is an effective means for heat removal from computer chips. We present a numerical study of flow boiling in micro-channels with conjugate heat transfer with a focus on the bubbly flow regime. The bubbles are assumed to nucleate at a pre-determined location and frequency. The Navier Stokes equations are solved using a single fluid formulation with the Front tracking method. Phase change is implemented using the deficit in heat flux across the bubble interface. The analytical solution for bubble growth in a superheated liquid is used as a benchmark to validate the mentioned numerical method. Water and FC-72 are studied as the operating fluids in a micro-channel made of Copper with a focus on hotspot mitigation. The micro-channel of cross-section 231 μm × 1000 μm , is used to study the effects of vertical up-flow, vertical down-flow and horizontal flow of the mentioned fluids on the heat transfer coefficients. A simple film model accounting for mass and energy conservation is applied wherever the bubble approaches closer than a cell width to the wall. The results of the simulation are compared with existing experimental data for bubble growth rates and heat transfer coefficients.

  20. MOSCAB. A geyser-concept bubble chamber to be used in a dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonicci, A.; Bertoni, R.; Mazza, R. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Ardid, M. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia Camino de Vera, Valencia (Spain); Bruno, G. [LNGS, INFN, Assergi (L' Aquila) (Italy); Burgio, N.; Santagata, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy); Caruso, G.; Frullini, M.; Ricci, E. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy); Cattaneo, D. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Informatica Sistemistica e Comunicazione, Milan (Italy); Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Lucchini, G.; Pullia, A.; Zanotti, L. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Corcione, M.; Quintino, A. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Cretara, L. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy); Cundy, D. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Fisica, Milan (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Felis, I. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia Camino de Vera, Valencia (Spain); Fulgione, W. [LNGS, INFN, Assergi (L' Aquila) (Italy); INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin, Pino Torinese (Italy); Manara, L. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Maspero, M. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, DISAT, Milan (Italy); Papagni, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Scienza dei Materiali, Milan (Italy); Perego, M. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); LNGS, INFN, Assergi (L' Aquila) (Italy); Podviyanuk, R. [LNGS, INFN, Assergi (L' Aquila) (Italy); Redaelli, N. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Sorrenti, D. [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipt. di Informatica Sistemistica e Comunicazione, Milan (Italy); Collaboration: The MOSCAB Collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The MOSCAB experiment (Materia OSCura A Bolle) uses the ''geyser technique'', a variant of the superheated liquid technique of extreme simplicity. Operating principles of the new dark matter detector and technical solutions of the device are reported in detail. First results obtained in a series of test runs taken in laboratory demonstrate that we have successfully built and tested a geyser-concept bubble chamber that can be used in particle physics, especially in dark matter searches, and that we are ready to move underground for extensive data taking. (orig.)

  1. PICASSO, COUPP and PICO - search for dark matter with bubble chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amole C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The PICASSO and COUPP collaborations use superheated liquid detectors to search for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs. These experiments, located in the underground laboratory of SNOLAB, Canada, detect phase transitions triggered by nuclear recoils in the keV range induced by interactions with WIMPs. We present details of the construction and operation of these detectors as well as the results, obtained by several years of observations. We also introduce PICO, a joint effort of the two collaborations to build a second generation ton-scale bubble chamber with 250 liters of active liquid.

  2. MOSCAB. A geyser-concept bubble chamber to be used in a dark matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonicci, A.; Bertoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Ardid, M.; Bruno, G.; Burgio, N.; Santagata, A.; Caruso, G.; Frullini, M.; Ricci, E.; Cattaneo, D.; Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Lucchini, G.; Pullia, A.; Zanotti, L.; Corcione, M.; Quintino, A.; Cretara, L.; Cundy, D.; Felis, I.; Fulgione, W.; Manara, L.; Maspero, M.; Papagni, A.; Perego, M.; Podviyanuk, R.; Redaelli, N.; Sorrenti, D.

    2017-01-01

    The MOSCAB experiment (Materia OSCura A Bolle) uses the ''geyser technique'', a variant of the superheated liquid technique of extreme simplicity. Operating principles of the new dark matter detector and technical solutions of the device are reported in detail. First results obtained in a series of test runs taken in laboratory demonstrate that we have successfully built and tested a geyser-concept bubble chamber that can be used in particle physics, especially in dark matter searches, and that we are ready to move underground for extensive data taking. (orig.)

  3. MOSCAB: a geyser-concept bubble chamber to be used in a dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonicci, A.; Ardid, M.; Bertoni, R.; Bruno, G.; Burgio, N.; Caruso, G.; Cattaneo, D.; Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Corcione, M.; Cretara, L.; Cundy, D.; Felis, I.; Frullini, M.; Fulgione, W.; Lucchini, G.; Manara, L.; Maspero, M.; Mazza, R.; Papagni, A.; Perego, M.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pullia, A.; Quintino, A.; Redaelli, N.; Ricci, E.; Santagata, A.; Sorrenti, D.; Zanotti, L.

    2017-11-01

    The MOSCAB experiment (Materia OSCura A Bolle) uses the "geyser technique", a variant of the superheated liquid technique of extreme simplicity. Operating principles of the new dark matter detector and technical solutions of the device are reported in detail. First results obtained in a series of test runs taken in laboratory demonstrate that we have successfully built and tested a geyser-concept bubble chamber that can be used in particle physics, especially in dark matter searches, and that we are ready to move underground for extensive data taking.

  4. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  5. Bubbles, Banks, and Financial Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Aoki; Kalin Nikolov

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks two main questions: (1) What makes some asset price bubbles more costly for the real economy than others? and (2) When do costly bubbles occur? We construct a model of rational bubbles under credit frictions and show that when bubbles held by banks burst this is followed by a costly financial crisis. In contrast, bubbles held by ordinary savers have relatively muted effects. Banks tend to invest in bubbles when financial liberalisation decreases their profitability.

  6. Cascade control of superheated steam temperature with neuro-PID controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Fenfang; Ren, Mifeng; Hou, Guolian; Fang, Fang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, an improved cascade control methodology for superheated processes is developed, in which the primary PID controller is implemented by neural networks trained by minimizing error entropy criterion. The entropy of the tracking error can be estimated recursively by utilizing receding horizon window technique. The measurable disturbances in superheated processes are input to the neuro-PID controller besides the sequences of tracking error in outer loop control system, hence, feedback control is combined with feedforward control in the proposed neuro-PID controller. The convergent condition of the neural networks is analyzed. The implementation procedures of the proposed cascade control approach are summarized. Compared with the neuro-PID controller using minimizing squared error criterion, the proposed neuro-PID controller using minimizing error entropy criterion may decrease fluctuations of the superheated steam temperature. A simulation example shows the advantages of the proposed method. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fragility of superheated melts and glass-forming ability in Pr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Q.G.; Zhou, J.K.; Zheng, H.X.; Li, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic viscosity (η) of superheated melts, thermal properties (T x , T m , T L ) and X-ray diffraction analysis on the Pr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG) are reported and discussed. A new refined concept, the superheated fragility defined as M' = E S δ x /k B , has been developed based on common solidification theory and the Arrhenius equation. The interrelationship between this kind of fragility and the glass-forming ability (GFA) is elaborated on and evaluated in Pr-based BMG and Al-based amorphous ribbon alloys. Using viscosity data of superheated melts, it is shown, theoretically and experimentally, that the fragility parameter M' may be used as a GFA indicator for metallic alloys

  8. Flow visualization using bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    Soap bubbles were used for visualizing flows. The tests effected allowed some characteristics of flows around models in blow tunnels to be precised at mean velocities V 0 5 . The velocity of a bubble is measured by chronophotography, the bulk envelope of the trajectories is also registered [fr

  9. HCDA bubble experiment, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Mashiko, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro; Isozaki, Tadashi.

    1981-06-01

    An experiment simulating the behavior of the very large steam bubbles generated at the time of an accident of core collapse was carried out with a warm water tank, and the applicability of the theory of very small bubble disappearance known at present was examined. The bubbles generated in HCDA (hypothetical core disruptive accident) are expected to be very large, containing sodium, fuel, FP gas and so on, and play important role in the mechanism of emitting radioactive substances in the safety analysis of LMFBRs. In this experiment, the degree of subcool of the warm water pool, the initial radii of steam bubbles and the blowoff pressure of steam were taken as the parameters. The radius of the steam bubbles generated in the experiment was about 6.5 cm, and the state of disappearance was different above and below the degree of unsaturation of 10 deg C. Comparing the disappearance curve obtained by the experiment with the theory of disappearance of small bubbles, the experimental values were between inertia-controlled disappearance and heat transfer-controlled disappearance, and this result was able to be explained generally with the model taking the pressure change within steam bubbles into account. The rise of bubbles was also observed. (Kako, I.)

  10. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tögel, R.; Luther, S.; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar

  11. Bubbles in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  12. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  13. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  14. Rapid Generation of Superheated Steam Using a Water-containing Porous Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shoji; Okuyama, Kunito

    Heat treatment by superheated steam has been utilized in several industrial fields including sterilization, desiccation, and cooking. In particular, cooking by superheated steam is receiving increased attention because it has advantages of reducing the salt and fat contents in foods as well as suppressing the oxidation of vitamin C and fat. In this application, quick startup and cut-off responses are required. Most electrically energized steam generators require a relatively long time to generate superheated steam due to the large heat capacities of the water in container and of the heater. Zhao and Liao (2002) introduced a novel process for rapid vaporization of subcooled liquid, in which a low-thermal-conductivity porous wick containing water is heated by a downward-facing grooved heating block in contact with the upper surface of the wick structure. They showed that saturated steam is generated within approximately 30 seconds from room-temperature water at a heat flux 41.2 kW⁄m2. In order to quickly generate superheated steam of approximately 300°C, which is required for cooking, the heat capacity of the heater should be as small as possible and the imposed heat flux should be so high enough that the porous wick is able to dry out in the vicinity of the contact with the heater and that the resulting heater temperature becomes much higher than the saturation temperature. The present paper proposes a simple structured generator to quickly produce superheated steam. Only a fine wire heater is contacted spirally on the inside wall in a hollow porous material. The start-up, cut-off responses and the rate of energy conversion for input power are investigated experimentally. Superheated steam of 300°C is produced in approximately 19 seconds from room-temperature water for an input power of 300 W. The maximum rate of energy conversion in the steady state is approximately 0.9.

  15. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  16. Static and dynamic superheated water extraction of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota

    2009-09-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) performed in both static and dynamic condition (S-SWE and D-SWE, respectively) was applied for the extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris L. The influence of extraction pressure, temperature, time, and flow rate on the total yield of essential oil and the influence of extraction temperature on the extraction of some chosen components are discussed in the paper. The SWE extracts are related to PLE extracts with n-hexane and essential oil obtained by steam distillation. The superheated water extraction in dynamic condition seems to be a feasible option for the extraction of essential oil components from T. vulgaris L.

  17. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  18. Fragmentation mechanisms based on single drop steam explosion experiments using flash X-ray radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Dept. of Advanced Technology, Upton, NY (United States)); Frost, D.L. (Mechanical Engineering Dept., McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada))

    1994-02-01

    Flash X-ray and high-speed regular photography were used to investigate the fragmentation processes during the vapor explosion of single drops of molten metal immersed in water. For relatively low ambient flow velocities (<5 m/s), a comparison of the breakup of hot and cold drops shows that whereas cold drops breakup due to the stripping of fragments by the relative flow, the fragmentation of a hot drop is dominated by the growth and collapse of a vapor bubble. X-ray radiographs show during the growth of the bubble, that fine filaments of metal protrude from the drop and the drop surface becomes highly convoluted. Using a simple model for the bubble dynamics, an estimate of the energy budget shows that the majority (about 80%) of the thermal energy transfer occurs during bubble collapse. For hot drops at higher flow velocities (>45 m/s), vapor bubble growth is diminished and high-speed motion of vapor within the bubble leads to an enhanced fragmentation rate. (orig.)

  19. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  20. Theory calculation of combination of 'embryo' bubble growing-up visible bubble in bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zipiao; Sheng Xiangdong; Dai Changjiang

    2004-01-01

    By aid of island combination theory of 'embryo' bubble, it is resolved well the question which 'embryo' bubble grows up a visible bubble in the bubble chamber. Through theory calculation it is shown that radius of the big' embryo' bubble combinated not only relates with work matter such as surface tension coefficient, saturation vapour pressure and boiling point of liquid, but also does absorbing quantity of heat and the numbers of 'embryo' bubbles combination. It is explained reasonably that the radius of bubbles in bubble chamber is different for the same energies of neutrons and proton. The track of neutron in bubble chamber is long and thin, and the track of proton in bubble chamber is wide and short. It is also explained reasonably that the bubble radius of the incident particles with more charges which there are the same energies will be wider than that of the incident particles with less charges in the track. (author)

  1. Biodiesel production via injection of superheated methanol technology at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Gaik Tin; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic superheated methanol for biodiesel production is developed. • Crude Jatropha curcas oil with high FFA can be directly used as oil feedstock. • High content of biodiesel can be produced. • Separation of FAME and glycerol from the sample product is easy. - Abstract: In this high demand of renewable energy market, biodiesel was extensively produced via various catalytic and non-catalytic technologies. Conventional catalytic transesterification for biodiesel production has been shown to have limitation in terms of sensitivity to high water and free fatty acid, complicated separation and purification of biodiesel. In this study, an alternative and innovative approach was carried out via non-catalytic superheated methanol technology to produce biodiesel. Similar to supercritical reaction, the solvent need to be heated beyond the critical temperature but the reactor pressure remained at 0.1 MPa (atmospheric pressure). Transesterification reaction with superheated methanol was carried out at different reaction temperature within the limit of 270–300 °C and at different methanol flow rate ranging from 1 ml/min to 3 ml/min for 4 h. Results obtained showed that the highest biodiesel yield at 71.54% w/w was achieved at reaction temperature 290 °C and methanol flow rate at 2 ml/min with 88.81% w/w FAME content, implying the huge potential of superheated technology in producing FAME

  2. Correlation Between Superheated Liquid Fragility And Onset Temperature Of Crystallization For Al-Based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous alloys or metallic glasses have attracted significant interest in the materials science and engineering communities due to their unique physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. The viscous flow of amorphous alloys exhibiting high strain rate sensitivity and homogeneous deformation is considered to be an important characteristic in thermoplastic forming processes performed within the supercooled liquid region because it allows superplastic-like deformation behavior. Here, the correlation between the superheated liquid fragility, and the onset temperature of crystallization for Al-based alloys, is investigated. The activation energy for viscous flow of the liquid is also investigated. There is a negative correlation between the parameter of superheated liquid fragility and the onset temperature of crystallization in the same Al-based alloy system. The activation energy decreases as the onset temperature of crystallization increases. This indicates that the stability of a superheated liquid can affect the thermal stability of the amorphous alloy. It also means that a liquid with a large superheated liquid fragility, when rapidly solidified, forms an amorphous alloy with a low thermal stability.

  3. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE ROASTING CHESTNUTS PROCESS BY SUPERHEATED STEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematic modeling for chestnuts roasting process by superheated steam is conducted. Diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients are used for process description. Initial conditions and boundary conditions of the third kind for thermal conductivity and mass transfer equations are set.

  4. Fragmentation mechanisms based on single drop steam explosion experiments using flash X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Frost, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Flash X-ray and high-speed regular photography were used to investigate the fragmentation processes during the vapor explosion of single drops of molten metal immersed in water. For relatively low ambient flow velocities ( 45 m/s), vapor bubble growth is diminished and high-speed motion of vapor within the bubble leads to an enhanced fragmentation rate. (orig.)

  5. R&D of a SIMPLE bubble chamber for dark matter searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felizardo M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments intends the realization and full field tests of a 25 kg, low background, low frequency-instrumented BC (Bubble Chamber, with data from the BC testing and a small array demonstration providing new physics results. We report on the development of a 1 kg freon BC prototype, including chamber recompression system design and testing with initial acoustic detection of bubble formation. Realization of full field tests leading to a 25 kg, overall 10−6 recoil evt/kgF/d background, low frequency-instrumented BC, incorporating several innovations designed, are intended to serve for an anticipated 2500 kgd exposure, resulting in new exclusion contours with sensitivities of 2 × 10−8 and 5 × 10−5 pb at 35 GeV in the SI and SD sector of the WIMP phase space, respectively.

  6. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  7. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  8. Magnetic-bubble devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairholme, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic bubbles were first described only ten years ago when research workers were discussing orthoferrites containing μm diameter bubbles. However, problems of material fabrication limit crystals to a few mm across which severely curtailed device development. Since then materials have changed and rare-earth-iron garnet films can be grown up 3 inches in diameter with bubble diameters down to sizes below 1 μm. The first commercial products have device capacities in the range 64 000 to 100 000 bits with bubble diameters between 4 and 6 μm. Chip capacities of 1 Mbit are presently under development in the laboratory, as are new techniques to use submicrometre bubbles. The operation and fabrication of a bubble device is described using the serial loop devices currently being manufactured at Plessey as models. Chip organization is one important variable which directly affects the access time. A range of access times and capacities is available which offers a wide range of market opportunities, ranging from consumer products to fixed head disc replacements. some of the application areas are described. (author)

  9. Bubble transport in bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph; Qamar, Adnan

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment, we examine the transport of bubbles entrained in liquid. In gas embolotherapy, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that originate from acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. In the case of non-functionalized droplets with the objective of vessel occlusion, the bubbles are transported by flow through vessel bifurcations, where they may split prior to eventually reach vessels small enough that they become lodged. This splitting behavior affects the distribution of bubbles and the efficacy of flow occlusion and the treatment. In these studies, we investigated bubble transport in bifurcations using computational and theoretical modeling. The model reproduces the variety of experimentally observed splitting behaviors. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number. The initial bubble length was found to affect the splitting behavior in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  10. Bubble Chamber : A novel technique for measuring thermonuclear rates at low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, R.; Benesh, J.; Digiovine, B.; Grames, J.; Holt, R. J.; Kharashvili, G.; Meekins, D.; Moser, D.; Poelkar, M.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tennant, C.; Ugalde, C.

    2016-03-01

    Adopting ideas from dark matter search experiments, we have found that a superheated liquid in a bubble detector is sensitive to recoils produced by γ-ray beams impinging on the nuclei in the liquid. Such a target-detector system has a density factor of four orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets and is practically insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself. Also, since photodisintegration reactions have approximately two orders of magnitude higher cross-sections than direct particle capture reactions, such a technique can pave the way towards measuring these reactions within the stellar Gamow window. In an effort to study the 16O(γ , α)12C system using the bubble chamber technique, the first test of the superheated N2O liquid with a low-energy bremsstrahlung beam at JLab has been completed. This test has been performed to understand the background contributions from 17O and 18O nuclei in N2O. The experimental technique, results and future plans will be presented. This work has been supported by US DOE (DE-AC02-06CH11357) and Jefferson Science Associations, LLC (DE-AC05-06OR23177).

  11. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  12. Bajo la piel del superhéroe: fusión entre su identidad y su imagen

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso-Calero, Jose Maria; Cano-García, Josefa

    2011-01-01

    Cuando hablamos de la estética debemos ver la dos épocas donde analizar la estética de los superhéroes, desde una clara de inclusión/exclusión donde los colores las personalidades y están bien definidas el bien es el bien frente al mal, bien diferenciados donde la definición de un superhéroes esta en lo superficial, en lo que reviste al personaje, toda la parafernalia que se va construyendo a su alrededor, para asentar la imagen de su personalidad. Tres son los facetas de un superhéroe: su...

  13. Drop entrainment from the surface of oil mist filters: mechanisms, kinetics, and drop spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Wurster, S.; Kolb, H.; Meyer, J.; Kasper, G.

    2016-01-01

    Oil entrainment from coalescence filters has been characterized by different techniques. Drop spectra and entrainment rates were measured by a combination of techniques from 1 mm over long periods of time. Dominant entrainment mechanism(s) are identified on the basis of comparisons of entrainment rates measured in different regions of the filter surface with rates of air bubble formation, measurements of oil film thickness, as well as visual observations. Experiments are supported by force es...

  14. Underwater sound produced by individual drop impacts and rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Crum, L. A.; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1989-01-01

    ; the second occurs for some impacts but not others. A range of conditions is described in which a bubble is produced for every drop impact, and it is shown that these conditions are likely to be met by a significant fraction of the raindrops in a typical shower. Underwater sound produced by artificial as well...

  15. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  16. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    During the period of reionization that followed the dark ages of our universe, hydrogen was transformed from a neutral state, which is opaque to radiation, to an ionized one, which is transparent to radiation. But what generated the initial ionizing radiation? The recent discovery of multiple distant galaxies offers evidence for how this process occurred.Two Distant GalaxiesWe believe reionization occurred somewhere between a redshift of z = 6 and 7, because Ly-emitting galaxies drop out at roughly this redshift. Beyond this distance, were generally unable to see the light from these galaxies, because the universe is no longer transparent to their emission. This is not always the case, however: if a bubble of ionized gas exists around a distant galaxy, the radiation can escape, allowing us to see the galaxy.This is true of two recently-discovered Ly-emitting galaxies, confirmed to be at a redshift of z~7 and located near one another in a region known as the Bremer Deep Field. The fact that were able to see the radiation from these galaxies means that they are in an ionized HII region presumably one of the earlier regions to have become reionized in the universe.But on their own, neither of these galaxies is capable of generating an ionized bubble large enough for their light to escape. So what ionized the region around them, and what does this mean for our understanding of how reionization occurred in the universe?A Little Help From FriendsLocation in different filters of the objects in the Hubble Bremer Deep Field catalog. The z~7 selection region is outlined by the grey box. BDF-521 and BDF-3299 were the two originally discovered galaxies; the remaining red markers indicate the additional six galaxies discovered in the same region. [Castellano et al. 2016]A team of scientists led by Marco Castellano (Rome Observatory, INAF) investigated the possibility that there are other, faint galaxies near these two that have helped to ionize the region. Performing a survey

  17. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  18. The Fermi Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Bubbles are a pair of giant lobes at the heart of the Milky Way, extending roughly 50 degrees north and south of the Galactic Center, and emitting photons with energies up to 100 GeV. This previously unknown structure could be evidence for past activity of the central supermassive black hole, or enhanced star formation towards the inner Galaxy. We will describe the path to discovery of the Bubbles in multiwavelength data, from the first hints in microwave radiation measured by WMAP and X-rays from ROSAT, to the unveiling of their shape and spectrum using public gamma-ray data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, to more recent measurements by Planck and XMM-Newton. We will outline the current state of knowledge of the Bubbles' spectrum, morphology and internal structure, and discuss theoretical proposals and numerical simulations for their nature and origin.

  19. Dynamics of gas bubble growth in a supersaturated solution with Sievert's solubility law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor, G Yu; Kuchma, A E

    2009-07-21

    This paper presents a theoretical description of diffusion growth of a gas bubble after its nucleation in supersaturated liquid solution. We study systems where gas molecules completely dissociate in the solvent into two parts, thus making Sievert's solubility law valid. We show that the difference between Henry's and Sievert's laws for chemical equilibrium conditions causes the difference in bubble growth dynamics. Assuming that diffusion flux is steady we obtain a differential equation on bubble radius. Bubble dynamics equation is solved analytically for the case of homogeneous nucleation of a bubble, which takes place at a significant pressure drop. We also obtain conditions of diffusion flux steadiness. The fulfillment of these conditions is studied for the case of nucleation of water vapor bubbles in magmatic melts.

  20. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  1. Microwave-superheated Vics Vapo Rub: an ocular public health danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Anne E; Oxford, Karen W

    2004-02-01

    To report a case of a microwave-oven superheated petroleum-based liquid causing severe chemical and thermal ocular burns treated successfully with amniotic membrane transplantation. Observational case report. Retrospective review of clinical case. A 77-year-old woman sustained a severe combined chemical and thermal burn from microwave-heated Vicks Vapo-Rub requiring amniotic membrane transplant, with subsequent development of phacomorphic glaucoma, requiring cataract extraction, and bullous keratopathy, requiring penetrating keratoplasty. As microwave oven use becomes more commonplace, the risk of superheating liquids becomes an increasingly significant ocular danger. Continued efforts to educate the public about safe microwave use is necessary. Additionally, amniotic membrane transplantation was found to be effective in managing a combined chemical and thermal ocular burn.

  2. Crude Oil Distillation with Superheated Water Steam: Parametrical Sensitivity and Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Samborskaya, Marina Anatolievna; Gusev, Valeriy Petrovich; Gryaznova, I. A.; Vdovushkina, N. S.; Wolf, Andrey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Stability of crude oil distillation units was analyzed with mathematical models developed using Aspen Hysys. Parametrical sensitivities of light fractions yields, heat duties and steam load of column trays to perturbations of superheated steam flow rate were estimated. Objective function based on the light products yields and energy consumption for distillation was formed. The maxima of the objective function were calculated depending on operational parameters and flow rate of water steam.

  3. Direct injection of superheated steam for continuous hydrolysis reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2012-09-01

    The primary intent for previous continuous hydrolysis studies was to minimize the reaction temperature and reaction time. In this work, hydrolysis is the first step of a proprietary chemical process to convert lipids to sustainable, drop-in replacements for petroleum based fuels. To improve the economics of the process, attention is now focused on optimizing the energy efficiency of the process, maximizing the reaction rate, and improving the recovery of the glycerol by-product. A laboratory-scale reactor system has been designed and built with this goal in mind.Sweet water (water with glycerol from the hydrolysis reaction) is routed to a distillation column and heated above the boiling point of water at the reaction pressure. The steam pressure allows the steam to return to the reactor without pumping. Direct injection of steam into the hydrolysis reactor is shown to provide favorable equilibrium conditions resulting in a high quality of FFA product and rapid reaction rate, even without preheating the inlet water and oil and with lower reactor temperatures and lower fresh water demand. The high enthalpy of the steam provides energy for the hydrolysis reaction. Steam injection offers enhanced conditions for continuous hydrolysis of triglycerides to high-purity streams of FFA and glycerol. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  5. Non-equilibrium phase stabilization versus bubble nucleation at a nanoscale-curved Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Luo, Tengfei

    Using continuum dynamic van der Waals theory in a radial 1D geometry with a Lennard-Jones fluid model, we investigate the nature of vapor bubble nucleation near a heated, nanoscale-curved convex interface. Vapor bubble nucleation and growth are observed for interfaces with sufficiently large radius of curvature while phase stabilization of a superheated fluid layer occurs at interfaces with smaller radius. The hypothesis that the high Laplace pressure required for stable equilibrium of very small bubbles is responsible for phase stability is tested by effectively varying the parameter which controls liquid-vapor surface tension. In doing so, the liquid-vapor surface tension- hence Laplace pressure-is shown to have limited effect on phase stabilization vs. bubble nucleation. However, the strong dependence of nucleation on leading-order momentum transport, i.e. viscous dissipation, near the heated inner surface is demonstrated. We gratefully acknowledge ND Energy for support through the ND Energy Postdoctoral Fellowship program and the Army Research Office, Grant No. W911NF-16-1-0267, managed by Dr. Chakrapani Venanasi.

  6. Tests of Bubble Damage Detectors in a Heavy Ion Beam from the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is designed to investigate the properties of a bubble damage polymer (BDP) using ion beams from the SPS. These polymers are already used commercially for making neutron and gamma-ray dosimeters. \\\\ \\\\ An attractive feature of BDP detectors is the ability to ``design'' a material to have a particular dE/dx threshold which can be used to detect such objects as monopoles and heavy ions as well as relativistic, singly charged tracks originating f particle interactions. \\\\ \\\\ The BDP detector is a polymer which holds droplets of super-heated liquid in suspension. The droplet size is typically a few microns and the droplet density is normally between 10|5 and 10|7 droplets/cm|3. The passage of a particle with a dE/dx exceeding the threshold of the material will cause the droplets with a sufficiently s parameter to change state, giving rise to bubbles. The dE/dx threshold of the BDP varies with pressure and temperature. The growth of bubbles in the bubble trail is limited by the polymer matrix and th...

  7. Study of bubble behavior in weightlessness (effects of thermal gradient and acoustic stationary wave) (M-16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to understand how bubbles behave in a thermal gradient and acoustic stationary wave under microgravity. In microgravity, bubble or bubbles in a liquid will not rise upward as they do on Earth but will rest where they are formed because there exists no gravity-induced buoyancy. We are interested in how bubbles move and in the mechanisms which support the movement. We will try two ways to make bubbles migrate. The first experiment concerns behavior of bubbles in a thermal gradient. It is well known than an effect of surface tension which is masked by gravity on the ground becomes dominant in microgravity. The surface tension on the side of the bubble at a lower temperature is stronger than at a higher temperature. The bubble migrates toward the higher temperature side due to the surface tension difference. The migration speed depends on the so-called Marangoni number, which is a function of the temperature difference, the bubble diameter, liquid viscosity, and thermal diffusivity. At present, some experimental data about migration speeds in liquids with very small Marangoni numbers were obtained in space experiments, but cases of large Marangoni number are rarely obtained. In our experiment a couple of bubbles are to be injected into a cell filled with silicon oil, and the temperature gradient is to be made gradually in the cell by a heater and a cooler. We will be able to determine migration speeds in a very wide range of Marangoni numbers, as well as study interactions between the bubbles. We will observe bubble movements affected by hydrodynamical and thermal interactions, the two kinds of interactions which occur simultaneously. These observation data will be useful for analyzing the interactions as well as understanding the behavior of particles or drops in materials processing. The second experiment concerns bubble movement in an acoustic stationary wave. It is known that a bubble in a stationary wave moves toward the node or the

  8. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  9. MISSING: BUBBLE CHAMBER LENS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Would the person who borrowed the large bubble chamber lens from the Microcosm workshops on the ISR please return it. This is a much used piece from our object archives. If anybody has any information about the whereabouts of this object, please contact Emma.Sanders@cern.ch Thank you

  10. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in a PS experiment. Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  11. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  12. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  13. Critical scattering by bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    We apply the complex angular momentum theory to the problem of the critical scattering of light by spherical cavities in the high frequency limit (permittivity greater than the external media) (e.g, air bubble in water) (M.W.O.) [pt

  14. Soap Bubbles and Crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jean Taylor is Professor. Emerita at Rutgers. University and currently a. Visitor at the Courant. Institute, NYU. She works on problems related to soap bubble froths, crystals, and how they evolve under various physical laws. Much of her recent research has been interdisciplinary, joint work with materials scientists ...

  15. Bubble properties of heterogeneous bubbly flow in a square bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Wei; Deen, Niels G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on the measurements of bubble properties in heterogeneous bubbly flows in a square bubble column. A four-point optical fibre probe was used for this purpose. The accuracy and intrusive effect of the optical probe was investigated first. The results show that the optical

  16. Solubility of helium in mercury for bubbling technology of the spallation neutron mercury target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.; Naoe, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-01-01

    The pitting damage of mercury target container that originates in the pressure wave excited by the proton beam incidence becomes a large problem to reach the high-power neutron source in JSNS and SNS. The lifetime of mercury container is decreased remarkably by the pitting damage. As one of solutions, the pressure wave is mitigated by injecting the helium micro bubbles in mercury. In order to inject the helium micro bubbles into mercury, it is important to understand the characteristic of micro bubbles in mercury. The solubility of mercury-helium system is a key factor to decide bubbling conditions, because the disappearance behavior, i.e. the lifetime of micro bubbles, depends on the solubility. In addition, the bubble generation method is affected by it. Moreover, the experimental data related to the solubility of helium in mercury hardly exist. In this work, the solubility was obtained experimentally by measuring precisely the pressure drop of the gas that is facing to mercury surface. The pressure drop was attributed to the helium dissolution into mercury. Based on the measured solubility, the lifetime of micro bubbles and the method of the bubble generation is estimated using the solubility data.

  17. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  18. Bubble dynamics in microchannels: inertial and capillary migration forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Scheid, Benoit

    2018-05-01

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a train of unconfined bubbles flowing in microchan- nels. We investigate the transverse position of a train of bubbles, its velocity and the associated pressure drop when flowing in a microchannel depending on the internal forces due to viscosity, inertia and capillarity. Despite the small scales of the system, inertia, referred to as inertial migration force, play a crucial role in determining the transverse equilibrium position of the bubbles. Beside inertia and viscosity, other effects may also affect the transverse migration of bubbles such as the Marangoni surface stresses and the surface deformability. We look at the influence of surfactants in the limit of infinite Marangoni effect which yields rigid bubble interface. The resulting migration force may balance external body forces if present such as buoyancy, Dean or magnetic ones. This balance not only determines the transverse position of the bubbles but, consequently, the surrounding flow structure, which can be determinant for any mass/heat transfer process involved. Finally, we look at the influence of the bubble deformation on the equilibrium position and compare it to the inertial migration force at the centred position, explaining the stable or unstable character of this position accordingly. A systematic study of the influence of the parameters - such as the bubble size, uniform body force, Reynolds and capillary numbers - has been carried out using numerical simulations based on the Finite Element Method, solving the full steady Navier-Stokes equations and its asymptotic counterpart for the limits of small Reynolds and/or capillary numbers.

  19. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  20. Bubble Dynamics and Breakup in a T-junction at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiols, Octavi; Rangel, Roger

    2017-11-01

    The deformation and breakup of droplets and bubbles in an immiscible carrier liquid in microchannels has been extensively investigated in the literature. In this study, we address the case of bubbles and drops in a centimeter-scale T-junction at moderate Reynolds numbers, a problem that is relevant for fluidics and emulsion processing applications. The main features include complex oscillating transients, recirculation stabilization, and drop stabilization against breakup. In particular, very elongated drop shapes are observed, which would be unstable in the unbounded case and can be explained in terms of wall-induced distortion of the flow field. We show that wall effects can be exploited to obtain nearly monodisperse emulsions in confined flows. Surface tension also plays an important role on the breakup of the dispersed phase. Different drop sizes can be obtained depending on the Capillary number as well as the bubble initial size. A mechanism for finding the non-breakup and break-up regions depending on bubble size is found. It is found with different initial flow rates of the matrix flow, the non-breakup regime allows for the bubble to remain attached to the bottom wall of the T-junction. In the breakup regime, the elongation of the drop results in a significant delay for breakup, allowing for the study of the breakup time and location. Results are presented for different Ca and Re numbers.

  1. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  2. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  3. Scanning drop sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  4. Short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, A-L; Sibai, A; Mahfoud, L; Oubari, D; Ashkar, J; Fuleihan, N

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice. Prospective study. Eighteen non-dysphonic subjects (seven men and 11 women) with a history of hubble-bubble smoking and no history of cigarette smoking underwent acoustic analysis and laryngeal video-stroboscopic examination before and 30 minutes after hubble-bubble smoking. On laryngeal video-stroboscopy, none of the subjects had vocal fold erythema either before or after smoking. Five patients had mild vocal fold oedema both before and after smoking. After smoking, there was a slight increase in the number of subjects with thick mucus between the vocal folds (six, vs four before smoking) and with vocal fold vessel dilation (two, vs one before smoking). Acoustic analysis indicated a drop in habitual pitch, fundamental frequency and voice turbulence index after smoking, and an increase in noise-to-harmonics ratio. Even 30 minutes of hubble-bubble smoking can cause a drop in vocal pitch and an increase in laryngeal secretions and vocal fold vasodilation.

  5. Evaporation of a sessile water drop and a drop of aqueous salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S Y

    2017-11-07

    The influence of various factors on the evaporation of drops of water and aqueous salt solution has been experimentally studied. Typically, in the studies of drop evaporation, only the diffusive vapor transfer, radiation and the molecular heat conduction are taken into account. However, vapor-gas convection plays an important role at droplet evaporation. In the absence of droplet boiling, the influence of gas convection turns out to be the prevailing factor. At nucleate boiling, a prevailing role is played by bubbles generation and vapor jet discharge at a bubble collapse. The gas convection behavior for water and aqueous salt solution is substantially different. With a growth of salt concentration over time, the influence of the convective component first increases, reaches an extremum and then significantly decreases. At nucleate boiling in a salt solution it is incorrect to simulate the droplet evaporation and the heat transfer in quasi-stationary approximation. The evaporation at nucleate boiling in a liquid drop is divided into several characteristic time intervals. Each of these intervals is characterized by a noticeable change in both the evaporation rate and the convection role.

  6. Test of a superheated superconducting granule detector with nuclear recoil measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Czapek, G.; Diggelmann, U.; Flammer, I.; Frei, D.; Furlan, M.; Gabutti, A.; Janos, S.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schmiemann, K.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.

    1993-01-01

    The presented results are part of a Superheated Superconducting Granule (SSG) detector development for neutrinos and dark matter. An aluminum SSG detector was exposed to a 70MeV neutron beam to test the detector sensitivity to nuclear recoils. The neutron scattering angels were determined using a scintillator hodoscope. Coincidences between the SSG and the hodoscope signals have been clearly established. Data were taken at an operating temperature of 120mK for different SSG intrinsic thresholds. The proved sensitivity of the detector to nuclear recoils above 10keV is encouraging for possible applications of SSG as a dark matter detector. (orig.)

  7. First Dark Matter Limits from a Large-Mass, Low-Background Superheated Droplet Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Limagne, D.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the fabrication aspects and calibration of the first large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) modules of SIMPLE, a search for particle dark matter using Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs). While still limited by the statistical uncertainty of the small data sample on hand, the first weeks of operation in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt already provide a sensitivity to axially-coupled Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) competitive with leading experiments, confirming SDDs as a convenient, low-cost alternative for WIMP detection.

  8. Improvement of the phase transition homogeneity of superheated superconducting tin granules

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Czapek, G; Ebert, T R; Hasenbalg, F; Hauser, M G; Janos, S; Kainer, K U; Knoop, K M; Moser, U; Palmieri, V G; Pretzl, Klaus P; Sahli, B; Sgobba, Stefano; Vollenberg, W; Wyss, C

    2000-01-01

    A considerably improved phase transition homogeneity was observed with superheated superconducting Sn spheres as a result of laser melting and fast cooling. These spheres exhibited a very homogeneous phase transition behaviour independent of the orientation of the spheres with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Compared to previously untreated Sn spheres the spread of the phase transition boundaries was reduced by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, we studied mass production of Sn structures using vacuum evaporation and deposition. First encouraging results are reported. (7 refs).

  9. Statistical evaluations concerning the failure behaviour of formed parts with superheated steam flow. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oude-Hengel, H.H.; Vorwerk, K.; Heuser, F.W.; Boesebeck, K.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical evaluations concerning the failure behaviour of formed parts with superheated-steam flow were carried out using data from VdTUEV inventory and failure statistics. Due to the great number of results, the findings will be published in two volumes. This first part will describe and classify the stock of data and will make preliminary quantitative statements on failure behaviour. More differentiated statements are made possible by including the operation time and the number of start-ups per failed part. On the basis of time-constant failure rates some materials-specific statements are given. (orig./ORU) [de

  10. Combined Effect of Far Infrared Heating on the Quality of Vegetable Oil During Superheated Steam Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    雨坪, 知音; 羽倉, 義雄; 鈴木, 寛一

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the quality of soybean oil heated using superheated steam (SHS) combined with far infrared heating (FIH) were compared to those of oil heated using SHS only. Oil quality was measured with respect to acid value (AV), peroxide value (POV) and viscosity. For the SHS treatment, oil was heated at two temperatures (180°C and 230°C). For the combined treatment of SHS with FIH (SHS + FIH), oil temperature was 180°C and the surface temperature of the FIH ceramic heater was 230°C. Change...

  11. Un « superhéros » du cyberespace appelle à la prise de conscience ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    8 sept. 2014 ... Penny Park, directrice générale du Centre canadien science et médias, qui a présenté M. Deibert, a dit de celui-ci qu'il était un « superhéros du XXIe siècle » cherchant à lever le voile sur une sphère numérique de plus en plus sombre et opaque. Mme Park a loué la puissance et la pertinence du travail ...

  12. Shape and size of methane bubbles in muddy aquatic sediments and their dependence on sediment fracture toughness: a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Regina

    2014-05-01

    Shallow gassy marine sediments abundantly found on continental margins of Israel and worldwide, are a source of a major concern for their contribution to the destabilization of coastal and marine infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. Bubbles are different in the different sediment types. Size of the bubbles residing in the fine-grained muddy sediment exceeds significantly the grain size of sediment, and its shape can be approximated by a large oblate spheroid surrounded by sediment saturated with water. Experimental results indicate that bubble growth is accompanied by fracturing of the fine-grained muddy sediment. Modeling reveals that fracture toughness of the muddy sediments significantly affects bubble shape and size evolution prior its ascent. Small fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the small bubbles with highly asymmetric configuration and with fracturing concentrated mostly on the bubble head. In contrast, bigger fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the large, more symmetric bubbles. Moreover, growing bubble demonstrates a positive allometry resulting in a bigger rate of growth of its surface area that is responsible for the effectiveness of the solute supply from pore water to the bubble interior. This scaling demonstrates a strong correlation with sediment fracture toughness as well. Cross-section of the buoyant bubbles evolves from the elliptic profile to the one resembling an 'inverted tear drop'. Calculated bubbles characteristics in different sediments types demonstrate a good agreement with values reported in the literature.

  13. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  14. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  15. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  16. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  17. Neutron detection via bubble chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)]. E-mail: david.jordan@pnl.gov; Ely, J.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Peurrung, A.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bond, L.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Collar, J.I. [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., LASR 214, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Flake, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Knopf, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pitts, W.K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Shaver, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Sonnenschein, A. [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., LASR 214, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Smart, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Todd, L.C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a {sup 137}Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  18. Numerical Simulation on Single Bubble Pool Boiling with Influence of Heater Thermal Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Liang; Li, Zhen-Dong

    The model of single bubble pool boiling is used to simulate nucleate pool boiling phenomenon in the present paper. Local convection and heat transfer around a single vapour bubble which is growing from a nucleus bubble planted artificially on the surface of heaters with different thicknesses, as well as transient heat conduction inside the heater’s wall, are simulated numerically with sharp interface representation. Multi-cycle simulation is adopted to eliminate the effect of un-physical initial conditions. It’s found that the thermal response of wall is found to affect the bubble growth and boiling heat transfer. During the process of bubble growth, a sharp temperature drop inside the solid wall is evident near the contact line underneath the growing bubble because of the strong evaporation in micro-region. The temperature and heat flux profiles change with the move of the contact line, and twice sharp temperature drops at a certain location are observed, which correspond to the expanding and recoiling processes, respectively. During the waiting period after the bubble detached from the wall, the temperature field is recovered by heat conduction inside the solid wall. As a part of preparation of the SOBER project onboard the Chinese recoverable satellite SJ-10, which will be launched in the end of 2015, the gravity influence is also studied.

  19. Oscillations of bubbles attached to a capillary: case of pure liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vobecka L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating bubble attached to a tip of a capillary is used for probing interfacial properties of liquids containing surface-active agents. Nevertheless, available theories even for the case of pure liquid are not satisfactory. In this contribution, we therefore present results of a linear inviscid theory for shape oscillations of a spherical bubble, which is in contact with a solid support. The theory allows determining eigenmodes (i.e. eigenfrequencies, eigenmode shapes and damping of eigenmode oscillations, but also response of the bubble shape to a motion of its support or to volume variations. Present theory covers also the cases previously analyzed by Strani and Sabetta (J. Fluid Mech., 1984 and Bostwick and Steen (Phys. Fluids, 2009, and it can be applied to both bubbles and drops. The theory has been compared to experiments. Good agreement is found for the case of small bubbles, which have spherical static shape. Experimental results for larger bubbles and drops deviate from the theory, if a neck is formed. It is shown that this deviation correlates well with a ratio of bubble volume to the maximum volume, when a detachment occurs.

  20. Oscillations of bubbles attached to a capillary: case of pure liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejrazka, J.; Vobecka, L.; Tihon, J.

    2013-04-01

    An oscillating bubble attached to a tip of a capillary is used for probing interfacial properties of liquids containing surface-active agents. Nevertheless, available theories even for the case of pure liquid are not satisfactory. In this contribution, we therefore present results of a linear inviscid theory for shape oscillations of a spherical bubble, which is in contact with a solid support. The theory allows determining eigenmodes (i.e. eigenfrequencies, eigenmode shapes and damping of eigenmode oscillations), but also response of the bubble shape to a motion of its support or to volume variations. Present theory covers also the cases previously analyzed by Strani and Sabetta (J. Fluid Mech., 1984) and Bostwick and Steen (Phys. Fluids, 2009), and it can be applied to both bubbles and drops. The theory has been compared to experiments. Good agreement is found for the case of small bubbles, which have spherical static shape. Experimental results for larger bubbles and drops deviate from the theory, if a neck is formed. It is shown that this deviation correlates well with a ratio of bubble volume to the maximum volume, when a detachment occurs.

  1. Bubble Coalescence: Effect of Bubble Approach Velocity and Liquid Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Růžička, Marek; Olivieri, G.; Marzocchella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, SEP 29 (2015), s. 205-216 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble coalescence * bubble approach velocity * liquid viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  2. Magnetic Bubble Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    x-axis intercept in Figure 20 is twice the coercive field, which for this sample is 0.3 oersted . In this experiment, the laser beam diameter was...the ion im- planted region. From the theory of optical waveguides, Namba, et al., have shown that the minimum refractive index change in an...resulting in bubble outputs at both A + B and A • B outputs. Our first devices of this type were found to have 6 to 7 Oersted bias field margins for

  3. Sound speed of isobaric heat capacity in the saturated and superheated vapour of cesium, rubidium and potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, I.I.; Roschupkin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the thermodynamic properties of alkali metal vapours. The most systematic investigations concern the sound velocity measurements for saturated and superheated vapours of caesium, for saturated vapour of rubidium, and for superheated vapour of potassium. The Joule-Thompson coefficient has been studied in caesium vapour, and the isobaric heat capacity of potassium vapour has also been examined. The experimental methods for all these experiments are described, and the data obtained are presented in tabular form. (U.K.)

  4. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  5. Life cycle assessment of superheated steam drying technology as a novel cow manure management method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifzadeh, Mohammadmatin; Nabati, Zahra; Longka, Pairote; Malakul, Pomthong; Apul, Defne; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2017-09-01

    Common methods of managing dairy manure are directly applying it to the farm field as a fertilizer. For direct application without any type of treatment, the majority of nutrients in the manure run off to the local river and lake during precipitation periods. The algae bloom is one of the environmental outcomes due to eutrophication of the lakes, which may jeopardize the quality of drinking water. In this study, superheated steam drying (SSD) technology is investigated as an alternative manure management method. Rapidly dried cow manure can be used as alternative fuel. Evaluations of energy payback time (EPBT) and life cycle assessment (LCA) of the SSD technology are presented in the SSD scenario and the results are compared with those of the direct field application (FA) of fresh manure and anaerobic digestion (AD). The heat required for the generation of superheated steam in the SSD scenario is provided from combustion of the dry manure to reduce energy costs. The results for the SSD process show 95% and 70% lower eutrophication and global warming potential in comparison to the FA scenario. Acidification potential for SSD turned out to be 35% higher than FA. The comparison of SSD with AD for their EPBT and normalized impacts indicated that the proposed SSD scenario has higher environmental sustainability than AD (70% lower impact), and is likely an economically better choice compared to conventional AD method (87% lower EPBT) for the future investment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li having high (α, n neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of ~10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by ~2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  7. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  8. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  9. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  10. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well as the distribu...

  11. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  12. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.; Arora, M.; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the

  13. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-D. Ohl (Claus-Dieter); M. Arora (Manish); R. Ikink (Roy); N. de Jong (Nico); M. Versluis (Michel); M. Delius (Michael); D. Lohse (Detlef)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads

  14. Sonoluminescing Air Bubbles Rectify Argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.; Dupont, Todd F.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Johnston, Blaine

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) strongly depends on the percentage of inert gas within the bubble. We propose a theory for this dependence, based on a combination of principles from sonochemistry and hydrodynamic stability. The nitrogen and oxygen dissociation and subsequent

  15. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...... and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...

  16. Growing bubbles rising in line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Harper

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over many years the author and others have given theories for bubbles rising in line in a liquid. Theory has usually suggested that the bubbles will tend towards a stable distance apart, but experiments have often showed them pairing off and sometimes coalescing. However, existing theory seems not to deal adequately with the case of bubbles growing as they rise, which they do if the liquid is boiling, or is a supersaturated solution of a gas, or simply because the pressure decreases with height. That omission is now addressed, for spherical bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers. As the flow is then nearly irrotational, Lagrange's equations can be used with Rayleigh's dissipation function. The theory also works for bubbles shrinking as they rise because they dissolve.

  17. Impact of ultra-viscous drops: air-film gliding and extreme wetting

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth

    2017-01-23

    A drop impacting on a solid surface must push away the intervening gas layer before making contact. This entails a large lubricating air pressure which can deform the bottom of the drop, thus entrapping a bubble under its centre. For a millimetric water drop, the viscous-dominated flow in the thin air layer counteracts the inertia of the drop liquid. For highly viscous drops the viscous stresses within the liquid also affect the interplay between the drop and the gas. Here the drop also forms a central dimple, but its outer edge is surrounded by an extended thin air film, without contacting the solid. This is in sharp contrast with impacts of lower-viscosity drops where a kink in the drop surface forms at the edge of the central disc and makes a circular contact with the solid. Larger drop viscosities make the central air dimple thinner. The thin outer air film subsequently ruptures at numerous random locations around the periphery, when it reaches below 150 nm thickness. This thickness we measure using high-speed two-colour interferometry. The wetted circular contacts expand rapidly, at orders of magnitude larger velocities than would be predicted by a capillary-viscous balance. The spreading velocity of the wetting spots is independent of the liquid viscosity. This may suggest enhanced slip of the contact line, assisted by rarefied-gas effects, or van der Waals forces in what we call extreme wetting. Myriads of micro-bubbles are captured between the local wetting spots.

  18. Bubble length affects bubble speed in a rough microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Witten, Tom

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the creeping motion of bubbles of different length in rough capillary tubes filled with carrier fluids. This extends the results of BrethertonfootnotetextF.P.Bretherton, 1961, J. Fluid Mech., 10, 166. for an infinite-length bubble at small capillary number Ca in a circular tube. We first derive the asymptotic corrections to the speed owing to finite length. This dependence on length is exponentially small, with a decay length much shorter than the tube radius R. Then we discuss the effect of azimuthal roughness of the tube on the bubble speed. Tube roughness leads to a carrier fluid flow in the azimuthal plane; this flow controls the relaxation of the bubble shape to its infinite length limit. For long-wavelength roughness, we find that the above decay length becomes much longer and even comparable to R. This implies a much-enhanced dependence of the bubble velocity on length. A shorter bubble should then catch up with a longer bubble ahead of it in the same channel. This mechanism may explain catch-up effects seen experimentally.footnotetextR.Ismagilov, private communication.

  19. The bubble legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  20. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  1. Experimental Study on Breakdown Characteristics of Transformer Oil Influenced by Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxu Qin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bubbles will reduce the electric strength of transformer oil, and even result in the breakdown of the insulation. This paper has studied the breakdown voltages of transformer oil and oil-impregnated pressboard under alternating current (AC and direct current (DC voltages. In this paper, three types of electrodes were applied: cylinder-plan electrodes, sphere-plan electrodes, and cone-plan electrodes, and the breakdown voltages were measured in both no bubbles and bubbles. The sphere-sphere electrodes were used to study the breakdown voltage of the oil-impregnated pressboard. The results showed that under the influence of bubble, the breakdown voltage of the cylinder-plan electrode dropped the most, and the breakdown voltage of the cone-plan electrode dropped the least. The bubbles motion was the key factor of the breakdown. The discharge types of the oil-impregnated pressboard were different with bubbles, and under DC, the main discharge type was flashover along the oil-impregnated pressboard, while under AC, the main discharge type was breakdown through the oil-impregnated pressboard.

  2. New evidence on the first financial bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehen, R.G.P.; Goetzmann, W.; Rouwenhorst, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Bubble, South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Windhandel of 1720 together represent the world's first global financial bubble. We hand-collect cross-sectional price data and investor account data from 1720 to test theories about market bubbles. Our tests suggest that innovation was a key

  3. Modification of shape oscillations of an attached bubble by surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihon J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents (surfactants, e.g. washing agents strongly modifies properties of gas-liquid interface. We have carried out extensive experiments, in which we study effect of surfactants on the shape oscillations of a bubble, which is attached at a tip of a capillary. In the experiments, shape oscillations of a bubble are invoked by a motion of a capillary, to which the bubble is injected. Decaying oscillations are recorded and their frequency and damping are evaluated. By changing the excitation frequency, three lowest oscillation modes are studied. Experiments were repeated in aqueous solution of several surfactants (terpineol, SDS, CTAB, Triton X-100, Triton X-45 at various concentrations. Generally, these features are observed: Initially a surfactant addition leads to an increase of the oscillation frequency (though surface tension is decreasing; this effect can be attributed to the increasing interfacial elasticity. The decay time of oscillation is strongly decreasing, as a consequence of energy dissipation linked with Marangoni stresses. At a certain critical concentration, frequency decreases abruptly and the decay time passes by a minimum. With further addition of surfactant, frequency decreases, and the decay time slightly lengthens. Above critical micelle concentration, all these parameters stabilize. Interestingly, the critical concentration, at which frequency drop occurs, depends on mode order. This clearly shows that the frequency drop and minimum decay time are not a consequence of some abrupt change of interfacial properties, but are a consequence of some phenomena, which still need to be explained.

  4. Modification of shape oscillations of an attached bubble by surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobecká, L.; Vejražka, J.; Tihon, J.

    2013-04-01

    Surface-active agents (surfactants, e.g. washing agents) strongly modifies properties of gas-liquid interface. We have carried out extensive experiments, in which we study effect of surfactants on the shape oscillations of a bubble, which is attached at a tip of a capillary. In the experiments, shape oscillations of a bubble are invoked by a motion of a capillary, to which the bubble is injected. Decaying oscillations are recorded and their frequency and damping are evaluated. By changing the excitation frequency, three lowest oscillation modes are studied. Experiments were repeated in aqueous solution of several surfactants (terpineol, SDS, CTAB, Triton X-100, Triton X-45) at various concentrations. Generally, these features are observed: Initially a surfactant addition leads to an increase of the oscillation frequency (though surface tension is decreasing); this effect can be attributed to the increasing interfacial elasticity. The decay time of oscillation is strongly decreasing, as a consequence of energy dissipation linked with Marangoni stresses. At a certain critical concentration, frequency decreases abruptly and the decay time passes by a minimum. With further addition of surfactant, frequency decreases, and the decay time slightly lengthens. Above critical micelle concentration, all these parameters stabilize. Interestingly, the critical concentration, at which frequency drop occurs, depends on mode order. This clearly shows that the frequency drop and minimum decay time are not a consequence of some abrupt change of interfacial properties, but are a consequence of some phenomena, which still need to be explained.

  5. Numerical analysis of single and multiple particles of Belchatow lignite dried in superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Marcin; Sciazko, Anna; Komatsu, Yosuke; Akiyama, Taro; Hashimoto, Akira; Kaneko, Shozo; Kimijima, Shinji; Szmyd, Janusz S.; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2018-03-01

    Low production costs have contributed to the important role of lignite in the energy mixes of numerous countries worldwide. High moisture content, though, diminishes the applicability of lignite in power generation. Superheated steam drying is a prospective method of raising the calorific value of this fuel. This study describes the numerical model of superheated steam drying of lignite from the Belchatow mine in Poland in two aspects: single and multi-particle. The experimental investigation preceded the numerical analysis and provided the necessary data for the preparation and verification of the model. Spheres of 2.5 to 30 mm in diameter were exposed to the drying medium at the temperature range of 110 to 170 °C. The drying kinetics were described in the form of moisture content, drying rate and temperature profile curves against time. Basic coal properties, such as density or specific heat, as well as the mechanisms of heat and mass transfer in the particular stages of the process laid the foundations for the model construction. The model illustrated the drying behavior of a single particle in the entire range of steam temperature as well as the sample diameter. Furthermore, the numerical analyses of coal batches containing particles of various sizes were conducted to reflect the operating conditions of the dryer. They were followed by deliberation on the calorific value improvement achieved by drying, in terms of coal ingredients, power plant efficiency and dryer input composition. The initial period of drying was found crucial for upgrading the quality of coal. The accuracy of the model is capable of further improvement regarding the process parameters.

  6. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  7. Sodium-fuel interaction: dropping experiments and subassembly test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtbecker, H.; Schins, H.; Jorzik, E.; Klein, K.

    1978-01-01

    Nine dropping tests, which bring together 2 to 4 kg of molten UO 2 with 150 l sodium, showed the incoherency and non-violence of these thermal interactions. The pressures can be described by sodium incipient boiling and bubble collapse; the UO 2 fragmentation by thermal stress and bubble collapse impact forces. The mildness of the interaction is principally due to the slowness and incoherency of UO 2 fragmentation. This means that parametric models which assume instantaneous mixing and fragmentation are of no use for the interpretation of dropping experiments. One parametric model, the Caldarola Fuel Coolant Interaction Variable Mass model, is being coupled to the two dimensional time dependent hydrodynamic REXCO-H code. In a first step the coupling is applicated to a monodimensional geometry. A subassembly test is proposed to validate the model. In this test rapid mixing between UO 2 and sodium has to be obtained. Dispersed molten UO 2 fuel is obtained by flashing injected sodium drops inside a UO 2 melt. This flashing is theoretically explained and modelled as a superheat limited explosion. The measured sodium drop dwell times of two experiments are compared to results obtained from the mentioned theory, which is the basis of the Press 2 Code

  8. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  9. Holography in small bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on an experiment to determine the total charm cross section at different incident momenta using the small, heavy liquid bubble chamber HOBC. Holography in liquid hydrogen is also tested using the holographic lexan bubble chamber HOLEBC with the aim of preparing a future holographic experiment in hydrogen. The high intensity tests show that more than 100 incident tracks per hologram do not cause a dramatic effect on the picture quality. Hydrogen is more favorable than freon as the bubble growth is much slower in hydrogen. An advantage of holography is to have the maximum resolution in the full volume of the bubble chamber, which allows a gain in sensitivity by a factor of 10 compared to classical optics as 100 tracks per hologram look reasonable. Holograms are not more difficult to analyze than classical optics high-resolution pictures. The results show that holography is a very powerful technique which can be used in very high resolution particle physics experiments

  10. Large drops cause complete coalescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thin film below the drop drains out slowly with time, finally creating a hole in the drop when it comes in contact with the interface at t=0.37 Tc, a small matrix drop, also called satellite drop, is seen to be trapped during the film rupture. Such an entrapment was observed by Thoroddsen et al (2008) and Chen et al (2006).

  11. Two secondary drops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure shows formation of two secondary drops of unequal size and their merger. The process is same as the earlier process until t= 0.039 Tc with necking occurring at two places, one at the bottom of the column and the other at the middle. The necking at the middle of the liquid column is due to Raleigh instability.

  12. Two secondary drops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Notes: Figure shows formation of two secondary drops of unequal size and their merger. The process is same as the earlier process until t= 0.039 Tc with necking occurring at two places, one at the bottom of the column and the other at the middle. The necking at the ...

  13. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    the parameters that any of their callees might possibly need. Both lambda-lifting and lambda-dropping thus require one to compute a transitive closure over the call graph:• for lambda-lifting: to establish the Def/Use path of each free variable (these free variables are then added as parameters to each......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... of the functions in the call path);• for lambda-dropping: to establish the Def/Use path of each parameter (parameters whose use occurs in the same scope as their definition do not need to be passed along in the call path).Without free variables, a program is scope-insensitive. Its blocks are then free...

  14. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  15. From rational bubbles to crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μbubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μmodel and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  16. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  17. Measuring online social bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Nikolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media have become a prevalent channel to access information, spread ideas, and influence opinions. However, it has been suggested that social and algorithmic filtering may cause exposure to less diverse points of view. Here we quantitatively measure this kind of social bias at the collective level by mining a massive datasets of web clicks. Our analysis shows that collectively, people access information from a significantly narrower spectrum of sources through social media and email, compared to a search baseline. The significance of this finding for individual exposure is revealed by investigating the relationship between the diversity of information sources experienced by users at both the collective and individual levels in two datasets where individual users can be analyzed—Twitter posts and search logs. There is a strong correlation between collective and individual diversity, supporting the notion that when we use social media we find ourselves inside “social bubbles.” Our results could lead to a deeper understanding of how technology biases our exposure to new information.

  18. Beyond the gas bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilt, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The deliverability issue currently being discussed within the natural gas industry involves both near-term and long-term questions. In the near-term, over the next two or three years, it is probable that the natural gas industry will need to mobilize for much greater levels of investment than have been the experience over the past few years. In the longer-term, it is expected that new opportunities for gas will arise as the nation seeks to meet increasing energy requirements within new environmental constraints. Methane for emissions control, CNG vehicles, expanded gas-fired electricity generation, and increased efficiency of traditional energy services are just a few examples. The issues in the longer-term center on the ability of the gas industry to meet increasing supply requirements reliably and at cost-competitive prices for these markets. This paper begins by reviewing the historical situation of gas deliverability that is the capability of the gas producing and transportation portions of the industry. The delivery system's ability to handle shifts in the centers of consumption and production is discussed, with an emphasis on regional problems of gas deliverability and potential bottlenecks. On the production side, the paper reviews the capability and the required investment necessary to handle an orderly transition to a stable supply and demand balance once the elusive bubble had finally disappeared

  19. Toroidal and rotating bubble nuclei and the nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Fauchard, C.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1997-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. Previously, a one-parameter shape sequence has been defined to describe the path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes. New analytical expressions for the shape dependent functions have been obtained. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three-dimensional and plane-fragmentation barriers. Metastable bubble-like minima only appear at very high angular momentum and above the three dimensional fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localized below the plane-fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension

  20. Probing the nanoscale with high-speed interferometry of an impacting drop

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-02-28

    The simple phenomenon of a water drop falling onto a glass plate may seem like a trivial fluid mechanics problem. However, detailed imaging has shown that this process is highly complex and a small air-bubble is always entrapped under the drop when it makes contact with the solid. This bubble can interfere with the uniformity of spray coatings and degrade inkjet fabrication of displays etc. We will describe how we use high-speed interferometry at 5 million frames per second to understand the details of this process. As the impacting drop approaches the solid, the dynamics are characterized by a balance between the lubrication pressure in the thin air layer and the inertia of the bot-tom of the drop. This deforms the drop, forming a dimple at its bottom and making the drop touch the surface along a ring, thereby entrapping the air-layer, which is typically 1-3 mu m thick. This air-layer can be highly compressed and the deceleration of the bottom of the drop can be as large as 300,000 g. We describe how the thicknessevolution of the lubricating air-layer is extracted from following the interference fringes between frames. Two-color interferometry is also used to extract absolute layer thicknesses. Finally, we identify the effects of nanometric surface roughness on the first contact of the drop with the substrate. Here we need to resolve the 100 nm thickness changes occurring during 200 ns intervals, requiring these state of the art high-speed cameras. Surprisingly, we see a ring of micro-bubbles marking the first contact of the drop with the glass, only for microscope slides, which have a typical roughness of 20 nm, while such rings are absent for drop impacts onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces.

  1. Fundamental study of FC-72 pool boiling surface temperature fluctuations and bubble behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Alison R.

    A heater designed to monitor surface temperature fluctuations during pool boiling experiments while the bubbles were simultaneously being observed has been fabricated and tested. The heat source was a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) layer commercially deposited on a fused quartz substrate. Four copper-nickel thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) on the heater surface measured the surface temperature, while a thin layer of sapphire or fused silica provided electrical insulation between the TFTCs and the ITO. The TFTCs were micro-fabricated using the liftoff process to deposit the nickel and copper metal films. The TFTC elements were 50 mum wide and overlapped to form a 25 mum by 25 mum junction. TFTC voltages were recorded by a DAQ at a sampling rate of 50 kHz. A high-speed CCD camera recorded bubble images from below the heater at 2000 frames/second. A trigger sent to the camera by the DAQ synchronized the bubble images and the surface temperature data. As the bubbles and their contact rings grew over the TFTC junction, correlations between bubble behavior and surface temperature changes were demonstrated. On the heaters with fused silica insulation layers, 1--2°C temperature drops on the order of 1 ms occurred as the contact ring moved over the TFTC junction during bubble growth and as the contact ring moved back over the TFTC junction during bubble departure. These temperature drops during bubble growth and departure were due to microlayer evaporation and liquid rewetting the heated surface, respectively. Microlayer evaporation was not distinguished as the primary method of heat removal from the surface. Heaters with sapphire insulation layers did not display the measurable temperature drops observed with the fused silica heaters. The large thermal diffusivity of the sapphire compared to the fused silica was determined as the reason for the absence of these temperature drops. These findings were confirmed by a comparison of temperature drops in a 2-D simulation of

  2. Non-Intrusive, Real-Time, On-Line Temperature Sensor for Superheated Hydrogen at High Pressure and High Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SSC needs a hydrogen temperature sensor that can provide high accuracy, fast response and can be operated on a superheated hydrogen (SHH2) environment. This will...

  3. CFD simulation of fatty acid methyl ester production in bubble column reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, N. S. Mohd; Nasir, N. F.

    2017-09-01

    Non-catalytic transesterification is one of the method that was used to produce the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) by blowing superheated methanol bubbles continuously into the vegetable oil without using any catalyst. This research aimed to simulate the production of FAME from palm oil in a bubble column reactor. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation was used to predict the distribution of fatty acid methyl ester and other product in the reactor. The fluid flow and component of concentration along the reaction time was investigated and the effects of reaction temperature (523 K and 563 K) on the non-catalytic transesterification process has been examined. The study was carried out using ANSYS CFX 17.1. The finding from the study shows that increasing the temperature leads to higher amount of fatty acid methyl ester can be produced in shorter time. On the other hand, concentration of the component such as triglyceride (TG), glycerol (GL) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) can be known when reaching the optimum condition.

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  5. Influence of geological variations on lignite drying kinetics in superheated steam atmosphere for Belchatow deposit located in the central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciazko Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignite-fired coal power plants suffer from a significant heat loss due to the high moisture content in this energy carrier. Water removal from fuel is an indispensable treatment for improving the combustion process, which will foster the efficient utilization of lignite. Superheated steam fluidized bed drying is expected for this purpose in a power generation sector. Understanding drying kinetics of lignite will greatly reinforce design process of a dryer. Physical features as well as the drying behaviour may be divergent among the lignite originated from different depths and positions in a certain mine. To reveal and clarify the influence of the geological features, the drying characteristics of several grades of lignite from the Belchatow mine in Poland were investigated. The attempts to clarify the influence of the divergent properties of the investigated samples on the drying kinetics in superheated steam were presented in this paper.

  6. Natural oscillations of a gas bubble in a liquid-filled cavity located in a viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Marmottant, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    The present study is motivated by cavitation phenomena that occur in the stems of trees. The internal pressure in tree conduits can drop down to significant negative values. This drop gives rise to cavitation bubbles, which undergo high-frequency eigenmodes. The aim of the present study is to determine the parameters of the bubble natural oscillations. To this end, a theory is developed that describes the pulsation of a spherical bubble located at the center of a spherical cavity surrounded by an infinite solid medium. It is assumed that the medium inside the bubble is a gas-vapor mixture, the cavity is filled with a compressible viscous liquid, and the medium surrounding the cavity behaves as a viscoelastic solid. The theoretical solution takes into account the outgoing acoustic wave produced by the bubble pulsation, the incoming wave caused by reflection from the liquid-solid boundary, and the outgoing wave propagating in the solid. A dispersion equation for the calculation of complex wavenumbers of the bubble eigenmodes is derived. Approximate analytical solutions to the dispersion equation are found. Numerical simulations are performed to reveal the effect of different physical parameters on the resonance frequency and the attenuation coefficient of the bubble oscillations.

  7. Spherical Solutions of an Underwater Explosion Bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the 1D explosion bubble flow field out to the first bubble minimum is examined in detail using four different models. The most detailed is based on the Euler equations and accounts for the internal bubble fluid motion, while the simplest links a potential water solution to a stationary, Isentropic bubble model. Comparison of the different models with experimental data provides insight into the influence of compressibility and internal bubble dynamics on the behavior of the explosion bubble.

  8. On the Inception of Financial Representative Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to formalize the inception of representative bubbles giving the condition under which they may arise. We will find that representative bubbles may start at any time, depending on the definition of a behavioral component. This result is at odds with the theory of classic rational bubbles, which are those models that rely on the fulfillment of the transversality condition by which a bubble in a financial asset can arise just at its first trade. This means that a classic rational bubble (differently from our model cannot follow a cycle since if a bubble exists, it will burst by definition and never arise again.

  9. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sheen S; Apfelbaum, Evan P; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L; Zajac, Edward J; Stark, David

    2014-12-30

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others' decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity.

  10. Module for Oxygenating Water without Generating Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia; Sidik, Reyimjan; Kim, Jinseong

    2004-01-01

    A module that dissolves oxygen in water at concentrations approaching saturation, without generating bubbles of oxygen gas, has been developed as a prototype of improved oxygenators for water-disinfection and water-purification systems that utilize photocatalyzed redox reactions. Depending on the specific nature of a water-treatment system, it is desirable to prevent the formation of bubbles for one or more reasons: (1) Bubbles can remove some organic contaminants from the liquid phase to the gas phase, thereby introducing a gas-treatment problem that complicates the overall water-treatment problem; and/or (2) in some systems (e.g., those that must function in microgravity or in any orientation in normal Earth gravity), bubbles can interfere with the flow of the liquid phase. The present oxygenation module (see Figure 1) is a modified version of a commercial module that contains >100 hollow polypropylene fibers with a nominal pore size of 0.05 m and a total surface area of 0.5 m2. The module was originally designed for oxygenation in a bioreactor, with no water flowing around or inside the tubes. The modification, made to enable the use of the module to oxygenate flowing water, consisted mainly in the encapsulation of the fibers in a tube of Tygon polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with an inside diameter of 1 in. (approx.=25 mm). In operation, water is pumped along the insides of the hollow fibers and oxygen gas is supplied to the space outside the hollow tubes inside the PVC tube. In tests, the pressure drops of water and oxygen in the module were found to be close to zero at water-flow rates ranging up to 320 mL/min and oxygen-flow rates up to 27 mL/min. Under all test conditions, no bubbles were observed at the water outlet. In some tests, flow rates were chosen to obtain dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 25 and 31 parts per million (ppm) . approaching the saturation level of approx.=35 ppm at a temperature of 20 C and pressure of 1 atm (approx.=0.1 MPa). As one

  11. Influences of superheated steam roasting on changes in sugar, amino acid and flavour active components of cocoa bean (Theobroma cacao).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zzaman, Wahidu; Bhat, Rajeev; Yang, Tajul Aris; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2017-10-01

    Roasting is one of the important unit operations in the cocoa-based industries in order to develop unique flavour in products. Cocoa beans were subjected to roasting at different temperatures and times using superheated steam. The influence of roasting temperature (150-250°C) and time (10-50 min) on sugars, free amino acids and volatile flavouring compounds were investigated. The concentration of total reducing sugars was reduced by up to 64.61, 77.22 and 82.52% with increased roasting temperature at 150, 200 and 250°C for 50 min, respectively. The hydrophobic amino acids were reduced up to 29.21, 36.41 and 48.87% with increased roasting temperature at 150, 200 and 250°C for 50 min, respectively. A number of pyrazines, esters, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, carboxyl acids and hydrocarbons were detected in all the samples at different concentration range. Formation of the most flavour active compounds, pyrazines, were the highest concentration (2.96 mg kg -1 ) at 200°C for 10 min. The superheated steam roasting method achieves the optimum roasting condition within a short duration Therefore, the quality of cocoa beans can be improved using superheated steam during the roasting process. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Hamiltonian description of bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, A. O.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a nonspherical bubble in a liquid is described within the Hamiltonian formalism. Primary attention is focused on the introduction of the canonical variables into the computational algorithm. The expansion of the Dirichlet-Neumann operator in powers of the displacement of a bubble wall from an equilibrium position is obtained in the explicit form. The first three terms (more specifically, the second-, third-, and fourth-order terms) in the expansion of the Hamiltonian in powers of the canonical variables are determined. These terms describe the spectrum and interaction of three essentially different modes, i.e., monopole oscillations (pulsations), dipole oscillations (translational motions), and surface oscillations. The cubic nonlinearity is analyzed for the problem associated with the generation of Faraday ripples on the wall of a bubble in an acoustic field. The possibility of decay processes occurring in the course of interaction of surface oscillations for the first fifteen (experimentally observed) modes is investigated.

  13. Bubble dynamics equations in Newton fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J

    2008-01-01

    For the high-speed flow of Newton fluid, bubble is produced and expanded when it moves toward the surface of fluid. Bubble dynamics is a very important research field to understand the intrinsic feature of bubble production and motion. This research formulates the bubble expansion by expansion-local rotation transformation, which can be calculated by the measured velocity field. Then, the related dynamic equations are established to describe the interaction between the fluid and the bubble. The research shows that the bubble production condition can be expressed by critical vortex value and fluid pressure; and the bubble expansion rate can be obtained by solving the non-linear dynamic equation of bubble motion. The results may help the related research as it shows a special kind of fluid motion in theoretic sense. As an application example, the nanofiber radium-voltage relation and threshold voltage-surface tension relation in electrospinning process are discussed

  14. Sequential microwave superheated water extraction of mannans from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Cláudia P; Moreira, Ana S P; Domingues, M Rosário M; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2014-03-15

    The feasibility of using sequential microwave superheated water extraction (MAE) for the recovery of mannans from spent coffee grounds (SCG) was studied. Due to the high contents of mannose still present in the SCG residue left after two consecutive MAE, the unextracted material was re-suspended in water and submitted to a third microwave irradiation (MAE3) at 200 °C for 3 min. With MAE3, mannose recovery achieved 48%, increasing to 56% by MAE4, and reaching a maximum of 69% with MAE5. Glycosidic-linkage analysis showed that in MAE3 mainly galactomannans were recovered, while debranched galactomannans were recovered with MAE4 and MAE5. With increasing the number of extractions, the average degree of polymerization of the mannans decreased, as observed by size-exclusion chromatography and by methylation analysis. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a decrease on cell walls thickness. After final MAE5, the remaining un-extracted insoluble material, representing 22% of the initial SCG, was composed mainly by cellulose (84%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Superheated water extraction, steam distillation and Soxhlet extraction of essential oils of Origanum onites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Mustafa Z; Kaymaz, Hilal

    2004-08-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) at various temperatures (100, 125, 150 and 175 degrees C), steam distillation, and Soxhlet extraction were compared in the extraction of essential oils from two samples of the plant Origanum onites, one cultivated, the other wild. C18 solid-phase extraction was used to elute the essential oils from the SWE aqueous extract. The compositions of the extracted essential oils obtained from all three methods were then characterized by comprehensive GCxGC/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF/MS). The highest essential oil yields were obtained by using SWE at 150 degrees C with a flow rate of 2 mL min(-1) and a pressure of 60 bar for 30 min: these were 3.76 and 4.11% for wild and cultivated O. onites samples, respectively, expressed as a percentage of 100 g of dry (leaf) matter. The yields obtained using SWE at 150 degrees C were slightly higher than those from conventional methods. Steam distillation was performed for 3 h, and Soxhlet extraction was completed in 12 h. The major compounds found were borneol, terpinen-4-ol and carvacrol.

  16. Kinetics of Texture and Colour Changes in Chicken Sausage during Superheated Steam Cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhameed Asmaa A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a kinetic model to describe the texture and colour changes of chicken sausage during superheated steam cooking. Chicken sausages were cooked at temperature ranging from 150-200°C with treatment times ranging from 2-6 mins. The texture profile was evaluated in terms of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness, while the colour parameters were estimated in terms of lightness (L*, redness (a*, yellowness (b*, and total colour difference (∆E. Experimental data showed a gradual reduction in texture parameters as cooking times and temperatures increased. The L* value of the colour showed a linear reduction with cooking condition, while the a*, b*, and ∆E values showed a contrary effects. The decrease in texture parameters and L*-value of colour parameter followed the first-order kinetic model. While, zero-order kinetic model was adapted to fit the a* and b*. The modified first order kinetic showed a good fit for total ∆E. Significant correlations between colour and texture parameters were observed, which showed that a* alone could be used to predict the texture of chicken sausage.

  17. Modification of Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Characteristics Using Superheated Steam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbian Karuppuchamy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF was treated with superheated steam (SHS in order to modify its characteristics for biocomposite applications. Treatment was conducted at temperatures 190–230 °C for 1, 2 and 3 h. SHS-treated OPMF was evaluated for its chemical composition, thermal stability, morphology and crystallinity. OPMF treated at 230 °C exhibited lower hemicellulose content (9% compared to the untreated OPMF (33%. Improved thermal stability of OPMF was found after the SHS treatment. Moreover, SEM and ICP analyses of SHS-treated OPMF showed that silica bodies were removed from OPMF after the SHS treatment. XRD results exhibited that OPMF crystallinity increased after SHS treatment, indicating tougher fiber properties. Hemicellulose removal makes the fiber surface more hydrophobic, whereby silica removal increases the surface roughness of the fiber. Overall, the results obtained herewith suggested that SHS is an effective treatment method for surface modification and subsequently improving the characteristics of the natural fiber. Most importantly, the use of novel, eco-friendly SHS may contribute to the green and sustainable treatment for surface modification of natural fiber.

  18. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  19. Satellite formation during bubble transition through an interface between immiscible liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2014-03-12

    When a bubble rises to an interface between two immiscible liquids, it can pass through the interface, if this is energetically favourable, i.e. The bubble preferring the side of the interface with the lower air-liquid surface tension. Once the intermediate film between the bubble and the interface has drained sufficiently, the bubble makes contact with the interface, forming a triple-line and producing strong capillary waves which travel around the bubble and can pinch off a satellite on the opposite side, akin to the dynamics in the coalescence cascade. We identify the critical Ohnesorge numbers where such satellites are produced and characterize their sizes. The total transition time scales with the bubble size and differential surface tension, while the satellite pinch-off time scales with the capillary-inertial time of the pool liquid, which originally surrounds the bubble. We also use high-speed video imaging to study the motion of the neck of the contact. For low viscosity we show that it grows in time with a power-law exponent between 0.44 and 0.50, with a prefactor modified by the net sum of the three interfacial tensions. Increasing the viscosity of the receiving liquid drop drastically slows down the motion of the triple-line, when the Ohnesorge number exceeds ${\\\\sim }$0.08. This differs qualitatively from the coalescence of two miscible drops of different viscosities, where the lower viscosity sets the coalescence speed. We thereby propose a strong resistance from the triple-line. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Computing bubble-points of CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdin, M.; Balaji, S.P.; Vicent Luna, J.M.; Torres-Knoop, A; Chen, Q.; Dubbeldam, D.; Calero, S; de Loos, T.W.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Computing bubble-points of multicomponent mixtures using Monte Carlo simulations is a non-trivial task. A new method is used to compute gas compositions from a known temperature, bubble-point pressure, and liquid composition. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the bubble-points of

  1. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  3. Observation of contact area of bubbles with heating surface in pool boiling of water under microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kawamura, H.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abe, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Burnout heat flux was measured in subcooled pool boiling of water under attached boiling bubbles on heating surface with bubble holding plate in ground experiment. A thin stainless flat plate was employed for heating surface. The experimental setup and the heating procedures were same as used in reduced gravity experiment performed by a parabolic flight of jet aircraft. Same burnout heat flux as in the reduced gravity was obtained by adjusting the clearance between the bubble holder and the heating surface. They were 100 ∝ 400 percent higher than the widely accepted existing theories. As extending heating time longer than the reduced gravity duration until burnout occurred, burnout heat flux decreased gradually and became a constant value calculated from the existing theories. In a result of observing contact area of boiling bubbles with transparent heating surface, the contact area was smaller in quick heating time than that in long time heating at same heat flux. The experimental results suggest in microgravity that liquid layer is remained between rapidly expanded bubbles and heating surface. In microgravity experiment by a drop shaft facility, contact area of bubbles with heating surface increased considerably at starting of microgravity. (orig.)

  4. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  5. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.

  6. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  7. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  8. Soliton bubbles and phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masperi, L.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that no topological classical solutions in form of bubbles of a real scalar field theory with Lagrangian of quartet and sextet self interactions in 1+1 dimensions are responsible to discontinue transitions in the quantum problem between phases with degenerated and disordered excited level. (M.C.K.)

  9. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A; Hay, Todd A; Hamilton, Mark F

    2012-09-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23-26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion.

  10. "Financial Bubbles" and Monetary Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Yuriy A.; Pudovkina, Olga E.; Permjakova, Juliana V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this research is caused by the need of strengthening a role of monetary regulators to prevent financial bubbles in the financial markets. The aim of the article is the analysis of a problem of crisis phenomena in the markets of financial assets owing to an inadequate growth of their cost, owing to subjective reasons. The leading…

  11. Axial stability of Taylor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Long gas bubbles rising in a vertical tube are observed to lose axial symmetry and become unstable in a downward liquid flow. In this paper an approximate linear stability analysis of this phenomenon is presented. It is found that, under the combined effect of gravity and the pressure gradient which

  12. Air Bubble Technique for Fundus Visualization during Vitrectomy in Aphakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohamed Farouk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of air bubble technique for vitrectomy in aphakia. Study Design. Prospective interventional uncontrolled case series. Methods. This study included 53 eyes of 53 patients who are phakic and indicated for phacovitrectomy (7 eyes, group 1, aphakic and indicated for vitrectomy (22 eyes, group 2, or underwent unplanned vitrectomy for immediate management of a phacoemulsification surgery complicated by rupture posterior capsule with dropped nucleus, fragments, or IOL (24 eyes, group 3. Cases with complicated vitreoretinal pathology were not included in this study. All vitrectomy surgeries were conducted by the air bubble technique in the anterior chamber. Main outcomes included anatomical success, visual acuity, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results. The surgical success was achieved in 50 eyes (94.3%. Conversion to BIOM viewing system was needed in the retinal detachment cases of groups 1 and 2. The mean overall LogMAR visual acuity was significantly improved from 1.29 ± 0.58 preoperatively to 0.56 ± 0.19 at the final visit, 6 months postoperatively (P<0.001. Conclusion. The air bubble technique as visualization method for vitrectomy in aphakia is an effective and cheap technique for immediate management of complications of phacoemulsification surgery. This trial is registered with Pan African Clinical Trial Registry PACTR201709002466296.

  13. Bubble fusion: fact or fiction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennicott, Katie

    2002-04-01

    Physicists in the US claim to have seen nuclear fusion in a table-top experiment but their work has met with a hostile reaction from other researchers. In sonoluminescence, flashes of light are emitted by bubbles that are forced to expand and then collapse by sound waves, although this process is still not fully understood (see Physics World May 1998 pp38-42, print version). Physicists have long speculated that the considerable compression forces inside the collapsing bubbles could be large enough to spark nuclear reactions. If this was the case, it could lead to a new source of clean energy. In their experiment, Taleyarkhan and co-workers at Oak Ridge, the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the US, and the Russian Academy of Sciences used 14 MeV neutrons to create bubbles about 10 nano metres across in acetone in which the ordinary hydrogen atoms had been replaced by deuterium atoms (C{sub 3}D{sub 6O}). An acoustic signal then forced these bubbles - and the acetone vapour inside them - to first expand to about a millimetre in size, and then collapse. Two deuterium nuclei can fuse to produce either a tritium nucleus and a proton, or a helium-3 nucleus and a neutron with an energy of 2.45 MeV. Taleyarkhan and co-workers claim to have seen evidence for both tritium and 2.45 MeV neutrons in their experiments. They have also calculated that temperatures of a million or even 10 million degrees - the temperature at the Sun's core - must have existed inside the bubbles for these reactions to proceed. Some other experiments and the controversy discussions of the researchers are summarized. (U.K.)

  14. Hydrodynamics in a swarm of rising bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboux, G.

    2007-04-01

    In many applications, bubbles are used to agitate a liquid in order to enhance mixing and transfer. This work is devoted to the study of the hydrodynamics in a stable bubble column. Experimentally, we have determined the properties of the velocity fluctuations inside and behind a homogeneous swarm of rising bubbles for different bubble sizes and gas volume fractions α: self-similarity in α 0,4 , spectrum in k -3 and integral length scale controlled by buoyancy. Numerically, we have reproduced these properties by means of large-scale simulations, the bubbles being modeled by volume-forces. This confirms that the dynamics is controlled by wake interactions. (author)

  15. Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Eckerle, Kate [Department of Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Greene, Brian [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-03-06

    We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by ‘free passage’ dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

  16. Lidar signature from bubbles in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H

    2010-04-12

    The lidar signature from a collection of bubbles is proportional to the volume backscatter coefficient at a scattering angle of 180 degrees . This quantity, calculated using a combination of geometric optics and diffraction, is proportional to the void fraction of the bubbles in the water for any bubble size distribution. The constant of proportionality is 233 m(-1) sr(-1)for clean bubbles, slightly less for bubbles coated with a thin layer of organic material, and as large as 1445 m(-1) sr(-1) for a thick coating of protein.

  17. An equation of motion for bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesage, F.J.; Cotton, J.S.; Robinson, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed which describes asymmetric bubble growth, either during boiling or bubble injection from submerged orifices. The model is developed using the integral form of the continuity and momentum equations, resulting in a general expression for the acceleration of the bubble's centre of gravity. The proposed model highlights the need to include acceleration due to an asymmetric gain or loss of mass in order to accurately predict bubble motion. Some scenarios are posed by which the growth of bubbles, particularly idealized bubbles that remain a section of a sphere, must include the fact that bubble growth can be asymmetric. In particular, for approximately hemispherical bubble growth the sum of the forces acting on the bubble is negligible compared with the asymmetric term. Further, for bubble injection from a submerged needle this component in the equation of motion is very significant during the initial rapid growth phase as the bubble issues from the nozzle changing from a near hemisphere to truncated sphere geometry. (author)

  18. Agitation, Mixing, and Transfers Induced by Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Bubbly flows involve bubbles randomly distributed within a liquid. At large Reynolds number, they experience an agitation that can combine shear-induced turbulence (SIT), large-scale buoyancy-driven flows, and bubble-induced agitation (BIA). The properties of BIA strongly differ from those of SIT. They have been determined from studies of homogeneous swarms of rising bubbles. Regarding the bubbles, agitation is mainly caused by the wake-induced path instability. Regarding the liquid, two contributions must be distinguished. The first one corresponds to the anisotropic flow disturbances generated near the bubbles, principally in the vertical direction. The second one is the almost isotropic turbulence induced by the flow instability through a population of bubbles, which turns out to be the main cause of horizontal fluctuations. Both contributions generate a k‑3 spectral subrange and exponential probability density functions. The subsequent issue will be to understand how BIA interacts with SIT.

  19. Dynamics of Bubbly-magma Flow in Conduits: Stress and Expansion Regimes of Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, N. K.; Koyaguchi, T.; Ida, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are characterized by magma fragmentation, that is, the process through which a bubbly magma is changed into a gas-pyroclast dispersion. Two criteria of mechanisms have been proposed for the magma fragmentation so far. First, magma fragments when stress or strain rate of magma around bubbles exceeds a critical value. Second, magma disrupts due to the instability of thin magma-foam. Which criterion is actually applicable is not yet known. In order to clarify the physics of the magma fragmentation, we numerically study one-dimensional steady flows with bubble growth in conduits. The spherical cell model is used to calculate expansion of bubbles in ascending visco-elastic magma. The stress around bubbles generally grows as magma ascends and the pressure difference between bubbles and surrounding magma increases. In some conditions, the stress becomes critically large only when the flow velocity approaches the sound speed meeting the choking condition. In other conditions, the stress becomes large enough as magma pressure drops with bubble pressure kept almost unchanged. These two distinct types may correspond to the above two criteria of fragmentation mechanisms. In the former case, void fraction becomes close to unity before the stress reaches the strength of magma. In such case, the magma does not fragment due to the visco-elastic deformations but fragments by the instability of the thin magma-foam (`expansion' regime). In the latter case, on the other hand, the stress reaches the magma strength at much lower void fractions. In such case, the magma fragments due to the visco-elastic deformation around bubbles (`stress' regime). The `expansion' and `stress' regimes occur when the ratio of the initial wall-friction stress to the magma strength is sufficiently smaller and greater than unity, respectively.

  20. Thermo-Economic Performance Analysis of a Regenerative Superheating Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghe Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is a promising form of technology for recovering low-grade waste heat. In this study, a regenerative ORC system is established to recover the waste flue gas of 160 °C. Focusing on thermodynamic and economic performance while simultaneously considering the limitations of volume flow ratio (VFR and the effect of superheat, working fluid selection and parameter optimization have been investigated. The optimization of the evaporation temperature is carried out by analyzing the variation of net power output and specific investment cost (SIC. Then, the net power output, specific net power output, total exergy destruction rate, VFR, total capital cost, and levelized electricity cost (LEC are selected as criteria, and a fuzzy multi-criteria evaluation method is adopted to select a more suitable working fluid and determine the optimal degree of superheat. In addition, the preheating coefficient, latent heat coefficient, superheating coefficient, and internal heat coefficient were proposed to explore the effect of working fluid critical temperature on thermal efficiency. Research studies demonstrate that there is an optimal evaporation temperature, maximizing net power output and minimizing the SIC. Isohexane and butane have greater specific net power output due to greater latent heat. A suitable degree of superheat is not only conducive to improving the working capacity of working fluids, but also reduces the VFR, total capital cost, SIC, and LEC for different working fluids. Thus, the system’s thermodynamic and economic performance—as well as the operational stability—are improved. Among the six working fluids, butane exhibits the best comprehensive performance, and its optimal evaporation temperature and degree of superheat are 100 °C and 5 °C, respectively.

  1. First drop dissimilarity in drop-on-demand inkjet devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famili, Amin; Palkar, Saurabh A.; Baldy, William J. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    As inkjet printing technology is increasingly applied in a broader array of applications, careful characterization of its method of use is critical due to its inherent sensitivity. A common operational mode in inkjet technology known as drop-on-demand ejection is used as a way to deliver a controlled quantity of material to a precise location on a target. This method of operation allows ejection of individual or a sequence (burst) of drops based on a timed trigger event. This work presents an examination of sequences of drops as they are ejected, indicating a number of phenomena that must be considered when designing a drop-on-demand inkjet system. These phenomena appear to be driven by differences between the first ejected drop in a burst and those that follow it and result in a break-down of the linear relationship expected between driving amplitude and drop mass. This first drop, as quantified by high-speed videography and subsequent image analysis, can be different in morphology, trajectory, velocity, and volume from subsequent drops within a burst. These findings were confirmed orthogonally by both volume and mass measurement techniques which allowed quantitation down to single drops.

  2. Formation of droplets and bubbles in a microfluidic T-junction-scaling and mechanism of break-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstecki, Piotr; Fuerstman, Michael J; Stone, Howard A; Whitesides, George M

    2006-03-01

    This article describes the process of formation of droplets and bubbles in microfluidic T-junction geometries. At low capillary numbers break-up is not dominated by shear stresses: experimental results support the assertion that the dominant contribution to the dynamics of break-up arises from the pressure drop across the emerging droplet or bubble. This pressure drop results from the high resistance to flow of the continuous (carrier) fluid in the thin films that separate the droplet from the walls of the microchannel when the droplet fills almost the entire cross-section of the channel. A simple scaling relation, based on this assertion, predicts the size of droplets and bubbles produced in the T-junctions over a range of rates of flow of the two immiscible phases, the viscosity of the continuous phase, the interfacial tension, and the geometrical dimensions of the device.

  3. Thermal bubble inkjet printing of water-based graphene oxide and graphene inks on heated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Simin; Shen, Ruoxi; Qian, Bo; Li, Lingying; Wang, Wenhao; Lin, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaofei; Li, Peng; Xie, Yonglin

    2018-04-01

    Stable-jetting water-based graphene oxide (GO) and graphene (GR) inks without any surfactant or stabilizer are prepared from an unstable-jetting water-based starting solvent, with many thermal bubble inkjet satellite drops, by simply increasing the material concentration. The concentration-dependent thermal bubble inkjet droplet generation process is studied in detail. To overcome the low concentration properties of water-based thermal bubble inkjet inks, the substrate temperature is tuned below 60 °C to achieve high-quality print lines. Due to the difference in hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the 2D materials, the printed GO lines show a different forming mechanism from that of the GR lines. The printed GO lines are reduced by thermal annealing and by ascorbic acid, respectively. The reduced GO lines exhibit electrical conductivity of the same order of magnitude as that of the GR lines.

  4. A case study of speculative financial bubbles in the South African stock market 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2009-03-01

    We tested 45 indices and common stocks in the South African stock market for the possible existence of a bubble over the period from January 2003 to May 2006. A bubble is defined by a faster-than-exponential acceleration with significant log-periodic oscillations. These two traits are analyzed using different methods. Sensitivity tests show that the estimated parameters are robust. With the insight of 6 additional months of data since the analysis was performed, we observe that many of the stocks on the South African market experienced an abrupt drop at mid-June 2006, which is compatible with the predicted tc for several of the stocks, but not all. This suggests that the mini-crash that occurred around mid-June of 2006 was only a partial correction, which has resumed into a renewed bubbly acceleration bound to end some time in 2007, similarly to what happened in the US market from October 1997 to August 1998.

  5. Bubble entrapment through topological change

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-05-03

    When a viscousdrop impacts onto a solid surface, it entraps a myriad of microbubbles at the interface between liquid and solid. We present direct high-speed video observations of this entrapment. For viscousdrops, the tip of the spreading lamella is separated from the surface and levitated on a cushion of air. We show that the primary mechanism for the bubble entrapment is contact between this precursor sheet of liquid with the solid and not air pulled directly through cusps in the contact line. The sheet makes contact with the solid surface,forming a wetted patch, which grows in size, but only entraps a bubble when it meets the advancing contact line. The leading front of this wet patch can also lead to the localized thinning and puncturing of the liquid film producing strong splashing of droplets.

  6. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  7. Informational pathologies and interest bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    This article contends that certain configurations of information networks facilitate specific cognitive states that are instrumental for decision and action on social media. Group-related knowledge and belief states—in particular common knowledge and pluralistic ignorance—may enable strong public...... signals. Indeed, some network configurations and attitude states foster informational pathologies that may fuel interest bubbles affecting agenda-setting and the generation of narratives in public spheres....

  8. Soap bubbles in paintings: Art and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi, F.

    2008-12-01

    Soap bubbles became popular in 17th century paintings and prints primarily as a metaphor for the impermanence and fragility of life. The Dancing Couple (1663) by the Dutch painter Jan Steen is a good example which, among many other symbols, shows a young boy blowing soap bubbles. In the 18th century the French painter Jean-Simeon Chardin used soap bubbles not only as metaphor but also to express a sense of play and wonder. In his most famous painting, Soap Bubbles (1733/1734) a translucent and quavering soap bubble takes center stage. Chardin's contemporary Charles Van Loo painted his Soap Bubbles (1764) after seeing Chardin's work. In both paintings the soap bubbles have a hint of color and show two bright reflection spots. We discuss the physics involved and explain how keenly the painters have observed the interaction of light and soap bubbles. We show that the two reflection spots on the soap bubbles are images of the light source, one real and one virtual, formed by the curved surface of the bubble. The faint colors are due to thin film interference effects.

  9. When Will Occur the Crude Oil Bubbles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Chi-Wei; Li, Zheng-Zheng; Chang, Hsu-Ling; Lobonţ, Oana-Ramona

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we apply a recursive unit root test to investigate whether there exist multiple bubbles in crude oil price. The method is best suited for a practical implementation of a time series and delivers a consistent date-stamping strategy for the origination and termination of multiple bubbles. The empirical result indicates that there exist six bubbles during 1986–2016 when the oil price deviate from its intrinsic value based on market fundamentals. Specifically, oil price contains the fundamentals and bubble components. The dates of the bubbles correspond to specific events in the politics and financial markets. The authorities should actively fight speculative bubbles or just observe their evolutions and speculation activities may decrease, which is favour of the stabilisation of the staple commodities including crude oil price. These findings have important economic and policy implications to recognise the cause of bubbles and take corresponding measures to reduce the impact on the real economy cause of the fluctuation of crude oil price. - Highlights: • Investigate multiple bubbles in crude oil price. • Indicate six bubbles deviate from its intrinsic value based on market fundamentals. • The bubbles correspond to specific events in the politics and financial markets. • Reduce the impact on the real economy cause of the fluctuation of crude oil price.

  10. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  11. Analysis of volatile components from Ziziphora taurica subsp. taurica by steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption with GCxGC-TOFMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Mustafa Z; Göğüş, Fahrettin; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Lewis, Alastair C

    2005-05-01

    Volatile components from the leaves of Ziziphora taurica subsp. taurica have been isolated by steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption techniques. The volatile components were characterized by comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. The extraction yields from Z. taurica leaves were found to be 1.56% and 1.32% for steam distillation and superheated-water extraction respectively. The major compounds found in the volatile fractions of the leaves of Z. taurica were pulegone, terpinen-4-ol, cis-carveol, trans-carveol, and verbenone. The number of volatile components identified were 28, 30, and 41 for steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption, respectively.

  12. Two-Phase Flow in Packed Columns and Generation of Bubbly Suspensions for Chemical Processing in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian J.; Green, R. D.; Nahra, H. K.; Sridhar, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    For long-duration space missions, the life support and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems necessary to lower the mass and volume of consumables carried from Earth will require more sophisticated chemical processing technologies involving gas-liquid two-phase flows. This paper discusses some preliminary two-phase flow work in packed columns and generation of bubbly suspensions, two types of flow systems that can exist in a number of chemical processing devices. The experimental hardware for a co-current flow, packed column operated in two ground-based low gravity facilities (two-second drop tower and KC- 135 low-gravity aircraft) is described. The preliminary results of this experimental work are discussed. The flow regimes observed and the conditions under which these flow regimes occur are compared with the available co-current packed column experimental work performed in normal gravity. For bubbly suspensions, the experimental hardware for generation of uniformly sized bubbles in Couette flow in microgravity conditions is described. Experimental work was performed on a number of bubbler designs, and the capillary bubble tube was found to produce the most consistent size bubbles. Low air flow rates and low Couette flow produce consistent 2-3 mm bubbles, the size of interest for the "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension" flight experiment. Finally the mass transfer implications of these two-phase flows is qualitatively discussed.

  13. Air-water flow in a vertical pipe: experimental study of air bubbles in the vicinity of the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, M. N.; Oliemans, R. V. A.; Ooms, G.; Mudde, R. F.

    2008-08-01

    This study deals with the influence of bubbles on a vertical air-water pipe flow, for gas-lift applications. The effect of changing the bubble size is of particular interest as it has been shown to affect the pressure drop over the pipe. Local measurements on the bubbles characteristics in the wall region were performed, using standard techniques, such as high-speed video recording and optical fibre probe, and more specific techniques, such as two-phase hot film anemometry for the wall shear stress and conductivity measurement for the thickness of the liquid film at the wall. The injection of macroscopic air bubbles in a pipe flow was shown to increase the wall shear stress. Bubbles travelling close to the wall create a periodic perturbation. The injection of small bubbles amplifies this effect, because they tend to move in the wall region; hence, more bubbles are travelling close to the wall. A simple analysis based on a two-fluid set of equations emphasised the importance of the local gas fraction fluctuations on the wall shear stress.

  14. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  15. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  16. The KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshikuni; Araoka, Osamu; Hayashi, Kohei; Hayashi, Yoshio; Hirabayashi, Hiromi.

    1978-03-01

    A medium size hydrogen bubble chamber has been constructed at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, KEK. The bubble chamber has been designed to be operated with a maximum rate of three times per half a second in every two second repetition time of the accelerator, by utilizing a hydraulic expansion system. The bubble chamber has a one meter diameter and a visible volume of about 280 l. A three-view stereo camera system is used for taking photographic pictures of the chamber. A 2 MW bubble chamber magnet is constructed. The main part of the bubble chamber vessel is supported by the magnet yoke. The magnet gives a maximum field of 18.4 kG at the centre of the fiducial volume of the chamber. The overall system of the KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber facility is described in some detail. Some operational characteristics of the facility are also reported. (auth.)

  17. Formation of soap bubbles by gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Maolei; Li, Min; Chen, Zhiyuan; Han, Jifeng; Liu, Dong

    2017-12-01

    Soap bubbles can be easily generated by various methods, while their formation process is complicated and still worth studying. A model about the bubble formation process was proposed in the study by Salkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 077801 (2016)] recently, and it was reported that the bubbles were formed when the gas blowing velocity was above one threshold. However, after a detailed study of these experiments, we found that the bubbles could be generated in two velocity ranges which corresponded to the laminar and turbulent gas jet, respectively, and the predicted threshold was only effective for turbulent gas flow. The study revealed that the bubble formation was greatly influenced by the aerodynamics of the gas jet blowing to the film, and these results will help to further understand the formation mechanism of the soap bubble as well as the interaction between the gas jet and the thin liquid film.

  18. Magnetic control of Leidenfrost drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-05-01

    We show how a magnetic field can influence the motion of a paramagnetic drop made of liquid oxygen in a Leidenfrost state on solids at room temperature. It is demonstrated that the trajectory can be modified in both direction and velocity and that the results can be interpreted in terms of classical mechanics as long as the drop does not get too close to the magnet. We study the deviation and report that it can easily overcome 180∘ and even diverge under certain conditions, leading to situations where a drop gets captured. In the vicinity of the magnet, another type of trapping is observed, due to the deformation of the drop in this region, which leads to a strong energy dissipation. Conversely, drops can be accelerated by moving magnets (slingshot effect).

  19. Asset Bubbles, Endogenous Growth, and Financial Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Tomohiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of bubbles in an infinitely-lived agent model of endogenous growth with financial frictions and heterogeneous agents. We provide a complete characterization on the relationship between financial frictions and the existence of bubbles. Our model predicts that if the degree of pledgeability is sufficiently high or sufficiently low, bubbles can not exist. They can only arise at an intermediate degree. This suggests that improving the financial market condition mig...

  20. Bubbles, Financial Crises, and Systemic Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Markus K. Brunnermeier; Martin Oehmke

    2012-01-01

    This chapter surveys the literature on bubbles, financial crises, and systemic risk. The first part of the chapter provides a brief historical account of bubbles and financial crisis. The second part of the chapter gives a structured overview of the literature on financial bubbles. The third part of the chapter discusses the literatures on financial crises and systemic risk, with particular emphasis on amplification and propagation mechanisms during financial crises, and the measurement of sy...

  1. On Bubble Rising in Countercurrent Flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeř, M.; Leštinský, P.; Wichterle, K.; Růžička, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2012 (2012), A30 ISSN 1542-6580 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0972; GA ČR GA104/07/1110 Grant - others:GA MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0069 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : ellipsoidal bubble * bubble shape * bubble velocity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.790, year: 2011

  2. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000 A large-mass, low-background Superheated Droplet Detector for WIMP searches

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    SIMPLE 2000 ({\\underline S}uperheated {\\underline I}nstrument for {\\underline M}assive {\\underline P}artic{\\underline {LE}} searches) will consist of an array of eight to sixteen large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) Superheated Droplet Detectors(SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimum ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from SIMPLE prototype SDDs, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the program, which aims at an exposure of $>$25 kg-day during the year 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to explore regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out.

  3. Organic chemical hydrides as storage medium of hydrogen on the basis of superheated liquid-film concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya Hodoshima; Atsushi Shono; Kazumi Satoh; Yasukazu Saito

    2006-01-01

    A catalysis pair of tetralin dehydrogenation / naphthalene hydrogenation has been proposed in the present paper as an organic chemical hydride for operating stationary fuel cells. Catalytic naphthalene hydrogenation, having been commercialized since the 1940's, proceeds to generate decalin via tetralin as an intermediate. The storage capacities of tetralin (3.0 wt%, 28.2 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) are lower than decalin (7.3 wt%, 64.8 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) but both tetralin dehydrogenation and naphthalene hydrogenation are much faster than the decalin / naphthalene pair. Moreover, existing infrastructures, e.g., gas station and tank lorry, are available for storage, transportation and supply of hydrogen. As for the stationary fuel cells with large space for hydrogen storage, tetralin as a hydrogen carrier is superior to decalin in terms of fast hydrogen supply. Rapid hydrogen supply from tetralin under mild conditions was only accomplished with the carbon supported metal catalysts in the 'superheated liquid-film states' under reactive distillation conditions. In contrast to the ordinary suspended states, the catalyst layer superheated in the liquid-film state gave high catalytic performances at around 250 C. As a result, serious coke formation over the catalyst surface and excessive exergy consumption were prevented simultaneously. (authors)

  4. Drying and heat transfer behavior of banana undergoing combined low-pressure superheated steam and far-infrared radiation drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmol, Chatchai; Devahastin, Sakamon; Swasdisevi, Thanit; Soponronnarit, Somchart

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the use of a drying system combining the concept of already proven low-pressure superheated steam drying and far-infrared radiation (LPSSD-FIR) for banana. The effects of various operating parameters, i.e., drying medium temperature and pressure, on the drying kinetics and heat transfer behavior of banana as well as the energy consumption of the process were investigated and discussed. Comparison was also made with similar sets of data obtained from the system with combined far-infrared radiation and vacuum drying (VACUUM-FIR) and the system using only low-pressure superheated steam drying (LPSSD). The results showed that LPSSD-FIR and VACUUM-FIR took shorter drying time compared to LPSSD at all drying conditions. In terms of the specific energy consumption, it was observed that the specific energy consumption of the vacuum pump was much higher than that of the far-infrared radiator or electric heater. It was also found that the specific energy consumption of LPSSD-FIR and VACUUM-FIR were lower than that of LPSSD at all drying conditions. Based on the drying rates and the specific energy consumption of all tested processes, LPSSD-FIR at 90 deg. C and 7 kPa was suggested

  5. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) device at the National Hospital Abuja gives immediate improvement in respiratory rate and oxygenation in neonates with respiratory distress.

  6. Multiple Spark-Generated Bubble Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Boo Cheong; Adikhari, Deepak; Fong, Siew Wan; Klaseboer, Evert

    The complex interactions of two and three spark-generated bubbles are studied using high speed photography. The corresponding simulations are performed using a 3D Boundary Element Method (BEM) code. The bubbles generated are between 3 to 5 mm in radius, and they are either in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The possible interaction phenomena between two identically sized bubbles are summarized. Depending on their relative distances and phase differences, they can coalesce, jet towards or away from one another, split into smaller bubbles, or 'catapult' away from one another. The 'catapult' effect can be utilized to generated high speed jet in the absence of a solid boundary or shockwave. Also three bubble interactions are highlighted. Complicated phenomena such as bubble forming an elliptical shape and bubble splitting are observed. The BEM simulations provide insight into the physics of the phenomena by providing details such as detailed bubble shape changes (experimental observations are limited by the temporal and spatial resolution), and jet velocity. It is noted that the well-tested BEM code [1,2] utilized here is computationally very efficient as compared to other full-domain methods since only the bubble surface is meshed.

  7. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  8. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced “catapult effect”, which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ∼ 5μm to ∼500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s and a low diameter (∼5 % of the maximum bubble diameter over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9 for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  9. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Zhao, Xiong-Tao; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced "catapult effect", which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ˜ 5μm to ˜500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s) and a low diameter (˜5 % of the maximum bubble diameter) over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9) for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  10. Trapping leidenfrost drops with crenelations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2011-09-09

    Drops placed on very hot solids levitate on a cushion of their own vapor, as discovered by Leidenfrost. This confers to these drops a remarkable mobility, which makes problematic their control and manipulation. Here we show how crenelated surfaces can be used to increase the friction of Leidenfrost drops by a factor on the order of 100, making them decelerate and be trapped on centimetric distances instead of the usual metric ones. We measure and characterize the friction force as a function of the design of the crenelations.

  11. Neutron field characterisation in a high-energy proton-synchrotron environment using bubble detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bhaskar.mukherjee@desy.de; Clement, Wolfgang; Simrock, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    During the beam adjustment of high energy accelerator facilities, a significant number of energetic particles impinge on the internal wall of the vacuum chamber thereby causing the production of intense parasitic radiation field, resulting in a short-term radiation exposure to personnel as well as interference in the operation of accelerator instrumentation systems usually based on sophisticated microelectronics. High-energy particle accelerators operate in pulsed mode; therefore, commercially available, general purpose radiation detectors for health physics activities are unsuitable for the assessment of such radiation field due to 'pulse pile-up' effects. Hence, we have used passive neutron dosimeters, i.e. temperature compensated superheated emulsion (bubble) detectors of types BDPND and BDT, to evaluate the neutron fluence at three selected locations of the 7.6 GeV proton synchrotron operated by DESY: (a) the 1.2-m thick concrete shielding roof of the experiment hall housing the proton synchrotron, (b) the 0.9-m thick shielding roof of the proton injector hut, and (c) at the lateral wall (2.5 m concrete and earth shielding) of the experiment hall, facing the proton injector delivering 7.6 GeV protons into the PETRA booster ring.

  12. El auge del género de superhéroes y la nueva industria cinematográfica global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente GARCÍA-ESCRIVÁ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Proveniente del mundo del cómic, la figura del superhéroe debutó con éxito en el cine a finales de la década de los 70. Sin embargo, ha sido durante los últimos quince años cuando esta figura ha cobrado un extraordinario protagonismo y, en sus múltiples variantes, ha dado pie a buena parte de las franquicias cinematográficas que en la actualidad dominan las salas de cine de todo el planeta. Al hilo de este nuevo paisaje fílmico, el presente artículo se propone explorar la naturaleza del cine de superhéroes, un apabullante espectáculo audiovisual que es consumido por millones de espectadores en todo el mundo, con especial incidencia entre el público infantil y juvenil. Tal indagación conduce a examinar las narrativas desplegadas en estas series de películas, así como a analizar la propia figura del superhéroe en el contexto de un cine saturado de efectos visuales y acción trepidante. Finalmente, el artículo trata de señalar las razones de fondo que han llevado a la industria de Hollywood a apostar por el género de superhéroes como fórmula recurrente para atraer al público a las salas de cine.

  13. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  14. Neutron Detection with Bubble Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Lerche, R. A.; Disdier, L.

    2005-10-01

    To improve neutron imaging resolution, we have developed a general imaging design tool for inertial confinement fusion facilities that can simulate aperture errors, generate arbitrary neutron source distributions, simulate arbitrary aperture shapes, calculate point-spread functions using ray tracing, and reconstruct source images using a variety of filter functions. Predicted system performance can be compared to various concepts before construction. This software design tool is being developed for the UR/LLE OMEGA laser and the NIF as part of a process to design and build an imaging system based on a bubble chamber detectorootnotetextR. A. Lerche et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 1709 (2003). for the UR/LLE OMEGA laser. This talk will present the latest results on aperture contributions to system performance and review the conceptual design of the bubble chamber-based imaging system, its conceptual design being reviewed in the second part of the presentation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460.

  15. Acoustic Energy Storage in Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Rosales, Rodolfo R.

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence is understood in terms of a shock focusing towards the bubble center. We present a mechanism for significantly enhancing the effect of shock focusing, arising from the storage of energy in the acoustic modes of the gas. The modes with strongest coupling are not

  16. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  17. Microfluidics with ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmottant, P.; Marmottant, P.G.M.; Raven, J.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Hilgenfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    Microstreaming from oscillating bubbles is known to induce vigorous vortex flow. Here we show how to harness the power of bubble streaming in an experiment to achieve directed transport flow of high velocity, allowing design and manufacture of microfluidic MEMS devices. By combining oscillating

  18. Laminar separation bubbles: Dynamics and control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    surface of a flat plate by appropriately contouring the top wall of the wind tunnel. First, a basic ... of thin aerofoils, on gas turbine blades and on low Reynolds number micro-aero-vehicle wings. Presence of bubbles ... ied its effect on the loss reduction in a gas turbine blade due to periodic quenching of the separation bubble.

  19. Bubble Swarm Rise Velocity in Fluidized Beds.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Punčochář, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Šimčík, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, OCT 2 (2016), s. 84-94 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05534S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubbling fluidized bed * gas-solid * bubble swarm velocity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.895, year: 2016

  20. Effect of bubble size on internal characteristics of upward bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Goichi; Kumazawa, Toshio; Yamashita, Yutaka.

    1987-01-01

    Bubble flow characteristics were investigated experimentally in nitrogen gas-water in a spuare channel using a laser Doppler anemometer and a double-sensor conductance probe under the same flow rate conditions. The size of the bubbles was controlled by changing the mixing conditions and by adding a surface active agent to water. Thus, four sets of experiments were conducted. Experimental results show that the reduction in bubble size flattens the gas-phase distribution and increases the number density of bubbles. The reduction in bubble size leads to a decrease in turbulence and an increase in water and bubble velocities, but an extreme reduction does not bring about a further increase in both velocities, although it leads to a further decrease in turbulence. Turbulence suppression was observed in layer-type bubble flows. This type of flow has a peculiar profile of water velocity. (author)

  1. Constraining hadronic models of the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2018-01-01

    The origin of sub-TeV gamma rays detected by Fermi-LAT from the Fermi bubbles at the Galactic center is unknown. In a hadronic model, acceleration of protons and/or nuclei and their subsequent interactions with gas in the bubble volume can produce observed gamma ray. Such interactions naturally produce high-energy neutrinos, and detection of those can discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic origin of gamma rays. Additional constraints on the Fermi bubbles gamma-ray flux in the PeV range from recent HAWC observations restrict hadronic model parameters, which in turn disfavor Fermi bubbles as the origin of a large fraction of neutrino events detected by IceCube along the bubble directions. We revisit our hadronic model and discuss future constraints on parameters from observations in very high-energy gamma rays by CTA and in neutrinos.

  2. Primordial black hole formation by vacuum bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Heling; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate during the inflationary epoch and expand, reaching relativistic speeds. After inflation ends, the bubbles are quickly slowed down, transferring their momentum to a shock wave that propagates outwards in the radiation background. The ultimate fate of the bubble depends on its size. Bubbles smaller than certain critical size collapse to ordinary black holes, while in the supercritical case the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior region by a wormhole. The wormhole then closes up, turning into two black holes at its two mouths. We use numerical simulations to find the masses of black holes formed in this scenario, both in subcritical and supercritical regime. The resulting mass spectrum is extremely broad, ranging over many orders of magnitude. For some parameter values, these black holes can serve as seeds for supermassive black holes and may account for LIGO observations.

  3. Bubble mobility in mud and magmatic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Aaron; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The rheology of particle-laden fluids with a yield stress, such as mud or crystal-rich magmas, controls the mobility of bubbles, both the size needed to overcome the yield stress and their rise speed. We experimentally measured the velocities of bubbles and rigid spheres in mud sampled from the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes adjacent to the Salton Sea, Southern California. Combined with previous measurements in the polymer gel Carbopol, we obtained an empirical model for the drag coefficient and bounded the conditions under which bubbles overcome the yield stress. Yield stresses typical of mud and basaltic magmas with sub-mm particles can immobilize millimeter to centimeter sized bubbles. At Stromboli volcano, Italy, a vertical yield stress gradient in the shallow conduit may immobilize bubbles with diameter ≲ 1 cm and hinder slug coalescence.

  4. Bubble streams rising beneath an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Brasz, Frederik; Kim, Dayoung; Menesses, Mark; Belden, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Bubbles released beneath a submerged inclined surface can tumble along the wall as they rise, dragging the surrounding fluid with them. This effect has recently regained attention as a method to mitigate biofouling in marine environment, such as a ship hull. It appears that the efficacy of this approach may be related to the velocity of the rising bubbles and the extent that they spread laterally as they rise. Yet, it is unclear how bubble stream rise velocity and lateral migration depend on bubble size, flow rate, and inclination angle. Here we perform systematic experiments to quantify these relationships for both individual bubble trajectories and ensemble average statistics. Research supported by the Office of Naval Research under Grant Number award N00014-16-1-3000.

  5. Gas Bubble Dynamics under Mechanical Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Elbing, Brian

    2017-11-01

    The scientific community has a limited understanding of the bubble dynamics under mechanical oscillations due to over simplification of Navier-Stockes equation by neglecting the shear stress tensor and not accounting for body forces when calculating the acoustic radiation force. The current work experimental investigates bubble dynamics under mechanical vibration and resulting acoustic field by measuring the bubble size and velocity using high-speed imaging. The experimental setup consists of a custom-designed shaker table, cast acrylic bubble column, compressed air injection manifold and an optical imaging system. The mechanical vibrations resulted in accelerations between 0.25 to 10 times gravitational acceleration corresponding to frequency and amplitude range of 8 - 22Hz and 1 - 10mm respectively. Throughout testing the void fraction was limited to definition of Bjerknes force in combination with Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Physical behavior of the system was capture and classified. Bubble size, velocity as well as size and spatial distribution will be presented.

  6. Influence of Superheated Steam Temperature Regulation Quality on Service Life of Boiler Steam Super-Heater Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Kulakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates influence of change in quality of superheated steam temperature regulations on service life of super-heater metal. А dependence between metal service life and dispersion value for different steel grades has been determined in the paper. Numerical values pertaining to increase of super-heater metal service life in case of transferring from manual regulation to standard system of automatic regulation (SAR have been determined and in case of transferring from standard SAR to improved SAR. The analysis of tabular data and plotted dependencies makes it possible to conclude that any change in conditions of convection super-heater metal work due to better quality of the regulation leads to essential increase of time period which is left till the completion of the service life of a super-heater heating surface.

  7. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...... and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes....

  8. Non-linear Shape Oscillations of Rising Drops and Bubbles: Experiments and Simulations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lalanne, B.; Abi Chebel, N.; Vejražka, Jiří; Tanguy, S.; Masbernat, O.; Risso, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 12 (2015), s. 123305 ISSN 1070-6631. [Conference of European Colloid and Interface Society /27./. Sofia, 01.09.2013-06.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : shape oscillations * nonlinearitites * interface dynamics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.017, year: 2015

  9. Captive bubble and sessile drop surface characterization of a submerged aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface energy parameters of the invasive aquatic weed, Hydrilla verticillata, were determined using contact angle measurements using two different methods. The abaxial and adaxial surfaces of the leaves and stem were characterized for the weed while submerged in water using captive air and octa...

  10. Faster multiple emulsification with drop splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Adam R; Weitz, David A

    2011-06-07

    Microfluidic devices can form emulsions in which the drops have an intricate, controlled structure; however, a challenge is that the droplets are produced slowly, typically only a few millilitres per hour. Here, we present a simple technique to increase the production rate. Using a large drop maker, we produce large drops at a fast volumetric rate; by splitting these drops several times in a splitting array, we create drops of the desired small size. The advantage of this over forming the small drops directly using a small drop maker is that the drops can be formed at much faster rates. This can be applied to the production of single and multiple emulsions.

  11. Thermocapillary reorientation of Janus drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rodolfo; Saenz, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Janus drops, named after the Ancient Roman two-faced god, are liquid drops formed from two immiscible fluids. Experimental observations indicate that a Janus drop may re-orientate in response to an applied external thermal gradient due to the Marangoni effect. Depending on the angle between the interior interface and the direction of the temperature gradient, disparities in the physical properties of the constituent liquids may lead to asymmetries in the thermocapillary flow. As a result, the drop will move along a curved path until a torque-free configuration is achieved, point after which it will continue on a straight trajectory. Here, we present the results of a theoretical investigation of this realignment phenomenon in the Stokes regime and in the limit of non-deformable interfaces. A 3D semi-analytical method in terms of polar spherical harmonics is developed to characterize and rationalize the hydrodynamic response (forces and torques), flow (velocity and temperature distribution) and trajectory of a Janus drop moving during the temperature-driven reorientation process. Furthermore, we discuss how this phenomenon may be exploited to develop dynamically reconfigurable micro-lenses. This work was partially supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants DMS-1614043 and DMS-1719637.

  12. Pressure drop-flow rate curves for single-phase steam in Combustion Engineering type steam generator U-tubes during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynan, Douglas A.; Ahn, Kwang-Il, E-mail: kiahn@kaeri.re.kr

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Pressure drop-flow rate curves for superheated steam in U-tubes were generated. • Forward flow of hot steam is favored in the longer and taller U-tubes. • Reverse flow of cold steam is favored in short U-tubes. • Steam generator U-tube bundle geometry and tube diameter are important. • Need for correlation development for natural convention heat transfer coefficient. - Abstract: Characteristic pressure drop-flow rate curves are generated for all row numbers of the OPR1000 steam generators (SGs), representative of Combustion Engineering (CE) type SGs featuring square bend U-tubes. The pressure drop-flow rate curves are applicable to severe accident natural circulations of single-phase superheated steam during high pressure station blackout sequences with failed auxiliary feedwater and dry secondary side which are closely related to the thermally induced steam generator tube rupture event. The pressure drop-flow rate curves which determine the recirculation rate through the SG tubes are dependent on the tube bundle geometry and hydraulic diameter of the tubes. The larger CE type SGs have greater variation of tube length and height as a function of row number with forward flow of steam favored in the longer and taller high row number tubes and reverse flow favored in the short low row number tubes. Friction loss, natural convection heat transfer coefficients, and temperature differentials from the primary to secondary side are dominant parameters affecting the recirculation rate. The need for correlation development for natural convection heat transfer coefficients for external flow over tube bundles currently not modeled in system codes is discussed.

  13. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  14. Average properties of bidisperse bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-García, J. C.; Mendez-Díaz, S.; Zenit, R.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the properties of a bubbly flow composed of two distinct bubble size species. Bubbles were produced using a capillary bank with tubes with two distinct inner diameters; the flow through each capillary size was controlled such that the amount of large or small bubbles could be controlled. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, a wide range of Reynolds and Weber number ranges were investigated. The gas volume fraction ranged between 0.5% and 6%. The measurements of the mean bubble velocity of each species and the liquid velocity variance were obtained and contrasted with the monodisperse flows with equivalent gas volume fractions. We found that the bidispersity can induce a reduction of the mean bubble velocity of the large species; for the small size species, the bubble velocity can be increased, decreased, or remain unaffected depending of the flow conditions. The liquid velocity variance of the bidisperse flows is, in general, bound by the values of the small and large monodisperse values; interestingly, in some cases, the liquid velocity fluctuations can be larger than either monodisperse case. A simple model for the liquid agitation for bidisperse flows is proposed, with good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  15. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, S; Moore, M J; Fahlman, A; Moore, K; Sharp, S; Harry, C T; Hoppe, J; Niemeyer, M; Lentell, B; Wells, R S

    2012-04-07

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber-muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness.

  16. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF BUBBLES IN QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudík, J.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Zapiór, M.; Heinzel, P.

    2012-01-01

    We study a polar-crown prominence with a bubble and its plume observed in several coronal filters by the SDO/AIA and in Hα by the MSDP spectrograph in Białków (Poland) to address the following questions: what is the brightness of prominence bubbles in EUV with respect to the corona outside of the prominence and the prominence coronal cavity? What is the geometry and topology of the magnetic field in the bubble? What is the nature of the vertical threads seen within prominences? We find that the brightness of the bubble and plume is lower than the brightness of the corona outside of the prominence, and is similar to that of the coronal cavity. We constructed linear force-free models of prominences with bubbles, where the flux rope is perturbed by inclusion of parasitic bipoles. The arcade field lines of the bipole create the bubble, which is thus devoid of magnetic dips. Shearing the bipole or adding a second one can lead to cusp-shaped prominences with bubbles similar to the observed ones. The bubbles have complex magnetic topology, with a pair of coronal magnetic null points linked by a separator outlining the boundary between the bubble and the prominence body. We conjecture that plume formation involves magnetic reconnection at the separator. Depending on the viewing angle, the prominence can appear either anvil-shaped with predominantly horizontal structures, or cusp-shaped with predominantly vertical structuring. The latter is an artifact of the alignment of magnetic dips with respect to the prominence axis and the line of sight.

  17. The Minnaert bubble: an acoustic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, Universite Paris Diderot and CNRS UMR 7057, 10 rue Alice Domont et Leonie Duquet, 75013 Paris (France); Leroy, Valentin [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Universite Paris 7 and CNRS UMR 7587, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: martin.devaud@univ-paris-diderot.fr

    2008-11-15

    We propose an ab initio introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian variables. In unbounded water, the air-water system has a continuum of eigenmodes, some of them correspond to regular Fabry-Perot resonances. A singular resonance, the lowest one, is shown to coincide with that of Minnaert. In bounded water, the eigenmodes spectrum is discrete, with a finite fundamental frequency. A spectacular quasi-locking of the latter occurs if it happens to exceed the Minnaert frequency, which provides an unforeseen one-bubble alternative version of the famous 'hot chocolate effect'. In the (low) frequency domain in which sound propagation inside the bubble reduces to a simple 'breathing' (i.e. inflation/deflation), the light air bubble can be 'dressed' by the outer water pressure forces, and is turned into the heavy Minnaert bubble. Thanks to this unexpected renormalization process, we demonstrate that the Minnaert bubble definitely behaves like a true harmonic oscillator of the spring-bob type, but with a damping term and a forcing term in apparent disagreement with those commonly admitted in the literature. Finally, we underline the double role played by the water. In order to tell the water motion associated with water compressibility (i.e. the sound) from the simple incompressible accompaniment of the bubble breathing, we introduce a new picture analogous to the electromagnetic radiative picture in Coulomb gauge, which naturally leads us to split the water displacement in an instantaneous and a retarded part. The Minnaert renormalized mass of the dressed bubble is then automatically recovered.

  18. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J. Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  19. The Minnaert bubble: an acoustic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an ab initio introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian variables. In unbounded water, the air-water system has a continuum of eigenmodes, some of them correspond to regular Fabry-Perot resonances. A singular resonance, the lowest one, is shown to coincide with that of Minnaert. In bounded water, the eigenmodes spectrum is discrete, with a finite fundamental frequency. A spectacular quasi-locking of the latter occurs if it happens to exceed the Minnaert frequency, which provides an unforeseen one-bubble alternative version of the famous 'hot chocolate effect'. In the (low) frequency domain in which sound propagation inside the bubble reduces to a simple 'breathing' (i.e. inflation/deflation), the light air bubble can be 'dressed' by the outer water pressure forces, and is turned into the heavy Minnaert bubble. Thanks to this unexpected renormalization process, we demonstrate that the Minnaert bubble definitely behaves like a true harmonic oscillator of the spring-bob type, but with a damping term and a forcing term in apparent disagreement with those commonly admitted in the literature. Finally, we underline the double role played by the water. In order to tell the water motion associated with water compressibility (i.e. the sound) from the simple incompressible accompaniment of the bubble breathing, we introduce a new picture analogous to the electromagnetic radiative picture in Coulomb gauge, which naturally leads us to split the water displacement in an instantaneous and a retarded part. The Minnaert renormalized mass of the dressed bubble is then automatically recovered

  20. 3D unified CFD to modeling of bubbles phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During of the last ten years the developed numerical methods and algorithms for solving of heat and mass transfer problems in compressible/incompressible fluids were successfully tested at simulation of interaction of two immiscible liquids. Now these computing tools are extended on a case of two-phase flows, such as a liquids-gas system as follows: outside of bubbles the non-stationary incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the primitive variables coupled with the heat transfer equation are used; inside of bubble a compressible medium model with low Mach limit is applied. To observe of an interface of liquid-gas system we use the modified level set method and three-dimensional advective schemes of TVD-type with small scheme diffusion with use of sub-grid simulation. These schemes with small diffusion were already applied by us under using of sub-grid simulation for interface transfer in case of two non-mixing liquids. For bubble phenomena a numerical technique based on the developed algorithms with a small scheme diffusion, for which the discrete approximations are constructed using the finite-volume methods and fully staggered grids is adapted. Testing of the developed approach is carried out on the set of test problems and a good agreement is obtained between numerical predictions and experimental data. The numerical technique was successfully utilized for numerical support of 3D experiment financed by Nuclear Energy Agency at the Organization economic cooperation and development within the framework of MASKA Project, where computational fluid dynamics of two non-mixing fluids such as corium and steel was investigated. In this paper there is application of developed approach for simulation of bubble flows, in particular, for study of coalescence of two drops. The developed technique has a high degree of efficiency and allows on a personal computer (3 GHz and 2 Gbytes RAM) to carry out CFD calculations on a grid with 10 7

  1. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jie, E-mail: shijie@hrbeu.edu.cn; Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo [Acoustic Science and Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei [College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  2. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  3. Primordial bubbles of colour superconducting quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masperi, L.; Orsaria, M.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the possibility that bubbles of quark matter surviving the confinement phase transition might have become superconducting due to the enormous compression they suffer. Because of the relatively high temperature of the process we compare the initially unpaired quark matter with the colour-flavour locked alternative when the extremely large chemical potential could have increased the critical temperature sufficiently and find that this latter phase would be more stable before the bubble compression stops. If other physical effects had not affected completely their stability, these bubbles might still exist today and perhaps be observed as strangelets

  4. Dynamics of bubbles in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, V.A.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Tkachev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    This is a systematic study of the evolution of thin shell bubbles in general relativity. We develop the general thin-wall formalism first elaborated by Israel and apply it to the investigation of the motion of various bubbles arising in the course of phase transitions in the very early Universe including new phase bubbles, old phase remnants, and domains. We consider metric junction conditions and derive constraints both on the decay of metastable states and on the evolution of non- equilibrium scalar field configurations (fluctuations) following from the global geometry of spacetime

  5. Blackbody spectra for sonoluminescing hydrogen bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, George; Camara, C; Putterman, S J; Weninger, K

    2002-05-13

    The dynamical motion of sonoluminescing bubbles formed from a mixture of water and hydrogen gas indicates that these bubbles contain hydrogen. Their spectrum is well matched by an ideal 6000 K blackbody radiating from a surface with a radius less than 1/4 microm. According to this model, the state of matter inside the collapsed bubble is so stressed that the photon mean free path is much smaller than 1 microm. Implications for various theories of the light-emitting mechanism and the role of chemical reactions are discussed.

  6. Holography in a freon bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, P.; Olivier, P.

    1982-01-01

    After some tests in a PS beam in the summer of 1981, the run took place in October 1981 in the H2 beam of the SPS. Although some problems of heat dissipation in freon limited the expansion rate of the bubble chamber, more than 11000 holograms were taken, showing 10 μm bubble tracks, with very good image quality and contrast. More than 100 tracks can be stored on a hologram without affecting the quality if all the bubbles are small. In addition, the analysis of the holograms does not look more complex than the exploitation of conventional high-resolution pictures. (orig./HSI)

  7. A model established of a 'Embryo' bubble growing-up some visible bubble in bubble chamber and its primary theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zipiao; Sheng Xiangdong

    2006-01-01

    A model of a 'embryo' bubble growing up a visible bubble in the bubble chamber is established. Through primary theory calculation it is shown that the 'embryo' bubble is not only absorbing quantity of heat, but also some molecules get into the 'embryo' bubble from its environment. It is explained reasonably that the radius of bubbles in bubble camber is different for the same energies of neutrons and proton. The track of neutron in bubble camber is long and thin, and the track of proton in bubble camber is wide and short. It is explained reasonably that the bubble radius of the incident particles with more charges which there are the same energies will be wider than that of the incident particles with less charges in the track. It is also explained reasonably that there are a little different radius of the bubbles of a track at the some region. It can be predicted theoretically that there should be big bubbles to burst when incident particles enter the bubble chamber at first. The sensitivity and the detective efficiency of bubble camber can be enhanced by choosing appropriate work matter. (authors)

  8. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  9. Conservation of bubble size distribution during gas reactive absorption in bubble column reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L.C. LAGE

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of the bubble size distribution function was applied to the reactive absorption of carbon dioxide in a bubble column reactor. The model developed was solved by the method of characteristics and by a Monte Carlo method. Simulations were carried out using simplified models for the liquid phase and for the gas-liquid mass transfer. Predictions of gas holdup and outlet gas composition showed that the concept of a mean bubble diameter is not applicable when the bubble size distribution is reasonably polydispersed. In these cases, the mass mean velocity and the numerical mean velocity of the bubbles are very different. Therefore, quantification of the polydispersion of bubbles was shown to be essential to gas-phase hydrodynamics modeling.

  10. Interactions of multiple spark-generated bubbles with phase differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Siew Wan; Adhikari, Deepak; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to study the complex interaction between multiple bubbles, and to provide a summary and physical explanation of the phenomena observed during the interaction of two bubbles. High-speed photography is utilized to observe the experiments involving multiple spark-generated bubbles. Numerical simulations corresponding to the experiments are performed using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The bubbles are typically between 3 and 5 mm in radius and are generated either in-phase (at the same time) or with phase differences. Complex phenomena are observed such as bubble splitting, and high-speed jetting inside a bubble caused by another collapsing bubble nearby (termed the ‘catapult’ effect). The two-bubble interactions are broadly classified in a graph according to two parameters: the relative inter-bubble distance and the phase difference (a new parameter introduced). The BEM simulations provide insight into the physics, such as bubble shape changes in detail, and jet velocities. Also presented in this paper are the experimental results of three bubble interactions. The interesting and complex observations of multiple bubble interaction are important for a better understanding of real life applications in medical ultrasonic treatment and ultrasonic cleaning. Many of the three bubble interactions can be explained by isolating bubble pairs and classifying their interaction according to the graph for the two bubble case. This graph can be a useful tool to predict the behavior of multiple bubble interactions.

  11. Stability of a Bubble Expanding and Translating Through an Inviscid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A bubble expands adiabatically and translates in an incompressible and inviscid liquid. We investigate the number of equilibrium points of the bubble and the nature of stability of the bubble at these points. We find that there is only one equilibrium point and the bubble is stable there.

  12. Tropical Bubbles : Asset Prices in Latin America, 1980-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Santiago; Perry, Guillermo

    2001-01-01

    The authors test for the existence of asset price bubbles in Latin America in 1980-2001, focusing mainly on stock prices. Based on unit root and cointegration tests, they find that they cannot reject the hypothesis of bubbles. They arrive at the same conclusion using Froot and Obstfeld's intrinsic bubbles model. To examine empirical regularities of these bubble episodes in the region, the ...

  13. MARANGONI CONVECTION AROUND A VENTILATED AIR BUBBLE UNDER MICROGRAVITY CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEFSLOOT, HCJ; JANSSEN, LPBM; HOOGSTRATEN, HW

    Under microgravity conditions in both parabolic and sounding rocket flights, the mass-transfer-induced Marangoni convection around an air bubble was studied. To prevent the bubble from becoming saturated, the bubble was ventilated. It turned out that the flow rate of the air through the bubble

  14. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  15. IMPLEMENTATION OF SERIAL AND PARALLEL BUBBLE SORT ON FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Marhaendro Jati Purnomo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sorting is common process in computational world. Its utilization are on many fields from research to industry. There are many sorting algorithm in nowadays. One of the simplest yet powerful is bubble sort. In this study, bubble sort is implemented on FPGA. The implementation was taken on serial and parallel approach. Serial and parallel bubble sort then compared by means of its memory, execution time, and utility which comprises slices and LUTs. The experiments show that serial bubble sort required smaller memory as well as utility compared to parallel bubble sort. Meanwhile, parallel bubble sort performed faster than serial bubble sort

  16. Increasing Gas Bubble Escape Rate for Water Splitting with Nonwoven Stainless Steel Fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Huang, Xiaolei; Jiang, Songshan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Huiping; Xue, Jun Min

    2017-11-22

    Water electrolysis has been considered as one of the most efficient approaches to produce renewable energy, although efficient removal of gas bubbles during the process is still challenging, which has been proved to be critical and can further promote electrocatalytic water splitting. Herein, a novel strategy is developed to increase gas bubble escape rate for water splitting by using nonwoven stainless steel fabrics (NWSSFs) as the conductive substrate decorated with flakelike iron nickel-layered double hydroxide (FeNi LDH) nanostructures. The as-prepared FeNi LDH@NWSSF electrode shows a much faster escape rate of gas bubbles as compared to that of other commonly used three-dimensional porous catalytic electrodes, and the maximum dragging force for a bubble releasing between NWSSF channels is only one-seventh of the dragging force within nickel foam channels. As a result, it exhibits excellent electrocatalytic performance for both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), with low overpotentials of 210 and 110 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm -2 in 1 M KOH for OER and HER, respectively. There is almost no current drop after a long-time durability test. In addition, its performance for full water splitting is superior to that of the previously reported catalysts, with a voltage of 1.56 V at current density of 10 mA cm -2 .

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations study of nano bubble attachment at hydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Dang, Liem X.; Miller, Jan D.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble attachment phenomena are examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulations (MDS) for the first time. The simulation involves a nitrogen nano bubble containing 906 nitrogen molecules in a water phase with 74,000 water molecules at molybdenite surfaces. During a simulation period of 1 ns, film rupture and displacement occurs. The attached nanobubble at the hydrophobic molybdenite face surface results in a contact angle of about 90º. This spontaneous attachment is due to a “water exclusion zone” at the molybdenite face surface and can be explained by a van der Waals (vdW) attractive force, as discussed in the literature. In contrast, the film is stable at the hydrophilic quartz (001) surface and the bubble does not attach. Contact angles determined from MD simulations are reported, and these results agree well with experimental and MDS sessile drop results. In this way, film stability and bubble attachment are described with respect to interfacial water structure for surfaces of different polarity. Interfacial water molecules at the hydrophobic molybdenite face surface have relatively weak interactions with the surface when compared to the hydrophilic quartz (001) surface, as revealed by the presence of a 3 Å “water exclusion zone” at the molybdenite/water interface. The molybdenite armchair-edge and zigzag-edge surfaces show a comparably slow process for film rupture and displacement when compared to the molybdenite face surface, which is consistent with their relatively weak hydrophobic character.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiple Bubbles Motion under Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deming Nie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of multiple bubbles under gravity in two dimensions is numerically studied through the lattice Boltzmann method for the Eotvos number ranging from 1 to 12. Two kinds of initial arrangement are taken into account: vertical and horizontal arrangement. In both cases the effects of Eotvos number on the bubble coalescence and rising velocity are investigated. For the vertical arrangement, it has been found that the coalescence pattern is similar. The first coalescence always takes place between the two uppermost bubbles. And the last coalescence always takes place between the coalesced bubble and the bottommost bubble. For four bubbles in a horizontal arrangement, the outermost bubbles travel into the wake of the middle bubbles in all cases, which allows the bubbles to coalesce. The coalescence pattern is more complex for the case of eight bubbles, which strongly depends on the Eotvos number.

  19. Optimization of the bubble radius in a moving single bubble sonoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirheydari, Mona; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa, E-mail: sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, 11365-91, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-01

    A complete study of the hydrodynamic force on a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in N-methylformamide is presented in this work. All forces exerted, trajectory, interior temperature and gas pressure are discussed. The maximum values of the calculated components of the hydrodynamic force for three different radii at the same driving pressure were compared, while the optimum bubble radius was determined. The maximum value of the buoyancy force appears at the start of bubble collapse, earlier than the other forces whose maximum values appear at the moment of bubble collapse. We verified that for radii larger than the optimum radius, the temperature peak value decreases.

  20. Optimization of the bubble radius in a moving single bubble sonoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirheydari, Mona; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa

    2011-01-01

    A complete study of the hydrodynamic force on a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in N-methylformamide is presented in this work. All forces exerted, trajectory, interior temperature and gas pressure are discussed. The maximum values of the calculated components of the hydrodynamic force for three different radii at the same driving pressure were compared, while the optimum bubble radius was determined. The maximum value of the buoyancy force appears at the start of bubble collapse, earlier than the other forces whose maximum values appear at the moment of bubble collapse. We verified that for radii larger than the optimum radius, the temperature peak value decreases.

  1. Bubble collisions and measures of the multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Michael P., E-mail: salem@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    To compute the spectrum of bubble collisions seen by an observer in an eternally-inflating multiverse, one must choose a measure over the diverging spacetime volume, including choosing an ''initial'' hypersurface below which there are no bubble nucleations. Previous calculations focused on the case where the initial hypersurface is pushed arbitrarily deep into the past. Interestingly, the observed spectrum depends on the orientation of the initial hypersurface, however one's ability observe the effect rapidly decreases with the ratio of inflationary Hubble rates inside and outside one's bubble. We investigate whether this conclusion might be avoided under more general circumstances, including placing the observer's bubble near the initial hypersurface. We find that it is not. As a point of reference, a substantial appendix reviews relevant aspects of the measure problem of eternal inflation.

  2. Loop exponent in DNA bubble dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Vojtěch; Novotný, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    Dynamics of DNA bubbles are of interest for both statistical physics and biology. We present exact solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation governing bubble dynamics in the presence of a long-range entropic interaction. The complete meeting time and meeting position probability distributions are derived from the solutions. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) reflect the value of the loop exponent of the entropic interaction. Our results extend previous results which concentrated mainly on the tails of the PDFs and open a way to determining the strength of the entropic interaction experimentally which has been a matter of recent discussions. Using numerical integration, we also discuss the influence of the finite size of a DNA chain on the bubble dynamics. Analogous results are obtained also for the case of subdiffusive dynamics of a DNA bubble in a heteropolymer, revealing highly universal asymptotics of meeting time and position probability functions.

  3. Why do bubbles in Guinness sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, E. S.; Cummins, C. P.; Lee, W. T.

    2013-02-01

    Stout beers show the counter-intuitive phenomena of sinking bubbles, while the beer is settling. Previous research suggests that this phenomenon is due to the small size of the bubbles in these beers and the presence of a circulatory current, directed downwards near the side of the wall and upwards in the interior of the glass. The mechanism by which such a circulation is established and the conditions under which it will occur has not been clarified. In this paper, we use simulations and experiments to demonstrate that the flow in a glass of stout beer depends on the shape of the glass. If it narrows downwards (as the traditional stout glass, the pint, does), the flow is directed downwards near the wall and upwards in the interior and sinking bubbles will be observed. If the container widens downwards, the flow is opposite to that described above and only rising bubbles will be seen.

  4. The 2008 oil bubble: Causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokic, Damir

    2010-01-01

    We argue that 'the 2008 Oil Bubble' was directly and indirectly created by the Federal Reserve in response to deflationary risks that resurfaced after the housing bubble burst and the resulting credit crisis of 2008. Deflationary risks first appeared after the dot.com bubble burst in 2000 and after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Manipulation of the US dollar value has been one of the key emergency tools in the Fed's arsenal. During the entire period from 2000 to 2008, the US dollar has been falling, while the price of crude oil has been rising, with the culmination in July 2008. If other global central banks embrace the Fed's anti-deflationary strategies, the consequences could be dire for the global economy, potentially resulting in an ultimate gold bubble.

  5. Universe out of a breathing bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We consider the model of a false-vacuum bubble with a thin wall where the surface energy density is composed of two different components, 'domain-wall' type and 'dust' type, with opposite signs. We find stably oscillating solutions, which we call 'breathing bubbles'. By decay to a lower mass state, such a breathing bubble could become either (i) a child universe or ii) a bubble that 'eats up' the original universe, depending on the sign of the surface energy of the domain-wall component. We also discuss the effect of the finite-thickness corrections to the thin-wall approximation and possible origins of the energy contents of our model

  6. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  7. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also

  8. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Mannetje, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line

  9. Modelling of large-scale dense gas-solid bubbling fluidised beds using a novel discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, G.A.; Laverman, J.A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to model the complex hydrodynamic phenomena prevailing in industrial scale gas–solid bubbling fluidised bed reactors and especially the macro-scale emulsion phase circulation patterns induced by bubble–bubble interactions and bubble coalescence, a discrete bubble model (DBM) has been

  10. Electron acceleration in the bubble regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Oliver

    2014-02-03

    The bubble regime of laser-wakefield acceleration has been studied over the recent years as an important alternative to classical accelerators. Several models and theories have been published, in particular a theory which provides scaling laws for acceleration parameters such as energy gain and acceleration length. This thesis deals with numerical simulations within the bubble regime, their comparison to these scaling laws and data obtained from experiments, as well as some specific phenomenona. With a comparison of the scaling laws with numerical results a parameter scan was able to show a large parameter space in which simulation and theory agree. An investigation of the limits of this parameter space revealed boundaries to other regimes, especially at very high (a{sub 0} > 100) and very low laser amplitudes (a{sub 0} < 4). Comparing simulation data with data from experiments concerning laser pulse development and electron energies, it was found that experimental results can be adequately reproduced using the Virtual-Laser-Plasma-Laboratory code. In collaboration with the Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena synchrotron radiation emitted from the inside of the bubble was investigated. A simulation of the movement of the electrons inside the bubble together with time dependent histograms of the emitted radiation helped to prove that the majority of radiation created during a bubble acceleration originates from the inside of the bubble. This radiation can be used to diagnose the amplitude of oscillation of the trapped electrons. During a further study it was proven that the polarisation of synchrotron radiation from a bubble contains information about the exact oscillation direction. This oscillation was successfully controlled by using either a laser pulse with a tilted pulse front or an asymmetric laser pulse. First results of ongoing studies concerning injecting electrons into an existing bubble and a scheme called

  11. Sono-chemiluminescence from a single cavitation bubble in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotchie, Adam; Shchukin, Dmitry; Moehwald, Helmuth; Schneider, Julia; Pflieger, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In summary, this study has revealed the conditions required for a single bubble to be sono-chemically active. Evidence of radical-induced processes surrounding the bubble was only observed below the SL threshold, where the bubble was not spatially stable, and did not correlate with emission from excited molecular states inside the bubble. Moreover, this work substantiates recent progress that has been made in bridging the gap between single and multi-bubble cavitation. (authors)

  12. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs

  13. Numerical simulation of single bubble boiling behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of a single bubble boiling process are studied with numerical modeling. The mass, momentum, energy and level set equations are solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The bubble boiling dynamics, the transient pressure field, velocity field and temperature field in time are analyzed, and reasonable results are obtained. The numeral model is validated by the empirical equation of Fritz and could be used for various applications.

  14. Bubble nonlinear dynamics and stimulated scattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Shi; De-Sen, Yang; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Bo, Hu; Hao-Yang, Zhang; Shi-Yong, Hu

    2016-02-01

    A complete understanding of the bubble dynamics is deemed necessary in order to achieve their full potential applications in industry and medicine. For this purpose it is first needed to expand our knowledge of a single bubble behavior under different possible conditions including the frequency and pressure variations of the sound field. In addition, stimulated scattering of sound on a bubble is a special effect in sound field, and its characteristics are associated with bubble oscillation mode. A bubble in liquid can be considered as a representative example of nonlinear dynamical system theory with its resonance, and its dynamics characteristics can be described by the Keller-Miksis equation. The nonlinear dynamics of an acoustically excited gas bubble in water is investigated by using theoretical and numerical analysis methods. Our results show its strongly nonlinear behavior with respect to the pressure amplitude and excitation frequency as the control parameters, and give an intuitive insight into stimulated sound scattering on a bubble. It is seen that the stimulated sound scattering is different from common dynamical behaviors, such as bifurcation and chaos, which is the result of the nonlinear resonance of a bubble under the excitation of a high amplitude acoustic sound wave essentially. The numerical analysis results show that the threshold of stimulated sound scattering is smaller than those of bifurcation and chaos in the common condition. Project supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1228) and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204050 and 11204049).

  15. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is taken from one of CERN's bubble chambers and shows the decay of a positive kaon in flight. The decay products of this kaon can be seen spiraling in the magnetic field of the chamber. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that has been heated to boiling point.

  16. Bayesian Analysis of Bubbles in Asset Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Andras Fulop; Jun Yu

    2017-01-01

    We develop a new model where the dynamic structure of the asset price, after the fundamental value is removed, is subject to two different regimes. One regime reflects the normal period where the asset price divided by the dividend is assumed to follow a mean-reverting process around a stochastic long run mean. The second regime reflects the bubble period with explosive behavior. Stochastic switches between two regimes and non-constant probabilities of exit from the bubble regime are both all...

  17. Bubbles on the river of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper is concerned with modern cosmology, and the possibility that our Universe is just one bubble among many in some greater suprauniverse. These ideas are connected with the concept of inflation; inflation occurred shortly after the moment of creation of the Universe and just before the fireball stage that represents the big bang proper. A description is given of inflation and its use to explain the creation of the Universe from bubbles of mass-energy. (U.K.)

  18. Bubble parameters analysis of gas-liquid two-phase sparse bubbly flow based on image method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yunlong; Zhou Hongjuan; Song Lianzhuang; Liu Qian

    2012-01-01

    The sparse rising bubbles of gas-liquid two-phase flow in vertical pipe were measured and studied based on image method. The bubble images were acquired by high-speed video camera systems, the characteristic parameters of bubbles were extracted by using image processing techniques. Then velocity variation of rising bubbles were drawn. Area and centroid variation of single bubble were also drawn. And then parameters and movement law of bubbles were analyzed and studied. The test results showed that parameters of bubbles had been analyzed well by using image method. (authors)

  19. Fearless versus fearful speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J. V.; Sornette, D.

    2004-06-01

    Using a recently introduced rational expectation model of bubbles, based on the interplay between stochasticity and positive feedbacks of prices on returns and volatility, we develop a new methodology to test how this model classifies nine time series that have been previously considered as bubbles ending in crashes. The model predicts the existence of two anomalous behaviors occurring simultaneously: (i) super-exponential price growth and (ii) volatility growth, that we refer to as the “fearful singular bubble” regime. Out of the nine time series, we find that five pass our tests and can be characterized as “fearful singular bubbles”. The four other cases are the information technology Nasdaq bubble and three bubbles of the Hang Seng index ending in crashes in 1987, 1994 and 1997. According to our analysis, these four bubbles have developed with essentially no significant increase of their volatility. This paper thus proposes that speculative bubbles ending in crashes form two groups hitherto unrecognized, namely those accompanied by increasing volatility (reflecting increasing risk perception) and those without change of volatility (reflecting an absence of risk perception).

  20. One thousand and one bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Jesús; Ramírez, Pedro F.; Ruipérez, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    We propose a novel strategy that permits the construction of completely general five-dimensional microstate geometries on a Gibbons-Hawking space. Our scheme is based on two steps. First, we rewrite the bubble equations as a system of linear equations that can be easily solved. Second, we conjecture that the presence or absence of closed timelike curves in the solution can be detected through the evaluation of an algebraic relation. The construction we propose is systematic and covers the whole space of parameters, so it can be applied to find all five-dimensional BPS microstate geometries on a Gibbons-Hawking base. As a first result of this approach, we find that the spectrum of scaling solutions becomes much larger when non-Abelian fields are present. We use our method to describe several smooth horizonless multicenter solutions with the asymptotic charges of three-charge (Abelian and non-Abelian) black holes. In particular, we describe solutions with the centers lying on lines and circles that can be specified with exact precision. We show the power of our method by explicitly constructing a 50-center solution. Moreover, we use it to find the first smooth five-dimensional microstate geometries with arbitrarily small angular momentum.

  1. Ultrasound-assisted dynamic extraction of valuable compounds from aromatic plants and flowers as compared with steam distillation and superheated liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Gutiérrez, Jannat M; Ruiz-Jiménez, J; Luque de Castro, M D

    2008-06-15

    A method for the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and flowers (viz. laurel, rosemary, thyme, oregano and tuberose) is proposed. The dynamic approach allows go-and-backward circulation of the extractant (ethanol) through the solid sample subjected to the action of an ultrasound probe (thus reducing sample amount and avoiding overpressure). A multivariate optimisation study and application of the optimum values of the variables to kinetics studies show that 10 min is sufficient to obtain extraction efficiencies that greatly surpass those provided by steam distillation for essential oils or superheated liquid extraction for these oils and other valuable compounds, with lower costs and higher quality of the extract. The extraction time of the proposed method is 176-165 min shorter than steam distillation and 31-20 min shorter than superheated liquid extraction, depending on the target compound.

  2. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  3. Capillary migration of large confined super-hydrophobic drops in wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Logan; Weislogel, Mark; Arnold, Sam

    2016-11-01

    When confined within an interior corner, drops and bubbles migrate to regions of minimum energy by the combined effects of surface tension, surface wetting, and corner geometry. Such capillary phenomena are exploited for passive phase separation operations in micro-fluidic devices on earth and macro-fluidic devices aboard spacecraft. Our study focuses on the migration of large inertial-capillary drops confined between two planar super-hydrophobic surfaces. In our experiments, the near weightless environment of a drop tower produces Bo <<1 for drop volumes O(10mL) with migration velocities up to 10 cm/s. We observe transient power law behavior as a function of drop volume, wedge angle, initial confinement, and fluid properties including contact angle. We then further demonstrate how the experiment method may be employed as a large horizontal quiescent droplet generator for studies ranging from inertial non-wetting moving contact line investigations to large geyser-free horizontal drop impacts. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12AO47A, URMP.

  4. Influence of the type of working fluid in the lower cycle and superheated steam parameters in the upper cycle on effectiveness of operation of binary power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachel Aleksander A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented have been the results of the analysis of effectiveness of operation of binary power plant consisting of combined two Clausius-Rankine cycles, namely the binary cycle with water as a working fluid in the upper cycle and organic substance as a working fluid in the lower cycle, as well as a single fluid component power plant operating also in line with the C-R cycle for superheated steam, with water as a working fluid. The influence of the parameters of superheated steam in the upper cycle has been assessed as well as the type of working fluid in the lower cycle. The results of calculations have been referred to the single-cycle classical steam power plant operating at the same parameters of superheated steam and the same mass flow rate of water circulating in both cycles. On the basis of accomplished analysis it has been shown that the binary power plant shows a greater power with respect to the reference power plant.

  5. Development of three-dimensional individual bubble-velocity measurement method by bubble tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Taizo; Furuya, Masahiro; Arai, Takahiro; Shirakawa, Kenetsu; Nishi, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A gas-liquid two-phase flow in a large diameter pipe exhibits a three-dimensional flow structure. Wire-Mesh Sensor (WMS) consists of a pair of parallel wire layers located at the cross section of a pipe. Both the parallel wires cross at 90o with a small gap and each intersection acts as an electrode. The WMS allows the measurement of the instantaneous two-dimensional void-fraction distribution over the cross-section of a pipe, based on the difference between the local instantaneous conductivity of the two-phase flow. Furthermore, the WMS can acquire a phasic-velocity on the basis of the time lag of void signals between two sets of WMS. Previously, the acquired phasic velocity was one-dimensional with time-averaged distributions. The authors propose a method to estimate the three-dimensional bubble-velocity individually WMS data. The bubble velocity is determined by the tracing method. In this tracing method, each bubble is separated from WMS signal, volume and center coordinates of the bubble is acquired. Two bubbles with near volume at two WMS are considered as the same bubble and bubble velocity is estimated from the displacement of the center coordinates of the two bubbles. The validity of this method is verified by a swirl flow. The proposed method can successfully visualize a swirl flow structure and the results of this method agree with the results of cross-correlation analysis. (author)

  6. MASS-TRANSFER AND BUBBLE-SIZE IN A BUBBLE-COLUMN UNDER PRESSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILKINSON, PM; HARINGA, H; VANDIERENDONCK, LL

    The influence of pressure on the gas hold-up in a bubble column is determined for a sodium sulphite solution in combination with the volumetric mass transfer coefficient. Furthermore, for the same conditions the bubble size is also estimated from photos. The results of these experiments show that

  7. Application of coalescence and breakup models in a discrete bubble model for bubble columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hengel, E.I.V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a discrete bubble model (DBM) is used to investigate the hydrodynamics, coalescence, and breakup occurring in a bubble column. The DBM, originally developed by Delnoij et al. (Chem. Eng. Sci. 1997, 52, 1429-1458; Chem. Eng. Sci. 1999, 54, 2217-2226),1,2 was extended to incorporate

  8. Financial Bubbles, Real Estate Bubbles, Derivative Bubbles, and the Financial and Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier; Woodard, Ryan

    The financial crisis of 2008, which started with an initially well-defined epicenter focused on mortgage backed securities (MBS), has been cascading into a global economic recession, whose increasing severity and uncertain duration has led and is continuing to lead to massive losses and damage for billions of people. Heavy central bank interventions and government spending programs have been launched worldwide and especially in the USA and Europe, with the hope to unfreeze credit and bolster consumption. Here, we present evidence and articulate a general framework that allows one to diagnose the fundamental cause of the unfolding financial and economic crisis: the accumulation of several bubbles and their interplay and mutual reinforcement have led to an illusion of a "perpetual money machine" allowing financial institutions to extract wealth from an unsustainable artificial process. Taking stock of this diagnostic, we conclude that many of the interventions to address the so-called liquidity crisis and to encourage more consumption are ill-advised and even dangerous, given that precautionary reserves were not accumulated in the "good times" but that huge liabilities were. The most "interesting" present times constitute unique opportunities but also great challenges, for which we offer a few recommendations.

  9. Device for making liquid drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Fukuda, Fumito; Nishikawa, Masana; Ishii, Takeshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a device for producing liquid drops in the form of liquefied gases indispensable to make deuterium and tritium ice pellets used as a fusion fuel in a tokamak type fusion reactor. Structure: First, pressure P 1 at the upper surface of liquefied gas in a container and outlet pressure P 2 of a nozzle disposed at the lower part of the container are adjusted into the state of P 1 >= P 2 , and it is preset so that even under such conditions, the liquefied gas from the nozzle is not naturally flown out. Next, a vibration plate disposed within the container is rapidly downwardly advanced toward the nozzle through a predetermined distance. As a result, pressure of the liquefied gas within a depression under the vibration plate rises instantaneously or in a pulse fashion to dissatisfy the aforesaid set condition whereby the liquefied gas may be flown out from the nozzle in the form of liquid drops. In accordance with the present device, it is possible to produce a suitable number of drops at a suitable point. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Non-intuitive bubble effects in reactor and containment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Most people know a lot about bubbles, including how they rise in liquids and the way they appear when the cap is removed from a bottle of carbonated beverage. A lot of bubble knowledge is obtained from bubbling air through water in aquariums to keep the fish alive and happy, or watching scuba divers feed the sharks in large glass tanks at the local zoo. But innocent bubbles can be sources of structural loadings and sometimes destructive fluid behavior. In fact, there are many non-intuitive effects associated with bubbles which have been discovered by experiments and analyses. It has been necessary to design various reactor and containment components in the nuclear energy industry to accommodate the fact that bubbles can expand like compressed springs, or oscillate, or collapse abruptly, and create structural loads. This paper describes several important phenomena associated with bubble action in nuclear reactor and containment systems and the associated loads exerted. An awareness of these effects can help to avoid unwelcome surprises in general thermal-hydraulic applications when a system is disturbed by bubble behavior. Major topics discussed include expanding and collapsing submerged bubbles, steam chugging and ringout, bubble shattering, surprising hot bubble action in a saturated pool, bubble effects on fluid-structure-interaction, waterhammer from collapsing bubble in pipes, and vapor bubble effects on sound speed in saturated mixtures

  12. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high......-velocity turbulent fluidized bed cases. The simulation results indicate that the extended EMMS/bubbling drag model is a potential method for coarse-grid simulations of large-scale fluidized beds....

  13. Giant gas bubbles in a rheomorphic vent fill at the Las Cañadas caldera, Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Carles; Giordano, Daniele; Galindo, Inés; Hürlimann, Marcel; Ardia, Paola

    2009-10-01

    During rheomorphism subsequent to fallout deposition, a portion of the densely welded fallout of the La Grieta Member flowed back into the vent from where it was erupted, while the rest of it flowed down the outer slopes of the Las Cañadas caldera in Tenerife. The welded fallout and conduit-vent structure are physically connected and constitute a rare example of this type of deposits rooted to its feeder conduit and exposed in the caldera wall. The lower part of the vent-filling rheomorphic rocks shows gas bubbles and cavities that increase in size (up to 4 m) down vent. Bubbles are deformed against other bubbles, against the steep vent walls, flattened parallel to the flow foliation planes, and elongated parallel to the flow lineation and flow fold axes. The preservation of such giant bubbles, rather than their formation, seems to be a pretty unique feature of the phonolitic products investigated here and it is likely the result of the combination of factors that acted to preserve, in the surrounding of the glass transition interval, the sealing and the late stage cooling of a pressurized system. In addition, strain drop at the base of the vent-filling rheomorphic flow caused by flow stopping against vertical vent walls may have promoted rapid gas exsolution and the formation of large bubbles.

  14. Active connectors for microfluidic drops on demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, Jean-Christophe; Studer, Vincent [Laboratoire de Neurobiologie, ESPCI-CNRS UMR 7637, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Bartolo, Denis [PMMH-ESPCI-CNRS UMR 7636-Universite Paris 6-Universite Paris 7, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: jean-christophe.galas@espci.fr, E-mail: denis.bartolo@espci.fr, E-mail: vincent.studer@espci.fr

    2009-07-15

    We introduce a simple and versatile microfluidic drop-on-demand solution that enables independent and dynamical control of both the drop size and the drop production rate. To do so, we combine a standard microfluidic T-junction and a novel active switching component that connects the microfluidic channel to the macroscopic liquid reservoirs. Firstly, we explain how to make this simple but accurate drop-on-demand device. Secondly, we carefully characterize its dynamic response and its range of operations. Finally, we show how to generate complex two-dimensional drop patterns dynamically in single or multiple synchronized drop-on-demand devices.

  15. Helium-filled soap bubbles for vortex core velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2017-09-01

    Velocity measurements within the core of high-swirl vortices are often hampered by heavier-than-air particle tracers being centrifuged outside the vortex core region. The use of neutrally buoyant and lighter-than-air tracers is investigated to aim at homogeneous tracers concentration in air flow experiments dealing with high-swirl vortices using particle image velocimetry. Helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) of sub-millimeter diameter are employed as flow tracers. Their density is controlled varying the relative amount of helium and soap solution composing the bubbles. The dynamics of HFSB and micro-size droplets is modeled within a Lamb-Oseen vortex to retrieve the order of magnitude of the tracers slip velocity. A positive radial drift for heavier-than-air tracers leads to an empty vortex core. In contrast, the concentration at the vortex axis is expected to increase for lighter than air tracers. Experiments are conducted on a sharp-edged slender delta wing at 20° incidence. At chosen chord-based Reynolds numbers of 2 × 105 and 6 × 105, a stable laminar vortex is formed above the delta wing. Laser sheet visualization is used to inspect the spatial concentration of tracers. A comparison is made between micron-sized fog droplets and HFSB tracers in the nearly neutrally buoyant condition. Stereo-PIV measurements with fog droplets return a systematically underestimated axial velocity distribution within the vortex core due to drop-out of image cross-correlation signal. The nearly neutrally buoyant HFSB tracers appear to maintain a homogeneous spatial concentration and yield cross-correlation signal up to the vortex axis. The resulting velocity measurements are in good agreement with literature data.

  16. Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2015-09-07

    When a drop impacts on a solid surface, its rapid deceleration is cushioned by a thin layer of air, which leads to the entrapment of a bubble under its centre. For large impact velocities the lubrication pressure in this air layer becomes large enough to compress the air. Herein we use high-speed interferometry, with 200 ns time-resolution, to directly observe the thickness evolution of the air layer during the entire bubble entrapment process. The initial disc radius and thickness shows excellent agreement with available theoretical models, based on adiabatic compression. For the largest impact velocities the air is compressed by as much as a factor of 14. Immediately following the contact, the air disc shows rapid vertical expansion. The radial speed of the surface minima just before contact, can reach 50 times the impact velocity of the drop.

  17. Process analysis of superheated steam pre-treatment of wheat straw and its relative effect on ethanol selling price

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Barchyn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing bioethanol operations rely on starch-based substrates, which have been criticized for their need to displace food crops in order to be produced. As an alternative to these first generation biofuels, the use of agricultural residues is being considered to create more environmentally-benign second generation, or cellulosic biofuels. Recalcitrance of these substrates to fermentation requires extensive pre-treatment processes, which often consume more energy than can be extracted from the ethanol that they produce, so one of the priorities in developing cellulosic ethanol is an effective and efficient pre-treatment method. This study examines the use of superheated steam (SS as a process medium by which wheat straw lignocellulosic material is pre-treated. Following enzymatic hydrolysis, it was found that 47% of the total glucose could be liberated from the substrate, and the optimal conditions for pre-treatment were 15 min in hot water (193 kPa, 119˚C followed by 2 min in SS. Furthermore, a preliminary relative economic analysis showed that the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP was comparable to that obtained from steam explosion, a similar process, while energy consumption was 22% less. The conclusion of the study is that SS treatment stands to be a competitive pre-treatment technology to steam explosion.

  18. Detection of nuclear recoils in prototype dark matter detectors, made from Al, Sn and Zn superheated superconducting granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abplanalp, M.; Van den Brandt, B.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.

    1995-01-01

    This work is part of an ongoing project to develop a superheated superconducting granule (SSG) detector for cold dark matter and neutrinos. The response of SSG devices to nuclear recoils has been explored irradiating SSG detectors with a 70 MeV neutron beam. The aim of the experiment was to test the sensitivity of Sn, Al and Zn SSG detectors to nuclear recoil energies down to a few keV. The detector consisted of a hollow teflon cylinder (0.1 cm 3 inner volume) filled with tiny superconducting metastable granules embedded in a dielectric medium. The nuclear recoil energies deposited in the SSG were determined measuring the neutron scattering angles with a neutron hodoscope. Coincidences in time between the SSG and the hodoscope signals have been clearly established. In this paper the results of the neutron irradiation experiments at different SSG intrinsic thresholds are discussed and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that SSG are sensitive to recoil energies down to similar 1 keV. The limited angular resolution of the neutron hodoscope prevented us from measuring the SSG sensitivity to even lower recoil energies. (orig.)

  19. Combination of Superheated Steam with Laccase Pretreatment Together with Size Reduction to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Oil Palm Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Fatin Athirah Ahmad Rizal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of superheated steam (SHS with ligninolytic enzyme laccase pretreatment together with size reduction was conducted in order to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of oil palm biomass into glucose. The oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB and oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF were pretreated with SHS and ground using a hammer mill to sizes of 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.25 mm before pretreatment using laccase to remove lignin. This study showed that reduction of size from raw to 0.25 mm plays important role in lignin degradation by laccase that removed 38.7% and 39.6% of the lignin from OPEFB and OPMF, respectively. The subsequent saccharification process of these pretreated OPEFB and OPMF generates glucose yields of 71.5% and 63.0%, which represent a 4.6 and 4.8-fold increase, respectively, as compared to untreated samples. This study showed that the combination of SHS with laccase pretreatment together with size reduction could enhance the glucose yield.

  20. The stability of large oscillating bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John; Pearson, Antony

    2002-11-01

    In a most remarkable paper, in October 1942, Penney & Price developed a theory for the stability of large oscillating bubbles; in their case they were interested in underwater explosions. Much of our current understanding on the stability of oscillating bubbles can be traced to the theoretical and experimental insight shown in this paper. While interest in this particular area continues with regard ship survivability to underwater explosions, other newer areas include the oscillatory behaviour of of seismic airgun generated bubbles. Apart from large volume oscillations with a characteristic period, the other dominant parameter is associated with buoyancy. An appropriate parameter is chosen that provides a measure of the distance of migration of a bubble over one period. An analytical and computational analysis of this class of problem reveals that this pressure gradient driven instability, normally observed in the form of a high speed liquid jet threading the bubble, is the most dominant surface instability, a characteristic feature borne out in most experimental and practical applications due to the presence of an incipient pressure gradient associated with hydrostatics, dynamics or boundaries

  1. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  2. Inflation and bubbles in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Castillo, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A.

    1986-11-01

    Following Israel's study of singular hypersurfaces and thin shells in general relativity, the complete set of Einstein's field equations in the presence of a bubble boundary SIGMA is reviewed for all spherically symmetric embedding four-geometries M+/-. The mapping that identifies points between the boundaries Σ+ and Σ- is obtained explicitly when the regions M+ and M- are described by a de Sitter and a Minkowski metric, respectively. In addition, the evolution of a bubble with vanishing surface energy density is studied in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker space-time, for region M- radiation dominated with a vanishing cosmological constant, and an energy equation in M+ determined by the matching. It is found that this type of bubble leads to a ``worm-hole'' matching; that is, an infinite extent exterior of a sphere is joined across the wall to another infinite extent exterior of a sphere. Interior-interior matches are also possible. Under this model, solutions for a bubble following a Hubble law are analyzed. Numerical solutions for bubbles with constant tension are also obtained.

  3. Double Contact During Drop Impact on a Solid Under Reduced Air Pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-11-20

    Drops impacting on solid surfaces entrap small bubbles under their centers, owing to the lubrication pressure which builds up in the thin intervening air layer. We use ultrahigh-speed interference imaging, at 5 Mfps, to investigate how this air layer changes when the ambient air pressure is reduced below atmospheric. Both the radius and the thickness of the air disc become smaller with reduced air pressure. Furthermore, we find the radial extent of the air disc bifurcates, when the compressibility parameter exceeds similar to 25. This bifurcation is also imprinted onto some of the impacts, as a double contact. In addition to the central air disc inside the first ring contact, this is immediately followed by a second ring contact, which entraps an outer toroidal strip of air, which contracts into a ring of bubbles. We find this occurs in a regime where Navier slip, due to rarefied gas effects, enhances the rate gas can escape from the path of the droplet.

  4. Double Contact During Drop Impact on a Solid Under Reduced Air Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Er Qiang; Langley, Kenneth R.; Tian, Yuan Si; Hicks, Peter D.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-11-01

    Drops impacting on solid surfaces entrap small bubbles under their centers, owing to the lubrication pressure which builds up in the thin intervening air layer. We use ultrahigh-speed interference imaging, at 5 Mfps, to investigate how this air layer changes when the ambient air pressure is reduced below atmospheric. Both the radius and the thickness of the air disc become smaller with reduced air pressure. Furthermore, we find the radial extent of the air disc bifurcates, when the compressibility parameter exceeds ˜25 . This bifurcation is also imprinted onto some of the impacts, as a double contact. In addition to the central air disc inside the first ring contact, this is immediately followed by a second ring contact, which entraps an outer toroidal strip of air, which contracts into a ring of bubbles. We find this occurs in a regime where Navier slip, due to rarefied gas effects, enhances the rate gas can escape from the path of the droplet.

  5. Non-catalytic alcoholysis process for production of biodiesel fuel by using bubble column reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, S; Nabetani, H; Nakajima, M

    2015-01-01

    -edible lipids by use of the SMV reactor has not been examined yet. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the productivity of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils using the SMV reactor. Biodiesel fuel is a replacement for diesel as a fuel produced from biomass resources. It is generally produced as a FAME derived from vegetable oil by using alkaline catalyzed alcoholysis process. This alkaline method requires deacidification process prior to the reaction process and the alkaline catalyst removal process after the reaction. Those process increases the total cost of biodiesel fuel production. In order to solve the problems in the conventional alkaline catalyzed alcoholysis process, the authors proposed a non-catalytic alcoholysis process called the Superheated Methanol Vapor (SMV) method with bubble column reactor. So, this study aims to investigate the productivity of biodiesel produced from vegetable oils and other lipids using the SMV method with bubble column reactor

  6. Non-catalytic alcoholysis process for production of biodiesel fuel by using bubble column reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, S.; Nabetani, H.; Nakajima, M.

    2015-04-01

    -edible lipids by use of the SMV reactor has not been examined yet. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the productivity of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils using the SMV reactor. Biodiesel fuel is a replacement for diesel as a fuel produced from biomass resources. It is generally produced as a FAME derived from vegetable oil by using alkaline catalyzed alcoholysis process. This alkaline method requires deacidification process prior to the reaction process and the alkaline catalyst removal process after the reaction. Those process increases the total cost of biodiesel fuel production. In order to solve the problems in the conventional alkaline catalyzed alcoholysis process, the authors proposed a non-catalytic alcoholysis process called the Superheated Methanol Vapor (SMV) method with bubble column reactor. So, this study aims to investigate the productivity of biodiesel produced from vegetable oils and other lipids using the SMV method with bubble column reactor.

  7. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-06-19

    Covering 71% of the Earth’s surface, oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. The size and composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) affect their ability to serve as cloud seeds and thus understanding the factors controlling their composition is critical to predicting their impact on clouds and climate. SSA particles have been shown to be an external mixture of particles with different compositions. Film and jet drop production mechanisms ultimately determine the individual particle compositions which are comprised of an array of salt/organic mixtures ranging from pure sea salt to nearly pure organic particles. It is often assumed that the majority of submicron SSA are formed by film drops produced from bursting hydrophobic organic-rich bubble film caps at the sea surface, and in contrast, jet drops are postulated to produce larger supermicron particles from underlying seawater comprised largely of salts and water soluble organic species. However, here we show that jet drops produced by bursting sub-100 m bubbles account for up to 40 % of all submicron particles. They have distinct chemical compositions, organic volume fractions and ice nucleating activities from submicron film drops. Thus a substantial fraction of submicron particles will not necessarily be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer as has been assumed in many studies. This finding has significant ramifications for the size-resolved mixing states of SSA particles which must be taken into consideration when accessing SSA impacts on clouds.

  8. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS, Final Report for the Period November 1, 1999 - February 28, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISHER,RK

    2003-02-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 {micro}, are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} yield DT target plasmas with a target plane spatial resolution of {approx} 140 {micro}. As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of {approx} 5000 drops ({approx} 100 {micro} in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm{sup 3} suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are {approx} 10 {micro} in diameter, should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of {approx} 10 to 50 {micro}.

  9. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugey, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Weaire, D.

    2006-05-01

    We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stresses and dissipation in the system. In particular, we investigate the relationship between the drag force and the slip velocity of the bubble, which for small slip velocities obeys power laws, as predicted by previous semianalytical treatments.

  10. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  11. Bubbles, sparks, and the postwar laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galison, P.

    1989-01-01

    The development and use of bubble chambers and spark chambers in the 1950s form the main thrust of this article, the bubble chamber as an example of ''image-producing'' instruments and the spark chamber as a ''logic'' device. Work on a cloud chamber by Glaser led to the development of the bubble chamber detector using liquid hydrogen, which was later linked to a computer for accurate automatic track analysis. It made possible demonstrations of the existence of a particle or interaction. Spark chambers were easier to build and so soon became common, various types being developed across the world. The development of spark chambers originated in the need for timing devices for the Manhattan Project, but work on their design occurred in a number of units worldwide. (UK)

  12. Fermi Bubbles: Formation Scenarios and Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2013-04-01

    The Milky Way has gamma-ray lobes extending several kpc above and below the Galactic center, known as the "Fermi Bubbles." Although the Galactic center is quiet today, these bubbles are a hint of past AGN activity, a burst of star formation, or some other dramatic energy injection. In the three years since their discovery, they have been modeled analytically and numerically, and additional radio and x-ray data have been obtained, leading to a number of ideas about their origins. I will review the latest data and report on some possible formation scenarios. I will also give an update on our tentative claim last year of a linear jet-like structure within the bubbles (arXiv:1205.5852).

  13. Rational speculative bubbles: A critical view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radonjić Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of rational bubbles, the bubble is present whenever asset prices progressively diverge from their fundamental value, which occurs because agents expect that asset prices will continue to grow exponentially (self-fulfilling prophecies far in the future and consistently, which promises the realization of ever larger capital gains. In our opinion, the basic shortcoming of this theory refers to the assumption that all market agents are perfectly informed and rational and, accordingly, form homogeneous expectations. The model does not explain decision-making processes or expectation formation, nor does it detect potential psychological and institutional factors that might significantly influence decision making processes and market participants’ reactions to news. Since assumptions of the model critically determine its validity, we conclude that comprehensiveness of the rational bubble model is, to put it mildly, limited.

  14. Bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we provide a unifying framework for a set of seemingly disparate models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies in financial markets. Markets operate by balancing intrinsic levels of risk and return. This seemingly simple observation is commonly over-looked by academics and practitioners alike. Our model shares its origins in statistical physics with others. However, under our approach, changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. This structure leads to an improved physical and econometric model. We develop models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies. The list of empirical applications is both interesting and topical and includes real-estate bubbles and the on-going Eurozone crisis. We close by comparing the results of our model with purely qualitative findings from the finance literature.

  15. Experimental investigation of bubble plume structure instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco Simiano; Robert Zboray; Francois de Cachard [Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Djamel Lakehal; George Yadigaroglu [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zentrum/CLT, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The hydrodynamic properties of a 3D bubble plume in a large water pool are investigated experimentally. Bubble plumes are present in various industrial processes, including chemical plants, stirred reactors, and nuclear power plants, e.g. in BWR suppression pools. In these applications, the main issue is to predict the currents induced by the bubbles in the liquid phase, and to determine the consequent mixing. Bubble plumes, especially large and unconfined ones, present strong 3D effects and a superposition of different characteristic length scales. Thus, they represent relevant test cases for assessment and verification of 3D models in thermal-hydraulic codes. Bubble plumes are often unsteady, with fluctuations in size and shape of the bubble swarm, and global movements of the plume. In this case, local time-averaged data are not sufficient to characterize the flow. Additional information regarding changes in plume shape and position is required. The effect of scale on the 3D flow structure and stability being complex, there was a need to conduct studies in a fairly large facility, closer to industrial applications. Air bubble plumes, up to 30 cm in base diameter and 2 m in height were extensively studied in a 2 m diameter water pool. Homogeneously sized bubbles were obtained using a particular injector. The main hydrodynamic parameters. i.e., gas and liquid velocities, void fraction, bubble shape and size, plume shape and position, were determined experimentally. Photographic and image processing techniques were used to characterize the bubble shape, and double-tip optical probes to measure bubble size and void fraction. Electromagnetic probes measured the recirculation velocity in the pool. Simultaneous two-phase flow particle image velocimetry (STPFPIV) in a vertical plane containing the vessel axis provided instantaneous velocity fields for both phases and therefore the relative velocity field. Video recording using two CCD

  16. ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradner, H.; Solmitz, F.

    1958-01-01

    Since its invention by Glaser in 1953, the bubble chamber has become a most valuable tool in high-energy physics. It combines a number of advantages of various older methods of particle detection: it offers high spatial resolution, rapid accumulation of data, some time resolution, and some choice of the nucleus whose interaction one wants to study (bubble chambers have been made to operate with a large number of different liquids, including H 2 , D 2 , He, Xe, and several hydrocarbons). In order to exploit the advantages of spatial resolution and rapid data accumulation, high-speed high-precision analysis procedures must be developed. In this article they discuss some of the problems posed by such analysis. The discussion is based largely on experience gained in performing hydrogen bubble chamber experiments with the University of California's Bevatron (6-Bev proton synchrotron)

  17. Drag and drop display & builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  18. Vortex-induced buckling of a viscous drop impacting a pool

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-07-20

    We study the intricate buckling patterns which can form when a viscous drop impacts a much lower viscosity miscible pool. The drop enters the pool by its impact inertia, flattens, and sinks by its own weight while stretching into a hemispheric bowl. Upward motion along the outer bottom surface of this bowl produces a vortical boundary layer which separates along its top and rolls up into a vortex ring. The vorticity is therefore produced in a fundamentally different way than for a drop impacting a pool of the same liquid. The vortex ring subsequently advects into the bowl, thereby stretching the drop liquid into ever thinner sheets, reaching the micron level. The rotating motion around the vortex pulls in folds to form multiple windings of double-walled toroidal viscous sheets. The axisymmetric velocity field thereby stretches the drop liquid into progressively finer sheets, which are susceptible to both axial and azimuthal compression-induced buckling. The azimuthal buckling of the sheets tends to occur on the inner side of the vortex ring, while their folds can be stretched and straightened on the outside edge. We characterize the total stretching from high-speed video imaging and use particle image velocimetry to track the formation and evolution of the vortex ring. The total interfacial area between the drop and the pool liquid can grow over 40-fold during the first 50 ms after impact. Increasing pool viscosity shows entrapment of a large bubble on top of the drop, while lowering the drop viscosity produces intricate buckled shapes, appearing at the earliest stage and being promoted by the crater motions. We also present an image collage of the most intriguing and convoluted structures observed. Finally, a simple point-vortex model reproduces some features from the experiments and shows variable stretching along the wrapping sheets.

  19. Acoustical bubble trapper applied to hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanchon, P; Birmelé, B; Tranquart, F

    2008-04-01

    Gaseous microemboli can arise in extracorporeal lines and devices such as dialysis machines. They are associated with severe pulmonary side effects in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis sessions. The goal of this study was to develop a gaseous emboli trapper using ultrasound waves to remove any air bubble from the tubing system before they reach the patient. A homemade bubble trapper, developed in the laboratory, consists of a Perspex block containing a main channel connected to the tubing of a hemodialysis machine and a second subchannel positioned perpendicularly to the main one, used to trap the air microemboli. The microemboli flowing in the main channel were insonified through an acoustic window with an ultrasound wave, at a frequency of 500 kHz and with a maximal acoustic pressure of 500 kPa, generated by a single-element transducer positioned 3 cm away from the main flow. The radiation force induced by the ultrasound beam acts directly on the flowing air emboli, by pushing them into the subchannel. Two Doppler probes operating both at 2 MHz, connected to a DWL Doppler machine were placed before and after the bubble trapper to count sequentially the number of embolic events. The flow of the machine was varied between 200 mL/min and 500 mL/min. Depending on the flow velocity, the number of microembolic signals (MES) detected by the Doppler probes before and after the trapping system was identical and ranged from 5 to 150 MES/min in absence of the ultrasound irradiation. When the air bubble trapper was activated, a reduction of the number of MES, up to 70%, was achieved. Doppler recordings suggest that the circulating bubbles were either fragmented into smaller bubble fragments or directly got pushed into the second subchannel where they were collected. This simple approach using an ultrasound-based trapping system was shown to operate adequately with the current settings and can be used to filter air microemboli.

  20. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor · MALA DAS NILANJAN BISWAS ... Article ID 15 Regular. Effects of non-extensive electrons and positive/negative dust particles on modulational instability of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in non-planar geometry · M EGHBALI B ...

  1. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  2. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  3. Stochastic modelling for financial bubbles and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we draw upon the close relationship between statistical physics and mathematical finance to develop a suite of models for financial bubbles and crashes. By modifying previous approaches, we are able to derive novel analytical formulae for evaluation problems and for the expected timing of future change points. In particular, we help to explain why previous approaches have systematically overstated the timing of changes in market regime. The list of potential empirical applications is deep and wide ranging, and includes contemporary housing bubbles, the Eurozone crisis and the Crash of 2008.

  4. Simulations of Bubble Motion in an Oscillating Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynik, A. M.; Romero, L. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    Finite-element simulations are used to investigate the motion of a gas bubble in a liquid undergoing vertical vibration. The effect of bubble compressibility is studied by comparing "compressible" bubbles that obey the ideal gas law with "incompressible" bubbles that are taken to have constant volume. Compressible bubbles exhibit a net downward motion away from the free surface that does not exist for incompressible bubbles. Net (rectified) velocities are extracted from the simulations and compared with theoretical predictions. The dependence of the rectified velocity on ambient gas pressure, bubble diameter, and bubble depth are in agreement with the theory. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. A note on effects of rational bubble on portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan; Nie, Pu-yan

    2018-02-01

    In general, demand increases in wealth and decreases in price in microeconomics. We thereby propose a completely different perspective. By establishing expected utility function of investors, this article introduces one rational bubble asset and one bubble free asset in portfolios and focuses on the effects of bubble on investment portfolios from wealth and price perspectives. All conclusions are obtained by theoretical analysis with microeconomics theory. We argue that inferior goods and Giffen behavior can occur for the bubble free asset in microeconomic fields. The results can help investors to recognize bubble assets and bubble free assets more scientifically. Both bubble and bubble free assets can be inferior goods under some conditions, so we cannot to say which asset better than the other one absolutely.

  6. Contact Lens Wear at Altitude: Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    incidence of (PMMA) lenses . Reported here are the results of contact lens subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at bubble studies with soft...vision from formation of large bubbles greater than 6,096 m (20,000 It). With soft contact lenses , bubble under their contact lenses . They also found...always located at the limbus and were without sequela to vision or corneal epithelial integrity. scleral lenses used by Jaeckle were permeable to gases

  7. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Keliang Wang; Pucheng Pei; Yu Pei; Ze Ma; Huachi Xu; Dongfang Chen

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicula...

  8. Boundary curvature effects on gas bubble oscillations in underwater explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble produced as a result of underwater explosion could cause the severe whipping damage on nearby marine vehicle. The effects of rigid boundary curvatures to explosive gas bubble oscillation behavior in underwater were investigated. The analyses were conducted using a multimaterial Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element code, MSC/DYTRAN. The incident shock wave pressure, bubble pulse pressure, gas bubble radius and period were calculated for the case of detonation of a...

  9. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, V.; Sojka, P. E.

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 2 ), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak

  10. Spray and microjets produced by focusing a laser pulse into a hemispherical drop

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2009-11-02

    We use high-speed video imaging to study laser disruption of the free surface of a hemispheric drop. The drop sits on a glass surface and the Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser pulse propagates through the drop and is focused near the free surface from below. We focus on the evolution of the cylindrical liquid sheet and spray which emerges out of the drop and resembles typical impact crowns. The tip of the sheet emerges at velocities over 1 km/s. The tip of the crown breaks up into fine spray some of which is sucked back into the growing cavity at about 100 m/s. We measure the size of the typical spray droplets to be about 3 μm. We also show the formation of fine microjets, which are produced when the laser is focused inside the drop and the shock front hits small bubbles sitting under the free surface. For water these microjets are 5–50 μm in diameter and exit at 100–250 m/s. For higher viscositydrops, these jets can emerge at over 500 m/s.

  11. Vibration-Induced Climbing of Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, P.; Eggers, J.; Deegan, R. D.

    2007-10-01

    We report an experimental study of liquid drops moving against gravity, when placed on a vertically vibrating inclined plate, which is partially wetted by the drop. The frequency of vibrations ranges from 30 to 200 Hz, and, above a threshold in vibration acceleration, drops experience an upward motion. We attribute this surprising motion to the deformations of the drop, as a consequence of an up or down symmetry breaking induced by the presence of the substrate. We relate the direction of motion to contact angle measurements. This phenomenon can be used to move a drop along an arbitrary path in a plane, without special surface treatments or localized forcing.

  12. The emission of sound by statistically homogeneous bubble layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijngaarden, L.; van Wijngaarden, L.; Buist, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the flow of a bubbly fluid along a wavy wall, which is one Fourier component of a linearized hydrofoil. The bubbles are dispersed, not throughout the whole of the liquid, but only over a certain distance from the wall, as occurs in practice with cavitation bubbles.

  13. Adhesion of solid particles to gas bubbles. Part 2: Experimental

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omota, Florin; Dimian, Alexandre C.; Bliek, A.

    2006-01-01

    In slurry bubble columns, the adhesion of solid catalyst particles to bubbles may significantly affect the G–L mass transfer and bubble size distribution. This feature may be exploited in design by modifying the hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature of the particles used. Previously we have proposed a

  14. Rhetoric, Risk, and Markets: The Dot-Com Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnight, G. Thomas; Green, Sandy Edward, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Post-conventional economic theories are assembled to inquire into the contingent, mimetic, symbolic, and material spirals unfolding the dot-com bubble, 1992-2002. The new technologies bubble is reconstructed as a rhetorical movement across the practices of the hybrid market-industry risk culture of communications. The legacies of the bubble task…

  15. Stability of a bubble expanding and translating through an inviscid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Department of Mathematics, Delhi University, Delhi 110 007, India. MS received 27 August 2001; revised 2 February 2002. Abstract. A bubble expands adiabatically and translates in an incompressible and inviscid liquid. We investigate the number of equilibrium points of the bubble and the nature of stability of the bubble at ...

  16. Abstract of report on increasing the oil yield in low temperature carbonization by the addition of catalyst and superheated steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-04-29

    In a letter dated February 2, 1943, Hydro-works Poelitz stated that in practical operation, as well as in the laboratory, an increased oil yield in low-temperature carbonization had been obtained by the simultaneous addition of superheated steam and sulfur. Other experiments with the same objective were later performed at Gelsenberg, Scholven, and Ludwigshafen. The laboratory experimental results and operating experimental results were discussed in this report. Poelitz found that it could increase its yield from 71.5% to 79.3% by the addition of 1.2% sulfur and an increase in the steam from 150 kg/hr to 320 kg/hr when carbonizing centrifuge residue from coal and, at the time, increased the throughput in the ball kiln from 3.5 to 3.8 tons/hr. Some properties of the heavy oils were given. The use of these results in mass production depended on two factors. The first was the extent to which the quantity of steam could be increased without too great an increase in the dust content of the precooler oil. The second factor was the economy of increased steam consumption and the cost of catalysts. Most of the beneficial effect of the additions seemed to be due to the steam, but the catalyst added some effect to that of the steam; without the use of steam, catalyst alone seemed to have essentially no effect. Replacement of part of the sulfur in the catalyst by small amounts of sodium sulfide and soda seemed to give the same effect as the sulfur alone, and the alkaline addition seemed to have the additional benefit of preventing the kiln residue from becoming plastic.

  17. Experimental analysis on pressure drop and heat transfer of a terminal fan-coil unit with ice slurry as cooling medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Diz, Ruben; Uhia, Francisco J.; Dopazo, J. Alberto [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    This paper is concerned with the experimental analysis of a standard terminal fan-coil unit with ice slurry as coolant. The ice slurry was produced from an ethylene glycol 10 wt% aqueous solution. The pressure drop measurements are presented as a function of volumetric flow rate, ice concentration and Reynolds number. The experimental friction factors are obtained and discussed. The fan-coil capacity was experimentally determined for chilled water and melting ice slurry with inlet ice fractions around 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%, considering in each case three different fan rotation velocities. The fan-coil capacity is higher with melting ice slurry than with chilled water by factors between 3.7 and 4.9. The heat transfer analysis realizes that the air side thermal resistance controls the heat transfer process. Experimental results for the melt off rate of ice in the fan coil and the superheating at the fan-coil outlet are shown and discussed. (author)

  18. Is there a Housing Bubble in Turkey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Yener

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There was a notable housing price inflation in aggregate/local levels in Turkey during the last few years. Although the country’s economic fundamentals remain strong, the probability of a housing bubble is a heated debate among market participants. This timely investigation brings greater clarity to whether the Turkish housing market is in a bubble. The study uses a multi-strand approach to dissect the bubble over the period of Jan. 2010 - Dec. 2014. First, monthly/annual price-to-income and monthly price-to-rent ratios are examined for the national Turkish as well as regional Istanbul, Izmir and Ankara housing markets. Second, an extended CASE and SHILLER (2003 model is applied assessing the interdependence between housing prices and a series of explanatory variables. Lastly, the Right Tail Augmented Dickey-Fuller (Rtadf test is performed to support the overall analysis. This study finds that neither affordability ratios nor regression estimates support the existence of the bubble in Turkey.

  19. The bubble distribution in glass refining channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Cincibusová, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2005), s. 269-277 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : glass fining * bubble distribution s models * horizontal channel Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  20. The charged bubble oscillator: Dynamics and thresholds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of day-to-day medical devices and techniques using ultrasound ... When a pressure wave is incident on the bubble in the liquid .... Dependence of the expansion-compression ratio on the driving pressure amplitude Ps. we will merely cite the result here. We find the critical. Blake radius and the critical liquid pressure to be.

  1. Characterization of polymers by bubble inflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    In order to characterise materials using a simple and relative inexpensive method, the bubble inflation technique was modified. A polymer plate is clamped between a Teflon coated heating plate and a heated cylinder. By applying air through the heating plate the polymer membrane deforms...

  2. On Stability of a Bubble Column

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 2 (2013), s. 191-203 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble column * flow regimes * steady solution Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.281, year: 2013

  3. Image digitizer system for bubble chamber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, H.

    1986-01-01

    An IBM PC-based image digitizer system has been assembled to monitor the laser flash used for holography at the 15 foot bubble chamber. The hardware and the operating software are outlined. For an operational test of the system, an array of LEDs was flashed with a 10 microsecond pulse and the image was grabbed by one of the operating programs and processed

  4. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  5. Customized bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-09

    Feb 9, 2013 ... To meet the increasing demand for a simple respiratory support for preterm babies in our institution, we modified the existing Bubble CPAP ... the humidified oxygen source (oxygen cylinder, oxygen concentrator or wall-piped oxygen) through the interface to the baby. It is interesting to note that these tubes ...

  6. Toward a Metatheory of Economic Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    and original research in Toward a Metatheory of Economic Bubbles have far-reaching implications for the study and practice of entrepreneurship and marketing, public and corporate finance, and public policies towards innovation, economy, and finance. It contributes to the defining issues for economic sociology...

  7. Soap-bubble Optimization of Gaits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Suresh; Hatton, Ross

    We present a geometric gait optimizer that applies Lie bracket theory to identify optimal cost-of-transport (displacement divided by effort) gaits. This optimizer builds on our previous work, where we have shown that for drag-dominated systems, the efficiency of a gait corresponds to a ratio between ``metric-weighted perimeter length of the cycle and the area integral of the Lie bracket it encloses. In this work, we encode this geometric insight into a variational gait optimizer. For a system with two shape variables, the dynamics of this optimizer are similar to the dynamics of a soap bubble, with the Lie bracket providing internal pressure which causes the boundary of the bubble to expand, the metric-weighted path length providing surface tension constraining the growth of the soap bubble, and a pace-balancing term corresponding to the concentration gradient that evenly distributes soap across the surface of the bubble. In systems with three shape variables, the dynamics are more akin to a windsock, capturing maximum flux through a loop. The variational form of the optimizer allows us to extend it to higher dimensional shape spaces beyond these physical analogies.

  8. Bubble growth on an impulsively powered microheater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Z.; Prosperetti, Andrea; Kim, J.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of single vapor bubbles in FC-72 generated by a transient heat pulse applied to a square 260 × 260 μm2 microheater are investigated for different heat fluxes between 3 and 44 MW/m2. It is found that in all cases the growth consists of two steps, a first relatively violent one, followed

  9. Is Education Facing a "Tech Bubble"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2013-01-01

    Educational technology companies and entrepreneurs may face the risk of a "tech bubble," similar to the massive boom-and-bust that rocked the technology market in the late 1990s, according to market analysts and a recently released paper. A relatively new focus on K-12 educational technology as an investment vehicle, a surge of investors looking…

  10. Making continuous bubble type polyethylene foam incombustible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Kanako; Hatada, Motoyoshi; Yoshizawa, Iwao; Komai, Kuniaki; Kohara, Choji.

    1989-01-01

    Since continuous bubble type plastic foam has excellent compression characteristics and sound absorption characteristics, it has been widely used as cushion material, sealing material, sound insulating material and so on. However, the most part of plastic foam is taken by air, therefore at the time of fires, it becomes a very dangerous material. At present, the material used mostly as the seat cushions for airliners, railroad coaches, automobiles and others is polyurethane foam, but since it contains C-N couples in its molecules, it is feared to generate cyanic gas according to the condition of combustion. As the plastic foam that does not generate harmful gas at the time of fires, there is continuous bubble type polyethylene which is excellent in its weathering property and chemical resistance. A reactive, phosphorus-containing oligomer has large molecular weight and two or more double couplings in a molecule, therefore, it does not enter the inside of polyethylene, and polymerizes and crosslinks on the surfaces of bubble walls in the foam, accordingly it is expected that the apparent graft polymerization is carried out, and it is very effective for making polyethylene foam incombustible. The method of making graft foam, the properties of graft foam and so on are reported. When the graft polymerization of this oligomer to continuous bubble type polyethylene foam was tried, highly incombustible polyethylene foam was obtained. (K.I.)

  11. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... ous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is often sufficient to tide a preterm infant through RDS. ... eration in BCPAP and arrived at a modification of the existing bubble CPAP device which is effective, ..... gestational age dependent, oxygen induced retinopathy. Conclusion. The NHA-BCPAP device produces ...

  12. Multi-Dimensional Analysis of the Forced Bubble Dynamics Associated with Bubble Fusion Phenomena. Final Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahey, Jr., Richard T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Center for Multiphase Research and Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Nuclear Engineering; Jansen, Kenneth E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Center for Multiphase Research and Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Nuclear Engineering; Nagrath, Sunitha [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Center for Multiphase Research and Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Nuclear Engineering

    2002-12-02

    A new adaptive grid, 3-D FEM hydrodynamic shock (ie, HYDRO )code called PHASTA-2C has been developed and used to investigate bubble implosion phenomena leading to ultra-high temperatures and pressures. In particular, it was shown that nearly spherical bubble compressions occur during bubble implosions and the predicted conditions associated with a recent ORNL Bubble Fusion experiment [Taleyarkhan et al, Science, March, 2002] are consistent with the occurrence of D/D fusion.

  13. The effect of channel height on bubble nucleation in superhydrophobic microchannels due to subcritical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Adam; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie; Iverson, Brian

    2017-11-01

    This work experimentally investigates the effects of heating on laminar flow in high aspect ratio superhydrophobic (SH) microchannels. When water that is saturated with dissolved air is used, the unwetted cavities of the SH surfaces act as nucleation sites and air effervesces out of solution onto the surfaces. The microchannels consist of a rib/cavity structured SH surface, that is heated, and a glass surface that is utilized for flow visualization. Two channel heights of nominally 183 and 366 μm are considered. The friction factor-Reynolds product (fRe) is obtained via pressure drop and volumetric flow rate measurements and the temperature profile along the channel is obtained via thermocouples embedded in an aluminum block below the SH surface. Five surface types/configurations are investigated: smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, SH with ribs perpendicular to the flow, SH with ribs parallel to the flow, and SH with both ribs parallel to the flow and sparse ribs perpendicular to the flow. Depending on the surface type/configuration, large bubbles can form and adversely affect fRe and lead to higher temperatures along the channel. Once bubbles grow large enough, they are expelled from the channel. The channel size greatly effects the residence time of the bubbles and consequently fRe and the channel temperature. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant No. CBET-1235881) and the Utah NASA Space Grant Consortium (NASA Grant NNX15A124H).

  14. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  15. A method for indication and improving the position stability of the bubble in single-bubble cavitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocek, Jaroslav

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed method for indication of the bubble state in classical single-bubble cavitation experiments is introduced. The method is based on processing the signal from a sensor, positioned on the flask from outside. The technical means of the method are further explored to improve the position stability of the bubble.

  16. Study of droplet entrainment from bubbling surface in a bubble column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez de Santiago, M.

    1991-05-01

    In a bubble column droplets are ejected from the free surface by bubble bursting or splashing. Depending on their size, the droplets are partly carried away by the streaming gas or fall back to the bubbling surface by gravity force. Experiments have been carried out to determine the void fraction in the column by means of an optical probe. In the interfacial zone the bubble bursting process was captured with a high-speed video camera. Simultaneous measurements were made of size and velocity of droplets at several distances from the bubbling surface with a Phase-Doppler Anemometry. The bubble column can be divided into three regions: A lower zone with a flat profile of the local void fraction, a central zone where the flow regime is steady and an upper zone where the local void fraction grows rapidly. A two-parameter log-normal distribution function was proposed in order to describe the polydisperse distribution of droplet-size. Results were obtained concerning the entrainment, concentration, volume fraction and interfacial area of droplets. Finally, it was found that the turbulence intensity affects the droplet terminal velocity for droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov microscale [fr

  17. A derivation of the stable cavitation threshold accounting for bubble-bubble interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédra, Matthieu; Cornu, Corentin; Inserra, Claude

    2017-09-01

    The subharmonic emission of sound coming from the nonlinear response of a bubble population is the most used indicator for stable cavitation. When driven at twice their resonance frequency, bubbles can exhibit subharmonic spherical oscillations if the acoustic pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold value. Although various theoretical derivations exist for the subharmonic emission by free or coated bubbles, they all rest on the single bubble model. In this paper, we propose an analytical expression of the subharmonic threshold for interacting bubbles in a homogeneous, monodisperse cloud. This theory predicts a shift of the subharmonic resonance frequency and a decrease of the corresponding pressure threshold due to the interactions. For a given sonication frequency, these results show that an optimal value of the interaction strength (i.e. the number density of bubbles) can be found for which the subharmonic threshold is minimum, which is consistent with recently published experiments conducted on ultrasound contrast agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  19. The effect of ion irradiation on inert gas bubble mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Al ion irradiation on the mobility of Xe gas bubbles in Al thin films was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine bubble diffusivities in films irradiated and/or annealed at 673K, 723K and 773K. Irradiation increased bubble diffusivity by a factor of 2--9 over that due to thermal annealing alone. The Arrhenius behavior and dose rate dependence of bubble diffusivity are consistent with a radiation enhanced diffusion phenomenon affecting a volume diffusion mechanism of bubble transport. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  1. Models optimization for the pressure drop calculation in two-phase flow cooled bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, L.C.D.; Rezende, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of two-phase tests, performed in a mock-up of nuclear fuel element, to verify the applicability of existing calculation models to determine the pressure drop is presented. The tests were performed using Reynolds Number in the range from 4 x 10 4 to 1.6 x 10 5 , with heat flux up to 105 W/cm 2 , and three different levels of pressure: 2.0, 6.0 and 10.0 bar. The tests results were used to optimize the bubble detaching point in two correlations (Bowing and Lelouche-Zolotar) in order to obtain the subcooled void fraction. Comparison between measured and calculated results has shown that the pressure drop,in 96% of the tests, was reproduced within +- 16% when using the Bowing correlation, and +- 9% with the Lellouche-Zolotar one. (author)

  2. Effect of surfactant on single drop mass transfer for extraction of aromatics from lubricating oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izza, H.; Ben Abdessalam, S.; Korichi, M.

    2018-03-01

    Solvent extraction is an effective method for the reduction of the content of aromatic of lubricating oil. Frequently, with phenol, furfural, the NMP (out of N-methyl pyrrolidone). The power solvent and the selectivity can be still to increase while using surfactant as additive which facilitates the separation of phase and increases the yeild in raffinat. Liquid-liquid mass transfer coefficients for single freely rising drops in the presence of surfactant in an extraction column have been investigated. The surfactant used in this study was sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES). The experiments were performed by bubbling a solvent as a series of individual drops from the top of the column containing furfural-SLES solution. The column used in this experiment was made from glass with 17 mm inner diameter and a capacity of 125ml. The effects of the concentration of surfactant on the overall coefficient of mass transfer was investigated.

  3. Dynamics of micro-bubble sonication inside a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2013-01-10

    A model for sonicated micro-bubble oscillations inside a phantom vessel is proposed. The model is not a variant of conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation and is obtained from reduced Navier-Stokes equations. The model relates the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics with geometric and acoustic parameters in a consistent manner. It predicts micro-bubble oscillation dynamics as well as micro-bubble fragmentation when compared to the experimental data. For large micro-bubble radius to vessel diameter ratios, predictions are damped, suggesting breakdown of inherent modeling assumptions for these cases. Micro-bubble response with acoustic parameters is consistent with experiments and provides physical insight to the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics.

  4. Interaction of equal-size bubbles in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Byk, Leonid; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-04-01

    The inertia-induced forces on two identical spherical bubbles in a simple shear flow at small but finite Reynolds number, for the case when the bubbles are within each other's inner viscous region, are calculated making use of the reciprocal theorem. This interaction force is further employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a viscous fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that, during a long time scale, the inertial interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other and, as a result, equal-size bubbles eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors. We report on experiments showing the dynamic evolution of various numbers of bubbles. The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. On the mobility of fission-gas bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.A.; Ronchi, C.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of bubble migration in fuel swelling and fission-product release remains a controversial topic in spite of a great deal of research. For steady state analyses some authors ignore bubble motion totally, whereas others use mobilities (based on out-of-pile measurements) which are far below the theoretical diffusion-control predictions. Under transient conditions some continue to use zero or low bubble mobilities, whereas others invoke higher mobilities. Experimental information on mobility of bubbles under irradiation conditions is very limited, but supports the theoretical values for bubble sizes above 1 μm. The authors discuss here some interesting new results which may provide direct evidence for in-pile mobilities comparable with surface-diffusion control predictions for much smaller bubbles (<20nm), where out-of-pile studies indicate greatly reduced mobilities. A brief summary is presented of information available for bubble mobilities, both in- and out-of-pile

  6. The elasticity of soap bubbles containing wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadini, Edvaldo; Ungarato, Rafael F S; Miranda, Paulo B

    2014-01-28

    Slow-motion imaging of the rupture of soap bubbles generally shows the edges of liquid films retracting at a constant speed (known as the Taylor-Culick velocity). Here we investigate soap bubbles formed from simple solutions of a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide - CTAB) and sodium salicylate. The interaction of salicylate ions with CTAB leads to the formation of wormlike micelles (WLM), which yield a viscoelastic behavior to the liquid film of the bubble. We demonstrate that these elastic bubbles collapse at a velocity up to 30 times higher than the Taylor-Culick limit, which has never been surpassed. This is because during the bubble inflation, the entangled WLM chains stretch, storing elastic energy. This extra energy is then released during the rupture of the bubble, yielding an additional driving force for film retraction (besides surface tension). This new mechanism for the bursting of elastic bubbles may have important implications to the breakup of viscoelastic sprays in industrial applications.

  7. Star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José; Burton, Justin C.

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-sustained, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with n =2 -13 lobes around the drop periphery. We find that the wavelength of the oscillations depends only on the capillary length of the liquid and is independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depends sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations in the vapor layer is approximately twice the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results show that the star-shaped oscillations are driven by capillary waves of a characteristic wavelength beneath the drop and that the waves are generated by a large shear stress at the liquid-vapor interface.

  8. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Sarwat E-mail: sarwathussain@hotmail.com

    2001-12-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis.

  9. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Sarwat

    2001-01-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis

  10. Hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    OpenAIRE

    Brutin, D.; Rigollet, F.; Niliot, C. Le

    2009-01-01

    Drop evaporation is a simple phenomena but still unclear concerning the mechanisms of evaporation. A common agreement of the scientific community based on experimental and numerical work evidences that most of the evaporation occurs at the triple line. However, the rate of evaporation is still empirically predicted due to the lack of knowledge on the convection cells which develop inside the drop under evaporation. The evaporation of sessile drop is more complicated than it appears due to the...

  11. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Soft drop jet mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Jennifer Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Calculations of jet substructure observables that are accurate beyond leading-logarithm accuracy have recently become available. Such observables are significant not only for probing the collinear regime of QCD that is largely unexplored at a hadron collider, but also for improving the understanding of jet substructure properties that are used in many studies at the Large Hadron Collider. This poster documents a measurement of the first jet substructure quantity at a hadron collider to be calculated at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm accuracy. The normalized, differential cross-section is measured as a function of log( ρ^2), where ρ is the ratio of the soft-drop mass to the ungroomed jet transverse momentum. This quantity is measured in dijet events from 32.9 ifb of sqrt(s) = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The data are unfolded to correct for detector effects and compared to precise QCD calculations and leading-logarithm particle-level Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Computational analysis of ozonation in bubble columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones-Bolanos, E.; Zhou, H.; Otten, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational ozonation model based on the principle of computational fluid dynamics along with the kinetics of ozone decay and microbial inactivation to predict the performance of ozone disinfection in fine bubble columns. The model can be represented using a mixture two-phase flow model to simulate the hydrodynamics of the water flow and using two transport equations to track the concentration profiles of ozone and microorganisms along the height of the column, respectively. The applicability of this model was then demonstrated by comparing the simulated ozone concentrations with experimental measurements obtained from a pilot scale fine bubble column. One distinct advantage of this approach is that it does not require the prerequisite assumptions such as plug flow condition, perfect mixing, tanks-in-series, uniform radial or longitudinal dispersion in predicting the performance of disinfection contactors without carrying out expensive and tedious tracer studies. (author)

  14. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  15. Correlation of bubble rise velocity and volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burge, C.

    1991-01-01

    This project was conducted at Westinghouse's Savannah River Laboratories (SRL). The goal of SRL is to make certain that the modifications on the reactor are safe for those working at the plant as well as the general public. One of the steps needed to insure safety is the knowledge of the occurrences that result from a plenum pipe breakage. When a plenum pipe breaks, two things occur: air is sucked into the pipe and is trapped in the cooling water; and water used to cool the fuel rods is lost. As a result of these occurrences, the water is slowed down by both the loss in water pressure and the upward force of air bubbles pushing against the downward force of the water. The project required the conducting of tests to find the bubble velocity in an annular ribbed pipe filled with stagnant water. This document discusses the methodology and results of this testing

  16. Bubbling surface operators and S-duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Matsuura, Shunji

    2007-01-01

    We construct smooth asymptotically /ADS solutions of Type IIB supergravity corresponding to all the half-BPS surface operators in N = 4 SYM. All the parameters labeling a half-BPS surface operator are identified in the corresponding bubbling geometry. We use the supergravity description of surface operators to study the action of the SL(2,Z) duality group of N 4 SYM on the parameters of the surface operator, and find that it coincides with the recent proposal by Gukov and Witten in the framework of the gauge theory approach to the geometrical Langlands with ramification. We also show that whenever a bubbling geometry becomes singular that the path integral description of the corresponding surface operator also becomes singular

  17. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  18. The Recent Financial Bubble: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalassinos E.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to analyse the recent financial crisis and to make recommendations how to handle it in the best possible way. Financial bubbles, since the great depression, have been analysed and some recommendations have been made taking into account the internationalization of the world economy which behaves like a domino. The recent financial crisis in the sub-prime mortgage market creates new problems in the world market with unforeseen continuances. Deflation has been referred to as a possible continuance after a financial bubble because often but not always deflation follows. Deflation often results in financial and economic crises. Financial and economic crises affect the architecture of the monetary system, while a change in the system may affect the role of the dollar, the euro and the yen.

  19. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  20. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-01-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than ± 25%. (authors)