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Sample records for supergiants chemical signatures

  1. Chemical composition of late-type supergiants. IV. Homogeneous abundances and galactic metallicity trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    In a recent series of papers by Luck and by Luck and Bond on the chemical composition of G and K lb supergiants, [Fe/H] ratios were determined from high-dispersion spectroscopic data for 54 stars. The main results were: (1) that supergiants in the solar neighborhood have about twice the iron content of the Sun ( = +0.3); and (2) that supergiants between 7.7 and 10.2 kpc from the galactic center show a steep radial metallicity gradient, d[Fe/H]/dR = -0.24 kpc -1

  2. Chemical complexity in the winds of the oxygen-rich supergiant star VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N.; Apponi, A. J.; Woolf, N. J.

    2007-06-01

    The interstellar medium is enriched primarily by matter ejected from old, evolved stars. The outflows from these stars create spherical envelopes, which foster gas-phase chemistry. The chemical complexity in circumstellar shells was originally thought to be dominated by the elemental carbon to oxygen ratio. Observations have suggested that envelopes with more carbon than oxygen have a significantly greater abundance of molecules than their oxygen-rich analogues. Here we report observations of molecules in the oxygen-rich shell of the red supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). A variety of unexpected chemical compounds have been identified, including NaCl, PN, HNC and HCO+. From the spectral line profiles, the molecules can be distinguished as arising from three distinct kinematic regions: a spherical outflow, a tightly collimated, blue-shifted expansion, and a directed, red-shifted flow. Certain species (SiO, PN and NaCl) exclusively trace the spherical flow, whereas HNC and sulphur-bearing molecules (amongst others) are selectively created in the two expansions, perhaps arising from shock waves. CO, HCN, CS and HCO+ exist in all three components. Despite the oxygen-rich environment, HCN seems to be as abundant as CO. These results suggest that oxygen-rich shells may be as chemically diverse as their carbon counterparts.

  3. THE CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN THE GALACTIC CENTER FROM THE ATMOSPHERES OF RED SUPERGIANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Ben; Figer, Don F.; Origlia, Livia; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; Najarro, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The Galactic center (GC) has experienced a high degree of recent star-forming activity, as evidenced by the large number of massive stars currently residing there. The relative abundances of chemical elements in the GC may provide insights into the origins of this activity. Here, we present high-resolution H-band spectra of two red supergiants (RSGs) in the GC (IRS 7 and VR 5-7), and in combination with spectral synthesis we derive abundances for Fe and C, as well as other α-elements Ca, Si, Mg Ti, and O. We find that the C depletion in VR 5-7 is consistent with the predictions of evolutionary models of RSGs, while the heavy depletion of C and O in IRS 7's atmosphere is indicative of deep mixing, possibly due to fast initial rotation and/or enhanced mass loss. Our results indicate that the current surface Fe/H content of each star is slightly above solar. However, comparisons to evolutionary models indicate that the initial Fe-to-H ratio was likely closer to solar, and has been driven higher by H depletion at the stars' surface. Overall, we find α-to-Fe ratios for both stars, which are consistent with the thin Galactic disk. These results are consistent with other chemical studies of the GC, given the precision to which abundances can currently be determined. We argue that the GC abundances are consistent with a scenario in which the recent star-forming activity in the GC was fueled by either material traveling down the Bar from the inner disk, or from the winds of stars in the inner bulge-with no need to invoke top-heavy stellar initial mass functions to explain anomalous abundance ratios.

  4. SN 2016X: a type II-P supernova with a signature of shock breakout from explosion of a massive red supergiant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Wang, X.-F.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Brown, P. J.; Mo, J.; Zhang, J.-J.; Zhang, K.-C.; Zhang, T.-M.; Howell, D.-A.; Arcavi, I.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.; Rui, L.-M.; Song, H.; Xiang, D.-F.; Li, W.-X.; Lin, H.; Wang, L.-F.

    2018-04-01

    We present extensive ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry, as well as dense optical spectroscopy, for type II Plateau (IIP) supernova SN 2016X that exploded in the nearby (˜15 Mpc) spiral galaxy UGC 08041. The observations span the period from 2 to 180 d after the explosion; in particular, the Swift UV data probably captured the signature of shock breakout associated with the explosion of SN 2016X. It shows very strong UV emission during the first week after explosion, with a contribution of ˜20-30 per cent to the bolometric luminosity (versus ≲15 per cent for normal SNe IIP). Moreover, we found that this supernova has an unusually long rise time of about 12.6 ± 0.5 d in the R band (versus ˜7.0 d for typical SNe IIP). The optical light curves and spectral evolution are quite similar to the fast-declining type IIP object SN 2013ej, except that SN 2016X has a relatively brighter tail. Based on the evolution of photospheric temperature as inferred from the Swift data in the early phase, we derive that the progenitor of SN 2016X has a radius of about 930 ± 70 R⊙. This large-size star is expected to be a red supergiant star with an initial mass of ≳19-20 M⊙ based on the mass-radius relation of the Galactic red supergiants, and it represents one of the most largest and massive progenitors found for SNe IIP.

  5. A SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF BLUE SUPERGIANT STARS IN THE SCULPTOR GALAXY NGC 55: CHEMICAL EVOLUTION AND DISTANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Ho, I.-T.; Bresolin, F. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Castro, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Urbaneja, M. A.; Przybilla, N. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25/8, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-10-01

    Low-resolution (4.5–5 Å) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities, and metallicities (from iron peak and α -elements). A metallicity gradient of −0.22 ± 0.06 dex/ R {sub 25} is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [ Z ] = −0.37 ± 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of column densities of the stellar and interstellar medium gas mass reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extraplanar metal-poor H ii regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above the galactic plane are ionized by massive stars formed in situ outside the disk. For a subsample of supergiants, for which Hubble Space Telescope photometry is available, the flux-weighted gravity–luminosity relationship is used to determine a distance modulus of 26.85 ± 0.10 mag.

  6. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS IN THE INNER GALAXY: THE SCUTUM RED SUPERGIANT CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Ben; Origlia, Livia; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Figer, Don F.; Rich, R. Michael; Najarro, Francisco; Negueruela, Ignacio; Clark, J. Simon

    2009-01-01

    The location of the Scutum Red Supergiant (RSG) clusters at the end of the Galactic Bar makes them an excellent probe of the Galaxy's secular evolution, while the clusters themselves are ideal testbeds in which to study the predictions of stellar evolutionary theory. To this end, we present a study of the RSG's surface abundances using a combination of high-resolution Keck/NIRSPEC H-band spectroscopy and spectral synthesis analysis. We provide abundance measurements for elements C, O, Si, Mg, Ti, and Fe. We find that the surface abundances of the stars studied are consistent with CNO burning and deep, rotationally enhanced mixing. The average α/Fe ratios of the clusters are solar, consistent with a thin-disk population. However, we find significantly subsolar Fe/H ratios for each cluster, a result which strongly contradicts a simple extrapolation of the Galactic metallicity gradient to lower Galactocentric distances. We suggest that a simple one-dimensional parameterization of the Galaxy's abundance patterns is insufficient at low Galactocentric distances, as large azimuthal variations may be present. Indeed, we show that the abundances of O, Si, and Mg are consistent with independent measurements of objects in similar locations in the Galaxy. In combining our results with other data in the literature, we present evidence for large-scale (∼ kpc) azimuthal variations in abundances at Galactocentric distances of 3-5 kpc. While we cannot rule out that this observed behavior is due to systematic offsets between different measurement techniques, we do find evidence for similar behavior in a study of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 4736 which uses homogeneous methodology. We suggest that these azimuthal abundance variations could result from the intense but patchy star formation driven by the potential of the central bar.

  7. The chemical composition of two supergiants in the dwarf irregular galaxy WLM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venn, K. A.; Tolstoy, E.; Kaufer, A.; Skillman, E. D.; Clarkson, S. M.; Smartt, S. J.; Lennon, D. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.

    The chemical composition of two stars in WLM has been determined from high-quality Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) data obtained at the VLT-UT2. The model atmospheres analysis shows that they have the same metallicity, [Fe/H] = - 0.38 +/- 0.20 (+/- 0.29). Reliable magnesium abundances

  8. Detection of chemical explosives using multiple photon signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loschke, K.W.; Dunn, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A template-matching procedure to aid in rapid detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is being investigated. Multiple photon-scattered and photon-induced positron annihilation radiation responses are being used as part of a photon-neutron signature-based radiation scanning (SBRS) approach (see companion reference for description of the neutron component), in an attempt to detect chemical explosives at safe standoff distances. Many past and present photon interrogation methods are based on imaging. Imaging techniques seek to determine at high special resolution the internal structure of a target of interest. Our technique simply seeks to determine if an unknown target contains a detectable amount of chemical explosives by comparing multiple responses (signatures) that depend on both density and composition of portions of a target. In the photon component, beams of photons are used to create back-streaming signatures, which are dependent on the density and composition of part of the target being interrogated. These signatures are compared to templates, which are collections of the same signatures if the interrogated volume contained a significant amount of explosives. The signature analysis produces a figure-of-merit and a standard deviation of the figure-of-merit. These two metrics are used to filter safe from dangerous targets. Experiments have been conducted that show that explosive surrogates (fertilizers) can be distinguished from several inert materials using these photon signatures, demonstrating that these signatures can be used effectively to help IEDs

  9. Infrared Model Spectra for Evolving Red Supergiants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available The space and ground based infrared spectra of red supergiants are modeled and arranged in order of their evolutionary status with their theoretical model parameters. The chemical compositions of the dust shells around red supergiants are affected by the nuclear reaction and dredge-up processes of the cental stars. The processes are sensitively dependent on the initial mass, the initial chemical composition, and the evolutionary status. Miras, infrared carbon stars, and OH/IR stars have close link in their evolution in manu aspects, i,e., the chemical composition, the optical depths and the mass loss rates. The evolutionary tracks for the three classes of red supergiants on infrared two-color diagrams have been made from model calculations and IRAS observational data.

  10. Astrophysics of Red Supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-12-01

    'Astrophysics of Red Supergiants' is the first book of its kind devoted to our current knowledge of red supergiant stars, a key evolutionary phase that is critical to our larger understanding of massive stars. It provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental physical properties of red supergiants, their evolution, and their extragalactic and cosmological applications. It serves as a reference for researchers from a broad range of fields (including stellar astrophysics, supernovae, and high-redshift galaxies) who are interested in red supergiants as extreme stages of stellar evolution, dust producers, supernova progenitors, extragalactic metallicity indicators, members of massive binaries and mergers, or simply as compelling objects in their own right. The book is accessible to a range of experience levels, from graduate students up to senior researchers.

  11. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  12. A new paradigm of quantifying ecosystem stress through chemical signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Ben [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MSIN K9-30 Richland Washington 99352 USA; Guenther, Alex B. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, 3200 Croul Hall Street Irvine California 92697 USA; Gu, Lianhong [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee 37831 USA; Karl, Thomas [Institute of Atmospheric and Crysopheric Sciences, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52f A-6020 Innsbruck Austria; Kaser, Lisa [National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000 Boulder Colorado 80307 USA; Pallardy, Stephen G. [Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, 203 Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building Columbia Missouri 65211 USA; Peñuelas, Josep [CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08193 Catalonia Spain; Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CSIC-UAB, CSIC, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08193 Catalonia Spain; Potosnak, Mark J. [Department of Environmental Science and Studies, DePaul University, McGowan South, Suite 203 Chicago Illinois 60604 USA; Seco, Roger [Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, 3200 Croul Hall Street Irvine California 92697 USA

    2016-11-01

    Stress-induced emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from terrestrial ecosystems may be one of the dominant sources of VOC emissions world-wide. Understanding the ecosystem stress response could reveal how ecosystems will respond and adapt to climate change and, in turn, quantify changes in the atmospheric burden of VOC oxidants and secondary organic aerosols. Here we argue, based on preliminary evidence from several opportunistic measurement sources, that chemical signatures of stress can be identified and quantified at the ecosystem scale. We also outline future endeavors that we see as next steps toward uncovering quantitative signatures of stress, including new advances in both VOC data collection and analysis of "big data."

  13. Chemical signatures of planets: beyond solar-twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I.; Meléndez, J.; Asplund, M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Elemental abundance studies of solar twin stars suggest that the solar chemical composition contains signatures of the formation of terrestrial planets in the solar system, namely small but significant depletions of the refractory elements. Aims: To test whether these chemical signatures of planets are real, we study stars which, compared to solar twins, have less massive convective envelopes (therefore increasing the amplitude of the predicted effect) or are, arguably, more likely to host planets (thus increasing the frequency of signature detections). Methods: We measure relative atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances of two groups of stars: a "warm" late-F type dwarf sample (52 stars), and a sample of "metal-rich" solar analogs (59 stars). The strict differential approach that we adopt allows us to determine with high precision (errors ~0.01 dex) the degree of refractory element depletion in our stars independently of Galactic chemical evolution. By examining relative abundance ratio versus condensation temperature plots we are able to identify stars with "pristine" composition in each sample and to determine the degree of refractory-element depletion for the rest of our stars. We calculate what mixture of Earth-like and meteorite-like material corresponds to these depletions. Results: We detect refractory-element depletions with amplitudes up to about 0.15 dex. The distribution of depletion amplitudes for stars known to host gas giant planets is not different from that of the rest of stars. The maximum amplitude of depletion increases with effective temperature from 5650 K to 5950 K, while it appears to be constant for warmer stars (up to 6300 K). The depletions observed in solar twin stars have a maximum amplitude that is very similar to that seen here for both of our samples. Conclusions: Gas giant planet formation alone cannot explain the observed distributions of refractory-element depletions, leaving the formation of rocky material as a

  14. Identification of chemical signatures of gunshot residues in different fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Joao Carlos Dias de

    2010-01-01

    The modern forensic science goes hand in hand with scientific research. The forensic scientists are faced every day with many cases requiring the analysis of residues from firing gun (gunshot residues). This works describes the development of a methodology to determine chemical signatures of shots from a firearm, by measuring the concentrations of Pb, Ba e Sb in the residues from these shots deposited near the entrance hole of bullets, based on the technique with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). Shots were performed on five types of target-fabrics and collected testimonies from regions close to the entrance hole of projectiles. The results showed that the method enabled us to identify and distinguish the residues of the .38 caliber revolver and pistols .40 and 9mm caliber. The use of ternary graphs as a tool for data analysis helped to identify specific patterns of distribution of blank samples and gunshot residues deposited after firing revolvers and pistols. The methodology enabled the assignment of the origin of the shot through the confirmation of the residues collected also from the hands of shooters. As a result the methodology in police procedures and aims to add a valuable contribution to forensic investigations. (author)

  15. Supergiants and the Galactic metallicity gradient. II. Spectroscopic abundances for 64 distant F- to M-type supergiants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, R.E.; Bond, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    The metallicity gradient in the Galactic disk from in situ stars with visual magnitude ranging from 6 to 10 is analyzed. Atmospheric parameters and detailed chemical abundances for 64 Population I supergiants of spectral types F through M and luminosity classes Ia through II have been determined. The derived Fe/H ratios ranging from -0.5 to + 0.7 show a mean value of +0.13 with an estimated uncertainty of + or - 0.2. A subset of 25 supergiants fainter than 7th magnitude lying in the direction of the Galactic center shows a Fe/H mean of +0.18 + or - 0.04, while a similar sample of 15 faint supergiants lying in the direction of the Galactic anticenter shows a lower Fe/H mean of +0.07 + or - 0.06. For a sample of bright supergiants analyzed by Luck and Lambert (1985), the mean abundance pattern for all 64 stars showed the following: deficient C and O along with enhancement of N, indicating mixing of CNO-cycled material to the stellar surfaces; an apparent Sr enhancement attributed to departures from LTE; and an essentially solar pattern of other chemical elements. 50 refs

  16. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  17. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the

  18. Searching for chemical signatures of brown dwarf formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Villaver, E.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Recent studies have shown that close-in brown dwarfs in the mass range 35-55 MJup are almost depleted as companions to stars, suggesting that objects with masses above and below this gap might have different formation mechanisms. Aims: We aim to test whether stars harbouring massive brown dwarfs and stars with low-mass brown dwarfs show any chemical peculiarity that could be related to different formation processes. Methods: Our methodology is based on the analysis of high-resolution échelle spectra (R 57 000) from 2-3 m class telescopes. We determine the fundamental stellar parameters, as well as individual abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn for a large sample of stars known to have a substellar companion in the brown dwarf regime. The sample is divided into stars hosting massive and low-mass brown dwarfs. Following previous works, a threshold of 42.5 MJup was considered. The metallicity and abundance trends of the two subsamples are compared and set in the context of current models of planetary and brown dwarf formation. Results: Our results confirm that stars with brown dwarf companions do not follow the well-established gas-giant planet metallicity correlation seen in main-sequence planet hosts. Stars harbouring massive brown dwarfs show similar metallicity and abundance distribution as stars without known planets or with low-mass planets. We find a tendency of stars harbouring less-massive brown dwarfs of having slightly higher metallicity, [XFe/Fe] values, and abundances of Sc II, Mn I, and Ni I than the stars having the massive brown dwarfs. The data suggest, as previously reported, that massive and low-mass brown dwarfs might present differences in period and eccentricity. Conclusions: We find evidence of a non-metallicity dependent mechanism for the formation of massive brown dwarfs. Our results agree with a scenario in which massive brown dwarfs are formed as stars. At high metallicities, the core

  19. Surface Magnetic Fields on Giants and Supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebre, Agnès

    2018-04-01

    After a short introduction to spectropolarimetry and the tecnics allowing for the detection of surface fields, I will review the numerous and various detections of magnetic fields at the surface of giant and supergiant stars. On Betelgeuse, the prototype of Red Supergiants, I will present recent results collected after a 10 years long spectropolarimetric survey.

  20. Yellow supergiants in open clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowell, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Superluminous giant stars (SLGs) have been reported in young globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These stars appear to be in the post-asymptotic-giant-branch phase of evolution. This program was an investigation of galactic SLG candidates in open clusters, which are more like the LMC young globular clusters. These were chosen because luminosity, mass, and age determinations can be made for members since cluster distances and interstellar reddenings are known. Color magnitude diagrams were searched for candidates, using the same selection criteria as for SLGs in the LMC. Classification spectra were obtained of 115 program stars from McGraw-Hill Observatory and of 68 stars from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Chile. These stars were visually classified on the MK system using spectral scans of standard stars taken at the respective observations. Published information was combined with this program's data for 83 stars in 30 clusters. Membership probabilities were assigned to these stars, and the clusters were analyzed according to age. It was seen that the intrinsically brightest supergiants are found in the youngest clusters. With increasing cluster age, the absolute luminosities attained by the supergiants decline. Also, it appears that the evolutionary tracks of luminosity class II stars are more similar to those of class I than of class III

  1. Enhanced anti-counterfeiting measures for additive manufacturing: coupling lanthanide nanomaterial chemical signatures with blockchain technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Zachary C.; Stephenson, David E.; Christ, Josef F.; Pope, Timothy R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Barrett, Christopher A.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2017-08-18

    The significant rise of additive manufacturing (AM) in recent years is in part due to the open sourced nature of the printing processes and reduced cost and capital barriers relative to traditional manufacturing. However, this democratization of manufacturing spurs an increased demand for producers and end-users to verify the authenticity and quality of individual parts. To this end, we introduce an anti-counterfeiting method composed of first embedding engineered nanomaterials into features of a 3D-printed part followed by non-destructive interrogation of these features to quantify a chemical signature profile. The part specific chemical signature data is then linked to a securitized, distributed, and time-stamped blockchain ledger entry. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, lanthanide-aspartic acid nanoscale coordination polymers (Ln3+- Asp NCs) / poly(lactic) acid (PLA) composites were formulated and transformed into a filament feedstock for fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing. In the present case, a quick-response (QR) code containing the doped Ln3+-Asp NCs was printed using a dual-extruder FDM printer into pure PLA parts. The QR code provides a searchable reference to an Ethereum-based blockchain entry. The QR code physical features also serve as defined areas to probe the signatures arising from the embedded Ln3+-Asp NCs. Visible fluorescence emission with UV-excitation was quantified in terms of color using a smartphone camera and incorporated into blockchain entries. Ultimately, linking unique chemical signature data to blockchain databases is anticipated to make the costs of counterfeiting AM materials significantly more prohibitive and transactions between those in the supply chain more trustworthy.

  2. Environmental fate and transport of chemical signatures from buried landmines -- Screening model formulation and initial simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, J.M.; Webb, S.W.

    1997-06-01

    The fate and transport of chemical signature molecules that emanate from buried landmines is strongly influenced by physical chemical properties and by environmental conditions of the specific chemical compounds. Published data have been evaluated as the input parameters that are used in the simulation of the fate and transport processes. A one-dimensional model developed for screening agricultural pesticides was modified and used to simulate the appearance of a surface flux above a buried landmine, estimate the subsurface total concentration, and show the phase specific concentrations at the ground surface. The physical chemical properties of TNT cause a majority of the mass released to the soil system to be bound to the solid phase soil particles. The majority of the transport occurs in the liquid phase with diffusion and evaporation driven advection of soil water as the primary mechanisms for the flux to the ground surface. The simulations provided herein should only be used for initial conceptual designs of chemical pre-concentration subsystems or complete detection systems. The physical processes modeled required necessary simplifying assumptions to allow for analytical solutions. Emerging numerical simulation tools will soon be available that should provide more realistic estimates that can be used to predict the success of landmine chemical detection surveys based on knowledge of the chemical and soil properties, and environmental conditions where the mines are buried. Additional measurements of the chemical properties in soils are also needed before a fully predictive approach can be confidently applied.

  3. Nature's chemical signatures in human olfaction: a foodborne perspective for future biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Andreas; Steinhaus, Martin; Kotthoff, Matthias; Nowak, Bettina; Krautwurst, Dietmar; Schieberle, Peter; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-07-07

    The biocatalytic production of flavor naturals that determine chemosensory percepts of foods and beverages is an ever challenging target for academic and industrial research. Advances in chemical trace analysis and post-genomic progress at the chemistry-biology interface revealed odor qualities of nature's chemosensory entities to be defined by odorant-induced olfactory receptor activity patterns. Beyond traditional views, this review and meta-analysis now shows characteristic ratios of only about 3 to 40 genuine key odorants for each food, from a group of about 230 out of circa 10 000 food volatiles. This suggests the foodborn stimulus space has co-evolved with, and roughly match our circa 400 olfactory receptors as best natural agonists. This perspective gives insight into nature's chemical signatures of smell, provides the chemical odor codes of more than 220 food samples, and beyond addresses industrial implications for producing recombinants that fully reconstruct the natural odor signatures for use in flavors and fragrances, fully immersive interactive virtual environments, or humanoid bioelectronic noses. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Probing the ToxCastTM Chemical Library for Predictive Signatures of Developmental Toxicity - Poster at Teratology Society Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemical compounds to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesize that cell signaling pathways are primary targets for diverse environmental chemicals ...

  5. Identification of Chemical Attribution Signatures of Fentanyl Syntheses Using Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Orthogonal Analytical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, B. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mew, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DeHope, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spackman, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-24

    Attribution of the origin of an illicit drug relies on identification of compounds indicative of its clandestine production and is a key component of many modern forensic investigations. The results of these studies can yield detailed information on method of manufacture, starting material source, and final product - all critical forensic evidence. In the present work, chemical attribution signatures (CAS) associated with the synthesis of the analgesic fentanyl, N-(1-phenylethylpiperidin-4-yl)-N-phenylpropanamide, were investigated. Six synthesis methods, all previously published fentanyl synthetic routes or hybrid versions thereof, were studied in an effort to identify and classify route-specific signatures. 160 distinct compounds and inorganic species were identified using gas and liquid chromatographies combined with mass spectrometric methods (GC-MS and LCMS/ MS-TOF) in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The complexity of the resultant data matrix urged the use of multivariate statistical analysis. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), 87 route-specific CAS were classified and a statistical model capable of predicting the method of fentanyl synthesis was validated and tested against CAS profiles from crude fentanyl products deposited and later extracted from two operationally relevant surfaces: stainless steel and vinyl tile. This work provides the most detailed fentanyl CAS investigation to date by using orthogonal mass spectral data to identify CAS of forensic significance for illicit drug detection, profiling, and attribution.

  6. Confirmation of Element Abundance Inhomogeneity in Interstellar Matter from a Study of the O-type Supergiants HDE 226868 (Cyg X-1) and α Cam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karitskaya, E. A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Shimansky, V. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2011-09-01

    Chemical abundances derived for two O-type supergiants with similar parameters confirm the inhomogeneity of heavy-element distribution on a scale of 2 kpc and a lifetime of ISM superclouds exceeding 1 Gyr.

  7. Two-Dimensional Resonance Raman Signatures of Vibronic Coherence Transfer in Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P; Cheshire, Thomas P; Moran, Andrew M

    2017-11-02

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in condensed phase systems. 2DRR spectroscopy is motivated by knowledge of non-equilibrium effects that cannot be detected with traditional resonance Raman spectroscopy. For example, 2DRR spectra may reveal correlated distributions of reactant and product geometries in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this chapter, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide. We show that signatures of "vibronic coherence transfer" in the photodissociation process can be targeted with particular 2DRR pulse sequences. Key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopy techniques are also addressed. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest that it will be a valuable tool for elucidating ultrafast chemical reaction mechanisms.

  8. How could a freshwater swamp produce a chemical signature characteristic of a saltmarsh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Terrence; Smith, Christopher G.; Liu, Kam-biu; Marot, Marci E.; Haller, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Reduction–oxidation (redox) reaction conditions, which are of great importance for the soil chemistry of coastal marshes, can be temporally dynamic. We present a transect of cores from northwest Florida wherein radical postdepositional changes in the redox regime has created atypical geochemical profiles at the bottom of the sedimentary column. The stratigraphy is consistent along the transect, consisting of, from the bottom upward, carbonate bedrock, a gray clay, an organic mud section, a dense clay layer, and an upper organic mud unit representing the current saltwater marsh. However, the geochemical signature of the lower organic mud unit suggests pervasive redox reactions, although the interval has been identified as representing a freshwater marsh, an unlikely environment for such conditions. Analyses indicate that this discrepancy results from postdepositional diagenesis driven by millennial-scale environmental parameters. Rising sea level that led to the deposition of the capping clay layer, created anaerobic conditions in the freshwater swamp interval, and isolated it hydrologically from the rest of the sediment column. The subsequent infiltration of marine water into this organic material led to sulfate reduction, the buildup of H2S and FeS, and anoxic conditions. Continued sulfidation eventually resulted in euxinic conditions, as evidenced by elevated levels of Fe, S, and especially Mo, the diagnostic marker of euxinia. Because this chemical transformation occurred long after the original deposition the geochemical signature does not reflect soil chemistry at the time of deposition and cannot be used to infer syn-depositional environmental conditions, emphasizing the importance of recognizing diagenetic processes in paleoenvironmental studies.

  9. Sensing signatures mediated by chemical structure of molecular solids in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2015-03-03

    Laser ablation of organic compounds has been investigated for almost 30 years now, either in the framework of pulse laser deposition for the assembling of new materials or in the context of chemical sensing. Various monitoring techniques such as atomic and molecular fluorescence, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectroscopy have been used for plasma diagnostics in an attempt to understand the spectral signature and potential origin of gas-phase ions and fragments from organic plasmas. Photochemical and photophysical processes occurring within these systems are generally much more complex than those suggested by observation of optical emission features. Together with laser ablation parameters, the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules seem to be closely tied to the observed phenomena. The present manuscript, for the first time, discusses the role of molecular structure in the optical emission of organic plasmas. Factors altering the electronic distribution within the organic molecule have been found to have a direct impact on its ensuing optical emissions. The electron structure of an organic molecule, resulting from the presence, nature, and position of its atoms, governs the breakage of the molecule and, as a result, determines the extent of atomization and fragmentation that has proved to directly impact the emissions of CN radicals and C2 dimers. Particular properties of the molecule respond more positively depending on the laser irradiation wavelength, thereby redirecting the ablation process through photochemical or photothermal decomposition pathways. It is of paramount significance for chemical identification purposes how, despite the large energy stored and dissipated by the plasma and the considerable number of transient species formed, the emissions observed never lose sight of the original molecule.

  10. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  11. Dissolved black carbon in the global cryosphere: Concentrations and chemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Wagner, Sasha; Jaffe, Rudolf; Xian, Peng; Williams, Mark; Armstrong, Richard; McKnight, Diane

    2017-06-01

    snow or ice surface, as well as the combustion conditions under which the DBC was formed. We show that samples from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GRIS) have a distinct molecular chemical signature, consistent with deposition of BC from Canadian wildfires occurring the week before sampling. The concentration range observed in this global cryosphere study indicates significant amounts of DBC persist in both pristine and human-impacted snow and glacial meltwater. Our results are significant for understanding the controls on meltwater production from glaciers worldwide and the feedbacks between combustion sources, wildfires, and the global cryosphere. Wildfires are predicted to increase due to climate change, and albedo cannibalism is already influencing meltwater generation on the GRIS. Anticipated longer summer melt seasons as a result of climate change may result in longer durations between snowfalls, enhancing exposure of recalcitrant DBC on snow/ice surfaces, which could further exacerbate surface albedo reduction in the cryosphere.

  12. Line profile variability in B supergiants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomić, S.; Kraus, Michaela; Atanacković, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), s. 161-166 ISSN 0373-3742. [National Conference of Astronomers of Serbia /17./. Belgrade, 23.09.2014-27.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21373S; GA MŠk LG14013 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : supergiants * variability * macroturbulenc Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science)

  13. Analysis of human plasma metabolites across different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry platforms: Cross-platform transferable chemical signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telu, Kelly H; Yan, Xinjian; Wallace, William E; Stein, Stephen E; Simón-Manso, Yamil

    2016-03-15

    The metabolite profiling of a NIST plasma Standard Reference Material (SRM 1950) on different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) platforms showed significant differences. Although these findings suggest caution when interpreting metabolomics results, the degree of overlap of both profiles allowed us to use tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra to evaluate to what extent these results are transferable across platforms and to develop cross-platform chemical signatures. Non-targeted global metabolite profiles of SRM 1950 were obtained on different LC/MS platforms using reversed-phase chromatography and different chromatographic scales (conventional HPLC, UHPLC and nanoLC). The data processing and the metabolite differential analysis were carried out using publically available (XCMS), proprietary (Mass Profiler Professional) and in-house software (NIST pipeline). Repeatability and intermediate precision showed that the non-targeted SRM 1950 profiling was highly reproducible when working on the same platform (relative standard deviation (RSD) HPLC, UHPLC and nanoLC) on the same platform. A substantial degree of overlap (common molecular features) was also found. A procedure to generate consistent chemical signatures using tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra is proposed. Different platforms rendered significantly different metabolite profiles, but the results were highly reproducible when working within one platform. Tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra are proposed to evaluate the degree of transferability of chemical signatures generated on different platforms. Chemical signatures based on our procedure are most likely cross-platform transferable. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES OF THE FIRST GALAXIES: CRITERIA FOR ONE-SHOT ENRICHMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frebel, Anna; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We utilize metal-poor stars in the local, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs; L tot ≤ 10 5 L ☉ ) to empirically constrain the formation process of the first galaxies. Since UFDs have much simpler star formation histories than the halo of the Milky Way, their stellar populations should preserve the fossil record of the first supernova (SN) explosions in their long-lived, low-mass stars. Guided by recent hydrodynamical simulations of first galaxy formation, we develop a set of stellar abundance signatures that characterize the nucleosynthetic history of such an early system if it was observed in the present-day universe. Specifically, we argue that the first galaxies are the product of chemical 'one-shot' events, where only one (long-lived) stellar generation forms after the first, Population III, SN explosions. Our abundance criteria thus constrain the strength of negative feedback effects inside the first galaxies. We compare the stellar content of UFDs with these one-shot criteria. Several systems (Ursa Major II, and also Coma Berenices, Bootes I, Leo IV, Segue 1) largely fulfill the requirements, indicating that their high-redshift predecessors did experience strong feedback effects that shut off star formation. We term the study of the entire stellar population of a dwarf galaxy for the purpose of inferring details about the nature and origin of the first galaxies 'dwarf galaxy archaeology'. This will provide clues to the connection of the first galaxies, the surviving, metal-poor dwarf galaxies, and the building blocks of the Milky Way.

  15. Interacting supernovae from photoionization-confined shells around red supergiant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Kotak, Rubina; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M.-A.; Moriya, Takashi J.; Neilson, Hilding R.

    2014-08-01

    Betelgeuse, a nearby red supergiant, is a fast-moving star with a powerful stellar wind that drives a bow shock into its surroundings. This picture has been challenged by the discovery of a dense and almost static shell that is three times closer to the star than the bow shock and has been decelerated by some external force. The two physically distinct structures cannot both be formed by the hydrodynamic interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium. Here we report that a model in which Betelgeuse's wind is photoionized by radiation from external sources can explain the static shell without requiring a new understanding of the bow shock. Pressure from the photoionized wind generates a standing shock in the neutral part of the wind and forms an almost static, photoionization-confined shell. Other red supergiants should have much more massive shells than Betelgeuse, because the photoionization-confined shell traps up to 35 per cent of all mass lost during the red supergiant phase, confining this gas close to the star until it explodes. After the supernova explosion, massive shells dramatically affect the supernova light curve, providing a natural explanation for the many supernovae that have signatures of circumstellar interaction.

  16. Source contributions and mass loadings for chemicals of emerging concern: Chemometric application of pharmaco-signature in different aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jheng-Jie; Lee, Chon-Lin; Brimblecombe, Peter; Vydrova, Lucie; Fang, Meng-Der

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the source contributions of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) from different aquatic environments of Taiwan, we collected water samples from different aquatic systems, which were screened for 30 pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. The total estimated mass loadings of CECs were 23.1 g/d in southern aquatic systems and 133 g/d in central aquatic systems. We developed an analytical framework combining pollutant fingerprinting, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and principal component analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) to infer the pharmaco-signature and source contributions of CECs. Based on this approach, we estimate source contributions of 62.2% for domestic inputs, 16.9% for antibiotics application, and 20.9% for drug abuse/medication in southern aquatic system, compared with 47.3% domestic, 35.1% antibiotic, and 17.6% drug abuse/medication inputs to central aquatic systems. The proposed pharmaco-signature method provides initial insights into the profile and source apportionment of CECs in complex aquatic systems, which are of importance for environmental management. - Highlights: • Pharmaco-signature provides first insights into the profile and source apportionment of CECs. • Performing HCA and PCA-MLR can discern the potential source of CECs in different aquatic systems. • Chemometric results resolved 3 factors: domestic inputs, antibiotic application and drug abuse. - The proposed pharmaco-signature method provides initial insights into the profile and source apportionment of CECs in complex aquatic systems.

  17. Signatures of rocky planet engulfment in HAT-P-4. Implications for chemical tagging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffe, C.; Jofré, E.; Martioli, E.; Flores, M.; Petrucci, R.; Jaque Arancibia, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to explore the possible chemical signature of planet formation in the binary system HAT-P-4 by studying the trends of abundance vs. condensation temperature Tc. The star HAT-P-4 hosts a planet detected by transits, while its stellar companion does not have any detected planet. We also study the lithium content, which might shed light on the problem of Li depletion in exoplanet host stars. Methods: We derived for the first time both stellar parameters and high-precision chemical abundances by applying a line-by-line full differential approach. The stellar parameters were determined by imposing ionization and excitation equilibrium of Fe lines, with an updated version of the FUNDPAR program, together with ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the MOOG code. We derived detailed abundances of different species with equivalent widths and spectral synthesis with the MOOG program. Results: The exoplanet host star HAT-P-4 is found to be 0.1 dex more metal rich than its companion, which is one of the highest differences in metallicity observed in similar systems. This could have important implications for chemical tagging studies. We rule out a possible peculiar composition for each star, such as is the case for λ Boötis and δ Scuti, and neither is this binary a blue straggler. The star HAT-P-4 is enhanced in refractory elements relative to volatile when compared to its stellar companion. Notably, the Li abundance in HAT-P-4 is greater than that of its companion by 0.3 dex, which is contrary to the model that explains the Li depletion by the presence of planets. We propose a scenario where at the time of planet formation, the star HAT-P-4 locked the inner refractory material in planetesimals and rocky planets, and formed the outer gas giant planet at a greater distance. The refractories were then accreted onto the star, possibly as a result of the migration of the giant planet. This explains the higher metallicity, the higher Li content, and the negative Tc trend we

  18. Part 3: Solid phase extraction of Russian VX and its chemical attribution signatures in food matrices and their detection by GC-MS and LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Audrey M; Vu, Alexander K; Mayer, Brian P; Hok, Saphon; Valdez, Carlos A; Alcaraz, Armando

    2018-08-15

    Chemical attribution signatures indicative of O-isobutyl S-(2-diethylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (Russian VX) synthetic routes were investigated in spiked food samples. Attribution signatures were identified using a multifaceted approach: Russian VX was synthesized using six synthetic routes and the chemical attribution signatures identified by GC-MS and LC-MS. Three synthetic routes were then down selected and spiked into complex matrices: bottled water, baby food, milk, liquid eggs, and hot dogs. Sampling and extraction methodologies were developed for these materials and used to isolate the attribution signatures and Russian VX from each matrix. Recoveries greater than 60% were achieved for most signatures in all matrices; some signatures provided recoveries greater than 100%, indicating some degradation during sample preparation. A chemometric model was then developed and validated with the concatenated data from GC-MS and LC-MS analyses of the signatures; the classification results of the model were > 75% for all samples. This work is part three of a three-part series in this issue of the United States-Sweden collaborative efforts towards the understanding of the chemical attribution signatures of Russian VX in crude materials and in food matrices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultraviolet extinction in M-supergiant circumstellar envelopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, R.H. Jr.; Snow, T.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Using International Ultraviolet (IUS) archival low-dispersion spectra, ultraviolet spectral extinctions were derived for the circumstellar envelopes of two M supergiants: HD 60414 and HD 213310. The observed stellar systems belong to a class of widely-separated spectroscopic binaries that are called VV Cephei stars. The total extinction was calculated by dividing the reddened fluxes with unreddened comparison fluxes of similar stars (g B2.5 for HD 213310 and a normalized s+B3 for HD 60414) from the reference atlas. After substracting the interstellar extinctions, which were estimated from the E(B-V) reddening of nearby stars, the resultant circumstellar extinctions were normalized at about 3.5 inverse microns. Not only is the 2175 A extinction bump absent in the circumstellar extinctions, but the far-ultraviolet extinction rise is also absent. The rather flat, ultraviolet extinction curves were interpreted as signatures of a population of noncarbonaceous, oxygen-rich grains with diameters larger than the longest observed wavelength

  20. A High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijfhout, Falko P.

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. A range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes a...

  1. The red supergiant population in the Perseus arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorda, R.; Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.

    2018-04-01

    We present a new catalogue of cool supergiants in a section of the Perseus arm, most of which had not been previously identified. To generate it, we have used a set of well-defined photometric criteria to select a large number of candidates (637) that were later observed at intermediate resolution in the infrared calcium triplet spectral range, using a long-slit spectrograph. To separate red supergiants from luminous red giants, we used a statistical method, developed in previous works and improved in the present paper. We present a method to assign probabilities of being a red supergiant to a given spectrum and use the properties of a population to generate clean samples, without contamination from lower luminosity stars. We compare our identification with a classification done using classical criteria and discuss their respective efficiencies and contaminations as identification methods. We confirm that our method is as efficient at finding supergiants as the best classical methods, but with a far lower contamination by red giants than any other method. The result is a catalogue with 197 cool supergiants, 191 of which did not appear in previous lists of red supergiants. This is the largest coherent catalogue of cool supergiants in the Galaxy.

  2. Usage of FT-ICR-MS Metabolomics for characterizing the chemical signatures of barrel-aged whisky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Signoret, Julie; Hemmler, Daniel; Witting, Michael A.; Kanawati, Basem; Schäfer, Bernhard; Gougeon, Régis D.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Whisky can be described as a complex matrix integrating the chemical history from the fermented cereals, the wooden barrels, the specific distillery processes, ageing and environmental factors. In this study, using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we analysed 150 whisky samples from 49 different distilleries, 7 countries, and ranging from 1 day new make spirit to 43 years of maturation with different types of barrel. Chemometrics revealed the unexpected impact of the wood history on the distillatés composition during barrel ageing, regardless of the whisky origin. Flavonols, oligolignols and fatty acids are examples of important chemical signatures for Bourbon casks, whereas a high number of polyphenol glycosides, including for instance quercetin-glucuronide or myricetin-glucoside as potential candidates, and carbohydrates would discriminate Sherry casks. However, the comparison of barrel aged rums and whiskies revealed specific signatures, highlighting the importance of the initial composition of the distillate and the distillery processes.

  3. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Orthogonal Mass Spectral Data for the Identification of Chemical Attribution Signatures of 3-Methylfentanyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, B. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Valdez, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DeHope, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spackman, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanner, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, H. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Critical to many modern forensic investigations is the chemical attribution of the origin of an illegal drug. This process greatly relies on identification of compounds indicative of its clandestine or commercial production. The results of these studies can yield detailed information on method of manufacture, sophistication of the synthesis operation, starting material source, and final product. In the present work, chemical attribution signatures (CAS) associated with the synthesis of the analgesic 3- methylfentanyl, N-(3-methyl-1-phenethylpiperidin-4-yl)-N-phenylpropanamide, were investigated. Six synthesis methods were studied in an effort to identify and classify route-specific signatures. These methods were chosen to minimize the use of scheduled precursors, complicated laboratory equipment, number of overall steps, and demanding reaction conditions. Using gas and liquid chromatographies combined with mass spectrometric methods (GC-QTOF and LC-QTOF) in conjunction with inductivelycoupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), over 240 distinct compounds and elements were monitored. As seen in our previous work with CAS of fentanyl synthesis the complexity of the resultant data matrix necessitated the use of multivariate statistical analysis. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), 62 statistically significant, route-specific CAS were identified. Statistical classification models using a variety of machine learning techniques were then developed with the ability to predict the method of 3-methylfentanyl synthesis from three blind crude samples generated by synthetic chemists without prior experience with these methods.

  4. BVR PHOTOMETRY OF SUPERGIANT STARS IN HOLMBERG II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-J. Sohn

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the photometric properties in BVR bands for the resolved bright supergiant stars in the dwarf galaxy Holmberg II. The color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagram of 374 resolved stars indicate that the majority of the member stars are supergiant stars with a wide range of spectral type between B-K. A comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks indicates that the supergiant stars in the observed field have progenitor masses between ~10M_⨀ and 20M_⨀. The exponent of luminosity function in V is in good agreement with those of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  5. The evolution of red supergiants to supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasor, Emma R.; Davies, Ben

    2017-11-01

    With red supergiants (RSGs) predicted to end their lives as Type IIP core collapse supernova (CCSN), their behaviour before explosion needs to be fully understood. Mass loss rates govern RSG evolution towards SN and have strong implications on the appearance of the resulting explosion. To study how the mass-loss rates change with the evolution of the star, we have measured the amount of circumstellar material around 19 RSGs in a coeval cluster. Our study has shown that mass loss rates ramp up throughout the lifetime of an RSG, with more evolved stars having mass loss rates a factor of 40 higher than early stage RSGs. Interestingly, we have also found evidence for an increase in circumstellar extinction throughout the RSG lifetime, meaning the most evolved stars are most severely affected. We find that, were the most evolved RSGs in NGC2100 to go SN, this extra extinction would cause the progenitor's initial mass to be underestimated by up to 9M⊙.

  6. PHOTOSPHERIC VARIATIONS OF THE SUPERGIANT γ Cyg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, David F.

    2010-01-01

    New high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the supergiant γ Cyg (F8 Iab) taken between 2000 and 2008 consistently show strongly reversed-C-shaped bisectors for all unblended spectral lines. Small-amplitude variations in radial velocity and line shapes occur in an irregular manner with time scales ∼100 days and longer. The radial velocities occasionally show changes as large as 2 km s -1 , but much smaller changes are going on continuously. Differential line bisectors show shape changes and Doppler displacement characteristic of radial expansion and contraction. These might arise from non-periodic radial pulsation-like motions or from the appearance of giant convection cells that occupy most of the visible hemisphere of the star. Line-depth ratios are correlated with the line shifts on a seasonal basis and indicate temperature changes ranging up to ∼15 K, with larger temperature occurring during times of most rapid contraction.

  7. Unveiling the evolutionary phase of B[e] supergiants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muratore, M.F.; Kraus, Michaela; Liermann, A.; Schnurr, O.; Cidale, L.S.; Arias, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2010), s. 123-126 E-ISSN 1669-9521 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : B[e] supergiants * K-band spectra Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  8. Chemical signature study of tupiguarani ceramic tradition from Central region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bona, Irene Akemy Tomiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    In this work a model based on experimental results using chemical composition data of the pottery sherds applied to Spearmann's no parametric test, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis, was applied. The samples are soils and Tupiguarani Tradition pottery sherd from the central area of the Rio Grande do Sul State. The chemical elements , Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Fe, K Mn, Pb, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti, V and Zn were determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXFR) while Ce, Cu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Y by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) techniques. Relationships among the pottery characteristics, studied sites and sherd dispersion in the several sites were proposed. Indications of chemical signature of the small pottery with function to go or not to the fire were observed. The largest dispersion is of small pottery with surface treatment no corrugated. The potteries chemical fingerprints from Ijui River, Ibicui-Vacacai Mirim River and Jacui River were verified. (author)

  9. Seasonal variation in the chemical composition and carbohydrate signature compounds of biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Garg, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Biofilm developed on stainless steel was characterised using biological, chemical and biochemical parameters, as well as aldose molecular biomarkers. Biofilm biomass and carbohydrate concentration increased on stainless steel, whereas C...

  10. In-source collision induced dissociation of inorganic explosives for mass spectrometric signature detection and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Thomas P., E-mail: thomas.forbes@nist.gov; Sisco, Edward

    2015-09-10

    The trace detection, bulk quantification, and chemical imaging of inorganic explosives and components was demonstrated utilizing in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) coupled with laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The incorporation of in-source CID provided direct control over the extent of adduct and cluster fragmentation as well as organic noise reduction for the enhanced detection of both the elemental and molecular ion signatures of fuel-oxidizer mixtures and other inorganic components of explosive devices. Investigation of oxidizer molecular anions, specifically, nitrates, chlorates, and perchlorates, identified that the optimal in-source CID existed at the transition between fragmentation of the ionic salt bonds and molecular anion bonds. The chemical imaging of oxidizer particles from latent fingerprints was demonstrated, including both cation and anion components in positive and negative mode mass spectrometry, respectively. This investigation demonstrated LDI-MS with in-source CID as a versatile tool for security fields, as well as environmental monitoring and nuclear safeguards, facilitating the detection of elemental and molecular inorganic compounds at nanogram levels. - Highlights: • In-source CID enhanced detection of elemental inorganics up to 1000-fold. • In-source CID optimization of polyatomic oxidizers enhanced detection up to 100-fold. • Optimal CID identified at transition from breaking ionic salt to molecular anion bonds. • Trace detection of inorganic explosives at nanogram levels was demonstrated. • Oxidizer particles were chemically imaged directly from latent fingerprints.

  11. Imaging Red Supergiants with VLT/SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Emily

    2018-04-01

    In the red supergiant (RSG) phase of evolution massive stars show powerful stellar winds, which strongly influence the supernova (progenitor) properties and control the nature of the compact object that is left behind. Material that is lost in the stellar wind, together with that ejected in the final core collapse, contributes to the chemical enrichment of the local interstellar medium. The mass-loss properties of RSGs are however poorly constrained. Moreover, little is known about the wind driving mechanism. To provide better constraints on both mass-loss rates and physics, high angular resolution observations are needed to unveil the inner regions of the circumstellar environment, where the mass loss is triggered. Using the VLT-SPHERE/ZIMPOL adaptive optics imaging polarimeter, spatially resolved images of four nearby RSGs were obtained in four filters. From these data, we obtain information on geometrical structures in the inner wind, the onset radius and spatial distribution of dust grains, and dust properties such as grain size. As dust grains may play a role in initiating and/or driving the outflow, this could provide us with clues as to the wind driving mechanism.

  12. A High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijfhout, Falko P.

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. A range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes are instantaneously detected. The result is identification and species level classification based on the entire DART-MS spectrum. Here, we illustrate how the method can be used to: (1) distinguish between endangered woods regulated by the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Flora and Fauna (CITES) treaty; (2) assess the origin and by extension the properties of biodiesel feedstocks; (3) determine insect species from analysis of puparial casings; (4) distinguish between psychoactive plants products; and (5) differentiate between Eucalyptus species. An advantage of the hierarchical clustering approach to processing of the DART-MS derived fingerprint is that it shows both similarities and differences between species based on their chemotypes. Furthermore, full knowledge of the identities of the constituents contained within the small molecule profile of analyzed samples is not required. PMID:26156000

  13. An orthologous transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related chemicals in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides are structurally diverse chemicals that inhibit plant-specific targets, however their off-target and potentially differentiating side-effects are less well defined. In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix AtH1 arrays was used to identify dis...

  14. Volcanic degassing at Somma-Vesuvio (Italy) inferred by chemical and isotopic signatures of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliro, S. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: caliro@ov.ingv.it; Chiodini, G. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Avino, R. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Cardellini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy); Frondini, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy)

    2005-06-15

    A geochemical model is proposed for water evolution at Somma-Vesuvio, based on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters, submarine gas emission and chemical composition of the dissolved gases. The active degassing processes, present in the highest part of the volcano edifice, strongly influence the groundwater evolution. The geological-volcanological setting of the volcano forces the waters infiltrating at Somma-Vesuvio caldera, enriched in volcanic gases, to flow towards the southern sector to an area of high pCO{sub 2} groundwaters. Reaction path modelling applied to this conceptual model, involving gas-water-rock interaction, highlights an intense degassing process in the aquifer controlling the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases, total dissolved inorganic C (TDIC) and submarine gas emission. Mapping of TDIC shows a unique area of high values situated SSE of Vesuvio volcano with an average TDIC value of 0.039 mol/L, i.e., one order of magnitude higher than groundwaters from other sectors of the volcano. On the basis of TDIC values, the amount of CO{sub 2} transported by Vesuvio groundwaters was estimated at about 150 t/d. This estimate does not take into account the fraction of gas loss by degassing, however, it represents a relevant part of the CO{sub 2} emitted in this quiescent period by the Vesuvio volcanic system, being of the same order of magnitude as the CO{sub 2} diffusely degassed from the crater area.

  15. Volcanic degassing at Somma-Vesuvio (Italy) inferred by chemical and isotopic signatures of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Avino, R.; Cardellini, C.; Frondini, F.

    2005-01-01

    A geochemical model is proposed for water evolution at Somma-Vesuvio, based on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters, submarine gas emission and chemical composition of the dissolved gases. The active degassing processes, present in the highest part of the volcano edifice, strongly influence the groundwater evolution. The geological-volcanological setting of the volcano forces the waters infiltrating at Somma-Vesuvio caldera, enriched in volcanic gases, to flow towards the southern sector to an area of high pCO 2 groundwaters. Reaction path modelling applied to this conceptual model, involving gas-water-rock interaction, highlights an intense degassing process in the aquifer controlling the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases, total dissolved inorganic C (TDIC) and submarine gas emission. Mapping of TDIC shows a unique area of high values situated SSE of Vesuvio volcano with an average TDIC value of 0.039 mol/L, i.e., one order of magnitude higher than groundwaters from other sectors of the volcano. On the basis of TDIC values, the amount of CO 2 transported by Vesuvio groundwaters was estimated at about 150 t/d. This estimate does not take into account the fraction of gas loss by degassing, however, it represents a relevant part of the CO 2 emitted in this quiescent period by the Vesuvio volcanic system, being of the same order of magnitude as the CO 2 diffusely degassed from the crater area

  16. Do biofilm communities respond to the chemical signatures of fracking? A test involving streams in North-central Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wilson H; Douglas, Marlis R; Lewis, Jeffrey A; Stuecker, Tara N; Carbonero, Franck G; Austin, Bradley J; Evans-White, Michelle A; Entrekin, Sally A; Douglas, Michael E

    2017-02-03

    Unconventional natural gas (UNG) extraction (fracking) is ongoing in 29 North American shale basins (20 states), with ~6000 wells found within the Fayetteville shale (north-central Arkansas). If the chemical signature of fracking is detectable in streams, it can be employed to bookmark potential impacts. We evaluated benthic biofilm community composition as a proxy for stream chemistry so as to segregate anthropogenic signatures in eight Arkansas River catchments. In doing so, we tested the hypothesis that fracking characteristics in study streams are statistically distinguishable from those produced by agriculture or urbanization. Four tributary catchments had UNG-wells significantly more dense and near to our sampling sites and were grouped as 'potentially-impacted catchment zones' (PICZ). Four others were characterized by significantly larger forested area with greater slope and elevation but reduced pasture, and were classified as 'minimally-impacted' (MICZ). Overall, 46 bacterial phyla/141 classes were identified, with 24 phyla (52%) and 54 classes (38%) across all samples. PICZ-sites were ecologically more variable than MICZ-sites, with significantly greater nutrient levels (total nitrogen, total phosphorous), and elevated Cyanobacteria as bioindicators that tracked these conditions. PICZ-sites also exhibited elevated conductance (a correlate of increased ion concentration) and depressed salt-intolerant Spartobacteria, suggesting the presence of brine as a fracking effect. Biofilm communities at PICZ-sites were significantly less variable than those at MICZ-sites. Study streams differed by Group according to morphology, land use, and water chemistry but not in biofilm community structure. Those at PICZ-sites covaried according to anthropogenic impact, and were qualitatively similar to communities found at sites disturbed by fracking. The hypothesis that fracking signatures in study streams are distinguishable from those produced by other anthropogenic effects

  17. Distribution of magnesium and phosphorous in the H. americanus exoskeleton: Insights for chemical signatures in biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Crustacean exoskeletons provide a unique opportunity to study biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), a common intermediate phase in the biomineralization of invertebrate skeletons. The lobster exoskeleton is of particular interest as a complex biocomposite of organic matrix (primarily chitin) and CaCO3 mineral (ACC with minor calcite). This metastable ACC remarkably persists for up to one year. Previous investigations demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of Mg and P in the exoskeleton but a broader understanding of elemental signatures is limited. Despite the discrepancies, the data suggest anecdotal evidence for underlying systematic relationships. To test this idea, we designed a series of experiments that used three extraction procedures to isolate the mineral (ACC plus calcite) fraction from the organic (chitin and protein each) fractions for seven body parts of the lobster exoskeleton. A parallel structural study of the mineral component was conducted using high energy X-ray scattering. We confirm previous reports that the mineral component compromises ≈30% of the main body exoskeleton and is ≈85% ACC, with the remainder as calcite. Chelae (claws) contain a still-greater proportion of ACC (>90%). Measurements show the Mg, P, Ca concentrations in the bulk and mineral fractions are variable and body part-specific. However, the ratios of these elements are highly regulated at Mg/Ca ≈ 0.084±0.011 (n=108) and P/Ca ≈ 0.098±0.003 (n=108) for all body parts except the chelae, where Mg and P ratios relative to Ca are offset to higher values. There is no evidence of a separate phosphate phase. The mineral fraction dominates the bulk trends of total Mg and P. The systematic relationships reported here for the lobster exoskeleton hold promise for establishing compositional correlations between body parts for studies that lack complete animal samples. In addition, we compare composition ratios of four exoskeleton-forming species and find the Mg/Ca and P

  18. Understanding A-type supergiants. I. Ultraviolet and visible spectral atlas of A-type supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Verdugo, E; Gómez de Castro, A I

    1999-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series whose aim is to perform a systematic study of A-type supergiant atmospheres and winds. Here we present a spectral atlas of 41 A-supergiants observed by us in high and medium resolution in the visible and ultraviolet. The atlas consists of profiles of the H alpha , H beta , H gamma , H delta , H epsilon , Ca II (H and K), Na I (D1 and D2), Mg II/sub 4481/, Mg II uv1 and Fe II uv1, uv2, uv3, uv62, uv63, uv161 lines for 41 stars with spectral types ranging from B9 to A9 and luminosity classes Ia, Iab and Ib, and provides the basic data for a thoughtful study of these stars. The overall characteristics of the sample as well as the data reduction procedures are described. We also present some examples of spectral variability. Figures 1-3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.com. (27 refs).

  19. Inhabited or Uninhabited? Pitfalls in the Interpretation of Possible Chemical Signatures of Extraterrestrial Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fox

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The “Rare Earth” hypothesis—put forward by Ward and Brownlee in their 2000 book of the same title—states that prokaryote-type organisms may be common in the universe but animals and higher plants are exceedingly rare. If this idea is correct, the search for extraterrestrial life is essentially the search for microorganisms. Various indicators may be used to detect extant or extinct microbial life beyond Earth. Among them are chemical biosignatures, such as biomolecules and stable isotope ratios. The present minireview focuses on the major problems associated with the identification of chemical biosignatures. Two main types of misinterpretation are distinguished, namely false positive and false negative results. The former can be caused by terrestrial biogenic contaminants or by abiotic products. Terrestrial contamination is a common problem in space missions that search for biosignatures on other planets and moons. Abiotic organics can lead to false positive results if erroneously interpreted as biomolecules, but also to false negatives, for example when an abiotic source obscures a less productive biological one. In principle, all types of putative chemical biosignatures are prone to misinterpretation. Some, however, are more reliable (“stronger” than others. These include: (i homochiral polymers of defined length and sequence, comparable to proteins and polynucleotides; (ii enantiopure compounds; (iii the existence of only a subset of molecules when abiotic syntheses would produce a continuous range of molecules; the proteinogenic amino acids constitute such a subset. These considerations are particularly important for life detection missions to solar system bodies such as Mars, Europa, and Enceladus.

  20. Otolith chemical signature and growth of Chaetodon speculum in coastal areas of New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, M.; Morize, E.; Kulbicki, M.; Ponton, D.; Marec, L.

    2008-07-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. They are currently exposed to increasing levels of anthropogenic perturbations. Several recent reviews point to the lack of good indicators for these perturbations especially to monitor their effects on fish populations or fish assemblages. The SW lagoon of New Caledonia is an ideal location to test indicator species in this context as contrasting sites are present within a small geographical range. This study analysed fish from four sites, one with heavy industrial pollution, another dominated by domestic waste, a third with historic mining activities, and the fourth as a control. The butterfly fish, Chaetodon speculum, was chosen to determine C. speculum's potential as an indicator species due to its link to coral, its sedentary behaviour and its wide geographical distribution. The size distribution, growth rate, age distribution and whole otolith composition were analysed at each site. Age and mean growth rate were analysed from daily increments of the otoliths. The concentrations of eight elements (Li, Mg, Co, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, and Ba) were measured by ICP-MS in the otoliths of a subset of individuals. The sites under anthropogenic impact were distinct from the control site by fish size frequencies, age distributions, and the chemical content of their otoliths. The chemical elements Mg, Co, Ni, Cu, and Rb showed differences amongst sites. Fish belonging to the sites furthest from Nouméa could be discriminated in nearly 80% of samples or 60% of the cases when otolith weight or fish age respectively were taken into account. Ni concentrations of the otoliths were also higher in the bays where water concentrations of this element were known to be higher, but these differences were no longer significant once corrected for otolith weight. These results should be mitigated by the fact that: (1) despite significant differences between sites in age distribution and size frequencies there were no differences in

  1. The Chemical Signature of SNIax in the Stars of Ursa Minor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescutti, Gabriele; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2018-06-01

    Recently, a new class of supernovae Ia was discovered: the supernovae Iax; the increasing sample of these objects share common features as lower maximum-light velocities and typically lower peak magnitudes.In our scenario, the progenitors of the SNe Iax are very massive white dwarfs, possibly hybrid C+O+Ne white dwarfs; due to the accretion from a binary companion, they reach the Chandrasekhar mass and undergo a central carbon deflagration, but the deflagration is quenched when it reaches the outer O+Ne layer. This class of SNe Ia are expected to be rarer than standard SNe Ia and do not affect the chemical evolution in the solar neighbourhood; however, they have a short delay time and they could influence the evolution of metal-poor systems. Therefore, we have included in a stochastic chemical evolution model for the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Ursa minor the contribution of SNe Iax.The model predicts a spread in [Mn/Fe] in the ISM medium at low metallicity and - at the same time - a decrease of the [alpha/Fe] elements, as in the classical time delay model. This is in surprising agreement with the observed abundances in stars of Ursa minor and provide a strong indication to the origin of this new classes of SNIa.

  2. Descendants of the first stars: the distinct chemical signature of second generation stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Yoshida, Naoki; Magg, Mattis; Frebel, Anna; Glover, Simon C. O.; Gómez, Facundo A.; Griffen, Brendan; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Ji, Alexander P.; Klessen, Ralf S.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2018-05-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Milky Way (MW) allow us to infer the properties of their progenitors by comparing their chemical composition to the metal yields of the first supernovae. This method is most powerful when applied to mono-enriched stars, i.e. stars that formed from gas that was enriched by only one previous supernova. We present a novel diagnostic to identify this subclass of EMP stars. We model the first generations of star formation semi-analytically, based on dark matter halo merger trees that yield MW-like halos at the present day. Radiative and chemical feedback are included self-consistently and we trace all elements up to zinc. Mono-enriched stars account for only ˜1% of second generation stars in our fiducial model and we provide an analytical formula for this probability. We also present a novel analytical diagnostic to identify mono-enriched stars, based on the metal yields of the first supernovae. This new diagnostic allows us to derive our main results independently from the specific assumptions made regarding Pop III star formation, and we apply it to a set of observed EMP stars to demonstrate its strengths and limitations. Our results may provide selection criteria for current and future surveys and therefore contribute to a deeper understanding of EMP stars and their progenitors.

  3. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane M. Calarge

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10m. The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context.Um depósito Permiano de bentonita em Melo, Uruguai,é composto por um arenito com cimento calcítico contendo pseudomorfos de argila sobre detritos vítreos(0-0.50 m superpostos a um deposito maciço de argila rosado (0.50-2.10 m. A camada maciça é composta por dois níveis contendo quartzo e esmectita ou esmectita pura, respectivamente. A homogeneidade de esmectita ao longo do perfil é notável: trata-se de um interestratificado composto de três tipos de camadas, cuja expansibilidade com etileno-glicol (folhas 2EG, 1EG ou 0EG na zona interfoliar correspondentes a camadas com baixa, média e alta carga, respectivamente variam com o tipo de cátion que satura a zona interfoliar. A homogeneidade da esmectita ao longo do perfil

  4. Chemical and isotopic seismic precursory signatures in deep groundwater: Cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, D.V.; Nagabhushanam, P.

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory hydrochemical studies were initiated in Koyna, India, to examine the chemical changes in the deep groundwater due to seismic activity, 2 months before the occurrence of a M 5.1 earthquake on 14th March 2005. A few deep wells (100–250 m), out of a dozen, recorded hydrochemical anomalies induced by this earthquake, and the anomalies continued for the next 3 months. Periodical hydrochemical data of one of the wells indicated a linear increase in Cl − , SO 4 2- , F − and depleted δ 18 O from August 2006 to March 2009, though there is no long term change in groundwater level (except short duration seasonal change). The observed linear change is hypothesised as an effect of aquifer response to seismic stress related to an impending earthquake of M ⩾ 5. The observed temporal change in different chemical concentrations projected linearly to the levels of March 2005 and estimated the time of the impending earthquake (the same as that of March 2005 event) as 2011/12. Further, the time projection also made based on exponential increase in hydrochemistry after 3/2009, advanced the possible time window to 2010/11. This hypothesis was realized on 12 December 2009 with an earthquake of M 5.1. Even the simple arithmetic mean of the 45-a earthquake (M > 5) history of Koyna indicates a recurrence time of ∼5.4 a. To account for the observed temporal hydrochemical changes, a model, based on mixing of two aquifer waters caused by seismic stress, was proposed. Hourly monitoring of electrical conductivity (EC) of groundwater also recorded conductivity changes induced by the M 5.1 earthquake on 12th December 2009. A very important observation that emerges from this study is that the cyclic change in subsurface stress leads to earthquakes. Continuous monitoring of EC may be helpful in visualizing the effect of tectonic forces on groundwater chemistry.

  5. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES OF THE FIRST SUPERNOVAE IN THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Joshua D.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Jacobson, Heather R.; Frebel, Anna; Adams, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a homogeneous chemical abundance analysis of five of the most metal-poor stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We analyze new and archival high resolution spectroscopy from Magellan/MIKE and VLT/UVES and determine stellar parameters and abundances in a consistent way for each star. Two of the stars in our sample, at [Fe/H] = −3.5 and [Fe/H] = −3.8, are new discoveries from our Ca K survey of Sculptor, while the other three were known in the literature. We confirm that Scl 07-50 is the lowest metallicity star identified in an external galaxy, at [Fe/H] = −4.1. The two most metal-poor stars both have very unusual abundance patterns, with striking deficiencies of the α elements, while the other three stars resemble typical extremely metal-poor Milky Way halo stars. We show that the star-to-star scatter for several elements in Sculptor is larger than that for halo stars in the same metallicity range. This scatter and the uncommon abundance patterns of the lowest metallicity stars indicate that the oldest surviving Sculptor stars were enriched by a small number of earlier supernovae, perhaps weighted toward high-mass progenitors from the first generation of stars the galaxy formed

  6. Proteomic Signatures of the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo: Sensitivity and Specificity in Toxicity Assessment of Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Karen; Küster, Eberhard; Altenburger, Rolf; Gündel, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Studies using embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio (DarT) instead of adult fish for characterising the (eco-) toxic potential of chemicals have been proposed as animal replacing methods. Effect analysis at the molecular level might enhance sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the embryonal studies. The present paper aimed to test the potential of toxicoproteomics with zebrafish eleutheroembryos for sensitive and specific toxicity assessment. 2-DE-based toxicoproteomics was performed applying low-dose (EC(10)) exposure for 48 h with three-model substances Rotenone, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC) and Diclofenac. By multivariate "pattern-only" PCA and univariate statistical analyses, alterations in the embryonal proteome were detectable in nonetheless visibly intact organisms and treatment with the three substances was distinguishable at the molecular level. Toxicoproteomics enabled the enhancement of sensitivity and specificity of the embryonal toxicity assay and bear the potency to identify protein markers serving as general stress markers and early diagnosis of toxic stress.

  7. Analysis of chemical signatures of alkaliphiles using fatty acid methyl ester analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basha Sreenivasulu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatty acids occur in nearly all living organisms as the important predominant constituents of lipids. While all fatty acids have essentially the same chemical nature, they are an extremely diverse group of compounds. Materials and Methods: To test the hypothesis, fatty acids of alkaliphiles isolates, Bacillus subtilis SVUNM4, Bacillus licheniformis SVUNM8, Bacillus methylotrohicus SVUNM9, and Paenibacillus dendritiformis SVUNM11, were characterized compared using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. Results: The content of investigated ten fatty acids, 1, 2-benzenedicarboxylic acid butyl 2-methylpropyl ester, phthalic acid, isobutyl 2-pentyl ester, dibutyl phthalate, cyclotrisiloxane, hexamethyl, cyclotetrasiloxane, octamethyl, dodecamethyl, heptasiloxane 1,1,3,3,5,5,7,7,9,9,11,11,13,13-etradecamethyl, 7,15-dihydroxydehydroabietic acid, methyl ester, di (trimethylsilyl ether, hentriacontane, 2-thiopheneacetic acid, undec-2-enyl ester, obviously varied among four species, suggesting each species has its own fatty acid pattern. Conclusions: These findings demonstrated that GC-MS-based fatty acid profiling analysis provides the reliable platform to classify these four species, which is helpful for ensuring their biotechnological interest and novel chemotaxonomic.

  8. Cracking the Conundrum of F-supergiant Coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2018-02-01

    Chandra X-ray and HST far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of three early-F supergiants have shed new light on a previous puzzle involving a prominent member of the class: α Persei (HD 20902: F5 Ib). The warm supergiant is a moderately strong, hard coronal (T∼ {10}7 K) X-ray source, but has 10 times weaker “subcoronal” Si IV 1393 Å (T∼ 8× {10}4 K) emissions than early-G supergiants of similar high-energy properties. The α Per X-ray excess was speculatively ascribed to a close-in hyperactive G-dwarf companion, which could have escaped previous notice, lost in the glare of the bright star. However, a subsequent dedicated multi-wavelength imaging campaign failed to find any evidence for a resolved secondary. The origin of the α Per high-energy dichotomy then devolved to (1) an unresolved companion or (2) intrinsic coronal behavior. Exploring the second possibility, the present program has found that early-F supergiants do appear to belong to a distinct coronal class, characterized by elevated X-ray/FUV ratios, although sharing some similarities with Cepheid variables in their transitory X-ray “high states.” Remarkably, the early-F supergiants now are seen to align with the low-activity end of the X-ray/FUV sequence defined by late-type dwarfs, suggesting that the disjoint behavior relative to the G supergiants might be attributed to thinner outer atmospheres on the F types, as in dwarfs, but in this case perhaps caused by a weakened “ionization valve” effect due to overly warm photospheres.

  9. Assessing biological and chemical signatures related to nutrient removal by floating islands in stormwater mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Islam, Kamrul; Marimon, Zachary; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-07-01

    Aquatic floating plants on BioHaven mats were tested for their potential use as a Best Management Practice to be incorporated within existing stormwater detention ponds. Plants were analyzed for their capability to remove nutrient-pollution in parallel with the study of ecological dynamics. Experiments were carried out in cylindrical mesocosms of 5 m diameter and 1.2 m height, above-ground pools with a water volume of 14 m(3). The design parameters tested were for 5% and 10% vegetated floating island coverage of the mesocosm, both with and without shoreline plants called littoral zone. This littoral shelf was 0.5 m thick, graded at a downward slope of 1:5 toward the center using loamy soil with low organic matter content, excavated from below turf grass. Endemic plant species were chosen for the experimental location in central Florida based on a wetland identification manual by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ensure the study was not compromised by unique climate requirements of the plants. Nutrient and aquatic chemical conditions such as pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, turbidity, and chlorophyll a were monitored to understand their relationships to the general wetland ecosystem. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis identified the microbial activity near the rhizospheric zone. Logistical placement considerations were made using spatial sampling across the horizontal plane of the mesocosms, beneath and around the root zone, to determine if nutrients tend to aggregate around the floating island. This study concluded that the application of floating islands as a stormwater technology can remove nutrients through plant uptake and biological activity. The most cost-effective size in the outdoor mesocosms was 5% surface area coverage of the mat. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mantle amphibole control on arc and within-plate chemical signatures: Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirkhah, M.; Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Emami, M. H.; McLeod, C.

    2012-04-01

    New analyses of Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province in west Iran shed light on the nature of collision zone magmatism. The rocks are from the Turkish-Iranian plateau within the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Compositions are typically basanite, hawaiite and alkali basalt. Sr-Nd isotope values are close to BSE, which is similar to Quaternary alkali basalts of NW Iran, but distinct from a depleted source melting under Mount Ararat. The chemical signatures suggests variable melting of two distinct sources. One inferred source produced melts with La/Nb from~3.5 to~1.2, which we model as the result of depletion of amphibole during ≤1% melting in the garnet stability field. We infer phlogopite in the source of potassic lavas from Takab. Lithosphere delamination or slab break-off mechanisms for triggering melting are problematic, as the lithosphere is~150-200km thick. It is possible that the negative dT/dP section of the amphibole peridotite solidus was crossed as a result of lithospheric thickening in the collision zone. This explanation is conditional upon the mantle source being weakly hydrated and so only containing a small proportion of amphibole, which can be exhausted during small degrees of partial melting. Our model maybe viable for other magmatic areas within orogenic plateaux, e.g. northern Tibet. Depletion of mantle amphibole may also help explain larger scale transitions from arc to within-plate chemistry in orogens, such as the Palaeogene Arabia-Eurasia system.

  11. The 13Carbon footprint of B[e] supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liermann, A.; Kraus, M.; Schnurr, O.; Fernandes, M. Borges

    2010-10-01

    We report on the first detection of 13C enhancement in two B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Stellar evolution models predict the surface abundance in 13C to strongly increase during main-sequence and post-main-sequence evolution of massive stars. However, direct identification of chemically processed material on the surface of B[e]SGs is hampered by their dense, disc-forming winds, hiding the stars. Recent theoretical computations predict the detectability of enhanced 13C via the molecular emission in 13CO arising in the circumstellar discs of B[e]SGs. To test this potential method and to unambiguously identify a post-main-sequence B[e] SG by its 13CO emission, we have obtained high-quality K-band spectra of two known B[e] SGs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using the Very Large Telescope's Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). Both stars clearly show the 13CO band emission, whose strength implies a strong enhancement of 13C, in agreement with theoretical predictions. This first ever direct confirmation of the evolved nature of B[e]SGs thus paves the way to the first identification of a Galactic B[e]SG. Based on observations collected with the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under programme 384.D-1078(A). E-mail: liermann@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de (AL); kraus@sunstel.asu.cas.cz (MK); oschnurr@aip.de (OS); borges@on.br (MBF)

  12. Kinematic properties of supergiants in the Perseus spiral arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimenko, T P [Ural' skij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Sverdlovsk (USSR)

    1963-05-01

    Large-scale inhomogeneity of the velocity field in the Perseus spiral arm region is found on the basis of the analysis of spatial motions of supergiants. The inhomogeneity seems to be connected with both presence of large groups of young stars and systematic motions in the arm predicted by the density wave theory. Proper motions of 78 stars are presented.

  13. Spectroscopic Variability of Supergiant Star HD14134, B3Ia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. M. Maharramov

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... the hot supergiant HD14134 studied in the present paper has a mass-loss rate of ...... tific program for the priority fields of research of the. National .... emission-line stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Astron. Astrophys., 158 ...

  14. Chemical signatures of life in modern stromatolites from Lake Alchichica, Mexico. Applications for the search of life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Karina F.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Alcocer, Javier; Escobar, Elva; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, Francois; Stalport, Fabien; Cabane, Michel; Person, Alain; McKay, Chris

    ,5-dimethylfuran, 4-methylpyridine, ethylbenzene, dimethylbenzene, styrene, methylbenze-neamine, 2,4-hexadienal, phenol, 3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, benzonitrile, cyclopropyliden-emethylbenzene, 2,3-dihydro-1-H-indene, 1-methylethenylbenzene, 3-methylphenol, and 1-propenyl-benzene. The carbon isotopic composition of the organic fraction of the stromatolites is deter-mined by a δ 13 C=-24.28 whereas the inorganic fraction, hydromagnesite, is determined by a δ 13 C=5.86. Our data shows two interesting chemical signatures that can used to detect extant life in Martian carbonates: (1) organics are not oxidized by mineral matrix during TV-MS and TV-GC-MS analysis; and (2) distinctive carbon isotopic fractionation occurs in the or-ganic and inorganic fraction of stromatolites. Future work should center on studying fossilized stromatolites to determine if these chemical signatures are lost with time. References: Ehlmann, B.L., Mustard, J.F., Murchie, S.L. Poulet, F., Bishop, J.L., Brown, A.J., Calvin, W.M., Clark, R.N., Des Marais, D.J., Milliken, R.E., Roach, L.H., Roush, T.L., Swayze, G.A., and Wray, J.J.: 2008, Orbital identification of carbonate-bearing rocks on Mars. Science 322, 1828-1832. Escobar-Briones, E., Alcocer, J., Cienfuegos, E., and Morales P.: 1998, Carbon stable isotopes ratios of pelagic and litoral communities in Alchichica crater-lake, Mexico, Internat J Salt Lake Res 7, 345-355. Falcón, L.I., Escobar-Briones, E., and Romero, D.: 2002, Nitrogen fixation patterns displayed by cyanobacterial consortia in Alchichica crater-lake, Mexico, Hydrobiol 467, 71-78. Navarro-González, R., Navarro, K.F., de la Rosa, J., Molina, P., Iñiguez, E., Miranda, L.D., a n Morales, P., Cienfuegos, E., Coll, P., Raulin, F., Amils, R. and McKay, C.P.: 2006. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization-gas chromatography-MS and their implications for the Viking results. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103, 16089-16094. Navarro-González, R., Iñiguez, E., de

  15. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: KMOS OBSERVATIONS IN NGC 6822

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, L. R.; Evans, C. J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR spectroscopy of red supergiant (RSG) stars in NGC 6822, obtained with the new K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph Very Large Telescope, Chile. From comparisons with model spectra in the J-band we determine the metallicity of 11 RSGs, finding a mean value of [Z] = −0.52 ± 0.21, which agrees well with previous abundance studies of young stars and H ii regions. We also find an indication for a low-significance abundance gradient within the central 1 kpc. We compare our results with those derived from older stellar populations and investigate the difference using a simple chemical evolution model. By comparing the physical properties determined for RSGs in NGC 6822 with those derived using the same technique in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, we show that there appears to be no significant temperature variation of RSGs with respect to metallicity, in contrast to recent evolutionary models

  16. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios

  17. Demonstration of spread-on peel-off consumer products for sampling surfaces contaminated with pesticides and chemical warfare agent signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Deborah L; Smith, Deborah L; Katona, Vanessa R; Lewis, Alan T; Hernon-Kenny, Laura A; Crenshaw, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    A terrorist attack using toxic chemicals is an international concern. The utility of rubber cement and latex body paint as spray-on/spread-on peel-off collection media for signatures attributable to pesticides and chemical warfare agents from interior building and public transportation surfaces two weeks post-deposition is demonstrated. The efficacy of these media to sample escalator handrail, stainless steel, vinyl upholstery fabric, and wood flooring is demonstrated for two pesticides and eight chemicals related to chemical warfare agents. The chemicals tested are nicotine, parathion, atropine, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, dipinacolyl methylphosphonate, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, methylphosphonic acid, and thiodiglycol. Amounts of each chemical found are generally greatest when latex body paint is used. Analytes with low volatility and containing an alkaline nitrogen or a sulfur atom (e.g., nicotine and parathion) usually are recovered to a greater extent than the neutral phosphonate diesters and acidic phosphonic acids (e.g., dimethyl methylphosphonate and ethyl methylphosphonic acid). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The blue supergiant MN18 and its bipolar circumstellar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Bodensteiner, J.; Langer, N.; Greiner, J.; Grebel, E. K.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of spectrophotometric observations of the massive star MN18 revealed via discovery of a bipolar nebula around it with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Using the optical spectrum obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope, we classify this star as B1 Ia. The evolved status of MN18 is supported by the detection of nitrogen overabundance in the nebula, which implies that it is composed of processed material ejected by the star. We analysed the spectrum of MN18 by using the code CMFGEN, obtaining a stellar effective temperature of ≈21 kK. The star is highly reddened, E(B - V) ≈ 2 mag. Adopting an absolute visual magnitude of MV = -6.8 ± 0.5 (typical of B1 supergiants), MN18 has a luminosity of log L/L⊙ ≈ 5.42 ± 0.30, a mass-loss rate of ≈(2.8-4.5) × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1, and resides at a distance of ≈5.6^{+1.5} _{-1.2} kpc. We discuss the origin of the nebula around MN18 and compare it with similar nebulae produced by other blue supergiants in the Galaxy (Sher 25, HD 168625, [SBW2007] 1) and the Large Magellanic Cloud (Sk-69°202). The nitrogen abundances in these nebulae imply that blue supergiants can produce them from the main-sequence stage up to the pre-supernova stage. We also present a K-band spectrum of the candidate luminous blue variable MN56 (encircled by a ring-like nebula) and report the discovery of an OB star at ≈17 arcsec from MN18. The possible membership of MN18 and the OB star of the star cluster Lynga 3 is discussed.

  19. Astrometry of red supergiant VY Canis Majoris with VERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. K.; Hirota, T.; Honma, M.; Kobayashi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We present observational results on the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris with VERA. We have observed 22 GHz H2O masers and 43 GHz SiO masers (v=1 and 2 J=1-0) around VY CMa for 13 months. We succesfully detected a parallax of 0.87 ± 0.08 mas, corresponding to the distance of 1.15 +0.10-0.09 kpc using H2O masers. As the result of phase-referencing analyses, we have measured absolute positions for both H2O masers and SiO masers. The H2O maser features show rapid expansion off the central star.

  20. Chemistry in the final stages of stellar evolution: Millimeter and submillimeter observations of supergiants and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessica Louise

    High mass loss rates in evolved stars make them the major contributors to recycling processed material back into the interstellar medium. This mass loss creates large circumstellar shells, rich in molecular material. This dissertation presents millimeter and submillimeter studies of the end stages of low mass and high mass stars in order to probe their molecular content in more detail. In low mass stars, the molecular material is carried on into the planetary nebula (PN) stage. Observations of CS, HCO+, and CO in planetary nebulae (PNe) of various post-asymptotic giant branch ages have shown that molecular abundances in these objects do not significantly vary with age, as previously thought. More detailed observations of the slightly oxygen-rich PN NGC 6537 resulted in the detection of CN, HCN, HNC, CCH, CS, SO, H 2CO, HCO+ and N2H+, as well as numerous 13C isotopologues. Observations of the middle-aged PN M2-48 showed the presence of CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, SO2, SiO, HCO+, N2H+, and several 13C isotopologues. These observations represent the first detections of CS, SO, SO2, and SiO in any planetary nebula. The implications of these observations are discussed. A 1 mm spectral survey of the supergiant star NML Cygni has been carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope resulting in the observation of 102 emission features arising from 17 different molecules and 4 unidentified features. The line profiles observed in this circumstellar shell are asymmetric and vary between different molecules, akin to what has been seen in another supergiant, VY Canis Majoris. The non-LTE radiative transfer code ESCAPADE has been used to model molecular abundances in the various asymmetric outflows of VY Canis Majoris, showing just how chemically and kinematically complex these supergiant circumstellar envelopes really are.

  1. Clumpy wind accretion in Supergiant X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mellah, I.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Keppens, R.

    2017-12-01

    Supergiant X-ray binaries (\\sgx) contain a neutron star (NS) orbiting a Supergiant O/B star. The fraction of the dense and fast line-driven wind from the stellar companion which is accreted by the NS is responsible for most of the X-ray emission from those system. Classic \\sgx display photometric variability of their hard X-ray emission, typically from a few 10^{35} to a few 10^{37}erg\\cdots^{-1}. Inhomogeneities (\\aka clumps) in the wind from the star are expected to play a role in this time variability. We run 3D hydrodynamical (HD) finite volume simulations to follow the accretion of the inhomogeneous stellar wind by the NS over almost 3 orders of magnitude. To model the unperturbed wind far upstream the NS, we use recent simulations which managed to resolve its micro-structure. We observe the formation of a Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) like bow shock around the accretor and follow the clumps as they cross it, down to the NS magnetosphere. Compared to previous estimations discarding the HD effects, we measure lower time variability due to both the damping effect of the shock and the necessity to evacuate angular momentum to enable accretion. We also compute the associated time-variable column density and compare it to recent observations in Vela X-1.

  2. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Barthelmy, S.; Bozzo, E.; Burrows, D.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Evans, P.; Kennea, J.; Krimm, H.; Vercellone, S.

    2017-10-01

    We present the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project, a systematic study of SFXTs and classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) through efficient long-term monitoring of 17 sources including SFXTs and classical SGXBs across more than 4 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity on timescales from hundred seconds to years. We derived dynamic ranges, duty cycles, and luminosity distributions to highlight systematic differences that help discriminate between different theoretical models proposed to explain the differences between the wind accretion processes in SFXTs and classical SGXBs. Our follow-ups of the SFXT outbursts provide a steady advancement in the comprehension of the mechanisms triggering the high X-ray level emission of these sources. In particular, the observations of the outburst of the SFXT prototype IGR J17544-2619, when the source reached a peak X-ray luminosity of 3×10^{38} erg s^{-1}, challenged for the first time the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by a wind-fed neutron star high mass X-ray binary. We propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient accretion disc around the compact object. We also created a catalogue of over 1000 BAT flares which we use to predict the observability and perspectives with future missions.

  3. Does the chemical signature of TYC 8442-1036-1 originate from a rotating massive star that died in a faint explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescutti, G.; Valentini, M.; François, P.; Chiappini, C.; Depagne, E.; Christlieb, N.; Cortés, C.

    2016-11-01

    Context. We have recently investigated the origin of chemical signatures observed in Galactic halo stars by means of a stochastic chemical evolution model. We found that rotating massive stars are a promising way to explain several signatures observed in these fossil stars. Aims: We discuss how the extremely metal-poor halo star TYC 8442-1036-1, for which we have now obtained detailed abundances from VLT-UVES spectra, fits into the framework of our previous work. Methods: We applied a standard one-dimensional (1D) LTE analysis to the spectrum of this star. We measured the abundances of 14 chemical elements; we computed the abundances for Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn using equivalent widths; we obtained the abundances for C, Sr, and Ba by means of synthetic spectra generated by MOOG. Results: We find an abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.5 ±0.13 dex based on our high-resolution spectrum; this points to an iron content that is lower by a factor of three (0.5 dex) compared to that obtained by a low-resolution spectrum. The star has a [C/Fe] = 0.4 dex, and it is not carbon enhanced like most of the stars at this metallicity. Moreover, this star lies in the plane [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] in a relatively unusual position, shared by a few other Galactic halo stars, which is only marginally explained by our past results. Conclusions: The comparison of the model results with the chemical abundance characteristics of this group of stars can be improved if we consider in our model the presence of faint supernovae coupled with rotating massive stars. These results seem to imply that rotating massive stars and faint supernovae scenarios are complementary to each other, and are both required in order to match the observed chemistry of the earliest phases of the chemical enrichment of the Universe. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (ID 094.B-0781(A); P.I. G. Cescutti).

  4. Detrital and early chemical remanent magnetization in redbeds and their rock magnetic signature: Zicapa Formation, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rojas, Maria Isabel; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2018-06-01

    Poles from continental redbeds are a large fraction of the world's palaeomagnetic database. Nonetheless, the time of acquisition and origin of the remanent magnetization of redbeds has been long debated. We report palaeomagnetic data, rock magnetic data and microscope observations for Lower Cretaceous redbeds in southern Mexico. These data allow us to discriminate between the hysteresis properties of remanent magnetizations of detrital and chemical origin, and to establish the early origin of a chemical remanence. Red sandstones of the Zicapa Formation contain a multicomponent remanence revealed by thermal demagnetization, and consisting of three stable components with partially overlapping laboratory unblocking temperatures of 600 °C, (low, intermediate and high temperature, respectively). They are interpreted as a viscous remanence residing in detrital magnetite, a chemical remanence residing in authigenic hematite and a depositional remanence residing in detrital hematite, respectively. The low-temperature component is nearly parallel to the recent dipole field. The tilt-corrected overall site means of the intermediate (chemical) and high temperature (depositional) components are indistinguishable (Dec = 282.0°, Inc = 12.4°, k = 13.33, α95 = 10.1°, N = 17, for the intermediate temperature; and Dec = 272.5°, Inc = 16.5°, k = 14.04, α95 = 11, N = 14, for the high temperature). Elongation/inclination analysis suggests that depositional and chemical components require applying an f = factor of approximately 0.4. Both of these components define a magnetic polarity zonation, but the polarity of the chemical and detrital components may or may not be the same. The chemical remanence coincides, more often than not, with the polarity of the depositional remanence of the overlying (younger) strata, suggesting a delay in remanence acquisition of tens to a few hundred ka for the chemical component. Pigmentary and detrital haematite were recognized with microscopic

  5. A modern study of HD 166734: a massive supergiant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahy, L.; Damerdji, Y.; Gosset, E.; Nitschelm, C.; Eenens, P.; Sana, H.; Klotz, A.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: HD 166734 is an eccentric eclipsing binary system composed of two supergiant O-type stars, orbiting with a 34.5-day period. In this rare configuration for such stars, the two objects mainly evolve independently, following single-star evolution so far. This system provides a chance to study the individual parameters of two supergiant massive stars and to derive their real masses. Methods: An intensive monitoring was dedicated to HD 166734. We analyzed mid- and high-resolution optical spectra to constrain the orbital parameters of this system. We also studied its light curve for the first time, obtained in the VRI filters. Finally, we disentangled the spectra of the two stars and modeled them with the CMFGEN atmosphere code in order to determine the individual physical parameters. Results: HD 166734 is a O7.5If+O9I(f) binary. We confirm its orbital period but we revise the other orbital parameters. In comparison to what we found in the literature, the system is more eccentric and, now, the hottest and the most luminous component is also the most massive one. The light curve exhibits only one eclipse and its analysis indicates an inclination of 63.0° ± 2.7°. The photometric analysis provides us with a good estimation of the luminosities of the stars, and therefore their exact positions in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The evolutionary and the spectroscopic masses show good agreement with the dynamical masses of 39.5 M⊙ for the primary and 33.5 M⊙ for the secondary, within the uncertainties. The two components are both enriched in helium and in nitrogen and depleted in carbon. In addition, the primary also shows a depletion in oxygen. Their surface abundances are however not different from those derived from single supergiant stars, yielding, for both components, an evolution similar to that of single stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) with FEROS and TAROT and on data collected at the San Pedro

  6. A predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is a critical component of chemical assessment. The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the DNA damage response pathways involved in response, is becoming more common. In companion papers previously published in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Li et al. (2015 [6] developed a dose optimization protocol that was based on evaluating expression changes in several well-characterized stress-response genes using quantitative real-time PCR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells in culture. This optimization approach was applied to the analysis of TK6 cells exposed to one of 14 genotoxic or 14 non-genotoxic agents, with sampling 4 h post-exposure. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses were then used to develop a classifier for genotoxicity using the nearest shrunken centroids method. A panel of 65 genes was identified that could accurately classify toxicants as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In Buick et al. (2015 [1], the utility of the biomarker for chemicals that require metabolic activation was evaluated. In this study, TK6 cells were exposed to increasing doses of four chemicals (two genotoxic that require metabolic activation and two non-genotoxic chemicals in the presence of rat liver S9 to demonstrate that S9 does not impair the ability to classify genotoxicity using this genomic biomarker in TK6cells.

  7. Coupling Thermal and Chemical Signatures of Crustal Magma Bodies: Energy-Constrained Eruption, Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization (E'RAχFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.

    2004-12-01

    which all parts of the composite magmatic system achieve thermal equilibrium. Comparison of the results of three EC-AFC simulations at different Teq (1150° C, 1050° C, 1000° C) for a mafic magma intruding middle-upper crust of mafic-intermediate composition illustrate the distinctions that can be imparted by a range of thermal regimes. Model parameters relevant to the following results include: initial Sr concentration, isotope composition and bulk D for host magma are 700 ppm, 0.7035, and 1.5, respectively; those for wallrock are 230 ppm, 0.7100, 0.05. The 1150° C case (i.e., high Tb) yields the least crust-like Sr isotope signatures. The mass of wallrock that reaches thermal equilibrium is relatively small (0.26, normalized to the mass of initial host magma), although the degree of melting is high (97%). In contrast, the 1000° C case (i.e., low Tb) yields the most crust-like Sr isotope signatures. This case is also characterized by the largest mass of wallrock (0.98, normalized to the mass of initial host magma) that achieves thermal equilibrium, but the degree to which this wallrock melts is small (10%). A fundamental issue that derives from these results is the relationship between the chemical evolution of the hydrothermal system and the chemical evolution of associated melt and cumulates. In particular, to what extent can predictions be made from the thermal interactions between magma and wallrock on the chemical signatures of the associated magmatic rocks and hydrothermal deposits?

  8. Magnetic field evidence for the supergiant ν Cep (HD 207260)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, G.; Gerth, E.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of 55 Zeeman spectrograms the effective magnetic fields and the radial velocities of the supergiant ν Cep (HD 207260) were determined. For the effective magnetic field a slow variation occurring on a time-scale of years was found. The spectrograms taken at the first epoch show only moderate effective magnetic field strengths of a few hundred Gauss but in 1978 values of + 2000 G were detected. The measured radial velocities show a long-term variability similar to that of the magnetic field as well as more rapid changes of approximately equal to 39.9 day. Not only the Balmer absorption lines Hβ, Hγ, and Hdelta but also the various elements and ions have different radial velocities. (author)

  9. Expanding chromospheres of late G and K supergiants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S V

    1986-09-15

    The radiative transfer problem in non-LTE moving atmospheres has been explicitly solved for H..cap alpha.. line profiles. These computations have been done for a schematic model of the line-forming region over a wide range of optical depths and velocity gradients in order to cover the observed characteristics in 23 G and K supergiants. The best theoretical fits yield optical depths in the range 10-500 and velocity fields in the range 0.5-3 Doppler widths. The computed mass-flow rates lie in the range 10/sup -5/-10/sup -7/ Solar Mass yr/sup -1/; the higher the extent of the line-forming region, the lower the mass-loss rates. The effect of the extent on the H..cap alpha.. emission components has also been investigated in some detail.

  10. Additional radial velocities of supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thackeray, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Additional radial velocities of 28 SMC supergiants determined in the years 1959-69 at the Radcliffe Observatory are presented. These and other measures from ESO and elsewhere are intercompared. The mean Radcliffe velocities have an internal standard error of +- 4.7 km/s and a systematic error exceeding 4 km/s is regarded as unlikely. Eight stars in the SMC core have a corrected velocity dispersion of only 6.9 km/s, similar to Feast's values for H II regions in the core. But the core H II regions have a velocity differential of -20 km/s relative to these stars. The velocity dispersion for stars in other parts of the Cloud is of the order 15 km/s as previously found. Two possibly variable-velocity stars are discussed, without reaching a satisfactory conclusion. (author)

  11. IRC -10414: a bow-shock-producing red supergiant star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Menten, K. M.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Kraus, A.; Meyer, D. M.-A.; Kamiński, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most runaway OB stars, like the majority of massive stars residing in their parent clusters, go through the red supergiant (RSG) phase during their lifetimes. Nonetheless, although many dozens of massive runaways were found to be associated with bow shocks, only two RSG bow-shock-producing stars, Betelgeuse and μ Cep, are known to date. In this paper, we report the discovery of an arc-like nebula around the late M-type star IRC -10414 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey. Our spectroscopic follow-up of IRC -10414 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) showed that it is a M7 supergiant, which supports previous claims on the RSG nature of this star based on observations of its maser emission. This was reinforced by our new radio- and (sub)millimetre-wavelength molecular line observations made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12-m telescope and the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, respectively. The SALT spectrum of the nebula indicates that its emission is the result of shock excitation. This finding along with the arc-like shape of the nebula and an estimate of the space velocity of IRC -10414 (≈70 ± 20 km s-1) imply the bow shock interpretation for the nebula. Thus, IRC -10414 represents the third case of a bow-shock-producing RSG and the first one with a bow shock visible at optical wavelengths. We discuss the smooth appearance of the bow shocks around IRC -10414 and Betelgeuse and propose that one of the necessary conditions for stability of bow shocks generated by RSGs is the ionization of the stellar wind. Possible ionization sources of the wind of IRC -10414 are proposed and discussed.

  12. A period-luminosity relation for supergiant red variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.W.; Catchpole, R.M.; Carter, B.S.; Roberts, G.

    1980-01-01

    Infrared photometry for 24 red supergiant variables in the LMC is used to derive bolometric magnitudes. The existence of a period-luminosity relation for these stars is demonstrated and compared with theory. (author)

  13. A Fly-Through Mission Strategy Targeting Peptide as a Signature of Chemical Evolution and Possible Life in Enceladus Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Dziomba, Szymon; Takahagi, Wataru; Shibuya, Takazo; Takano, Yoshinori; Guerrouache, Mohamed; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Takai, Ken; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Yano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In situ detection of organic molecules in the extraterrestrial environment provides a key step towards better understanding the variety and the distribution of building blocks of life and it may ultimately lead to finding extraterrestrial life within the Solar System. Here we present combined results of two separate experiments that enable us to realize such in situ life signature detection from the deep habitats of the "Ocean World": a hydrothermal reactor experiment simulating complex organic synthesis and a simulated fly-through capture experiment of organic-bearing microparticles using silica aerogels, followed by subsequent analysis. Both experiments employ peptide as a plausible organics existing in Encleadus plume particles produced in its subsurface ocean. Recent laboratory hydrothermal experiments and a theoretical model on silica saturation indicated an on going hydrothermal reactions in subsurface Enceladus ocean. Given the porous chondritic origin of the core, it is likely that organic compounds originated by radiation chemistry such as amino acid precursors could have been provided, leached, and altered through widespread water-rock interactions. By using the same laboratory experimental setup from the latest water-rock interaction study, we performed amino acid polymerization experiments for 144 days and monitored the organic complexity changing over time. So far over 3,000 peaks up to the size of greater than 600 MW were observed through the analysis of capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS) with an indication of amino acid derivatives and short peptides. Generally abiotic polymerization of enantiomeric amino acids results in forming stereoisomeric peptides with identical molecular weight and formula as opposed to homochiral biopolymers. Assuming Enceladus plume particles may contain a mixture of stereoisomeric peptides, we were able to distinguish 16 of the 17 stereoisomeric tripeptides as a test sample using

  14. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution ω[over dot]=-ω(2) along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)] this outcome will be naturally related to the

  15. Country-specific chemical signatures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in breast milk of French, Danish and Finnish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antignac, J P; Main, K M; Virtanen, H E

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares concentrations and chemical profiles of an extended range of persistent organic pollutants (dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls, brominated flame retardants and organochlorine pesticides) in breast milk samples from French (n = 96), Danish (n = 438) and Finnish (n = 22) women....... Median exposure levels observed in French women (WHO-TEQ2005 PCDD/F = 6.1 pg/g l.w., WHO-TEQ2005 dl-PCB = 4.3 pg/g l.w., sum of 6 ndl-PCB = 85.2 ng/g l.w., sum of 7 i-PBDE = 1.5 ng/g l.w.) appeared overall lower than in Danish and Finnish women for all examined POPs, except for α-HBCD (2-fold higher...... level at 0.6 ng/g l.w.). Furthermore, the observed exposure levels of dioxins and PCBs were higher in Danish women (WHO-TEQ2005 PCDD/F = 13.2 pg/g l.w., WHO-TEQ2005 dl-PCB = 6.6 pg/g l.w., sum of 6 ndl-PCB = 162.8 ng/g l.w.) compared to Finnish women (WHO-TEQ2005 PCDD/F = 9.0 pg/g l.w., WHO-TEQ2005 dl...

  16. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10 -9 s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼10 0 s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  17. THE TYPE IIb SUPERNOVA 2011dh FROM A SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Folatelli, Gastón; Maeda, Keiichi; Benvenuto, Omar G.; Ergon, Mattias; Sollerman, Jesper; Benetti, Stefano; Ochner, Paolo; Tomasella, Lina; Botticella, Maria Teresa; Fraser, Morgan; Kotak, Rubina

    2012-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamical models based on stellar evolutionary progenitors is used to study the nature of SN 2011dh. Our modeling suggests that a large progenitor star—with R ∼ 200 R ☉ —is needed to reproduce the early light curve (LC) of SN 2011dh. This is consistent with the suggestion that the yellow super-giant star detected at the location of the supernova (SN) in deep pre-explosion images is the progenitor star. From the main peak of the bolometric LC and expansion velocities, we constrain the mass of the ejecta to be ≈2 M ☉ , the explosion energy to be E = (6-10) × 10 50 erg, and the 56 Ni mass to be approximately 0.06 M ☉ . The progenitor star was composed of a helium core of 3-4 M ☉ and a thin hydrogen-rich envelope of ≈0.1M ☉ with a main-sequence mass estimated to be in the range of 12-15 M ☉ . Our models rule out progenitors with helium-core masses larger than 8 M ☉ , which correspond to M ZAMS ∼> 25M ☉ . This suggests that a single star evolutionary scenario for SN 2011dh is unlikely.

  18. CNO abundances in Cepheids and supergiants: theoretical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.A.; Cox, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Models of a 9 M/sub sun/ star have been evolved to see if the observed nitrogen enhancement and the carbon and oxygen depletions in yellow supergiants and Cepheids can be explained. In the standard (first dredge-up phase) evolutionary picture, the normal or near normal CNO abundances for the envelopes of stars on the main sequence are altered when such stars become red giants with deeply mixed convective envelopes prior to core He ignition. While this process does result in a noticeable nitrogen enhancement and a carbon reduction (oxygen is only slightly reduced), the observed changes in the CNO abundances are reported to be much larger. Consequently, other additional mechanisms need to be considered. The effects of primordial abundances, mass loss and transfer, convective overshoot, rotation, and magnetic fields are discussed. It is found that in order to explain the observed O depletion, there must be some form of mixing between the convective hydrogen-burning core and the inner part of the radiative envelope. This additional mixed material is then latter dredged up during the red giant phase. A simplified three-zone model is proposed. Finally, as a consequence of this additional mixing, longer main-sequence lifetimes and more luminous blue loops in the Cepheid region are predicted

  19. Strong magnetic field generated by the extreme oxygen-rich red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Claussen, Mark J.; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Shimojo, Masumi

    2017-12-01

    Evolved stars experience high mass-loss rates forming thick circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The circumstellar material is made of the result of stellar nucleosynthesis and, as such, plays a crucial role in the chemical evolution of galaxies and the universe. Since asymmetric geometries of CSEs are common, and with very complex structures for some cases, radiative pressure from the stars can explain only a small portion of the mass-loss processes; thus the essential driving mechanism is still unknown, particularly for high-mass stars. Here we report on magnetic field measurements associated with the well-known extreme red supergiant (RSG) VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). We measured the linear polarization and the Zeeman splitting of the SiO v = 0, J = 1-0 transition using a sensitive radio interferometer. The measured magnetic field strengths are surprisingly high; their upper limits range between 150 and 650 G within 530 au (˜80 R*) of the star. The lower limit of the field strength is expected to be at least ˜10 G based on the high degree of linear polarization. Since the field strengths are very high, the magnetic field must be a key element in understanding the stellar evolution of VY CMa, as well as the dynamical and chemical evolution of the complex CSE of the star. M-type RSGs, with large stellar surface, were thought to be very slow rotators. This would seem to make a dynamo in operation difficult, and would also dilute any fossil magnetic field. At least for VY CMa, we expect that powerful dynamo processes must still be active to generate the intense magnetic field.

  20. Seven years with the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.

    2015-09-01

    Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are HMXBs with OB supergiant companions. I review the results of the Swift SFXT project, which since 2007 has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) by combining follow-ups of outbursts, when detailed broad-band spectroscopy is possible, with long-term monitoring campaigns, when the out-of-outburst fainter states can be observed. This strategy has led us to measure their duty cycles as a function of luminosity, to extract their differential luminosity distributions in the soft X-ray domain, and to compare, with unprecedented detail, the X-ray variability in these different classes of sources. I also discuss the ;seventh year crisis;, the challenges that the recent Swift observations are making to the prevailing models attempting to explain the SFXT behavior.

  1. A Runaway Yellow Supergiant Star in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia I.; Skiff, Brian; Georgy, Cyril

    2018-05-01

    We recently discovered a yellow supergiant (YSG) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a heliocentric radial velocity of ∼300 km s‑1, which is much larger than expected for a star at its location in the SMC. This is the first runaway YSG ever discovered and only the second evolved runaway star discovered in a galaxy other than the Milky Way. We classify the star as G5-8 I and use de-reddened broad-band colors with model atmospheres to determine an effective temperature of 4700 ± 250 K, consistent with what is expected from its spectral type. The star’s luminosity is then log L/L ⊙ ∼ 4.2 ± 0.1, consistent with it being a ∼30 Myr 9 M ⊙ star according to the Geneva evolution models. The star is currently located in the outer portion of the SMC’s body, but if the star’s transverse peculiar velocity is similar to its peculiar radial velocity, in 10 Myr the star would have moved 1.°6 across the disk of the SMC and could easily have been born in one of the SMC’s star-forming regions. Based on its large radial velocity, we suggest it originated in a binary system where the primary exploded as a supernovae, thus flinging the runaway star out into space. Such stars may provide an important mechanism for the dispersal of heavier elements in galaxies given the large percentage of massive stars that are runaways. In the future, we hope to look into additional evolved runaway stars that were discovered as part of our other past surveys. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. Evolution of a blue supergiant with a neutron star companion immersed in its envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of a binary system consisting of 1 Msub(sun) neutron star and a 25 Msub(sun) blue supergiant through a phase of common envelope is investigated. We include the effects of an additional energy source on the supergiant's envelope, due to the presence of the neutron star, and variable mass loss from the system, taken as proportional to the total luminosity. The results indicate that, independently of the initial period, the system loses its whole envelope as a consequence of the common envelope phase, the final product of this being a detached system, consisting of a neutron star and a helium star. (orig.)

  3. DISCOVERY OF SiO BAND EMISSION FROM GALACTIC B[e] SUPERGIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, M. [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Oksala, M. E. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190, Meudon (France); Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Torres, A. F. [Departamento de Espectroscopía Estelar, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Fernandes, M. Borges, E-mail: michaela.kraus@asu.cas.cz [Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 São Cristovão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-02-20

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are evolved massive stars in a short-lived transition phase. During this phase, these objects eject large amounts of material, which accumulate in a circumstellar disk-like structure. The expelled material is typically dense and cool, providing the cradle for molecule and dust condensation and for a rich, ongoing chemistry. Very little is known about the chemical composition of these disks, beyond the emission from dust and CO revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. As massive stars preserve an oxygen-rich surface composition throughout their life, other oxygen-based molecules can be expected to form. As SiO is the second most stable oxygen compound, we initiated an observing campaign to search for first-overtone SiO emission bands. We obtained high-resolution near-infrared L-band spectra for a sample of Galactic B[e]SGs with reported CO band emission. We clearly detect emission from the SiO first-overtone bands in CPD-52 9243 and indications for faint emission in HD 62623, HD 327083, and CPD-57 2874. From model fits, we find that in all these stars the SiO bands are rotationally broadened with a velocity lower than observed in the CO band forming regions, suggesting that SiO forms at larger distances from the star. Hence, searching for and analyzing these bands is crucial for studying the structure and kinematics of circumstellar disks, because they trace complementary regions to the CO band formation zone. Moreover, since SiO molecules are the building blocks for silicate dust, their study might provide insight in the early stage of dust formation.

  4. DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST B[e] SUPERGIANTS IN M 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E. [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L. [Departamento de Espectroscopía Estelar, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, B1900FWA La Plata (Argentina); Borges Fernandes, M., E-mail: kraus@sunstel.asu.cas.cz [Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 São Cristovão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are transitional objects in the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. The small number of B[e]SGs known so far in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds indicates that this evolutionary phase is short. Nevertheless, the strong aspherical mass loss occurring during this phase, which leads to the formation of rings or disk-like structures, and the similarity to possible progenitors of SN1987 A emphasize the importance of B[e]SGs for the dynamics of the interstellar medium as well as stellar and galactic chemical evolution. The number of objects and their mass-loss behavior at different metallicities are essential ingredients for accurate predictions from stellar and galactic evolution calculations. However, B[e]SGs are not easily identified, as they share many characteristics with luminous blue variables (LBVs) in their quiescent (hot) phase. We present medium-resolution near-infrared K-band spectra for four stars in M 31, which have been assigned a hot LBV (candidate) status. Applying diagnostics that were recently developed to distinguish B[e]SGs from hot LBVs, we classify two of the objects as bonafide LBVs; one of them currently in outburst. In addition, we firmly classify the two stars 2MASS J00441709+4119273 and 2MASS J00452257+4150346 as the first B[e]SGs in M 31 based on strong CO band emission detected in their spectra, and infrared colors typical for this class of stars.

  5. Inhomogeneous molecular ring around the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraus, Michaela; Cidale, L.S.; Arias, M.L.; Maravelias, Grigorios; Nickeler, Dieter Horst; Torres, A.F.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Aret, A.; Curé, M.; Vallverdú, R.; Barbá, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 593, September (2016), s. 1-14 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21373S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR017 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : circumstellar matter * early-type stars * supergiants Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  6. On the hydrogen neutral outflowing disks of B[e] supergiants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraus, Michaela; Borges Fernandes, M.; de Araújo, F. X.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 463, č. 2 (2007), s. 627-634 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/1267 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : supergiants * winds * outflows Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2007

  7. Mass loss from OB supergiants in x-ray binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alme, M.L.; Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the atmospheres of OB supergiants in x-ray binary systems indicates that when the stellar surface is close enough to the saddle in the gravitational potential to provide a mass transfer rate adequate to power a compact x-ray source, large-amplitude variations in the rate of mass flow occur. 9 references

  8. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN)

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  9. Towards a Unified View of Inhomogeneous Stellar Winds in Isolated Supergiant Stars and Supergiant High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, Silvia; Kretschmar, Peter; Bozzo, Enrico; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Puls, Joachim; Sidoli, Lara; Sundqvist, Jon Olof; Blay, Pere; Falanga, Maurizio; Fürst, Felix; Gímenez-García, Angel; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kühnel, Matthias; Sander, Andreas; Torrejón, José Miguel; Wilms, Jörn

    2017-10-01

    Massive stars, at least ˜10 times more massive than the Sun, have two key properties that make them the main drivers of evolution of star clusters, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. On the one hand, the outer layers of massive stars are so hot that they produce most of the ionizing ultraviolet radiation of galaxies; in fact, the first massive stars helped to re-ionize the Universe after its Dark Ages. Another important property of massive stars are the strong stellar winds and outflows they produce. This mass loss, and finally the explosion of a massive star as a supernova or a gamma-ray burst, provide a significant input of mechanical and radiative energy into the interstellar space. These two properties together make massive stars one of the most important cosmic engines: they trigger the star formation and enrich the interstellar medium with heavy elements, that ultimately leads to formation of Earth-like rocky planets and the development of complex life. The study of massive star winds is thus a truly multidisciplinary field and has a wide impact on different areas of astronomy. In recent years observational and theoretical evidences have been growing that these winds are not smooth and homogeneous as previously assumed, but rather populated by dense "clumps". The presence of these structures dramatically affects the mass loss rates derived from the study of stellar winds. Clump properties in isolated stars are nowadays inferred mostly through indirect methods (i.e., spectroscopic observations of line profiles in various wavelength regimes, and their analysis based on tailored, inhomogeneous wind models). The limited characterization of the clump physical properties (mass, size) obtained so far have led to large uncertainties in the mass loss rates from massive stars. Such uncertainties limit our understanding of the role of massive star winds in galactic and cosmic evolution. Supergiant high mass X-ray binaries (SgXBs) are among the brightest X

  10. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the blue supergiant SBW1: the remarkably weak wind of a SN 1987A analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Groh, Jose H.; France, Kevin; McCray, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The Galactic blue supergiant SBW1 with its circumstellar ring nebula represents the best known analogue of the progenitor of SN 1987A. High-resolution imaging has shown Hα and infrared structures arising in an ionized flow that partly fills the ring's interior. To constrain the influence of the stellar wind on this structure, we obtained an ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the central star of SBW1 with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. The UV spectrum shows none of the typical wind signatures, indicating a very low mass-loss rate. Radiative transfer models suggest an extremely low rate below 10-10 M⊙ yr-1, although we find that cooling time-scales probably become comparable to (or longer than) the flow time below 10-8 M⊙ yr-1. We therefore adopt this latter value as a conservative upper limit. For the central star, the model yields Teff = 21 000 ± 1000 K, log(geff) = 3.0, L ≃ 5 × 104 L⊙, and roughly Solar composition except for enhanced N abundance. SBW1's very low mass-loss rate may hinder the wind's ability to shape its nebula and to shed angular momentum. The spin-down time-scale for magnetic breaking is more than 500 times longer than the age of the ring. This, combined with the star's slow rotation rate, constrains merger scenarios to form ring nebulae. The mass-loss rate is at least 10 times lower than expected from mass-loss recipes, without any account of clumping. The physical explanation for why SBW1's wind is so weak presents an interesting mystery.

  11. Low-frequency photospheric and wind variability in the early-B supergiant HD2905

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Aerts, C.; Urbaneja, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    to the lack of adequate observations for a proper characterization of the complex spectroscopic and photometric variability occurring in these stars. Aims. Our goal is to detect, analyze, and interpret variability in the early-B-type supergiant HD2905 (kappa Cas, B1 Ia) using long-term, ground-based, high...... snapshot and time-dependent information about the stellar parameters and abundances by means of the FASTWIND stellar atmosphere code. Results. HD2905 is a spectroscopic variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes in the zero and first moments of the photospheric lines of up to 15% and 30 km s(-1), respectively....... Conclusions. Combined long-term uninterrupted space photometry with high-precision spectroscopy is the best strategy to unravel the complex low-frequency photospheric and wind variability of B supergiants. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of waves and of convective motions in the sub-surface layers can shed...

  12. Semi-analytical Formulas for the Fundamental Parameters of Galactic Early B Supergiants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaninetti, L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication of new tables of calibration of some fundamental parameters of Galactic B0-B5 supergiants in the two classes $I_mathrm{a}$ and $I_mathrm{b} $ allows to particularize the eight parameters conjecture that model five fundamental parameters. The numerical expressions for visual magnitude, radius, mass, luminosity and surface gravity are derived for supergiants in the range of temperature between 29700 K and 15200 K. The availability of accurate tables of calibration allows us to estimate the efficiency of the derived formulas in reproducing the observed values. The average efficiency of the new formulas, expressed in percent, is 94 for the visual magnitude, 81 for the mass, 96 for the radius, 99 for the logarithm of the luminosity and 97 for the logarithm of the surface gravity.

  13. RED SUPERGIANTS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: THE SCULPTOR GALAXY NGC 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Bresolin, Fabio; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee; Davies, Ben; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand; Bender, Ralf; Wegner, Michael; Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Williams, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative spectroscopic study of 27 red supergiants (RSGs) in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 300. J-band spectra were obtained using KMOS on the Very Large Telescope and studied with state of the art synthetic spectra including NLTE corrections for the strongest diagnostic lines. We report a central metallicity of [Z] = −0.03 ± 0.05 with a gradient of −0.083 ± 0.014 [dex/kpc], in agreement with previous studies of blue supergiants and H ii-region auroral line measurements. This result marks the first application of the J-band spectroscopic method to a population of individual RSG stars beyond the Local Group of galaxies and reveals the great potential of this technique

  14. LBT Discovery of a Yellow Supergiant Eclipsing Binary in the Dwarf Galaxy Holmberg IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Weisz, D. R.; Baruffolo, A.; Bechtold, J.; Burwitz, V.; De Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Garnavich, P. M.; Giallongo, E.; Hill, J. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Ragazzoni, R.; Speziali, R.; Thompson, D. J.; Wagner, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    In a variability survey of M81 using the Large Binocular Telescope we have discovered a peculiar eclipsing binary (MV ~ - 7.1) in the field of the dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX. It has a period of 271 days, and the light curve is well fit by an overcontact model in which both stars are overflowing their Roche lobes. It is composed of two yellow supergiants (V - Isimeq 1 mag, Teffsimeq 4800 K), rather than the far more common red or blue supergiants. Such systems must be rare. While we failed to find any similar systems in the literature, we did, however, note a second example. The SMC F0 supergiant R47 is a bright (MV ~ - 7.5) periodic variable whose All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) light curve is well fit as a contact binary with a 181 day period. We propose that these systems are the progenitors of supernovae like SN 2004et and SN 2006ov, which appeared to have yellow progenitors. The binary interactions (mass transfer, mass loss) limit the size of the supergiant to give it a higher surface temperature than an isolated star at the same core evolutionary stage. We also discuss the possibility of this variable being a long-period Cepheid. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  15. K2 photometry and HERMES spectroscopy of the blue supergiant rho Leo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aerts, C.; Bowman, D. M.; Simon-Diaz, S.

    2018-01-01

    We present an 80-d long uninterrupted high-cadence K2 light curve of the B1Iab supergiant rho Leo (HD91316), deduced with the method of halo photometry. This light curve reveals a dominant frequency of f(rot) = 0.0373 d(-1) and its harmonics. This dominant frequency corresponds with a rotation...... period of 26.8 d and is subject to amplitude and phase modulation. The K2 photometry additionally reveals multiperiodic low-frequency variability (

  16. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients with Swift: spectroscopic and temporal properties

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Vercellone, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are a class of high-mass X-ray binaries with possible counterparts in the high energy gamma rays. The Swift SFXT Project has conducted a systematic investigation of the properties of SFTXs on timescales ranging from minutes to years and in several intensity states (from bright flares, to intermediate intensity states, and down to almost quiescence). We also performed broad-band spectroscopy of outbursts, and intensity-selected spectroscopy outside of o...

  17. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay, TAS 7005 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield NSW 2122 (Australia); Wong, T. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hughes, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Fukui, Y. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kawamura, A., E-mail: joanne.dawson@utas.edu.au [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  18. Chemical signature study of tupiguarani ceramic tradition from Central region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil; Estudo de assinaturas quimicas em ceramica da tradicao tupiguarani da regiao central do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Irene Akemy Tomiyoshi

    2006-07-01

    In this work a model based on experimental results using chemical composition data of the pottery sherds applied to Spearmann's no parametric test, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis, was applied. The samples are soils and Tupiguarani Tradition pottery sherd from the central area of the Rio Grande do Sul State. The chemical elements , Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Fe, K Mn, Pb, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti, V and Zn were determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXFR) while Ce, Cu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Y by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) techniques. Relationships among the pottery characteristics, studied sites and sherd dispersion in the several sites were proposed. Indications of chemical signature of the small pottery with function to go or not to the fire were observed. The largest dispersion is of small pottery with surface treatment no corrugated. The potteries chemical fingerprints from Ijui River, Ibicui-Vacacai Mirim River and Jacui River were verified. (author)

  19. Chemical signature study of tupiguarani ceramic tradition from Central region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil; Estudo de assinaturas quimicas em ceramica da tradicao tupiguarani da regiao central do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Irene Akemy Tomiyoshi

    2006-07-01

    In this work a model based on experimental results using chemical composition data of the pottery sherds applied to Spearmann's no parametric test, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis, was applied. The samples are soils and Tupiguarani Tradition pottery sherd from the central area of the Rio Grande do Sul State. The chemical elements , Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Fe, K Mn, Pb, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti, V and Zn were determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXFR) while Ce, Cu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Y by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) techniques. Relationships among the pottery characteristics, studied sites and sherd dispersion in the several sites were proposed. Indications of chemical signature of the small pottery with function to go or not to the fire were observed. The largest dispersion is of small pottery with surface treatment no corrugated. The potteries chemical fingerprints from Ijui River, Ibicui-Vacacai Mirim River and Jacui River were verified. (author)

  20. Signature-based User Authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Hámorník, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    This work aims on missing handwritten signature authentication in Windows. Result of this work is standalone software that allow users to log into Windows by writing signature. We focus on security of signature authentification and best overall user experience. We implemented signature authentification service that accept signature and return user access token if signature is genuine. Signature authentification is done by comparing given signature to signature patterns by their similarity. Si...

  1. Electronic Signature Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishes the United States Environmental Protection Agency's approach to adopting electronic signature technology and best practices to ensure electronic signatures applied to official Agency documents are legally valid and enforceable

  2. Lesson 6: Signature Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checklist items 13 through 17 are grouped under the Signature Validation Process, and represent CROMERR requirements that the system must satisfy as part of ensuring that electronic signatures it receives are valid.

  3. Exotic signatures from supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.J.

    1989-08-01

    Minor changes to the standard supersymmetric model, such as soft flavor violation and R parity violation, cause large changes in the signatures. The origin of these changes and the resulting signatures are discussed. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Blinding for unanticipated signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chaum (David)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractPreviously known blind signature systems require an amount of computation at least proportional to the number of signature types, and also that the number of such types be fixed in advance. These requirements are not practical in some applications. Here, a new blind signature technique

  5. Fair quantum blind signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian-Yin, Wang; Qiao-Yan, Wen

    2010-01-01

    We present a new fair blind signature scheme based on the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyse the security of this scheme, and show that it is not possible to forge valid blind signatures. Moreover, comparisons between this scheme and public key blind signature schemes are also discussed. (general)

  6. Quantitative spectroscopy of Galactic BA-type supergiants. I. Atmospheric parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firnstein, M.; Przybilla, N.

    2012-07-01

    Context. BA-type supergiants show a high potential as versatile indicators for modern astronomy. This paper constitutes the first in a series that aims at a systematic spectroscopic study of Galactic BA-type supergiants. Various problems will be addressed, including in particular observational constraints on the evolution of massive stars and a determination of abundance gradients in the Milky Way. Aims: The focus here is on the determination of accurate and precise atmospheric parameters for a sample of Galactic BA-type supergiants as prerequisite for all further analysis. Some first applications include a recalibration of functional relationships between spectral-type, intrinsic colours, bolometric corrections and effective temperature, and an exploration of the reddening-free Johnson Q and Strömgren [c1] and β-indices as photometric indicators for effective temperatures and gravities of BA-type supergiants. Methods: An extensive grid of theoretical spectra is computed based on a hybrid non-LTE approach, covering the relevant parameter space in effective temperature, surface gravity, helium abundance, microturbulence and elemental abundances. The atmospheric parameters are derived spectroscopically by line-profile fits of our theoretical models to high-resolution and high-S/N spectra obtained at various observatories. Ionization equilibria of multiple metals and the Stark-broadened hydrogen and the neutral helium lines constitute our primary indicators for the parameter determination, supplemented by (spectro-)photometry from the UV to the near-IR. Results: We obtain accurate atmospheric parameters for 35 sample supergiants from a homogeneous analysis. Data on effective temperatures, surface gravities, helium abundances, microturbulence, macroturbulence and rotational velocities are presented. The interstellar reddening and the ratio of total-to-selective extinction towards the stars are determined. Our empirical spectral-type-Teff scale is steeper than

  7. Real Traceable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sherman S. M.

    Traceable signature scheme extends a group signature scheme with an enhanced anonymity management mechanism. The group manager can compute a tracing trapdoor which enables anyone to test if a signature is signed by a given misbehaving user, while the only way to do so for group signatures requires revealing the signer of all signatures. Nevertheless, it is not tracing in a strict sense. For all existing schemes, T tracing agents need to recollect all N' signatures ever produced and perform RN' “checks” for R revoked users. This involves a high volume of transfer and computations. Increasing T increases the degree of parallelism for tracing but also the probability of “missing” some signatures in case some of the agents are dishonest.

  8. Impurity profiling of a chemical weapon precursor for possible forensic signatures by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Jamin C; Wahl, Jon H; Synovec, Robert E; Mong, Gary M; Fraga, Carlos G

    2010-01-15

    In this report we present the feasibility of using analytical and chemometric methodologies to reveal and exploit the chemical impurity profiles from commercial dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) samples to illustrate the type of forensic information that may be obtained from chemical-attack evidence. Using DMMP as a model compound of a toxicant that may be used in a chemical attack, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC/TOF-MS) to detect and identify trace organic impurities in six samples of commercially acquired DMMP. The GC x GC/TOF-MS data was analyzed to produce impurity profiles for all six DMMP samples using 29 analyte impurities. The use of PARAFAC for the mathematical resolution of overlapped GC x GC peaks ensured clean spectra for the identification of many of the detected analytes by spectral library matching. The use of statistical pairwise comparison revealed that there were trace impurities that were quantitatively similar and different among five of the six DMMP samples. Two of the DMMP samples were revealed to have identical impurity profiles by this approach. The use of nonnegative matrix factorization indicated that there were five distinct DMMP sample types as illustrated by the clustering of the multiple DMMP analyses into five distinct clusters in the scores plots. The two indistinguishable DMMP samples were confirmed by their chemical supplier to be from the same bulk source. Sample information from the other chemical suppliers supported the idea that the other four DMMP samples were likely from different bulk sources. These results demonstrate that the matching of synthesized products from the same source is possible using impurity profiling. In addition, the identified impurities common to all six DMMP samples provide strong evidence that basic route information can be obtained from impurity profiles. Finally, impurities that may be unique to the sole bulk manufacturer of DMMP were

  9. The luminosities of cool supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds, and the Humphreys-Davidson limit revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben; Crowther, Paul A.; Beasor, Emma R.

    2018-05-01

    The empirical upper luminosity boundary Lmax of cool supergiants, often referred to as the Humphreys-Davidson limit, is thought to encode information on the general mass-loss behaviour of massive stars. Further, it delineates the boundary at which single stars will end their lives stripped of their hydrogen-rich envelope, which in turn is a key factor in the relative rates of Type-II to Type-Ibc supernovae from single star channels. In this paper we have revisited the issue of Lmax by studying the luminosity distributions of cool supergiants (SGs) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC). We assemble samples of cool SGs in each galaxy which are highly-complete above log L/L⊙=5.0, and determine their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the mid-infrared using modern multi-wavelength survey data. We show that in both cases Lmax appears to be lower than previously quoted, and is in the region of log L/L⊙=5.5. There is no evidence for Lmax being higher in the SMC than in the LMC, as would be expected if metallicity-dependent winds were the dominant factor in the stripping of stellar envelopes. We also show that Lmax aligns with the lowest luminosity of single nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet stars, indicating of a change in evolutionary sequence for stars above a critical mass. From population synthesis analysis we show that the Geneva evolutionary models greatly over-predict the numbers of cool SGs in the SMC. We also argue that the trend of earlier average spectral types of cool SGs in lower metallicity environments represents a genuine shift to hotter temperatures. Finally, we use our new bolometric luminosity measurements to provide updated bolometric corrections for cool supergiants.

  10. THE DISCOVERY OF A MASSIVE CLUSTER OF RED SUPERGIANTS WITH GLIMPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Clemens, Dan P.; Jameson, Katherine; Pinnick, April; Pavel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a previously unknown massive Galactic star cluster at l = 29. 0 22, b = -0. 0 20. Identified visually in mid-IR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, the cluster contains at least eight late-type supergiants, based on follow-up near-IR spectroscopy, and an additional 3-6 candidate supergiant members having IR photometry consistent with a similar distance and reddening. The cluster lies at a local minimum in the 13 CO column density and 8 μm emission. We interpret this feature as a hole carved by the energetic winds of the evolving massive stars. The 13 CO hole seen in molecular maps at V LSR ∼ 95 km s -1 corresponds to near/far kinematic distances of 6.1/8.7 ± 1 kpc. We calculate a mean spectrophotometric distance of 7.0 +3.7 -2.4 kpc, broadly consistent with the kinematic distances inferred. This location places it near the northern end of the Galactic bar. For the mean extinction of A V = 12.6 ± 0.5 mag (A K = 1.5 ± 0.1 mag), the color-magnitude diagram of probable cluster members is well fit by isochrones in the age range 18-24 Myr. The estimated cluster mass is ∼20,000 M sun . With the most massive original cluster stars likely deceased, no strong radio emission is detected in this vicinity. As such, this red supergiant (RSG) cluster is representative of adolescent massive Galactic clusters that lie hidden behind many magnitudes of dust obscuration. This cluster joins two similar RSG clusters as residents of the volatile region where the end of our Galaxy's bar joins the base of the Scutum-Crux spiral arm, suggesting a recent episode of widespread massive star formation there.

  11. Light variations of the population II F-type supergiant HD 46703

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, H. E.; Carney, B. W.; Grauer, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Photometric monitoring has revealed brightness variations of 0.1 m on a time scale of weeks for HD 46703, a metal-deficient F-type field analog of the stars lying above the horizontal branch in globular clusters. It is suggested that HD 46703 belongs to the '89 Her' class of luminous F-type variables. Since HD 46703 is unquestionably a halo object, it is almost certainly a low-mass star. It is suggested that it, and probably the other 89 Her variables, are masquerading as supergiants during their final evolution off the asymptotic giant branch.

  12. Effect of mass loss on the driving of g-modes in B supergiant stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godart, Melanie; Noels, Arlette [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Liege (Belgium); Dupret, Marc-Antoine [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, LESIA (France)], E-mail: Helanie.Godart@ulg.ac.be, E-mail: Arlette.Noels@ulg.ac.be, E-mail: ma.dupret@obspm.fr

    2008-10-15

    MOST has detected p and g-modes in the B supergiant star HD163899. Saio et al. (2006) have explained the driving of g-modes in a post main sequence star by the presence of a convective shell which prevents some modes from entering the damping radiative core. We show that this scenario depends on the evolution of the star, with or without mass loss. If the mass loss rate is high enough, the convective shell disappears and all the g-modes are stable.

  13. The orbital period in the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J16465--4507

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, D. J.; Sguera, V.; Bird, A. J; McBride, V. A.; Hill, A. B.; Scaringi, S.; Drave, S.; Bazzano, A.; Dean, A. J

    2010-01-01

    Timing analysis of the INTEGRAL-IBIS and Swift-BAT light curves of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) IGR J16465-4507 has identified a period of 30.32+/-0.02 days which we interpret as the orbital period of the binary system. In addition 11 outbursts (9 of which are previously unpublished) have been found between MJD 52652 to MJD 54764, all of which occur close to the region of the orbit we regard as periastron. From the reported flux outbursts, we found a dynamical range in the inter...

  14. On the Disappearance of the Supergiant Progenitor of SN 2011dh in M51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergon, Mattias; Sollerman, Jesper; Pursimo, Tapio; Augusteijn, Thomas; Telting, John; Smirnova, Olesja; Kankare, Erkki; Mattila, Seppo; Maund, Justyn; Fraser, Morgan

    2013-03-01

    We report on high quality pre- and post-explosion B, V and r band imaging obtained with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). Difference imaging reveals a reduction of 45-60 percent in flux at the position of the yellow supergiant coincident with SN 2011dh and proposed as the progenitor by Maund et al. (2011, ApJ, 739, L37). The pre-explosion imaging was obtained on May 26 2008 (B) and May 29 2011 (V and r), the latter just 2 days before explosion.

  15. Disappearance of the Supergiant Progenitor of SN 2011dh in M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori; Kelly, Patrick; Smith, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    We report that in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations at F555W and F814W with the UVIS channel, conducted on 2013 March 2 UT as part of our Cycle 20 Snapshot program GO-13029 (PI: A. Filippenko), we have discovered that the yellow supergiant star, identified by Van Dyk et al. (2011, ApJ, 741, L28) and Maund et al. (2011, MNRAS, 739, L37) at the position of the Type IIb SN 2011dh in M51, has vanished.

  16. Effect of mass loss on the driving of g-modes in B supergiant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godart, Melanie; Noels, Arlette; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2008-01-01

    MOST has detected p and g-modes in the B supergiant star HD163899. Saio et al. (2006) have explained the driving of g-modes in a post main sequence star by the presence of a convective shell which prevents some modes from entering the damping radiative core. We show that this scenario depends on the evolution of the star, with or without mass loss. If the mass loss rate is high enough, the convective shell disappears and all the g-modes are stable.

  17. Chemical Abundances of Main-sequence, Turnoff, Subgiant, and Red Giant Stars from APOGEE Spectra. I. Signatures of Diffusion in the Open Cluster M67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Diogo; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Allende Prieto, C.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Holzer, Parker; Frinchaboy, Peter; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, J. A.; Jönsson, Henrik; Majewski, Steven R.; Shetrone, Matthew; Sobeck, Jennifer; Stringfellow, Guy; Teske, Johanna; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Carrera, Ricardo; Stassun, Keivan; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Santana, Felipe

    2018-04-01

    Detailed chemical abundance distributions for 14 elements are derived for eight high-probability stellar members of the solar metallicity old open cluster M67 with an age of ∼4 Gyr. The eight stars consist of four pairs, with each pair occupying a distinct phase of stellar evolution: two G dwarfs, two turnoff stars, two G subgiants, and two red clump (RC) K giants. The abundance analysis uses near-IR high-resolution spectra (λ1.5–1.7 μm) from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey and derives abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Our derived stellar parameters and metallicity for 2M08510076+1153115 suggest that this star is a solar twin, exhibiting abundance differences relative to the Sun of ≤0.04 dex for all elements. Chemical homogeneity is found within each class of stars (∼0.02 dex), while significant abundance variations (∼0.05–0.20 dex) are found across the different evolutionary phases; the turnoff stars typically have the lowest abundances, while the RCs tend to have the largest. Non-LTE corrections to the LTE-derived abundances are unlikely to explain the differences. A detailed comparison of the derived Fe, Mg, Si, and Ca abundances with recently published surface abundances from stellar models that include chemical diffusion provides a good match between the observed and predicted abundances as a function of stellar mass. Such agreement would indicate the detection of chemical diffusion processes in the stellar members of M67.

  18. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  19. Application of CWC analytical procedures for safeguards; Analysis of phosphorus-containing organic chemical signatures from environmental samples; Final report on task FIN A844 on the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, M; Bjoerk, H; Haekkinen, V; Kostiainen, O; Kuitunen, M L; Lehtonen, P; Mesilaakso, M; Soederstroem, M [Finnish Inst. for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    Solvent extraction can be used for the recovery of U and Pu from irradiated fuel. The most potential organic chemical signatures are extractants and solvents used in reprocessing plants. The PUREX process is widely used in reprocessing. It uses tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as extractant in an organic solvent for U and Pu from irradiated fuel and U from its ores. TBP is a strong extractant for tetra and hexavalent actinides from nitric acid media. Stable complexes are formed between actinide nitrate and TBP which are soluble in the organic phase. Sample containing TBP and some radiolysis products can indicate that TBP is used for reprocessing nuclear fuel. The TBP will decompose in the PUREX process to mono-and dibutyl phosphates (MBP and DBP). TBP, DBP and MBP have been analysed from air, water, soil, and sediment samples according to slightly modified procedures presented in Recommended Operating Procedures for Sampling and Analysis in the Verification of Chemical Disarmament. The limits of detection for the phosphates have been determined for air, water and soil samples. (orig.) (12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.).

  20. THE YELLOW SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR OF THE TYPE II SUPERNOVA 2011dh IN M51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maund, J. R.; Fraser, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Kotak, R.; Magill, L.; Ergon, M.; Sollerman, J.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Botticella, M.-T.; Valenti, S.; Bufano, F.; Danziger, I. J.; Stephens, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the detection of the putative progenitor of the Type IIb SN 2011dh in archival pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. Using post-explosion Adaptive Optics imaging with Gemini NIRI+ALTAIR, the position of the supernova (SN) in the pre-explosion images was determined to within 23 mas. The progenitor candidate is consistent with an F8 supergiant star (logL/L sun = 4.92 ± 0.20 and T eff = 6000 ± 280 K). Through comparison with stellar evolution tracks, this corresponds to a single star at the end of core C-burning with an initial mass of M ZAMS = 13 ± 3 M sun . The possibility of the progenitor source being a cluster is rejected, on the basis of: (1) the source not being spatially extended, (2) the absence of excess Hα emission, and (3) the poor fit to synthetic cluster spectral energy distributions (SEDs). It is unclear if a binary companion is contributing to the observed SED, although given the excellent correspondence of the observed photometry to a single star SED we suggest that the companion does not contribute significantly. Early photometric and spectroscopic observations show fast evolution similar to the transitional Type IIb SN 2008ax and suggest that a large amount of the progenitor's hydrogen envelope was removed before explosion. Late-time observations will reveal if the yellow supergiant or the putative companion star were responsible for this SN explosion.

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY IN THE A0 SUPERGIANT HR 1040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corliss, David J.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    A time-series analysis of spectroscopic and photometric observables of the A0 Ia supergiant HR 1040 has been performed, including equivalent widths, radial velocities, and Strömgren photometric indices. The data, obtained from 1993 through 2007, include 152 spectroscopic observations from the Ritter Observatory 1 m telescope and 269 Strömgren photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope. Typical of late B- and early A-type supergiants, HR 1040 has a highly variable Hα profile. The star was found to have an intermittent active phase marked by correlation between the Hα absorption equivalent width and blue-edge radial velocity and by photospheric connections observed in correlations to equivalent width, second moment and radial velocity in Si ii λλ6347, 6371. High-velocity absorption (HVA) events were observed only during this active phase. HVA events in the wind were preceded by photospheric activity, including Si ii radial velocity oscillations 19–42 days prior to onset of an HVA event and correlated increases in Si ii W λ and second moment from 13 to 23 days before the start of the HVA event. While increases in various line equivalent widths in the wind prior to HVA events have been reported in the past in other stars, our finding of precursors in enhanced radial velocity variations in the wind and at the photosphere is a new result

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Mass-losing Supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.

    1998-04-01

    The highly luminous M supergiant VY CMa is a massive star that appears to be in its final death throes, losing mass at high rate en route to exploding as a supernova. Subarcsecond-resolution optical images of VY CMa, obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, vividly demonstrate that mass loss from VY CMa is highly anisotropic. In the FOC images, the optical ``star'' VY CMa constitutes the bright, well-resolved core of an elongated reflection nebula. The imaged nebula is ~3" (~4500 AU) in extent and is clumpy and highly asymmetric. The images indicate that the bright core, which lies near one edge of the nebula, is pure scattered starlight. We conclude that at optical wavelengths VY CMa is obscured from view along our line of sight by its own dusty envelope. The presence of the extended reflection nebula then suggests that this envelope is highly flattened and/or that the star is surrounded by a massive circumstellar disk. Such axisymmetric circumstellar density structure should have profound effects on post-red supergiant mass loss from VY CMa and, ultimately, on the shaping of the remnant of the supernova that will terminate its post-main-sequence evolution.

  3. Molecular Abundances in the Circumstellar Envelope of Oxygen-Rich Supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessica L.; Ziurys, Lucy

    2014-06-01

    A complete set of molecular abundances have been established for the Oxygen-rich circumstellar envelope (CSE) surrounding the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). These data were obtained from The Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 1-mm spectral line survey of this object using the ARO Sub-millimeter Telescope (SMT), as well as complimentary transitions taken with the ARO 12-meter. The non-LTE radiative transfer code ESCAPADE has been used to obtain the molecular abundances and distributions in VY CMa, including modeling of the various asymmetric outflow geometries in this source. For example, SO and SO2 were determined to arise from five distinct outflows, four of which are asymmetric with respect to the central star. Abundances of these two sulfur-bearing molecules range from 3 x 10-8 - 2.5 x 10-7 for the various outflows. Similar results will be presented for molecules like CS, SiS, HCN, and SiO, as well as more exotic species like NS, PO, AlO, and AlOH. The molecular abundances between the various outflows will be compared and implications for supergiant chemistry will be discussed.

  4. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  5. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  6. Science of Signatures Workshop on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Applications July 24, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, Donald D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riciputi, Lee D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The science of signatures focus areas are: (1) Radiological and Nuclear; (2) Chemical and Materials (including explosives); (3) Biological - Signatures of Disease and Health; (4) Energy; (5) Climate; and (6) Space.

  7. ALMA observations of anisotropic dust mass loss in the inner circumstellar environment of the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Gorman, E.; Vlemmings, W.; Richards, A.M.S.; Baudry, A.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Harper, G.M.; Humphreys, E.M.; Kervella, P.; Khouri, T.; Muller, S.

    2015-01-01

    The processes leading to dust formation and the subsequent role it plays in driving mass loss in cool evolved stars is an area of intense study. Here we present high resolution ALMA Science Verification data of the continuum emission around the highly evolved oxygen-rich red supergiant VY CMa. These

  8. A new observational tracer for high-density disc-like structures around B[e] supergiants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aret, Anna; Kraus, Michaela; Muratore, M.F.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 423, č. 1 (2012), s. 284-293 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0003; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1198 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : circumstellar matter * emission line * Be supergiants Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.521, year: 2012

  9. Long-period variables in the Magellanic Clouds: Supergiants, AGB stars, supernova precursors, planetary nebula precursors, and enrichment of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, P.; Bessell, M.S.; Fox, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared JHK magnitudes and low-dispersion red spectra have been obtained for 90 long-period variables (LPVs) in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds. The LPVs fall into two distinct groups, core helium (or carbon) burning supergiants and stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). The supergiants have small pulsation amplitudes in K ( or approx. =5 M/sub sun/ produce supernovae while less massive stars produce planetary nebulae with nebula masses from approx.0.1--2.1 M/sub sun/. The coreburning red supergiants appear highly overluminous for their pulsation mass, indicating that they have lost up to half their mass since the main-sequence phase

  10. Chemical and isotopic signature of bulk organic matter and hydrocarbon biomarkers within mid-slope accretionary sediments of the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masanori; Shingai, Hiroshi; Pohlman, John W.; Naraoka, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) from two mid-slope sites of the northern Cascadia margin were investigated during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 to elucidate the organic matter origins and identify potential microbial contributions to SOM. Gas hydrate is present at both locations (IODP Sites U1327 and U1328), with distinct patterns of near-seafloor structural accumulations at the cold seep Site U1328 and deeper stratigraphic accumulations at the slope-basin Site U1327. Source characterization and evidence that some components of the organic matter have been diagenetically altered are determined from the concentrations and isotopic compositions of hydrocarbon biomarkers, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and total sulfur (TS). The carbon isotopic compositions of TOC (δ13CTOC = −26 to −22‰) and long-chain n-alkanes (C27, C29 and C31, δ13C = −34 to − 29‰) suggest the organic matter at both sites is a mixture of 1) terrestrial plants that employ the C3 photosynthetic pathway and 2) marine algae. In contrast, the δ15NTN values of the bulk sediment (+ 4 to + 8‰) are consistent with a predominantly marine source, but these values most likely have been modified during microbial organic matter degradation. The δ13C values of archaeal biomarker pentamethylicosane (PMI) (− 46.4‰) and bacterial-sourced hopenes, diploptene and hop-21-ene (− 40.9 to − 34.7‰) indicate a partial contribution from methane carbon or a chemoautotrophic pathway. Our multi-isotope and biomarker-based conclusions are consistent with previous studies, based only on the elemental composition of bulk sediments, that suggested a mixed marine-terrestrial organic matter origin for these mid-slope sites of the northern Cascadia margin.

  11. Chemical composition of air masses transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast during ITCT 2K2: Fossil fuel combustion versus biomass-burning signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Cooper, O. R.; Warneke, C.; Hudson, P. K.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Nicks, D. K., Jr.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Donnelly, S. G.; Schauffler, S. M.; Stroud, V.; Johnson, K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D. G.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation experiment in 2002 (ITCT 2K2), a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft was used to study the long-range transport of Asian air masses toward the west coast of North America. During research flights on 5 and 17 May, strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO) and other species were observed in air masses that had been transported from Asia. The hydrocarbon composition of the air masses indicated that the highest CO levels were related to fossil fuel use. During the flights on 5 and 17 May and other days, the levels of several biomass-burning indicators increased with altitude. This was true for acetonitrile (CH3CN), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), the ratio of acetylene (C2H2) to propane (C3H8), and, on May 5, the percentage of particles measured by the particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) instrument that were attributed to biomass burning based on their carbon and potassium content. An ensemble of back-trajectories, calculated from the U.S. west coast over a range of latitudes and altitudes for the entire ITCT 2K2 period, showed that air masses from Southeast Asia and China were generally observed at higher altitudes than air from Japan and Korea. Emission inventories estimate the contribution of biomass burning to the total emissions to be low for Japan and Korea, higher for China, and the highest for Southeast Asia. Combined with the origin of the air masses versus altitude, this qualitatively explains the increase with altitude, averaged over the whole ITCT 2K2 period, of the different biomass-burning indicators.

  12. Terminal velocities for a large sample of O stars, B supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, R.K.; Barlow, M.J.; Howarth, I.D.

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that easily measured, reliable estimates of terminal velocities for early-type stars are provided by the central velocity asymptotically approached by narrow absorption features and by the violet limit of zero residual intensity in saturated P Cygni profiles. These estimators are used to determine terminal velocities, v(infinity), for 181 O stars, 70 early B supergiants, and 35 Wolf-Rayet stars. For OB stars, the values are typically 15-20 percent smaller than the extreme violet edge velocities, v(edge), while for WR stars v(infinity) = 0.76 v(edge) on average. New mass-loss rates for WR stars which are thermal radio emitters are given, taking into account the new terminal velocities and recent revisions to estimates of distances and to the mean nuclear mass per electron. The relationships between v(infinity), the surface escape velocities, and effective temperatures are examined. 67 refs

  13. Asymmetric ejecta of cool supergiants and hypergiants in the massive cluster Westerlund 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, H.; Fenech, D.; Prinja, R. K.; Clark, J. S.; Hindson, L.

    2018-06-01

    We report new 5.5 GHz radio observations of the massive star cluster Westerlund 1, taken by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, detecting nine of the ten yellow hypergiants (YHGs) and red supergiants (RSGs) within the cluster. Eight of nine sources are spatially resolved. The nebulae associated with the YHGs Wd1-4a, -12a, and -265 demonstrate a cometary morphology - the first time this phenomenon has been observed for such stars. This structure is also echoed in the ejecta of the RSGs Wd1-20 and -26; in each case the cometary tails are directed away from the cluster core. The nebular emission around the RSG Wd1-237 is less collimated than these systems but once again appears more prominent in the hemisphere facing the cluster. Considered as a whole, the nebular morphologies provide compelling evidence for sculpting via a physical agent associated with Westerlund 1, such as a cluster wind.

  14. The early-type strong emission-line supergiants of the Magellanic Clouds - A spectroscopic zoology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, S. N.; Sanduleak, N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic survey of 21 early-type extreme emission line supergiants of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds using IUE and optical spectra are presented. The combined observations are discussed and the literature on each star in the sample is summarized. The classification procedures and the methods by which effective temperatures, bolometric magnitudes, and reddenings were assigned are discussed. The derived reddening values are given along with some results concerning anomalous reddening among the sample stars. The derived mass, luminosity, and radius for each star are presented, and the ultraviolet emission lines are described. Mass-loss rates are derived and discussed, and the implications of these observations for the evolution of the most massive stars in the Local Group are addressed.

  15. Pulsating red giants and supergiants as probes of galaxy formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib; Rezaei, Sara; Golshan, Roya; Saberi, Maryam

    2015-08-01

    We have developed new techniques to use pulsating red giant and supergiants stars to reconstruct the star formation history of galaxies over cosmological time, as well as using them to map the dust production across their host galaxies. We describe the large programme on the Local Group spiral galaxy Triangulum (M33), which we have monitored at near-infrared wavelengths for several years using the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope in Hawai'i. We outline the methodology and present the results for the central square kiloparsec (Javadi et al. 2011a,b, 2013) and - fresh from the press - the disc of M33 (Javadi et al. 2015, and in preparation). We also describe the results from our application of this new technique to other nearby galaxies: the Magellanic Clouds (published in Rezaei et al. 2014), the dwarf galaxies NGC 147 and 185 (Golshan et al. in preparation), and Centaurus A.

  16. The circumstellar envelopes of F and G type supergiants in the large magellanic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, W.; Humphreys, R.M.; Stencel, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained high-dispersion echellograms at 2.5 and 5.1 A/mm of four F and G-type supergiants (Msub(V) approximately -9) in the large Magellanic Cloud for the purpose of studying their outer atmospheres as compared to their Milky Way counterparts. Line doubling at Na I D indicates extensive circumstellar envelopes and mass loss rates in excess of 10 -5 M . yr -1 with outflow velocities of 10-60 km s -1 . Deep exposures at Ca II H and K reveal new information about the chromospheres of extragalactic stars. The presence of H and K wing emission lines augments this, and also provides an independent way of estimating Msub(V). (author)

  17. Submillimeter vibrationally excited water emission from the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Philipp, S. D.; Güsten, R.; Alcolea, J.; Polehampton, E. T.; Brünken, S.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .Vibrationally excited emission from the SiO and H2O molecules probes the innermost circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich red giant and supergiant stars. VY CMa is the most prolific known emission source in these molecules. Aims: .Observations were made to search for rotational lines in the lowest vibrationally excited state of H2O. Methods: .The APEX telescope was used for observations of H2O lines at frequencies around 300 GHz. Results: .Two vibrationally excited H2O lines were detected, a third one could not be found. In one of the lines we find evidence for weak maser action, similar to known (sub)millimeter ν2 = 1 lines. We find that the other line's intensity is consistent with thermal excitation by the circumstellar infrared radiation field. Several SiO lines were detected together with the H2O lines.

  18. Unveiling the molecular bipolar outflow of the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Claussen, Mark J.; Lim, Jeremy; Dinh-van-Trung; Tsuboi, Masato

    2003-04-01

    We carried out polarimetric spectral-line imaging of the molecular outflow of the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris in SiO J=1-0 line in the ground vibrational state, which contains highly linearly-polarized velocity components, using the Very Large Array. We succeeded in unveiling the highly linearly polarized bipolar outflow for the first time at subarcsecond spatial resolution. The results clearly show that the direction of linear polarization of the brightest maser components is parallel to the outflow axis. The results strongly suggest that the linear polarization of the SiO maser is closely related to the outflow phenomena of the star. Furthermore, the results indicate that the linear polarization observed in the optical and infrared also occur due to the outflow phenomena.

  19. Astrometry of the Red Supergiant Star VY Canis Majoris with VERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. K.; Hirota, T.; Honma, M.; Kobayashi, H.

    2009-08-01

    We present observational results on the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris with VERA. We have observed 22 GHz H_2O masers and 43 GHz SiO masers (v=1 and 2 J=1-0) around VY CMa for 13 months. We successfully detected a parallax of 0.87 ± 0.08 mas, corresponding to 1.15 +0.10 -0.09 kpc of distance using H_2O masers. As results of phase--referencing analyses, we have measured absolute positions for both the H_2O masers and SiO masers. The proper motions of the H_2O masers show the tendency of expansion.

  20. An LTE effective temperature scale for red supergiants in the Magellanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, H. M.; Dorda, R.; Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.

    2018-05-01

    We present a self-consistent study of cool supergiants (CSGs) belonging to the Magellanic clouds. We calculated stellar atmospheric parameters using LTE KURUCZ and MARCS atmospheric models for more than 400 individual targets by fitting a careful selection of weak metallic lines. We explore the existence of a Teff scale and its implications in two different metallicity environments (each Magellanic cloud). Critical and in-depth tests have been performed to assess the reliability of our stellar parameters (i.e. internal error budget, NLTE systematics). In addition, several Monte Carlo tests have been carried out to infer the significance of the Teff scale found. Our findings point towards a unique Teff scale that seems to be independent of the environment.

  1. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert; Evans, Christopher J.; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Carraro, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T eff indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  2. The initial masses of the red supergiant progenitors to Type II supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben; Beasor, Emma R.

    2018-02-01

    There are a growing number of nearby supernovae (SNe) for which the progenitor star is detected in archival pre-explosion imaging. From these images it is possible to measure the progenitor's brightness a few years before explosion, and ultimately estimate its initial mass. Previous work has shown that II-P and II-L SNe have red supergiant (RSG) progenitors, and that the range of initial masses for these progenitors seems to be limited to ≲ 17 M⊙. This is in contrast with the cut-off of 25-30 M⊙ predicted by evolutionary models, a result that is termed the `red supergiant problem'. Here we investigate one particular source of systematic error present in converting pre-explosion photometry into an initial mass, which of the bolometric correction (BC) used to convert a single-band flux into a bolometric luminosity. We show, using star clusters, that RSGs evolve to later spectral types as they approach SN, which in turn causes the BC to become larger. Failure to account for this results in a systematic underestimate of a star's luminosity, and hence its initial mass. Using our empirically motivated BCs we reappraise the II-P and II-L SNe that have their progenitors detected in pre-explosion imaging. Fitting an initial mass function to these updated masses results in an increased upper mass cut-off of Mhi = 19.0^{+2.5}_{-1.3} M⊙, with a 95 per cent upper confidence limit of <27 M⊙. Accounting for finite sample size effects and systematic uncertainties in the mass-luminosity relationship raises the cut-off to Mhi = 25 M⊙ (<33 M⊙, 95 per cent confidence). We therefore conclude that there is currently no strong evidence for `missing' high-mass progenitors to core-collapse SNe.

  3. Tests of two convection theories for red giant and red supergiant envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Two theories of stellar envelope convection are considered here in the context of red giants and red supergiants of intermediate to high mass: Boehm-Vitense's standard mixing-length theory (MLT) and Canuto & Mazzitelli's new theory incorporating the full spectrum of turbulence (FST). Both theories assume incompressible convection. Two formulations of the convective mixing length are also evaluated: l proportional to the local pressure scale height (H(sub P)) and l proportional to the distance from the upper boundary of the convection zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red phase of core helium burning. Since the theoretically predicted effective temperatures for cool stars are known to be sensitive to the assigned value of the mixing length, this quantity has been individually calibrated for each evolutionary sequence. The calibration is done in a composite Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the red giant and red supergiant members of well-observed Galactic open clusters. The MLT model requires the constant of proportionality for the convective mixing length to vary by a small but statistically significant amount with stellar mass, whereas the FST model succeeds in all cases with the mixing lenghth simply set equal to z. The structure of the deep stellar interior, however, remains very nearly unaffected by the choices of convection theory and mixing lenghth. Inside the convective envelope itself, a density inversion always occurs, but is somewhat smaller for the convectively more efficient MLT model. On physical grounds the FST model is preferable, and seems to alleviate the problem of finding the proper mixing length.

  4. The Type IIb Supernova 2013df and its Cool Supergiant Progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDyk, Schuyler D.; Zeng, Weikang; Fox, Ori D.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei; Foley, Ryan J.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan; Kelly, Patrick L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type II b, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less Ni-56 (is approximately less than 0.06M) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe II b 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013dfis estimated to be A(sub V) = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope(HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T(sub eff) = 4250+/-100 K and a bolometric luminosity L(sub bol) =10(exp 4.94+/-0.06) Solar Luminosity. This leads to an effective radius Reff = 545+/-65 Solar Radius. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17Solar Mass; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.

  5. The type IIb supernova 2013df and its cool supergiant progenitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zheng, WeiKang; Fox, Ori D.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kelly, Patrick L. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Miller, Adam A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85720 (United States); Lee, William H. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, México DF 04510 (Mexico); Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay, E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-02-01

    We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type IIb, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less {sup 56}Ni (≲ 0.06 M {sub ☉}) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe IIb 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013df is estimated to be A{sub V} = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T {sub eff} = 4250 ± 100 K and a bolometric luminosity L {sub bol} = 10{sup 4.94±0.06} L {sub ☉}. This leads to an effective radius R {sub eff} = 545 ± 65 R {sub ☉}. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17 M {sub ☉}; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.

  6. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert [Institute for Astro and Particle Physics, A-6020 Innsbruck University (Austria); Evans, Christopher J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Carraro, Giovanni, E-mail: mwhosek@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: Norbert.Przybilla@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: chris.evans@stfc.ac.uk, E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, La Silla Paranal Observatory (Chile)

    2014-04-20

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T {sub eff} indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  7. Type IIP supernova light curves affected by the acceleration of red supergiant winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Förster, Francisco; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Gräfener, Götz; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2018-05-01

    We introduce the first synthetic light-curve model set of Type IIP supernovae exploded within circumstellar media in which the acceleration of the red supergiant winds is taken into account. Because wind acceleration makes the wind velocities near the progenitors low, the density of the immediate vicinity of the red supergiant supernova progenitors can be higher than that extrapolated by using a constant terminal wind velocity. Therefore, even if the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is relatively low, it can have a dense circumstellar medium at the immediate stellar vicinity and the early light curves of Type IIP supernovae are significantly affected by it. We adopt a simple β velocity law to formulate the wind acceleration. We provide bolometric and multicolour light curves of Type IIP supernovae exploding within such accelerated winds from the combinations of three progenitors, 12-16 M⊙; five β, 1-5; seven mass-loss rates, 10-5-10-2 M⊙ yr-1; and four explosion energies, (0.5-2) × 1051 erg. All the light-curve models are available at https://goo.gl/o5phYb. When the circumstellar density is sufficiently high, our models do not show a classical shock breakout as a consequence of the interaction with the dense and optically thick circumstellar media. Instead, they show a delayed `wind breakout', substantially affecting early light curves of Type IIP supernovae. We find that the mass-loss rates of the progenitors need to be 10-3-10-2 M⊙ yr-1 to explain typical rise times of 5-10 d in Type IIP supernovae assuming a dense circumstellar radius of 1015 cm.

  8. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  9. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  10. THE ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voiculescu Madalina Irena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Article refers to significance and the digital signature in electronic commerce. Internet and electronic commerce open up many new opportunities for the consumer, yet, the security (or perceived lack of security of exchanging personal and financial data

  11. Digital signature feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of using digital signatures to assist the Arizona Department of Transportation in conducting business. The Department is evaluating the potential of performing more electronic t...

  12. Physics Signatures at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2001-01-01

    A set of signatures for physics processes of potential interests for the CLIC programme at = 1 - 5 TeV are discussed. These signatures, that may correspond to the manifestation of different scenarios of new physics as well as to Standard Model precision tests, are proposed as benchmarks for the optimisation of the CLIC accelerator parameters and for a first definition of the required detector response.

  13. Stellar chemical signatures and hierarchical galaxy formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venn, KA; Irwin, M; Shetrone, MD; Tout, CA; Hill, [No Value; Tolstoy, E

    To compare the chemistries of stars in the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies with stars in the Galaxy, we have compiled a large sample of Galactic stellar abundances from the literature. When kinematic information is available, we have assigned the stars to standard Galactic

  14. Effects of deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium in the atmospheres of F supergiants. I. Overionization of Fe I atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchuk, A.A.; Lyubimkov, L.S.; Sakhibullin, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    For a number of class F supergiants and dwarfs, non-LTE calculations have been made of the Fe I-Fe II ionization balance. It is shown that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium lead to a strong overionization of the Fe I atoms in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This confirms the conclusion obtained by Lyubimkov and Boyarchuk on the basis of an investigation of microturbulence in F supergiants. The reason for the overionization (compared with LTE) is the nonequality of the recombination and photoionization temperatures: To recombination processes there corresponds a local temperature T(/tau/), whereas the photoionization takes place under the influence of ultraviolet radiation from deeper and hotter layers of the atmosphere. The equivalent widths of some Fe I lines have been calculated. It is shown that neglect of the overionization in the analysis of sufficiently strong lines may lead to an underestimation of the iron abundance by an order of magnitude

  15. ISO observations of far-infrared rotational emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris

    OpenAIRE

    Neufeld, David A.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwit, Martin; Melnick, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of numerous far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris. A 29.5 - 45 micron grating scan of VY CMa, obtained using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at a spectral resolving power of approximately 2000, reveals at least 41 spectral features due to water vapor that together radiate a total luminosity ~ 25 solar luminosities. In addition to pure rotational transitions within the groun...

  16. Low-frequency photospheric and wind variability in the early-B supergiant HD 2905

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Aerts, C.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Camacho, I.; Antoci, V.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Grundahl, F.; Pallé, P. L.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Despite important advances in space asteroseismology during the last decade, the early phases of evolution of stars with masses above 15 M⊙ (including the O stars and their evolved descendants, the B supergiants) have been only vaguely explored up to now. This is due to the lack of adequate observations for a proper characterization of the complex spectroscopic and photometric variability occurring in these stars. Aim. Our goal is to detect, analyze, and interpret variability in the early-B-type supergiant HD 2905 (κ Cas, B1 Ia) using long-term, ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy. Methods: We gather a total of 1141 high-resolution spectra covering some 2900 days with three different high-performance spectrographs attached to 1-2.6m telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories. We complement these observations with the hipparcos light curve, which includes 160 data points obtained during a time span of 1200 days. We investigate spectroscopic variability of up to 12 diagnostic lines by using the zero and first moments of the line profiles. We perform a frequency analysis of both the spectroscopic and photometric dataset using Scargle periodograms. We obtain single snapshot and time-dependent information about the stellar parameters and abundances by means of the FASTWIND stellar atmosphere code. Results: HD 2905 is a spectroscopic variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes in the zero and first moments of the photospheric lines of up to 15% and 30 km s-1, respectively. The amplitude of the line-profile variability is correlated with the line formation depth in the photosphere and wind. All investigated lines present complex temporal behavior indicative of multi-periodic variability with timescales of a few days to several weeks. No short-period (hourly) variations are detected. The Scargle periodograms of the hipparcos light curve and the first moment of purely photospheric lines reveal a low-frequency amplitude excess and a clear dominant frequency

  17. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  18. Practical quantum digital signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  19. Star-formation complexes in the `galaxy-sized' supergiant shell of the galaxy Holmberg I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Smirnov-Pinchukov, Grigory V.

    2018-05-01

    We present the results of observations of the galaxy Holmberg I carried out at the Russian 6-m telescope in the narrow-band imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer modes. A detailed analysis of gas kinematics, ionization conditions, and metallicity of star-forming regions in the galaxy is presented. The aim of the paper is to analyse the propagation of star formation in the galaxy and to understand the role of the ongoing star formation in the evolution of the central `galaxy-sized' supergiant H I shell (SGS), where all regions of star formation are observed. We show that star formation in the galaxy occurs in large unified complexes rather than in individual giant H II regions. Evidence of the triggered star formation is observed both on scales of individual complexes and of the whole galaxy. We identified two supernova-remnant candidates and one late-type WN star and analysed their spectrum and surrounding-gas kinematics. We provide arguments indicating that the SGS in Holmberg I is destructing by the influence of star formation occurring on its rims.

  20. THE FIRST SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC MONITORING OF THE PECULIAR O4 Ief SUPERGIANT ζ PUPPIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I.; Kholtygin, A.; Schöller, M.; Oskinova, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the magnetic field in massive O-type stars is still under debate. To model the physical processes responsible for the generation of O star magnetic fields, it is important to understand whether correlations between the presence of a magnetic field and stellar evolutionary state, rotation velocity, kinematical status, and surface composition can be identified. The O4 Ief supergiant ζ Pup is a fast rotator and a runaway star, which may be a product of a past binary interaction, possibly having had an encounter with the cluster Trumper 10 some 2 Myr ago. The currently available observational material suggests that certain observed phenomena in this star may be related to the presence of a magnetic field. We acquired spectropolarimetric observations of ζ Pup with FORS 2 mounted on the 8 m Antu telescope of the Very Large Telescope to investigate if a magnetic field is indeed present in this star. We show that many spectral lines are highly variable and probably vary with the recently detected period of 1.78 day. No magnetic field is detected in ζ Pup, as no magnetic field measurement has a significance level higher than 2.4 σ . Still, we studied the probability of a single sinusoidal explaining the variation of the longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  1. Quantitative spectroscopic J-band study of red supergiants in Perseus OB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Davies, Ben; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how the metallicities of red supergiant (RSG) stars can be measured from quantitative spectroscopy down to resolutions of ≈3000 in the J-band. We have obtained high resolution spectra on a sample of the RSG population of h and χ Persei, a double cluster in the solar neighborhood. We show that careful application of the MARCS model atmospheres returns measurements of Z consistent with solar metallicity. Using two grids of synthetic spectra–one in pure LTE and one with non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for the most important diagnostic lines–we measure Z = +0.04 ± 0.10 (LTE) and Z = –0.04 ± 0.08 (NLTE) for the sample of eleven RSGs in the cluster. We degrade the spectral resolution of our observations and find that those values remain consistent down to resolutions of less than λ/δλ of 3000. Using measurements of effective temperatures we compare our results with stellar evolution theory and find good agreement. We construct a synthetic cluster spectrum and find that analyzing this composite spectrum with single-star RSG models returns an accurate metallicity. We conclude that the RSGs make ideal targets in the near infrared for measuring the metallicities of star forming galaxies out to 7-10 Mpc and up to 10 times farther by observing the integrated light of unresolved super star clusters.

  2. THE FIRST SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC MONITORING OF THE PECULIAR O4 Ief SUPERGIANT ζ PUPPIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kholtygin, A. [Astronomical Institute, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetski pr. 28, 198504, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schöller, M. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Oskinova, L. M., E-mail: shubrig@aip.de [Universität Potsdam, Institut für Physik und Astronomie, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-05-10

    The origin of the magnetic field in massive O-type stars is still under debate. To model the physical processes responsible for the generation of O star magnetic fields, it is important to understand whether correlations between the presence of a magnetic field and stellar evolutionary state, rotation velocity, kinematical status, and surface composition can be identified. The O4 Ief supergiant ζ Pup is a fast rotator and a runaway star, which may be a product of a past binary interaction, possibly having had an encounter with the cluster Trumper 10 some 2 Myr ago. The currently available observational material suggests that certain observed phenomena in this star may be related to the presence of a magnetic field. We acquired spectropolarimetric observations of ζ Pup with FORS 2 mounted on the 8 m Antu telescope of the Very Large Telescope to investigate if a magnetic field is indeed present in this star. We show that many spectral lines are highly variable and probably vary with the recently detected period of 1.78 day. No magnetic field is detected in ζ Pup, as no magnetic field measurement has a significance level higher than 2.4 σ . Still, we studied the probability of a single sinusoidal explaining the variation of the longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  3. Large Magellanic Cloud helium-rich peculiar blue supergiants and SN 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchman, Y.; Wheeler, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical distribution of massive stars in the H-R diagram is compared to the revised data of Fitzpatrick and Garmany for the LMC. Preferred models of about 20 M solar masses undergo a thermal contraction at T(eff) about 35,000 K at the end of core hydrogen burning but reestablish thermal equilibrium to the red of the main sequence at T(eff) about 20,000 K after ignition of a hydrogen-burning shell. They then evolve on a nuclear time scale to T(eff) about 6000 K where they lose thermal equilibrium and jump to the Hayashi track. The theoretical and observed distributions agree with two significant exceptions: the blue thermal contraction gap is overpopulated compared to the theory, and there is a ledge crossing the center of the H-R diagram. The hypothesis that some of the observed stars in the blue gap are secondaries that have accreted helium-rich matter from deep within the hydrogen envelope of a red supergiant primary is explored. Some preliminary observational justification is given. 27 refs

  4. Resolving the clumpy circumstellar environment of the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A. F.; Cidale, L. S.; Kraus, M.; Arias, M. L.; Barbá, R. H.; Maravelias, G.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2018-05-01

    Context. B[e] supergiants are massive post-main-sequence stars, surrounded by a complex circumstellar environment where molecules and dust can survive. The shape in which the material is distributed around these objects and its dynamics as well as the mechanisms that give rise to these structures are not well understood. Aims: The aim is to deepen our knowledge of the structure and kinematics of the circumstellar disc of the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 35. Methods: High-resolution optical spectra were obtained in three different years. Forbidden emission lines, that contribute to trace the disc at different distances from the star, are modelled in order to determine the kinematical properties of their line-forming regions, assuming Keplerian rotation. In addition, we used low-resolution near-infrared spectra to explore the variability of molecular emission. Results: LHA 120-S 35 displays an evident spectral variability in both optical and infrared regions. The P-Cygni line profiles of H I, as well as those of Fe II and O I, suggest the presence of a strong bipolar clumped wind. We distinguish density enhancements in the P-Cygni absorption component of the first Balmer lines, which show variations in both velocity and strength. The P-Cygni profile emission component is double-peaked, indicating the presence of a rotating circumstellar disc surrounding the star. We also observe line-profile variations in the permitted and forbidden features of Fe II and O I. In the infrared, we detect variations in the intensity of the H I emission lines as well as in the emission of the CO band-heads. Moreover, we find that the profiles of each [Ca II] and [O I] emission lines contain contributions from spatially different (complete or partial) rings. Globally, we find evidence of detached multi-ring structures, revealing density variations along the disc. We identify an inner ring, with sharp edge, where [Ca II] and [O I] lines share their forming region with the CO molecular bands

  5. An Interferometric 270--355 GHz Spectral Line Survey of the Red Supergiant VY CMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Young, K. H.; Patel, N. A.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P.; McCarthy, M. C.; Gurwell, M. A.; Belloche, A.; Kaminski, T.; Verheyen, L.; Decin, L.; Brunken, S.; Holger, S. P. M.

    2011-05-01

    We have used the Submillimeter Array to image the molecular line emission in the circumstellar envelope of the peculiar red supergiant star VY Canis Majoris over the whole 870 μm atmospheric window. Employing adaptive calibration using the object's continuum emission we achieve high quality one arcsecond resolution imaging of the whole 280--355 GHz range within which we find 211 distinct spectral lines from 33 molecules (including isotopologues) plus 40 unidentified lines. From the distribution of molecules we are obtaining their abundances and isotopologic abundance ratios. Using data for multiple transitions in a number of molecules we are deriving the physical conditions in the circumstellar envelope to reach a picture of the star's chemistry that can be compared with models. Our legacy survey is accompanied by a strong laboratory effort that helps with the identification of possibly newly found molecules traced by unidentified lines. We shall create a publicly accessible database of spectral-line channel-maps of the emission from all the lines detected in the survey.

  6. Supergiant fast X-ray transients with Swift: Spectroscopic and temporal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Vercellone, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-12-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are a class of high-mass X-ray binaries with possible counterparts in the high energy gamma rays. The Swift SFXT Project1 has conducted a systematic investigation of the properties of SFTXs on timescales ranging from minutes to years and in several intensity states (from bright flares, to intermediate intensity states, and down to almost quiescence). We also performed broad-band spectroscopy of outbursts, and intensity-selected spectroscopy outside of outbursts. We demonstrated that while the brightest phase of the outburst only lasts a few hours, further activity is observed at lower fluxes for a remarkably longer time, up to weeks. Furthermore, we assessed the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity. We present the most recent results from our investigation. The spectroscopic and, most importantly, timing properties of SFXTs we have uncovered with Swift will serve as a guide in search for the high energy emission from these enigmatic objects.

  7. Triggering the formation of the supergiant H II region NGC 604 in M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachihara, Kengo; Gratier, Pierre; Sano, Hidetoshi; Tsuge, Kisetsu; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Formation mechanism of a supergiant H II region NGC 604 is discussed in terms of collision of H I clouds in M 33. An analysis of the archival H I data obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) reveals complex velocity distributions around NGC 604. The H I clouds are composed of two velocity components separated by ˜20 km s-1 for an extent of ˜700 pc, beyond the size of the the H II region. Although the H I clouds are not easily separated in velocity with some mixed component represented by merged line profiles, the atomic gas mass amounts to 6 × 106 M_{⊙} and 9 × 106 M_{⊙} for each component. These characteristics of H I gas and the distributions of dense molecular gas in the overlapping regions of the two velocity components suggest that the formation of giant molecular clouds and the following massive cluster formation have been induced by the collision of H I clouds with different velocities. Referring to the existence of a gas bridging feature connecting M 33 with M 31 reported by large-scale H I surveys, the disturbed atomic gas possibly represents the result of past tidal interaction between the two galaxies, which is analogous to the formation of the R 136 cluster in the LMC.

  8. On the stability of bow shocks generated by red supergiants: the case of IRC -10414

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Boumis, P.; Mohamed, S.

    2014-03-01

    In this Letter, we explore the hypothesis that the smooth appearance of bow shocks around some red supergiants (RSGs) might be caused by the ionization of their winds by external sources of radiation. Our numerical simulations of the bow shock generated by IRC -10414 (the first-ever RSG with an optically detected bow shock) show that the ionization of the wind results in its acceleration by a factor of 2, which reduces the difference between the wind and space velocities of the star and makes the contact discontinuity of the bow shock stable for a range of stellar space velocities and mass-loss rates. Our best-fitting model reproduces the overall shape and surface brightness of the observed bow shock and suggests that the space velocity and mass-loss rate of IRC -10414 are ≈50 km s-1 and ≈10-6 M⊙ yr-1, respectively, and that the number density of the local interstellar medium is ≈3 cm-3. It also shows that the bow shock emission comes mainly from the shocked stellar wind. This naturally explains the enhanced nitrogen abundance in the line-emitting material, derived from the spectroscopy of the bow shock. We found that photoionized bow shocks are ≈15-50 times brighter in optical line emission than their neutral counterparts, from which we conclude that the bow shock of IRC -10414 must be photoionized.

  9. The circumstellar shells and mass loss rates of four M supergiants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernat, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    A reanalysis of the physical structure of the circumstellar gas shells of four bright M supergiants, Betelgeuse, Antares, α Herculis, and μ Cephei, has been undertaken. The observational data include old Hale Observatories plates, recent McDonald Struve telescope plates, and McDonald 2.7 m photoelectric scans. These data are analyzed in the full expanding spherical geometry formulation of the radiative transfer equation.The results of the present analysis indicate that column densities in the gas shells must be revised downward compared with the previous plane-parallel results. However, the physical extents of the shells are considerably larger than previously assumed. These extents are inferred through ionization modeling, Weymann's Ca II technique, and direct observation. Also inferred are schematic wavelength-dependent chromospheric color temperatures. These results lead to much larger mass loss rates (in the range 6.7 x 10 -7 to 4.2 x 10 -4 M/sub sun/ yr -2 ) than previously inferred. The influence of these large rates of mass loss on the evolution of both stars and the Galaxy is briefly discussed

  10. Signatures of the Invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    Strom, D

    2003-01-01

    On the Net it is possible to take a look at art from afar via Virtual Museums. One such exhibition was recently in the New York Museum of Modern Art's branch, PS1. Entitled 'Signatures of the Invisible' it was a collaborative effort between artists and physicists (1/2 page).

  11. A Directed Signature Scheme and its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lal, Sunder; Kumar, Manoj

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a directed signature scheme with the property that the signature can be verified only with the help of signer or signature receiver. We also propose its applications to share verification of signatures and to threshold cryptosystems.

  12. Spectral decomposition of MR spectroscopy signatures with use of eigenanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearshen, D.O.; Windham, J.P.; Roebuck, J.R.; Helpern, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Partial-volume contamination and overlapping resonances are common problems in whole-body MR spectroscopy and can affect absolute or relative intensity and chemical-shift measurements. One technique, based on solution of constrained eigenvalue problems, treats spectra as N-dimensional signatures and minimizes contributions of undesired signatures while maximizing contributions of desired signatures in compromised spectra. Computer simulations and both high-resolution (400-MHz) and whole-body (63.8-MHz) phantom studies tested accuracy and reproducibility of spectral decomposition. Results demonstrated excellent decomposition and good reproducibility within certain constraints. The authors conclude that eigenanalysis may improve quantitation of spectra without introducing operator bias

  13. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey . XXIV. Stellar properties of the O-type giants and supergiants in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Grin, N. J.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Langer, N.; Puls, J.; Markova, N.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Castro, N.; Crowther, P. A.; Evans, C. J.; García, M.; Gräfener, G.; Herrero, A.; van Kempen, B.; Lennon, D. J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Najarro, F.; Sabín-Sanjulián, C.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The Tarantula region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) contains the richest population of spatially resolved massive O-type stars known so far. This unmatched sample offers an opportunity to test models describing their main-sequence evolution and mass-loss properties. Aims: Using ground-based optical spectroscopy obtained in the framework of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS), we aim to determine stellar, photospheric and wind properties of 72 presumably single O-type giants, bright giants and supergiants and to confront them with predictions of stellar evolution and of line-driven mass-loss theories. Methods: We apply an automated method for quantitative spectroscopic analysis of O stars combining the non-LTE stellar atmosphere model fastwind with the genetic fitting algorithm pikaia to determine the following stellar properties: effective temperature, surface gravity, mass-loss rate, helium abundance, and projected rotational velocity. The latter has been constrained without taking into account the contribution from macro-turbulent motions to the line broadening. Results: We present empirical effective temperature versus spectral subtype calibrations at LMC-metallicity for giants and supergiants. The calibration for giants shows a +1kK offset compared to similar Galactic calibrations; a shift of the same magnitude has been reported for dwarfs. The supergiant calibrations, though only based on a handful of stars, do not seem to indicate such an offset. The presence of a strong upturn at spectral type O3 and earlier can also not be confirmed by our data. In the spectroscopic and classical Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, our sample O stars are found to occupy the region predicted to be the core hydrogen-burning phase by state-of-the-art models. For stars initially more massive than approximately 60 M⊙, the giant phase already appears relatively early on in the evolution; the supergiant phase develops later. Bright giants, however, are not

  14. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-α EXCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-α (Pα) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0. 0 65 x 0. 0 25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong Pα excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  15. The convective photosphere of the red supergiant CE Tauri. I. VLTI/PIONIER H-band interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montargès, M.; Norris, R.; Chiavassa, A.; Tessore, B.; Lèbre, A.; Baron, F.

    2018-06-01

    Context. Red supergiant stars are one of the latest stages in the evolution of massive stars. Their photospheric convection may play an important role in the launching mechanism of their mass loss; however, its characteristics and dynamics are still poorly constrained. Aims: By observing red supergiant stars with near infrared interferometry at different epochs, we expect to reveal the evolution of bright convective features on their stellar surface. Methods: We observed the M2Iab-Ib red supergiant star CE Tau with the VLTI/PIONIER instrument in the H band at two different epochs separated by one month. Results: We derive the angular diameter of the star and basic stellar parameters, and reconstruct two reliable images of its H-band photosphere. The contrast of the convective pattern of the reconstructed images is 5 ± 1% and 6 ± 1% for our two epochs of observation. Conclusions: The stellar photosphere shows few changes between the two epochs. The contrast of the convective pattern is below the average contrast variations obtained on 30 randomly chosen snapshots of the best matching 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulation: 23 ± 1% for the original simulation images and 16 ± 1% for the maps degraded to the reconstruction resolution. We offer two hypotheses to explain this observation. CE Tau may be experiencing a quiet convective activity episode or it could be a consequence of its warmer effective temperature (hence its smaller radius) compared to the simulation. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programs 298.D-5005(A) and 298.D-5005(B).Reconstructed images as FITS files and basic stellar parameters are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/614/A12Animated gif of the two epochs is available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  16. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Minamidani, Tetsuhiro [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, 462-2 Nobeyama Minamimaki-mura, Minamisaku-gun, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken' ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dawson, Joanne [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Yamayashiki-machi, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Sakai, Takeshi [Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Tsukagoshi, Takashi [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Tanaka, Kunihiko [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: kosuke.fujii@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  17. X-ray observation of the shocked red supergiant wind of Cassiopeia A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook; Hughes, John P.; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-01-01

    Cas A is a Galactic supernova remnant whose supernova explosion is observed to be of Type IIb from spectroscopy of its light echo. Having its SN type known, observational constraints on the mass-loss history of Cas A's progenitor can provide crucial information on the final fate of massive stars. In this paper, we study X-ray characteristics of the shocked ambient gas in Cas A using the 1 Ms observation carried out with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and try to constrain the mass-loss history of the progenitor star. We identify thermal emission from the shocked ambient gas along the outer boundary of the remnant. Comparison of measured radial variations of spectroscopic parameters of the shocked ambient gas to the self-similar solutions of Chevalier show that Cas A is expanding into a circumstellar wind rather than into a uniform medium. We estimate a wind density n H ∼ 0.9 ± 0.3 cm –3 at the current outer radius of the remnant (∼3 pc), which we interpret as a dense slow wind from a red supergiant (RSG) star. Our results suggest that the progenitor star of Cas A had an initial mass around 16 M ☉ , and its mass before the explosion was about 5 M ☉ , with uncertainties of several tens of percent. Furthermore, the results suggest that, among the mass lost from the progenitor star (∼11 M ☉ ), a significant amount (more than 6 M ☉ ) could have been via its RSG wind.

  18. Accretion from a clumpy massive-star wind in supergiant X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mellah, I.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Keppens, R.

    2018-04-01

    Supergiant X-ray binaries (SgXB) host a compact object, often a neutron star (NS), orbiting an evolved O/B star. Mass transfer proceeds through the intense line-driven wind of the stellar donor, a fraction of which is captured by the gravitational field of the NS. The subsequent accretion process on to the NS is responsible for the abundant X-ray emission from SgXB. They also display peak-to-peak variability of the X-ray flux by a factor of a few 10-100, along with changes in the hardness ratios possibly due to varying absorption along the line of sight. We use recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of inhomogeneities (a.k.a. clumps) in the non-stationary wind of massive hot stars to evaluate their impact on the time-variable accretion process. For this, we run 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the wind in the vicinity of the accretor to investigate the formation of the bow shock and follow the inhomogeneous flow over several spatial orders of magnitude, down to the NS magnetosphere. In particular, we show that the impact of the wind clumps on the time variability of the intrinsic mass accretion rate is severely tempered by the crossing of the shock, compared to the purely ballistic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton estimation. We also account for the variable absorption due to clumps passing by the line of sight and estimate the final effective variability of the column density and mass accretion rate for different orbital separations. Finally, we compare our results to the most recent analysis of the X-ray flux and the hardness ratio in Vela X-1.

  19. Radio continuum emission from winds, chromospheres, and coronae of cool giants and supergiants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, S.A.; Linsky, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a sensitive VLA radio continuum survey at 6 cm of 39 of the nearest, single cool giants and supergiants with spectral types in the range G0--M5. We discuss our findings in the context of the various mechanisms that might be producing radio emission in these cool stars. We have definitely detected four K and M giants (α 1 Her, α Boo, rho Per, and μ Gem) and probably detected a fifth ( β UMi) at flux levels of 0.1--1.0 mJy. We believe that in all five of these cases the radio emission is thermal emission from cool stellar winds. We have made additional 2 cm observations of several stars, including the four stars definitely detected at 6 cm. We have derived spectral indices for α Boo, α 1 Her, and rho Per of 0.80, 0.84, and 0.95, respectively, that are close to the 0.6 value predicted by standard stellar wind models in the optically thick regime. An additional cool giant (α Tau) was detected only at 2 cm, implying a spectral index of > or =0.87. None of the coronal or hybrid-chromosphere giants observed were detected in this study, with the exception of α Aur, a 0.2 mJy radio source at 6 cm, which is in fact a widely separated, long-period (P/sub orb/approx.104/sup d/) RS CVn system containing two cool giant stars. In this case, we believe that the 6 cm radio emission is optically thin, thermal emission from the corona(e) of one or both of the components, since the radio-emission measure is consistent with that of the observed x-ray emission

  20. HD 179821 (V1427 Aql, IRAS 19114+0002) - a massive post-red supergiant star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, T.; Lambert, David L.; Klochkova, Valentina G.; Panchuk, Vladimir E.

    2016-10-01

    We have derived elemental abundances of a remarkable star, HD 179821, with unusual composition (e.g. [Na/Fe] = 1.0 ± 0.2 dex) and extra-ordinary spectral characteristics. Its metallicity at [Fe/H] = 0.4 dex places it among the most metal-rich stars yet analysed. The abundance analysis of this luminous star is based on high-resolution and high-quality (S/N ≈ 120-420) optical echelle spectra from McDonald Observatory and Special Astronomy Observatory. The data includes five years of observations over 21 epochs. Standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis provides a fresh determination of the atmospheric parameters over all epochs: Teff = 7350 ± 200 K, log g= +0.6 ± 0.3, and a microturbulent velocity ξ = 6.6 ± 1.6 km s-1 and [Fe/H] = 0.4 ± 0.2, and a carbon abundance [C/Fe] = -0.19 ± 0.30. We find oxygen abundance [O/Fe] = -0.25 ± 0.28 and an enhancement of 0.9 dex in N. A supersonic macroturbulent velocity of 22.0 ± 2.0 km s-1 is determined from both strong and weak Fe I and Fe II lines. Elemental abundances are obtained for 22 elements. HD 179821 is not enriched in s-process products. Eu is overabundant relative to the anticipated [X/Fe] ≈ 0.0. Some peculiarities of its optical spectrum (e.g. variability in the spectral line shapes) is noticed. This includes the line profile variations for H α line. Based on its estimated luminosity, effective temperature and surface gravity, HD 179821 is a massive star evolving to become a red supergiant and finally a Type II supernova.

  1. Optical spectroscopy of the blue supergiant Sk-69° 279 and its circumstellar shell with SALT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Maryeva, O. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.

    2018-02-01

    We report the results of optical spectroscopy of the blue supergiant Sk-69° 279 and its circular shell in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). We classify Sk-69° 279 as an O9.2 Iaf star and analyse its spectrum by using the stellar atmosphere code CMFGEN, obtaining a stellar temperature of ≈30 kK, a luminosity of log (L*/ L⊙) = 5.54, a mass-loss rate of log (\\dot{M}/ M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) = -5.26, and a wind velocity of 800km s-1. We found also that Sk-69° 279 possesses an extended atmosphere with an effective temperature of ≈24 kK and that its surface helium and nitrogen abundances are enhanced, respectively, by factors of ≈2 and 20-30. This suggests that either Sk-69° 279 was initially a (single) fast-rotating ( ≳ 400 km s- 1) star, which only recently evolved off the main sequence, or that it is a product of close binary evolution. The long-slit spectroscopy of the shell around Sk-69° 279 revealed that its nitrogen abundance is enhanced by the same factor as the stellar atmosphere, which implies that the shell is composed mostly of the CNO processed material lost by the star. Our findings support previous propositions that some massive stars can produce compact circumstellar shells and, presumably, appear as luminous blue variables while they are still on the main sequence or have only recently left it.

  2. A DARK ENERGY CAMERA SEARCH FOR MISSING SUPERGIANTS IN THE LMC AFTER THE ADVANCED LIGO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE EVENT GW150914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Diehl, H. T.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Herner, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Berger, E.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Drout, M. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chen, H.; Doctor, Z.; Farr, B.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chornock, R. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, 251B Clippinger Lab, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2016-06-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg{sup 2} of the localization area, including 38 deg{sup 2} on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  3. A Dark Energy Camera Search for Missing Supergiants in the LMC After the Advanced LIGO Gravitational-Wave Event GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Chen, H.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Cenko, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg(exp.2) of the localization area,including 38 deg(exp. 2) on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates:less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  4. There Are (super)Giants in the Sky: Searching for Misidentified Massive Stars in Algorithmically-Selected Quasar Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn-Wallenstein, Trevor Z.; Levesque, Emily

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to incredible advances in instrumentation, surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have been able to find and catalog billions of objects, ranging from local M dwarfs to distant quasars. Machine learning algorithms have greatly aided in the effort to classify these objects; however, there are regimes where these algorithms fail, where interesting oddities may be found. We present here an X-ray bright quasar misidentified as a red supergiant/X-ray binary, and a subsequent search of the SDSS quasar catalog for X-ray bright stars misidentified as quasars.

  5. Dynamical instability of the envelope of red supergiants and the lower mass limit for carbon detonation supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, M.Y.; Nomoto, K.; Sugimoto, D.

    1976-01-01

    The lower mass limit Msub(l) for the carbon detonation supernovae was investigated by testing the dynamical instability of the envelopes of red supergiants. It was found that the dependence of Msub(l) on the mixing length l of convection is appreciable. As a smaller value of l is assumed, Msub(l) becomes larger. It may be as large as 8 solar masses if l is a third of the pressure scale-height. This is one of the ways to remove the difficulty of overproduction of iron-peak elements involved in the model of the carbon detonation supernovae. (Auth.)

  6. THE XMM-Newton and integral observations of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient IGR J16328-4726

    OpenAIRE

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Sguera, V.; Bird, A. J.; Boon, C.M.; Persi, P.; Piro, L.

    2016-01-01

    The accretion mechanism producing the short flares observed from the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) is still highly debated and forms a major part in our attempts to place these X-ray binaries in the wider context of the High Mass X-ray Binaries. We report on a 216 ks INTEGRAL observation of the SFXT IGR J16328-4726 (2014 August 24–27) simultaneous with two fixed-time observations with XMM-Newton (33 and 20 ks) performed around the putative periastron passage, in order to investigate...

  7. Dynamical instability of the envelope of red supergiants and the lower mass limit for carbon detonation supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, M Y [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Nomoto, K; Sugimoto, D [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1976-11-01

    The lower mass limit Msub(l) for the carbon detonation supernovae was investigated by testing the dynamical instability of the envelopes of red supergiants. It was found that the dependence of Msub(l) on the mixing length l of convection is appreciable. As a smaller value of l is assumed, Msub(l) becomes larger. It may be as large as 8 solar masses if l is a third of the pressure scale-height. This is one of the ways to remove the difficulty of overproduction of iron-peak elements involved in the model of the carbon detonation supernovae.

  8. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW): Functional Signature Ontology Tool: Triplicate Measurements of Reporter Gene Expression in Response to Individual Genetic and Chemical Perturbations in HCT116 Cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use an eight-gene expression profile to define functional signatures for small molecules and natural products with heretofore undefined mechanism of action. Two genes in the eight gene set are used as internal controls and do not vary across gene expression array data collected from the public domain. The remaining six genes are found to vary independently across a large collection of publically available gene expression array datasets.  Read the abstract

  9. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Functional Signature Ontology Tool: Triplicate Measurements of Reporter Gene Expression in Response to Individual Genetic and Chemical Perturbations in HCT116 Cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use an eight-gene expression profile to define functional signatures for small molecules and natural products with heretofore undefined mechanism of action. Two genes in the eight gene set are used as internal controls and do not vary across gene expression array data collected from the public domain. The remaining six genes are found to vary independently across a large collection of publically available gene expression array datasets.  Read the abstract

  10. Signatures of topological superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yang

    2017-07-19

    The prediction and experimental discovery of topological insulators brought the importance of topology in condensed matter physics into the limelight. Topology hence acts as a new dimension along which more and more new states of matter start to emerge. One of these topological states of matter, namely topological superconductors, comes into the focus because of their gapless excitations. These gapless excitations, especially in one dimensional topological superconductors, are Majorana zero modes localized at the ends of the superconductor and exhibit exotic nonabelian statistics, which can be potentially applied to fault-tolerant quantum computation. Given their highly interesting physical properties and potential applications to quantum computation, both theorists and experimentalists spend great efforts to realize topological supercondoctors and to detect Majoranas. In two projects within this thesis, we investigate the properties of Majorana zero modes in realistic materials which are absent in simple theoretical models. We find that the superconducting proximity effect, an essential ingredient in all existing platforms for topological superconductors, plays a significant role in determining the localization property of the Majoranas. Strong proximity coupling between the normal system and the superconducting substrate can lead to strongly localized Majoranas, which can explain the observation in a recent experiment. Motivated by experiments in Molenkamp's group, we also look at realistic quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions, in which charge puddles acting as magnetic impurities are coupled to the helical edge states. We find that with this setup, the junction generically realizes an exotic 8π periodic Josephson effect, which is absent in a pristine Josephson junction. In another two projects, we propose more pronounced signatures of Majoranas that are accessible with current experimental techniques. The first one is a transport measurement, which uses

  11. Modem Signature Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    AD-A127 993 MODEM SIGNATURE ANALISIS (U) PAR TECHNOLOGY CORP NEW / HARTFORD NY V EDWARDS ET AL. OCT 82 RADC-TR-82-269 F30602-80-C-0264 NCLASSIFIED F/G...as an indication of the class clustering and separation between different classes in the modem data base. It is apparent from the projection that the...that as the clusters disperse, the likelihood of a sample crossing the boundary into an adjacent region and causing a symbol decision error increases. As

  12. DISCOVERY OF A POSSIBLY SINGLE BLUE SUPERGIANT STAR IN THE INTRA-CLUSTER REGION OF VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Youichi; Hota, Ananda [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-20

    IC 3418 is a dwarf irregular galaxy falling into the Virgo cluster, and a 17 kpc long trail is seen behind the galaxy, which is considered to have formed due to ram pressure stripping. The trail contains compact knots and diffuse blobs of ultraviolet and blue optical emission and, thus, it is a clear site of recent star formation but in an unusual environment, surrounded by a million degree intra-cluster medium. We report on our optical spectroscopy of a compact source in the trail, SDSS J122952.66+112227.8, and show that the optical spectrum is dominated by emission from a massive blue supergiant star. If confirmed, our report would mark the farthest star with spectroscopic observation. We interpret that a massive O-type star formed in situ in the trail has evolved recently out of the main sequence into this blue supergiant phase, and now lacks any detectable spectral sign of its associated H II region. We argue that turbulence within the ram pressure striped gaseous trail may play a dominant role for the star formation within such trails.

  13. DISCOVERY OF A POSSIBLY SINGLE BLUE SUPERGIANT STAR IN THE INTRA-CLUSTER REGION OF VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Youichi; Hota, Ananda

    2013-01-01

    IC 3418 is a dwarf irregular galaxy falling into the Virgo cluster, and a 17 kpc long trail is seen behind the galaxy, which is considered to have formed due to ram pressure stripping. The trail contains compact knots and diffuse blobs of ultraviolet and blue optical emission and, thus, it is a clear site of recent star formation but in an unusual environment, surrounded by a million degree intra-cluster medium. We report on our optical spectroscopy of a compact source in the trail, SDSS J122952.66+112227.8, and show that the optical spectrum is dominated by emission from a massive blue supergiant star. If confirmed, our report would mark the farthest star with spectroscopic observation. We interpret that a massive O-type star formed in situ in the trail has evolved recently out of the main sequence into this blue supergiant phase, and now lacks any detectable spectral sign of its associated H II region. We argue that turbulence within the ram pressure striped gaseous trail may play a dominant role for the star formation within such trails.

  14. Electronic Signature (eSig)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Beginning with the Government Paperwork Elimination Act of 1998 (GPEA), the Federal government has encouraged the use of electronic / digital signatures to enable...

  15. Expressiveness considerations of XML signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Meyer, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    XML Signatures are used to protect XML-based Web Service communication against a broad range of attacks related to man-in-the-middle scenarios. However, due to the complexity of the Web Services specification landscape, the task of applying XML Signatures in a robust and reliable manner becomes...... more and more challenging. In this paper, we investigate this issue, describing how an attacker can still interfere with Web Services communication even in the presence of XML Signatures. Additionally, we discuss the interrelation of XML Signatures and XML Encryption, focussing on their security...

  16. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  17. Neutral material around the B[e] supergiant star LHA115-S 65 An outflowing disk or a detached Keplerian rotating disk?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraus, Michaela; Borges Fernandes, M.; de Araújo, F. X.

    July, č. 517 (2010), A30/1-A30/13 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300030701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : supergiants * circumstellar matter * outflows Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.410, year: 2010

  18. Inhomogeneous molecular ring around the B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Maravelias, G.; Nickeler, D. H.; Torres, A. F.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Aret, A.; Curé, M.; Vallverdú, R.; Barbá, R. H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. B[e] supergiants are evolved massive stars, enshrouded in a dense wind and surrounded by a molecular and dusty disk. The mechanisms that drive phases of enhanced mass loss and mass ejections, responsible for the shaping of the circumstellar material of these objects, are still unclear. Aims: We aim to improve our knowledge on the structure and dynamics of the circumstellar disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud B[e] supergiant LHA 120-S 73. Methods: High-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopic data were obtained over a period of 16 and 7 yr, respectively. The spectra cover the diagnostic emission lines from [Ca II] and [O I], as well as the CO bands. These features trace the disk at different distances from the star. We analyzed the kinematics of the individual emission regions by modeling their emission profiles. A low-resolution mid-infrared spectrum was obtained as well, which provides information on the composition of the dusty disk. Results: All diagnostic emission features display double-peaked line profiles, which we interpret as due to Keplerian rotation. We find that the profile of each forbidden line contains contributions from two spatially clearly distinct rings. In total, we find that LHA 120-S 73 is surrounded by at least four individual rings of material with alternating densities (or by a disk with strongly non-monotonic radial density distribution). Moreover, we find that the molecular ring must have gaps or at least strong density inhomogeneities, or in other words, a clumpy structure. The optical spectra additionally display a broad emission feature at 6160-6180 Å, which we interpret as molecular emission from TiO. The mid-infrared spectrum displays features of oxygen- and carbon-rich grain species, which indicates a long-lived, stable dusty disk. We cannot confirm the previously reported high value for the stellar rotation velocity. He I λ 5876 is the only clearly detectable pure atmospheric absorption line in our data. Its

  19. Signatures of Mechanosensitive Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G

    2017-01-10

    The question of how mechanically gated membrane channels open and close is notoriously difficult to address, especially if the protein structure is not available. This perspective highlights the relevance of micropipette-aspirated single-particle tracking-used to obtain a channel's diffusion coefficient, D, as a function of applied membrane tension, σ-as an indirect assay for determining functional behavior in mechanosensitive channels. While ensuring that the protein remains integral to the membrane, such methods can be used to identify not only the gating mechanism of a protein, but also associated physical moduli, such as torsional and dilational rigidity, which correspond to the protein's effective shape change. As an example, three distinct D-versus-σ "signatures" are calculated, corresponding to gating by dilation, gating by tilt, and gating by a combination of both dilation and tilt. Both advantages and disadvantages of the approach are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Signatures de l'invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    "Signatures of the Invisible" is an unique collaboration between contemporary artists and contemporary physicists which has the potential to help redefine the relationship between science and art. "Signatures of the Invisible" is jointly organised by the London Institute - the world's largest college of art and design and CERN*, the world's leading particle physics laboratory. 12 leading visual artists:

  1. An interpretation of signature inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Naoki; Tajima, Naoki

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation in terms of the cranking model is presented to explain why signature inversion occurs for positive γ of the axially asymmetric deformation parameter and emerges into specific orbitals. By introducing a continuous variable, the eigenvalue equation can be reduced to a one dimensional Schroedinger equation by means of which one can easily understand the cause of signature inversion. (author)

  2. Cell short circuit, preshort signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, C.

    1980-01-01

    Short-circuit events observed in ground test simulations of DSCS-3 battery in-orbit operations are analyzed. Voltage signatures appearing in the data preceding the short-circuit event are evaluated. The ground test simulation is briefly described along with performance during reconditioning discharges. Results suggest that a characteristic signature develops prior to a shorting event.

  3. Ship Signature Management System : Functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arciszewski, H.F.R.; Lier, L. van; Meijer, Y.G.S.; Noordkamp, H.W.; Wassenaar, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    A signature of a platform is the manner in which the platform manifests itself to a certain type of sensor and how observable it is when such a sensor is used to detect the platform. Because many military platforms use sensors in different media, it is the total of its different signatures that

  4. Determination of electron temperature of the envelopes for the A2 Ia supergiants α Cyg and ν Cep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushneva, I.N.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of the energy distribution data in the spectra of two bright A2 Ia supergiants, α Cyg and ω Cep, the electron temperature of the envelope and the contributions of the star and of the mantle in the continuum formation are determined. It is shown that the temperature obtained on the basis of the observations in the ultraviolet range lambda lambda 3200-3600 A is slightly higher that the effective temperature (Tsub(e) approximately 8500 K), being 12500 K in the case of α Cyg and 11000 K for ν Cep. The analysis of the α Cyg infrared excess shows that the regions with T approximately 10 4 K as well as with higher temperatures (about 2x10 4 K) exist in the envelope

  5. RED SUPERGIANTS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: THE FIRST DIRECT METALLICITY DETERMINATION OF NGC 4038 IN THE ANTENNAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardo, C.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Evans, C. J.; Patrick, L. R.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a direct determination of the stellar metallicity in the close pair galaxy NGC 4038 (D = 20 Mpc) based on the quantitative analysis of moderate-resolution KMOS/Very Large Telescope spectra of three super star clusters. The method adopted in our analysis has been developed and optimized to measure accurate metallicities from atomic lines in the J-band of single red supergiant (RSG) or RSG-dominated star clusters. Hence, our metallicity measurements are not affected by the biases and poorly understood systematics inherent to strong line H ii methods, which are routinely applied to massive data sets of galaxies. We find [Z] = +0.07 ± 0.03 and compare our measurements to H ii strong line calibrations. Our abundances and literature data suggest the presence of a flat metallicity gradient, which can be explained as redistribution of metal-rich gas following the strong interaction

  6. 2D RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUT IN BIPOLAR EXPLOSIONS OF A BLUE SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu [Research Center for the Early Universe, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-07-10

    A two-dimensional special relativistic radiation-hydrodynamics code is developed and applied to numerical simulations of supernova shock breakout in bipolar explosions of a blue supergiant. Our calculations successfully simulate the dynamical evolution of a blast wave in the star and its emergence from the surface. Results of the model with spherical energy deposition show a good agreement with previous simulations. Furthermore, we calculate several models with bipolar energy deposition and compare their results with the spherically symmetric model. The bolometric light curves of the shock breakout emission are calculated by a ray-tracing method. Our radiation-hydrodynamic models indicate that the early part of the shock breakout emission can be used to probe the geometry of the blast wave produced as a result of the gravitational collapse of the iron core.

  7. Einstein Observatory magnitude-limited X-ray survey of late-type giant and supergiant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, A.; Vaiana, G. S.; Haisch, B. M.; Stern, R. A.; Bookbinder, J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of an extensive X-ray survey of 380 giant and supergiant stars of spectral types from F to M, carried out with the Einstein Observatory. It was found that the observed F giants or subgiants (slightly evolved stars with a mass M less than about 2 solar masses) are X-ray emitters at the same level of main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The G giants show a range of emissions more than 3 orders of magnitude wide; some single G giants exist with X-ray luminosities comparable to RS CVn systems, while some nearby large G giants have upper limits on the X-ray emission below typical solar values. The K giants have an observed X-ray emission level significantly lower than F and F giants. None of the 29 M giants were detected, except for one spectroscopic binary.

  8. Identifying developmental vascular disruptor compounds using a predictive signature and alternative toxicity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying Developmental Vascular Disruptor Compounds Using a Predictive Signature and Alternative Toxicity Models Presenting Author: Tamara Tal Affiliation: U.S. EPA/ORD/ISTD, RTP, NC, USA Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide...

  9. Initial Semantics for Strengthened Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hirschowitz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We give a new general definition of arity, yielding the companion notions of signature and associated syntax. This setting is modular in the sense requested by Ghani and Uustalu: merging two extensions of syntax corresponds to building an amalgamated sum. These signatures are too general in the sense that we are not able to prove the existence of an associated syntax in this general context. So we have to select arities and signatures for which there exists the desired initial monad. For this, we follow a track opened by Matthes and Uustalu: we introduce a notion of strengthened arity and prove that the corresponding signatures have initial semantics (i.e. associated syntax. Our strengthened arities admit colimits, which allows the treatment of the λ-calculus with explicit substitution.

  10. Retail applications of signature verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  11. Magnetic Signature Analysis & Validation System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vliet, Scott

    2001-01-01

    The Magnetic Signature Analysis and Validation (MAGSAV) System is a mobile platform that is used to measure, record, and analyze the perturbations to the earth's ambient magnetic field caused by object such as armored vehicles...

  12. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and (3...

  13. 76 FR 30542 - Adult Signature Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Adult Signature Services AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Final..., Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]) 503.8, to add a new extra service called Adult Signature. This new service has two available options: Adult Signature Required and Adult Signature Restricted Delivery. DATES...

  14. 1 CFR 18.7 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 18.7 Section 18.7 General Provisions... PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.7 Signature. The original and each duplicate original... stamped beneath the signature. Initialed or impressed signatures will not be accepted. Documents submitted...

  15. Attribute-Based Digital Signature System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibraimi, L.; Asim, Muhammad; Petkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    An attribute-based digital signature system comprises a signature generation unit (1) for signing a message (m) by generating a signature (s) based on a user secret key (SK) associated with a set of user attributes, wherein the signature generation unit (1) is arranged for combining the user secret

  16. Quantum messages with signatures forgeable in arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taewan; Choi, Jeong Woon; Jho, Nam-Su; Lee, Soojoon

    2015-01-01

    Even though a method to perfectly sign quantum messages has not been known, the arbitrated quantum signature scheme has been considered as one of the good candidates. However, its forgery problem has been an obstacle to the scheme becoming a successful method. In this paper, we consider one situation, which is slightly different from the forgery problem, that we use to check whether at least one quantum message with signature can be forged in a given scheme, although all the messages cannot be forged. If there are only a finite number of forgeable quantum messages in the scheme, then the scheme can be secured against the forgery attack by not sending forgeable quantum messages, and so our situation does not directly imply that we check whether the scheme is secure against the attack. However, if users run a given scheme without any consideration of forgeable quantum messages, then a sender might transmit such forgeable messages to a receiver and in such a case an attacker can forge the messages if the attacker knows them. Thus it is important and necessary to look into forgeable quantum messages. We show here that there always exists such a forgeable quantum message-signature pair for every known scheme with quantum encryption and rotation, and numerically show that there are no forgeable quantum message-signature pairs that exist in an arbitrated quantum signature scheme. (paper)

  17. SIGNATURE: A workbench for gene expression signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jeffrey T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenotype of a cell, such as a characteristic visual image or behavior, reflects activities derived from the expression of collections of genes. As such, an ability to measure the expression of these genes provides an opportunity to develop more precise and varied sets of phenotypes. However, to use this approach requires computational methods that are difficult to implement and apply, and thus there is a critical need for intelligent software tools that can reduce the technical burden of the analysis. Tools for gene expression analyses are unusually difficult to implement in a user-friendly way because their application requires a combination of biological data curation, statistical computational methods, and database expertise. Results We have developed SIGNATURE, a web-based resource that simplifies gene expression signature analysis by providing software, data, and protocols to perform the analysis successfully. This resource uses Bayesian methods for processing gene expression data coupled with a curated database of gene expression signatures, all carried out within a GenePattern web interface for easy use and access. Conclusions SIGNATURE is available for public use at http://genepattern.genome.duke.edu/signature/.

  18. BROAD BALMER WINGS IN BA HYPER/SUPERGIANTS DISTORTED BY DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS: FIVE EXAMPLES IN THE 30 DORADUS REGION FROM THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sana, Hugues; Sabbi, Elena, E-mail: walborn@stsci.edu, E-mail: hsana@stsci.edu, E-mail: sabbi@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2015-08-10

    Extremely broad emission wings at Hβ and Hα have been found in VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of Hβ and the shortward wing of Hα. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.

  19. Five Guidelines for Selecting Hydrological Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, H. K.; Westerberg, I.; Branger, F.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological signatures are index values derived from observed or modeled series of hydrological data such as rainfall, flow or soil moisture. They are designed to extract relevant information about hydrological behavior, such as to identify dominant processes, and to determine the strength, speed and spatiotemporal variability of the rainfall-runoff response. Hydrological signatures play an important role in model evaluation. They allow us to test whether particular model structures or parameter sets accurately reproduce the runoff generation processes within the watershed of interest. Most modeling studies use a selection of different signatures to capture different aspects of the catchment response, for example evaluating overall flow distribution as well as high and low flow extremes and flow timing. Such studies often choose their own set of signatures, or may borrow subsets of signatures used in multiple other works. The link between signature values and hydrological processes is not always straightforward, leading to uncertainty and variability in hydrologists' signature choices. In this presentation, we aim to encourage a more rigorous approach to hydrological signature selection, which considers the ability of signatures to represent hydrological behavior and underlying processes for the catchment and application in question. To this end, we propose a set of guidelines for selecting hydrological signatures. We describe five criteria that any hydrological signature should conform to: Identifiability, Robustness, Consistency, Representativeness, and Discriminatory Power. We describe an example of the design process for a signature, assessing possible signature designs against the guidelines above. Due to their ubiquity, we chose a signature related to the Flow Duration Curve, selecting the FDC mid-section slope as a proposed signature to quantify catchment overall behavior and flashiness. We demonstrate how assessment against each guideline could be used to

  20. The vast population of Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars in M101. I. Motivation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Crowther, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Moffat, Anthony F. J. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, CP 6128 Succ. C-V, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Drissen, Laurent [Département de Physique, Université Laval, Pavillon Vachon, Quebec City, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  1. K2 photometry and HERMES spectroscopy of the blue supergiant ρ Leo: rotational wind modulation and low-frequency waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Bowman, D. M.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Buysschaert, B.; Johnston, C.; Moravveji, E.; Beck, P. G.; De Cat, P.; Triana, S.; Aigrain, S.; Castro, N.; Huber, D.; White, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present an 80-d long uninterrupted high-cadence K2 light curve of the B1Iab supergiant ρ Leo (HD 91316), deduced with the method of halo photometry. This light curve reveals a dominant frequency of frot = 0.0373 d-1 and its harmonics. This dominant frequency corresponds with a rotation period of 26.8 d and is subject to amplitude and phase modulation. The K2 photometry additionally reveals multiperiodic low-frequency variability (<1.5 d-1) and is in full agreement with low-cadence high-resolution spectroscopy assembled during 1800 d. The spectroscopy reveals rotational modulation by a dynamic aspherical wind with an amplitude of about 20 km s-1 in the H α line, as well as photospheric velocity variations of a few km s-1 at frequencies in the range 0.2-0.6 d-1 in the Si III 4567 Å line. Given the large macroturbulence needed to explain the spectral line broadening of the star, we interpret the detected photospheric velocity as due to travelling superinertial low-degree large-scale gravity waves with dominant tangential amplitudes and discuss why ρ Leo is an excellent target to study how the observed photospheric variability propagates into the wind.

  2. MASER OBSERVATIONS OF WESTERLUND 1 AND COMPREHENSIVE CONSIDERATIONS ON MASER PROPERTIES OF RED SUPERGIANTS ASSOCIATED WITH MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, Thomas K. T.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Hsia, Chih-Hao [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Deguchi, Shuji, E-mail: junichi@hku.hk [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2012-11-20

    We report the results of Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) region in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines, and we also report the analysis of maser properties of red supergiants (RSGs) associated with six massive clusters including Wd1. The primary purpose of this research is to explore possibilities of using maser emission for investigating the nature of massive clusters and associated RSGs. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines are detected toward two of four known RSGs in Wd1. The large velocity ranges of maser emission are consistent with the RSG status. RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit redder log (F {sub 21}/F {sub 12}) and [K-12.13] colors compared to RSGs with no maser emission. The mass-loss rates derived from dust radiative transfer modeling suggest that RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit larger mass-loss rates compared to RSGs with no maser emission. In an extended sample of 57 RSGs in six massive clusters, detections in the SiO line tend to homogeneously distribute in absolute luminosity L, whereas those in the H{sub 2}O line tend to distribute in a region with large L values.

  3. The large dictionary on chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This book mentions the large dictionary on chemical engineering. It starts the preface. It mentions introduction for publish committee. It also has signature of publish committee. It introduces explanatory notes. It gives descriptions of glossary on chemical engineering. This has appendixes and index. This book consists of seven part to explain chemical engineering glossary. It was written by chemical engineering dictionary publish committee.

  4. Digital Signature Schemes with Complementary Functionality and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Kyazhin

    2012-01-01

    Digital signature schemes with additional functionality (an undeniable signature, a signature of the designated confirmee, a signature blind, a group signature, a signature of the additional protection) and examples of their application are considered. These schemes are more practical, effective and useful than schemes of ordinary digital signature.

  5. Signature Pedagogy in Theatre Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornetsky, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Critique in undergraduate theatre programs is at the heart of training actors at all levels. It is accepted as the signature pedagogy and is practiced in multiple ways. This essay defines critique and presents the case for why it is used as the single most important way that performers come to understand the language, values, and discourse of the…

  6. Motif signatures of transcribed enhancers

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-14

    In mammalian cells, transcribed enhancers (TrEn) play important roles in the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of gene expression levels in spatiotemporal manner. One of the most challenging questions in biology today is how the genomic characteristics of enhancers relate to enhancer activities. This is particularly critical, as several recent studies have linked enhancer sequence motifs to specific functional roles. To date, only a limited number of enhancer sequence characteristics have been investigated, leaving space for exploring the enhancers genomic code in a more systematic way. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational method, TELS, aimed at identifying predictive cell type/tissue specific motif signatures. We used TELS to compile a comprehensive catalog of motif signatures for all known TrEn identified by the FANTOM5 consortium across 112 human primary cells and tissues. Our results confirm that distinct cell type/tissue specific motif signatures characterize TrEn. These signatures allow discriminating successfully a) TrEn from random controls, proxy of non-enhancer activity, and b) cell type/tissue specific TrEn from enhancers expressed and transcribed in different cell types/tissues. TELS codes and datasets are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/TELS.

  7. Quark-Gluon Plasma Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Ramona

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of quark-gluon plasma signatures that can be measured by CMS are discussed. First the initial conditions of the system from minijet production are introduced, including shadowing effects. Color screening of the Upsilon family is then presented, followed by energy loss effects on charm and bottom hadrons, high Pt jets and global observables.

  8. Galaxy interactions : The HI signature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, R; Barnes, JE; Sanders, DB

    1999-01-01

    HI observations are an excellent tool for investigating tidal interactions. Ongoing major and minor interactions which can lead to traumatic mergers or to accretion and the triggering of star formation, show distinct HI signatures. Interactions and mergers in the recent past can also be recognized

  9. Military Tactical Aircraft Engine Noise Matching to Infrared Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-16

    Jet engine exhaust plumes also exhibit emission and absorption of radiation from their emitted chemical species, occurring at discrete spectra...Modulation,” Naval Postgraduate School MS thesis (1990). [8] Sinha, N., Ungewitter, R. J., Kenzakowski, D. C., and Seiner, J. M., “Gas Turbine Engine Jet...FINAL REPORT Military Tactical Aircraft Engine Noise Matching to Infrared Signatures SERDP Project WP-2404 JANUARY 2016 Dr

  10. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio-chemical

  11. Online Signature Verification on MOBISIG Finger-Drawn Signature Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Antal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present MOBISIG, a pseudosignature dataset containing finger-drawn signatures from 83 users captured with a capacitive touchscreen-based mobile device. The database was captured in three sessions resulting in 45 genuine signatures and 20 skilled forgeries for each user. The database was evaluated by two state-of-the-art methods: a function-based system using local features and a feature-based system using global features. Two types of equal error rate computations are performed: one using a global threshold and the other using user-specific thresholds. The lowest equal error rate was 0.01% against random forgeries and 5.81% against skilled forgeries using user-specific thresholds that were computed a posteriori. However, these equal error rates were significantly raised to 1.68% (random forgeries case and 14.31% (skilled forgeries case using global thresholds. The same evaluation protocol was performed on the DooDB publicly available dataset. Besides verification performance evaluations conducted on the two finger-drawn datasets, we evaluated the quality of the samples and the users of the two datasets using basic quality measures. The results show that finger-drawn signatures can be used by biometric systems with reasonable accuracy.

  12. Unsupervised signature extraction from forensic logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thaler, S.M.; Menkovski, V.; Petkovic, M.; Altun, Y.; Das, K.; Mielikäinen, T.; Malerba, D.; Stefanowski, J.; Read, J.; Žitnik, M.; Ceci, M.

    2017-01-01

    Signature extraction is a key part of forensic log analysis. It involves recognizing patterns in log lines such that log lines that originated from the same line of code are grouped together. A log signature consists of immutable parts and mutable parts. The immutable parts define the signature, and

  13. 7 CFR 718.9 - Signature requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature requirements. 718.9 Section 718.9... MULTIPLE PROGRAMS General Provisions § 718.9 Signature requirements. (a) When a program authorized by this chapter or Chapter XIV of this title requires the signature of a producer; landowner; landlord; or tenant...

  14. 42 CFR 424.36 - Signature requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signature requirements. 424.36 Section 424.36... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Claims for Payment § 424.36 Signature requirements. (a) General rule. The beneficiary's own signature is required on the claim unless the beneficiary...

  15. 17 CFR 12.12 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature. 12.12 Section 12.12... General Information and Preliminary Consideration of Pleadings § 12.12 Signature. (a) By whom. All... document on behalf of another person. (b) Effect. The signature on any document of any person acting either...

  16. 25 CFR 213.10 - Lessor's signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lessor's signature. 213.10 Section 213.10 Indians BUREAU... MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.10 Lessor's signature... thumbprint which shall be designated as “right” or “left” thumbmark. Such signatures must be witnessed by two...

  17. Signature effects in 2-qp rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Goel, A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors briefly review the progress in understanding the 2-qp rotational bands in odd-odd nuclei. Signature effects and the phenomenon of signature inversion are discussed. The Coriolis coupling appears to have all the ingredients to explain the inversion. Some recent work on signature dependence in 2-qp bands of even-even nuclei is also discussed; interesting features are pointed out

  18. 27 CFR 17.6 - Signature authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature authority. 17.6... PRODUCTS General Provisions § 17.6 Signature authority. No claim, bond, tax return, or other required... other proper notification of signature authority has been filed with the TTB office where the required...

  19. High-speed high-security signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Duif, N.; Lange, T.; Schwabe, P.; Yang, B.Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that a $390 mass-market quad-core 2.4GHz Intel Westmere (Xeon E5620) CPU can create 108000 signatures per second and verify 71000 signatures per second on an elliptic curve at a 2128 security level. Public keys are 32 bytes, and signatures are 64 bytes. These performance figures

  20. Some Proxy Signature and Designated verifier Signature Schemes over Braid Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Lal, Sunder; Verma, Vandani

    2009-01-01

    Braids groups provide an alternative to number theoretic public cryptography and can be implemented quite efficiently. The paper proposes five signature schemes: Proxy Signature, Designated Verifier, Bi-Designated Verifier, Designated Verifier Proxy Signature And Bi-Designated Verifier Proxy Signature scheme based on braid groups. We also discuss the security aspects of each of the proposed schemes.

  1. An HST COS 'SNAPSHOT' spectrum of the K supergiant λ Vel (K4Ib-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G. [NASA/GSFC Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ayres, Thomas R. [University of Colorado, CASA, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kober, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister E.; Wahlgren, Glenn M., E-mail: Kenneth.G.Carpenter@nasa.gov [Deptartment of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the K4 Ib-II supergiant λ Vel obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as a part of the SNAPshot program 'SNAPing coronal iron' (GO 11687). The observation covers a wavelength region (1326-1467 Å) not previously recorded for λ Vel at a spectral resolving power of R ∼ 20,000 and displays strong emission and absorption features, superposed on a bright chromospheric continuum. Fluorescent excitation is responsible for much of the observed emission, mainly powered by strong H I Lyα and the O I (UV 2) triplet emission near λ1304. The molecular CO and H{sub 2} fluorescences are weaker than in the early-K giant α Boo while the Fe II and Cr II lines, also pumped by H I Lyα, are stronger in λ Vel. This pattern of relative line strengths between the two stars is explained by the lower iron-group element abundance in α Boo, which weakens that star's Fe II and Cr II emission without reducing the molecular fluorescences. The λ Vel spectrum shows fluorescent Fe II, Cr II, and H{sub 2} emission similar to that observed in the M supergiant α Ori, but more numerous well-defined narrow emissions from CO. The additional CO emissions are visible in the spectrum of λ Vel since that star does not have the cool, opaque circumstellar shells that surround α Ori and produce broad circumstellar CO (A-X) band absorptions that hide those emissions in the cooler star. The presence of Si IV emission in λ Vel indicates a ∼8 × 10{sup 4} K plasma that is mixed into the cooler chromosphere. Evidence of the stellar wind is seen in the C II λλ1334,1335 lines and in the blueshifted Fe II and Ni II wind absorption lines. Line modeling using Sobolev with Exact Integration for the C II lines indicates a larger terminal velocity (∼45 versus ∼30 km s{sup –1}) and turbulence (∼27 versus <21 km s{sup –1}) with a more quickly accelerating wind (β = 0.35 versus 0.7) at the time of

  2. Effects of coronal regions on the x-ray flux and ionization conditions in the winds of ob supergiants and of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassinelli, J.P.; Olson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    The anomalously strong O VI and N V lines in O stars and the C IV lines in B supergiants may be due to Auger ionization by X-rays from a thin coronal zone at the base of the cool stellar winds. We determine the size of a corona that is necessary to produce the overall ionization conditions in zeta Pup as has been deduced by Olson from line profile analysis. In the ionization balance calculations we account for diffuse radiation field in the wind and for the large optical depths in the He II continuum due to radiative and Auger ionization edges of abundant elements. The X-ray flux transmitted through the wind is calculated and compared with upper limits derived for upper limits derived for zeta Pup observations from ANS and Uhuru satellites. It is found that a coronal zone with a temperature of 5x10 6 K and a volume emission measure of 10 58 cm -3 can produce the required ionization in a wind having a temperature of 30,000--35,000 K. The emergent X-ray flux bears little resemblance to the coronal emissivity because of the opacity of the wind. The X-ray flux nearly reaches the upper limits derived from the ANS observations and, at several energy bands, should be detectable by the HEAO B satellite. A simplified analysis of the Auger ionization process is developed and applied to other Of and OB supergiants. We find that the model can explain the presence of C IV and Si IV in supergaints with effective temperatures as low as 12,000 K and can explain the appearance of O VI and N V lines in early type supergiants as late as BO.5 and B2, respectively

  3. Resolving the Circumstellar Environment of the Galactic B[e] Supergiant Star MWC 137 from Large to Small Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michaela; Nickeler, Dieter H. [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, v.v.i., Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Liimets, Tiina [Tartu Observatory, 61602 Tõravere, Tartumaa (Estonia); Cappa, Cristina E.; Duronea, Nicolas U. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía, CONICET, CCT-La Plata, C.C.5., 1894, Villa Elisa (Argentina); Cidale, Lydia S.; Arias, Maria L. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Gunawan, Diah S.; Maravelias, Grigoris; Curé, Michel [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Casilla 5030, Valparaíso (Chile); Oksala, Mary E. [California Lutheran University, Department of Physics, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (United States); Fernandes, Marcelo Borges [Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 São Cristovão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santander-García, Miguel, E-mail: michaela.kraus@asu.cas.cz [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (IGN), C/Alfonso XII 3, E-28014, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-11-01

    The Galactic object MWC 137 has been suggested to belong to the group of B[e] supergiants. However, with its large-scale optical bipolar ring nebula and high-velocity jet and knots, it is a rather atypical representative of this class. We performed multiwavelength observations spreading from the optical to the radio regimes. Based on optical imaging and long-slit spectroscopic data, we found that the northern parts of the large-scale nebula are predominantly blueshifted, while the southern regions appear mostly redshifted. We developed a geometrical model consisting of two double cones. Although various observational features can be approximated with such a scenario, the observed velocity pattern is more complex. Using near-infrared integral-field unit spectroscopy, we studied the hot molecular gas in the vicinity of the star. The emission from the hot CO gas arises in a small-scale disk revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. Although the disk itself cannot be spatially resolved, its emission is reflected by the dust arranged in arc-like structures and the clumps surrounding MWC 137 on small scales. In the radio regime, we mapped the cold molecular gas in the outskirts of the optical nebula. We found that large amounts of cool molecular gas and warm dust embrace the optical nebula in the east, south, and west. No cold gas or dust was detected in the north and northwestern regions. Despite the new insights into the nebula kinematics gained from our studies, the real formation scenario of the large-scale nebula remains an open issue.

  4. ALMA observations of anisotropic dust mass loss in the inner circumstellar environment of the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, E.; Vlemmings, W.; Richards, A. M. S.; Baudry, A.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Harper, G. M.; Humphreys, E. M.; Kervella, P.; Khouri, T.; Muller, S.

    2015-01-01

    The processes leading to dust formation and the subsequent role it plays in driving mass loss in cool evolved stars is an area of intense study. Here we present high resolution ALMA Science Verification data of the continuum emission around the highly evolved oxygen-rich red supergiant VY CMa. These data enable us to study the dust in its inner circumstellar environment at a spatial resolution of 129 mas at 321 GHz and 59 mas at 658 GHz, thus allowing us to trace dust on spatial scales down to 11 R⋆ (71 AU). Two prominent dust components are detected and resolved. The brightest dust component, C, is located 334 mas (61 R⋆) southeast of the star and has a dust mass of at least 2.5 × 10-4 M⊙. It has a dust emissivity spectral index of β = -0.1 at its peak, implying that it is optically thick at these frequencies with a cool core of Td ≲ 100 K. Interestingly, not a single molecule in the ALMA data has emission close to the peak of this massive dust clump. The other main dust component, VY, is located at the position of the star and contains a total dust mass of 4.0 × 10-5 M⊙. It also contains a weaker dust feature extending over 60 R⋆ to the north with the total component having a typical dust emissivity spectral index of β = 0.7. We find that at least 17% of the dust mass around VY CMa is located in clumps ejected within a more quiescent roughly spherical stellar wind, with a quiescent dust mass loss rate of 5 × 10-6 M⊙yr-1. The anisotropic morphology of the dust indicates a continuous, directed mass loss over a few decades, suggesting that this mass loss cannot be driven by large convection cells alone. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Fundamental properties and atmospheric structure of the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris based on VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkowski, M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Marcaide, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the atmospheric structure and fundamental properties of the red supergiant VY CMa. Methods: We obtained near-infrared spectro-interferometric observations of VY CMa with spectral resolutions of 35 and 1500 using the AMBER instrument at the VLTI. Results: The visibility data indicate the presence of molecular layers of water vapor and CO in the extended atmosphere with an asymmetric morphology. The uniform disk diameter in the water band around 2.0 μm is increased by ~20% compared to the near-continuum bandpass at 2.20-2.25 μm, and in the CO band at 2.3-2.5 μm it is increased by up to ~50%. The closure phases indicate relatively small deviations from point symmetry close to the photospheric layer, and stronger deviations in the extended H2O and CO layers. Making use of the high spatial and spectral resolution, a near-continuum bandpass can be isolated from contamination by molecular and dusty layers, and the Rosseland-mean photospheric angular diameter is estimated to 11.3 ± 0.3 mas based on a PHOENIX atmosphere model. Together with recent high-precision estimates of the distance and spectro-photometry, this estimate corresponds to a radius of 1420 ± 120 R⊙ and an effective temperature of 3490 ± 90 K. Conclusions: VY CMa exhibits asymmetric, possibly clumpy, atmospheric layers of H2O and CO, which are not co-spatial, within a larger elongated dusty envelope. Our revised fundamental parameters put VY CMa close to the Hayashi limit of recent evolutionary tracks of initial mass 25 M⊙ with rotation or 32 M⊙ without rotation, shortly before evolving blueward in the HR-diagram. Based on observations made with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) at Paranal Observatory under programme ID 386.D-0012.Figures 2, 3 and 5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Resolving the Circumstellar Environment of the Galactic B[e] Supergiant Star MWC 137 from Large to Small Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Michaela; Nickeler, Dieter H.; Liimets, Tiina; Cappa, Cristina E.; Duronea, Nicolas U.; Cidale, Lydia S.; Arias, Maria L.; Gunawan, Diah S.; Maravelias, Grigoris; Curé, Michel; Oksala, Mary E.; Fernandes, Marcelo Borges; Santander-García, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The Galactic object MWC 137 has been suggested to belong to the group of B[e] supergiants. However, with its large-scale optical bipolar ring nebula and high-velocity jet and knots, it is a rather atypical representative of this class. We performed multiwavelength observations spreading from the optical to the radio regimes. Based on optical imaging and long-slit spectroscopic data, we found that the northern parts of the large-scale nebula are predominantly blueshifted, while the southern regions appear mostly redshifted. We developed a geometrical model consisting of two double cones. Although various observational features can be approximated with such a scenario, the observed velocity pattern is more complex. Using near-infrared integral-field unit spectroscopy, we studied the hot molecular gas in the vicinity of the star. The emission from the hot CO gas arises in a small-scale disk revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. Although the disk itself cannot be spatially resolved, its emission is reflected by the dust arranged in arc-like structures and the clumps surrounding MWC 137 on small scales. In the radio regime, we mapped the cold molecular gas in the outskirts of the optical nebula. We found that large amounts of cool molecular gas and warm dust embrace the optical nebula in the east, south, and west. No cold gas or dust was detected in the north and northwestern regions. Despite the new insights into the nebula kinematics gained from our studies, the real formation scenario of the large-scale nebula remains an open issue.

  7. Evolutionary Models of Red Supergiants: Evidence for A Metallicity-dependent Mixing Length and Implications for Type IIP Supernova Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Jung, Moo-Keon; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Jihoon

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies on the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) in the local universe provide us with an excellent observational constraint on RSG models. We calibrate the mixing length parameter by comparing model predictions with the empirical RSG temperatures in Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Milky Way, and M31, which are inferred from the TiO band and the spectral energy distribution (SED). Although our RSG models are computed with the MESA code, our result may be applied to other stellar evolution codes, including the BEC and TWIN codes. We find evidence that the mixing length increases with increasing metallicity for both cases where the TiO and SED temperatures of RSGs are used for the calibration. Together with the recent finding of a similar correlation in low-mass red giants by Tayar et al., this implies that the metallicity dependence of the mixing length is a universal feature in post-main sequence stars of both low and high masses. Our result implies that typical Type IIP supernova (SN IIP) progenitors with initial masses of ∼ 10{--}16 {M}ȯ have a radius range of 400 {R}ȯ ≲ R≲ 800 {R}ȯ regardless of metallicity. As an auxiliary result of this study, we find that the hydrogen-rich envelope mass of SN IIP progenitors for a given initial mass is predicted to be largely independent of metallicity if the Ledoux criterion with slow semiconvection is adopted, while the Schwarzschild models predict systematically more massive hydrogen-rich envelopes for lower metallicity.

  8. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  9. Nonlinear analysis of dynamic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, S.; Fallah, A.; Towhidkhah, F.

    2013-12-01

    Signature is a long trained motor skill resulting in well combination of segments like strokes and loops. It is a physical manifestation of complex motor processes. The problem, generally stated, is that how relative simplicity in behavior emerges from considerable complexity of perception-action system that produces behavior within an infinitely variable biomechanical and environmental context. To solve this problem, we present evidences which indicate that motor control dynamic in signing process is a chaotic process. This chaotic dynamic may explain a richer array of time series behavior in motor skill of signature. Nonlinear analysis is a powerful approach and suitable tool which seeks for characterizing dynamical systems through concepts such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponent. As a result, they can be analyzed in both horizontal and vertical for time series of position and velocity. We observed from the results that noninteger values for the correlation dimension indicates low dimensional deterministic dynamics. This result could be confirmed by using surrogate data tests. We have also used time series to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and obtain a positive value. These results constitute significant evidence that signature data are outcome of chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system of motor control.

  10. Magnetic confinement, Alfven wave reflection, and the origins of X-ray and mass-loss 'dividing lines' for late-type giants and supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; An, C.-H.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple qualitative model for the origin of the coronal and mass-loss dividing lines separating late-type giants and supergiants with and without hot, X-ray-emitting corona, and with and without significant mass loss is discussed. The basic physical effects considered are the necessity of magnetic confinement for hot coronal material on the surface of such stars and the large reflection efficiency for Alfven waves in cool exponential atmospheres. The model assumes that the magnetic field geometry of these stars changes across the observed 'dividing lines' from being mostly closed on the high effective temperature side to being mostly open on the low effective temperature side.

  11. IGR J17544-2619 IN DEPTH WITH SUZAKU: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR CLUMPY WINDS IN A SUPERGIANT FAST X-RAY TRANSIENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.; Smith, David M.; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    We present direct evidence for dense clumps of matter in the companion wind in a Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) binary. This is seen as a brief period of enhanced absorption during one of the bright, fast flares that distinguish these systems. The object under study was IGR J17544-2619, and a total of 236 ks of data were accumulated with the Japanese satellite Suzaku. The activity in this period spans a dynamic range of almost 10 4 in luminosity and gives a detailed look at SFXT behavior.

  12. Degradation Signatures of Open Ocean Microplastic Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender Law, K. L.; Donohue, J. L.; Collins, T.; Proskurowsi, G.; Andrady, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    Microplastics collected from the open ocean offer few clues about their origin and history. There is currently no method to determine how long ocean plastic has undergone environmental weathering, how quickly fragmentation has occurred, or how small microplastic particles will ultimately become before (or if) they are fully degraded by microbial action. In the current absence of results from laboratory and field experiments designed to address these questions, we meticulously examined physical and chemical characteristics of open ocean microplastic particles collected over a 16-year period for clues about their weathering history. More than 1000 microplastic particles collected in the western North Atlantic between 1991 and 2007 were analyzed to determine polymer type, material density, mass and particle size, and were used to create a detailed catalogue of common microscopic surface features likely related to environmental exposure and weathering. Polyethylene and polypropylene, the two buoyant resins most commonly collected at the sea surface, can typically be distinguished by visual microscopy alone, and their particular characteristics lead us to hypothesize that these two resins weaken and fragment in different ways and on different time scales. A subset of resin pellets collected at sea were also analyzed using FTIR-ATR and/or FTIR microscopy for signatures of chemical degradation (e.g., carbonyl index) that are related to physical weathering characteristics such as color, quantified by the yellowness index.

  13. Spectral signature selection for mapping unvegetated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data covering the wavelength interval from 0.40-2.60 microns were collected at an altitude of 1000 m above the terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. Uniform training areas were selected within three sites from this flightline. Soil samples were collected from each site and a procedure developed to allow assignment of scan line and element number from the multispectral scanner data to each sampling location. These soil samples were analyzed on a spectrophotometer and laboratory spectral signatures were derived. After correcting for solar radiation and atmospheric attenuation, the laboratory signatures were compared to the spectral signatures derived from these same soils using multispectral scanner data. Both signatures were used in supervised and unsupervised classification routines. Computer-generated maps using the laboratory and multispectral scanner derived signatures resulted in maps that were similar to maps resulting from field surveys. Approximately 90% agreement was obtained between classification maps produced using multispectral scanner derived signatures and laboratory derived signatures.

  14. Time Series Based for Online Signature Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Gede Darma Putra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Signature verification system is to match the tested signature with a claimed signature. This paper proposes time series based for feature extraction method and dynamic time warping for match method. The system made by process of testing 900 signatures belong to 50 participants, 3 signatures for reference and 5 signatures from original user, simple imposters and trained imposters for signatures test. The final result system was tested with 50 participants with 3 references. This test obtained that system accuracy without imposters is 90,44897959% at threshold 44 with rejection errors (FNMR is 5,2% and acceptance errors (FMR is 4,35102%, when with imposters system accuracy is 80,1361% at threshold 27 with error rejection (FNMR is 15,6% and acceptance errors (average FMR is 4,263946%, with details as follows: acceptance errors is 0,391837%, acceptance errors simple imposters is 3,2% and acceptance errors trained imposters is 9,2%.

  15. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  16. Chemical ecology of interactions between human skin microbiota and mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Takken, W.; Dicke, M.; Schraa, G.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Microbiota on the human skin plays a major role in body odour production. The human microbial and chemical signature displays a qualitative and quantitative correlation. Genes may influence the chemical signature by shaping the composition of the microbiota. Recent studies on human skin microbiota,

  17. The Aro 1 mm Survey of the Oxygen-Rich Envelope of Supergiant Star NML Cygnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessica L.; Ziurys, L. M.; Woolf, N. J.

    2011-06-01

    Although a number of molecular line surveys of carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes (CSE) have been performed, only one oxygen-rich CSE, that of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), has been studied in depth. The Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 1 mm survey of VY CMa showed a very different and interesting chemistry dominated by sulfur- and silicon-bearing compounds as well as a number of more exotic species. A similar survey of the oxygen rich star NML Cygnus (NML Cyg) from 215 to 285 GHz is currently under way using the ARO Sub-millimeter Telescope. Initial observations show that this circumstellar envelope appears to be as chemically rich as that of VY CMa. Molecules including 12CO, 13CO, 12CN, 13CN, HCN, HCO+, CS, SO{_2}, SiO and 30SiO have been observed in NML Cyg. Line profiles of this source also suggest that there may be multiple outflows and that the circumstellar envelope is not spherically symmetric. Current results will be presented.

  18. A FIVE-YEAR SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC CAMPAIGN ON THE PROTOTYPICAL α CYGNI VARIABLE AND A-TYPE SUPERGIANT STAR DENEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, N. D.; Morrison, N. D.; Kryukova, E. E.; Adelman, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Deneb is often considered the prototypical A-type supergiant and is one of the visually most luminous stars in the Galaxy. A-type supergiants are potential extragalactic distance indicators, but the variability of these stars needs to be better characterized before this technique can be considered reliable. We analyzed 339 high-resolution echelle spectra of Deneb obtained over the five-year span of 1997 through 2001 as well as 370 Stroemgren photometric measurements obtained during the same time frame. Our spectroscopic analysis included dynamical spectra of the Hα profile, Hα equivalent widths, and radial velocities measured from Si II λλ 6347, 6371. Time-series analysis reveals no obvious cyclic behavior that proceeds through multiple observing seasons, although we found a suspected 40 day period in two, non-consecutive observing seasons. Some correlations are found between photometric and radial velocity data sets and suggest radial pulsations at two epochs. No correlation is found between the variability of the Hα profiles and that of the radial velocities or the photometry. Lucy found evidence that Deneb was a long-period single-lined spectroscopic binary star, but our data set shows no evidence for radial velocity variations caused by a binary companion.

  19. ARE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS CAUSED BY BLUE SUPERGIANT COLLAPSARS, NEWBORN MAGNETARS, OR WHITE DWARF TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioka, Kunihito [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: kunihito.ioka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-12-10

    Ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (ulGRBs) are a new population of GRBs with extreme durations of ∼10{sup 4} s. Leading candidates for their origin are blue supergiant collapsars, magnetars, and white dwarf tidal disruption events (WD-TDEs) caused by massive black holes (BHs). Recent observations of supernova-like (SN-like) bumps associated with ulGRBs challenged both the WD-TDE and the blue supergiant models because of the detection of SNe and the absence of hydrogen lines, respectively. We propose that WD-TDEs can accommodate the observed SN-like bumps if the fallback WD matter releases energy into the unbound WD ejecta. The observed ejecta energy, luminosity, and velocity are explained by the gravitational energy, Eddington luminosity, and escape velocity of the formed accretion disk, respectively. We also show that the observed X-rays can ionize the ejecta, eliminating lines. The SN-like light curves (SN 2011kl) for the ulGRB 111209A are consistent with all three models, although a magnetar model is unnatural because the spin-down time required to power the SN-like bump is a hundred times longer than the GRB. Our results imply that TDEs are a possible energy source for SN-like events in general and for ulGRBs in particular.

  20. Infrared signatures for remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, R.S.; Sharpe, S.W.; Kelly, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    PNL's capabilities for infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy include tunable-diode-laser (TDL) systems covering 300--3,000 cm -1 at 2 laser. PNL also has a beam expansion source with a 12-cm slit, which provides a 3-m effective path for gases at ∼10 K, giving a Doppler width of typically 10 MHz; and long-path static gas cells (to 100 m). In applying this equipment to signatures work, the authors emphasize the importance of high spectral resolution for detecting and identifying atmospheric interferences; for identifying the optimum analytical frequencies; for deriving, by spectroscopic analysis, the molecular parameters needed for modeling; and for obtaining data on species and/or bands that are not in existing databases. As an example of such spectroscopy, the authors have assigned and analyzed the C-Cl stretching region of CCl 4 at 770--800 cm -1 . This is an important potential signature species whose IR absorption has remained puzzling because of the natural isotopic mix, extensive hot-band structure, and a Fermi resonance involving a nearby combination band. Instrument development projects include the IR sniffer, a small high-sensitivity, high-discrimination (Doppler-limited) device for fence-line or downwind monitoring that is effective even in regions of atmospheric absorption; preliminary work has achieved sensitivities at the low-ppb level. Other work covers trace species detection with TDLs, and FM-modulated CO 2 laser LIDAR. The authors are planning a field experiment to interrogate the Hanford tank farm for signature species from Rattlesnake Mountain, a standoff of ca. 15 km, to be accompanied by simultaneous ground-truthing at the tanks

  1. Is there an aerosol signature of aqueous processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervens, B.; Sorooshian, A.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of aerosol mass in cloud water has been recognized as a substantial source of atmospheric aerosol mass. While sulfate formation can be relatively well constrained, the formation of secondary organic aerosol mass in the aqueous phase (aqSOA) is much more complex due to the multitude of precursors and variety in chemical processes. Aqueous phase processing adds aerosol mass to the droplet mode, which is formed due to mass addition to activated particles in clouds. In addition, it has been shown that aqSOA mass has specific characteristics in terms of oxidation state and hygroscopicity that might help to distinguish it from other SOA sources. Many models do not include detailed chemical mechanisms of sulfate and aqSOA formation and also lack details on the mass distribution of newly formed mass. Mass addition inside and outside clouds modifies different parts of an aerosol population and consequently affects predictions of properties and lifetime of particles. Using a combination of field data analysis and model studies for a variety of air masses, we will show which chemical and physical aerosol properties can be used, in order to identify an `aqueous phase signature' in processed aerosol populations. We will discuss differences in this signature in clean (e.g., background), moderately polluted (e.g., urban) and highly polluted (e.g., biomass burning) air masses and suggest air-mass-specific chemical and/or physical properties that will help to quantify the aqueous-phase derived aerosol mass.

  2. Magnetically aligned dust and SiO maser polarisation in the envelope of the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Khouri, T.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Tafoya, D.; Baudry, A.; Etoka, S.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Jones, T. J.; Kemball, A.; O'Gorman, E.; Pérez-Sánchez, A. F.; Richards, A. M. S.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: Polarisation observations of circumstellar dust and molecular (thermal and maser) lines provide unique information about dust properties and magnetic fields in circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars. Methods: We use Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 5 science verification observations of the red supergiant VY CMa to study the polarisation of SiO thermal/maser lines and dust continuum at 1.7 mm wavelength. We analyse both linear and circular polarisation and derive the magnetic field strength and structure, assuming the polarisation of the lines originates from the Zeeman effect, and that of the dust originates from aligned dust grains. We also discuss other effects that could give rise to the observed polarisation. Results: We detect, for the first time, significant polarisation ( 3%) of the circumstellar dust emission at millimeter wavelengths. The polarisation is uniform with an electric vector position angle of 8°. Varying levels of linear polarisation are detected for the J = 4 - 328SiO v = 0, 1, 2, and 29SiO v = 0, 1 lines, with the strongest polarisation fraction of 30% found for the 29SiO v = 1 maser. The linear polarisation vectors rotate with velocity, consistent with earlier observations. We also find significant (up to 1%) circular polarisation in several lines, consistent with previous measurements. We conclude that the detection is robust against calibration and regular instrumental errors, although we cannot yet fully rule out non-standard instrumental effects. Conclusions: Emission from magnetically aligned grains is the most likely origin of the observed continuum polarisation. This implies that the dust is embedded in a magnetic field >13 mG. The maser line polarisation traces the magnetic field structure. The magnetic field in the gas and dust is consistent with an approximately toroidal field configuration, but only higher angular resolution observations will be able to reveal more detailed field structure. If the

  3. Photometry of the Variable Bright Red Supergiant Betelgeuse from the Ground and from Space with the BRITE Nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Robert B. Minor, Edward Guinan, Richard Wasatonic Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) is a large, luminous semi-regular red supergiant of spectral class M1.5-2Iab. It is the 8th brightest star in the night sky. Betelgeuse is 30,000 times more luminous than the Sun and 700 times larger. It has an estimated age of ~8 +/- 2 Myr. Betelgeuse explode in a Type II supernova (anytime within the next million years). When it explodes, it will shine with about the intensity of a full moon and may be visible during the day. However, it is too far away to cause any major damage to Earth. Photometry of this pre-supernova star has been ongoing at Villanova for nearly 45 years. These observations are being used to define the complex brightness variations of this star. Semi-regular periodic light variations have been found with periods of 385 days up to many years. These light variations are used to study its unstable atmosphere and resulting complex pulsations. Over the last 15 years, it has been observed by Wasatonic who has accumulated a large photometric database. The ground-based observations are limited to precisions of 1.5%, and due to poor weather, limit observations to about 1-2 times per week. However, with the recent successful launch of the BRITE Nano-satellites (http://www.brite-constellation.at) during 2013-14, it is possible to secure high precision photometry of bright stars, including Betelgeuse, continuously for up to 3 months. Villanova has participated in the BRITE guest investigators program and has been awarded observing time and data rights many bright stars, including Betelgeuse. BRITE blue and red observations of Betelgeuse were carried out during the Nov-Feb 2013-14 season and the 2014-15. These datasets were given to Villanova and have been combined with coexistent photometry from Wasatonic. Although BRITE's red data is saturated, the blue data is useable. The BRITE datasets were combined with our ground-based V, red, and near-IR photometry. Problems were

  4. The energetic and chemical signatures of persistent soil organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barré, Pierre; Plante, Alain F.; Cecillon, Lauric

    2016-01-01

    A large fraction of soil organic matter (OM) resists decomposition over decades to centuries as indicated by long radiocarbon residence times, but the mechanisms responsible for the long-term (multi-decadal) persistence are debated. The current lack of mechanistic understanding limits our ability...

  5. Signature Curves Statistics of DNA Supercoils

    OpenAIRE

    Shakiban, Cheri; Lloyd, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the Euclidean signature curves for two dimensional closed curves in the plane and their generalization to closed space curves. The focus will be on discrete numerical methods for approximating such curves. Further we will apply these numerical methods to plot the signature curves related to three-dimensional simulated DNA supercoils. Our primary focus will be on statistical analysis of the data generated for the signature curves of the supercoils. We will try to esta...

  6. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge...

  7. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  8. Modeling the Thermal Signature of Natural Backgrounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gamborg, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Two measuring stations have been established the purpose being to collect comprehensive databases of thermal signatures of background elements in addition to the prevailing meteorological conditions...

  9. An Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme without Entanglement*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui-Ran; Luo Ming-Xing; Peng Dai-Yuan; Wang Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Several quantum signature schemes are recently proposed to realize secure signatures of quantum or classical messages. Arbitrated quantum signature as one nontrivial scheme has attracted great interests because of its usefulness and efficiency. Unfortunately, previous schemes cannot against Trojan horse attack and DoS attack and lack of the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. In this paper, we propose an improved arbitrated quantum signature to address these secure issues with the honesty arbitrator. Our scheme takes use of qubit states not entanglements. More importantly, the qubit scheme can achieve the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. Our scheme is also secure for other known quantum attacks . (paper)

  10. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  11. Identification of High Confidence Nuclear Forensics Signatures. Results of a Coordinated Research Project and Related Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The results of a Coordinated Research Project and related research on the identification of high confidence nuclear forensic isotopic, chemical and physical data characteristics, or signatures, provides information on signatures that can help identify the origin and history of nuclear and other radioactive material encountered out of regulatory control. This research report compiles findings from investigations of materials obtained from throughout the nuclear fuel cycle to include radioactive sources. The report further provides recent results used to identify, analyse in the laboratory, predict and interpret these signatures relative to the requirements of a nuclear forensics examination. The report describes some of the controls on the incorporation and persistence of these signatures in these materials as well as their potential use in a national system of identification to include a national nuclear forensics library.

  12. Uranium isotopic signatures measured in samples of dirt collected at two former uranium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, L.A.; Stalcup, A.M.; LaMont, S.P.; Spitz, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is a multidisciplinary science that uses a variety of analytical methods and tools to explore the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of nuclear and radiological materials. These characteristics, when evaluated alone or in combination, become signatures that may reveal how and when the material was fabricated. The signatures contained in samples of dirt collected at two different uranium metal processing facilities in the United States were evaluated to determine uranium isotopic composition and compare results with processes that were conducted at these sites. One site refined uranium and fabricated uranium metal ingots for fuel and targets and the other site rolled hot forged uranium and other metals into dimensional rods. Unique signatures were found that are consistent with the activities and processes conducted at each facility and establish confidence in using these characteristics to reveal the provenance of other materials that exhibit similar signatures. (author)

  13. Detection of the spectroscopic signatures of explosives and their degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Vivian; Cabanzo, Andrea; Baez, Bibiana; Correa, Sandra; Irrazabal, Maik; Briano, Julio G.; Castro, Miguel E.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2005-06-01

    Detection and removal of antipersonnel and antitank landmines is a great challenge and a worldwide enviromental and humanitarian problem. Sensors tuned on the spectroscopic signature of the chemicals released from mines are a potential solution. Enviromental factors (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall precipitation, wind, sun irradiation, pressure, etc.) as well as soil characteristics (water content, compaction, porosity, chemical composition, particle size distribution, topography, vegetation, etc), have a direct impact on the fate and transport of the chemicals released from landmines. Chemicals such as TNT, DNT and their degradation products, are semi-volatile, and somewhat soluble in water. Also, they may adsorb strongly to soil particles, and are susceptible to degradation by microorganisms, light, or chemical agents. Here we show an experimental procedure to quantify the effect of the above variables on the spectroscopic signature. A number of soil tanks under controlled conditions are used to study the effect of temperature, water content, relative humidity and light radiation.

  14. 21 CFR 11.70 - Signature/record linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature/record linking. 11.70 Section 11.70 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.70 Signature/record linking. Electronic signatures and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records shall be linked to their respective...

  15. 15 CFR 908.16 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 908.16 Section 908.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.16 Signature. All reports filed with the National...

  16. 12 CFR 269b.731 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 269b.731 Section 269b.731 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.731 Signature. The original of each document filed shall be...

  17. The Pedagogic Signature of the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Ewald; Lerche, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Oubaid, Viktor; Weiss, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lee S. Shulman deplores that the field of education as a profession does not have a pedagogic signature, which he characterizes as a synthesis of cognitive, practical and moral apprenticeship. In this context, the following study has three goals: 1) In the first theoretical part, the basic problems of constructing a pedagogic signature are…

  18. Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and

  19. Does Social Work Have a Signature Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earls Larrison, Tara; Korr, Wynne S.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse on signature pedagogy by reconceptualizing how our pedagogies are understood and defined for social work education. We critique the view that field education is social work's signature pedagogy and consider what pedagogies are distinct about the teaching and learning of social work. Using Shulman's…

  20. Quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    When we want to sign a quantum message that we create, we can use arbitrated quantum signature schemes which are possible to sign for not only known quantum messages but also unknown quantum messages. However, since the arbitrated quantum signature schemes need the help of a trusted arbitrator in each verification of the signature, it is known that the schemes are not convenient in practical use. If we consider only known quantum messages such as the above situation, there can exist a quantum signature scheme with more efficient structure. In this paper, we present a new quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages without the help of an arbitrator. Differing from arbitrated quantum signature schemes based on the quantum one-time pad with the symmetric key, since our scheme is based on quantum public-key cryptosystems, the validity of the signature can be verified by a receiver without the help of an arbitrator. Moreover, we show that our scheme provides the functions of quantum message integrity, user authentication and non-repudiation of the origin as in digital signature schemes. (paper)

  1. Analysis of signature wrapping attacks and countermeasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajek, Sebastian; Jensen, Meiko; Liao, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    In recent research it turned out that Boolean verification, of digital signatures in the context of WSSecurity, is likely to fail: If parts of a SOAP message, are signed and the signature verification applied to, the whole document returns true, then nevertheless the, document may have been...

  2. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4.102 Section 4.102 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with an...

  3. Quantum Signature of Analog Hawking Radiation in Momentum Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiron, D; Fabbri, A; Larré, P-É; Pavloff, N; Westbrook, C I; Ziń, P

    2015-07-10

    We consider a sonic analog of a black hole realized in the one-dimensional flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that one- and two-body momentum distributions accessible by present-day experimental techniques provide clear direct evidence (i) of the occurrence of a sonic horizon, (ii) of the associated acoustic Hawking radiation, and (iii) of the quantum nature of the Hawking process. The signature of the quantum behavior persists even at temperatures larger than the chemical potential.

  4. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  5. DIGITAL SIGNATURE IN THE WAY OF LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Samlı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Signature can be defined as a person’s name or special signs that he/she writes when he/she wants to indicate he/she wrote or confirm that writing. A person signs many times in his/her life. A person’s signature that is used for thousands of times for many things from formal documents to exams has importance for that person. Especially, signing in legal operations is an operation that can build important results. If a person’s signature is imitated by another person, he/she can become beholden, donate his/her whole wealth, commits offences or do some judicial operations. Today, because many operations can be done with digital environments and internet, signature operation that provides identity validation must also be carried to digital environment. In this paper digital signature concept that is approved for this reason and its situation in international areas and Turkish laws are investigated.

  6. Resolving the Circumstellar Environment of the Galactic B[e] Supergiant Star MWC 137 from Large to Small Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michaela; Liimets, Tiina; Cappa, Cristina E.; Cidale, Lydia S.; Nickeler, Dieter H.; Duronea, Nicolas U.; Arias, Maria L.; Gunawan, Diah S.; Oksala, Mary E.; Borges Fernandes, Marcelo; Maravelias, Grigoris; Curé, Michel; Santander-García, Miguel

    2017-11-01

    The Galactic object MWC 137 has been suggested to belong to the group of B[e] supergiants. However, with its large-scale optical bipolar ring nebula and high-velocity jet and knots, it is a rather atypical representative of this class. We performed multiwavelength observations spreading from the optical to the radio regimes. Based on optical imaging and long-slit spectroscopic data, we found that the northern parts of the large-scale nebula are predominantly blueshifted, while the southern regions appear mostly redshifted. We developed a geometrical model consisting of two double cones. Although various observational features can be approximated with such a scenario, the observed velocity pattern is more complex. Using near-infrared integral-field unit spectroscopy, we studied the hot molecular gas in the vicinity of the star. The emission from the hot CO gas arises in a small-scale disk revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. Although the disk itself cannot be spatially resolved, its emission is reflected by the dust arranged in arc-like structures and the clumps surrounding MWC 137 on small scales. In the radio regime, we mapped the cold molecular gas in the outskirts of the optical nebula. We found that large amounts of cool molecular gas and warm dust embrace the optical nebula in the east, south, and west. No cold gas or dust was detected in the north and northwestern regions. Despite the new insights into the nebula kinematics gained from our studies, the real formation scenario of the large-scale nebula remains an open issue. Based on observations collected with (1) the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under programs 094.D-0637(B) and 097.D-0033(A), (2) the MPG 2.2 m telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile, under programs 096.A-9030(A) and 096.A-9039(A), (3) the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the

  7. 48 CFR 804.101 - Contracting officer's signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... signature. 804.101 Section 804.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 804.101 Contracting officer's signature. (a) If a... signature. ...

  8. Maximizing biomarker discovery by minimizing gene signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene signatures can potentially be of considerable value in the field of clinical diagnosis. However, gene signatures defined with different methods can be quite various even when applied the same disease and the same endpoint. Previous studies have shown that the correct selection of subsets of genes from microarray data is key for the accurate classification of disease phenotypes, and a number of methods have been proposed for the purpose. However, these methods refine the subsets by only considering each single feature, and they do not confirm the association between the genes identified in each gene signature and the phenotype of the disease. We proposed an innovative new method termed Minimize Feature's Size (MFS based on multiple level similarity analyses and association between the genes and disease for breast cancer endpoints by comparing classifier models generated from the second phase of MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II, trying to develop effective meta-analysis strategies to transform the MAQC-II signatures into a robust and reliable set of biomarker for clinical applications. Results We analyzed the similarity of the multiple gene signatures in an endpoint and between the two endpoints of breast cancer at probe and gene levels, the results indicate that disease-related genes can be preferably selected as the components of gene signature, and that the gene signatures for the two endpoints could be interchangeable. The minimized signatures were built at probe level by using MFS for each endpoint. By applying the approach, we generated a much smaller set of gene signature with the similar predictive power compared with those gene signatures from MAQC-II. Conclusions Our results indicate that gene signatures of both large and small sizes could perform equally well in clinical applications. Besides, consistency and biological significances can be detected among different gene signatures, reflecting the

  9. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  10. Genomic Signatures of Sexual Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimatis, Katja R; Nelson, Thomas C; Phillips, Patrick C

    2017-10-30

    Sexual conflict is a specific class of intergenomic conflict that describes the reciprocal sex-specific fitness costs generated by antagonistic reproductive interactions. The potential for sexual conflict is an inherent property of having a shared genome between the sexes and, therefore, is an extreme form of an environment-dependent fitness effect. In this way, many of the predictions from environment-dependent selection can be used to formulate expected patterns of genome evolution under sexual conflict. However, the pleiotropic and transmission constraints inherent to having alleles move across sex-specific backgrounds from generation to generation further modulate the anticipated signatures of selection. We outline methods for detecting candidate sexual conflict loci both across and within populations. Additionally, we consider the ability of genome scans to identify sexually antagonistic loci by modeling allele frequency changes within males and females due to a single generation of selection. In particular, we highlight the need to integrate genotype, phenotype, and functional information to truly distinguish sexual conflict from other forms of sexual differentiation. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Transcriptomic signatures in cartilage ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Age is an important factor in the development of osteoarthritis. Microarray studies provide insight into cartilage aging but do not reveal the full transcriptomic phenotype of chondrocytes such as small noncoding RNAs, pseudogenes, and microRNAs. RNA-Seq is a powerful technique for the interrogation of large numbers of transcripts including nonprotein coding RNAs. The aim of the study was to characterise molecular mechanisms associated with age-related changes in gene signatures. Methods RNA for gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq and real-time PCR analysis was isolated from macroscopically normal cartilage of the metacarpophalangeal joints of eight horses; four young donors (4 years old) and four old donors (>15 years old). RNA sequence libraries were prepared following ribosomal RNA depletion and sequencing was undertaken using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Differentially expressed genes were defined using Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate correction with a generalised linear model likelihood ratio test (P ageing cartilage. Conclusion There was an age-related dysregulation of matrix, anabolic and catabolic cartilage factors. This study has increased our knowledge of transcriptional networks in cartilage ageing by providing a global view of the transcriptome. PMID:23971731

  12. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  13. Molecular signatures of thyroid follicular neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, R.; Rossing, M.; Henao, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The molecular pathways leading to thyroid follicular neoplasia are incompletely understood, and the diagnosis of follicular tumors is a clinical challenge. To provide leads to the pathogenesis and diagnosis of the tumors, we examined the global transcriptome signatures of follicular thyroid...... a mechanism for cancer progression, which is why we exploited the results in order to generate a molecular classifier that could identify 95% of all carcinomas. Validation employing public domain and cross-platform data demonstrated that the signature was robust and could diagnose follicular nodules...... and robust genetic signature for the diagnosis of FA and FC. Endocrine-Related Cancer (2010) 17 691-708...

  14. DIGITAL SIGNATURE IN THE WAY OF LAW

    OpenAIRE

    Ruya Samlı

    2013-01-01

    Signature can be defined as a person’s name or special signs that he/she writes when he/she wants to indicate he/she wrote or confirm that writing. A person signs many times in his/her life. A person’s signature that is used for thousands of times for many things from formal documents to exams has importance for that person. Especially, signing in legal operations is an operation that can build important results. If a person’s signature is imitated by another person, he/she can be...

  15. A simple and robust method for connecting small-molecule drugs using gene-expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gant Timothy W

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of a drug or chemical with a biological system can result in a gene-expression profile or signature characteristic of the event. Using a suitably robust algorithm these signatures can potentially be used to connect molecules with similar pharmacological or toxicological properties by gene expression profile. Lamb et al first proposed the Connectivity Map [Lamb et al (2006, Science 313, 1929–1935] to make successful connections among small molecules, genes, and diseases using genomic signatures. Results Here we have built on the principles of the Connectivity Map to present a simpler and more robust method for the construction of reference gene-expression profiles and for the connection scoring scheme, which importantly allows the valuation of statistical significance of all the connections observed. We tested the new method with two randomly generated gene signatures and three experimentally derived gene signatures (for HDAC inhibitors, estrogens, and immunosuppressive drugs, respectively. Our testing with this method indicates that it achieves a higher level of specificity and sensitivity and so advances the original method. Conclusion The method presented here not only offers more principled statistical procedures for testing connections, but more importantly it provides effective safeguard against false connections at the same time achieving increased sensitivity. With its robust performance, the method has potential use in the drug development pipeline for the early recognition of pharmacological and toxicological properties in chemicals and new drug candidates, and also more broadly in other 'omics sciences.

  16. Magnetic Signature of Brushless Electric Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, David

    2006-01-01

    Brushless electric motors are used in a number of underwater vehicles. When these underwater vehicles are used for mine clearance operations the magnetic signature of the brushless motors is important...

  17. Magnetic signature surveillance of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernatowicz, H.; Schoenig, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    Typical nuclear fuel material contains tramp ferromagnetic particles of random size and distribution. Also, selected amounts of paramagnetic or ferromagnetic material can be added at random or at known positions in the fuel material. The fuel material in its non-magnetic container is scanned along its length by magnetic susceptibility detecting apparatus whereby susceptibility changes along its length are obtained and provide a unique signal waveform of the container of fuel material as a signature thereof. The output signature is stored. At subsequent times in its life the container is again scanned and respective signatures obtained which are compared with the initially obtained signature, any differences indicating alteration or tampering with the fuel material. If the fuel material includes a paramagnetic additive by taking two measurements along the container the effects thereof can be cancelled out. (author)

  18. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  19. Signature scheme based on bilinear pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui Y.; Geng, Yong J.

    2013-03-01

    An identity-based signature scheme is proposed by using bilinear pairs technology. The scheme uses user's identity information as public key such as email address, IP address, telephone number so that it erases the cost of forming and managing public key infrastructure and avoids the problem of user private generating center generating forgery signature by using CL-PKC framework to generate user's private key.

  20. Signature for the shape of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomero, G.I.; Reboucas, M.J.; Teixeira, A.F.F.

    2001-03-01

    If the universe has a nontrival shape (topology) the sky may show multiple correlated images of cosmic objects. These correlations can be counched in terms of distance correlations. We propose a statistical quantity which can be used to reveal the topological signature of any Roberston-Walker (RW) spacetime with nontrivial topology. We also show through computer-aided simulations how one can extract the topological signatures of flat elliptic and hyperbolic RW universes with nontrivial topology. (author)

  1. Signature-based store checking buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  2. Neutral signature Walker-VSI metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coley, A; McNutt, D; Musoke, N; Brooks, D; Hervik, S

    2014-01-01

    We will construct explicit examples of four-dimensional neutral signature Walker (but not necessarily degenerate Kundt) spaces for which all of the polynomial scalar curvature invariants vanish. We then investigate the properties of some particular subclasses of Ricci flat spaces. We also briefly describe some four-dimensional neutral signature Einstein spaces for which all of the polynomial scalar curvature invariants are constant. (paper)

  3. Tightly Secure Signatures From Lossy Identification Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla , Michel; Fouque , Pierre-Alain; Lyubashevsky , Vadim; Tibouchi , Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present three digital signature schemes with tight security reductions in the random oracle model. Our first signature scheme is a particularly efficient version of the short exponent discrete log-based scheme of Girault et al. (J Cryptol 19(4):463–487, 2006). Our scheme has a tight reduction to the decisional short discrete logarithm problem, while still maintaining the non-tight reduction to the computational version of the problem upon which the or...

  4. L1000CDS2: LINCS L1000 characteristic direction signatures search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiaonan; Reid, St Patrick; Clark, Neil R; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Readhead, Ben; Tritsch, Sarah R; Hodos, Rachel; Hafner, Marc; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K; Dudley, Joel T; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The library of integrated network-based cellular signatures (LINCS) L1000 data set currently comprises of over a million gene expression profiles of chemically perturbed human cell lines. Through unique several intrinsic and extrinsic benchmarking schemes, we demonstrate that processing the L1000 data with the characteristic direction (CD) method significantly improves signal to noise compared with the MODZ method currently used to compute L1000 signatures. The CD processed L1000 signatures are served through a state-of-the-art web-based search engine application called L1000CDS 2 . The L1000CDS 2 search engine provides prioritization of thousands of small-molecule signatures, and their pairwise combinations, predicted to either mimic or reverse an input gene expression signature using two methods. The L1000CDS 2 search engine also predicts drug targets for all the small molecules profiled by the L1000 assay that we processed. Targets are predicted by computing the cosine similarity between the L1000 small-molecule signatures and a large collection of signatures extracted from the gene expression omnibus (GEO) for single-gene perturbations in mammalian cells. We applied L1000CDS 2 to prioritize small molecules that are predicted to reverse expression in 670 disease signatures also extracted from GEO, and prioritized small molecules that can mimic expression of 22 endogenous ligand signatures profiled by the L1000 assay. As a case study, to further demonstrate the utility of L1000CDS 2 , we collected expression signatures from human cells infected with Ebola virus at 30, 60 and 120 min. Querying these signatures with L1000CDS 2 we identified kenpaullone, a GSK3B/CDK2 inhibitor that we show, in subsequent experiments, has a dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ebola infection in vitro without causing cellular toxicity in human cell lines. In summary, the L1000CDS 2 tool can be applied in many biological and biomedical settings, while improving the extraction of

  5. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. IV. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, B[e] Supergiants, and the Warm Hypergiants: How to Tell Them Apart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Gordon, Michael S.; Hahn, David [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [University of Illinois Springfield, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Weis, Kerstin, E-mail: roberta@umn.edu [Astronomical Institute, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    In this series of papers we have presented the results of a spectroscopic survey of luminous stars in the nearby spirals M31 and M33. Here, we present spectroscopy of 132 additional stars. Most have emission-line spectra, including luminous blue variables (LBVs) and candidate LBVs, Fe ii emission line stars, the B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. Many of these objects are spectroscopically similar and are often confused with each other. We examine their similarities and differences and propose the following guidelines that can be used to help distinguish these stars in future work. (1) The B[e] supergiants have emission lines of [O i] and [Fe ii] in their spectra. Most of the spectroscopically confirmed sgB[e] stars also have warm circumstellar dust in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). (2) Confirmed LBVs do not have the [O i] emission lines in their spectra. Some LBVs have [Fe ii] emission lines, but not all. Their SEDs show free–free emission in the near-infrared but no evidence for warm dust . Their most important and defining characteristic is the S Dor-type variability. (3) The warm hypergiants spectroscopically resemble the LBVs in their dense wind state and the B[e] supergiants. However, they are very dusty. Some have [Fe ii] and [O i] emission in their spectra like the sgB[e] stars, but are distinguished by their A- and F-type absorption-line spectra. In contrast, the B[e] supergiant spectra have strong continua and few if any apparent absorption lines. Candidate LBVs should share the spectral characteristics of the confirmed LBVs with low outflow velocities and the lack of warm circumstellar dust.

  6. A Black Hole Spectral Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2000-03-01

    An accreting black hole is, by definition, characterized by the drain. Namely, the matter falls into a black hole much the same way as water disappears down a drain matter goes in and nothing comes out. As this can only happen in a black hole, it provides a way to see ``a black hole'', an unique observational signature. The accretion proceeds almost in a free-fall manner close to the black hole horizon, where the strong gravitational field dominates the pressure forces. In this paper we present analytical calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations of the specific features of X-ray spectra formed as a result of upscattering of the soft (disk) photons in the converging inflow (CI) into the black hole. The full relativistic treatment has been implemented to reproduce these spectra. We show that spectra in the soft state of black hole systems (BHS) can be described as the sum of a thermal (disk) component and the convolution of some fraction of this component with the CI upscattering spread (Greens) function. The latter boosted photon component is seen as an extended power-law at energies much higher than the characteristic energy of the soft photons. We demonstrate the stability of the power spectral index over a wide range of the plasma temperature 0 - 10 keV and mass accretion rates (higher than 2 in Eddington units). We also demonstrate that the sharp high energy cutoff occurs at energies of 200-400 keV which are related to the average energy of electrons mec2 impinging upon the event horizon. The spectrum is practically identical to the standard thermal Comptonization spectrum when the CI plasma temperature is getting of order of 50 keV (the typical ones for the hard state of BHS). In this case one can see the effect of the bulk motion only at high energies where there is an excess in the CI spectrum with respect to the pure thermal one. Furthermore we demonstrate that the change of spectral shapes from the soft X-ray state to the hard X-ray state is clearly to be

  7. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78% of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26% was smaller than the Forum effect (52% in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  8. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore information hidden in social phenomena.

  9. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  10. Gamma signatures of the C-BORD Tagged Neutron Inspection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardet A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of C-BORD project (H2020 program of the EU, a Rapidly relocatable Tagged Neutron Inspection System (RRTNIS is being developed to non-intrusively detect explosives, chemical threats, and other illicit goods in cargo containers. Material identification is performed through gamma spectroscopy, using twenty NaI detectors and four LaBr3 detectors, to determine the different elements composing the inspected item from their specific gamma signatures induced by fast neutrons. This is performed using an unfolding algorithm to decompose the energy spectrum of a suspect item, selected by X-ray radiography and on which the RRTNIS inspection is focused, on a database of pure element gamma signatures. This paper reports on simulated signatures for the NaI and LaBr3 detectors, constructed using the MCNP6 code. First experimental spectra of a few elements of interest are also presented.

  11. Research on a New Signature Scheme on Blockchain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of Bitcoin, blockchain which is the core technology of Bitcoin has received increasing attention. Privacy preserving and performance on blockchain are two research points in academia and business, but there are still some unresolved issues in both respects. An aggregate signature scheme is a digital signature that supports making signatures on many different messages generated by many different users. Using aggregate signature, the size of the signature could be shortened by compressing multiple signatures into a single signature. In this paper, a new signature scheme for transactions on blockchain based on the aggregate signature was proposed. It was worth noting that elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem and bilinear maps played major roles in our signature scheme. And the security properties of our signature scheme were proved. In our signature scheme, the amount will be hidden especially in the transactions which contain multiple inputs and outputs. Additionally, the size of the signature on transaction is constant regardless of the number of inputs and outputs that the transaction contains, which can improve the performance of signature. Finally, we gave an application scenario for our signature scheme which aims to achieve the transactions of big data on blockchain.

  12. Lattice-Based Revocable Certificateless Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hao Hung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Certificateless signatures (CLS are noticeable because they may resolve the key escrow problem in ID-based signatures and break away the management problem regarding certificate in conventional signatures. However, the security of the mostly previous CLS schemes relies on the difficulty of solving discrete logarithm or large integer factorization problems. These two problems would be solved by quantum computers in the future so that the signature schemes based on them will also become insecure. For post-quantum cryptography, lattice-based cryptography is significant due to its efficiency and security. However, no study on addressing the revocation problem in the existing lattice-based CLS schemes is presented. In this paper, we focus on the revocation issue and present the first revocable CLS (RCLS scheme over lattices. Based on the short integer solution (SIS assumption over lattices, the proposed lattice-based RCLS scheme is shown to be existential unforgeability against adaptive chosen message attacks. By performance analysis and comparisons, the proposed lattice-based RCLS scheme is better than the previously proposed lattice-based CLS scheme, in terms of private key size, signature length and the revocation mechanism.

  13. Calculated NWIS signatures for enriched uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Koehler, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) signatures have been calculated using a Monte Carlo transport code for measurement configurations of a 252 Cf source, detectors, and a uranium metal casting. NWIS signatures consist of a wide variety of time-and frequency-analysis signatures such as the time distribution of neutrons after californium fission, the time distribution of counts in a detector after a previous count, the number of times n pulses occur in a time interval, and various frequency-analysis signatures, such as auto-power and cross-power spectral densities, coherences, and a ratio of spectral densities. This ratio is independent of detection efficiency. The analysis presented here, using the MCNP-DSP code, evaluates the applicability of this method for measurement of the 235 U content of 19-kg castings of depleted uranium and uranium with enrichments of 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, and 93.2 wt % 235 U. The dependence of the wide variety of NWIS signatures on 235 U content and possible configurations of a measurement system are presented. These preliminary calculations indicate short measurement times. Additional calculations are being performed to optimize the source-detector-moderator-casting configuration for the shortest measurement time. Although the NWIS method was developed for nuclear weapons identification, the development of a small processor now allows it to be also applied in a practical way to subcriticality measurements, nuclear fuel process monitoring and qualitative nondestructive assay of special nuclear material

  14. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, R.L.; Dunn, W.L.; Heider, S.; Matthew, C.; Yang, X.

    2012-01-01

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of “signatures” obtained from a test target to a collection of “templates”, sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8 L and larger. - Highlights: ► Signature-based radiation-scanning techniques applied to detection of explosives. ► Nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples served as surrogate explosive samples. ► Signatures of a target compared to collections of templates of surrogate explosives. ► Figure-of-merit determined for neutron and neutron-induced gamma-ray signatures. ► Discrimination of surrogate explosive from inert samples of 3.8 L and larger.

  15. Significance of chemical recognition cues is context dependent in ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, N.; Guerrieri, F.J.; d'Ettorre, P.

    2010-01-01

    signatures, composed primarily of long-chain cuticular hydrocarbons. These signatures are colony specific and allow discrimination between nestmates and non-nestmates. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying detection, perception and information processing of chemical signatures are poorly understood. It has...... context, affects aggression against non-nestmates carrying the hydrocarbon profile associated with food. Individual ant workers were able to associate the non-nestmate chemical profile with food. However, conditioned ants were still aggressive when encountering a non-nestmate carrying the odour profile...

  16. Trace element ink spiking for signature authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatzistavros, V.S.; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Signature authentication is a critical question in forensic document examination. Last years the evolution of personal computers made signature copying a quite easy task, so the development of new ways for signature authentication is crucial. In the present work a commercial ink was spiked with many trace elements in various concentrations. Inorganic and organometallic ink soluble compounds were used as spiking agents, whilst ink retained its initial properties. The spiked inks were used for paper writing and the documents were analyzed by a non destructive method, the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. The thin target model was proved right for quantitative analysis and a very good linear relationship of the intensity (X-ray signal) against concentration was estimated for all used elements. Intensity ratios between different elements in the same ink gave very stable results, independent on the writing alterations. The impact of time both to written document and prepared inks was also investigated. (author)

  17. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasky, Marc Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bathke, Charles G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  18. Cryptanalysis of the arbitrated quantum signature protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Qin Sujuan; Guo Fenzhuo; Wen Qiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    As a new model for signing quantum messages, arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) has recently received a lot of attention. In this paper we study the cryptanalysis of previous AQS protocols from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. We show that in these protocols the receiver, Bob, can realize existential forgery of the sender's signature under known message attack. Bob can even achieve universal forgery when the protocols are used to sign a classical message. Furthermore, the sender, Alice, can successfully disavow any of her signatures by simple attack. The attack strategies are described in detail and some discussions about the potential improvements of the protocols are given. Finally we also present several interesting topics on AQS protocols that can be studied in future.

  19. Molecular Signature in HCV-Positive Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli De Re

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive, single-stranded RNA virus, which has been associated to different subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL. Cumulative evidence suggests an HCV-related antigen driven process in the B-NHL development. The underlying molecular signature associated to HCV-related B-NHL has to date remained obscure. In this review, we discuss the recent developments in this field with a special mention to different sets of genes whose expression is associated with BCR coupled to Blys signaling which in turn was found to be linked to B-cell maturation stages and NF-κb transcription factor. Even if recent progress on HCV-B-NHL signature has been made, the precise relationship between HCV and lymphoma development and phenotype signature remain to be clarified.

  20. Selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariello, Maria-Ines; Servin, Bertrand; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel; Moreno, Carole; San Cristobal, Magali; Boitard, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of populations in domestic species offers great opportunities to study genome response to selection. The recently published Sheep HapMap dataset is a great example of characterization of the world wide genetic diversity in sheep. In this study, we re-analyzed the Sheep HapMap dataset to identify selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations. Compared to previous analyses, we made use of statistical methods that (i) take account of the hierarchical structure of sheep populations, (ii) make use of linkage disequilibrium information and (iii) focus specifically on either recent or older selection signatures. We show that this allows pinpointing several new selection signatures in the sheep genome and distinguishing those related to modern breeding objectives and to earlier post-domestication constraints. The newly identified regions, together with the ones previously identified, reveal the extensive genome response to selection on morphology, color and adaptation to new environments.

  1. Biomarker Gene Signature Discovery Integrating Network Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Fröhlich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of prognostic and diagnostic biomarker gene signatures for diseases, such as cancer, is seen as a major step towards a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods, mainly coming from the machine learning or statistical domain, have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinical diagnosis is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Here we review the current state of research in this field by giving an overview about so-far proposed approaches.

  2. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  3. Peripheral blood signatures of lead exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather G LaBreche

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current evidence indicates that even low-level lead (Pb exposure can have detrimental effects, especially in children. We tested the hypothesis that Pb exposure alters gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells and that these changes reflect dose-specific alterations in the activity of particular pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 arrays, we examined gene expression changes in the peripheral blood of female Balb/c mice following exposure to per os lead acetate trihydrate or plain drinking water for two weeks and after a two-week recovery period. Data sets were RMA-normalized and dose-specific signatures were generated using established methods of supervised classification and binary regression. Pathway activity was analyzed using the ScoreSignatures module from GenePattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The low-level Pb signature was 93% sensitive and 100% specific in classifying samples a leave-one-out crossvalidation. The high-level Pb signature demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity in the leave-one-out crossvalidation. These two signatures exhibited dose-specificity in their ability to predict Pb exposure and had little overlap in terms of constituent genes. The signatures also seemed to reflect current levels of Pb exposure rather than past exposure. Finally, the two doses showed differential activation of cellular pathways. Low-level Pb exposure increased activity of the interferon-gamma pathway, whereas high-level Pb exposure increased activity of the E2F1 pathway.

  4. Infrared Space Observatory Observations of Far-Infrared Rotational Emission Lines of Water Vapor toward the Supergiant Star VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwit, Martin; Melnick, Gary J.

    1999-06-01

    We report the detection of numerous far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris. A 29.5-45 μm grating scan of VY CMa, obtained using the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory at a spectral resolving power λ/Δλ of ~2000, reveals at least 41 spectral features due to water vapor that together radiate a total luminosity of ~25 Lsolar. In addition to pure rotational transitions within the ground vibrational state, these features include rotational transitions within the (010) excited vibrational state. The spectrum also shows the 2Π1/2(J=5/2)VY CMa were carried out in the instrument's Fabry-Perot mode for three water transitions: the 725-616 line at 29.8367 μm, the 441-312 line at 31.7721 μm, and the 432-303 line at 40.6909 μm. The higher spectral resolving power λ/Δλ of approximately 30,000 thereby obtained permits the line profiles to be resolved spectrally for the first time and reveals the ``P Cygni'' profiles that are characteristic of emission from an outflowing envelope. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK) with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  5. The emission-line regions in the nucleus of NGC 1313 probed with GMOS-IFU: a supergiant/hypergiant candidate and a kinematically cold nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.

    2017-04-01

    NGC 1313 is a bulgeless nearby galaxy, classified as SB(s)d. Its proximity allows high spatial resolution observations. We performed the first detailed analysis of the emission-line properties in the nuclear region of NGC 1313, using an optical data cube obtained with the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph. We detected four main emitting areas, three of them (regions 1, 2 and 3) having spectra typical of H II regions. Region 1 is located very close to the stellar nucleus and shows broad spectral features characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars. Our analysis revealed the presence of one or two WC4-5 stars in this region, which is compatible with results obtained by previous studies. Region 4 shows spectral features (as a strong Hα emission line, with a broad component) typical of a massive emission-line star, such as a luminous blue variable, a B[e] supergiant or a B hypergiant. The radial velocity map of the ionized gas shows a pattern consistent with rotation. A significant drop in the values of the gas velocity dispersion was detected very close to region 1, which suggests that the young stars there were formed from this cold gas, possibly keeping low values of velocity dispersion. Therefore, although detailed measurements of the stellar kinematics were not possible (due to the weak stellar absorption spectrum of this galaxy), we predict that NGC 1313 may also show a drop in the values of the stellar velocity dispersion in its nuclear region.

  6. Doppler Velocity Signatures of Idealized Elliptical Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar observations have revealed a class of atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes, dust devils that possess elliptical radar reflectivity signatures. One famous example is Typhoon Herb (1996 that maintained its elliptical reflectivity structure over a 40-hour period. Theoretical work and dual-Doppler analyses of observed tropical cyclones have suggested two physical mechanisms that can explain the formation of two types of elliptical vortices observed in nature, namely, the combination of a circular vortex with either a wavenumber two vortex Rossby wave or a deformation field. The characteristics of these two types of elliptical vortices and their corresponding Doppler velocity signatures have not been previously examined.

  7. KEA-71 Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and uses of the Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS), also known as the Valve Health Monitor (VHM) system. SCSS provides a way to not only monitor real-time the valve's operation in a non invasive manner, but also to monitor its health (Fault Detection and Isolation) and identify potential faults and/or degradation in the near future (Prediction/Prognosis). This technology approach is not only applicable for solenoid valves, and it could be extrapolated to other electrical components with repeatable electrical current signatures such as motors.

  8. Security problem on arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong Woon; Chang, Ku-Young; Hong, Dowon

    2011-01-01

    Many arbitrated quantum signature schemes implemented with the help of a trusted third party have been developed up to now. In order to guarantee unconditional security, most of them take advantage of the optimal quantum one-time encryption based on Pauli operators. However, in this paper we point out that the previous schemes provide security only against a total break attack and show in fact that there exists an existential forgery attack that can validly modify the transmitted pair of message and signature. In addition, we also provide a simple method to recover security against the proposed attack.

  9. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and β during these events

  10. Transient thermal camouflage and heat signature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Zhi; Su, Yishu; Xu, Weikai; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been proposed to manipulate heat flux as a new way to cloak or camouflage objects in the infrared world. To date, however, thermal metamaterials only operate in the steady-state and exhibit detectable, transient heat signatures. In this letter, the theoretical basis for a thermal camouflaging technique with controlled transient diffusion is presented. This technique renders an object invisible in real time. More importantly, the thermal camouflaging device instantaneously generates a pre-designed heat signature and behaves as a perfect thermal illusion device. A metamaterial coating with homogeneous and isotropic thermal conductivity, density, and volumetric heat capacity was fabricated and very good camouflaging performance was achieved.

  11. Security problem on arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeong Woon [Emerging Technology R and D Center, SK Telecom, Kyunggi 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Ku-Young; Hong, Dowon [Cryptography Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Many arbitrated quantum signature schemes implemented with the help of a trusted third party have been developed up to now. In order to guarantee unconditional security, most of them take advantage of the optimal quantum one-time encryption based on Pauli operators. However, in this paper we point out that the previous schemes provide security only against a total break attack and show in fact that there exists an existential forgery attack that can validly modify the transmitted pair of message and signature. In addition, we also provide a simple method to recover security against the proposed attack.

  12. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  13. Toward a hyperspectral optical signature of extra virgin olive oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.

    2007-05-01

    Italian extra virgin olive oils bearing labels of certified area of origin were considered. Their multispectral digital signature was measured by means of absorption spectroscopy in the 200-1700 nm spectral range. The instrumentation was a fiber optic-based, cheap, and compact device. The spectral data were processed by means of multivariate analysis and plotted on a 2D classification map. The map showed sharp clusters according to the geographical origin of the oils, thus demonstrating the potentials of UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy for optical fingerprinting. Then, the spectral data were correlated to the content of the most important fatty acids. The good fitting achieved demonstrated that the optical fingerprinting can be used also for predicting nutritional and chemical parameters.

  14. COMPUTER-IMPLEMENTED METHOD OF PERFORMING A SEARCH USING SIGNATURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of processing a query vector and a data vector), comprising: generating a set of masks and a first set of multiple signatures and a second set of multiple signatures by applying the set of masks to the query vector and the data vector, respectively, and generating...... candidate pairs, of a first signature and a second signature, by identifying matches of a first signature and a second signature. The set of masks comprises a configuration of the elements that is a Hadamard code; a permutation of a Hadamard code; or a code that deviates from a Hadamard code...

  15. Quantum multi-signature protocol based on teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiao-jun; Liu Yun; Sun Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a protocol which can be used in multi-user quantum signature is proposed. The scheme of signature and verification is based on the correlation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the controlled quantum teleportation. Different from the digital signatures, which are based on computational complexity, the proposed protocol has perfect security in the noiseless quantum channels. Compared to previous quantum signature schemes, this protocol can verify the signature independent of an arbitrator as well as realize multi-user signature together. (orig.)

  16. A group signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaojun; Tian Yuan; Ji Liping; Niu Xiamu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a group signature scheme using quantum teleportation. Different from classical group signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either group signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum teleportation. Security analysis proved that our scheme has the characteristics of group signature, non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. Our quantum group signature scheme has a foreseeable application in the e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc.

  17. A group signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaojun; Tian Yuan; Ji Liping; Niu Xiamu, E-mail: wxjun36@gmail.co [Information Countermeasure Technique Research Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a group signature scheme using quantum teleportation. Different from classical group signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either group signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum teleportation. Security analysis proved that our scheme has the characteristics of group signature, non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. Our quantum group signature scheme has a foreseeable application in the e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc.

  18. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  19. Lorentz violations and Euclidean signature metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero G, J. Fernando; Villasenor, Eduardo J.S.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the families of effective actions considered by Jacobson et al. to study Lorentz invariance violations contain a class of models that represent pure general relativity with a Euclidean signature. We also point out that some members of this family of actions preserve Lorentz invariance in a generalized sense

  20. Mechanical System Simulations for Seismic Signature Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lacombe, J

    2001-01-01

    .... Results for an M1A1 and T72 are discussed. By analyzing the simulated seismic signature data in conjunction with the spectral features associated with the vibrations of specific vehicle sprung and un-sprung components we are able to make...

  1. Exploring Signature Pedagogies in Undergraduate Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the instructional strategies most frequently used by leadership educators who teach academic credit-bearing undergraduate leadership studies courses through a national survey and identifies signature pedagogies within the leadership discipline. Findings from this study suggest that class discussion--whether in the form of…

  2. The Pedagogic Signature of Special Needs Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Sabine; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Lerche, Thomas; Oubaid, Viktor; Kiel, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the following study is to identify a pedagogic signature, according to LS Shulman, for working with students who have special educational needs. Special educational needs are defined as significant limitations in personal development and learning which require particular educational measures beyond regular education. The development of…

  3. Arbitrated quantum signature scheme with message recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwayean; Hong, Changho; Kim, Hyunsang; Lim, Jongin; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Two quantum signature schemes with message recovery relying on the availability of an arbitrator are proposed. One scheme uses a public board and the other does not. However both schemes provide confidentiality of the message and a higher efficiency in transmission

  4. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  5. Dictionary of Large Hadron Collider signatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report on a plan to establish a `Dictionary of LHC Signatures', an initiative that started at the WHEPP-X workshop in Chennai, January 2008. This study aims at the strategy of distinguishing 3 classes of dark matter motivated scenarios such as -parity conserved supersymmetry, little Higgs models with -parity ...

  6. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrov, L.B.; Nik-Zainal, S.; Wedge, D.C.; Aparicio, S.A.; Behjati, S.; Biankin, A.V.; Bignell, G.R.; Bolli, N.; Borg, A.; Borresen-Dale, A.L.; Boyault, S.; Burkhardt, B.; Butler, A.P.; Caldas, C.; Davies, H.R.; Desmedt, C.; Eils, R.; Eyfjord, J.E.; Foekens, J.A.; Greaves, M.; Hosoda, F.; Hutter, B.; Ilicic, T.; Imbeaud, S.; Imielinsk, M.; Jager, N.; Jones, D.T.; Knappskog, S.; Kool, M.; Lakhani, S.R.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Martin, S.; Munshi, N.C.; Nakamura, H.; Northcott, P.A.; Pajic, M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Paradiso, A.; Pearson, J.V.; Puente, X.S.; Raine, K.; Ramakrishna, M.; Richardson, A.L.; Richter, J.; Rosenstiel, P.; Schlesner, M.; Schumacher, T.N.; Span, P.N.; Teague, J.W.; Totoki, Y.; Tutt, A.N.; Valdes-Mas, R.; Buuren, M.M. van; Veer, L. van 't; Vincent-Salomon, A.; Waddell, N.; Yates, L.R.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Futreal, P.A.; McDermott, U.; Lichter, P.; Meyerson, M.; Grimmond, S.M.; Siebert, R.; Campo, E.; Shibata, T.; Pfister, S.M.; Campbell, P.J.; Stratton, M.R.; Schlooz-Vries, M.S.; Tol, J.J. van; Laarhoven, H.W. van; Sweep, F.C.; Bult, P.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362

  7. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  8. Detection of proteolytic signatures for Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordal, Peter Lüttge; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Winge, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate if idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is associated with distinct proteolytic signatures relative to non-neurodegenerative controls (NND) and patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). Materials & methods: A subtiligase-based N-terminomics screening method was exploited...

  9. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  10. Geoelectrical signatures of reactive mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, U.; Bandopadhyay, A.; Jougnot, D.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing the effects of fluid mixing on geochemical reactions in the subsurface is of paramount importance owing to their pivotal role in processes such as contaminant migration or aquifer remediation, to name a few [1]. Large velocity gradients in the porous media are expected to lead to enhanced diffusive mixing accompanied by augmented reaction rates [2]. Despite its importance, accurate monitoring of such processes still remains an open challenge, mainly due to the opacity of the medium and to the lack of access to it. However, in recent years, geophysical methods based on electrical conductivity and polarization have come up as a promising tool for mapping and monitoring such reactions in the subsurface. In this regard, one of the main challenges is to properly characterize the multiple sources of electrical signals and in particular isolate the influence of reactive mixing on the electrical conductivity from those of other sources [3]. In this work, we explore the coupling between fluid mixing, reaction and charge migration in porous media to evaluate the potential of obtaining a spatially-resolved measurement of local reaction rates in the subsurface from electrical measurements. To this end, we employ a lamellar description of the mixing interface [4] with novel semi-analytical upscaling techniques to quantify changes in electrical conductivity induced by chemical reactions across mixing fronts. The changes in electrical conductivity are strongly dependent on the concentration of ionic species as well as on the polarization of the pore (water) solution around the grains, which in turn are controlled by local reaction rates and, consequently, by the local velocity gradients. Hence, our results essentially suggest that local variations in the electrical conductivity may be quantitatively related to the mixing and reaction dynamics, and thus be used as a measurement tool to characterize these dynamics. References 1. M. Dentz, T. Le Borgne, A. Englert

  11. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of sodium and potassium cyanide as a forensic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. Upon analysis, a few of the cyanide samples displayed nonhomogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of the 65 cyanide samples, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Perancangan Aplikasi Undeniable Digital Signature Dengan Algoritma Chaum’s Blind Signature

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Martin Dennain

    2012-01-01

    Desperaty need a securiry system in the exchange of information via computer media, so that information can not be accessed by unauthorized parties. One of the security system is to use a system of digital signatures as a means of authenticating the authenticity of digital document that are exchanged. By using a digital a digital signature system is undeniable, the security system can be generated digital document exchange, where the system is free from the from of rejection...

  13. The effects of extrinsic motivation on signature authorship opinions in forensic signature blind trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Tahnee N; Found, Bryan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Rogers, Doug

    2014-03-01

    Expertise studies in forensic handwriting examination involve comparisons of Forensic Handwriting Examiners' (FHEs) opinions with lay-persons on blind tests. All published studies of this type have reported real and demonstrable skill differences between the specialist and lay groups. However, critics have proposed that any difference shown may be indicative of a lack of motivation on the part of lay participants, rather than a real difference in skill. It has been suggested that qualified FHEs would be inherently more motivated to succeed in blinded validation trials, as their professional reputations could be at risk, should they perform poorly on the task provided. Furthermore, critics suggest that lay-persons would be unlikely to be highly motivated to succeed, as they would have no fear of negative consequences should they perform badly. In an effort to investigate this concern, a blind signature trial was designed and administered to forty lay-persons. Participants were required to compare known (exemplar) signatures of an individual to questioned signatures and asked to express an opinion regarding whether the writer of the known signatures wrote each of the questioned signatures. The questioned signatures comprised a mixture of genuine, disguised and simulated signatures. The forty participants were divided into two separate groupings. Group 'A' were requested to complete the trial as directed and were advised that for each correct answer they would be financially rewarded, for each incorrect answer they would be financially penalized, and for each inconclusive opinion they would receive neither penalty nor reward. Group 'B' was requested to complete the trial as directed, with no mention of financial recompense or penalty. The results of this study do not support the proposition that motivation rather than skill difference is the source of the statistical difference in opinions between individuals' results in blinded signature proficiency trials. Crown

  14. Optical/Infrared Signatures for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picard, R. H; Dewan, E. M; Winick, J. R; O'Neil, R. R

    2007-01-01

    This report describes work carried out under the Air Force Research Laboratory's basic research task in optical remote-sensing signatures, entitled Optical / Infrared Signatures for Space-Based Remote Sensing...

  15. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A [Richland, WA; Samuel, Todd J [Pasco, WA; Valencia, Juan D [Kennewick, WA; Gervais, Kevin L [Richland, WA; Tucker, Brian J [Pasco, WA; Kirihara, Leslie J [Richland, WA; Skorpik, James R [Kennewick, WA; Reid, Larry D [Benton City, WA; Munley, John T [Benton City, WA; Pappas, Richard A [Richland, WA; Wright, Bob W [West Richland, WA; Panetta, Paul D [Richland, WA; Thompson, Jason S [Richland, WA

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  16. Passive Infrared Signature Augmentation of Full-Scale Plastic Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gebus, Lisa M; Sanders, Jeffrey S

    2002-01-01

    ... (IR), and radar signatures of threat systems. To address this need, a program was initiated by TMO to augment an existing full-scale, vacuum-formed plastic target with sufficient signature fidelity to adequately stress U.S...

  17. Re-examining the security of blind quantum signature protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingming; Chen Xiubo; Niu Xinxin; Yang Yixian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, blind quantum signature (BQS) protocols have been proposed with the help of a third-party verifier. However, our research shows that some of the BQS protocols are unable to complete the blind signature task fairly if the verifier is dishonest. Indeed, these protocols can be viewed as variants of the classical digital signature scheme of symmetric-key cryptography. If nobody is trusted in such protocols, digital signature cannot be implemented since disagreements cannot be solved fairly.

  18. Quantum signature scheme based on a quantum search algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chun Seok; Kang, Min Sung; Lim, Jong In; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum signature scheme based on a two-qubit quantum search algorithm. For secure transmission of signatures, we use a quantum search algorithm that has not been used in previous quantum signature schemes. A two-step protocol secures the quantum channel, and a trusted center guarantees non-repudiation that is similar to other quantum signature schemes. We discuss the security of our protocol. (paper)

  19. A Signature Comparing Android Mobile Application Utilizing Feature Extracting Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grafilon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented one of the application that can be done using smartphones camera. Nowadays forgery is one of the most undetected crimes. With the forensic technology used today it is still difficult for authorities to compare and define what a real signature is and what a forged signature is. A signature is a legal representation of a person. All transactions are based on a signature. Forgers may use a signature to sign illegal contracts and withdraw from bank accounts undetected. A signature can also be forged during election periods for repeated voting. Addressing the issues a signature should always be secure. Signature verification is a reduced problem that still poses a real challenge for researchers. The literature on signature verification is quite extensive and shows two main areas of research off-line and on-line systems. Off-line systems deal with a static image of the signature i.e. the result of the action of signing while on-line systems work on the dynamic process of generating the signature i.e. the action of signing itself. The researchers have found a way to resolve the concerns. A mobile application that integrates the camera to take a picture of a signature analyzes it and compares it to other signatures for verification. It will exist to help citizens to be more cautious and aware with issues regarding the signatures. This might also be relevant to help organizations and institutions such as banks and insurance companies in verifying signatures that may avoid unwanted transactions and identity theft. Furthermore this might help the authorities in the never ending battle against crime especially against forgers and thieves. The project aimed to design and develop a mobile application that integrates the smartphone camera for verifying and comparing signatures for security using the best algorithm possible. As the result of the development the said smartphone camera application is functional and reliable.

  20. Can specific transcriptional regulators assemble a universal cancer signature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Isik, Zerrin; Pilarsky, Christian; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Recently, there is a lot of interest in using biomarker signatures derived from gene expression data to predict cancer progression. We assembled signatures of 25 published datasets covering 13 types of cancers. How do these signatures compare with each other? On one hand signatures answering the same biological question should overlap, whereas signatures predicting different cancer types should differ. On the other hand, there could also be a Universal Cancer Signature that is predictive independently of the cancer type. Initially, we generate signatures for all datasets using classical approaches such as t-test and fold change and then, we explore signatures resulting from a network-based method, that applies the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. We show that the signatures as published by the authors and the signatures generated with classical methods do not overlap - not even for the same cancer type - whereas the network-based signatures strongly overlap. Selecting 10 out of 37 universal cancer genes gives the optimal prediction for all cancers thus taking a first step towards a Universal Cancer Signature. We furthermore analyze and discuss the involved genes in terms of the Hallmarks of cancer and in particular single out SP1, JUN/FOS and NFKB1 and examine their specific role in cancer progression.

  1. Radar micro-doppler signatures processing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Victor C; Miceli, William J

    2014-01-01

    Radar Micro-Doppler Signatures: Processing and applications concentrates on the processing and application of radar micro-Doppler signatures in real world situations, providing readers with a good working knowledge on a variety of applications of radar micro-Doppler signatures.

  2. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  3. 22 CFR 92.28 - Signature of affiant on affidavit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature of affiant on affidavit. 92.28 Section 92.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Specific Notarial Acts § 92.28 Signature of affiant on affidavit. The signature of the affiant is...

  4. 45 CFR 81.32 - Signature of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signature of documents. 81.32 Section 81.32 Public... UNDER PART 80 OF THIS TITLE Form, Execution, Service and Filing of Documents § 81.32 Signature of documents. The signature of a party, authorized officer, employee or attorney constitutes a certificate that...

  5. 21 CFR 1309.32 - Application forms; contents; signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application forms; contents; signature. 1309.32... Application forms; contents; signature. (a) Any person who is required to be registered pursuant to § 1309.21... this paragraph and shall contain the signature of the individual being authorized to sign the...

  6. 17 CFR 201.65 - Identity and signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity and signature. 201.65... of 1934 § 201.65 Identity and signature. Applications pursuant to this subpart may omit the identity, mailing address, and signature of the applicant; provided, that such identity, mailing address and...

  7. Signature Pedagogies in Support of Teachers' Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa; Patton, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Signature pedagogies [Shulman, L. 2005. "Signature pedagogies in the professions." "Daedalus" 134 (3): 52--59.] are a focus of teacher educators seeking to improve teaching and teacher education. The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary common language of signature pedagogies for teacher professional development…

  8. 34 CFR 101.32 - Signature of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature of documents. 101.32 Section 101.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Documents § 101.32 Signature of documents. The signature of a party, authorized officer, employee or...

  9. 36 CFR 1150.22 - Signature of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature of documents. 1150.22 Section 1150.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... Documents for Proceedings on Citations § 1150.22 Signature of documents. The signature of a party...

  10. 29 CFR 102.116 - Signature of orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature of orders. 102.116 Section 102.116 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Certification and Signature of Documents § 102.116 Signature of orders. The executive secretary or the associate executive...

  11. 48 CFR 204.101 - Contracting officer's signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracting officer's signature. 204.101 Section 204.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... officer's signature. Follow the procedures at PGI 204.101 for signature of contract documents. [71 FR 9268...

  12. 32 CFR 842.6 - Signature on the claim form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature on the claim form. 842.6 Section 842.6... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS General Information § 842.6 Signature on the claim form. The claimant or authorized agent... authorized agent signing for a claimant shows, after the signature, the title or capacity and attaches...

  13. 38 CFR 18b.21 - Signature of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature of documents. 18b.21 Section 18b.21 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Documents § 18b.21 Signature of documents. The signature of a party, authorized officer, employee, or...

  14. 37 CFR 2.74 - Form and signature of amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form and signature of... signature of amendment. (a) Form of Amendment. Amendments should be set forth clearly and completely... record. (b) Signature. A request for amendment of an application must be signed by the applicant, someone...

  15. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1) Employ at least two distinct identification components such as an identification code and password. (i... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other than...

  16. Chemical Abundances and Physical Parameters of H II Regions in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R. E. C.

    The chemical abundances and physical parameters of H II regions are important pa rameters to determine in order to understand how stars and galaxies evolve. The Magellanic Clouds offer us a unique oportunity to persue such studies in low metallicity galaxies. In this contribution we present the results of the photoionization modeling of 5 H II regions in each of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) sys tems. Optical data were collected from the literature, complemented by our own observa tions (Carlos Reyes et al. 1998), including UV spectra from the new IUE data ban k and infrared fluxes from the IRAS satellite. The chemical abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, S, Ar and physical parameters like the densities, the ionized masses, the luminosities, the ionization temperatures , the filling factor and optical depth are determined. A comparison of the abundances of these HII regions with those of typical planetary nebulae and supergiants stars is also presented.

  17. Long-lasting X-ray emission from type IIb supernova 2011dh and mass-loss history of the yellow supergiant progenitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Katsuda, Satoru [RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Bamba, Aya [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Fukazawa, Yasushi, E-mail: keiichi.maeda@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh, with conclusive detection of an unprecedented yellow supergiant (YSG) progenitor, provides an excellent opportunity to deepen our understanding on the massive star evolution in the final centuries toward the SN explosion. In this paper, we report on detection and analyses of thermal X-ray emission from SN IIb 2011dh at ∼500 days after the explosion on Chandra archival data, providing a solidly derived mass-loss rate of a YSG progenitor for the first time. We find that the circumstellar media should be dense, more than that expected from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star by one order of magnitude. The emission is powered by a reverse shock penetrating into an outer envelope, fully consistent with the YSG progenitor but not with a W-R progenitor. The density distribution at the outermost ejecta is much steeper than that expected from a compact W-R star, and this finding must be taken into account in modeling the early UV/optical emission from SNe IIb. The derived mass-loss rate is ∼3 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the mass-loss velocity of ∼20 km s{sup –1} in the final ∼1300 yr before the explosion. The derived mass-loss properties are largely consistent with the standard wind mass-loss expected for a giant star. This is not sufficient to be a main driver to expel nearly all the hydrogen envelope. Therefore, the binary interaction, with a huge mass transfer having taken place at ≳ 1300 yr before the explosion, is a likely scenario to produce the YSG progenitor.

  18. An Optical and Infrared Time-domain Study of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient Candidate IC 10 X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Stephanie; Lau, Ryan M.; Jencson, Jacob; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Boyer, Martha L.; Ofek, Eran; Masci, Frank; Laher, Russ

    2018-03-01

    We present an optical and infrared (IR) study of IC 10 X-2, a high-mass X-ray binary in the galaxy IC 10. Previous optical and X-ray studies suggest that X-2 is a Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient: a large-amplitude (factor of ∼100), short-duration (hours to weeks) X-ray outburst on 2010 May 21. We analyze R- and g-band light curves of X-2 from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory taken between 2013 July 15 and 2017 February 14 that show high-amplitude (≳1 mag), short-duration (≲8 days) flares and dips (≳0.5 mag). Near-IR spectroscopy of X-2 from Palomar/TripleSpec show He I, Paschen-γ, and Paschen-β emission lines with similar shapes and amplitudes as those of luminous blue variables (LBVs) and LBV candidates (LBVc). Mid-IR colors and magnitudes from Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera photometry of X-2 resemble those of known LBV/LBVcs. We suggest that the stellar companion in X-2 is an LBV/LBVc and discuss possible origins of the optical flares. Dips in the optical light curve are indicative of eclipses from optically thick clumps formed in the winds of the stellar counterpart. Given the constraints on the flare duration (0.02–0.8 days) and the time between flares (15.1 ± 7.8 days), we estimate the clump volume filling factor in the stellar winds, f V , to be 0.01interpret the origin of the optical flares as the accretion of clumps formed in the winds of an LBV/LBVc onto the compact object.

  19. Red Supergiants as Potential Type IIn Supernova Progenitors: Spatially Resolved 4.6 μm CO Emission Around VY CMa and Betelgeuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ryde, Nils

    2009-03-01

    We present high-resolution 4.6 μm CO spectra of the circumstellar environments of two red supergiants (RSGs) that are potential supernova (SN) progenitors: Betelgeuse and VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). Around Betelgeuse, 12CO emission within ±3'' (±12 km s-1) follows a mildly clumpy but otherwise spherical shell, smaller than its ~55'' shell in K I λ7699. In stark contrast, 4.6 μm CO emission around VY CMa is coincident with bright K I in its clumpy asymmetric reflection nebula, within ±5'' (±40 km s-1) of the star. Our CO data reveal redshifted features not seen in K I spectra of VY CMa, indicating a more isotropic distribution of gas punctuated by randomly distributed asymmetric clumps. The relative CO and K I distribution in Betelgeuse arises from ionization effects within a steady wind, whereas in VY CMa, K I is emitted from skins of CO cloudlets resulting from episodic mass ejections 500-1000 yr ago. In both cases, CO and K I trace potential pre-SN circumstellar matter: we conclude that an extreme RSG like VY CMa might produce a Type IIn event like SN 1988Z if it were to explode in its current state, but Betelgeuse will not. VY CMa demonstrates that luminous blue variables are not necessarily the only progenitors of SNe IIn, but it underscores the requirement that SNe IIn suffer enhanced episodic mass loss shortly before exploding. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory.

  20. Toward connecting core-collapse supernova theory with observations. I. Shock revival in a 15 M ☉ blue supergiant progenitor with SN 1987A energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handy, Timothy; Plewa, Tomasz; Odrzywołek, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the collapsing core of a 15 M ☉ blue supergiant supernova progenitor from the core bounce until 1.5 s later. We present a sample of hydrodynamic models parameterized to match the explosion energetics of SN 1987A. We find the spatial model dimensionality to be an important contributing factor in the explosion process. Compared to two-dimensional (2D) simulations, our three-dimensional (3D) models require lower neutrino luminosities to produce equally energetic explosions. We estimate that the convective engine in our models is 4% more efficient in 3D than in 2D. We propose that the greater efficiency of the convective engine found in 3D simulations might be due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio of convective plumes, which aids in distributing energy deposited by neutrinos. We do not find evidence of the standing accretion shock instability or turbulence being a key factor in powering the explosion in our models. Instead, the analysis of the energy transport in the post-shock region reveals characteristics of penetrative convection. The explosion energy decreases dramatically once the resolution is inadequate to capture the morphology of convection on large scales. This shows that the role of dimensionality is secondary to correctly accounting for the basic physics of the explosion. We also analyze information provided by particle tracers embedded in the flow and find that the unbound material has relatively long residency times in 2D models, while in 3D a significant fraction of the explosion energy is carried by particles with relatively short residency times.

  1. Dilatonic imprints on exact gravitational wave signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Fiona; KubizÅák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2018-05-01

    By employing the moduli space approximation, we analytically calculate the gravitational wave signatures emitted upon the merger of two extremally charged dilatonic black holes. We probe several values of the dilatonic coupling constant a , and find significant departures from the Einstein-Maxwell (a =0 ) counterpart studied in [Phys. Rev. D 96, 061501 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.96.061501]. For (low-energy) string theory black holes (a =1 ) there are no coalescence orbits and only a memory effect is observed, whereas for an intermediate value of the coupling (a =1 /√{3 } ) the late-time merger signature becomes exponentially suppressed, compared to the polynomial decay in the a =0 case without a dilaton. Such an imprint shows a clear difference between the case with and without a scalar field (as, for example, predicted by string theory) in black hole mergers.

  2. Chameleon dark energy models with characteristic signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gannouji, Radouane; Moraes, Bruno; Polarski, David; Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    In chameleon dark energy models, local gravity constraints tend to rule out parameters in which observable cosmological signatures can be found. We study viable chameleon potentials consistent with a number of recent observational and experimental bounds. A novel chameleon field potential, motivated by f(R) gravity, is constructed where observable cosmological signatures are present both at the background evolution and in the growth rate of the perturbations. We study the evolution of matter density perturbations on low redshifts for this potential and show that the growth index today γ 0 can have significant dispersion on scales relevant for large scale structures. The values of γ 0 can be even smaller than 0.2 with large variations of γ on very low redshifts for the model parameters constrained by local gravity tests. This gives a possibility to clearly distinguish these chameleon models from the Λ-cold-dark-matter (ΛCDM) model in future high-precision observations.

  3. Entanglement as a signature of quantum chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Ghose, Shohini; Sanders, Barry C; Hu, Bambi

    2004-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of entanglement in classically chaotic systems by considering a multiqubit system that behaves collectively as a spin system obeying the dynamics of the quantum kicked top. In the classical limit, the kicked top exhibits both regular and chaotic dynamics depending on the strength of the chaoticity parameter kappa in the Hamiltonian. We show that the entanglement of the multiqubit system, considered for both the bipartite and the pairwise entanglement, yields a signature of quantum chaos. Whereas bipartite entanglement is enhanced in the chaotic region, pairwise entanglement is suppressed. Furthermore, we define a time-averaged entangling power and show that this entangling power changes markedly as kappa moves the system from being predominantly regular to being predominantly chaotic, thus sharply identifying the edge of chaos. When this entangling power is averaged over all states, it yields a signature of global chaos. The qualitative behavior of this global entangling power is similar to that of the classical Lyapunov exponent.

  4. Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drapier, O.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of a deconfining phase transition of nuclear matter is a clear prediction of lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations. The signatures of this quark-gluon plasma (QGP) have been searched for, since the first high energy ion beams became available at BNL and CERN in 1986, and gold and lead beams are now accelerated at 11 and 160 GeV per nucleon by the AGS and SPS. An overview of the main signatures expected in case of QGP formation is presented here. Although some recent results have been found in agreement with the predictions of the QGP scenario, no clear evidence for its formation has been observed at present. Nevertheless, new high statistics results are expected from CERN lead beams. In addition, future experiments are being prepared at RHIC and LHCC, providing an increase by two orders of magnitude of the c.m.s. energy within a few years. (author). 66 refs., 28 figs

  5. Supernova signatures of neutrino mass ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2018-01-01

    A suite of detectors around the world is poised to measure the flavor-energy-time evolution of the ten-second burst of neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova occurring in the Milky Way or nearby. Next-generation detectors to be built in the next decade will have enhanced flavor sensitivity and statistics. Not only will the observation of this burst allow us to peer inside the dense matter of the extreme event and learn about the collapse processes and the birth of the remnant, but the neutrinos will bring information about neutrino properties themselves. This review surveys some of the physical signatures that the currently-unknown neutrino mass pattern will imprint on the observed neutrino events at Earth, emphasizing the most robust and least model-dependent signatures of mass ordering.

  6. Cryptographic key generation using handwritten signature

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, Manuel R.; Fiérrez, Julián; Ortega-García, Javier

    2006-01-01

    M. Freire-Santos ; J. Fierrez-Aguilar ; J. Ortega-Garcia; "Cryptographic key generation using handwritten signature", Biometric Technology for Human Identification III, Proc. SPIE 6202 (April 17, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.665875. Copyright 2006 Society of Photo‑Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of...

  7. Limits and signatures of relativistic spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsever, Ulvi; Wilkinson, Steven

    2018-01-01

    While special relativity imposes an absolute speed limit at the speed of light, our Universe is not empty Minkowski spacetime. The constituents that fill the interstellar/intergalactic vacuum, including the cosmic microwave background photons, impose a lower speed limit on any object travelling at relativistic velocities. Scattering of cosmic microwave photons from an ultra-relativistic object may create radiation with a characteristic signature allowing the detection of such objects at large distances.

  8. Signatures of quark-gluon plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1985-01-01

    A critical analysis of a variety of proposed signatures for quark-gluon formation in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions is given. The authors emphasize that longitudinal growth rather than the nuclear radius controls the time scales for expansion. The author pointed out the qualitative difference of the evolution of the plasma produced in the stopping regime E approx. 10 GeV/nucleon and the scaling regime E > 1 TeV/nucleon. This difference reflects itself in the the rmal profile function

  9. Selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Fariello, Maria-Ines; Servin, Bertrand; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel; Moreno, Carole; San Cristobal, Magali; Boitard, Simon; Drögemüller, Cord; The International Sheep Genomics Consortium, ISGC

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of populations in domestic species offers great opportunities to study genome response to selection. The recently published Sheep HapMap dataset is a great example of characterization of the world wide genetic diversity in sheep. In this study, we re-analyzed the Sheep HapMap dataset to identify selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations. Compared to previous analyses, we made use of statistical methods that (i) take account of the hierarchical structure of sheep popula...

  10. Selection Signatures in Worldwide Sheep Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Fariello, Maria-Ines; Servin, Bertrand; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel; Moreno, Carole; Cristobal, Magali San; Boitard, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of populations in domestic species offers great opportunities to study genome response to selection. The recently published Sheep HapMap dataset is a great example of characterization of the world wide genetic diversity in sheep. In this study, we re-analyzed the Sheep HapMap dataset to identify selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations. Compared to previous analyses, we made use of statistical methods that (i) take account of the hierarchical structure of sheep popula...

  11. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brivio, I.; Gavela, M. B.; Merlo, L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is d...... final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations....

  12. Staggering in signature partners of A∼190 mass region of superdeformed rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, V.S.; Goel, Alpana; Yadav, Archana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discuss about ΔI=1 signature splitting in signature partner pairs of A∼190 mass region. Around twenty signature partner pairs (usually called as two bands, each with a fixed signature) have been reported in this mass region. For these signature pairs, band head moment of inertia (J 0 ) and intrinsic structure of each pair of signature partners have been found as almost identical. Also, these signature partner pairs showed large amplitude signature splitting. As each of the two signature partner forms a regular spin sequence and signature bands are not equivalent in terms of energies. This difference in energies results in signature splitting

  13. On signature change in p-adic space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragovic, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    Change of signature by linear coordinate transformations in p-adic space-times is considered. In this paper it is shown that there exists arbitrary change of trivial signature in Q p n for all n ≥ 1 if p ≡ 1 (mod 4). In other cases it is possible to change only even number of the signs of the signature. The authors suggest new concept of signature with respect to distinct quadratic extensions, of Q p . If space-time dimension is restricted to four there is no signature change

  14. A Digital Signature Scheme Based on MST3 Cryptosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As special types of factorization of finite groups, logarithmic signature and cover have been used as the main components of cryptographic keys for secret key cryptosystems such as PGM and public key cryptosystems like MST1, MST2, and MST3. Recently, Svaba et. al proposed a revised MST3 encryption scheme with greater security. Meanwhile, they put forward an idea of constructing signature schemes on the basis of logarithmic signatures and random covers. In this paper, we firstly design a secure digital signature scheme based on logarithmic signatures and random covers. In order to complete the task, we devise a new encryption scheme based on MST3 cryptosystems.

  15. New particles and their experimental signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Gelmini, G.; Kowalski, H.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes work done by our theoretical working group on exotic particles before, during and since the Lausanne meeting. We discuss the motivations, rates and experimental signatures for new physics and new particles in the 1 TeV mass range. Section 2 reviews some of the motivations for expecting new physics in this range. Of particular interest is the physics of gauge symmetry breaking. In section 3 we discuss the rates and experimental signatures of new particles predicted by theoretical models of gauge symmetry breaking, notably the Higgs boson supersymmetry and technicolour. Among the signatures we discuss are multiple Wsup(+-) and/or Z 0 events (for the Higgs), missing transverse energy (for supersymmetry) and multiple anti tt events (for the Higgs and technicolour). We provide many examples of final state differential distributions in rapidity and Psub(T), particularly for Higgses and for supersymmetry. We also analyse some physics backgrounds to the new particle production processes which interest us. Examples include W + W - , Z 0 Z 0 , W(anti tt) and (anti tt) production as backgrounds to Higgs production. However, we do not consider in detail non-physics backgrounds such as the jet fluctuation background to missing energy signals for supersymmetry production. Section 4 summarizes our preliminary conclusions on the observability at a high energy hadron collider of the new particles studied in this report. (orig./HSI)

  16. Mirage: a visible signature evaluation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Meehan, Alaster J.; Shao, Q. T.; Richards, Noel

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the Mirage visible signature evaluation tool, designed to provide a visible signature evaluation capability that will appropriately reflect the effect of scene content on the detectability of targets, providing a capability to assess visible signatures in the context of the environment. Mirage is based on a parametric evaluation of input images, assessing the value of a range of image metrics and combining them using the boosted decision tree machine learning method to produce target detectability estimates. It has been developed using experimental data from photosimulation experiments, where human observers search for vehicle targets in a variety of digital images. The images used for tool development are synthetic (computer generated) images, showing vehicles in many different scenes and exhibiting a wide variation in scene content. A preliminary validation has been performed using k-fold cross validation, where 90% of the image data set was used for training and 10% of the image data set was used for testing. The results of the k-fold validation from 200 independent tests show a prediction accuracy between Mirage predictions of detection probability and observed probability of detection of r(262) = 0:63, p Pearson correlation) and a MAE = 0:21 (mean absolute error).

  17. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L) J , as a function of (g – i) versus (i – J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  18. On psychoanalytic supervision as signature pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C Edward

    2014-04-01

    What is signature pedagogy in psychoanalytic education? This paper examines that question, considering why psychoanalytic supervision best deserves that designation. In focusing on supervision as signature pedagogy, I accentuate its role in building psychoanalytic habits of mind, habits of hand, and habits of heart, and transforming theory and self-knowledge into practical product. Other facets of supervision as signature pedagogy addressed in this paper include its features of engagement, uncertainty, formation, and pervasiveness, as well as levels of surface, deep, and implicit structure. Epistemological, ontological, and axiological in nature, psychoanalytic supervision engages trainees in learning to do, think, and value what psychoanalytic practitioners in the field do, think, and value: It is, most fundamentally, professional preparation for competent, "good work." In this paper, effort is made to shine a light on and celebrate the pivotal role of supervision in "making" or developing budding psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Now over a century old, psychoanalytic supervision remains unparalleled in (1) connecting and integrating conceptualization and practice, (2) transforming psychoanalytic theory and self-knowledge into an informed analyzing instrument, and (3) teaching, transmitting, and perpetuating the traditions, practice, and culture of psychoanalytic treatment.

  19. Enhanced vibration diagnostics using vibration signature analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Shehzad, K.; Zahoor, Y.; Mahmood, A.; Bibi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Symptoms will appear in equipment, as well as in human beings. when 'suffering from sickness. Symptoms of abnormality in equipment are vibration, noise, deformation, temperature, pressure, electric current, crack, wearing, leakage etc. these are called modes of failure. If the mode of failure is vibration then the vibration signature analysis can be effectively used in order to diagnose the machinery problems. Much valuable information is contained within these vibration 'Spectra' or 'Signatures' but is only of use if the analyst can unlock its 'Secrets'. This paper documents a vibration problem in the motor of a centrifugal pump (Type ETA). It focuses mainly on the roll of modern vibration monitoring system in problem analysis. The problem experienced was the motor unstability and noise due to high vibration. Using enhanced vibration signature data, the problem was analyzed. which suggested that the rotor eccentricity was the cause of excessive noise and vibration in the motor. In conclusion, advanced electronic monitoring and diagnostic systems provide powerful information for machine's condition assessment and problem analysis. Appropriate interpretation and use of this information is important for accurate and effective vibration analysis. (author)

  20. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  1. TOXsIgN: a cross-species repository for toxicogenomic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darde, Thomas A; Gaudriault, Pierre; Beranger, Rémi; Lancien, Clément; Caillarec-Joly, Annaëlle; Sallou, Olivier; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Chevrier, Cécile; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Jégou, Bernard; Collin, Olivier; Becker, Emmanuelle; Rolland, Antoine D; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2018-01-27

    At the same time that toxicologists express increasing concern about reproducibility in this field, the development of dedicated databases has already smoothed the path toward improving the storage and exchange of raw toxicogenomic data. Nevertheless, none provides access to analyzed and interpreted data as originally reported in scientific publications. Given the increasing demand for access to this information, we developed TOXsIgN, a repository for TOXicogenomic sIgNatures. The TOXsIgN repository provides a flexible environment that facilitates online submission, storage, and retrieval of toxicogenomic signatures by the scientific community. It currently hosts 754 projects that describe more than 450 distinct chemicals and their 8491 associated signatures. It also provides users with a working environment containing a powerful search engine as well as bioinformatics/biostatistics modules that enable signature comparisons or enrichment analyses. The TOXsIgN repository is freely accessible at http://toxsign.genouest.org. Website implemented in Python, JavaScript, and MongoDB, with all major browsers supported. frederic.chalmel@inserm.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. The electronic identification, signature and security of information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the actual methods and technologies of information and communication systems security. It introduces the overview of electronic identification elements such as static password, dynamic password and single sign-on. Into this category belong also biometric and dynamic characteristics of verified person. Widespread is authentication based on identification elements ownership, such as various cards and authentication calculators. In the next part is specified a definition and characterization of electronic signature, its basic functions and certificate categories. Practical utilization of electronic signature consists of electronic signature acquirement, signature of outgoing email message, receiving of electronic signature and verification of electronic signature. The use of electronic signature is continuously growing and in connection with legislation development it exercises in all resorts.

  3. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Susmita Roy. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 127 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 49-59 Regular Articles. Composition dependent non-ideality in aqueous binary mixtures as a signature of avoided spinodal decomposition · Sarmistha Sarkar Saikat Banerjee ...

  4. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Shridhar R Gadre. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 121 Issue 5 September 2009 pp 815-821. Signatures of molecular recognition from the topography of electrostatic potential · Dhimoy K Roy P Balanarayan Shridhar R Gadre · More Details Abstract ...

  5. The Solar-flux Third Granulation Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David F.; Oostra, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The velocity shifts of spectral lines as a function of line strength, so-called the third signature of granulation, are investigated using three published solar-flux atlases. We use flux atlases because we wish to treat the Sun as a star, against which stellar observations can be compared and judged. The atlases are critiqued and compared to the lower-resolution observations taken with the Elginfield stellar spectrograph. Third-signature plots are constructed for the 6020–6340 Å region. No dependence on excitation potential or wavelength is found over this wavelength span. The shape of the plots from the three solar atlases is essentially the same, with rms line-core velocity differences of 30–35 m s‑1. High-resolution atlas data are degraded to the level of the Elginfield spectrograph and compared to direct observations taken with that spectrograph. The line-core velocities show good agreement, with rms differences of 38 m s‑1. A new standard curve is derived and compared with the previously published one. Only small differences in shape are found, but a significant (+97 m s‑1) change in the zero point is indicated. The bisector of the Fe I 6253 line is mapped onto the third-signature plots and flux deficits are derived, which measure the granule/lane flux imbalance. The lower spectral resolution lowers the flux deficit area slightly and moves the peak of the deficit 0.3–0.5 km s‑1 toward higher velocities. These differences, while significant, are not large compared to measurement errors for stellar data.

  6. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  7. Signatures for quark clustering in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.E. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Lassila, K.E. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    As a signature for the presence of quark clusters in nuclei, the authors suggest studying backward protons produced by electron scattering off deuterons and suggest a ratio that cancels out much of the detailed properties of deuterons or 6-quark clusters. The test may be viewed as a test that the short range part of the deuteron is still a 2-nucleon system. They make estimates to show how it fails in characteristic and significant ways if the two nucleons at short range coalesce into a kneaded 6-quark cluster.

  8. Study on the signatures for a magazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jan Bom; Kim, Tae Hwan; Park, Sung Keun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diagnostic algorithms are developed to be utilized to monitor the condition of and to diagnose defects in the magazine of a fuelling machine installed in CANDU plants. The magazine plays a role in storing fuels, plugs and tools. Since the magazine operates in the high radiation area, it is impossible to give direct access to it for measuring the signals. Therefore, inlet and outlet pressures of a hydraulic motor, which can be acquired remotely, were selected as the measuring variables. The measured signals are further processed to extract the diagnostic signatures. They were examined and validated in the various experiments with the magazine mock-up

  9. Signatures for quark clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, C.E.; Lassila, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    As a signature for the presence of quark clusters in nuclei, the authors suggest studying backward protons produced by electron scattering off deuterons and suggest a ratio that cancels out much of the detailed properties of deuterons or 6-quark clusters. The test may be viewed as a test that the short range part of the deuteron is still a 2-nucleon system. They make estimates to show how it fails in characteristic and significant ways if the two nucleons at short range coalesce into a kneaded 6-quark cluster

  10. Strong signatures of right-handed compositeness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, Michele [INFN, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Sanz, Veronica [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Vries, Maikel de; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Right-handed light quarks could be significantly composite, yet compatible with experimental searches at the LHC and precision tests on Standard Model couplings. In these scenarios, that are motivated by flavor physics, one expects large cross sections for the production of new resonances coupled to light quarks. We study experimental strong signatures of right-handed compositeness at the LHC, and constrain the parameter space of these models with recent results by ATLAS and CMS. We show that the LHC sensitivity could be significantly improved if dedicated searches were performed, in particular in multi-jet signals.

  11. Ulysses and the Signature of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Dukes, Hunter

    2017-01-01

    James Joyce’s depiction of autographic signatures resembles the “doctrine of signatures” — a pre-modern system of correspondence between medicinal plants and parts of the body. Certain aspects of this episteme reappear in the late nineteenth century. This recurrence is due, in large part, to developments in the technology of writing that threaten what Friedrich Kittler calls the “surrogate sensuality of handwriting.” Reading the “Nausicaa” episode of Ulysses against fin-de-siècle ideas about ...

  12. Characterizing Resident Space Object Earthshine Signature Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cor, Jared D.

    There are three major sources of illumination on objects in the near Earth space environment: Sunshine, Moonshine, and Earthshine. For objects in this environment (satellites, orbital debris, etc.) known as Resident Space Objects (RSOs), the sun and the moon have consistently small illuminating solid angles and can be treated as point sources; this makes their incident illumination easily modeled. The Earth on the other hand has a large illuminating solid angle, is heterogeneous, and is in a constant state of change. The objective of this thesis was to characterize the impact and variability of observed RSO Earthshine on apparent magnitude signatures in the visible optical spectral region. A key component of this research was creating Earth object models incorporating the reflectance properties of the Earth. Two Earth objects were created: a homogeneous diffuse Earth object and a time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object. The homogeneous diffuse Earth object has a reflectance equal to the average global albedo, a standard model used when modeling Earthshine. The time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object was created with two material maps representative of the dynamic reflectance of the surface of the earth, and a shell representative of the atmosphere. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Earth observing satellite product libraries, MCD43C1 global surface BRDF map and MOD06 global fractional cloud map, were utilized to create the material maps, and a hybridized version of the Empirical Line Method (ELM) was used to create the atmosphere. This dynamic Earth object was validated by comparing simulated color imagery of the Earth to that taken by: NASAs Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) located on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), and by MODIS located on the Terra satellite. The time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object deviated from MODIS imagery by a spectral radiance root mean square error (RMSE) of +/-14.86 [watts/m. 2sr

  13. Otolith chemistry discriminates natal signatures of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, L. L.; Rooker, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the otolith chemistry of young-of-the-year (YOY) yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) was examined to determine whether chemical signatures are distinct across different putative spawning areas in the Atlantic Ocean. Yellowfin tuna is a highly migratory species that is currently managed as a single panmictic stock in the Atlantic Ocean; however, uncertainty remains regarding the population structure of yellowfin in this region, particularly concerning the degree of mixing between spawning populations. Analysis of naturally occurring chemical tracers in otoliths provides a valuable means to reconstruct a fish's environmental history and is thus a promising approach for delineating stock structure of Atlantic yellowfin tuna. YOY yellowfin tuna otoliths were collected from 5 locations in the Atlantic Ocean (Gulf of Mexico, SE Caribbean, Brazil, Cape Verde, and Gulf of Guinea) from 2013-2015 and trace element (Li, Mg, Mn, Co, Cu, Sr, Zn, and Ba) and stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) analyses were conducted to investigate regional variation in otolith chemical composition. Results show significant differences among nursery areas in both trace element (MANOVA, p<0.001) and δ13C and δ18O signatures (ANOVA, p=0.017 and p=0.001, respectively). Particularly high spatial separation was observed based on eastern Atlantic (Gulf of Guinea + Cape Verde) and western Atlantic (Gulf of Mexico + Brazil + Martinique) nursery areas, indicating the approach has promise for distinguishing migrants displaying trans-ocean movement. These chemical signatures will be used to assign adult yellowfin tuna to their nursery of origin, ultimately providing an improved understanding of the stock structure and movement of yellowfin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Signatures of unstable semiclassical trajectories in tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levkov, D G; Panin, A G; Sibiryakov, S M

    2009-01-01

    It was found recently that processes of multidimensional tunneling are generally described at high energies by unstable semiclassical trajectories. We study two observational signatures related to the instability of trajectories. First, we find an additional power-law dependence of the tunneling probability on the semiclassical parameter as compared to the standard case of potential tunneling. The second signature is a substantial widening of the probability distribution over final-state quantum numbers. These effects are studied using a modified semiclassical technique which incorporates stabilization of the tunneling trajectories. The technique is derived from first principles. We obtain expressions for the inclusive and exclusive tunneling probabilities in the case of unstable semiclassical trajectories. We also investigate the 'phase transition' between the cases of stable and unstable trajectories across certain 'critical' values of energy. Finally, we derive the relation between the semiclassical probabilities of tunneling from the low-lying and highly excited initial states. This puts on firm ground a conjecture made previously in the semiclassical description of collision-induced tunneling in field theory

  16. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures (Muzzle Flash)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet and infrared spectra of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. We are currently employing quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication to optimize molecular geometries, compute vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase molecules and radicals of interest. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A comparison of computational results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess the affect of basis set and functional choice on calculation accuracy. The current status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, and USMA.

  17. Signature inversion in doubly odd 124La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantler, H.J.; Paul, E.S.; Boston, A.J.; Choy, P.T.W.; Nolan, P.J.; Carpenter, M.P.; Davids, C.N.; Seweryniak, D.; Charity, R.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D.G.; Chiara, C.J.; Fossan, D.B.; Koike, T.; LaFosse, D.R.; Starosta, K.; Fletcher, A.M.; Smith, J.F.; Jenkins, D.G.; Kelsall, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    High-spin states have been studied in neutron-deficient 57 124 La 67 , populated through the 64 Zn( 64 Zn,3pn) reaction at 260 MeV. The Gammasphere γ-ray spectrometer has been used in conjunction with the Microball charged-particle detector, the Neutron Shell, and the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer, in order to select evaporation residues of interest. The known band structures have been extended and new bands found. Most of the bands are linked together, allowing more consistent spin and parity assignments. Comparison of band properties to cranking calculations has allowed configuration assignments to be made and includes the first identification of the g 9/2 proton-hole in an odd-odd lanthanum isotope. Two bands have been assigned a πh 11/2 xνh 11/2 structure; the yrast one exhibits a signature inversion in its level energies below I=18.5(ℎ/2π), while the excited one exhibits a signature inversion above I=18.5(ℎ/2π)

  18. Persistence of social signatures in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramäki, Jari; Leicht, E A; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2014-01-21

    The social network maintained by a focal individual, or ego, is intrinsically dynamic and typically exhibits some turnover in membership over time as personal circumstances change. However, the consequences of such changes on the distribution of an ego's network ties are not well understood. Here we use a unique 18-mo dataset that combines mobile phone calls and survey data to track changes in the ego networks and communication patterns of students making the transition from school to university or work. Our analysis reveals that individuals display a distinctive and robust social signature, captured by how interactions are distributed across different alters. Notably, for a given ego, these social signatures tend to persist over time, despite considerable turnover in the identity of alters in the ego network. Thus, as new network members are added, some old network members either are replaced or receive fewer calls, preserving the overall distribution of calls across network members. This is likely to reflect the consequences of finite resources such as the time available for communication, the cognitive and emotional effort required to sustain close relationships, and the ability to make emotional investments.

  19. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Billan, Florian; Amazit, Larbi; Bleakley, Kevin; Xue, Qiong-Yao; Pussard, Eric; Lhadj, Christophe; Kolkhof, Peter; Viengchareun, Say; Fagart, Jérôme; Lombès, Marc

    2018-05-07

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are two closely related hormone-activated transcription factors that regulate major pathophysiologic functions. High homology between these receptors accounts for the crossbinding of their corresponding ligands, MR being activated by both aldosterone and cortisol and GR essentially activated by cortisol. Their coexpression and ability to bind similar DNA motifs highlight the need to investigate their respective contributions to overall corticosteroid signaling. Here, we decipher the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie selective effects of MRs and GRs on shared genomic targets in a human renal cellular model. Kinetic, serial, and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches were performed on the period circadian protein 1 ( PER1) target gene, providing evidence that both receptors dynamically and cyclically interact at the same target promoter in a specific and distinct transcriptional signature. During this process, both receptors regulate PER1 gene by binding as homo- or heterodimers to the same promoter region. Our results suggest a novel level of MR-GR target gene regulation, which should be considered for a better and integrated understanding of corticosteroid-related pathophysiology.-Le Billan, F., Amazit, L., Bleakley, K., Xue, Q.-Y., Pussard, E., Lhadj, C., Kolkhof, P., Viengchareun, S., Fagart, J., Lombès, M. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

  20. Monotop signature from a fermionic top partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Dorival; Kong, Kyoungchul; Sakurai, Kazuki; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2018-01-01

    We investigate monotop signatures arising from phenomenological models of fermionic top partners, which are degenerate in mass and decay into a bosonic dark matter candidate, either spin 0 or spin 1. Such a model provides a monotop signature as a smoking gun, while conventional searches with t t ¯ + missing transverse momentum are limited. Two such scenarios, (i) a phenomenological third generation extradimensional model with excited top and electroweak sectors, and (ii) a model where only a top partner and a dark matter particle are added to the standard model, are studied in the degenerate mass regime. We find that in the case of extra dimension a number of different processes give rise to effectively the same monotop final state, and a great gain can be obtained in the sensitivity for this channel. We show that the monotop search can explore top-partner masses up to 630 and 300 GeV for the third generation extradimensional model and the minimal fermionic top-partner model, respectively, at the high luminosity LHC.

  1. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  2. Provably Secure and Subliminal-Free Variant of Schnorr Signature

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Yinghui; Li , Hui; Li , Xiaoqing; Zhu , Hui

    2013-01-01

    Part 2: Asian Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security (AsiaARES); International audience; Subliminal channels present a severe challenge to information security. Currently, subliminal channels still exist in Schnorr signature. In this paper, we propose a subliminal-free variant of Schnorr signature. In the proposed scheme, an honest-but-curious warden is introduced to help the signer to generate a signature on a given message, but it is disallowed to sign messages independently. ...

  3. Invariance Signatures: Characterizing contours by their departures from invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Squire, David; Caelli, Terry M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a new invariant feature of two-dimensional contours is reported: the Invariance Signature. The Invariance Signature is a measure of the degree to which a contour is invariant under a variety of transformations, derived from the theory of Lie transformation groups. It is shown that the Invariance Signature is itself invariant under shift, rotation and scaling of the contour. Since it is derived from local properties of the contour, it is well-suited to a neural network implement...

  4. Analysis of Non-contact Acousto Thermal Signature Data (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0321 ANALYSIS OF NON-CONTACT ACOUSTO-THERMAL SIGNATURE DATA (POSTPRINT) Amanda K. Criner AFRL/RX...October 2014 – 16 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF NON-CONTACT ACOUSTO-THERMAL SIGNATURE DATA (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...words) The non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) is a nondestructive evaluation technique with potential to detect fatigue in materials such as

  5. General Conversion for Obtaining Strongly Existentially Unforgeable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Isamu; Oyama, Takuro; Ogata, Wakaha

    We say that a signature scheme is strongly existentially unforgeable (SEU) if no adversary, given message/signature pairs adaptively, can generate a signature on a new message or a new signature on a previously signed message. We propose a general and efficient conversion in the standard model that transforms a secure signature scheme to SEU signature scheme. In order to construct that conversion, we use a chameleon commitment scheme. Here a chameleon commitment scheme is a variant of commitment scheme such that one can change the committed value after publishing the commitment if one knows the secret key. We define the chosen message security notion for the chameleon commitment scheme, and show that the signature scheme transformed by our proposed conversion satisfies the SEU property if the chameleon commitment scheme is chosen message secure. By modifying the proposed conversion, we also give a general and efficient conversion in the random oracle model, that transforms a secure signature scheme into a SEU signature scheme. This second conversion also uses a chameleon commitment scheme but only requires the key only attack security for it.

  6. Enhanced arbitrated quantum signature scheme using Bell states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; Liu Jian-Wei; Shang Tao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the existing arbitrated quantum signature schemes as well as their cryptanalysis, including intercept-resend attack and denial-of-service attack. By exploring the loopholes of these schemes, a malicious signatory may successfully disavow signed messages, or the receiver may actively negate the signature from the signatory without being detected. By modifying the existing schemes, we develop counter-measures to these attacks using Bell states. The newly proposed scheme puts forward the security of arbitrated quantum signature. Furthermore, several valuable topics are also presented for further research of the quantum signature scheme

  7. FIR signature verification system characterizing dynamics of handwriting features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumwarin, Pitak; Pernwong, Jitawat; Matsuura, Takenobu

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an online signature verification method based on the finite impulse response (FIR) system characterizing time-frequency characteristics of dynamic handwriting features. First, the barycenter determined from both the center point of signature and two adjacent pen-point positions in the signing process, instead of one pen-point position, is used to reduce the fluctuation of handwriting motion. In this paper, among the available dynamic handwriting features, motion pressure and area pressure are employed to investigate handwriting behavior. Thus, the stable dynamic handwriting features can be described by the relation of the time-frequency characteristics of the dynamic handwriting features. In this study, the aforesaid relation can be represented by the FIR system with the wavelet coefficients of the dynamic handwriting features as both input and output of the system. The impulse response of the FIR system is used as the individual feature for a particular signature. In short, the signature can be verified by evaluating the difference between the impulse responses of the FIR systems for a reference signature and the signature to be verified. The signature verification experiments in this paper were conducted using the SUBCORPUS MCYT-100 signature database consisting of 5,000 signatures from 100 signers. The proposed method yielded equal error rate (EER) of 3.21% on skilled forgeries.

  8. Monsoon signatures in trace gas records from Cape Rama, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.K.; Jani, R.A.; Borole, D.V.; Francey, R.J.; Allison, C.E.; Masarie, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of trace gases CO 2 , CH 4 , CO, N 2 O and H 2 , and the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of CO 2 have been measured in air samples collected from Cape Rama, a coastal station on the west coast of India, since 1993. The data show clear signatures of continental and oceanic air mass resulting in complex seasonal variation of trace gas characteristics. The regional atmospheric circulation in the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea undergoes biannual reversal in low-level winds associated with the yearly migration of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). From June to September, the wind is from the equatorial Indian Ocean to the Indian subcontinent (southwest monsoon) and brings in pristine marine air. From December to February, dry continental winds blow from the northeast and transport continental emissions to the ocean (northeast monsoon). Detailed transport and chemical modelling will be necessary to interpret these records, however the potential to identify and constrain the regional trace gas emissions appears to be high. (author)

  9. Single Nucleobase Identification Using Biophysical Signatures from Nanoelectronic Quantum Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-03-01

    Nanoelectronic DNA sequencing can provide an important alternative to sequencing-by-synthesis by reducing sample preparation time, cost, and complexity as a high-throughput next-generation technique with accurate single-molecule identification. However, sample noise and signature overlap continue to prevent high-resolution and accurate sequencing results. Probing the molecular orbitals of chemically distinct DNA nucleobases offers a path for facile sequence identification, but molecular entropy (from nucleotide conformations) makes such identification difficult when relying only on the energies of lowest-unoccupied and highest-occupied molecular orbitals (LUMO and HOMO). Here, nine biophysical parameters are developed to better characterize molecular orbitals of individual nucleobases, intended for single-molecule DNA sequencing using quantum tunneling of charges. For this analysis, theoretical models for quantum tunneling are combined with transition voltage spectroscopy to obtain measurable parameters unique to the molecule within an electronic junction. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is then used to measure these nine biophysical parameters for DNA nucleotides, and a modified machine learning algorithm identified nucleobases. The new parameters significantly improve base calling over merely using LUMO and HOMO frontier orbital energies. Furthermore, high accuracies for identifying DNA nucleobases were observed at different pH conditions. These results have significant implications for developing a robust and accurate high-throughput nanoelectronic DNA sequencing technique. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fossil Signatures Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Bayesian Probabilistic Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Al3, P15, S16, Cl17, K19, Ca20, Ti22, Mn25, Fe26, and Ni28) were obtained for a set of terrestrial fossils and the rock matrix surrounding them. Principal Component Analysis extracted five factors accounting for the 92.5% of the data variance, i.e. information content, of the elemental abundance data. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis provided unsupervised sample classification distinguishing fossil from matrix samples on the basis of either raw abundances or PCA input that agreed strongly with visual classification. A stochastic, non-linear Artificial Neural Network produced a Bayesian probability of correct sample classification. The results provide a quantitative probabilistic methodology for discriminating terrestrial fossils from the surrounding rock matrix using chemical information. To demonstrate the applicability of these techniques to the assessment of meteoritic samples or in situ extraterrestrial exploration, we present preliminary data on samples of the Orgueil meteorite. In both systems an elemental signature produces target classification decisions remarkably consistent with morphological classification by a human expert using only structural (visual) information. We discuss the possibility of implementing a complexity analysis metric capable of automating certain image analysis and pattern recognition abilities of the human eye using low magnification optical microscopy images and discuss the extension of this technique across multiple scales.

  11. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  12. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  13. Chemical ecotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasivirta, J.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses risk assessment, chemical cycles, structure-activity relations, organohalogens, oil residues, mercury, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals, and emissions from the forestry industry. Topics include: Cycles of chemicals in the environment. Rick assessment and management, strucuture and toxicity, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals in environment, interpretation of the environmental analysis results, mercury in the environment, organohalogen compounds in the environment, emissions from forestry industry, oil residues in the environment: oil spills in the marine environment

  14. SEARCHING FOR THE SIGNATURES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS IN SOLAR ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S.; Neves, V.; Udry, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a fully differential chemical abundance analysis using very high resolution (λ/δλ ∼> 85, 000) and very high signal-to-noise (S/N ∼800 on average) HARPS and UVES spectra of 7 solar twins and 95 solar analogs, of which 24 are planet hosts and 71 are stars without detected planets. The whole sample of solar analogs provides very accurate Galactic chemical evolution trends in the metallicity range -0.3 < [Fe/H] < 0.5. Solar twins with and without planets show similar mean abundance ratios. We have also analyzed a sub-sample of 28 solar analogs, 14 planet hosts, and 14 stars without known planets, with spectra at S/N ∼850 on average, in the metallicity range 0.14 < [Fe/H] < 0.36, and find the same abundance pattern for both samples of stars with and without planets. This result does not depend on either the planet mass, from 7 Earth masses to 17.4 Jupiter masses, or the orbital period of the planets, from 3 to 4300 days. In addition, we have derived the slope of the abundance ratios as a function of the condensation temperature for each star and again find similar distributions of the slopes for both stars with and without planets. In particular, the peaks of these two distributions are placed at a similar value but with the opposite sign to that expected from a possible signature of terrestrial planets. In particular, two of the planetary systems in this sample, each of them containing a super-Earth-like planet, show slope values very close to these peaks, which may suggest that these abundance patterns are not related to the presence of terrestrial planets.

  15. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  16. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  17. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, David T; Schoenfeld, Thomas

    2008-09-17

    Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC), where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of the Octopus and Bear Paw metagenomic contigs

  18. Quantum liquid signatures in dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David, E-mail: gg32@nyu.edu, E-mail: dmp371@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We develop further the proposal of arXiv:0806.3692 that a new state of matter - charged condensate of spin-0 nuclei - may exist in helium-core dwarf stars. The charged condensate and its fluctuations are described by an effective field theory Lagrangian. The spectrum of bosonic fluctuations is gapped, while electrons, at temperatures of interest, give rise to gapless excitations near the Fermi surface. These properties determine the evolution of the dwarfs with condensed cores. In particular, we show that such dwarf stars would cool significantly faster than their crystallized counterparts. As a result, the luminosity function for the helium-core dwarfs will have a sharp drop-off after the condensation. It is tempting to interpret the recently discovered abrupt termination of a sequence of 24 helium-core dwarf candidates in NGC 6397 as a signature of the charged condensation.

  19. SSC physics signatures and trigger requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Strategies are considered for triggering on new physics processes on the environment of the SSC, where interaction rates will be very high and most new physics processes quite rare. The quantities available for use in the trigger at various levels are related to the signatures of possible new physics. Two examples were investigated in some detail using the ISAJET Monte Carlo program: Higgs decays to W pairs and a missing energy trigger applied to gluino pair production. In both of the examples studied in detail, it was found that workable strategies for reducing the trigger rate were obtainable which also produced acceptable efficiency for the processes of interest. In future work, it will be necessary to carry out such a program for the full spectrum of suggested new physics

  20. Signatures of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzi, Elena; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Zwirner, Fabio

    2000-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with a very light gravitino, the effective theory at the weak scale should contain not only the goldstino G-tilde, but also its supersymmetric partners, the sgoldstinos. In the simplest case, the goldstino is a gauge-singlet and its superpartners are two neutral spin-0 particles, S and P. We study possible signals of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders, focusing on those that are most relevant for the Tevatron. We show that inclusive production of sgoldstinos, followed by their decay into two photons, can lead to observable signals or to stringent combined bounds on the gravitino and sgoldstino masses. Sgoldstino decays into two gluon jets may provide a useful complementary signature

  1. Signatures of chromodynamics in hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1979-01-01

    The quantum chromodynamics (QCD) describes the interaction of the parton constituents of hadrons (quarks and gluons) via eight colored photons (gluons) interacting with the quarks, and unlike the photons, with each other. The simple picture of Drell-Yan model has made surprising success. The marriage of the old fashion Drell-Yan parton model with QCD has not only made its phenomenological success in the study of lepton pair production, but has allowed to study quantitatively the gluon correction to the model. Information from beam dump and emulsion experiments on charm production is compared with the typical QCD diagram. The results indicate some possible non-perturbative contribution to the photon- and hadron-production of heavy quarks. The definite features of dilepton as well as large transverse momentum data are direct signature of gluons. (Kato, T.)

  2. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H"± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  3. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  4. Signatures of Beam - and Anisotropy Driven Oscillitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K.; Dubinin, E.; McKenzie, J. F.

    Oscillitons represent a new class of stationary nonlinear waves, first found in bi-ion plasmas (Sauer et al., 1991) where mode splitting of the `individual' wave modes leads to conditions for phase- and group-standing waves near the `crossing points'. The corresponding structures have signatures of the usual solitons, superimposed by spatial oscillations. Oscillitons may also occur in single-ion plasmas, e.g. in the elec- tron whistler branch. The characteristic features of different types of oscillitons under realistic conditions in space plasmas including damping, beams and anisotropies are analyzed. Relevant mechanisms of coherent waves observed in different frequency ranges (Lion Roars at Earth, ion cyclotron waves near Io and Mars) are discussed.

  5. Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Scott; Bean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We characterize both nonlinear and high order linear responses of fiber-optic and optoelectronic components using spread spectrum temperature cycling methods. This Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS) provides much more detail than conventional narrowband or quasi-static temperature profiling methods. This detail allows us to match components more thoroughly, detect subtle reversible shifts in performance, and investigate the cause of instabilities or irreversible changes. In particular, we create parameterized models of athermal fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), delay line interferometers (DLIs), and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, then subject the alternative models to selection via the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Detailed pairing of components, e.g. FBGs, is accomplished by means of weighted distance metrics or norms, rather than on the basis of a single parameter, such as center wavelength.

  6. Spin-3/2 Pentaquark Resonance Signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Anthony Williams; Waseem Kamleh; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-01-01

    We search for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction between the resonance constituents which leads to a bound state at quark masses near the physical regime. We study a variety of spin-1/2 interpolators and for the first time, interpolators providing access to spin-3/2 pentaquark states. In looking for evidence of binding, a precise determination of the mass splitting between the pentaquark state and its lowest-lying decay channel is performed by constructing the effective mass splitting from the various two-point correlation functions. While the binding of the pentaquark state is not a requirement, the observation of such binding would provide compelling evidence for the existence of the theta+ pentaquark resonance. Evidence of binding is observed in the isoscalar spin-3/2 positive parity channel, making it an interesting state for further research

  7. Signature of Microbial Dysbiosis in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Boyer, Emile; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Martin, Bénédicte; Fong, Shao Bing; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-07-15

    Periodontitis is driven by disproportionate host inflammatory immune responses induced by an imbalance in the composition of oral bacteria; this instigates microbial dysbiosis, along with failed resolution of the chronic destructive inflammation. The objectives of this study were to identify microbial signatures for health and chronic periodontitis at the genus level and to propose a model of dysbiosis, including the calculation of bacterial ratios. Published sequencing data obtained from several different studies (196 subgingival samples from patients with chronic periodontitis and 422 subgingival samples from healthy subjects) were pooled and subjected to a new microbiota analysis using the same Visualization and Analysis of Microbial Population Structures (VAMPS) pipeline, to identify microbiota specific to health and disease. Microbiota were visualized using CoNet and Cytoscape. Dysbiosis ratios, defined as the percentage of genera associated with disease relative to the percentage of genera associated with health, were calculated to distinguish disease from health. Correlations between the proposed dysbiosis ratio and the periodontal pocket depth were tested with a different set of data obtained from a recent study, to confirm the relevance of the ratio as a potential indicator of dysbiosis. Beta diversity showed significant clustering of periodontitis-associated microbiota, at the genus level, according to the clinical status and independent of the methods used. Specific genera ( Veillonella , Neisseria , Rothia , Corynebacterium , and Actinomyces ) were highly prevalent (>95%) in health, while other genera ( Eubacterium , Campylobacter , Treponema , and Tannerella ) were associated with chronic periodontitis. The calculation of dysbiosis ratios based on the relative abundance of the genera found in health versus periodontitis was tested. Nonperiodontitis samples were significantly identifiable by low ratios, compared to chronic periodontitis samples. When

  8. Experimental signatures of gravitational wave bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubath, Florian; Foffa, Stefano; Gasparini, Maria Alice; Maggiore, Michele; Sturani, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursters are sources which emit repeatedly bursts of gravitational waves, and have been recently suggested as potentially interesting candidates for gravitational wave (GW) detectors. Mechanisms that could give rise to a GW burster can be found for instance in highly magnetized neutron stars (the 'magnetars' which explain the phenomenon of soft gamma repeaters), in accreting neutron stars and in hybrid stars with a quark core. We point out that these sources have very distinctive experimental signatures. In particular, as already observed in the γ-ray bursts from soft gamma repeaters, the energy spectrum of the events is a power-law, dN∼E -γ dE with γ≅1.6, and they have a distribution of waiting times (the times between one outburst and the next) significantly different from the distribution of uncorrelated events. We discuss possible detection strategies that could be used to search for these events in existing gravitational wave detectors

  9. Continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Shang, Tao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-10-01

    Quantum cryptography is believed to be unconditionally secure because its security is ensured by physical laws rather than computational complexity. According to spectrum characteristic, quantum information can be classified into two categories, namely discrete variables and continuous variables. Continuous-variable quantum protocols have gained much attention for their ability to transmit more information with lower cost. To verify the identities of different data sources in a quantum network, we propose a continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature scheme. It is based on continuous-variable entanglement swapping and provides additive and subtractive homomorphism. Security analysis shows the proposed scheme is secure against replay, forgery and repudiation. Even under nonideal conditions, it supports effective verification within a certain verification threshold.

  10. Machine monitoring via current signature analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.; Nowlin, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant need in the effort to provide increased production quality is to provide improved plant equipment monitoring capabilities. Unfortunately, in today's tight economy, even such monitoring instrumentation must be implemented in a recognizably cost effective manner. By analyzing the electric current drawn by motors, actuator, and other line-powered industrial equipment, significant insights into the operations of the movers, driven equipment, and even the power source can be obtained. The generic term 'current signature analysis' (CSA) has been coined to describe several techniques for extracting useful equipment or process monitoring information from the electrical power feed system. A patented method developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described which recognizes the presence of line-current modulation produced by motors and actuators driving varying loads. The in-situ application of applicable linear demodulation techniques to the analysis of numerous motor-driven systems is also discussed. The use of high-quality amplitude and angle-demodulation circuitry has permitted remote status monitoring of several types of medium and high-power gas compressors in (US DOE facilities) driven by 3-phase induction motors rated from 100 to 3,500 hp, both with and without intervening speed increasers. Flow characteristics of the compressors, including various forms of abnormal behavior such as surging and rotating stall, produce at the output of the specialized detectors specific time and frequency signatures which can be easily identified for monitoring, control, and fault-prevention purposes. The resultant data are similar in form to information obtained via standard vibration-sensing techniques and can be analyzed using essentially identical methods. In addition, other machinery such as refrigeration compressors, brine pumps, vacuum pumps, fans, and electric motors have been characterized

  11. Acoustic signature of thunder from seismic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Mary E.; Vernon, Frank L.

    1991-06-01

    Thunder, the sound wave through the air associated with lightning, transfers sufficient energy to the ground to trigger seismometers set to record regional earthquakes. The acoustic signature recorded on seismometers, in the form of ground velocity as a function of time, contains the same type features as pressure variations recorded with microphones in air. At a seismic station in Kislovodsk, USSR, a nearly direct lightning strike caused electronic failure of borehole instruments while leaving a brief impulsive acoustic signature on the surface instruments. The peak frequency of 25-55 Hz is consistent with previously published values for cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, but spectra from this station are contaminated by very strong wind noise in this band. A thunderstorm near a similar station in Karasu triggered more than a dozen records of individual lightning strikes during a 2-hour period. The spectra for these events are fairly broadband, with peaks at low frequencies, varying from 6 to 13 Hz. The spectra were all computed by multitaper analysis, which deals appropriately with the nonstationary thunder signal. These independent measurements of low-frequency peaks corroborate the occasional occurrences in traditional microphone records, but a theory concerning the physical mechanism to account for them is still in question. Examined separately, the individual claps in each record have similar frequency distributions, discounting a need for multiple mechanisms to explain different phases of the thunder sequence. Particle motion, determined from polarization analysis of the three-component records, is predominantly vertical downward, with smaller horizontal components indicative of the direction to the lightning bolt. In three of the records the azimuth to the lightning bolt changes with time, confirming a significant horizontal component to the lightning channel itself.

  12. Thermal-Signature-Based Sleep Analysis Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Seba

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the development of a new technique in the sleep analysis domain. Sleep is defined as a periodic physiological state during which vigilance is suspended and reactivity to external stimulations diminished. We sleep on average between six and nine hours per night and our sleep is composed of four to six cycles of about 90 min each. Each of these cycles is composed of a succession of several stages of sleep that vary in depth. Analysis of sleep is usually done via polysomnography. This examination consists of recording, among other things, electrical cerebral activity by electroencephalography (EEG, ocular movements by electrooculography (EOG, and chin muscle tone by electromyography (EMG. Recordings are made mostly in a hospital, more specifically in a service for monitoring the pathologies related to sleep. The readings are then interpreted manually by an expert to generate a hypnogram, a curve showing the succession of sleep stages during the night in 30s epochs. The proposed method is based on the follow-up of the thermal signature that makes it possible to classify the activity into three classes: “awakening,” “calm sleep,” and “restless sleep”. The contribution of this non-invasive method is part of the screening of sleep disorders, to be validated by a more complete analysis of the sleep. The measure provided by this new system, based on temperature monitoring (patient and ambient, aims to be integrated into the tele-medicine platform developed within the framework of the Smart-EEG project by the SYEL–SYstèmes ELectroniques team. Analysis of the data collected during the first surveys carried out with this method showed a correlation between thermal signature and activity during sleep. The advantage of this method lies in its simplicity and the possibility of carrying out measurements of activity during sleep and without direct contact with the patient at home or hospitals.

  13. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo M Airoldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  14. Searches with long-lived or unusual signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    We present recent ATLAS and CMS results from searches with long-lived and unusual signatures. They are based on analysis of LHC proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies at 7 and 8 TeV. Long-lived and heavy particles may cause peculiar signatures in the detectors, but are in several Standard Model extensions well motivated.

  15. 27 CFR 70.52 - Signature presumed authentic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature presumed authentic. 70.52 Section 70.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Collection-General Provisions § 70.52 Signature presumed...

  16. 25 CFR 117.33 - Signature of illiterates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature of illiterates. 117.33 Section 117.33 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF... Signature of illiterates. An Indian who cannot write shall be required to endorse checks payable to his...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6064-1 - Signature presumed authentic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature presumed authentic. 301.6064-1 Section 301.6064-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6064-1 Signature presumed authentic. An individual's name signed to a return, statement, or other...

  18. Field Education as the Signature Pedagogy of Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Julianne; Bogo, Marion; Raskin, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    In its EPAS, CSWE (2008) identifies field education as the signature pedagogy (Shulman, 2005b) of social work education. This article analyzes the field education-signature pedagogy fit. It finds congruence in selected organizational arrangements that are pervasive and routine, and disparities with respect to expectations about public student…

  19. 12 CFR 18.6 - Signature and attestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature and attestation. 18.6 Section 18.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.6 Signature and attestation. A duly authorized officer of the...

  20. 12 CFR 350.6 - Signature and attestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature and attestation. 350.6 Section 350.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY FDIC-INSURED STATE NONMEMBER BANKS § 350.6 Signature and...

  1. 13 CFR 134.209 - Requirement of signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement of signature. 134.209 Section 134.209 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION RULES OF PROCEDURE GOVERNING... of signature. Every written submission to OHA, other than evidence, must be signed by the party...

  2. 48 CFR 4.101 - Contracting officer's signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracting officer's signature. 4.101 Section 4.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.101 Contracting officer's signature. Only contracting officers shall...

  3. Selective forgery of RSA signatures with fixed-pattern padding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenstra, A.K.; Shparlinski, I.E.; Naccache, D.; Paillier, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a practical selective forgery attack against RSA signatures with fixed-pattern padding shorter than two thirds of the modulus length. Our result extends the practical existential forgery of such RSA signatures that was presented at Crypto 2001. For an n-bit modulus the heuristic

  4. Subsurface signatures and timing of extreme wave events along the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The diagnostic event signatures include the extent and elevation of the deposits, as well as morphologic similarity ... Historical archives of the origin, timing, and impact of tsunamis, storms, and floods along the mar- gins of ... High-resolution GPR studies (by the IIT Madras group) of erosional signatures from the beach ridge.

  5. Restrictive partially blind signature for resource-constrained information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Weidong; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Bozhong; Long, Yu; Chen, Kefei

    2010-01-01

    Restrictive partially blind signature, which is designed for privacy oriented information systems, allows a user to obtain a blind signature from a signer whilst the blind message must obey some certain rules. In order to reduce storage and communication costs, several public-key cryptosystems are

  6. Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. Public Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document presents the text of Public Law 106-229, the "Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act." The act states that, with respect to any transaction in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce: a signature, contract, or other record relating to such transaction may not be denied legal effect, validity, or…

  7. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Introduction This presentation summarizes recent activity in monitoring spacecraft health status using passive remote optical nonimaging ...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation...It is beneficial to the observer/analyst to understand the fundamental optical signature variability associated with these detection and

  8. Online Signature Verification using Recurrent Neural Network and Length-normalized Path Signature

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Songxuan; Jin, Lianwen; Yang, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the great success of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in sequential modeling, we introduce a novel RNN system to improve the performance of online signature verification. The training objective is to directly minimize intra-class variations and to push the distances between skilled forgeries and genuine samples above a given threshold. By back-propagating the training signals, our RNN network produced discriminative features with desired metrics. Additionally, we propose a novel d...

  9. A semi-classical approach to signature splitting and signature inversion in odd–odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Sushil; Hasan, Zafrul; Koranga, B.S.; Kumar, Deepak; Negi, D.; Angus, Lee

    2011-01-01

    The signature inversion observed in rotational bands belonging to high-j configurations of odd–odd deformed nuclei has been analyzed within the framework of an axially symmetric rotor plus two-particle model. The Coriolis and n–p interaction are considered the main cause of energy staggering. However, γ-triaxial deformation and the numbers of valence protons, N p , and neutrons, N n also contribute to the energy staggering between odd- and even-spin states. (author)

  10. Time-dependent delayed signatures from energetic photon interrogations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, Daren R.; Jones, James L.; Blackburn, Brandon W.; Haskell, Kevin J.; Johnson, James T.; Watson, Scott M.; Hunt, Alan W.; Spaulding, Randy; Harmon, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8-24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in pulsed photonuclear assessment environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon-inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods

  11. Signature scheme for the microscopic description of nuclear collective excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K.

    1980-04-01

    The symmetries between the proton and neutron systems in a nucleus are described in terms of the signatures. Three kinds of signatures (i.e. the pn-, p anti n- and p anti p- (or n anti n-) signatures) are introduced and they are related to the appearance of various collective motions such as rotations or vibrations. It is shown that the pn-signature scheme provides a band-like structure of deformed nuclei, while the features associated with the quadrupole vibration are obtained in the p anti n- and p anti p-signature scheme. From the detail investigation of the p anti n-symmetric wave functions, it is concluded that the reguralities provided by the present shell model are more analogous to those of the γ-unstable surface vibration model (Wilets-Jean model) than to those of harmonic phonon model. (author)

  12. An Efficient Homomorphic Aggregate Signature Scheme Based on Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homomorphic aggregate signature (HAS is a linearly homomorphic signature (LHS for multiple users, which can be applied for a variety of purposes, such as multi-source network coding and sensor data aggregation. In order to design an efficient postquantum secure HAS scheme, we borrow the idea of the lattice-based LHS scheme over binary field in the single-user case, and develop it into a new lattice-based HAS scheme in this paper. The security of the proposed scheme is proved by showing a reduction to the single-user case and the signature length remains invariant. Compared with the existing lattice-based homomorphic aggregate signature scheme, our new scheme enjoys shorter signature length and high efficiency.

  13. Individual odor recognition in birds: an endogenous olfactory signature on petrels' feathers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Francesco; Miguel, Eve; Grosbois, Vladimir; Jouventin, Pierre; Bessiere, Jean-Marie

    2007-09-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that odors are used in individual, sexual, and species recognition in vertebrates, and may be reliable signals of quality and compatibility. Petrels are seabirds that exhibit an acute sense of smell. During the breeding period, many species of petrels live in dense colonies on small oceanic islands and form pairs that use individual underground burrows. Mates alternate between parental duties and foraging trips at sea. Returning from the ocean at night (to avoid bird predators), petrels must find their nest burrow. Antarctic prions, Pachyptila desolata, are thought to identify their nest by recognizing their partner's odor, suggesting the existence of an individual odor signature. We used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyze extracts obtained from the feathers of 13 birds. The chemical profile of a single bird was more similar to itself, from year to year, than to that of any other bird. The profile contained up to a hundred volatile lipids, but the odor signature may be based on the presence or absence of a few specific compounds. Our results show that the odor signature in Antarctic prions is probably endogenous, suggesting that in some species of petrels it may broadcast compatibility and quality of potential mates.

  14. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrekt Ann-Sofie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests.

  15. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests. PMID:21824406

  16. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. IV. CONSTRUCTION AND VALIDATION OF A GRID OF MODELS FOR OXYGEN-RICH AGB STARS, RED SUPERGIANTS, AND EXTREME AGB STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    2011-01-01

    To measure the mass loss from dusty oxygen-rich (O-rich) evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we have constructed a grid of models of spherically symmetric dust shells around stars with constant mass-loss rates using 2Dust. These models will constitute the O-rich model part of the 'Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS' (GRAMS). This model grid explores four parameters-stellar effective temperature from 2100 K to 4700 K; luminosity from 10 3 to 10 6 L sun ; dust shell inner radii of 3, 7, 11, and 15 R star ; and 10.0 μm optical depth from 10 -4 to 26. From an initial grid of ∼1200 2Dust models, we create a larger grid of ∼69,000 models by scaling to cover the luminosity range required by the data. These models are available online to the public. The matching in color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to observed O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) candidate stars from the SAGE and SAGE-Spec LMC samples and a small sample of OH/IR stars is generally very good. The extreme AGB star candidates from SAGE are more consistent with carbon-rich (C-rich) than O-rich dust composition. Our model grid suggests lower limits to the mid-infrared colors of the dustiest AGB stars for which the chemistry could be O-rich. Finally, the fitting of GRAMS models to spectral energy distributions of sources fit by other studies provides additional verification of our grid and anticipates future, more expansive efforts.

  17. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  18. Using pattern classification and nuclear forensic signatures to link UOC to source rocks and purification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.; Robel, M.; Borg, M.; Hutcheon, I.; Kristo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is a scientific discipline interfacing law enforcement, nuclear science and nonproliferation. Information on the history and on the potential origin of unknown nuclear material can be obtained through nuclear forensic analysis. Using commonly available techniques of mass spectrometry, microscopy and x-ray diffraction, we have gained insight into the processing and origin of a suite of uranium ore concentrate (UOC) samples. We have applied chemometric techniques to investigate the relationships between uranium ore deposits and UOC samples in order to identify chemical and isotopic signatures of nuclear forensic importance. We developed multivariate signatures based on elemental concentrations and isotope ratios using a database of characteristics of UOC originating throughout the world. By introducing detailed and specific information about the source rock geology for each sample, we improved our understanding of the preservation of forensic signatures in UOC. Improved characterization of sample processing and provenance allows us to begin to assess the statistical significance of different groupings of samples and identify underlying patterns. Initial results indicate the concentration of uranium in the ore body, the geochemical conditions associated with uranium emplacement, and host rock petrogenesis exert controlling influences on the impurities preserved in UOC. Specific ore processing techniques, particularly those related to In-Situ Recovery, are also reflected in UOC impurity signatures. Stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry can be used in conjunction with rare earth element patterns and other characteristics to link UOCs to specific geologic deposits of origin. We will present a number of case studies illustrating the ways in which nuclear forensic analysis can provide insight into the ore geology and production and purification processes used to produce UOC. (author)

  19. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.

  20. Alarms, Chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    cited in applicable qualitative materiel requirements, small development requirements, technical characteristics, and other requirements and documentation that pertain to automatic chemical agent alarms.