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Sample records for superferric wiggler magnets

  1. Calculated and measured fields in superferric wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, E.B.; Solomon, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Although Klaus Halbach is widely known and appreciated as the originator of the computer program POISSON for electromagnetic field calculation, Klaus has always believed that analytical methods can give much more insight into the performance of a magnet than numerical simulation. Analytical approximations readily show how the different aspects of a magnet`s design such as pole dimensions, current, and coil configuration contribute to the performance. These methods yield accuracies of better than 10%. Analytical methods should therefore be used when conceptualizing a magnet design. Computer analysis can then be used for refinement. A simple model is presented for the peak on-axis field of an electro-magnetic wiggler with iron poles and superconducting coils. The model is applied to the radiator section of the superconducting wiggler for the BNL Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured field and the results from POISSON.

  2. Standard Wiggler magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.; Helm, R.H.

    1977-09-01

    Interest in Wiggler magnets (a close sequence of transverse fields with alternating polarity) to extend and enhance the spectrum of synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings has increased significantly during the past few years. Standard wigglers, i.e., wigglers in which interference effects on the spectrum of synchrotron radiation are not important, are considered. In standard wigglers the spectrum of synchrotron radiation has the same general shape as the spectrum from ring bending magnets. However, the critical energy of the wiggler spectrum may be different. The critical energy of the wiggler spectrum is given by epsilon/sub CW/ = epsilon/sub CB/(B/sub W//B/sub B/) where epsilon/sub CB/ is the critical energy from the bending magnets and B/sub W/ and B/sub B/ are the magnetic field strengths of the wiggler magnet and bending magnets respectively. Since most electron storage rings operate with relatively low bending magnet fields (B/sub B/ less than or equal to 12 kG), even a modest wiggler magnet field (less than or equal to 18 kG) can significantly increase the critical energy. Such magnets are planned for ADONE and SPEAR. Higher field (30 to 50 kG) superconducting magnets are planned at Brookhaven, Daresbury, and Novosibirsk to produce even larger increase in the critical energy. For some standard wigglers a further enhancement of the spectrum is produced due tothe superposition of the radiation from the individual poles. Wiggler designs are discussed as well as the effect of wigglers on the synchrotron radiation spectrum and on the operation of storage rings

  3. Why superferric magnets for a desertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    It has been proposed by R.R. Wilson and L. Lederman that it may be advantageous and cheaper to construct a large accelerator (> 10 TeV) with superferric magnets (approx. 2.5 Tesla). We take as a premise that a sufficiently large piece of land is available for the accelerator (see paper on Site and Tunnel), that is, one is not limited by the radius of the tunnel. The word superferric has been interpreted to mean a super conducting magnet where the coils are used principally to drive the field in the steel. We also add the constraint of simplicity and keep the coil shaped in a rectangle with no more than a few turns

  4. High-field superferric MR magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, F.R.; Carcagno, R.; Colvin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Current large-bore (>20 cm), high-field (2-T) MR magnets have major implementation disadvantages, mostly related to the extensive stray field of traditional air-core superconducting magnets. To circumvent this problem, the authors designed, constructed, and tested a 30-cm prototype superconducting, self-shielded, high field magnet. This unshimmed superferric magnet can operate between 0.5 and 4 T with a field quality of about one part per million over one quarter of its aperture. The magnet can be ramped from one field strength to another in approximately 10 minutes. The 5-Gauss line extends less than 1 meter outside the magnet structure. Further details, including MR measurements and images, are demonstrated, as well as 1-meter bore scale-up projections

  5. Wiggler magnets at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.

    1980-01-01

    A wiggler magnet has been installed in SPEAR and has been routinely used as a radiation source for Beam Line IV at SSRL since March, 1979. The magnets is 1.22 m long. It has five full central poles and two end half-poles producing a total of three complete small amplitude (<= 1 mm) oscillations of the electron beam in traversing the magnet. The magnet has been operated with the peak field in the central full poles at 17.2 kG and produces an intense beam of synchrotron radiation extending to 12 keV and beyond even at the lowest operating energies of SPEAR (1.5 GeV). It is compatible with all phases of colliding-beam operation of SPEAR and has improved the colliding-beam luminosity. The results of measurements on the spectrum and intensity of the radiation produced by the Wiggler will be presented. The measured effects of the wiggler on the stored beam tunes, energy spread and emittance will also be presented. Plans will also be described for installing additional high field wiggler magnets in SPEAR and also weak-field, many-period undulator magnets in both SPEAR and PEP. (orig.)

  6. A 4 Tesla/1 meter superferric MRI magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.M.; Huson, F.R.; Mackay, W.W.; Rocha, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Superferric technology was first applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) magnets by the Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) in 1986 with the design and construction of a 4 Tesla/30 cm magnet. In an evolutionary step, this technology is now being applied to the development of a whole body 4 Tesla/1 meter superconducting magnet. The design of such a magnetis presented in this paper

  7. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Park, S.Y.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  8. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  9. submitter Electromagnetic Study of a Round Coil Superferric Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Volpini, Giovanni; Statera, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A novel type of superferric magnets suitable to arbitrary multipole orders was proposed by I. F. Malyshev and later by V. Kashikhin. This new topology, which we refer to as round coil superferric magnets (RCSM), allows a great simplification of the superconducting part, which in the simplest case may be composed by a single round coil, which has intrinsically a rather large bending radius allowing the use of strain-sensitive superconductors. INFN is designing and building a prototype of a multipolar corrector magnet based on this geometry and using MgB2 tapes. In this paper, we investigate a number of issues pertaining to the electromagnetic characteristics of RCSM. The RCSM magnetic has inherently even harmonics, in addition to usual odd ones and a solenoidal component. Either (but not both) disappears when integrated using a one-coil or a two-coil specular design. We investigate the effect of saturation on the multipolar components and on the load line, since in RCSM, saturation plays a role that differs bo...

  10. Magnetic-field considerations in superferric dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowdon, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Iron dominated magnets are characterized in the limit of infinite permeability by a pole shape that is a magnetic equipotential. Deviations from this ideal because of finite permeability are associated with differences in path length, local saturation, flux concentration in slotted pole if crenellation is used, and sub surface voids. For moderate field levels the variation in flux path length throughout the iron lowers the magnetic potential on the iron surface more for the longer paths. As the excitation increases the permeability is lowered in regions of high flux density. Crenellation in this region offers some degree of control over the permeability by concentrating the flux. To a lesser degree sub surface voids can be used to control the reluctance of a flux path. The net result suggests that the shape of the effective air gap can be adjusted to be a magnetic equipotential sensibly equivalent to the ideal pole shape for infinite permeability

  11. Design of self-correction coils in a superferric dipole magnet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Design of self-correction coils in a superferric dipole magnet is carried out. By adopting the self-correction coil (SCC) scheme, we can do online correction of unwanted fields inside the magnet aperture during the whole operating cycle irrespective of their origin. The self-correction coils are short-circuited superconducting ...

  12. Permanent magnets including undulators and wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrdt, J

    2010-01-01

    After a few historic remarks on magnetic materials we introduce the basic definitions related to permanent magnets. The magnetic properties of the most common materials are reviewed and the production processes are described. Measurement techniques for the characterization of macroscopic and microscopic properties of permanent magnets are presented. Field simulation techniques for permanent magnet devices are discussed. Today, permanent magnets are used in many fields. This article concentrates on the applications of permanent magnets in accelerators starting from dipoles and quadrupoles on to wigglers and undulators.

  13. Purcell filter of unusual shape in fair superferric sextupole magnet for improving the field quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, P.R.; Dutta Gupta, A.; Nandi, C.; Saha, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Pal, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the Energy Buncher Section of the Super-FRS of the FAIR project, magnets of very high quality and wide aperture are needed. Wide aperture of these magnets generates large end-effects which can be reduced by end shaping and using Purcell filters which are voids in the pole for modifying the field. In the present work we have investigated various shapes of Purcell filters in magnets, especially in superferric sextupole magnets. Conventional Purcell filters are through and through rectangular voids in the pole region, a little away from the pole face. We have seen that the length of the Purcell filter is an important parameter which can be optimized. Thus one can use partially penetrating filters. We have further shown that Purcell filters of unusual geometry which start right from the pole face can be effectively used in reducing the weight of the iron, while keeping the field quality intact or improve the field quality, keeping the weight constant. (author)

  14. NbTi Superferric Corrector Magnets for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Volpini, G; Bellomo, G; Broggi, F; Paccalini, A; Pedrini, D; Leone, A; Quadrio, M; Somaschini, L; Sorbi, M; Todero, M; Uva, C; Fessia, P; Todesco, E; Toral, F

    2015-01-01

    CERN and INFN, Italy, have signed an agreement for R&D activities relating to high-luminosity LHC superconducting magnets, which include the design, construction, and cryogenic test of a set of five prototypes, one for each type foreseen, from the skew quadrupole to the dodecapole. The reference layout of these magnets is based on a superferric design type, which allows reaching the required integrated field strength with a relatively simple design. Since the number of magnets of all the types required for the series is 36, emphasis has been put on modularity, reliability, ease of construction, and on the use of an available superconducting wire. This paper presents the status of the development work being performed at INFN, LASA Laboratory, and at CERN, focusing on the following issues: the electromagnetic 2- and 3-D design including harmonic component study; the fringe field analysis; the magnet powering and quench protection; mechanical and construction main choices.

  15. Advanced optimization of permanent magnet wigglers using a genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajima, Ryoichi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    In permanent magnet wigglers, magnetic imperfection of each magnet piece causes field error. This field error can be reduced or compensated by sorting magnet pieces in proper order. We showed a genetic algorithm has good property for this sorting scheme. In this paper, this optimization scheme is applied to the case of permanent magnets which have errors in the direction of field. The result shows the genetic algorithm is superior to other algorithms.

  16. Advanced optimization of permanent magnet wigglers using a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajima, Ryoichi

    1995-01-01

    In permanent magnet wigglers, magnetic imperfection of each magnet piece causes field error. This field error can be reduced or compensated by sorting magnet pieces in proper order. We showed a genetic algorithm has good property for this sorting scheme. In this paper, this optimization scheme is applied to the case of permanent magnets which have errors in the direction of field. The result shows the genetic algorithm is superior to other algorithms

  17. A wiggler magnet for FEL low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shamma`a, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    In low voltage FELs (ie, 200kV), operation is necessarily in the microwave frequency range for wiggler periods of the order of cms., so that a waveguide system is mandatory. Also, because of the relatively low velocity of the electron beam, the wiggle amplitude of the electron beam can be much larger than is normal for highly relativistic FELs. Both these factors mean that the electron trajectory must be carefully controlled to avoid beam collision with the waveguide walls. A wiggler system with half poles at entrance and exit is not an acceptable solution because of the offset is gives rise to the electron trajectory. Consequently, we have designed and constructed a wiggler magnet with exponential entrance and exit tapers for a minimal deflection and displacement of the electron beam. Simulations and experimental measurements showed that an on axis trajectory is easily obtainable.

  18. Wiggler magnetic field assisted third harmonic generation in expanding clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Shivani

    2018-04-01

    A simple theoretical model is constructed to study the wiggler magnetic field assisted third harmonic generation of intense short pulse laser in a cluster in its expanding phase. The ponderomotive force of laser causes density perturbations in cluster electron density which couples with wiggler magnetic field to produce a nonlinear current that generates transverse third harmonic. An intense short pulse laser propagating through a gas embedded with atomic clusters, converts it into hot plasma balls via tunnel ionization. Initially, the electron plasma frequency inside the clusters ω pe > \\sqrt{3}{ω }1 (with ω 1 being the frequency of the laser). As the cluster expands under Coulomb force and hydrodynamic pressure, ω pe decreases to \\sqrt{3}{ω }1. At this time, there is resonant enhancement in the efficiency of the third harmonic generation. The efficiency of third harmonic generation is enhanced due to cluster plasmon resonance and by phase matching due to wiggler magnetic field. The effect of cluster size on the expansion rate is studied to observe that the clusters of different radii would expand differently. The impact of laser intensity and wiggler magnetic field on the efficiency of third harmonic generation is also explored.

  19. Superconducting wiggler magnets for beam-emittance damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge are necessary for the luminosity performance of linear electron-positron colliders, such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). An effective way to create ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge is to use damping rings, or storage rings equipped with strong damping wiggler magnets. The remanent field of the permanent magnet materials and the ohmic losses in normal conductors limit the economically achievable pole field in accelerator magnets operated at around room temperature to below the magnetic saturation induction, which is 2.15 T for iron. In wiggler magnets, the pole field in the center of the gap is reduced further like the hyperbolic cosine of the ratio of the gap size and the period length multiplied by pi. Moreover, damping wiggler magnets require relatively large gaps because they have to accept the un-damped beam and to generate, at a small period length, a large magnetic flux density amplitude to effectively damp the beam emittance....

  20. ELECTRON TRAPPING IN WIGGLER AND QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS OF CESRTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lanfa

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R and D (1). One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in the wiggler and quadrupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with long lifetime in a quadrupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism and photoelectrons produced in the wiggler zero field zone have long lifetime due to their complicated trajectory.

  1. A new type of permanent magnet ondulator and wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianming, X.; Maosan, L.; Qing, X.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of permanent magnet ondulator and wiggler is discussed. In this new design the magnet is composed of permanent magnet segments with modulated thickness. The magnetization directions of the segments are all perpendicular to the symmetrical plane of the magnet gap. By modulating the thicknesses of the segments, the field distribution is a pure sinusoidal curve in the ideal 2-dimensional case. The spatial expressions of the magnet field in the ideal case and in the real case are given. The methods for reducing the undesirable harmonics in the magnet field in the real case are discussed. Because of the arrangement of the magnetization directions of the magnet segments, soft iron shield can be used to strenghten the magnet field. In some cases, the stregnthening factor is more than two. The strenghtening effect of the soft iron shield is analysed also

  2. Theoretical study of H- stripping with a wiggler magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The first step for injecting protons into the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at LANL is to strip a beam of 800-MeV H - ions to H 0 with a 1.8-T dipole magnet. Because of the finite lifetime of energetic H - ions in the magnetic field, their trajectories bend before stripping causing the angular spread of the beam, and therefore its emittance, to grow during the stripping process. In the case of the PSR, the horizontal beam emittance grows by a factor of roughly three during injection. As a consequence, beam losses in the ring are significantly greater than they would be if there were not emittance growth. A speculative technique is proposed in which the beam divergence growth and resulting emittance growth is reduced by stripping the H - in a wiggler magnet whose transverse field alternates in direction as a function of position along the beam axis. The wiggler field configuration is adjusted so that the angular beam spread introduced during passage through one unidirectional-field increment of path is relatively small and so that 99.99% of the beam is stripped after passing through the whole magnet. With careful field design the net added angular beam spread is reduced because the incremental angular spreads are painted back and forth over the same small range. In the hypothetical case described, the calculated emittance growth and beam loss increase are significantly smaller than those calculated for a conventional stripper magnet. 3 refs., 3 figs

  3. Experimental and numerical studies of sheet electron beam propagation through a planar wiggler magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ze Xiang; Granatstein, V.L.; Destler, W.W.; Rodgers, J.; Cheng, S.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Bidwell, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies on sheet relativistic electron beam propagation through a long planar wiggler are reported and compared with numerical simulations. The planar wiggler has 56 periods with a period of 9.6 mm. Typically, the wiggler field peak amplitude is 5 kG. The experimental efforts have been focused on control of the deviation of the beam toward the side edge of the planar wiggler along the wide transverse direction. It is found that a suitably tapered magnetic field configuration at the wiggler entrance can considerably reduce the rate of the deviation. The effects of the following techniques on beam transport efficiency are also discussed: side focusing, beam transverse velocity tuning at the wiggler entrance, and beam spread limiting. High beam transport efficiency (almost 100%) of a 15 A beam has been obtained in some cases. The results are relevant to development of a free electron laser amplifier for application to stabilizing and heating of plasma in magnetic fusion research

  4. Conceptual designs for NLC ubitrons with permanent-magnet wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes three embodiments of the ubitron (FEL) amplifier that will be analyzed for possible use on the NLC. The design frequency and power are 11.424 GHz and 200 MW peak rf output power. The baseline against which these conceptual designs are to be evaluated is the PPM-focused 50-MW SIAC klystron, which in simulation shows 65% efficiency. In order to remain competitive in cost and power consumption, only ubitron beam-wave configurations that can use permanent-magnet wigglers are considered

  5. Analysis of the superconducting wiggler magnets for the ATF Harmonic Generation FEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Ingold, G.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the superconducting wiggler magnet under construction for the High Gain Harmonic Generation experiment (HGHG) at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL. This wiggler consists of an energy modulation section, a dispersion magnet and a radiator section. We present an analysis of the dispersion magnet and the end effects in the other wiggler sections. The purpose of the dispersion magnet is to convert energy modulation of the electron beam into spatial bunching. For the dispersion magnet, we discuss the physical requirements, analyze the magnetic design, determine the focusing properties, and consider the effect of departures from ideal behavior on the FEL gain. In the modulator and radiator wigglers we analyze the effects due to the ends of the wiggler and discuss their correction. In addition, the localized field produced by a trim coil for horizontal beam steering is investigated

  6. Magnetic X-ray measurements using the elliptical multipole wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, P. A.; Li, Y.; Beno, M. A.; Jennings, G.; Kimball, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The EMW at the BESSRC beam lines at the APS provides high photon flux at high energies with the capability of producing circular polarization on axis. The authors observe a high degree of circularly polarized x-rays at such energies. The polarization and frequency tunability of the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW) is an ideal source for many magnetic measurements from X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) to Compton scattering experiments. They performed Compton scattering measurements to determine the polarization and photon flux at the sample as a function of the deflection parameters K y and K x . They used for their measurements a Si (220) Laue monochromator providing simultaneous photon energies at 50 keV, 100 keV and 150 keV. Magnetic Compton Profiles were determined by either switching the magnet polarity or the photon helicity. The results obtained using Fe(110) single crystals were very similar

  7. CSEM-steel hybrid wiggler/undulator magnetic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.

    1985-05-01

    Current design of permanent magnet wiggler/undulators use either pure charge sheet equivalent material (CSEM) or the CSEM-Steel hybrid configuration. Hybrid configurations offer higher field strength at small gaps, field distributions dominated by the pole surfaces and pole tuning. Nominal performance of the hybrid is generally predicted using a 2-D magnetic design code neglecting transverse geometry. Magnetic measurements are presented showing transverse configuration influence on performance, from a combination of models using CSEMs, REC (H/sub c/ = 9.2 kOe) and NdFe (H/sub c/ = 10.7 kOe), different pole widths and end configurations. Results show peak field improvement using NdFe in place of REC in identical models, gap peak field decrease with pole width decrease (all results less than computed 2-D fields), transverse gap field distributions, and importance of CSEM material overhanging the poles in the transverse direction for highest gap fields

  8. Magnetic field simulation of wiggler on LUCX accelerator facility using Radia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutygina, Y. N.; Harisova, A. E.; Shkitov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    A flat wiggler consisting of NdFeB permanent magnets was installed on a compact linear electron accelerator LUCX (KEK) in Japan. After installing the wiggler on LUCX, the experiments on the generation of undulator radiation (UR) in the terahertz wavelength range is planned. To perform the detailed calculations and optimization of UR characteristics, it is necessary to know the parameters of the magnetic field generated in the wiggler. In this paper extended simulation results of wiggler magnetic field over the entire volume between the poles are presented. The obtained in the Radia simulation magnetic field is compared with the field calculated by another code, which is based on the finite element method.

  9. Adjustment of Adiabatic Transition Magnetic Field of Solenoid-Induced Helicla Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunawaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have been constructed a solenoid-induced helical wiggler for a compact free electron maser operated in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. It consists of two staggered-iron arrays inserted perpendicularly to each other in a solenoid electromagnet. In order to lead/extract an electron beam into/from the wiggler, adiabatic transition (AT) field is necessary at both ends of the wiggler. In this work the AT field was produced by setting staggered-nickel plates with different thickness in the five periods. The thickness of each nickel plate was decided by the field analysis using the MAGTZ computational code based on a magnetic moment method. Exact thickness was, however, found by the precise measurement of the field distribution with the greatest circumspection to obtain a homogeneous increment of the AT field. The change of AT field distribution was studied by referring to an equivalent electric circuit of the wiggler.

  10. Design and manufacture of a 6-T wiggler magnet for the Daresbury SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.; Smith, K.

    1992-01-01

    The 6-T wiggler is an iron-cored, warm bore, superconducting dipole magnet destined for the SERC Daresbury Laboratory's 2-GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source to enhance the available radiation spectrum. The new wiggler will be inserted in the ring in addition to an existing 5-T wiggler, both of which will use the existing, although upgraded, refrigerator. The magnet is designed to provide a peak field of 6 T on the beam line. The design and manufacturing contract for this magnet was started in September 1989 and was preceded by a feasibility study, presented by Oxford Instruments in mid 1988. The major features of the magnet, along with a discussion of the early stages of manufacture, are described in the article

  11. In vacuum permanent magnet wiggler optimized for the production of hard x rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marcouille

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of wiggler has been designed and realized at SOLEIL to produce high energy photons in low/intermediate electron storage rings. Instead of using the superconducting technology which requires new equipment and instrumentation, heavy maintenance, and additional running costs, we have proposed to build a compact in-vacuum small gap short period wiggler that operates rather at moderate field than at high field. The wiggler composed of 38 periods of 50 mm produces 2.1 T at a gap of 5.5 mm. The moderate value of the magnetic field enables one to limit the effects on the beam dynamics and to avoid excessive power and magnetic forces. In this purpose, the narrow magnetic system has been equipped with a counterforce device made of nonmagnetic springs. The roll-off resulting from the small size of poles has been compensated in situ by permanent magnet magic fingers. This paper reports the phases of design, construction, magnetic measurements, and on-beam tests of the in-vacuum wiggler WSV50.

  12. CESR-c Performance of a Wiggler-Dominated Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    CESR-c operates now as a Wiggler-Dominated Storage Ring extending the lowest operating energy to 1.5GeV/beam. To improve beam stability at low energy, 12 super-ferric wiggler magnets with total length of 15m and 2.1T maximum field were installed in the ring. They cause ~90% of total beam radiation lost and increase radiation damping rate by factor 10 from ~3 to 40 Hz. However, the field of the wiggler magnets not only initiates the radiation, but potentially affects beam dynamics. The latter was an issue of a great concern from the planning the CESR-c project. In this paper we describe general performance of CESR-c and report the results of an experimental study on some aspects of beam dynamics. Comparisons are made between the experimental data and the model prediction. We find that all parameters, which are critically dependent on wigglers, such as beam properties and ring nonlinearity, are in good agreement with those calculated from the model. This validates the ring and wiggler models and justifies our d...

  13. Predesign Study of a 4-5 tesla Superconducting Wiggler Magnet for the ESRF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Herman H.J.; ter Avest, D.; ter Avest, D.; Ravex, A.; Lagnier, M.; Elleaume, P.

    1994-01-01

    The ESRF is currently setting up a beam line for very hard photons well above 250 keV. This requires the installation of a high field three polewavelength shifter. The nominal and target fields of the wiggler magnet are 4 and 5 tesla respectively while the nominal field integral over the central

  14. Window frame or ''superferric'' magnet design for low B(<3T) heavy ion storage ring study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repata, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Double magnets share common laminations without magnetic coupling. Single layer coils of rectangular conductor are dry wound on extruded bore tubes. Magnet construction requires no molding or prestress. Absence of superconducting (SC) magnetization fields in the aperture results in very large dynamic range. The coil is wound continuously across the modplane to give unusually large dynamic aperture. Above approx.2.2 T saturation is corrected by simple sextupole windings with no inductive coupling to the dipole. Ultrastable design requires no internal quench protection. A quadrupole pair of novel design gives excellent field quality to B > 2 T without corrections, with no SC magnetization. Experience shows magnets are accurate enough for the assembly to take place at its final location. No training is required. Test procedures (measurements with search coils or with the beam) and cooldown properties are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. Superconducting superferric dipole magnet with cold iron core for the VLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, G W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic system of the stage I Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is based on 2 Tesla superconducting magnets with combined functions. These magnets have a room temperature iron yoke with two 20 mm air gaps. Magnetic field in both horizontally separated air gaps is generated by a single, 100 kA superconducting transmission line. An alternative design with a cold iron yoke, horizontally or vertically separated air gaps is under investigation. The cold iron option with horizontally separated air gaps reduces the amount of iron, which is one of the major cost drivers for the 233-km magnet system of future accelerator. The vertical beam separation decreases the superconductor volume, heat load from the synchrotron radiation and eliminates fringe field from the return bus. Nevertheless, the horizontal beam separation provides lowest volume of the iron yoke and, therefore, smaller heat load on the cryogenic system during cooling down. All these options are discussed and compared in the paper. Superconducting correct...

  16. Minimisation of higher order harmonics for large aperture super-ferric quadrupole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Atanu; Sharma, P.R.; Dey, M.K.; Bhunia, U.; Nandy, C.; Roy, S.; Pal, G.; Mallik, C.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed the magnetic field of finite length (effective length of 1200 mm), large bore (pole radius of 350 mm) superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in Low Energy Branch of Super FRS with the program TOSCA. In particularly we have tried to minimize the 12-pole and 20-pole components, which would contribute to geometric aberrations. At the same time we have tried to keep the gradient field uniformity at reference radius 300 mm within ±8.0E-04. (author)

  17. Fabrication of the superferric cyclotron gas-stopper magnet at NSCL at Michigan state university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, S S; Bollen, G; DeKamp, J; Green, M A; Magsig, C; Zeller, A F; Lawton, D; Morrissey, D J; Ottarson, J; Schwarz, S

    2014-01-01

    The magnet for the cyclotron gas stopper is a newly designed, large warm-iron superconducting cyclotron sector gradient dipole. The maximum field in the centre (gap = 0.18 m) is 2.7 T. The outer diameter of magnet yoke is 4.0 m, with a pole radius of 1.1 m and B * ρ = 1.8 T m. The fabrication and assembly of the iron return yoke and twelve pole pieces is complete. Separate coils are mounted on the return yokes that have a total mass of about 167 metric tons of iron. This paper illustrates the design and the fabrication process for the cyclotron gas-stopper magnet that is being fabricated at MSU.

  18. Design and analysis of a wiggler magnet system for the PEP-II B-Factory LER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, J.; Kendall, M.; Bertolini, L.; Fackler, O.; O'Connor, T.; Swan, T.; Zholents, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II B-Factory will use a wiggler magnet system for emittance control and additional damping. The wiggler magnet system is a set of 11 individual iron core, water cooled, dipole magnets designed to operate at 1.6 T and generate 400 kW of synchrotron radiation. Space has been provided to add a second wiggler with an additional 400 kW of synchrotron radiation if more damping is needed in the future. A copper vacuum chamber is used with continuous antechambers connected to both sides of the beam chamber via slots. Synchrotron radiation dump surfaces and distributed vacuum pumping are located in both antechambers. The authors describe the design and analysis of the wiggler magnets and the salient features of the vacuum chamber and dumps

  19. Magnetic measurements of the 10 T superconducting wiggler for the SPring-8 storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Batrakov, A; Bekhtenev, E A; Fedurin, M; Hara, M; Karpov, G; Kuzin, M; Mezentsev, N A; Miahara, Y; Shimada, T; Shkaruba, V A; Soutome, K; Tzumaki, K

    2001-01-01

    In 1999, in the frame of the project ISTC No. 767 'Budker INP/RIKEN Slow Positron Source', the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics had made a 10 T Three-pole Superconducting Wiggler. The wiggler will be the keystone of this project by its installation on the SPring-8 storage ring for powerful gamma ray generation (lambda sub c =450 keV), that will be used for slow positron production (N subgamma(epsilon>1 MeV)approx 10 sup 1 sup 5 , gamma/s I sub e =0.1 A). A. Ando et al., Proposal of the high magnetic field super conducting WLS for slow positron source at SPring-8, presented at SR1 '97 Conference. In January, 2000, the wiggler was transported to SPring-8, where the last test and measurements were carried out in collaboration with Japan. In this article, the results of measurements of the magnetic field, finding the magnetic field amplitude by an NMR probe, the definition of feed current relations by stretch current wire method, the calibration of a Hall probe in the high magnetic field, and the measurement o...

  20. Measurements of electron cloud growth and mitigation in dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvey, J.R., E-mail: jrc97@cornell.edu; Hartung, W.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.

    2015-01-11

    Retarding field analyzers (RFAs), which provide a localized measurement of the electron cloud, have been installed throughout the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), in different magnetic field environments. This paper describes the RFA designs developed for dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler field regions, and provides an overview of measurements made in each environment. The effectiveness of electron cloud mitigations, including coatings, grooves, and clearing electrodes, are assessed with the RFA measurements.

  1. Design of end magnetic structures for the Advanced Light Source wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, D.; Akre, J.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Minamihara, Y.; Pipersky, P.; Plate, D.; Schlueter, R.

    1995-01-01

    The vertical magnetic structures for the Advanced Light planar wiggler and 20 cm period elliptical hybrid permanent magnet design. The ends of these structures are characterized by diminishing scalar potential distributions the poles which control beam trajectories. They incorporate electromagnetic correction coils to dynamically correct for variations in the first integral of the field as a function of gap. A permanent magnet trim mechanism is incorporated to minimize the transverse integrated error field distribution. The ends were designed using analytic and computer modeling techniques. The design and modeling results are presented

  2. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Betz, Michael; Caspers, Fritz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Semertzidis, Yannis [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zioutas, Konstantin [Patras Univ. (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  3. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Oliver K.; Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas; Semertzidis, Yannis; Sikivie, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic field adjustment structure and method for a tapered wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    An improved method and structure is disclosed for adjusting the magnetic field generated by a group of electromagnet poles spaced along the path of a charged particle beam to compensate for energy losses in the charged particles which comprises providing more than one winding on at least some of the electromagnet poles; connecting one respective winding on each of several consecutive adjacent electromagnet poles to a first power supply, and the other respective winding on the electromagnet pole to a different power supply in staggered order; and independently adjusting one power supply to independently vary the current in one winding on each electromagnet pole in a group whereby the magnetic field strength of each of a group of electromagnet poles may be changed in smaller increments.

  5. Free-electron lasers with magnetized ion-wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, H.; Jafari, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made using laser ionized channels to guide electron beams in the ion focus regime in a free-electron laser. Propagation of an electron beam in the ion focusing regime (IFR) allows the beam to propagate without expanding from space-charge repulsion. The ninth-degree polynomial dispersion relation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived analytically by solving the electron momentum transfer and wave equations. The variation of resonant frequencies and peak growth rates with axial magnetic field strength has been demonstrated. Substantial enhancement in peak growth rate is obtained as the axial field frequency approaches the gyroresonance frequency.

  6. The new CHESS wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    A 25-pole permanent magnet hybrid wiggler has been built at CHESS and installed on the CESR (Cornell Electron Storage Ring). This device has a magnetic period of 19.6 cm, a peak on-axis field of 1.2 T at the nominal operating gap of 4.0 cm, and a K parameter of 22. The wiggler has been designed to provide radiation for two new experimental stations with approximately four times the flux available from the present CHESS six-pole electromagnet wiggler. Under normal running conditions at 100 mA currents, the total power radiated should exceed 6 kW making this one of the highest flux x-ray sources below 1 A critical wavelength. In this paper an overview of the development of the wiggler is given, including the unique features in its design and construction as well as results of measurements obtained on its magnetic and spectral properties

  7. Effects of laser-polarization and wiggler magnetic fields on electron acceleration in laser-cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ghotra, Harjit; Kant, Niti

    2018-06-01

    We examine the electron dynamics during laser-cluster interaction. In addition to the electrostatic field of an individual cluster and laser field, we consider an external transverse wiggler magnetic field, which plays a pivotal role in enhancing the electron acceleration. Single-particle simulation has been presented with a short pulse linearly polarized as well as circularly polarized laser pulses for electron acceleration in a cluster. The persisting Coulomb field allows the electron to absorb energy from the laser field. The stochastically heated electron finds a weak electric field at the edge of the cluster from where it is ejected. The wiggler magnetic field connects the regions of the stochastically heated, ejected electron from the cluster and high energy gain by the electron from the laser field outside the cluster. This increases the field strength and hence supports the electron to meet the phase of the laser field for enhanced acceleration. A long duration resonance appears with an optimized magnetic wiggler field of about 3.4 kG. Hence, the relativistic energy gain by the electron is enhanced up to a few 100 MeV with an intense short pulse laser with an intensity of about 1019 W cm‑2 in the presence of a wiggler magnetic field.

  8. Free-electron laser with a plasma wave wiggler propagating through a magnetized plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, S; Jafarinia, F; Mehdian, H

    2013-01-01

    A plasma eigenmode has been employed as a wiggler in a magnetized plasma channel for the generation of laser radiation in a free-electron laser. The short wavelength of the plasma wave allows a higher radiation frequency to be obtained than from conventional wiggler free-electron lasers. The plasma can significantly slow down the radiation mode, thereby relaxing the beam energy requirement considerably. In addition, it allows a beam current in excess of the vacuum current limit via charge neutralization. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density in addition to the γ-tunability of the standard FEL. The laser gain has been calculated and numerical computations of the electron trajectories and gain are presented. Four groups (I–IV) of electron orbits have been found. It has been shown that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for orbits of group I and group III increases, while a decrease in gain has been obtained for orbits of group II and group IV. Similarly, the effect of plasma density on gain has been exhibited. The results indicate that with increasing plasma density, the orbits of all groups shift to higher cyclotron frequencies. The effects of beam self-fields on gain have also been demonstrated. It has been found that in the presence of beam self-fields the sensitivity of the gain increases substantially in the vicinity of gyroresonance. Here, the gain enhancement and reduction are due to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic effects of the self-magnetic field, respectively. (paper)

  9. Current driven wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournes, C.; Aucouturier, J.; Arnaud, B.; Brasile, J. P.; Convert, G.; Simon, M.

    1992-07-01

    A current-driven wiggler is the cornerstone of an innovative, compact, high-efficiency, transportable tunable free-electron laser (FEL), the feasibility of which is currently being evaluated by Thomson-CSF. The salient advantages are: compactness of the FEL, along with the possibility to accelerate the beam through several successive passes through the accelerating section (the number of passes being defined by the final wavelength of the radiation; i.e. visible, MWIR, LWIR); the wiggler can be turned off and be transparent to the beam until the last pass. Wiggler periodicities as small as 5 mm can be achieved, hence contributing to FEL compactness. To achieve overall efficiencies in the range of 10% at visible wavelengths, not only the wiggler periodicity must be variable, but the strength of the magnetic field of each period can be adjusted separately and fine-tuned versus time during the macropulse, so as to take into account the growing contribution of the wave energy in the cavity to the total ponderomotive force. The salient theoretical point of this design is the optimization of the parameters defining each period of the wiggler for each micropacket of the macropulse. The salient technology point is the mechanical and thermal design of the wiggler which allows the required high currents to achieve magnetic fields up to 2T.

  10. A novel micro wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingxiang; Xu Yong

    1995-01-01

    A novel structure of the micro-wiggler is presented. The authors developed a simplified theoretical model of the micro-wiggler. According to the model, an analytic formula of the magnetic field in two dimensions is got. A calculated program (PWMW-I) is developed from the formula. PWMW-I can calculate the field on the axis and the off-axis for the number of periods N, and the entrance or the exit of the micro-wiggler. Three model with different period (10 mm, 5 mm and 3 mm) is designed on the program. The 5T peak field for the period of 3 mm at the gap of 1 mm is got

  11. The 8 cm Period Electromagnetic Wiggler Magnet with Coils Made from Sheet Copper

    CERN Document Server

    Biallas, George H; Hiatt, Tommy; Neil, George R; Snyder, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    An electromagnetic wiggler, now lasing at the Jefferson Lab FEL, has 29 eight cm periods with K variable from 0.6 to1.1 and gap of 2.6 cm. The wiggler was made inexpensively in 11 weeks by an industrial machine shop. The conduction cooled coil design uses copper sheet material cut to forms using water jet cutting. The conductor is cut to serpentine shapes and the cooling plates are cut to ladder shape. The sheets are assembled in stacks insulated with polymer film, also cut with water jet. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The wiggler features graded fields in the two poles at each end and trim coils on these poles to eliminate field errors caused by saturation. An added critical feature is mirror plates at the ends with integral trim coils to eliminate three dimensional end field effects and align the entrance and exit orbit with the axis of the wiggler. Details of construction, measurement methods and excellent wiggler performance are pre...

  12. Field correction for a one meter long permanent-magnet wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Field errors in wigglers are usually measured and corrected on-axis only, thus ignoring field error gradients. We find that gradient scale lengths are of the same order as electron beam size and therefore can be important. We report measurements of wiggler field errors in three dimensions and expansion of these errors out to first order (including two dipole and two quadrupole components). Conventional techniques for correcting on-axis errors (order zero) create new off-axis (first order) errors. We present a new approach to correcting wiggler fields out to first order. By correcting quadrupole errors in addition to the usual dipole correction, we minimize growth in electron beam size. Correction to first order yields better overlap between the electron and optical beams and should improve laser gain. (Author) 2 refs., 5 figs

  13. Development of a strong electromagnet wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Holmes, R.H.; Van Maren, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    The Strong Electromagnet (SEM) wiggler is a permanent magnet-assisted electromagnet under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Induction Linac Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) program. This concept uses permanent magnets within the wiggler to provide a reverse bias flux in the iron and thus delay the onset of magnetic saturation. The electromagnet coils determine the wiggler field and operate at low current densities by virtue of their placement away from the midplane. We describe here the design approach used and test data from a 7-period wiggler prototype that includes curved pole tips to provide wiggle-plane focusing. 7 refs

  14. A CHI wiggler ubitron amplifier experiment: Wiggler characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccetti, J.M.; Jackson, R.H.; Freund, H.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 35 GHz CHI (Coaxial Hybrid Iron) wiggler ubitron amplifier experiment is under construction at the Naval Research Laboratory. The CHI wiggler configuration has the potential of generating high wiggler magnetic fields at short periods with excellent beam focusing and transport properties. This makes it a desirable configuration for the generation of high power coherent radiation in relatively compact systems. The CHI wiggler consists of alternating rings of magnetic and non-magnetic materials concentric with a central rod of similar alternating design but shifted along the axis by half a period. Once inserted in a solenoidal magnetic field, the CHI structure deforms the axial field to create a radial field oscillating with the same periodicity as the rings. An annular electron beam is propagated through the coaxial gap where the oscillating radial field imparts an azimuthal wiggle motion. The principal goals of the experiment are to investigate the performance tradeoffs involved in the CHI configuration for high frequency amplifiers operating at low voltages with small wiggler periods. The nominal design parameters are a center frequency of 35 GHz, wiggler period of 0.75 cm, and beam voltage of approximately 150 kV. Calculations have shown an intrinsic (untapered) efficiency of {approximately} 7% when operating at 6.3 kG axial field (wiggler field, B{sub w}{approximately}1270 G). The calculated gain was 36 dB, saturating at a distance of 46 cm. These parameters yield an instantaneous amplifier bandwidth of {approximately} 25%. There appears to be room for further improvement in efficiency, a matter which will be scrutinized more closely in the final design. A prototype CHI wiggler is presently being fabricated for use in conjunction with an existing 30 kG superconducting solenoid. The performance properties of the prototype will be characterized and compared with linear and non-linear calculations.

  15. Generalized theory of a free-electron laser in a helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields using the kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, K.D.; Mishra, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent theory of a free-electron laser is developed by the kinetic approach, using the method of characteristics in helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields. The detailed relativistic particle trajectories obtained in wiggler and guide magnetic fields are used in linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta to obtain the perturbed distribution function in terms of perturbed electric and magnetic fields deviating from the vector potential approach. The perturbed distribution function thus obtained, having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta for an arbitrary distribution function, is used to obtain current, conductivity and dielectric tensors. The full dispersion relation (FDR) and Compton dispersion relation (CDR) have been obtained. The dispersion diagram has been obtained and the interaction of the negative longitudinal space charge with the electromagnetic wave has been shown. The temporal growth rates obtained from the full dispersion relation and Compton dispersion relation for the tenuous cold relativistic beam in microwave region have been discussed

  16. Wigglers: the newest profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Wiggler systems have been used in storage rings within the last year to increase the intensity of synchrotron radiation available for experiments as well as to increase the reaction rates in high energy physics experiments. Multiperiod wigglers or undulators have also been used recently to make quasi-monochromatic photon beams as well as amplify existing photon beams such as in the free electron laser. If one defines a wiggler to be any system of transverse, periodic electromagnetic fields, then recent results on photon production via charged particle channeling in crystals also fall within this sphere. Of course, any periodic modulation of a charge or magnetic moment (e.g., by a laser) could produce coherent radiation or, conversely, passage through a periodic aperture (e.g., a metal bellows). This discussion is limited to a typical, active, macroscopic device and how it provides some unique advantages which are practical to achieve in storage rings. As implied, the subject divides into two basic parts - one related to the radiation from the wiggler and the other related to machine physics applications, e.g., tailoring the phase space of the particle beam, modifying its damping rates or possibly optimizing a ring for production of radiation. Neither area is exhausted nor hopefully the reader, since our goal is only to present enough information to allow one to make reasonable estimates of some important effects

  17. [Superferric Super Collider R and D Collaboration]: Final technical report: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, F.R.

    1987-07-01

    The idea of using a superferric magnet for a large accelerator such as the SSC arises from three considerations: Low Current. If the field is dominated by the iron, then the current is minimized. Forces and stored energy are lower by an order of magnitude than coil dominated magnets. Persistent currents and field errors due to coil placement are negligible; Simple and Reliable. Since the current is low and the number of turns is 8, the magnets are much simpler to construct and easier to operate. Reliability should be very good; and Inexpensive. The dominant cost of a superconducting magnet is the superconductor. The total cost of superconductor is directly proportional to the ampere-turns. Superferric magnets have 1/4 or less total pounds of superconductor than the 5 or 6.5 T magnets. This report describes a design of a superferric magnet that satisfies the three previous conditions. The first section of the report discusses a lattice that is designed for this magnet. The body of the report discusses the design, construction, assembly and installation of the magnets. The cryogenic section describes a complete system including cooldown, warm-up, steady state and quenches. The power supply is described with the quench detection and response system. Finally, the instrumentation is discussed

  18. Polarized wiggler for NSLS x-ray ring design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Krinsky, S.; Blum, E.

    1992-03-01

    We examine the properties of an elliptically polarized wiggler that will generate circularly polarized photons with energy spectrum of 3--12 KeV. The vertical wiggler magnetic field is produced by permanent magnets while the horizontal wiggler field is generated by electric coils capable of AC excitation. The radiation parameters of the wiggler are presented, including photon flux, circular and linear polarization and spectrum. These parameters are compared to the synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet. Numerical values are calculated for radiation from the wiggler and bending magnet for the NSLS X-ray ring parameters. A conceptual design for such a wiggler is discussed and several different alternatives are analyzed. We consider AC excitation of the wiggler to produce the time modulation of the elliptic polarization, and also to produce time modulated linearly polarized radiation

  19. Polarized wiggler for NSLS X-ray ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Zhang, X.; Krinsky, S.; Blum, E.B.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the properties of an elliptically polarized wiggler that will generate circularly polarized photons with energy spectrum of 3--12 KeV. The vertical wiggler magnetic field is produced by permanent magnets while the horizontal wiggler field is generated by electric coils capable of AC excitation. The radiation parameters of the wiggler is discussed. We consider AC excitation of the wiggler to produce the time modulation of the elliptic polarization. The power is dissipated in the vacuum chamber due to the eddy current

  20. Electron acceleration from rest to GeV energy by chirped axicon Gaussian laser pulse in vacuum in the presence of wiggler magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Niti; Rajput, Jyoti; Singh, Arvinder

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a scheme of electron energy enhancement by employing frequency - chirped lowest order axicon focussed radially polarised (RP) laser pulse in vacuum under the influence of wiggler magnetic field. Terawatt RP laser can be focussed down to ∼5μm by an axicon optical element, which produces an intense longitudinal electric field. This unique property of axicon focused Gaussian RP laser pulse is employed for direct electron acceleration in vacuum. A linear frequency chirp increases the time duration of laser-electron interaction, whereas, the applied magnetic wiggler helps in improving the strength of ponderomotive force v→ ×B→ and periodically deflects electron in order to keep it traversing in the accelerating phase up to longer distance. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the influence of laser, frequency chirp and magnetic field parameters on electron energy enhancement. It is noticed that an electron from rest can be accelerated up to GeV energy under optimized laser and magnetic field parameters. Significant enhancement in the electron energy gain of the order of 11.2 GeV is observed with intense chirped laser pulse in the presence of wiggler magnetic field of strength 96.2 kG.

  1. Development of a laced electromagnetic wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.C.; Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Parkison, C.D.; Prosnitz, D.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    The laced electromagnetic wiggler is a new concept being developed to attain higher magnetic fields, shorter wavelengths, and larger gaps for the induction-linear accelerator, free-electron-laser (FEL) program. In the laced wiggler design, permanent magnets are located (''laced'') between the electromagnetic coils to increase the reverse-bias flux in the iron pole beyond that possible with only pole-edge (''side'') permanent magnets. This increase in reverse-bias flux allows wiggler operation at midplane magnetic field intensities comparable to those of a hybrid permanent magnet/steel wiggler, but with field adjustability over a specified range. The maximum field intensity and tuning range are selected, within limits, for specific design requirements. We have designed and tested a one-period prototype of this concept with promising results

  2. New wiggler beam line for SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.

    1982-08-01

    A new high-intensity-beam line with a wiggler magnet source is described. This project, in final stages of design, is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), the Exxon Research and Engineering Company (EXXON), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Installation at SSRL will begin in the summer of 1982. The goal of this project is to provide extremely high-brightness synchrotron radiation beams over a broad spectral range from 50 eV to 40 keV. The radiation source is a 27 period (i.e., 55 pole) permanent magnet wiggler of a new design. The wiggler utilizes rare-earth cobalt (REC) material in the steel hybrid configuration to achieve high magnetic fields with short periods. An analysis has been made of the polarization, angular distribution and power density of the radiation produced by the wiggler. Details of the wiggler design are presented. The magnet is outside a thin walled (1mm) variable gap stainless steel vacuum chamber. The chamber gap will be opened to 1.8 cm for beam injection into SPEAR and then closed to 1.0 cm (or less) for operation. Five remotely controlled drives are provided; to change the wiggler gap, to change the vacuum chamber aperture and to position the wiggler. Details of the beam line optics and end stations are presented. Thermal loading on beam line components is severe. The peak power density at 7.5 m is 5 kW/cm 2 for the nominal wiggler field and present SPEAR beam currents and will approach 20 kW/cm 2 with the maximum wiggler field and projected SPEAR beam currents

  3. Window frame or ''superferric'' magnet design for low B(< 3T) heavy ion storage ring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-10-01

    Double magnets share common laminations without magnetic coupling. Single layer coils of rectangular conductor are dry wound on extruded bore tubes. Magnet construction requires no molding or prestress. Absence of superconducting (SC) magnetization fields in the aperture results in very large dynamic range. The coil is wound continuously across the midplane to give unusually large dynamic aperture. Above about2.2 T saturation is corrected by simple sextupole windings with no inductive coupling to the dipole. Ultrastable design requires no internal quench protection. A quadrupole pair of novel design gives excellent field quality to B > 2 T without corrections, with no SC magnetization. Experience shows magnets are accurate enough for the assembly to take place at its final location. No training is required. Test procedures (measurements with search coils or with the beam) and cooldown properties are discussed.

  4. Window frame or ''superferric'' magnet design for low B(<3T) heavy ion storage ring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G., Lee, Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repata, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Double magnets share common laminations without magnetic coupling. Single layer coils of rectangular conductor are dry wound on extruded bore tubes. Magnet construction requires no molding or prestress. Absence of superconducting (SC) magnetization fields in the aperture results in very large dynamic range. The coil is wound continuously across the modplane to give unusually large dynamic aperture. Above approx.2.2 T saturation is corrected by simple sextupole windings with no inductive coupling to the dipole. Ultrastable design requires no internal quench protection. A quadrupole pair of novel design gives excellent field quality to B > 2 T without corrections, with no SC magnetization. Experience shows magnets are accurate enough for the assembly to take place at its final location. No training is required. Test procedures (measurements with search coils or with the beam) and cooldown properties are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. FPGA-based quench detection system for super-FRS super-ferric dipole prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tongjun; Wu Wei; Yao Qinggao; Yuan Ping; He Yuan; Han Shaofei; Ma Lizhen

    2011-01-01

    The quench detection system for Super-FRS super-ferric dipole prototype magnet of FAIR has been designed and built. The balance bridge was used to detect quench signal. In order to avoid blind zone of quench detection, two independent bridges were used. NI PXI-7830R FPGA was used to implement filter to quench signal and algorithm of quench decision and to produce quench trigger signal. Pre-sample technique was used in quench data acquisition. The data before and after quench could be recorded for analysis later. The test result indicated that the quench of the dipole's superconducting coil could be reliably detected by the quench detection module. (authors)

  6. Electromagnetic wiggler technology development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Burns, M.J.; Christensen, T.C.; Coffield, F.E.; Kulke, B.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in induction-linac free-electron laser (IFEL) research, we are conducting a variety of activities addressing the unique requirements imposed on IFEL wiggler systems. We are actively developing improved dc iron-core electromagnetic wiggler designs to attain higher peak fields, greater tunability, and lower random error levels. We are pursuing specialized control systems, such as magnetic-field and beam-position controllers, which can relax requirements on the wiggler itself. We are also pursuing basic studies to establish the effect of radiation on permanent magnets

  7. Design of a vertical wiggler with superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huke, K.; Yamakawa, T.

    1980-01-01

    A vertical wiggler has been designed, which will be installed in the 2.5 GeV electron storage ring under construction at KEK-PF. The wiggler magnet with superconducting coils produces magnetic fields of 6 T and wiggles electron beams in a vertical plane. Synchrotron radiation generated by the wiggler has a critical wavelength of 0.5 Angstroem and has an electric field-vector in the vertical direction, which is very important for precise experiments in various fields of the material sciences. The wiggler consists of three pairs of superconducting coils, an iron magnetic shield, a beam pipe and a liquid helium cryogenic system and is contained in a vacuum vessel which can move up and down together with the wiggler. During the injection time, the vessel is pushed up, so that electron beams with a large spatial spread go through the lower part of the beam pipe, where the aperture of the beam pipe is large enough. After the beam size becomes small due to radiation damping, the vessel is pushed down so that the electron beams go through the narrow gap of the wiggler magnet. Using the iron magnetic shield with iron pole pieces, the ratio between the magnetic field in the gap and the maximum field on the superconductor coils is reduced to 1.1. (orig.)

  8. Nonlinear Dynamics in Spear Wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    BL11, the most recently installed wiggler in the SPEAR storage ring at SSRL, produces a large nonlinear perturbation of the electron beam dynamics, which was not directly evident in the integrated magnetic field measurements. Measurements of tune shifts with betatron oscillation amplitude and with closed orbit shifts were used to characterize the nonlinear fields of the SPEAR insertion devices (IDs). Because of the narrow pole width in BL11, the nonlinear fields seen along the wiggling electron trajectory are dramatically different than the flip coil measurements made along a straight line. This difference explains the tune shift measurements and the observed degradation in dynamic aperture. Corrector magnets to cancel the BL11 nonlinear fields are presently under construction

  9. Calculation of the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Impedance from a Wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Juhao

    2003-01-01

    Most studies of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) have only considered the radiation from independent dipole magnets. However, in the damping rings of future linear colliders, a large fraction of the radiation power will be emitted in damping wigglers. In this paper, the longitudinal wakefield and impedance due to CSR in a wiggler are derived in the limit of a large wiggler parameter K. After an appropriate scaling, the results can be expressed in terms of universal functions, which are independent of K. Analytical asymptotic results are obtained for the wakefield in the limit of large and small distances, and for the impedance in the limit of small and high frequencies

  10. Initial operation of SSRL wiggler in spear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, M.; Brunk, W.; Cronin, R.; Jensen, D.; Johnson, R.; King, A.; Spencer, J.; Taylor, T.; Winick, H.

    1979-03-01

    A 3 lambda planar, magnetic wiggler has been designed, built, installed and operated in the SPEAR storage ring. Its primary purpose is to provide tunable synchrotron radiation (SR) with a higher energy and intensity than previously available for a new SR beam line just commissioned at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Because the magnet operates from 0-18 kG, it should also produce undulator radiation (UR). Since the wiggler influences storage ring operation in both single beam and colliding beam modes, measurements were made of tune changes, emittance changes and energy spreads which are compared to predictions. Significant improvements in luminosity for high energy physics experiments were observed. The ability to do x-ray experiments easily that were not previously feasible at low electron beam energies and currents has also been demonstrated. The basic design, some interesting characteristics of the magnetic measurements and initial operating experience and results are discussed

  11. Symplectic integration for complex wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, E.; Ohmi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Using the example of the helical wiggler proposed for the KEK photon factory, we show how to integrate the equation of motion through the wiggler. The integration is performed in cartesian coordinates. For the usual expanded Hamiltonian (without square root), we derive a first order symplectic integrator for the purpose of tracking through a wiggler in a ring. We also show how to include classical radiation for the computation of the damping decrement

  12. Damping Wiggler Study at KEK-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Naito, Takashi; Honda, Yosuke; Korostelev, Maxim S; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Muto, Toshiya; Nakamura, Norio; Ross, Marc; Sakai, Hiroshi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The effects by damping wiggler magnets have been studied at KEK-ATF. The damping ring of the KEK-ATF is a 1.3 GeV storage ring capable of producing ultra-low emittance electron beams. It is significant issue to realize fast damping in the damping ring. The tuning method with 4 sets of wiggler was investigated for the ultra-low emittance beam. The performance on the beam quality, which is related to the transverse (x and y) and the longitudinal (z and dp/p), has been measured by the SR monitor, the laser wire, the streak camera and the energy spread monitor at the extraction line. We report on the operation condition and the measurement results.

  13. Synchrotron radiation from a Helical Wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irani, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The use of Wiggler magnets as an improved source of synchrotron radiation from high energy electron storage rings was proposed a few years ago. Since then it has also been suggested that synchrotron radiation from Wiggler magnets placed in proton machines can be used to monitor energy, dimensions and position of the beam and that this effect is even more interesting in proton storage rings where the need to see the beam is greater. Most of the calculations carried out so far consider radiation from a single particle in a Wiggler which is appropriate when the beam is radiating incoherently. In this paper a general formalism is developed for the case when the beam radiates coherently. These results are then applied to both electron and proton storage rings. For the electron case, an expression is derived for the length of the bunch to be used as a more intense coherent radiation source. For proton machines the radiation can be used to measure energy, current, transverse dimensions and longitudinal density variations in the beam

  14. Synchrotron radiation from a helical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irani, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The use of wiggler magnets as an improved source of synchrotron radiation from high energy electron storage rings was proposed a few years age. Since then it has also been suggested that synchrotron radiation from wiggler magnets placed in proton machines can be used to monitor energy, dimensions and position of the beam and that this effect is even more interesting in proton storage rings where the need to see the beam is greater. Most of the calculations carried out so far consider radiation from a single particle in a wiggler which is appropriate when the beam is radiating incoherently. A general formalism is presented for the case when the beam radiates coherently. These results are applied to both electron and proton storage rings. For the electron case, an expression is derived for the length of the bunch to use it as a more intense coherent radiation source. For proton machines the radiation can be used to measure energy, current, transverse dimensions and longitudinal density variations in the beam

  15. Commissioning of the LNLS 2 T Hybrid Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Farias, Ruy H A; Aparecida-Gouveia, Ana F; Cabral-Jahnel, Lucia; Citadini, James F; Ferreira, Marcelo J; Franco, J G; Liu, Lin; Neuenschwander, Regis; Resende, Ximenes R; Tavares, Pedro; Tosin, Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of the commissioning of a 28-pole 2 T Hybrid Wiggler at the 1.37 GeV electron storage ring of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source. The wiggler will be used mainly for protein crystallography and was optimized for the production of 12 keV photons. The very high field and relatively large gap (22 mm) of this insertion device led to a magnetic design that includes large main and side magnets and heavily saturated poles. We present the results of the commissioning with beam, with special attention to the correction of the large linear tune-shift perturbations produced by the wiggler as well as on the reduction of beam lifetime at full energy. Since the injection at the LNLS storage ring is performed at 500 MeV we also focus on the effects of non-linearities and their impact on injection efficiency.

  16. Preliminary design for a pierce wiggler beamstick and addendum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirkle, D.

    1988-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing a fast tunable microwave source for operation at 250 GHz and 10kW peak output power. This report presents the preliminary design of a Pierce gun and solenoid magnet that will be compatible with a Pierce-wiggler electron beam formation system (beamstick). The beamstick will be an appropriate power source for a tunable gyro-BWO at 250 GHz. Figure 1 presents the major components of the Pierce-wiggler beamstick: the electron gun, solenoid, beam tunnel, wiggler, and vacuum valve. Figure 2 shows an artistic conception of how the beamstick will interface with the interaction magnet, modulator and gyro-BWO circuit at MIT. 15 figs

  17. Performance of the SRRC storage ring and wiggler commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C.C.; Hsu, K.T.; Luo, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    A 1.3 GeV synchrotron radiation storage ring at SRRC has been operated for more than a year since October 1993. Starting from April 1994, the machine has been open to the user community. In February 1995, the authors installed a wiggler magnet of 1.8 tesla 25-pole in the ring and successfully commissioned. The machine was scheduled for the users' runs from the middle of April this year. The authors describe the performance of the machine without wiggler magnet system and then report the wiggler effects on the beam dynamics of the storage ring, e.g., tune shift, beta-beating, orbit change, nonlinear dynamics effect, etc. Some measurements are compared with the model prediction and agreement between them was fairly good. Possible actions to minimize wiggler effects have been taken, such as orbit correction as a function wiggler gap change. The machine improvement projects, such as longitudinal and transverse damping systems as well as orbit stability feedback system are under construction and will be in use soon

  18. Beam Line VI REC-steel hybrid wiggler for SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chan, T.; Chin, J.W.G.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.J.; Winick, H.; Yang, J.

    1983-03-01

    A wiggler magnet with 27 periods, each 7 cm long which reaches 1.21 T at a 1.2 cm gap and 1.64 T at 0.8 cm gap has been designed and is in fabrication. Installation in SPEAR is scheduled for mid 1983. This new wiggler will be the radiation source for a new high intensity synchrotron radiation beam line at SSRL. The magnet utilizes rare-earth cobalt (REC) material and steel in a hybrid configuration to achieve simultaneously a high magnetic field with a short period. The magnet is external to a thin walled variable gap stainless steel vacuum chamber which is opened to provide beam aperture of 1.8 cm gap at injection and then closed to a smaller aperture (< 1.0 cm). Five independent drive systems are provided to adjust the magnet and chamber gaps and alignment. Magnetic design, construction details and magnetic measurements are presented

  19. Superconducting 63-Pole 2 Tesla Wiggler for Canadian Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khruschev, S.V.; Kuper, E.A.; Lev, V.H.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Miginsky, E.G.; Repkov, V.V.; Shkaruba, B.A.; Syrovatin, V.M.; Tsukanov, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting 63-pole wiggler with the average period 34 mm designed and fabricated at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk for Synchrotron Radiation Center (CLS) in Canada is described. The maximum field 2.2 Tesla in the median plane has been achieved. The liquid helium consumption less than 0.03 liters per hour in operating mode has been reached. In January 2005, the wiggler was installed in the storage ring in CLS and now experiments are already underway. The main parameters of the magnet and the cryogenic systems as well as test results are presented

  20. Superconducting 63-pole 2 T wiggler for Canadian Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khruschev, S.V.; Kuper, E.A.; Lev, V.H.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Miginsky, E.G.; Repkov, V.V.; Shkaruba, V.A.; Syrovatin, V.M.; Tsukanov, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    A superconducting 63-pole wiggler with the average period 34 mm designed and fabricated in the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk for Synchrotron Radiation Center Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Canada is described. The maximum field 2.2 T in the median plane has been achieved. The liquid helium consumption less than 0.03 L h in operating mode has been reached. It allows refilling liquid helium once a year. In January 2005, the wiggler was installed in the storage ring in CLS and now experiments are carried out. The main parameters of the magnet and the cryogenic systems as well as test results are presented

  1. Construction of compact FEM using solenoid-induced helical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of compact Free-Electron Maser (FEM) has been designed for the operation in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. The electron energy is 60-120 keV. As it is lower, stronger guiding magnetic field is necessary in addition to wiggler field. To fulfil this condition a solenoid-induced helical wiggler is applied from the viewpoint of saving the electric power of restricted source capacity. The wiggler, for example, with the period of 12 mm creates the field of 92 G in the guiding field of 3.2 kG. The whole system of FEM has been just constructed in a small-scale laboratory. It is so small to occupy the area of 0.7x2.9 m 2

  2. CALCULATION OF THE COHERENT RADIATION IMPDENACE FROM A WIGGLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J

    2004-01-01

    Most studies of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) have considered only the radiation from independent dipole magnets. However, in the damping rings of future linear colliders and many high luminosity factories, a large fraction of the radiation power will be emitted in damping wigglers. In this paper, the longitudinal wakefield and impedance due to CSR in a wiggler are derived in the limit of a large wiggler parameter K. After an appropriate scaling, the results can be expressed in terms of universal functions, which are independent of K. Analytical asymptotic results are obtained for the wakefield in the limit of large and small distances, and for the impedance in the limit of small and high frequencies

  3. Design of High Field Multipole Wiggler at PLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. E.; Park, K. H.; Lee, H. G.; Suh, H. S.; Han, H. S.; Jung, Y. G.; Chung, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a high field multipole wiggler for new EXAFS beamline. The beamline is planning to utilize very high photon energy (∼40keV) synchrotron radiation at Pohang Light Source (PLS). To achieve higher critical photon energy, the wiggler field need to be maximized. A magnetic structure with wedged pole and blocks with additional side blocks which are similar to asymmetric wiggler of ESRF are designed to achieve higher flux density. The end structures were designed to be asymmetric along the beam direction to ensure systematic zero 1st field integral. The thickness of the last magnets were adjusted to minimize the transition sequence to the fully developed periodic field. This approach is more convenient to control than adjusting the strength of the end magnets. The final design features 140mm period, 2.5 Tesla peak flux density at 12mm pole gap, 1205mm magnetic structure length with 16 full field poles. In this article, all the design, engineering efforts for the HFMSII wiggler will be described

  4. Electron cloud dynamics in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Celata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The interference of stray electrons (also called “electron clouds” with accelerator beams is important in modern intense-beam accelerators, especially those with beams of positive charge. In magnetic wigglers, used, for instance, for transverse emittance damping, the intense synchrotron radiation produced by the beam can generate an electron cloud of relatively high density. In this paper the complicated dynamics of electron clouds in wigglers is examined using the example of a wiggler in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with the WARP-POSINST computer code show different density and dynamics for the electron cloud at locations near the maxima of the vertical wiggler field when compared to locations near the minima. Dynamics in these regions, the electron cloud distribution vs longitudinal position, and the beam coherent tune shift caused by the wiggler electron cloud will be discussed.

  5. SRS Behaviour with a superconducting 5-Tesla wiggler insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suller, V.P.; Marks, N.; Poole, M.W.; Walker, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    A 5 Tesla superconducting wavelength shifting wiggler magnet has been inserted into the SRS lattice. Observations have been made of the behaviour of the stored electron beam with the magnet powered. Betatron tune shifts and modulation of the betatron function have been measured and good agreement obtained with theory. Closed orbit changes have been examined and the stored beam lifetime optimised. The magnet is fully operational and is producing intense x-ray beams for users

  6. Initial experiment of focusing wiggler of MM wave Free Electron Laser on LAX-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Keishi; Maebara, Sunao; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nagashima, Takashi; Maeda, Hikosuke; Shiho, Makoto; Oda, Hisako; Kawasaki, Sunao.

    1991-03-01

    Initial results of Free Electron laser (FEL) Experiment in the mm wave region are presented. The experiment is carried out using a induction linac system (LAX-1: Large current Accelerator Experiment) of E b = 1 MeV, Ib = 1 ∼ 3 kA. The wiggler of FEL is composed of the curved surface magnets arrays (focusing wiggler), which is found to be effective for a transport of low energy and high current beam through the wiggler. The superradiance of the mm wave region (30 GHz ∼ 40 GHz) is observed. The growth rate of this radiation is 0.42 dB/cm. (author)

  7. New system for wiggler fabrication and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.W.; Elliott, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    A system approach is taken for fabrication and testing of wigglers for free-electron lasers. Emphasis is placed on convenient, practical, assembly procedures that produce wigglers with high fields, two-plane focusing, and facilities for in-place adjustments. Equal emphasis is placed on rapid and precise techniques for measuring field errors, both before final assembly and afterward, during wiggler operation. (author). 10 refs, 12 figs

  8. Design of the 1.8 Tesla wiggler for the DAΦNE Main Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanelli, C.; Hsieh, H.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic and mechanical design of the eight wiggler magnets for DAΦNE Main Rings is described. The wigglers have a large 1.8 Tesla flat top magnetic field, 64 cm period and 4 cm gap. The magnetic 3-D calculations, the electromagnetic design and the adopted mechanical solutions, with particular attention to the vacuum chamber problems are described. A full scale prototype (5 full poles and two half pole) will be constructed in order to verify the accuracy of magnetic calculations, the end pole design and the multipole content. (author) 4 figs.; 1 tab

  9. First operation of a wiggler-focused, sheet beam free electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destler, W.W.; Cheng, S.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1994-01-01

    A wiggler-focused, sheet beam free electron laser (FEL) amplifier utilizing a short-period wiggler magnet has been proposed as a millimeter-wave source for current profile modification and/or electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas. As proposed, such an amplifier would operate at a frequency of approximately 100--200 GHz with an output power of 1--10 MW CW. Electron beam energy would be in the range 500--1000 keV. To test important aspects of this concept, an initial sheet beam FEL amplifier experiment has been performed using a 1 mmx2 cm sheet beam produced by a pulse line accelerator with a pulse duration of 100 ns. The 500--570 keV, 4--18 A sheet beam is propagated through a 56 period uniform wiggler (λ w =9.6 mm) with a peak wiggler amplitude of 2--5 kG. Linear amplification of a 5--10 W, 94 GHz signal injected in the TE 01 rectangular mode is observed. All features of the amplified signal, including pulse shape and duration, are in accordance with the predictions of numerical simulation. Amplified signal gain has been measured as a function of injected beam energy, current, and wiggler field amplitude and is also in good agreement with simulation results. Continuation of this experiment will involve studying nonlinear amplifier operation and adding a section of tapered wiggler

  10. Design of a 6 Tesla wiggler for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, H.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1981-01-01

    A 6-pole, 6 Tesla wiggler with Nb-Ti superconducting windings has been designed, to be installed in a straight section of the 2.5 GeV x-ray storage ring of the NSLS. The technical problems of this magnet are discussed, in particular the optimization of the two-layer magnetic windings and the mechanical structure designed to counteract the strong magnetic forces. The effects of the insertion of the wiggler in the storage ring lattice are also studied

  11. Particle motion in the ELF wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1982-06-01

    Particle motion in the ELF wiggler was investigated numerically and analytically. A transport system was designed using continuous quadrupole focusing in the wiggle plane and natural wiggle focusing in the non-wiggle plane

  12. Single wavelength standard wiggler for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunk, W.; Fischer, G.; Spencer, J.

    1979-03-01

    A 1lambda planar wiggler has been designed that will be used for the initial operation of the 4 to 18 GeV storage ring PEP. Three of these wigglers will be installed symmetrically around the ring at 120 0 intervals in three of six available 5 m straight sections with the purpose of providing: (1) beam size control to obtain better luminosities below 15 GeV, and (2) decreased damping times to obtain better injection rates at lower energies. Design goals are discussed and a description of the final system including cost estimates is given. Expected results and usage in PEP are discussed. Some possibilities for production of synchrotron radiation and beam monitoring with shorter wavelength, multiple-period wigglers at PEP energies are also discussed. Comparison to a wiggler now operating in SPEAR is given

  13. Design of a superconducting wiggler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, S.S.; Miller, J.R.; Heim, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    We present a wiggler system based on currently available superconducting technology. The system is designed to provide maximum central field of 4.4 tesla with a specified period length of 160 mm and a gap of 40 mm, while meeting the field quality requirements along all axes. Also included are preliminary cost estimates and a survey of world-wide RandD efforts on superconducting wiggler systems. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-12-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. In the geometrical optics limit computations can be performed analytically. Within this limit, we restrict ourselves to the case of the beam size-dominated regime, which is typical for synchrotron radiation facilities in the X-ray wavelength range. We give a direct demonstration of the fact that the apparent horizontal source size is broadened in proportion to the beamline opening angle and to the length of the wiggler. While this effect is well-understood, a direct proof appears not to have been given elsewhere. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in literature.

  15. Chicane and wiggler based bunch compressors for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Emma, P.; Kheifets, S.

    1993-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss bunch compressors for future linear colliders. In the past, the bunch compression optics has been based upon achromatic cells using strong sextupoles to correct the dispersive and betatron chromaticity. To preserve the very small emittances required in most future collider designs, these schemes tend to have very tight alignment tolerances. Here, we describe bunch compressors based upon magnetic chicanes or wigglers which do need sextupoles to correct the chromatic emittance dilution. The dispersive chromaticity cancels naturally and the betatron chromaticity is not a significant source of emittance dilution. Thus, these schemes allow for substantially reduced alignment tolerances. Finally, we present a detailed design for the NLC linear collider

  16. The Beam Line X NdFe-steel hybrid wiggler for SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Halbach, K.; Humphries, D.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kulkarni, S.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    A wiggler magnet with 15 periods, each 12.85 cm long, which achieves 1.40 T at a 2.1 cm gap (2.26T at 0.8 cm) has been designed and is now in fabrication at LBL. This wiggler will be the radiation source of the high intensity synchrotron radiation beam line for the Beam Line X PRT facility at SSRL. The magnet utilizes Neodymium-Iron (NdFe) material and Vanadium Permendur (steel) in the hybrid configuration to achieve simultaneously a high magnetic field and short period. Magnetic field adjustment is with a driven chain and ball screw drive system. The magnetic structure is external to an s.s. vacuum chamber which has thin walls, 0.76 mm thickness, at each pole tip for higher field operation. Magnetic design, construction details and magnetic measurements are presented

  17. Wigglers and single-particle dynamics in the NLC damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Marco; Wolski, Andrzej; Dragt, Alex

    2003-01-01

    Wiggler insertions are expected to occupy a significant portion of the lattice of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Main Damping Rings (MDR) and have a noticeable impact on the single-particle beam dynamics. Starting from a realistic 3D representation of the magnetic fields we calculate the transfer maps for the wigglers, accounting for linear and nonlinear effects, and we study the beam dynamics with particular attention paid to the Dynamic Aperture(DA). A DA reduction is observed but appears to remain within acceptable limits

  18. A long electromagnetic wiggler for the paladin free-electron laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Harvey, A.R.; Parkison, C.D.; Prosnitz, D.; Rego, J.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a 25.6-m-long wiggler for a free-electron-laser (FEL) experiment. It is a DC iron-core electromagnetic wiggler that incorporates a number of important and unique features. Permanent magnets are used to suppress saturation in the iron and extend the linear operating range. Steering-free excitation allows real-time adjustment of the field taper without causing beam steering. Wiggle-plane focusing is produced by curved pole tips. The magnitude of random pole-to-pole field errors is minimized by a mechanical design concept that reduces tolerance stackup in critical locations. To date, we have tested 15 m of this wiggler, and our measurements have shown exceptionally low levels of random errors. 8 refs

  19. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blednykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ_{r}. In the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ_{r}→∞, and the case in which the magnets are fully saturated (μ_{r}=1.

  20. Field distribution in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Chang Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The field distribution in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler corresponds to the special solution of a Laplace equation in a cylindrical coordinate system with a boundary value problem of sinusoidal ripples. This paper is devoted to the physical and mathematical treatment for an analytical solution of the field distribution in the coaxial electrostatic wiggler. The explicit expression of the solution indicates that the field distribution in the coaxial electrostatic wiggler varies according to a periodic function in the longitudinal direction, and is related to the first and second kinds of modified Bessel functions in the radial direction, respectively. Comparison shows excellent agreement between the analytical formula and the computer simulation technology (CST results. The physical application of the considered system and its analytical solution are discussed.

  1. Installation of a second superconducting wiggler at SAGA-LS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, T., E-mail: kaneyasu@saga-ls.jp; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu 841-0005 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    The SAGA Light Source is a synchrotron radiation facility consisting of a 255 MeV injector linac and a 1.4 GeV storage ring with a circumference of 75.6 m. A superconducting wiggler (SCW) with a peak magnetic field of 4 T has been routinely operating for generating hard X-rays since its installation in 2010. In light of this success, it was decided to install a second SCW as a part of the beamline construction by Sumitomo Electric Industries. To achieve this, machine modifications including installation of a new magnet power supply, improvement of the magnet control system, and replacement of the vacuum chambers in the storage ring were carried out. Along with beamline construction, installation and commissioning of the second SCW are scheduled to take place in 2015.

  2. Conceptual Design of ILC Damping Ring Wiggler Straight Vacuum System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.; Kennedy, K.; Plate, D.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zisman, M.

    2007-01-01

    The positron and electron damping rings for the International Linear Collider will contain long straight sections consisting of twenty wiggler/quadrupole pairs. The wigglers will be based upon the CESR superconducting design. There are a number of challenges associated with the design of the wiggler straight vacuum system, in particular, the absorption of photon power generated by the wigglers. This paper will present the overall conceptual design of the wiggler straight vacuum system developed for the ILC Reference Design Report. Particular emphasis will be placed on photon power load calculations and the absorber design

  3. Harmonic generation with multiple wiggler schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo, L.; Pierini, P. [Universita degli Studi, Milano (Italy)

    1995-02-01

    In this paper the authors give a simple theoretical description of the basic physics of the single pass high gain free electron laser (FEL), describing in some detail the FEL bunching properties and the harmonic generation technique with a multiple-wiggler scheme or a high gain optical klystron configuration.

  4. Conceptual design of a three-pole wiggler for the APS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abliz, M., E-mail: mabliz@aps.anl.gov; Grimmer, J., E-mail: grimmer@aps.anl.gov; Dejus, R.; Ramanathan, M., E-mail: mohan@aps.anl.gov [The Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The current design of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) project is a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice, which incorporates three-pole wigglers as radiation sources for the bending magnet beamlines. They are located in the short section between the M4 dipole and Q8 quadrupole magnets. Due to space constraints, a hybrid permanent magnet design is necessary to provide the required magnetic field strength. A three-pole wiggler with a flat peak field profile along the beam axis was designed to enhance the photon flux and flatten the transverse flux density distributions. The magnetic peak field at the center pole reached 1.08 Tesla for a magnetic gap of 26 mm. The maximum power density, integrated over all vertical angles, is 3.1 W/mm{sup 2}, which is substantially higher than that of the existing bending magnets at the APS (0.86 W/mm{sup 2}). Detailed designs of the three-pole wiggler is presented, including calculated spectral-angular flux distributions.

  5. Decreasing the emittance using a multi-period Robinson wigglers in TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huamg, C. W., E-mail: huang.zw@nsrrc.org.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Hwang, C. S., E-mail: cshwang@nsrrc.org.tw [NSRRC, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, S. Y., E-mail: shylee@indiana.edu [Department of Physics, Indiana University (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) has been successfully commissioned. However, the minimum emittance in the TPS lattice is 1.6 nm rad. In the existing TPS storage ring lattice, it is imperative to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm rad. Therefore, a feasibility study for reducing the effective emittance of the TPS storage ring by using a Robinson wiggler was launched; the reduction is necessary to enhance the photon brilliance. In this study, a permanent-magnet multiperiod Robinson wiggler (MRW) was developed for use instead of the single-period Robinson wiggler. In general, the quadruple field of a combined function magnet in the storage ring is approximately few tesla per meter. According to beam dynamic analysis, we found that it is necessary to adopt a high gradient (40 T/m) combined-function MRW magnet to reduce the emittance effectively. Therefore, a high gradient field strength is required in the combined function MRW magnet. In this study, the quadrupole field strength of the MRW magnet was allowed to be approximately 40 T/m at a magnet gap of 20 mm. The period length of the MRW magnet was 300 mm and the period number was 16. The of MRWs is discussed in regard to the possibility of increasing the photon brilliance from IU22.

  6. Electron-cyclotron maser utilizing free-electron two-quantum magnetic-wiggler radiation, and explanation of effective laser injection in an electron cyclotron maser as lift-up of saturated power level arisen from uncertainty in electron energy due to electron's transverse wiggling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    We reason that in the free-electron radiation if the transition rate τ is less than the radiation frequency ν, the radiation is of broad-band spectrum whereas if τ ≫ ν, the radiation is of monochromatic. We find that when a weaker magnetic wiggler (MW) is superpositioned on a predominantly strong uniform magnetic field, free-electron two-quantum magnetic-wiggler (FETQMW) radiation takes place. In FETQMW radiation, the MW and the electron's intrinsic motivity to change its internal configuration through radiation play as two first-order perturbers while the uniform magnetic field acts as the sole zeroth-order perturber. When Δ E≪ hν, where Δ E is the uncertainty in the electron energy produced by transverse wiggling due to the MW in conjuction with a Heisenberg's uncertainty principle Δ EΔ x h and E = ( m 2 c 4 + c 2 p 2)1/2, the power of FETQMW radiation cannot exceed hν 2. However, we find that this power cap is lifted by the amount of νΔ E when Δ E ≫ hν holds [1,2]. This lift-up of the saturated radiation power is the responsible mechanism for the effective external injection of a 20 kW maser in an electron-cyclotron maser (ECM). We find that an MW-added ECM with radius 5 cm and length 1 m and operating parameters of the present beam technology can yield laser power of 50 MW at the radiation wavelength of 0.001 cm.

  7. Impact of the Wiggler Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Impedance on the Beam Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Juhao

    2003-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) can play an important role by not only increasing the energy spread and emittance of a beam, but also leading to a potential instability. Previous studies of the CSR induced longitudinal instability were carried out for the CSR impedance due to dipole magnets. However, many storage rings include long wigglers where a large fraction of the synchrotron radiation is emitted. This includes high-luminosity factories such as DAPHNE, PEP-II, KEK-B, and CESR-C as well as the damping rings of future linear colliders. In this paper, the instability due to the CSR impedance from a wiggler is studied assuming a large wiggler parameter K. The primary consideration is a low frequency microwave-like instability, which arises near the pipe cut-off frequency. Detailed results are presented on the growth rate and threshold for the damping rings of several linear collider designs. Finally, the optimization of the relative fraction of damping due to the wiggler systems is discussed for the damping rings

  8. An Influence of 7.5 T Superconducting Wiggler on Beam Parameters of Siberia-2 Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, Vladimir; Valentinov, Alexander; Mezentsev, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    At present the dedicated synchrotron radiation source Siberia-2 in Kurchatov Institute operates with electron energy 2.5 GeV and current up to 200 mA. In order to expand spectral range of SR and to increase brightness an installation of 7.5 T 19-pole superconducting wiggler is planned at the end of 2006. Now the wiggler is under fabrication in BINP, Novosibirsk. Such high level of a magnetic field in the wiggler will have a great influence on electron beam parameters of Siberia-2. Changes of these parameters (betatron tunes, horizontal emittance of the electron beam, momentum compaction, energy spread etc.) are discussed in the report. Different methods of compensation (global and local) of betatron functions distortion are presented. Much attention is paid to dynamic aperture calculations using analytical approximation of magnetic field behavior in transverse horizontal direction

  9. Electron dynamics with radiation and nonlinear wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowett, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    The physics of electron motion in storage rings is described by supplementing the Hamiltonian equations of motion with fluctuating radiation reaction forces to describe the effects of synchrotron radiation. This leads to a description of radiation damping and quantum diffusion in single-particle phase-space by means of Fokker-Planck equations. For practical purposes, most storage rings remain in the regime of linear damping and diffusion; this is discussed in some detail with examples, concentrating on longitudinal phase space. However special devices such as nonlinear wigglers may permit the new generation of very large rings to go beyond this into regimes of nonlinear damping. It is shown how a special combined-function wiggler can be used to modify the energy distribution and current profile of electron bunches

  10. Wiggler as spin rotators for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.; Conte, M.

    1993-01-01

    The spin of a polarized particle in a circular accelerator can be rotated with an arrangement of dipoles with field mutually perpendicular and perpendicular to the orbit. To achieve spin rotation, a given field integral value is required. The device must be designed in a way that the particle orbit is distorted as little as possible. It is shown that wigglers with many periods are suitable to achieve spin rotation with minimum orbit distortions. Wigglers are also more compact than more established structures and will use less electric power. Additional advantages include their use for non distructive beam diagnostics. Results are given for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the polarized proton mode

  11. Modeling a horizontal wiggler in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.H.

    1979-02-01

    The effects of a wiggler on the beam parameters depend on several integrals involving the machine functions and the field distribution in the wiggler. It is shown that these integrals are separable into sums of products of terms containing only the initial values of the machine functions, and terms containing integrals over the wiggler fields. The field-dependent integrals may be determined by numerical integrations based on measured field distribution. In typical wiggler designs, the energy and excitation dependencies of the integrals may be modeled mathematically by simple power series

  12. Dispersion relation and growth rate of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a Langmuir wave wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, H.; Jafari, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a theory of free-electron laser (FEL) with a Langmuir wave wiggler in the presence of an axial magnetic field has been presented. The small wavelength of the plasma wave (in the sub-mm range) allows obtaining higher frequency than conventional wiggler FELs. Electron trajectories have been obtained by solving the equations of motion for a single electron. In addition, a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method has been used to simulate the electron trajectories. Employing a perturbation analysis, the dispersion relation for an electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been derived by solving the momentum transfer, continuity, and wave equations. Numerical calculations show that the growth rate increases with increasing the e-beam energy and e-beam density, while it decreases with increasing the strength of the axial guide magnetic field.

  13. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  14. Competition of electron-cyclotron maser and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam with a finite transverse dc momentum (β/sub perpendicular/ = 1/γ 0 ) passing through a region of combined uniform solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler magnetic fields is observed to convert 25% of its kinetic energy into coherent radiation at frequency ω = γ 2 0 (k/sub w/V 0 +Ω/sub c//γ 0 ) if the phase velocity of the generated wave is slightly above the speed of light. In this situation, the bunchings of the slow electron-cyclotron mode and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (lowbitron) are observed to compensate each other, which gives rise to a finite threshold for lowbitron operation. In order to attain high efficiency, the wiggler strength of a lowbitron must substantially exceed the threshold

  15. Investigation of the nonlinear effects of Wiggler and undulator fields on the beam dynamics of particle storage rings in the case of DORIS III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decking, W.

    1995-11-01

    In this thesis I analyze the effects of wiggler and undulator magnetic fields on the beam dynamics of electron/positron storage rings. DORIS III, DESY's synchrotron radiation source is taken as an example. Wigglers and undulators are used for the production of synchrotron radiation or to control beam sizes in storage rings. Their introduction in the lattices of storage rings causes some problems due to the strong nonlinearities of the magnetic fields. Therefore a detailed analysis of the particle dynamics under the influence of wiggler magnetic fields and their field errors is necessary. This thesis provides such an analysis. The problem will be attacked analytically, numerically and experimentally. The analytic approach is based on the treatment of the appropriate Hamiltonian with perturbation theory. The magnetic fields are described with a Fourier series, which covers the main characteristics of wiggler and undulator fields. The main effect of wigglers and undulators is the excitation of fourth order synchro-betatron resonances. The description of field errors and other details of the magnetic fields is achieved by integrating over appropriately distributed current sheets. This allows the modeling of different parameters such as magnet pole width, periodicity errors and errors in the field gradients. (orig./WL)ons of motion in the fields calculated with this method can only be integrated numerically. This would be much too slow to be used in particle tracking codes. Therefore a transfer map b

  16. S.C. correction coils and magnets for the HERA proton ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, C.; Geerinck, J.; Schmueser, P.

    1986-05-01

    The quadrupole and sextupole correction coils of the HERA proton ring are mounted on the cold beam pipe inside the main dipole magnets. Superferric dipole magnets for orbit correction are located adjacent to the main quadrupole magnets in a common cryostat which also contains the beam monitor. The design, manufacture and performance of both types of correction elements are described. (orig.)

  17. Effects of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1986-08-01

    Synchrotron light facilities are making ever increasing use of wigglers and undulators, to the extent that these devices are becoming a significant part of the beam optical system of the storage ring itself. This paper presents a theoretical formulation for investigating the effect of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics in the approximation that the wiggler parameter, K, divided by γ is a small number and that the number of wiggler periods in one device is large. In addition to the linear forces which must be taken into account when tuning and matching the ring, nonlinear stop bends are created, with even orders more serious than odd orders. Some numerical examples are given for devices similar to those proposed for the 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  18. Nonlinear analysis of wiggler-imperfections in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, H.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Yu, L.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We present an analysis of the effect of wiggler imperfections in FELs using a variety of techniques. Our basic intention is to compare wiggler averaged nonlinear simulations to determine the effect of various approximations on the estimates of gain degradation due to wiggler imperfections. The fundamental assumption in the wiggler-averaged formulations is that the electrons are described by a random walk model, and an analytic representation of the orbits is made. This is fundamentally different from the approach taken for the non-wiggler-averaged formulation in which the wiggler imperfections are specified at the outset, and the orbits are integrated using a field model that is consistent with the Maxwell equations. It has been conjectured on the basis of prior studies using the non-wiggler-averaged formalism that electrons follow a {open_quotes}meander line{close_quotes} through the wiggler governed by the specific imperfections; hence, the electrons behave more as a ball-in-groove than as a random walk. This conjecture is tested by comparison of the wiggler-averaged and non-wiggler-averaged simulations. In addition, two different wiggler models are employed in the non-wiggler-averaged simulation: one based upon a parabolic pole face wiggler which is not curl and divergence free in the presence of wiggler imperfections, and a second model in which the divergence and z-component of the curl vanish identically. This will gauge the effect of inconsistencies in the wiggler model on the estimation of the effect of the imperfections. Preliminary results indicate that the inconsistency introduced by the non-vanishing curl and divergence result in an overestimation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on the orbit. The wiggler-averaged simulation is based upon the TDA code, and the non-wiggler-averaged simulation is a variant of the ARACHNE and WIGGLIN codes called MEDUSA developed to treat short-wavelength Gauss-Hermite modes.

  19. Quantum SASE FEL with a Laser Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, R

    2005-01-01

    Quantum effects in high-gain FELs become relevant when ρ'=ρ(mcγ/ ћ k)<1. The quantum FEL parameter ρ' rules the maximum number of photons emitted per electrons. It has been shown that when ρ'<1 a "quantum purification" of the SASE regime occurs: in fact, the spectrum of the emitted radiation (randomly spiky in the usual classical SASE regime) shrinks to a very narrow single line, leading to a high degree of temporal coherence. From the definition of ρ it appears that in order to achieve the quantum regime, small values of ρ, beam energy and radiation wavelength are necessary. These requirements can be met only using a laser wiggler. In this work we state the scaling laws necessary to operate a SASE FEL in the Angstrom region. All physical quantities are expressed in terms of the normalized emittance and of two parameters: the ratio between laser and electron beam spot sizes and the ratio between Rayleigh range and electron ...

  20. γ -Ray Generation from Plasma Wakefield Resonant Wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bifeng; Wang, Jingwei; Kharin, Vasily; Zepf, Matt; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    A flexible gamma-ray radiation source based on the resonant laser-plasma wakefield wiggler is proposed. The wiggler is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of a short laser pulse in a plasma channel. Electrons (self-)injected in such a wakefield experience both oscillations due to the transverse electric fields and energy gain due to the longitudinal electric field. The oscillations are significantly enhanced when the laser pulse centroid oscillations are in resonance with the electron betatron oscillations, extending the radiation spectrum to the gamma-ray range. The polarization of the radiation can be easily controlled by adjusting the injection of the laser pulse into the plasma channel.

  1. Power excitation by the use of a rf wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    It is well-known that there are difficulties to obtain rf power sources of significant amount for frequencies larger than 3 GHz. Yet, rf sources in the centimeter/millimeter wavelength range would be very useful to drive, for example, high-gradient accelerating linacs for electron-positron linear colliders. We would like to propose an alternative method to produce such radiation. It makes use of a short electron bunch traveling along the axis of a waveguide which is at the same time excited by a TM propagating electromagnetic wave. It is well known that radiation can be obtained by wiggling the motion of the electrons in a direction perpendicular to the main one. The wiggling action can be included by electromagnetic fields in a fashion similar to the one caused by wiggler magnets. We found that an interesting mode of operation is to drive the waveguide with an excitation frequency very close to the cut off. For such excitation, the corresponding e.m. wave travels with a very large phase velocity which in turn has the effect to increase the wiggling action on the electron bunch. Our method, to be effective, relies also on the coherence of the radiation; that is the bunch length is taken to be considerably shorter than the radiated wavelength. In this case, the total power radiated should be proportional to the square of the total number of electrons in the bunch. The paper concludes with possible modes of operation, a list of performance parameters and a proposed experimental set-up

  2. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field

  3. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    CERN Document Server

    Ohigashi, N; Kiyochi, M; Nakao, N; Fujita, M; Imasaki, K; Nakai, S; Mima, K

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  4. Spiking mode operation for a uniform-period wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of saturation in a uniform-period wiggler has been examined experimentally and through numerical simulations. Models have been constructed that explain the observations in simple and consistent ways. The models are based upon the development of strong frequency and amplitude modulation of the optical wave as a way to increase extraction efficiency and optical power

  5. Modeling the effects of a flat wiggler on a storage ring beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.H.

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of the present note is to show how the various effects of the wiggler may be modeled in a simple way suitable for use in machine control. It will be seen that in general a total of about 17 functions are involved. However, in typical designs many of these functions vanish identically because of symmetries, and others are neglibly small. Furthermore, each of the functions may be modeled quite accurately by a single power law in (B/sub o//E)/sup n/ where B is a measure of the field excitation. E is the beam energy, and n is an integer which takes on values of either 0, 2, 3, 4, for 5 for the different functions. Magnet saturation may cause the field distribution to vary with excitation so that the series coefficients would vary slowly with B/sub o/. A computer program has been used to obtain numerical results for typical wiggler designs. In practice, the required functions could be determined either by computer analysis of the measured field data, or by experimental calibration using the stored beam in the ring. 9 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Self-fields in free-electron lasers with planar wiggler and ion-channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farokhi, B; Jafary, F B; Maraghechi, B

    2006-01-01

    A theory of self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a one-dimensional planar wiggler and an ion-channel is presented. The equilibrium orbits and their stability, under the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields, are analysed. New unstable orbits, in the first part of the group I orbits, are found. It is shown that for a low energy and high density beam the self-fields can produce very large effects. Stabilities of quasi-steady-state orbits are investigated by analytical and numerical methods and perfect agreement was found. The theory of small signal gain is used to derive a formula for the gain with the self-field effects included. A numerical analysis is conducted to study the self-field effects on the quasi-steady-state orbits and the gain

  7. Formación de maclas durante el enfriamiento en aceros inoxidables superferríticos envejecidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salán, M. N.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Superferritic stainless steels show a BCC structure free of austenite at any temperature. Intermediate ageing temperatures, close to 475 °C, induce a-chromium content modulation and only after long periods of time, it is possible to detect chromium rich α' phase, which is responsible for embrittlement (475 °C embrittlement. In this work, ageing thermal treatments at intermediate temperatures in the superferritic stainless steel DIN 1.4575, have allowed to relate the associated hardness increase with time and temperature by means of a relationship that is compatible with a thermally activated process. After quenching from ageing temperature, twinning formation has been observed, and the extent of twinning is proportional to the increase in hardness, showing in this way that twinning density is proportional to embrittlement level.

    Los aceros inoxidables superferríticos se caracterizan por su estructura cúbica centrada, libre de austenita a cualquier temperatura. Sometidos a temperaturas intermedias, próximas a 475 °C, revelan una modulación del contenido en Cr de la red. Después de tiempos prolongados se forma fase α', fragilizante y rica en cromo, fenómeno conocido como fragilización a 475 °C. En este trabajo, los tratamientos de envejecimiento realizados a temperaturas intermedias para un superferrítico DIN 1.4575 han permitido relacionar el incremento de dureza asociado a éstos con el tiempo de tratamiento, mediante una expresión coherente con un proceso térmicamente activado. Por otra parte, se ha detectado la presencia de maclas en el acero envejecido y templado en agua, siendo proporcional su densidad al grado de endurecimiento provocado por el tratamiento.

  8. Pulse propagation in tapered wiggler free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Colson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The one-dimensional theory of short pulse propagation in free electron lasers is extended to tapered wiggler devices and is used to study the behavior of an oscillator with parameter values close to those expected in forthcoming experiments. It is found that stable laser output is possible only over a small range of optical cavity lengths. Optical pulse characteristcs are presented and are found to change considerably over this range

  9. Pierce-Wiggler electron beam system for 250 GHz GYRO-BWO: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirkle, D.R.; Alford, C.W.; Anderson, M.H.; Garcia, R.F.; Legarra, J.R.; Nordquist, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    This final report summarizes the design and performance of the VUW-8028 Pierce-Wiggler electron beam systems, which can be used to power high frequency gyro-BWO's. The operator's manual for this gyro-BWO beamstick is included as appendix A. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing a gyro-BWO with a center frequency of 250 GHz, 6% bandwidth, and 10 kV peak output power. The gyro-BWO will be used to drive a free electron laser amplifier at LLNL. The electron beam requirements of the gyro-BWO application are: Small beam size, .100 inch at 2500 gauss axial magnetic field; a large fraction of the electron energy in rotational velocity; ability to vary the electrons' axial velocity easily, for electronic tuning; and low velocity spread i.e. little variation in the axial velocities of the electrons in the interaction region. 1 ref., 13 figs

  10. Design Concept of Superconducting Multipole Wiggler with Variably Polarized X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.S.; Chang, C.H.; Li, W.P.; Lin, F.Y.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the growing demand for X-ray research, and to satisfy future needs for generating circularly polarized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray region, a 3.5 T superconducting multipole with a periodic length of 6 cm was designed to produce horizontal linearly polarized, and circularly polarized light on a 1.5 GeV electron storage ring. Differently arranged excitation current loop for the same coil design switched between the operation of symmetric and asymmetric modes to creat the linearly and circularly polarized light, respectively. This study elucidates the design concepts of the superconducting multipole wiggler with symmetric and asymmetric operation modes. The design of the magnetic circuit and the field calculation are also discussed. Meanwhile, the spectra characteristics of the symmetric and asymmetric modes are calculated and presented in this article

  11. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron laser for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (Intense Microwave, Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT), and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA, 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. The authors summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations

  12. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron-laser for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1992-05-01

    We have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (intense Microwave Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT). and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA. 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. We summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations

  13. Second crystal cooling on cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Simple methods for the cooling of the second crystals of cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators are described. Copper braids between the first and second crystals are used to cool the second crystals of the double crystal monochromators. The method has proved successful for an undulator monochromator and we describe a design for a wiggler monochromator

  14. Dynamic apeerture in damping rings with realistic wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2005-05-04

    The International Linear Collider based on superconducting RF cavities requires the damping rings to have extremely small equilibrium emittance, huge circumference, fast damping time, and large acceptance. To achieve all of these requirements is a very challenging task. In this paper, we will present a systematic approach to designing the damping rings using simple cells and non-interlaced sextupoles. The designs of the damping rings with various circumferences and shapes, including dogbone, are presented. To model realistic wigglers, we have developed a new hybrid symplectic integrator for faster and accurate evaluation of dynamic aperture of the lattices.

  15. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  16. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  17. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toral, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques

  18. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, Fernando

    2014-07-17

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  19. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toral, F [Madrid, CIEMAT (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  20. A novel small-period wiggler for free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Bibo; Wang Mingchang; Wang Zhijiang

    1992-01-01

    A novel small-period wiggler configuration constructed by sheet of bifilar-helix with ferro-core for free-electron lasers is proposed. The performance characteristics of the wiggler prototype with 10 mm period are measured. The field as high as 500 G to 1 kG have been obtained. The amplifier designs for operation at 190 GHz using modest electron beam energies in the range of 400-500 keV are presented

  1. The first steps towards a 7.5 T superconducting wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werin, S.

    1988-01-01

    A 7.5 T superconducting wiggler is currently beeing constructed in cooperation between MAX-lab and the Institute of Technology in Tammerfors, Finland. The wiggler will be places at MAX-lab, either at the existing 550 MeV storage ring or at a future 1.2 GeV ring. In this paper some basic designs and calculations are described and discussed. (author)

  2. Design of a High-Throughput Biological Crystallography Beamline for Superconducting Wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, P.C.; Chang, C.H.; Fung, H.S.; Ma, C.I.; Huang, L.J.; Jean, Y.C.; Song, Y.F.; Huang, Y.S.; Tsang, K.L.; Chen, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    We are constructing a high-throughput biological crystallography beamline BL13B, which utilizes the radiation generated from a 3.2 Tesla, 32-pole superconducting multipole wiggler, for multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD), single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD), and other related experiments. This beamline is a standard double crystal monochromator (DCM) x-ray beamline equipped with a collimating mirror (CM) and a focusing mirror (FM). Both the CM and FM are one meter long and made of Si substrate, and the CM is side-cooled by water. Based on detailed thermal analysis, liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling for both crystals of the DCM has been adopted to optimize the energy resolution and photon beam throughput. This beamline will deliver, through a 100 μm diameter pinhole, photon flux of greater than 1011 photons/sec in the energy range from 6.5 keV to 19 keV, which is comparable to existing protein crystallography beamlines from bending magnet source at high energy storage rings

  3. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  4. Near-ideal lasing with a uniform wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, R.W.; Sollid, J.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Stein, W.E.; Johnson, W.J.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos FEL team has reduced or eliminated many of the experimental problems that resulted in non-ideal lasing. The major problems were accelerator instabilities that cause noise and fluctuations in current, energy, and timing; wakefield effects in the wiggler and beamline that introduce fluctuations in the beam's energy; and mirror nonlinearities caused by free carriers produced in the mirror by the high light levels, which caused extra light losses and interfered with the diagnostics. Lasing is not thought to be ideal in that it lacks major disturbing effects and is limited only by emittance, energy spread, and peak current. In this paper we describe the features of lasing that we have observed over a range of optical power of 1000, from the onset of lasing, to the threshold of the sideband instability, to the organization of regular optical spikes, to the region of chaotic spikes. Cavity-length detuning is presented as an ideal technique, in most circumstances, to completely suppress sidebands. With detuning one can easily switch operating modes from that giving the highest efficiency (chaotic spiking) to that giving the narrowest spectral line (no sidebands). Alternative techniques for sideband suppression normally use some kind of wavelength selective device (e.g., a grating) inserted in the cavity. With detuning, there is no need for such a device, and, therefore, no conflict between the wavelength control exerted by this extra optical component and that exerted by the energy of the electron beam. Lasing, therefore, starts easily, a shift in wavelength, i.e., chirp, is easily accomplished, and the consequences of inadequate control of the electron beam energy are not severe. 35 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Making an Inexpensive Electromagnetic Wiggler Using Sheet Materials for the Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Herman-Biallas, George; Hiatt, Thomas; Neil, George; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An inexpensive electromagnetic wiggler, made with twenty-eight, 4 cm periods with a K of 1 and gap of 2.6 cm was made within 10 weeks after receipt of order by an industrial machine shop. The coil design used sheet and plate materials cut to shapes using water jet cutting and was assembled in a simple stack design. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The coils are conduction cooled to imbedded cooling plates. The wiggler features graded end pole fields, trim coil compensation for end field errors and mirror plates on the ends to avoid three dimensional end field effects. Details of the methods used in construction and the wiggler performance are presented.

  6. Control System of the Superconducting 63-Pole 2-Tesla Wiggler for Canadian Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuper, E.A.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Miginsky, E.G.; Repkov, V.V.; Tsukanov, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    A control system of the superconducting 63-pole wiggler fabricated at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk (BINP) for Synchrotron Radiation Center in Canada (CLS) is described. Specific electronics and software which provide continuos monitoring of all the superconducting wiggler parameters as well as full control and monitoring of power suppliers and cryogenics machines, have been designed. The control system is VME-based. A client/server architecture of the software allowed us to integrate easily this system into the CLS distributed control system

  7. High-power free-electron laser amplifier using a scalloped electron beam and a two-stage wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Nguyen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High-power free-electron laser (FEL amplifiers present many practical design and construction problems. One such problem is possible damage to any optical beam control elements beyond the wiggler. The ability to increase the optical beam’s divergence angle after the wiggler, thereby reducing the intensity on the first optical element, is important to minimize such damage. One proposal to accomplish this optical beam spreading is to pinch the electron beam thereby focusing the radiation as well. In this paper, we analyze an approach that relies on the natural betatron motion to pinch the electron beam near the end of the wiggler. We also consider a step-tapered, two-stage wiggler to enhance the efficiency. The combination of a pinched electron beam and step-taper wiggler leads to additional optical guiding of the optical beam. This novel configuration is studied in simulation using the MEDUSA code. For a representative set of beam and wiggler parameters, we discuss (i the effect of the scalloped beam on the interaction in the FEL and on the focusing and propagation of the radiation, and (ii the efficiency enhancement in the two-stage wiggler.

  8. Magnetic chicane for terahertz management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George Herman; Douglas, David; Jordan, Kevin Carl; Neil, George R.; Michelle D. Shinn; Willams, Gwyn P.

    2010-12-28

    The introduction of a magnetic electron beam orbit chicane between the wiggler and the downstream initial bending dipole in an energy recovering Linac alleviates the effects of radiation propagated from the downstream bending dipole that tend to distort the proximate downstream mirror of the optical cavity resonator.

  9. Simulations of the effects of a superconducting damping wiggler on a short bunched electron beam at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gethmann, Julian; Bernhard, Axel; Blomley, Edmund; Hillenbrand, Steffen; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Smale, Nigel [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Zolotarev, Konstantin [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    (As a part of the CLIC collaboration) A CLIC damping wiggler prototype has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source in order to validate the technical design of the 3 T superconducting conduction cooled wiggler and its cryostat and to cary out studies on beam dynamical aspects including collective effects. The latter one will be the main focus in this talk. Collective effects that will occur in damping rings are an issue in ANKA's short bunch operation as well. To simulate these effects the accelerator's model including its insertion device has to be very accurate. Such a model of the ANKA storage ring in short bunch operation mode has been developed in elegant. Simulations with the damping wiggler switched on and off have been performed in order to investigate effects of the wiggler on different machine parameters. These new results will be discussed with regard to the question if on the one hand the wiggler could be used for diagnostic purposes and if on the other hand the wiggler's impact on the beam dynamics is changed by the collective effects.

  10. Particle-in-Cell Calculations of the Electron Cloud in the ILC Positron Damping Ring Wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Grote, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    The self-consistent code suite WARP-POSINST is being used to study electron cloud effects in the ILC positron damping ring wiggler. WARP is a parallelized, 3D particle-in-cell code which is fully self-consistent for all species. The POSINST models for the production of photoelectrons and secondary electrons are used to calculate electron creation. Mesh refinement and a moving reference frame for the calculation will be used to reduce the computer time needed by several orders of magnitude. We present preliminary results for cloud buildup showing 3D electron effects at the nulls of the vertical wiggler field. First results from a benchmark of WARP-POSINST vs. POSINST are also discussed

  11. Dispersion relation of Raman FEL with helical Wiggler and ion channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinalinezhad, M.; Bahmani, M.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Salehkoutahi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the theory of free electron laser with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding has been presented. The equations of motion for an electron have been analyzed. A formula for the dispersion relation is then derived in the low-gain-per-pass limit. The results of a numerical study of the growth rate enhancement due to the ion channel are presented and discussed.

  12. Investigation of betatron instability in a wiggler pumped ion-channel free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavi, A [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, 19395-4697 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H, E-mail: Raghavi@tmu.ac.ir, E-mail: Mehdian@tmu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Betatron emission from an ion-channel free electron laser in the presence of a helical wiggler pump and in the high gain regime is studied. The dispersion relation and the frequency of betatron emission are derived. Growth rate is illustrated and maximum growth rate as a function of ion-channel density is considered. Finally, the relation between beam energy, the density of ion channel and the region of betatron emission is discussed.

  13. X-ray lithography using wiggler and undulator synchrotron-radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neureuther, A.R.; Kim, K.J.; Thompson, A.C.; Hoyer, E.

    1983-08-01

    A systems design approach is used to identify feasible options for wiggler and undulator beam lines for x-ray lithography in the 0.5 to 0.2 μm linewidth region over 5 cm by 5 cm fields. Typical parameters from the Wiggler and Undulator in the Advanced Light Source designed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are used as examples. Moving from the conventional wavelengths of 4 to 9 A to very soft wavelengths around 15 A is shown to be very promising. The mask absorber thickness can be reduced a factor of three so that 0.2 μm features can be made with a 1:1 mask aspect ratio. The mask heating limited exposure time is also reduced a factor of three to 3 sec/cm 2 . However, extremely thin beam line windows (1/4 mil Be) and mask supports (1 μm Si) must be used. A wiggler beam line design using a small slit window at a scanning mirror appears feasible. A unconventional, windowless differentially pumped beam line with dual deflecting mirrors could be used with an undulator source

  14. Global beta-beating compensation of the ALS W16 wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, D.; Decking, W.; Nishimura, H.

    1997-05-01

    The W16 wiggler is the first wiggler and highest field insertion device to be installed in the ALS storage ring. When the gaps of the W16 wiggler are closed, the vertical tune increases by 0.065 and the vertical beta function is distorted by up to ±37%. There are 48 quadrupoles in the ring whose fields can be adjusted individually to restore the tunes and partially compensate the beta-beating. In order to adjust the quadrupole field strengths to accurately compensate the focusing, it is necessary to have a method to precisely determine the beta-beating. In this paper we compare measurements of the induced beta-beating using two methods: measuring the tune dependence on quadrupole field strength and fitting a lattice model with measured response matrices. The fitted model also allows us to predict quadrupole field strengths that will best compensate the beta beating. These quadrupole field strengths are then applied and the resultant beta-beating is measured

  15. Kinetic description of self-field effects on laser and betatron emission in wiggler-pumped ion-channel free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimohamadi, M; Mehdian, H; Hasanbeigi, A

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-fields on the free electron lasers (FELs) with a helical wiggler and ion-channel guiding are considered. The steady-state orbits for a single electron in this configuration are obtained. The rate of change of axial velocity with energy, the characteristic function Φ, is derived and studied numerically. A kinetic approach has been used to get the effects of self-field on the FEL and betatron gain formula in the low-gain-pre-pass limit. It is shown that betatron gain is smaller than FEL gain. We also found a gain decrement (enhancement), arising from diamagnetism (paramagnetism) generated by the self-magnetic field for group I (group II) orbits. It is interesting that the gain enhancement is found for the non-relativistic part of group II orbits. The FEL gain and betatron gain have also been investigated for different relativistic factors γ.

  16. CesrTA Retarding Field Analyzer Measurements in Drifts, Dipoles, Quadrupoles and Wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvey, J.R.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Meller, R.E.; Palmer, M.A.; Schwartz, R.M.; Strohman, C.R.; Harkay, K.; Calatroni, S.; Rumolo, G.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the course of the CesrTA program, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been instrumented with several retarding field analyzers (RFAs), which measure the local density and energy distribution of the electron cloud. These RFAs have been installed in drifts, dipoles, quadrupoles, and wigglers; and data have been taken in a variety of beam conditions and bunch configurations. This paper will provide an overview of these results, and give a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of cloud mitigation techniques implemented in the instrumented vacuum chambers.

  17. Kinetic description of a wiggler pumped ion-channel free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, H; Raghavi, A

    2006-01-01

    The wiggler pumped ion-channel free electron laser (WPIC-FEL) is treated and the classes of possible single-particle electron trajectories in this configuration are discussed in the paper. A new region of orbital stability is seen in the negative mass regime. A kinetic description of WPIC-FEL is given. Vlasov-Maxwell equations are solved to get the linear gain in a tenuous-beam limit, where the beam plasma frequency is much less than the radiation frequency and the self-field effects can be ignored

  18. Depth-of-field effects in wiggler radiation sources: Geometrical versus wave optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Walker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis is carried out of the optical properties of synchrotron radiation emitted by multipole wigglers, concentrating on the effective source size and brightness and the so-called “depth of field” effects, concerning which there has been some controversy in the literature. By comparing calculations made with both geometrical optics and wave optics methods we demonstrate that the two approaches are not at variance, and that the wave optics results tend towards those of geometrical optics under well-defined conditions.

  19. Measurements of a crenelated iron pole tip for the VLHC transmission line magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Di Marco, J; Kashikhin, V V; Makarov, A A; Schlabach, P; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is under conceptual design in Fermilab. One option under development is a 2-Tesla warm iron 2-in-1 single turn superferric magnet built around an 80 kA superconducting transmission line. A normal-conducting test stand was built to optimize the iron lamination shape for this magnet. It uses a water- cooled copper winding to provide the 100 kA-turns needed to generate 2 Tesla fields in both 20 mm air gaps of the magnet. A magnetic measurement facility has been set up for magnetic field mapping, which includes a flat measurement coil, precision stage for coil motion and integrator. Results from a first test of the "crenelation" technique to mitigate the saturation sextupole in iron magnets are described and future plans are discussed. (5 refs).

  20. Focusing peculiarities of ion-channel guiding on a relativistic electron beam in a free-electron laser with a three-dimensional wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Shi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In a free-electron laser the ‘natural focusing’ effect of a three-dimensional wiggler is too weak to confine the transport of a relativistic electron beam when the beam has a high current and consequently an external focusing system is often needed. In this paper we study the focusing peculiarities of an ion-channel guide field on an electron beam. Nonlinear simulations of an electron beam transport show that, compared to an axial guide magnetic field, the ion-channel guide field results in smaller velocity–space and configuration–space spreads. The intrinsic mechanism of this physical phenomenon is that the ion-channel guide field confines the trajectory of the electron motion resulting in a smaller instantaneous curvature radius and a slighter curvature-center excursion than an axial guide magnetic field does. It is also found that, unlike with an axial guide magnetic field, over-focusing may occur if the ion-channel guide field is too strong. (paper)

  1. Theory of nonlinear harmonic generation in free-electron lasers with helical wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-05-01

    CoherentHarmonicGeneration (CHG), and in particularNonlinearHarmonicGeneration (NHG), is of importance for both short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), in relation with the achievement of shorter wavelengths with a fixed electron-beam energy, and high-average power FEL resonators, in relation with destructive effects of higher harmonics radiation on mirrors. In this paper we present a treatment of NHG from helical wigglers with particular emphasis on the second harmonic. Our study is based on an exact analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, derived with the help of a Green's function method. In particular, we demonstrate that nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG) fromhelicalwigglers vanishes on axis. Our conclusion is in open contrast with results in literature, that include a kinematical mistake in the description of the electron motion. (orig.)

  2. Traveling waves in a free-electron laser with an electromagnetic wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olumi, Mohsen; Maraghechi, B; Rouhani, M H

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic traveling wave in a free-electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic wiggler is investigated using the relativistic fluid-Maxwell formulation. By adapting the traveling-wave ansatz, three coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations are obtained describing the nonlinear propagation of the coupled wave. These equations may be used to study saturation in FELs. By linearizing the nonlinear equations dispersion relations for the traveling wave are obtained. Numerical solution of the small-signal traveling dispersion relation reveals the coupling of radiation to both slow and fast space-charge waves. It is shown that the traveling wave, which is not a normal mode in a laboratory frame, becomes a normal mode in terms of a transformed variable.

  3. Virtual reality visualization of accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, M.; Papka, M.; DeFanti, T.; Kettunen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the use of the CAVE virtual reality visualization environment as an aid to the design of accelerator magnets. They have modeled an elliptical multipole wiggler magnet being designed for use at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The CAVE environment allows the authors to explore and interact with the 3-D visualization of the magnet. Capabilities include changing the number of periods the magnet displayed, changing the icons used for displaying the magnetic field, and changing the current in the electromagnet and observing the effect on the magnetic field and particle beam trajectory through the field

  4. Free electron laser with small period wiggler and sheet electron beam: A study of the feasibility of operation at 300 GHz with 1 MW CW output power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The use of a small period wiggler (/ell//sub ω/ 2 ). Based on these encouraging results, a proof-of-principle experiment is being assembled, and is aimed at demonstrating FEL operating at 120 GHz with 300 kW output power in 1 μs pulses: electron energy would be 410 keV. Preliminary design of a 300 GHz 1 MW FEL with an untapered wiggler is also presented. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Enhanced THz radiation generation by photo-mixing of tophat lasers in rippled density plasma with a planar magnetostatic wiggler and s-parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, M.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the effects of planar magnetostatic wiggler and s-parameter on the terahertz (THz) radiation generation through rippled plasma have been investigated. Efficient THz radiation generation by photo-mixing of tophat lasers for rippled density plasma in the presence of the wiggler field has been presented. Fundamental equations for the analysis of the non-linear current density and THz radiation generation by wiggler magnetostatic field have been derived. It is shown that for the higher order of the tophat lasers, the values of THz amplitude are greater. In fact, the higher order of the tophat lasers has a sharp gradient in the intensity of lasers, which leads to a stronger nonlinear ponderomotive force and, consequently, a stronger current density. In addition, it is seen that by increasing s-parameter, the normalized transverse profile becomes more focused near the axis of y. Furthermore, it is observed that the normalized laser efficiency has a decreasing trend with increasing normalized THz frequency for different values of the wiggler field. Also, it is shown that by employing a greater order of the tophat lasers and a stronger wiggler field, the efficiency of order of 30% can be achieved. Moreover, it is found that we can control focus and intensity of THz radiation emitted in rippled plasma by choosing the appropriate order of the tophat lasers and tuning of the wiggler field.

  6. Analytic Electron Trajectories in an Extremely Relativistic Helical Wiggler an Application to the Proposed SLAC E166 Experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    ThomasDonohue, John

    2004-01-01

    The proposed experiment SLAC E166 intends to generate circularly polarized gamma rays of energy 10 MeV by passing a 15 GeV electron beam through a meter long wiggler with approximately 400 periods. Using an analytic model formulated by Rullier and me, I present calculations of electron trajectories. At this extremely high energy the trajectories are described quite well by the model, and an extremely simple picture emerges, even for trajectories that that fail to encircle the axis of the wiggler. Our calculations are successfully compared with standard numerical integration of the Lorentz force equations of motion. In addition, the calculation of the spectrum and angular distribution of the radiated photons is easily carried out.

  7. A high-average power tapered FEL amplifier at submillimeter frequencies using sheet electron beams and short-period wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Booske, J.H.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Latham, P.E.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A high-average-power FEL amplifier operating at submillimeter frequencies is under development at the University of Maryland. Program goals are to produce a CW, ∼1 MW, FEL amplifier source at frequencies between 280 GHz and 560 GHz. To this end, a high-gain, high-efficiency, tapered FEL amplifier using a sheet electron beam and a short-period (superconducting) wiggler has been chosen. Development of this amplifier is progressing in three stages: (1) beam propagation through a long length (∼1 m) of short period (λ ω = 1 cm) wiggler, (2) demonstration of a proof-of-principle amplifier experiment at 98 GHz, and (3) designs of a superconducting tapered FEL amplifier meeting the ultimate design goal specifications. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Operation of a five-pole superconducting wiggler in the DCI positron ring and design of the beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, C.; Dubuisson, J.M.; Labeque, A.; Level, M.P.; Raoux, D.; Sommer, M.; Zyngier, H.; Chomillier, J.; Frouin, J.; Garreau, Y.; Loupias, G.; Tarbes, J.

    1989-01-01

    A five-pole superconducting wiggler has been installed in the DCI positron ring and operated without disturbing the machine characteristics at full energy (1.85 GeV) and maximum current (300 mA). Three beamlines have been built which feed six beam ports. The first two-crystal monochromator to be used for Compton scattering has been commissioned although the sagittal focusing has not yet been tested

  9. Magnetic X-Ray Scattering with Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moncton, D. E.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob

    1986-01-01

    With the availability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation from multiple wigglers, magnetic X-ray scattering has become a powerful new probe of magnetic structure and phase transitions. Similar to the well-established magnetic neutron scattering technique, magnetic X-ray scattering methods have...... many complementary advantages. A brief review is presented of the history of magnetic X-ray scattering as well as recent results obtained in studies of the rare-earth magnet holmium with emphasis on instrumentational aspects. In particular, the development of a simple polarization analyzer...... to distinguish charge and magnetic scattering is described....

  10. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.; Callapp, L.; Case-Fortier, M.; Lerner, D.; Nelson, D.; Schermer, R.; Skipper, G.; Van Dyke, D.; Cork, C.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Harten, T.; Luchini, K.; Milburn, J.; Tanabe, J.; Zucca, F.; Keller, R.; Selph, F.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.A.; O'Neil, J.; Schafer, R.; Taylor, C.; Greiman, W.; Hall, D.; MacFarlane, J.

    1991-08-01

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). A survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS storage ring combined function magnets, and the design of the ALS insertion device magnets mapping system. We also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers. Both analog and digital integrators are used with the coils. Some problems that occurred and their rectification is described. The mechanisms used include rotating systems with optical encoders, X-Y mapping systems with optical encoders and a laser position measuring device. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Dispersion relation and growth in a two-stream free electron laser with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, Hassan; Abbasi, Negar

    2008-01-01

    A linear theory of two-stream free electron laser (FEL) with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding is presented. The dispersion relation is obtained with the help of fluid theory and the growth rate is analyzed through the numerical solutions. The considerable enhancement of the growth rate is demonstrated due to the two-stream instability and continuous tuning of peak growth rate ratio, two-stream FEL compared to single-stream FEL, in terms of varying the ion channel frequency is illustrated

  12. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.; Callapp, L.; Case-Fortier, M.; Lerner, D.; Nelson, D.; Schermer, R.; Skipper, G.; Van Dyke, D.; Cork, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). In this paper a survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS design of the ALS insertion device magnetic mapping system. The authors also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

  13. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library

  14. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  15. Modular filter design for the white-beam undulator/wiggler beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brite, C.; Shu, D.; Nian, T.; Wang, Z.; Haeffner, D.; Alp, E.; Kuzay, T.

    1994-01-01

    A new filter has been designed at Argonne National Laboratory that is intended for the use in undulator/wiggler beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. The water-cooled frame allows up to four individual filter foil banks simultaneously in the beam path. Additionally, the bottom of each frame holds two thin (20 μm) uncooled carbon filters in tandem for low-energy filtering. Therefore, a maximum of 625 filter selection combinations is theoretically possible. The design is intelligent, compact and modular, with great flexibility for the users. To prevent accidental movement of the filter, effort has been taken to provide a mechanically locked, fail-safe actuator system. Programming aspects are under development as part of our general personnel and equipment protection system. Aspects of the design and operational principles of the filter are presented in this paper

  16. Superconducting ''wiggler'' for the VEPP-3 storage ring and its effect on particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkov, L.M.; Baryshev, V.B.; Kulipanov, G.N.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Pindyurin, V.F.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Khorev, V.M.; Sheromov, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    To improve characteristics of synchrotron radiation, a superconducting S-type device has been developed and tested, which produces a sign-variable periodic magnetic field with an amplitude of 35 kGs and a half-period of 4.5 cm in the staight section of the VEPP-3 storage ring. The magnetic S-type device comprises 20 superconducting magnets (SCM) connected in series. SCM windings are made of NbTi multicore cables with a diameter of 0.7 mm and a glass fabric impregnated with an epoxy compound. The test results showed that the number of superconductivity disruptions for an operating current of 210 A constitutes 3 or 4 per a SCM, with the magnet critical current increasing from 130-150 A to 210-230 A and reaching a value of 0.9-0.95 of the measured critical current of short superconductor samples

  17. Design study of CEPC Alternating Magnetic Field Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, T; Cai, Y; Cui, X; Gao, J; Koratzinos, M; Su, F; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Xiao, M; Zhang, C

    2017-01-01

    The CEPC is a next generation circular e+e- collider proposed by China. The design of the full energy booster ring of the CEPC is especially challenging. The ejected beam energy is 120 GeV, but that of the injected beam is only 6 GeV. In a conventional approach, the low magnetic field of the main dipole magnets creates problems. We propose operating the booster ring as a large wiggler at low beam energies and as a normal ring at high energies to avoid the problem of very low dipole magnet fields.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  19. Safety aspects of superconducting magnets for Super-FRS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Super Fragment Separator (Super FRS) is a two-stage in flight separator to be built next to the site of GSI, Darmstadt, Germany as part of FAIR (Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research). Its purpose is to create and separate rare isotope beams and to enable the mass measurement also for very short lived nuclei. A superferric design with superconducting coils and standard iron yoke shaping the magnetic field was chosen for the magnets. The cooling will be by a liquid Helium bath. For the main dipoles only the coil is at cold for the multiplets (asemblies of quadrupoles and hgher order correctors) also the iron yoke will be in the bath. From a safety point of view the large He-volumes of more than 1000 l of the multiplets, the high design pressure of 20 bar, as well as the high inductances of the magnets up to 30 H are challenges to be considered in the design and definition of the testing procedures.

  20. Control of field uniformity for a large superconducting storage ring magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.45 Tesla, 14.2 meter diameter ''superferric'' magnet is in an advanced stage of construction at BNL. This magnet will be used to store muons for a planned ultra-precise measurement of their anomalous magnetic moment g-2. This measurement requires a magnetic field uniformity of 1 PPM with a knowledge of the field over the muon orbits to 0.1 PPM. The methods built into the design to produce ultra-high field uniformity will be described. Large deviations from the ideal circularly symmetric uniform shape of the iron flux path are required to accommodate transfer lines and superconducting current leads, as well as apparatus for beam injection. Shimming methods to correct for the perturbations due to these large holes will be presented. The pole pieces consist of 36 closely fitting 10 degree arc sections butted together to produce a very good approximation to a continuous 360 degree ring magnet. However, in the cast of a possible quench of the superconducting coils, significant eddy currents will be induced which will circulate within the confines of each 10 degree pole piece. At the great precision required, these eddy currents may leave very small but significant aberrations in the field even after they decay away, because of slight changes in the orientation of the magnetization. Surface coil possibilities to correct for this effect will be described

  1. Vibrating wire apparatus for periodic magnetic structure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temnykh, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Devices with periodic magnetic structures such as wigglers and undulators are often key elements in synchrotron radiation sources. In applications where the coherence of the emitted radiation is important, magnetic field errors distorting the periodicity of the field can significantly reduce the performance of the devices. Thus, the measurement, localization, and correction of the field errors can be a critical issue. This article presents a new method for magnetic field measurements in periodic magnetic structures. The method uses a vibrating taut wire passing through the magnetic structure, and it involves measurements of the amplitudes and phases of the standing waves excited on the wire by the Lorentz force between an AC current in the wire and the surrounding magnetic field. For certain arrangements of the wire, vibrations in the wire will be excited by only non-periodic magnetic field component, i.e., by the error field. By measuring the phase and amplitude of these waves, one can reconstruct the error field distribution and then correct it. The method was tested on a permanent magnet wiggler with 19.8 cm period and a peak field of ∼7000G. It demonstrated ∼0.6G RMS sensitivity, δB rms /B rms ∼1.2x10 -4 and spatial resolution sufficient to identify poles generating the field error. Good agreement was found between field error measurements obtained with the vibrating wire method and with traditional Hall probe field mapping

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  5. Thermo-mechanical analysis of a user filter assembly for undulator/wiggler operations at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, H.L.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Collins, J.; Shu, D.; Benson, C.; Dejus, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports a thermo-mechanical study of a beamline filter (user filter) for undulator/wiggler operations. It is deployed in conjunction with the current commissioning window assembly on the APS insertion device (ID) front ends. The beamline filter at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will eventually be used in windowless operations also. Hence survival and reasonable life expectancy of the filters under intense insertion device (ID) heat flu are crucial to the beamline operations. To accommodate various user requirements, the filter is configured to be a multi-choice type and smart to allow only those filter combinations that will be safe to operate with a given ring current and beamline insertion device gap. However, this paper addresses only the thermo-mechanical analysis of individual filter integrity and safety in all combinations possible. The current filter design is configured to have four filter frames in a cascade with each frame holding five filters. This allows a potential 625 total filter combinations. Thermal analysis for all of these combinations becomes a mammoth task considering the desired choices for filter materials (pyrolitic graphite and metallic filters), filter thicknesses, undulator gaps, and the beam currents. The paper addresses how this difficult task has been reduced to a reasonable effort and computational level. Results from thermo-mechanical analyses of the filter combinations are presented both in tabular and graphical format

  6. Development of cryogenic permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Shirasawa, Katsutoshi; Kitamura, Hideo; Bizen, Teruhiko; Seike, Takamitsu; Marechal, Xavier; Tsuru, Rieko; Iwaki, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A short period undulator increases not only the photon energy of undulator radiation, but also the brilliance due to its increased number of undulator periods. As a result, brilliant undulator radiation becomes available in the photon energy range, which is currently covered by wigglers. In order to develop a short period undulator, high performance magnets are indispensable and superconductive undulators have been actively investigated in recent years. In this paper, however, we propose a new approach, so called a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB magnets at the temperatures around 150 K. The current status of this cryogenic permanent magnet undulator development at SPring-8 is presented including the results of the magnetic field measurements on a prototype undulator. (author)

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  16. The Livermore Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Kulke, B.; Deis, G.A.; Frye, R.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Ollis, C.W.; Tyler, G.C.; Van Maren, R.D.; Weiss, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory supports the ongoing development of the Induction Linac Free Electron Laser (IFEL) and uses magnetic field measurement systems that are useful in the testing of long periodic magnetic structures, electron-beam transport magnets, and spectrometer magnets. The major systems described include two computer-controlled, three-axis Hall probe-and-search coil transports with computer-controlled data acquisition; a unique, automated-search coil system used to detect very small inaccuracies in wiggler fields; a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based Hall probe-calibration facility; and a high-current DC ion source using heavy ions of variable momentum to model the transport of high-energy electrons. Additionally, a high-precision electron-beam-position monitor for use within long wigglers that has a positional resolution of less than 100 μm is under development in the laboratory and will be discussed briefly. Data transfer to LLNL's central computing facility and on-line graphics enable us to analyze large data sets quickly. 3 refs

  17. Development of a two-dimensional imaging system for clinical applications of intravenous coronary angiography using intense synchrotron radiation produced by a multipole wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.; Oku, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Sugishita, Y.; Tada, J.

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional clinical intravenous coronary angiography system, comprising a large-size View area produced by asymmetrical reflection from a silicon crystal using intense synchrotron radiation from a multipole wiggler and a two-dimensional detector with an image intensifier, has been completed. An advantage of the imaging system is that two-dimensional dynamic imaging of the cardiovascular system can be achieved due to its two-dimensional radiation field. This world-first two-dimensional system has been successfully adapted to clinical applications. Details of the imaging system are described in this paper

  18. Development of a two-dimensional imaging system for clinical applications of intravenous coronary angiography using intense synchrotron radiation produced by a multipole wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, K.; Ando, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Inst. of Material Structure Sciences, Tsukuba (Japan); Oku, Y.; Yamamoto, S. [Graduated School for Advanced Sciences, Tsukuba (Japan); Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Sugishita, Y. [The Univ. of Tsukuba, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan); Tada, J. [The Univ. of Tsukuba, Inst. of Basic Medical Sciences, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    A two-dimensional clinical intravenous coronary angiography system, comprising a large-size View area produced by asymmetrical reflection from a silicon crystal using intense synchrotron radiation from a multipole wiggler and a two-dimensional detector with an image intensifier, has been completed. An advantage of the imaging system is that two-dimensional dynamic imaging of the cardiovascular system can be achieved due to its two-dimensional radiation field. This world-first two-dimensional system has been successfully adapted to clinical applications. Details of the imaging system are described in this paper. 18 refs.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  1. Beam simulation of synchrotron radiation equipment. New method responsive to three dimensional magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hirofumi

    1999-01-01

    A new numerical analysis method capable of precise modeling of complex three dimensional magnetic field of superconducting wiggler and of long-term beam simulation without destroying property of Hamiltonian dynamics system was developed by using the above-mentioned method. Therefore, a fundamental design of a compact synchrotron radiation equipment with hexagonal column shape was also developed. Its main parameters had 1 GeV in energy, 36 m in circumference, 300 mA in stored current, and 184 nmrad in emittance. So as to enable to research the x-ray and vacuum UV regions, a superconducting wiggler with 7T in magnetic field strength and an undulator were set at straight section. It depends upon if beam around stable region on exciting the superconducting wiggler is wider than the required region whether this type of synchrotron radiation equipment can be realized or not. By using three orbit analysis methods containing the developed one, the circulating stable region was introduced. As a result, although shape of the stable region was different from used methods, it was found that considerably larger stable region was obtained than the required in circulation results of every three methods. That is to say, it was shown that the designed compact equipment can accumulate electron beams stably. (G.K.)

  2. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  6. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications, Task A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Singh, A.

    1990-05-01

    This report details progress over the past year in the research program ''Free Electron Lasers with Short Period Wigglers.'' The work is performed jointly by the laboratory for Plasma Research and the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Maryland and is funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy. The goal of the work is the development of an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) scheme for magnetic fusion plasmas such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Our approach is the development of a free electron laser using a sheet electron beam and a short period wiggler magnet. The specific requirements for the heating method include 10 to 30 MW of average power with pulse durations of several seconds to CW at a frequency near 300 GHz (∼600 GHz) in the case of second harmonic (ECRH). Compatible with the experimental nature of the program, radiation frequency flexibility of 30% total bandwidth and 5% rapid dynamic (approx-lt 10 ms) bandwidth is desirable. As the source will eventually be applied to a reactor, priority is placed upon high system efficiency and reliability. Use of established technologies is encouraged where possible

  7. Application of high-temperature superconducting permanent magnets to synchrotron radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple scheme for field enhancement in synchrotron radiation sources such as undulators and wigglers is proposed, which is based on the fundamental nature of the superconducting loop where the magnetic flux is preserved. A superconductor ring placed to enclose the magnetic pole works as a kind of permanent magnet. The magnetization is performed by electromagnetic induction brought by the opening movement of the magnetic gap. Since neither additional external power supplies nor current leads are necessary, high-temperature bulk superconductors can easily be implemented in this scheme. Calculations to check the effectiveness of the new concept show that the critical current density of the superconductor is crucial to the performance of the synchrotron radiation sources based on this concept. Experiments were performed to verify the principle of the proposed scheme, which gave promising results to strongly support it.

  8. Explicit higher order symplectic integrator for s-dependent magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    We derive second and higher order explicit symplectic integrators for the charged particle motion in an s-dependent magnetic field with the paraxial approximation. The Hamiltonian of such a system takes the form of H (summation) k (p k - a k (rvec q), s) 2 + V((rvec q), s). This work solves a long-standing problem for modeling s-dependent magnetic elements. Important applications of this work include the studies of the charged particle dynamics in a storage ring with strong field wigglers, arbitrarily polarized insertion devices,and super-conducting magnets with strong fringe fields. Consequently, this work will have a significant impact on the optimal use of the above magnetic devices in the light source rings as well as in next generation linear collider damping rings

  9. X-radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes detected by real-time X-ray diffraction using wiggler-enhanced synchrotron radiation as the ionizing radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, M.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1984-01-01

    Radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes brought about by exposure to wiggler-derived synchrotron radiation at 8.3 keV (1.5 A) is reported. Considerable damage was observed with exposures under 1 h at an incident flux density of 3 x 10 10 photons s -1 mm -2 , corresponding to a cumulative radiation dose of <= 10 MRad. Damage was so dramatic as to be initially observed while making real-time X-ray diffraction measurements on the sample. The damaging effects of 8.3 keV X-rays on dispersions of dipalmitoyllecithin and lecithin derived from hen egg yolk are as follows: (1) marked changes were noted in the X-ray diffraction behaviour, indicating disruption of membrane stacking. (2) Chemical breakdown of lecithin was observed. (3) The X-ray beam visibly damaged the sample and changed the appearance of the lipid dispersion, when viewed under the light microscope. Considering the importance of X-ray diffraction as a structural probe and the anticipated use of synchrotron radiation in studies involving membranes, the problem of radiation damage must be duly recognized. Furthermore, since dipalmitoyllecithin, the major lipid used in the present study, is a relatively stable compound, it is not unreasonable to expect that X-ray damage may be a problem with other less stable biological and non-biological materials. These results serve to emphasize that whenever a high intensity X-ray source is used, radiation damage can be a problem and that the sensitivity of the sample must always be evaluated under the conditions of measurement. (orig.)

  10. Self-field effects on electron dynamics in free-electron lasers with axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzanejhad, S.; Maraghechi, B.; Mohsenpour, T.

    2004-01-01

    A self-consistent method for the analysis of self-magnetic field for a free-electron laser with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field is presented. The equilibrium orbits and their stability, under the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields, are analyzed. New unstable orbits, in the first part of the Group I orbits and in the resonance region of the Group II orbits, are found. It is shown that an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields will widen the unstable orbits. An anomalous self-field regime is found where an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields can have stabilizing effect on the resonance region

  11. Experimental results of a sheet-beam, high power, FEL amplifier with application to magnetic fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, S.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The experimental study of sheet-beam FELs as candidate millimeter-wave sources for heating magnetic fusion plasmas has achieved a major milestone. In a proof-of-principle, pulsed experiment, saturated FEL amplifier operation was achieved with 250 kW of output power at 86 GHz. Input microwave power was 1 kW, beam voltage was 450 kV and beam current was 17 A. The planar wiggler had a peak value of 3.8 kG, a period of 0.96 cm and was 71 cm long. The linear gain of 30 dB, saturated gain of 24 dB and saturated efficiency of 3% all are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. Follow-on work would include development of a thermionic sheet-beam electron-gun compatible with CW FEL operation, adding a section of tapered wiggler to increase the output power to levels in excess of 1 megawatt, and increasing the FEL frequency.

  12. A 2 Tesla Full Scale High Performance Periodic Permanent Magnet Model for Attractive (228 KN) and repulsive Maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Gardner, C.; Domigan, P.; Baker, J.; Hass, M.; McDonald, C.; Wu, C.; Farrell, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two 214.5 cm. long high performance periodic (26 cm period) permanent magnet half-assemblies were designed and constructed for use as a wiggler using Nd-B-Fe and vanadium permendur as hard and soft magnetic materials by Field Effects, a division of Intermagnetics General Corporation. Placing these assemblies in a supporting structure with a 2.1 cm pole to pole separation resulted in a periodic field with a maximum value of 2.04 T. This is believed to be the highest field ever achieved by this type of device. The attractive force between the two 602 kg magnet assemblies is 228 kN, providing enough force for suspension of a 45,500 kg vehicle. If used in an attractive maglev system with an appropriate flat iron rail, one assembly will generate the same force with a gap of 1.05 cm leading to a lift to weight ratio of 38.6, not including the vehicle attachment structure. This permanent magnet compares well with superconducting systems which have lift to weight ratios in the range of 5 to 10. This paper describes the magnet assemblies and their measured magnetic performance. The measured magnetic field and resulting attractive magnetic force have a negative spring characteristic. Appropriate control coils are necessary to provide stable operation. The estimated performance of the assemblies in a stable repulsive mode, with eddy currents in a conducting guideway, is also discussed.

  13. MAGNUS-3D: Accelerator magnet calculations in 3-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissanetzky, S.

    1988-12-01

    MAGNUS-3D is a professional finite element code for nonlinear magnetic engineering. MAGNUS-3D can solve numerically any general problem of linear or nonlinear magnetostatics in three dimensions. The problem is formulated in a domain with Dirichlet, Neumann or periodic boundary conditions, that can contain any combination of conductors of any shape in space, nonlinear magnetic materials with magnetic properties specified by magnetization tables, and nonlinear permanent magnets with any given demagnetization curve. MAGNUS-3D uses the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Magnetostatics and the finite element method, has an automatic 3D mesh generator, and advanced post-processing features that include graphics on a variety of supported devices, tabulation, and calculation of design quantities required in Magnetic Engineering. MAGNUS-3D is a general purpose 3D code, but it has been extensively used for accelerator work and many special features required for accelerator engineering have been incorporated into the code. One of such features is the calculation of field harmonic coefficients averaged in the direction of the beam, so important for the design of magnet ends. Another feature is its ability to calculate line integrals of any field component along the direction of the beam, or plot the field as a function of the z coordinate. MAGNUS-3D has found applications to the design of accelerator magnets and spectrometers, steering magnets, wigglers and undulators for free electron lasers, microtrons and magnets for synchrotron light sources, as well as magnets for NMR and medical applications, recording heads and various magnetic devices. There are three more programs closely associated with MAGNUS-3D. MAGNUS-GKS is the graphical postprocessor for the package; it supports a numer of output devices, including color vector or bit map devices. WIRE is an independent program that can calculate the field produced by any configuration of electric conductors in space, at any

  14. Magnets and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, Ch.; Rifflet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest highest-energy particle collider that the CERN plans to commission in 2008, gets a double boost from superconducting magnet technology. Superconducting magnets are first used to guide the particles scheduled for collision through the accelerator, and then to observe the events triggered by the collision inside giant detectors in a known magnetic field. Despite the installation's massive dimensions, all this is done with minimal expenditure of energy. (author)

  15. Magnetism and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    It describes the actual status of physics in Brazil concerning the study of magnetism and magnetic materials. It gives an overview of different research groups in Brazil, their needs, as well as the investments needed to improve the area. (A.C.A.S.)

  16. Energy Efficient Beam Transfer Channels for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Gardlowski, Philipp; Ondreka, David

    2016-01-01

    conducting (NC) magnets or high current pulsed (HCP) magnets are an economic solution. For high repetition rates above 1.0 Hz, superconducting Cos(N) (SC) magnets or superferric (SF) magnets are more attractive; at least if they are operated in DC mode and if no dynamic losses occur in the cryogenic system. Unfortunately, a range between these values exist, in which no...

  17. Specialty magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials

  18. Magnetic Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  19. The art and science of magnet design: Selected notes of Klaus Halbach. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This volume contains a compilation of 57 notes written by Dr. Klaus Halbach selected from his collection of over 1650 such documents. It provides an historic snapshot of the evolution of magnet technology and related fields as the notes range from as early as 1965 to the present, and is intended to show the breadth of Dr. Halbach`s interest and ability that have long been an inspiration to his many friends and colleagues. As Halbach is an experimental physicist whose scientific interests span many areas, and who does his most innovative work with pencil and paper rather than at the workbench or with a computer, the vast majority of the notes in this volume were handwritten and their content varies greatly--some reflect original work or work for a specific project, while others are mere clarifications of mathematical calculations or design specifications. As the authors converted the notes to electronic form, some were superficially edited and corrected, while others were extensively re-written to reflect current knowledge and notation. The notes are organized under five categories which reflect their primary content: Beam Position Monitors, (bpm), Current Sheet Electron Magnets (csem), Magnet Theory, (thry), Undulators and Wigglers (u-w), and Miscellaneous (misc). Within the category, they are presented chronologically starting from the most recent note and working backwards in time.

  20. The art and science of magnet design: Selected notes of Klaus Halbach. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This volume contains a compilation of 57 notes written by Dr. Klaus Halbach selected from his collection of over 1650 such documents. It provides an historic snapshot of the evolution of magnet technology and related fields as the notes range from as early as 1965 to the present, and is intended to show the breadth of Dr. Halbach's interest and ability that have long been an inspiration to his many friends and colleagues. As Halbach is an experimental physicist whose scientific interests span many areas, and who does his most innovative work with pencil and paper rather than at the workbench or with a computer, the vast majority of the notes in this volume were handwritten and their content varies greatly--some reflect original work or work for a specific project, while others are mere clarifications of mathematical calculations or design specifications. As the authors converted the notes to electronic form, some were superficially edited and corrected, while others were extensively re-written to reflect current knowledge and notation. The notes are organized under five categories which reflect their primary content: Beam Position Monitors, (bpm), Current Sheet Electron Magnets (csem), Magnet Theory, (thry), Undulators and Wigglers (u-w), and Miscellaneous (misc). Within the category, they are presented chronologically starting from the most recent note and working backwards in time

  1. Magnetic Field Generation, Particle Energization and Radiation at Relativistic Shear Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Spisak, Jake; Boettcher, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Recent large scale Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations have demonstrated that in unmagnetized relativistic shear flows, strong transverse d.c. magnetic fields are generated and sustained by ion-dominated currents on the opposite sides of the shear interface. Instead of dissipating the shear flow free energy via turbulence formation and mixing as it is usually found in MHD simulations, the kinetic results show that the relativistic boundary layer stabilizes itself via the formation of a robust vacuum gap supported by a strong magnetic field, which effectively separates the opposing shear flows, as in a maglev train. Our new PIC simulations have extended the runs to many tens of light crossing times of the simulation box. Both the vacuum gap and supporting magnetic field remain intact. The electrons are energized to reach energy equipartition with the ions, with 10% of the total energy in electromagnetic fields. The dominant radiation mechanism is similar to that of a wiggler, due to oscillating electron orbits around the boundary layer.

  2. Magnetic skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-01

    Welcome to the special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials on magnetic skyrmions. We are proud to present, with great pleasure, a timely collection of 9 original research articles on the recent hot topic "magnetic skyrmions" which studies the static and dynamic properties of skyrmions and the methods to control them in a variety of ways, including magnetic field, electric current and applied strain.

  3. Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the beam requirements for accelerator magnets, we will outline the main issues and the physical limitations for producing strong and pure magnetic fields with superconductors. The seminar will mainly focus on the magnets for the accelerator, and give some hints on the magnets for the experiments. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of Maxwell equations, and linear optics for particle accelerators (FODO cell, beta functions).

  4. Magnetic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Max

    2006-01-01

    The conception of the magnetic string is presented as an infinitely thin bundle of magnetic flux lines. The magnetic strings are surrounded by a film of current that rotates around them, and are a solution of Maxwell's equations. The magnetic potential contains a line singularity, and its stability can be established topologically. A few comments are added on the possibility that they may exist at a cosmological scale as relics of the Big Bang. (author) [es

  5. Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic materials are the foundation of multi-billion dollar industries and the focus of intensive research across many disciplines. This book covers the fundamentals, basic theories and applications of magnetism and conventional magnetic materials. Based on a lecture course given by Nicola Spaldin in the Materials Department at University of California, Santa Barbara, the book is ideal for a one- semester course in magnetic materials. It contains numerous homework problems and solutions.

  6. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  7. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets for high energy colliders are discussed. As an example, the magnets recently built for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are reviewed. Their technical performance and the cost for the industry-built production dipoles are given. The cost data is generalized in order to extrapolate the cost of magnets for a new machine

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic engineering: The programs magnus and epilog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingwu; Pissanetzky, Sergio

    1988-10-01

    by running the Graphical Kernel System GKS or some other graphics package. Another important feature of EPILOG is its ability to produce tables of quantities such as the scalar potential, the total field, the field of conductors alone, the magnetic permeability, etc. Editing options allow the user to specify where the quantities are to be tabulated, such as on equispaced points on a line or arc in space. One useful application is the evaluation of the maximum field inside conductors for superconducting magnets. The ability of EPILOG to accurately provide the magnetic field components at any given point in space is convenient for its use as input to particle tracking programs. EPILOG can easily be interfaced to such a program. EPILOG is appropriate for complicated 3-D geometries, common in wigglers and undulators, or for the analysis of ends of bending magnets, as required in the design of synchrotron light sources.

  9. Quantum regime of a plasma-wave-pumped free-electron laser in the presence of an axial magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, H; Jafari, S

    2018-03-01

    The quantum regime of a plasma-whistler-wave-pumped free-electron laser (FEL) in the presence of an axial-guide magnetic field is presented. By quantizing both the plasma whistler field and axial magnetic field, an N-particle three-dimensional Hamiltonian of quantum-FEL (QFEL) has been derived. Employing Heisenberg evolution equations and introducing a new collective operator which controls the vertical motion of electrons, a quantum dispersion relation of the plasma whistler wiggler has been obtained analytically. Numerical results indicate that, by increasing the intrinsic quantum momentum spread and/or increasing the axial magnetic field strength, the bunching and the radiation fields grow exponentially. In addition, a spiking behavior of the spectrum was observed with increasing cyclotron frequency which provides an enormous improvement in the coherence of QFEL radiation even in a limit close-to-classical regime, where an overlapping of these spikes is observed. Also, an upper limit of the intrinsic quantum momentum spread which depends on the value of the cyclotron frequency was found.

  10. An assessment of the effects of radiation on permanent magnet material in the ALS [Advanced Light Source] insertion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Jenkins, T.M.; Namito, Y.; Nelson, W.R.; Swanson, W.P.

    1989-08-01

    Electrons that are lost from the beam during normal operation of a synchrotron radiation source and during a beam dump at the end of a run produce both ionizing radiation and neutrons. This radiation has the potential for damaging sensitive materials, in particular those that need to be very close to the beam. The wigglers and undulators for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL will use magnetic materials such as the very high performance neodymium-iron-boron, which will be as close as 1 cm away from the electron beam during operation. This material, which is preferred because of its high remanence, is known to be more sensitive to radiation than some other magnetic materials. Simple energy loss estimates and the EGS4 code were used to estimate the radiation levels in the ALS insertion devices in the regions of the magnetic materials. The radiation levels were estimated for both aluminum and stainless steel vacuum chambers to determine if one would provide significantly better shielding. We conclude that Nd-Fe-B can be used in the ALS insertion devices and that there is little difference in the radiation levels for aluminum and stainless vacuum vessels. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  11. Super and ferric: the first HL-LHC component is ready

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Although the actual installation phase in the tunnel will only start in 2024, the first magnet – a sextupole – of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is ready and working according to specifications. This first component is also rather unique as, unlike the superconducting magnets currently used in the LHC, it relies on a “superferric” heart.   An expert in the LASA Laboratory (INFN Milan, Italy) works on assembling the first sextupole corrector of the HL-LHC. (Image: INFN Milan) Although the name might sound completely unfamiliar, superferric magnets were first proposed in the 1980s as a possible solution for high-energy colliders. However, many technical problems had to be overcome before the use of superferric magnets could become a reality. In its final configuration, the HL-LHC will have 36 superferric corrector magnets, of which 4 will be quadrupoles, 8 sextupoles and 24 higher order magnets. In superferric (or “iron-dominated”) magne...

  12. Electron–Cyclotron Laser Using Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Radiation in a Strong Uniform Axial Magnetic Field and an Alternating Axial Electric Field in a Voltage-Supplied Pill-Box Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the radiation from the beam electrons traveling in a strong uniform axial magnetic field and an axial alternating electric field of wavelength λ_w generated by a voltage-supplied pill-box cavity. The beam electrons emit genuine laser radiation that propagates only in the axial direction through free-electron two-quantum Stark radiation. We find that laser radiation takes place only at the expense of the axial kinetic energy when λ_w ≪ c/(ω_c/γ), where ω_c/γ is the relativistic electron–cyclotron frequency. We formulate the laser power based on quantum-wiggler electrodynamics, and envision a laser of length 10 m with estimated power 0.1 GW/(kA) in the 10"−"4 cm wavelength range. (paper)

  13. Magnetic Hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Della Torre, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Understanding magnetic hysteresis is vitally important to the development of the science of magnetism as a whole and to the advancement of practical magnetic device applications. Magnetic Hysteresis, by acclaimed expert Edward Della Torre, presents a clear explanation of the connection between physical principles and phenomenological hysteresis. This comprehensive book offers a lucid analysis that enables the reader to save valuable time by reducing trial-and-error design. Dr. Della Torre uses physical principles to modify Preisach modeling and to describe the complex behavior of magnetic media. While Pretsach modeling is a useful mathematical tool, its congruency and deletion properties present limitations to accurate descriptions of magnetic materials. Step-by-step, this book describes the modifications that can overcome these limitations. Special attention is given to the use of feedback around a Preisach transducer to remove the congruency restriction, and to the use of accommodation and aftereffect model...

  14. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  15. Magnetic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánek,B.; Paleček,M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with magnetism and its influence on superconducting materials. We describe the discovery and development of superconductivity, superconducting levitation and its use in future technology - called. MAGLEV speed trains. We show the interaction of the magnetic field of a strong neodymium magnet and high-temperature superconductor, cooled with liquid nitrogen at about -200 ° C. Of superconductors at this temperature becomes perfect diamagnetic material. That is ejected from the ma...

  16. Magnet Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Over the decades, Fermilab has been responsible for the design, construction, test and analysis of hundreds of conventional and superconducting accelerator magnets...

  17. Planetary Magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io

  18. Magnetics Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Processing Lab equipped to perform testing of magnetometers, integrate them into aircraft systems, and perform data analysis, including noise reduction...

  19. Magnetic starspots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, K.; Stepien, K.

    1984-01-01

    Models of large magnetic starspots with an axisymmetric untwisted magnetic field on late type stars are discussed. It is assumed that the magnetic field reduces the efficiency of convection inside the spot. A unique relation between the stellar mass and the difference of effective temperatures of the spot and the surrounding photosphere is adopted from observations. It is equivalent to the reduction of a s (the mixing length theory parameter) inside the spot to the value 0.15 independently of the stellar mass. The surface magnetic field of large spots covering a considerable part of the stellar surface is a decreasing function of the magnetic flux. Hence a coverage of a star by magnetic regions rapidly increases as a function of the magnetic flux in a narrow range of fluxes. This behaviour can explain the Vaughan-Preston gap. Recent observations of magnetic fields on G and K type stars are in a good agreement with our predictions. 35 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  20. Magnetic superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwo, J.; Hong, M.; McWhan, D.B.; Yafet, Y.; Fleming, R.M.; DiSalvo, F.J.; Waszczak, J.V.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Gibbs, D.; Goldmann, A.I.; Boni, P.; Bohr, J.; Grimm, H.; Bohr, J.; Chien, C.L.; Grimm, H.; Cable, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal magnetic rare earth superlattices were synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy. The studies include four rare earth systems: Gd-Y, Dy-Y, Ho-Y, and Gd-Dy. The magnetic properties and the long-range spin order are reviewed in terms of the interfacial behavior, and the interlayer exchange coupling across Y medium

  1. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  2. Lunar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  3. Rare earth permanent magnet with easy magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.S.; Camp, F.E.

    1998-01-01

    Rare earth permanent magnets have high energy products and coercivities, and thus the volume miniaturization of magnetic devices has been possible with improved magnetic performance. Although the high energy products of these rare earth permanent magnets provide substantial advantages for magnetic design and application, the strong magnetic force of the magnetized magnets makes assembly difficult. Therefore, a special device is needed to assemble the magnetized magnets. On the other hand, unmagnetized magnets are assembled and then they are magnetized. The assembled magnets are generally more difficult to magnetize than unassembled magnets because a much less effective magnetic field may be applied to them. This is particularly true for the rare earth permanent magnets because they usually need a much higher magnetic field to be fully magnetized than alnico or ferrite magnets. To obtain optimum magnetic properties, the required minimum magnetizing fields for SmCo 5 , Sm 2 TM 17 and Nd 2 Fe 14 B magnets were reported as 25-30 kOe, 45-60 kOe and 25-30 kOe, respectively. If the required magnetizing field for full saturation could be lowered, the effective utilization of magnetic properties would be maximized and the magnetic design option could be expanded with reduced restrictions. To meet this demand, we have sought to lower the field required for full magnetic saturation, and found that an increase in Dy content in R-(Fe,Co,Cu)-B type magnets lowers the field required for full saturation as well as improves the temperature stability. By increasing the H ci with Dy addition from 14 kOe to 24 and 34 kOe, the field required for full magnetic saturation decreases from about 20 to 15 and 10 kOe, respectively. This dual benefit will open up new application areas with more freedom for magnet design options. The mechanism for the lower magnetizing fields will be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references

  5. Quantum magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Johannes; Farnell, Damian; Bishop, Raymod

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of magnetic systems where quantum effects play a dominant role has become a very active branch of solid-state-physics research in its own right. The first three chapters of the "Quantum Magnetism" survey conceptual problems and provide insights into the classes of systems considered, namely one-dimensional, two-dimensional and molecular magnets. The following chapters introduce the methods used in the field of quantum magnetism, including spin wave analysis, exact diagonalization, quantum field theory, coupled cluster methods and the Bethe ansatz. The book closes with a chapter on quantum phase transitions and a contribution that puts the wealth of phenomena into the context of experimental solid-state physics. Closing a gap in the literature, this volume is intended both as an introductory text at postgraduate level and as a modern, comprehensive reference for researchers in the field.

  6. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preskill, J

    1984-01-01

    This article offers a review of the physics of the magnetic monopole, which, although as yet unseen, offers sound theoretical reasons to believe that it must exist. Several theories are presented and equations are given. The idea that magnetic monopoles, stable particles carrying magnetic charges, ought to exist has, according to the authors, proved to be very durable. One theory presented demonstrates the consistency of magnetic monopoles with quantum electrodynamics. Another theory demonstrates the necessity of monopoles in grand unified gauge theories. The authors believe it is reasonable to expect the monopole to be an extremely heavy stable elementary particle. The stability of the classical monopole solution given is ensured by a topological principle explained

  7. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  8. LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Preparations for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's LEP tunnel continue to make good progress. In particular development work for the high field superconducting magnets to guide the almost 8 TeVproton beams through the 'tight' curve of the 27-kilometre ring are proceeding well, while the magnet designs and lattice configuration are evolving in the light of ongoing experience. At the Evian LHC Experiments meeting, this progress was covered by Giorgio Brianti

  9. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  10. Magnetizing of permanent magnet using HTS bulk magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole containing the HTS bulk magnet, generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnetic plates inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the HTS bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the 'rewritten' magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated. (author)

  11. Magnetic spring based on two permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivilitsin, V.Yu.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Goncharuk, V.A.; Bondar, I.B.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of the magnetic spring construction 'two permanent magnets' has been considered. A mathematical expression for the estimation of a pulling-in force has been offered. This expression is verified experimentally on the produced operating magnetic spring. The theoretical and experimental data are in good accordance. A number of advantages of the magnetic spring over the construction 'permanent magnet - magnetic circuit' such as an insignificant friction force between two magnets and a higher pulling force are discussed.

  12. Magnetic reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Shohei; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2018-02-01

    We provide a new bound on the amplitude of primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) by using a novel mechanism, magnetic reheating. The damping of the magnetohydrodynamics fluid motions in a primordial plasma brings the dissipation of the PMFs. In the early Universe with z ≳ 2 × 106, cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons are quickly thermalized with the dissipated energy and shift to a different Planck distribution with a new temperature. In other words, the PMF dissipation changes the baryon-to-photon number ratio, and we name such a process magnetic reheating. From the current baryon-to-photon number ratio obtained from the big bang nucleosynthesis and CMB observations, we put the strongest constraint on the PMFs on small scales which CMB observations cannot access, B0 ≲ 1.0 μG at the scales 104 generation mechanisms of PMFs in the early Universe.

  13. Magnetic monopoles and dipoles

    CERN Multimedia

    Dominguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conventional bar magnets are also called ‘magnetic dipoles’ because they have two magnetic poles (a “North” and a “South” magnetic pole, like the Earth). In theory, “magnetic monopoles” could exist that act like an isolated “magnetic charge”, i.e. either a “North” or a “South” magnetic pole.

  14. Designing a magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerk, R

    2010-03-15

    This thesis investigates the design and optimization of a permanent magnet assembly for use in a magnetic refrigeration device. The heart of magnetic refrigeration is the adiabatic temperature change in the magnetocaloric material which is caused by the magnetic field. In order to design an ideal magnet assembly the magnetocaloric materials and the refrigeration process itself and their properties and performance as a function of magnetic field are investigated. For the magnetocaloric materials it is the magnetization, specific heat capacity and adiabatic temperature that are investigated as functions of the magnetic field. Following this the process utilized by a magnetic refrigerator to provide cooling is investigated using a publicly available one dimensional numerical model. This process is called active magnetic regeneration (AMR). The aim is to determine the performance of the AMR as a function of the magnetic field in order to learn the properties of the optimal magnet assembly. The performance of the AMR as a function of the synchronization and width of the magnetic field with respect to the AMR cycle, the ramp rate and maximum value of the magnetic field are investigated. Other published magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration devices are also evaluated, using a figure of merit based on the properties of the investigated magnetocaloric materials, to learn the properties of the best magnet designs to date. Following this investigation the Halbach cylinder, which is a hollow permanent magnet cylinder with a rotating remanent flux density, is investigated in detail as it forms the basis of many magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration. Here the optimal dimensions of a Halbach cylinder, as well as analytical calculations of the magnetic field for a Halbach cylinder of infinite length, are presented. Once it has been determined which properties are desirable for a magnet used in magnetic refrigeration the design of a new magnet is described. This is

  15. Magnetic collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frew, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A collector for use in a magnetic separator is formed by isostatically pressing a metal which is resistant to attack by acid about ferromagnetic bodies whereby to encase the bodies in the metal. In one arrangement, as shown, the bodies are encapsulated between inner and outer cylinders. In other arrangements the encapsulating metal is in the form of a tube or planar sheets. The bodies are of Fe or an oxide thereof and the acid-resistant metal parts may be of stainless steel, Au, Pt, Pa or an alloy. The magnetic separator is intended for use in removing particles from liquids during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel materials. (author)

  16. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1980-03-01

    The 'ingredients' which control a phase transition in well defined system as well as in random ones (e.g. random magnetic systems) are listed and discussed within a somehow unifying perspective. Among these 'ingredients' we find the couplings and elements responsible for the cooperative phenomenon, the topological connectivity as well as possible topological incompatibilities, the influence of new degrees of freedom, the order parameter dimensionality, the ground state degeneracy and finally the 'quanticity' of the system. The general trends, though illustrated in magnetic systems, essentially hold for all phase transitions, and give a basis for connection of this area with Field theory, Theory of dynamical systems, etc. (Author) [pt

  17. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1981-01-01

    The 'ingredients' which control a phase transition in well defined systems as well as in random ones (e.q. random magnetic systems) are listed and discussed within a somehow unifying perspective. Among these 'ingredients' the couplings and elements responsible for the cooperative phenomenon, the topological connectivity as well as possible topological incompatibilities, the influence of new degrees of freedom, the order parameter dimensionality, the ground state degeneracy and finally the 'quanticity' of the system are found. The general trends, though illustrated in magnetic systems, essentially hold for all phase transitions, and give a basis for connection of this area with Field theory, Theory of dynamical systems, etc. (Author) [pt

  18. Magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  19. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  20. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir-Kheli, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A few simple problems relating to random magnetic systems are presented. Translational symmetry, only on the macroscopic scale, is assumed for these systems. A random set of parameters, on the microscopic scale, for the various regions of these systems is also assumed. A probability distribution for randomness is obeyed. Knowledge of the form of these probability distributions, is assumed in all cases [pt

  1. Magnetic Design of Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todesco, E [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we discuss the main principles of magnetic design for superconducting magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) for particle accelerators. We give approximated equations that govern the relation between the field/gradient, the current density, the type of superconductor (Nb−Ti or Nb3Sn), the thickness of the coil, and the fraction of stabilizer. We also state the main principle controlling the field quality optimization, and discuss the role of iron. A few examples are given to show the application of the equations and their validity limits.

  2. Neutron Scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboussant, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets and focuses on their magnetic properties at low temperature and low energies. Several molecular magnets (Mn 12 , V 15 , Ni 12 , Mn 4 , etc.) are reviewed. Inelastic neutron scattering is shown to be a perfectly suited spectroscopy tool to -a) probe magnetic energy levels in such systems and -b) provide key information to understand the quantum tunnel effect of the magnetization in molecular spin clusters. (author)

  3. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase....

  4. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  5. Designing a magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    This thesis investigates the design and optimization of a permanent magnet assembly for use in a magnetic refrigeration device. The heart of magnetic refrigeration is the adiabatic temperature change in the magnetocaloric material which is caused by the magnetic field. In order to design an ideal...... magnet assembly the magnetocaloric materials and the refrigeration process itself and their properties and performance as a function of magnetic field are investigated. For the magnetocaloric materials it is the magnetization, specific heat capacity and adiabatic temperature that are investigated...... as a function of the magnetic field in order to learn the properties of the optimal magnet assembly. The performance of the AMR as a function of the synchronization and width of the magnetic field with respect to the AMR cycle, the ramp rate and maximum value of the magnetic field are investigated. Other...

  6. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnir, Ya.M.

    2005-01-01

    This monograph addresses the field theoretical aspects of magnetic monopoles. Written for graduate students as well as researchers, the author demonstrates the interplay between mathematics and physics. He delves into details as necessary and develops many techniques that find applications in modern theoretical physics. This introduction to the basic ideas used for the description and construction of monopoles is also the first coherent presentation of the concept of magnetic monopoles. It arises in many different contexts in modern theoretical physics, from classical mechanics and electrodynamics to multidimensional branes. The book summarizes the present status of the theory and gives an extensive but carefully selected bibliography on the subject. The first part deals with the Dirac monopole, followed in part two by the monopole in non-abelian gauge theories. The third part is devoted to monopoles in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories. (orig.)

  7. magnetic horn

    CERN Document Server

    Neutrinos and antineutrinos are ideal for probing the weak force because it is effectively the only force they feel. How were they made? Protons fired into a metal target produce a tangle of secondary particles. A magnetic horn like this one, invented by Simon Van der Meer, selected pions and focused them into a sharp beam. Pions decay into muons and neutrinos or antineutrinos. The muons were stopped in a wall of 3000 tons of iron and 1000 tons of concrete, leaving the neutrinos or antineutrinos to reach the Gargamelle bubble chamber. A simple change of magnetic field direction on the horn flipped between focusing positively- or negatively-charged pion beams, and so between neutrinos and antineutrinos.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  9. Planetary magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolginov, Sh.Sh.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data on magnetic fields of planets are surveyed. The magnetic fields of the Earth, Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon are considered in detail. A similarity of the physical models of both the planets of the Earth group and the giant planets was revealed. The fields of the planets and of the Earth are compared in the scheme of the precession dynamo and in the kinematic scheme. Proceeding from the assumption that the Poincare forces and their ratio to other forces are model-similar in the cores of all the planets, the values of Hsub(i)/Hsub(E) are calculated, where Hsub(i) and Hsub(E) are the field strengths of the i-th planet and that of the Earth. The experimental data on the dynamic compression of the Mercury confirm the calculations made. It is concluded that the problem of the origin and moving forces of the terrestrial magnetic field may be resolved only within the framework of comparative planetology

  10. MAGNET / INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Campi

    The final fast discharge of the Magnet took place on 3rd of November. The Coil reached a temperature of 70K by internal energy dissipation. By injecting a current of 200 A room temperature was reached on the 23rd November. During the heating of the coil un-connecting of the first magnet connectors on YBO was started to give the earliest possible access to the assembly groups and to continue the installation of the muon chambers. The removal of the pumping lines and the disconnection of the vacuum system was instead done as soon as the room temperature was reached: more precisely from the 4 to the 18 December. The disconnection of the transfer line from the cold box and the completion of the removal of the control cables of the vacuum system and cryogenics was done at last. In January 2007 the disconnection of MCS-MSS, CDS, vacuum racks and their cable trays was also achieved. After coil disconnection the effort of the magnet team has been mainly devoted in optimizing the lowering and reassembly of the a...

  11. Magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihler, Christoph

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis we investigated in detail the properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As, Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}P, and Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films with a focus on the magnetic anisotropy and the changes of their properties upon hydrogenation. We applied two complementary spectroscopic techniques to address the position of H in magnetic semiconductors: (i) Electron paramagnetic resonance, which provides direct information on the symmetry of the crystal field of the Mn{sup 2+} atoms and (ii) x-ray absorption fine structure analysis which allows to probe the local crystallographic neighborhood of the absorbing Mn atom via analysing the fine structure at the Mn K absorption edge. Finally, we discussed the obstacles that have to be overcome to achieve Curie temperatures above the current maximum in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As of 185 K. Here, we outlined in detail the generic problem of the formation of precipitates at the example of Ge:MN. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Kulsrud, Russell; Ji, Hantao

    2009-01-01

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two-fluid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also briefly discussed.

  13. Magnetic elements for switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Martaus, J.; Fedor, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.

    2010-01-01

    Using combination of micromagnetic calculations and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging we find optimal parameters for novel magnetic tips suitable for switching magnetization MFM. Switching magnetization MFM is based on two-pass scanning atomic force microscopy with reversed tip magnetization between the scans. Within the technique the sum of the scanned data with reversed tip magnetization depicts local atomic forces, while their difference maps the local magnetic forces. Here we propose the design and calculate the magnetic properties of tips suitable for this scanning probe technique. We find that for best performance the spin-polarized tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching fields, and single-domain state at remanence. The switching field of such tips is calculated and optimum shape of the Permalloy elements for the tips is found. We show excellent correspondence between calculated and experimental results for Py elements.

  14. Magnetic Measurement and Magnet Tutorial, Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Jack

    2003-07-15

    Magnetic measurements, like magnet design, is a broad subject. It is the intention of this lecture to cover only a small part of the field, regarding the characterization of the line integral field quality of multipole magnets (dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles) using compensated rotating coils. Other areas which are not covered are magnet mapping, AC measurements and sweeping wire measurements.

  15. Surface magnetic field measurement with magnetic shielding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 7 (2010), 66-68 ISSN 1335-3632 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic hysteresis * magnetic field measurement * magnetic shielding * extrapolation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.270, year: 2010

  16. An optimized magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2010-01-01

    A magnet designed for use in a magnetic refrigeration device is presented. The magnet is designed by applying two general schemes for improving a magnet design to a concentric Halbach cylinder magnet design and dimensioning and segmenting this design in an optimum way followed by the construction...... of the actual magnet. The final design generates a peak value of 1.24 T, an average flux density of 0.9 T in a volume of 2 L using only 7.3 L of magnet, and has an average low flux density of 0.08 T also in a 2 L volume. The working point of all the permanent magnet blocks in the design is very close...... to the maximum energy density. The final design is characterized in terms of a performance parameter, and it is shown that it is one of the best performing magnet designs published for magnetic refrigeration....

  17. An optimized magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, R.; Bahl, C.R.H.; Smith, A.; Christensen, D.V.; Pryds, N.

    2010-01-01

    A magnet designed for use in a magnetic refrigeration device is presented. The magnet is designed by applying two general schemes for improving a magnet design to a concentric Halbach cylinder magnet design and dimensioning and segmenting this design in an optimum way followed by the construction of the actual magnet. The final design generates a peak value of 1.24 T, an average flux density of 0.9 T in a volume of 2 L using only 7.3 L of magnet, and has an average low flux density of 0.08 T also in a 2 L volume. The working point of all the permanent magnet blocks in the design is very close to the maximum energy density. The final design is characterized in terms of a performance parameter, and it is shown that it is one of the best performing magnet designs published for magnetic refrigeration.

  18. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase.......Strong magnets with a high energy product are vital when optimizing the efficiency in the electric industry. But since the rare earth metals, normally used for making strong permanent magnets, are both expensive and difficult to mine, a great demand has come to cheaper types of magnets...

  19. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Lopusnik, R.; Fassbender, J.; Hillebrands, B.

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization reversal process. Comparing the case of perpendicular anisotropy with different kinds of in-plane anisotropies, a principal difference is found due to the symmetry of the shape anisotropy with respect to the anisotropy in question

  20. MAGNETIC WOVEN FABRICS - PHYSICAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU Marian C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A coated material is a composite structure that consists of at least two components: base material and coating layer. The purpose of coating is to provide special properties to base material, with potential to be applied in EMI shielding and diverse smart technical fields. This paper reports the results of a study about some physical and magnetic properties of coated woven fabrics made from cotton yarns with fineness of 17 metric count. For this aim, a plain woven fabric was coated with a solution hard magnetic polymer based. As hard magnetic powder, barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19 was selected. The plain woven fabric used as base has been coated with five solutions having different amounts of hard magnetic powder (15% - 45% in order to obtain five different magnetic woven fabrics. A comparison of physical properties regarding weight (g/m2, thickness (mm, degree of charging (% and magnetic properties of magnetic woven samples were presented. Saturation magnetizing (emu/g, residual magnetizing (emu/g and coercive force (kA/m of pure hard magnetic powder and woven fabrics have been studied as hysteresis characteristics. The magnetic properties of the woven fabrics depend on the mass percentage of magnetic powder from coating solution. Also, the residual magnetism and coercive field of woven fabrics represents only a part of bulk barium hexafferite residual magnetism and coercive field.

  1. Magnet innovations for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-01-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results of past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs are presented

  2. Magnet innovations for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs

  3. Magnetic guns with cylindrical permanent magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, Marco; Heller, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a cylindrical permanent magnet (projectile) inside a tubular permanent magnet, with both magnets magnetized axially, illustrates nicely the physical principles behind the operation of magnetic guns. The force acting upon the projectile is expressed semi-analytically as derivative...... of the magnetostatic interaction energy. For comparison, the forces involved are also calculated numerically using finite elements methods. Based on the conservation of the magnetostatic and kinetic energies, the exit and asymptotic velocities are determined. The derived formulas can be used to optimize the generated...... forces and motion of the inner cylindrical magnet....

  4. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  5. Magnetic nanocomposite sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Li, Bodong; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic nanocomposite device is described herein for a wide range of sensing applications. The device utilizes the permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires to allow operation without the application of an additional magnetic field

  6. Magnetism of Carbonados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  7. Magnetic propulsion for magnetically levitated trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melville, P H

    1973-12-01

    One of the main problems associated with magnetically levitated trains is the means of propulsion. A system is described whereby the repulsion from the superconducting magnets, in addition to levitating the train, can also be used to propel it.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  9. Magnetic guns with cylindrical permanent magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, M.; Heller, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 324, č. 9 (2012), s. 1715-1719 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : permanent magnet * cylindrical magnet * Earnshaw's theorem * magnetic gun * magnetostatic interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304885311008997

  10. The first insertion devices at SSRL - some personal recollections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winick, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The author recounts his experiences with insertion devices at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. His first experiences with wigglers occured at the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, and was carried over to SSRL with the proposal for a six pole electromagnetic wiggler. Most modern undulators, and many wigglers are now designed around permanent magnets, and the origin of this transition at SSRL was rather fortuitous and humorous. It reflects some of the personality characteristics of Klaus Halbach.

  11. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  12. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  13. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  15. Magnetic Barkhausen noise at different magnetization conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Alexandr; Perevertov, Oleksiy; Neslušan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 7 (2015), s. 10-13 ISSN 1335-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Barkhausen noise * surface magnetic field * magnetization control * magnetic hysteresis * digital feedback loop Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 0.407, year: 2015

  16. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  17. MAGNETIC DENSITOMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, J.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1961-08-15

    A magnetic densitometer for locating defects and metallic inclusions in materials is described. The apparatus consists of two primary coils connected in series opposition and adapted te be placed in inductive relation to the material under test, a source of constant frequency alternating current coupled across the primary coil combination, a pick-up coil disposed in symmetrical inductive relationship with said primary coils, a phase-shifter coupled to the output of the energizing source. The output of the phase-shifter is coupled in series with the pick-up coil. An amplifier is provided selective to the third harmonic of the energizing source frequency. The series combination of the pick-up coil and the phase-shifter output are connected across the input of the amplifier, and an amplitude comparitor is coupled to the output of the amplifier and the energizing source for comparing the instantaneous amplitude of the amplifier output and the instantaneous output of the energizing source and producing an output proportional to the difference in amplitude. A recorder is coupled to the output of the amplitude comparison means to give an indication of the amplitude difference, thereby providing a permanent presentation of the character of the changes in characteristics exhibited by the material under test. (AEC)

  18. Hoosier Magnetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-09-30

    Hoosier Magnetics proposes to replace the indirect clinker water cooling system with a cooling system that recycles heat from the hot ferrite to preheat the combustion air. This innovative process would significantly reduce the amount of natural gas required to heat the combustion air while eliminating Hoosier’s largest source of downtime. According to the Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, process temperature is customarily used as a rough indication of where preheating air will be cost effective. Previous studies have concluded that processes operating above 1,600° F are ideal candidates for the utilization of pre-heated combustion air. Hoosier Magnetics’ operating temperatures run between 1800-2200° F making Hoosier the perfect candidate. Using preheated air at 1200° F will result in 35% fuel savings, or $298,935 annually. Additionally, the new system would have improved process reliability and result in both production efficiency increases and cost savings. This technology is NOT practiced or utilized on a wide-spread basis but could have a significant energy reduction impact in many different high heat utilizing industries in the country. While the energy savings is apparent with this theory the application and design of such a process has not been studied.

  19. Environmental magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Roy

    1986-01-01

    The scientist will be forced, in the unenthusiastic words of one of my scientific colleagues, 'to slosh about in the primordial ooze known as inter-disciplinary studies'. John Passmore Man's responsibility for nature The present text has arisen from some thirteen years advances in our perception, appraisal and creative use of collaboration between the two authors. During that of order in natural systems. Out of this can come period, upwards of a dozen postgraduates in enhanced insight into processes, structures and Edinburgh, the New University of Ulster and Liver­ systems interactions on all temporal and spatial scales pool have been closely involved in exploring many of and at all integrative levels from subatomic to cosmic. the applications of magnetic measurements described In the environment, elements of order are often in the second half of the book. Much of the text is difficult to appraise and analyse, not only because of based on their work, both published and unpublished. intrinsic complexity, but ...

  20. Magnetic domains the analysis of magnetic microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hubert, Alex

    1998-01-01

    The book gives a systematic and comprehensive survey of the complete area of magnetic microstructures. It reaches from micromagnetism of nanoparticles to complex structures of extended magnetic materials. The book starts with a comprehensive evaluation of traditional and modern experimental methods for the observation of magnetic domains and continues with the treatment of important methods for the theoretical analysis of magnetic microcstructures. A survey of the necessary techniques in materials characterization is given. The book offers an observation and analysis of magnetic domains in all

  1. Transient anisotropic magnetic field calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesenik, Marko; Gorican, Viktor; Trlep, Mladen; Hamler, Anton; Stumberger, Bojan

    2006-01-01

    For anisotropic magnetic material, nonlinear magnetic characteristics of the material are described with magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. The paper presents transient finite element calculation of the magnetic field in the anisotropic magnetic material based on the measured magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. For the verification of the calculation method some results of the calculation are compared with the measurement

  2. Laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Behrsing, G.U.; Halbach, K.; Marks, J.S.; Morrison, M.E.; Nelson, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    A laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnet has been constructed for a proof-of-principle test. The magnet is a conventional tape-wound quadrupole electromagnet, using iron pole- pieces, with the addition of permanent magnet material (neodymium iron) between the poles to reduce the effects of saturation. The iron is preloaded with magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnet material, resulting in an asymmetrical saturation curve. Since the polarity of the quadrupole magnets in a drift tube linac is not reversed we can take advantage of this asymmetrical saturation to provide greater focusing strength. The magnet configuration has been optimized and the vanadium permendur poles needed in a conventional quadrupole have been replaced with iron poles. The use of permanent magnet material has allowed us to increase the focusing strength of the magnet by about 20% over that of a conventional tape-wound quadrupole. Comparisons will be made between this magnet and the conventional tape-wound quadrupole. 3 refs., 5 figs

  3. Designing magnets with prescribed magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liping

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel design method capable of finding the magnetization densities that generate prescribed magnetic fields. The method is based on the solution to a simple variational inequality and the resulting designs have simple piecewise-constant magnetization densities. By this method, we obtain new designs of magnets that generate commonly used magnetic fields: uniform magnetic fields, self-shielding fields, quadrupole fields and sextupole fields. Further, it is worth noting that this method is not limited to the presented examples, and in particular, three-dimensional designs can be constructed in a similar manner. In conclusion, this novel design method is anticipated to have broad applications where specific magnetic fields are important for the performance of the devices.

  4. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  5. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  6. Micro magnetic modeling of magnetization reversal in permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.C.; Kevorkian, B.; Givord, D.; Rossignol, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Micro magnetic numerical 3 D calculation is presented in this paper to investigate the effect of a soft magnetic heterogeneity on the magnetization reversal of a single hard magnetic grain. Both equilibrium and transient magnetization configurations are obtained by solving the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (L.L.G.) equation. A modified forward difference method is used to integrate the time dependent L.L.G. equation without conflicting with the constraint of constant magnetic moment. A continuum view of the material medium is adopted and the spatial finite difference method is used to describe the system as a set of cubic elements. In each element the magnetization is interpolated with quadratic polynomial functions and constrained to follow the Brown condition at the surface. A multigrid approach is developed to calculate the magnetic potential and the resulting stray field associated with a given microstructure. The calculated properties are compared to actual properties of Nd Fe B sintered magnets. Assuming a soft nucleus of 160 angstrom diameter and 80 angstrom depth, the calculated coercive field is about 1.45 T, close to experimental values and the calculated angular dependence of H c resembles experimental behaviours. (author)

  7. Magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n {approx}1.5X10{sup 20}m{sup -3}). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO{sub 2} interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 {mu}s) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong

  8. Magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n ∼1.5X10 20 m -3 ). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO 2 interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 μs) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong energetic particle

  9. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  10. Superconducting magnets 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T c at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design

  11. Magnetic multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  12. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The basic properties of the Hamiltonian representation of magnetic fields in canonical form are reviewed. The theory of canonical magnetic perturbation theory is then developed and applied to the time evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a toroidal plasma. Finally, the extension of the energy principle to tearing modes, utilizing the magnetic field line Hamiltonian, is outlined

  13. Magnetic effects in electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEBOJSA D. NIKOLIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of imposed magnetic fields onto the electrodeposition of magnetic (nickel and non – magnetic (copper metals was analysed. Also, magnetic properties of electrochemically obtained nanocontacts were examined. An effort to establish a possible correlation between the morphologies of the nanocontacts and the effect of the very large ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR effect was made.

  14. Introduction to permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijlstra, H.

    1985-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning the application of permanent magnets are developed. The relevant magnet properties are discussed, with particular reference to Nd-Fe-B alloy. The author comes to the following conclusions; the air gap field B should be high, for high electrical efficiency; the magnet should face the air gap, for efficient use of the magnet material; the magnet material should therefore have a high remanence; and the new Nd-Fe-B magnet fits in nicely, having (potentially) the highest remanence ever reported in permanent magnets, combined with sufficient coercivity to sustain it

  15. SLC kicker magnet limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Mattison, T.; Bowden, G.; Weaver, J.; Bulos, F.; Fiander, D.

    1991-01-01

    The SLC Damping Ring kicker magnets requires a fast magnetic field rise time of 58 nsec, a peak field of 800 gauss, a pulse amplitude stability of 0.01%, and a reasonable operational lifetime. The original kicker magnets designed by SLAC and at Fermi were not able to fulfill the SLC kicker requirements. Extensive studies were conducted to determine the limitation in the magnets, response of the ferrite in kicker magnet, and the modifications needed to improve the kicker magnet performance. The paper details the SLAC and Fermi kicker magnets limitation of performance

  16. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.; Chaud, X.; Gautier-Picard, P.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductors, especially high T c ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO

  17. High gradient magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prothero, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    In a process in which magnetic material is trapped in a filter disposed in a magnetic field, and is unloaded by passing a fluid through the filter in the absence of the initial magnetic field, the magnetic field is first reduced to an intermediate value to allow unloading of the more weakly magnetic particles, the more strongly magnetic particles being retained and subsequently unloaded by further reduction of the magnetic field. Stage by stage reduction of the magnetic field during unloading allows separation of different species from the mixture. As an example the method can be applied to the separation of uranium compounds from mine ores. The uranium compounds are magnetic, while most of the other constituents of the ore are non-magnetic. The starting material is a suspension of the ore. Water is used for unloading. The filter material in this case is stainless steel balls. (author)

  18. Neutron scattering and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Those properties of the neutron which make it a unique tool for the study of magnetism are described. The scattering of neutrons by magnetic solids is briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the information on the magnetic structure and dynamics which is inherent in the scattering cross-section. The contribution of neutron scattering to our understanding of magnetic ordering, excitations and phase transitions is illustrated by experimental results on a variety of magnetic crystals. (author)

  19. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses ultrafast magnetization dynamics from a theoretical perspective. The manipulation of magnetization using the inverse Faraday effect has been studied, as well as magnetic relaxation processes in quantum dots. The inverse Faraday effect – the generation of a magnetic field by nonresonant, circularly polarized light – offers the possibility to control and reverse magnetization on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This is important both for the technological advant...

  20. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines

  1. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhu

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  2. Magnetically operated check valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  3. Magnetic novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemko, Polina; Orio, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of optical and X-ray observations of two quiescent novae, V2491 Cyg and V4743 Sgr. Our observations suggest the intriguing possibility of localization of hydrogen burning in magnetic novae, in which accretion is streamed to the polar caps. V2491 Cyg was observed with Suzaku more than 2 years after the outburst and V4743 Sgr was observed with XMM Newton 2 and 3.5 years after maximum. In the framework of a monitoring program of novae previously observed as super soft X-ray sources we also obtained optical spectra of V4743 Sgr with the SALT telescope 11.5 years after the eruption and of V2491 Cyg with the 6m Big Azimutal Telescope 4 and 7 years post-outburst. In order to confirm the possible white dwarf spin period of V2491 Cyg measured in the Suzaku observations we obtained photometric data using the 90cm WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak and the 1.2 m telescope in Crimea. We found that V4743 Sgr is an intermediate polar (IP) and V2491 Cyg is a strong IP candidate. Both novae show modulation of their X-ray light curves and have X-ray spectra typical of IPs. The Suzaku and XMM Newton exposures revealed that the spectra of both novae have a very soft blackbody-like component with a temperature close to that of the hydrogen burning white dwarfs in their SSS phases, but with flux by at least two orders of magnitude lower, implying a possible shrinking of emitting regions in the thin atmosphere that is heated by nuclear burning underneath it. In quiescent IPs, independently of the burning, an ultrasoft X-ray flux component originates at times in the polar regions irradiated by the accretion column, but the soft component of V4743 Sgr disappeared in 2006, indicating that the origin may be different from accretion. We suggest it may have been due to an atmospheric temperature gradient on the white dwarf surface, or to continuing localized thermonuclear burning at the bottom of the envelope, before complete turn-off. The optical spectra of V2491 Cyg and V

  4. Intrinsic magnetic torque at low magnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, M.M.; Oliveira, I.G. de.

    1993-01-01

    Using anisotropic London theory the intrinsic magnetic torque for extreme type II uniaxial superconductors for any value of the magnetic induction is obtained. It is considered the vortex lines straight and take into account the contribution of the supercurrents flowing inside the vortex core within the London theory. It is shown that the interline and intra line free energies give opposite torque contributions, the first drives the magnetic induction parallel to the superconductor's axis of symmetry and the second orthogonal to it. At high magnetic induction torque expression obtained generalizes V. Kogan's formula since it has no free parameters other than the anisotropy γ = m 1 /m 3 and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. At low magnetic induction it is proposed a way to observe vortex chains effects in the total torque based on the fact that London theory is linear and the energy to make a single vortex line in space is independent of the magnetic induction. (author)

  5. Magnetization of Paraffin-Based Magnetic Nanocolloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikanskii, Yu. I.; Ispiryan, A. G.; Kunikin, S. A.; Radionov, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    Using paraffin-based magnetic nanocolloids as an example, the reasons for maxima in the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of magnetic colloids have been discussed. The behavior of these dependences in a wide temperature interval has been analyzed for colloids in solid and liquid states. It has been concluded that the maximum observed at the melting point of paraffin can be attributed to freezing Brownian degrees of freedom in magnetite coarse particles, the magnetic moment of which is intimately related to the solid matrix. The second main maximum, which arises in the solid state, is explained by the superparamagnetic-magnetically hard transition of most fine particles at lower temperatures. It has been noted that the flatness of this maximum results from the polydispersity of the magnetic nanoparticle ensemble.

  6. Manufacturing methods and magnetic characteristics of magnetic wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, H.; Hojo, A.; Osada, H.; Namizaki, Y.; Taniuchi, H.

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between wood construction and DC magnetic characteristics for three types of magnetic wood was experimentally investigated. The results show that the magnetic characteristics of each type of magnetic wood are dependent on the magnetic materials, the density of the magnetic material and the construction of the wood. Furthermore, it was determined that the relationship between the fiber direction and the magnetic path direction of the magnetic wood influenced the wood's magnetic characteristics

  7. Magnetization effects in superconducting dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, H.; Peters, R.E.; Price, M.E.; Yamada, R.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization effect of superconductors on the field quality was investigated for some of the typical Energy Doubler bending magnets. Calculations were made using the computor program GFUN2D and compared with some measured results. Agreement between them is good. The field quality at low excitation is mainly determined by the magnetization effect. A similar effect due to a stainless collar mechanical support was also calculated, although it is not as big as the first one

  8. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate.

  9. Magnetic design of a FFAG superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Nakamoto, T.; Sasaki, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Orikasa, T.

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting magnet for a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been proposed. The required magnetic field is static and proportional to the k-th power of the orbit radius where k is the geometrical field index of the accelerator. In 2D, the required magnetic field can be generated with the optimized cross section of the coil. The cross section of the coils is a left-right asymmetry to simplify the cross section and ellipse to downsize the magnet. Local and integral 3D fields along the beam trajectory are evaluated with using new type of 3D coil configuration

  10. Magnetization reversal in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokacheva, Louisa

    2002-09-01

    I have studied the magnetization reversal in single molecule magnets (SMMs). SMMs are Van der Waals crystals, consisting of identical molecules containing transition metal ions, with high spin and large uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. They can be considered as ensembles of identical, iso-oriented nanomagnets. At high temperature, these materials behave as superparamagnets and their magnetization reversal occurs by thermal activation. At low temperature they become blocked, and their magnetic relaxation occurs via thermally assisted tunneling or pure quantum tunneling through the anisotropy barrier. We have conducted detailed experimental studies of the magnetization reversal in SMM material Mn12-acetate (Mn12) with S = 10. Low temperature measurements were conducted using micro-Hall effect magnetometry. We performed hysteresis and relaxation studies as a function of temperature, transverse field, and magnetization state of the sample. We identified magnetic sublevels that dominate the tunneling at a given field, temperature and magnetization. We observed a crossover between thermally assisted and pure quantum tunneling. The form of this crossover depends on the magnitude and direction of the applied field. This crossover is abrupt (first-order) and occurs in a narrow temperature interval (tunneling mechanisms in Mn12.

  11. Computational quantum magnetism: Role of noncollinear magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Arthur J.; Nakamura, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We are witnessing today a golden age of innovation with novel magnetic materials and with discoveries important for both basic science and device applications. Computation and simulation have played a key role in the dramatic advances of the past and those we are witnessing today. A goal-driving computational science-simulations of every-increasing complexity of more and more realistic models has been brought into greater focus with greater computing power to run sophisticated and powerful software codes like our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Indeed, significant progress has been achieved from advanced first-principles FLAPW calculations for the predictions of surface/interface magnetism. One recently resolved challenging issue is the role of noncollinear magnetism (NCM) that arises not only through the SOC, but also from the breaking of symmetry at surfaces and interfaces. For this, we will further review some specific advances we are witnessing today, including complex magnetic phenomena from noncollinear magnetism with no shape approximation for the magnetization (perpendicular MCA in transition-metal overlayers and superlattices; unidirectional anisotropy and exchange bias in FM and AFM bilayers; constricted domain walls important in quantum spin interfaces; and curling magnetic nano-scale dots as new candidates for non-volatile memory applications) and most recently providing new predictions and understanding of magnetism in novel materials such as magnetic semiconductors and multi-ferroic systems

  12. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  13. The magnet database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggett, P.; Delagi, N.; Leedy, R.; Marshall, W.; Robinson, S.L.; Tompkins, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of MagCom, a central database of SSC magnet information that is available to all magnet scientists via network connections. The database has been designed to contain the specifications and measured values of important properties for major materials, plus configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet) and the test results on completed magnets. These data will help magnet scientists to track and control the production process and to correlate the performance of magnets with the properties of their constituents

  14. AGS superconducting bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.; McInturff, A.D.; Dahl, P.F.; Abbatiello, F.; Aggus, J.; Bamberger, J.; Brown, D.; Damm, R.; Kassner, D.; Lasky, C.; Schlafke, A.

    1976-01-01

    Four large aperture superconducting bending magnets are being built for use in the experimental beams at the AGS. Each of these magnets is 2.5 m long and has a room temperature aperture of 20 cm. The magnets are similar in design to the dipoles being developed for ISABELLE and employ a low temperature iron core. Results are presented on the ''training'' behavior of the magnets and a comparison will be made with the smaller aperture versions of this design. The magnet field measurements include end fields and leakage fields as well as the harmonic components of the straight section of the magnet

  15. Discussion of parameters, lattices and beam stability for a 200-TeV low-field collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that improved technology and reduced costs in remotely-drilled small-diameter tunnels, coupled with improvements in robotic technology, may make the original concept of the ''desertron'' more realistic and affordable. In this concept, a long, small-diameter tunnel is drilled (<∼1m diameter ''sewer'' pipe) and filled with long, low-cost magnets, which are installed and serviced robotically. To obtain high-energy then requires low cost magnets, which are iron-dominated ''superferric'' magnets (B∼2 T). A large circumference is then required (∼1000 km for ∼100 TeV/beam). Table 1 shows parameters for a 200 TeV proton-proton collider, based on the premise of a large low-cost ring with super-ferric magnets. While outline designs for a low-cost ∼2T dipole have been initiated, an accelerator requires beam stability, which means quadrupole fields for focusing, as well as sextupoles for chromatic correction, and further design tolerances and correctors to obtain sufficiently linear fields. Previously we have developed initial lattices and dynamic motion discussions for the earlier 40 TeV incarnation of the superferric supercollider. In this note we apply those results to initiate discussions of the dynamic requirements of this 200 TeV collider

  16. Magnet and device for magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.; Rem, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    A planar magnet for magnetic density separation, comprising an array of pole pieces succeeding in longitudinal direction of a mounting plane, each pole piece having a body extending transversely along the mounting plane with a substantially constant cross section that includes a top segment that is

  17. Magnetic properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de W.J.M.; Swagten, H.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A review will be given of the magnetic characteristics of diluted magnetic semiconductors and the relation with the driving exchange mechanisms. II–VI as well as IV–VI compounds will be considered. The relevance of the long-range interaction and the role of the carrier concentration will be

  18. Magnetically modified biocells in constant magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, E.G.; Panina, L.K. [Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kolikov, V.A., E-mail: kolikov1@yandex.ru [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogomolova, E.V. [Botanical Institute of the RAS after V.L.Komarov, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Snetov, V.N. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cherepkova, I.A. [Saint Petersburg State Institute of Technology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kiselev, A.A. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell’ size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. - Highlights: • The inverse problem was solved for finding zero velocity isolines of magnetically modified biological cells. • Solution of the inverse problem depends on the size of cells and the number of nanoparticles attached to the single cell. • The experimental data are in agreement with theoretical solution.

  19. Active Magnetic Bearings – Magnetic Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... of the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two experimental different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in details. A special test rig is designed where the 4 poles - AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high precision characterization...... of the magnetic forces are led by using different experimental tests: (I) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor; (II) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  20. Magnetization reversal mechanisms under oblique magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntallis, N.; Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr

    2017-03-01

    In this work finite element micromagnetic simulations were performed in order to study the reversal mechanisms of spherical ferromagnetic particles with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, when they are magnetized along an oblique direction with respect to the anisotropy axis. Magnetization loops are taken in different directions of external magnetic field, at different anisotropy constants and particle sizes. In the simulation results, the three reversal mechanisms (coherent, curling and domains) are observed and new phenomena arise due to the action of oblique magnetic fields. Moreover, the dependence of the critical fields with respect to the angle of the external field is presented. - Highlights: • Finite element micromagnetic simulation of the three different reversal mechanisms. • For the curling mechanism, the new phenomenon is the rotation of the vortex. • In the domain reversal mechanism, the formed domain wall is smaller than 180°. • In soft ferromagnetic particles a rearrangement of the magnetic domains is observed.

  1. Single molecule magnets from magnetic building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, W.; Paretzki, A.; Cervetti, C.; Hohloch, S.; Rauschenbach, S.; Kern, K.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.; M&üLler, P.

    2013-03-01

    We provide a basic set of magnetic building blocks that can be rationally assembled, similar to magnetic LEGO bricks, in order to create a huge variety of magnetic behavior. Using rare-earth centers and multipyridine ligands, fine-tuning of intra and intermolecular exchange interaction is demonstrated. We have investigated a series of molecules with monomeric, dimeric and trimeric lanthanide centers using SQUID susceptometry and Hall bar magnetometry. A home-made micro-Hall-probe magnetometer was used to measure magnetic hysteresis loops at mK temperatures and fields up to 17 T. All compounds show hysteresis below blocking temperatures of 3 to 4 K. The correlation of the assembly of the building blocks with the magnetic properties will be discussed.

  2. Magnetic shielding for MRI superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, A.; Hirooka, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an optimal design of a highly homogeneous superconducting coil system with magnetic shielding for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The presented optimal design method; which is originally proposed in our earlier papers, is a combination of the hybrid finite element and boundary element method for analysis of an axially symmetric nonlinear open boundary magnetic field problem, and the mathematical programming method for solving the corresponding optimization problem. In this paper, the multi-objective goal programming method and the nonlinear least squares method have been adopted. The optimal design results of 1.5- and 4.7-Tesla-magnet systems with different types of magnetic shielding for whole-body imaging are compared and the advantages of a combination of active and yoke shields are shown

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  4. An integrated magnetics component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics component comprising a magnetically permeable core comprising a base member extending in a horizontal plane and first, second, third and fourth legs protruding substantially perpendicularly from the base member. First, second, third...... and fourth output inductor windings are wound around the first, second, third and fourth legs, respectively. A first input conductor of the integrated magnetics component has a first conductor axis and extends in-between the first, second, third and fourth legs to induce a first magnetic flux through a first...... flux path of the magnetically permeable core. A second input conductor of the integrated magnetics component has a second coil axis extending substantially perpendicularly to the first conductor axis to induce a second magnetic flux through a second flux path of the magnetically permeable core...

  5. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  6. ISR magnet power supplies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    At the left, for the main magnets, the 18 kV switchgear is in the foreground and at the rear are cubicles with rectifiers and filters. At the right, rear, are rectifiers for pole face windings and auxiliary magnets.

  7. Magnet Quench 101

    OpenAIRE

    Bottura, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives a broad summary of the physical phenomena associated with the quench of a superconducting magnet. This paper gives a broad summary of the physical phenomena associated with the quench of a superconducting magnet.

  8. Big magnetoresistance: magnetic polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresa, J.M. de; Ibarra, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    By using several macro and microscopic experimental techniques we have given evidence for magnetoresistance in manganese oxides caused by the effect of the magnetic field on the magnetic polarons. (Author) 3 refs

  9. Enhanced Magnetic Model 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Enhanced Magnetic Model (EMM) extends to degree and order 720, resolving magnetic anomalies down to 56 km wavelength. The higher resolution of the EMM results in...

  10. Enhanced Magnetic Model 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Enhanced Magnetic Model (EMM) extends to degree and order 720, resolving magnetic anomalies down to 56 km wavelength. The higher resolution of the EMM results in...

  11. Magnetism basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanita, Carmen-Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    This textbook is aimed at engineering students who are likely to come across magnetics applications in their professional practice. Whether designing lithography equipment containing ferromagnetic brushes, or detecting defects in aeronautics, some basic knowledge of 21st century magnetism is needed. From the magnetic tape on the pocket credit card to the read head in a personal computer, people run into magnetism in many products. Furthermore, in a variety of disciplines tools of the trade exploit magnetic principles, and many interdisciplinary laboratory research areas cross paths with magnetic phenomena that may seem mysterious to the untrained mind. Therefore, this course offers a broad coverage of magnetism topics encountered more often in this millenium, revealing key concepts on which many practical applications rest. Some traditional subjects in magnetism are discussed in the first half of the book, followed by areas likely to spark the curiosity of those more interested in today’s technological achi...

  12. Tapered-Wiggler Free-Electron Laser Oscillator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    16 ) are usually ruled in substrates of pyrex or copper (for infrared applications). Typical CW S damage levels at 2.06 /lm wavelength are 10 XW/cm 2...degradation limit WW2 ; 2r/.D, (1) where r is either the average power or single-pulse integrated energy exposure within the cavity, whichever is

  13. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. (author)

  14. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  15. Supercollider: Magnet update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-07-15

    The heart of the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) is the set of superconducting magnets to hold its beams in orbit. Approximately 8,000 dipoles and 2,000 quadrupoles are needed, as well as many other special magnets. In addition the 2 TeV high energy booster would also be a superconducting machine, using about 1,200 magnets. In all, some 12,000 superconducting magnets would need to be precision built at the lowest possible cost.

  16. Supercollider: Magnet update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The heart of the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) is the set of superconducting magnets to hold its beams in orbit. Approximately 8,000 dipoles and 2,000 quadrupoles are needed, as well as many other special magnets. In addition the 2 TeV high energy booster would also be a superconducting machine, using about 1,200 magnets. In all, some 12,000 superconducting magnets would need to be precision built at the lowest possible cost

  17. Elements of magnetic switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaland, K.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter describes magnetic switching as a method of connecting a capacitor bank (source) to a load; reviews several successful applications of magnetic switching, and discusses switching transformers, limitations and future possibilities. Some of the inflexibility and especially the high cost of magnetic materials may be overcome with the availability of the new splash cooled ribbons (Metglas). Experience has shown that magnetics works despite shock, radiation or noise interferences

  18. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a tokamak reactor including a vacuum vessel, toroidal confining magnetic field coils disposed concentrically around the minor radius of the vacuum vessel, and poloidal confining magnetic field coils, an ohmic heating coil system comprising at least one magnetic coil disposed concentrically around a toroidal field coil, wherein the magnetic coil is wound around the toroidal field coil such that the ohmic heating coil enclosed the toroidal field coil

  19. Magnetic actuators and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, John R

    2014-01-01

    An accessible, comprehensive guide on magnetic actuators and sensors, this fully updated second edition of Magnetic Actuators and Sensors includes the latest advances, numerous worked calculations, illustrations, and real-life applications. Covering magnetics, actuators, sensors, and systems, with updates of new technologies and techniques, this exemplary learning tool emphasizes computer-aided design techniques, especially magnetic finite element analysis, commonly used by today's engineers. Detailed calculations, numerous illustrations, and discussions of discrepancies make this text an inva

  20. Preliminary experiments on a planar electron beam for an intense free electron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsumasa; Iwata, Kazuma; Kitamura, Taro; Yamada, Naohisa; Soga, Yukihiro; Kamada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Ginzburg, Naum S.

    2013-01-01

    A planar wiggler magnetic field was used to increase the output power of an intense free electron maser. As a preliminary experiment, a cylindrical electron beam was injected into a planar wiggler field with an axial magnetic field. Without the axial magnetic field, the cylindrical beam could not propagate through the wiggler field with length of 1 m. The microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was observed only when the beam propagates through the wiggler field. The frequency was nearly equal to the expected frequency of the free electron maser interaction. Though a sheet electron beam with nearly the same energy propagated through the planar wiggler field with deformation of its cross section, the microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was not observed. (author)

  1. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  2. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  3. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  4. Magnetic modes in superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.A.

    1990-04-01

    A first discussion of reciprocal propagation of magnetic modes in a superlattice is presented. In the absence of an applied external magnetic field a superllatice made of alternate layers of the type antiferromagnetic-non-magnetic materials presents effects similar to those of phonons in a dielectric superlattice. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  6. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  7. Color and magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    Schwinger's conjecture that the color degree of freedom of a quark is equivalent to its degree of freedom of taking different magnetic charges provides a plausible motivation for extending color to leptons. Leptons are just quarks with zero magnetic charges. It is shown that baryon number and lepton number can be replaced by fermion number and magnetic charge

  8. Rare earth permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Akira

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a review of the new technologies for Nd-Fe-B magnets, their markets and future perspectives. This type of magnet is a product approaching the ideal magnet, and is based upon the development history of two previous generations of Sm-Co alloy systems and the recent progress on physical and metallurgical research. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic polarizability of pion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luschevskaya, E.V., E-mail: luschevskaya@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Bolshaia Cheremushkinskaia 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, 690950 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, O.E., E-mail: olga.solovjeva@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Bolshaia Cheremushkinskaia 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Teryaev, O.V., E-mail: teryaev@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe highway, 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-10

    We explore the energy dependence of π mesons off the background Abelian magnetic field on the base of quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory and calculate the magnetic dipole polarizability of charged and neutral pions for various lattice volumes and lattice spacings. The contribution of the magnetic hyperpolarizability to the neutral pion energy has been also found.

  10. Omnigenous magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    In omnigenous magnetic fields particles' drift surfaces coincide with plasma magnetic surfaces. In this paper we formulate equations of omnigenous magnetic fields in natural curvilinear coordinates. An analysis of fields which are omnigenous only in the paraxial approximation is presented. (author)

  11. Magnetism in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, J. M.; Rowe, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    An overview is presented of magnetism in meteorites. A glossary of magnetism terminology followed by discussion of the various techniques used for magnetism studies in meteorites are included. The generalized results from use of these techniques by workers in the field are described. A brief critical analysis is offered.

  12. The Galactic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jinlin

    2006-01-01

    A good progress has been made on studies of Galactic magnetic fields in last 10 years. I describe what we want to know about the Galactic magnetic fields, and then review we current knowledge about magnetic fields in the Galactic disk, the Galactic halo and the field strengths. I also listed many unsolved problems on this area

  13. RF and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of how applied radiofrequency and magnet technology are used, and could be used, in the nuclear medical field are presented. Specific examples are: 1) the THERAC 25 electron accelerator project; 2) large, high field magnet systems for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); 3) the superconducting cyclotron; and 4. hyperthermia treatment. Emphasis is placed on the example of hyperthermia treatment

  14. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived...

  15. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  16. Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Martínez González, M. J.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical processes. They are difficult to detect and characterize since often their properties have to be inferred through interpreting the polarization of the light. Magnetic fields are also challenging to model and understand. Magnetized plasmas behave following highly non-linear differential equations having no general solution, so that every astrophysical problem represents a special case to be studied independently. Hence, magnetic fields are often an inconvenient subject which is overlooked or simply neglected (the elephant in the room, as they are dubbed in poster of the school). Such difficulty burdens the research on magnetic fields, which has evolved to become a very technical subject, with many small disconnected communities studying specific aspects and details. The school tried to amend the situation by providing a unifying view of the subject. The students had a chance to understand the behavior of magnetic fields in all astrophysical contexts, from cosmology to the Sun, and from starbursts to AGNs. The school was planed to present a balanced yet complete review of our knowledge, with excursions into the unknown to point out present and future lines of research. The subject of Cosmic Magnetic Fields was split into seven different topics: cosmic magnetic field essentials, solar magnetic fields, stellar magnetic fields, the role of magnetic fields on AGN feedback, magnetic fields in galaxies, magnetic fields in galaxy clusters and at larger scales, and primordial magnetic fields and magnetic fields in the early Universe. The corresponding lectures were delivered by seven well known and experienced scientists that have played key roles in the major advances of the field during the last years: F. Cattaneo, P. Judge, O. Kochukhov, R. Keppens, R. Beck, K. Dolag, and F. Finelli. Their lectures were recorded and are freely available at the IAC website: http://iactalks.iac.es/talks/serie/19.

  17. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E., E-mail: bekas@itmo.by [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S. [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Istomin, Yuri P. [N. N. Alexandrov National Cancer Center of Belarus, Lesnoy-2, Minsk 223040 (Belarus); Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S. [Institute of Physiology, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya str. 28, Minsk 220072 (Belarus)

    2015-04-15

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body. - Highlights: • Hard-magnetic nanoparticles are shown superior for hyperthetmia to superparamagnetic. • Optimal system parameters are found from magnetic reversal model in movable particle. • Penetrating suspension of HM particles with aggregation-independent SAR is developed. • For the first time, mice with tumors are healed in AC field acceptable for human body.

  18. Magnetism and metallurgy of soft magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chih-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Soft magnetic materials are economically and technologically the most important of all magnetic materials. In particular, the development of new materials and novel applications for the computer and telecommunications industries during the past few decades has immensely broadened the scope and altered the nature of soft magnetic materials. In addition to metallic substances, nonmetallic compounds and amorphous thin films are coming increasingly important. This thorough, well-organized volume - on of the most comprehensive treatments available - offers a coherent, logical presentation of the p

  19. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decurtins, S.; Pellaux, R.; Schmalle, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T c = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  1. Magnetic Check Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Poppet in proposed check valve restored to closed condition by magnetic attraction instead of spring force. Oscillations suppressed, with consequent reduction of wear. Stationary magnetic disk mounted just upstream of poppet, also containing magnet. Valve body nonmagnetic. Forward pressure or flow would push poppet away from stationary magnetic disk so fluid flows easily around poppet. Stop in valve body prevents poppet from being swept away. When flow stopped or started to reverse, magnetic attraction draws poppet back to disk. Poppet then engages floating O-ring, thereby closing valve and preventing reverse flow. Floating O-ring facilitates sealing at low loads.

  2. Magnetic nanocomposite sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-06

    A magnetic nanocomposite device is described herein for a wide range of sensing applications. The device utilizes the permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires to allow operation without the application of an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies miniaturization and integration into microsystems. In5 addition, the nanocomposite benefits from the high elasticity and easy patterning of the polymer-based material, leading to a corrosion-resistant, flexible material that can be used to realize extreme sensitivity. In combination with magnetic sensor elements patterned underneath the nanocomposite, the nanocomposite device realizes highly sensitive and power efficient flexible artificial cilia sensors for flow measurement or tactile sensing.

  3. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decurtins, S; Pellaux, R; Schmalle, H W [Zurich Univ., Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T{sub c} = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs.

  4. Magnets in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya S Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnets have generated great interest within dentistry. They have been used for various applications in orthodontics and prosthodontics. Earlier use of magnets was limited due to the unavailability of small size magnets, but after the introduction of rare earth magnets and their availability in smaller sizes, their use has increased considerably. They can be placed within prostheses without being obtrusive in the mouth. Their main use in orthodontics has been for tooth movement and in prosthodontics has been in maxillofacial prosthesis and in overdentures as retentive aids. This article reviews the types of magnets available and their application in maxillofacial prosthesis and overdentures, followed by other advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  6. Optimally segmented magnetic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Bahl, Christian; Bjørk, Rasmus

    We present a semi-analytical algorithm for magnet design problems, which calculates the optimal way to subdivide a given design region into uniformly magnetized segments.The availability of powerful rare-earth magnetic materials such as Nd-Fe-B has broadened the range of applications of permanent...... is not available.We will illustrate the results for magnet design problems from different areas, such as electric motors/generators (as the example in the picture), beam focusing for particle accelerators and magnetic refrigeration devices.......We present a semi-analytical algorithm for magnet design problems, which calculates the optimal way to subdivide a given design region into uniformly magnetized segments.The availability of powerful rare-earth magnetic materials such as Nd-Fe-B has broadened the range of applications of permanent...... magnets[1][2]. However, the powerful rare-earth magnets are generally expensive, so both the scientific and industrial communities have devoted a lot of effort into developing suitable design methods. Even so, many magnet optimization algorithms either are based on heuristic approaches[3...

  7. Superconducting pulsed magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mechanisms and calculation of total losses in the magnet. The need for cooling to minimize temperature rise in a magnet. Measuring ac losses in wires and in magnets. Lecture 5. Stab...

  8. The magnet database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, M.J.; Delagi, N.; Horton, B.; Ivey, J.C.; Leedy, R.; Li, X.; Marshall, B.; Robinson, S.L.; Tompkins, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Test Department of the Magnet Systems Division of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is developing a central database of SSC magnet information that will be available to all magnet scientists at the SSCL or elsewhere, via network connections. The database contains information on the magnets' major components, configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet), measurements made at major fabrication stages, and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. Recent efforts have focused on the development of procedures for user-friendly access to the data, including displays in the format of the production open-quotes travelerclose quotes data sheets, standard summary reports, and a graphical interface for ad hoc queues and plots

  9. Magnetism in the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, A.J.; Gschneider, K.A. Jr

    1991-01-01

    This special volume aims at providing a historical perspective of the developments that have taken place since the first volume of the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, that appeared in late 1975, to identify the most important issues and to provide a perspective for developments anticipated in the 1990's. The papers contained in this book cover many of the scientifically exciting and technologically important aspects of magnetism. They deal with research on various materials including amorphous, permanent and semiconducting magnets, magnetic and magneto-optic recording materials, strongly correlated electron systems and high Tc-superconductors. Several important experimental methods for measuring magnetic behaviour are covered, but the book also contains in-depth theoretical research of fundamental problems in magnetism

  10. Magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-05-11

    A broad overview on magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts is presented and the use of magnetic nanomaterials as catalysts is discussed. Magnetic materials are used as organocatalysts and their applications range to challenging reactions, such as hydroformylation and olefin metathesis. Magnetic nanomaterials are also being used in environmental applications, such as for photo- and biocatalysis and for the adsorption and removal of pollutants from air and water. These materials show great promise as enantioselective catalysts, which are used extensively for the synthesis of medicines, drugs, and other bioactive molecules. By functionalizing these materials using chiral ligands, a series of chiral nanocatalysts can be designed, offering great potential to reuse these otherwise expensive catalyst systems. Characterization of magnetic catalysts is often a challenging task, and NMR characterization of these catalysts is difficult because the magnetic nature of the materials interferes with the magnetic field of the spectrometer.

  11. Conventional magnets. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.

    1994-01-01

    This second paper covers the wide range of techniques associated with a.c. and pulsed magnets and associated power supplies. The necessary changes in magnet design to minimise eddy losses in low frequency magnets are first considered and this leads to a broader discussion of the different types of steel used in magnet yokes. Inductance is then considered and the traditional power supply circuit used for a.c. magnets is described. The paper then presents a simple description of the higher-frequency pulsed magnets and supply circuits used for injection and extraction and contrasts a number of different design concepts for both kicker and septum systems. In conclusion, the relevant properties of high-frequency magnetic materials are briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  12. The OPERA magnetic spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Dusini, S; Dulach, B; Fanin, C; Felici, G; Corso, F D; Garfagnini, A; Grianti, F; Gustavino, C; Monacelli, P; Paoloni, A; Stanco, L; Spinetti, M; Terranova, F; Votano, L

    2004-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment foresees the construction of two magnetized iron spectrometers located after the lead-nuclear emulsion targets. The magnet is made up of two vertical walls of rectangular cross section connected by return yokes. The particle trajectories are measured by high precision drift tubes located before and after the arms of the magnet. Moreover, the magnet steel is instrumented with Resistive Plate Chambers that ease pattern recognition and allow a calorimetric measurement of the hadronic showers. In this paper we review the construction of the spectrometers. In particular, we describe the results obtained from the magnet and RPC prototypes and the installation of the final apparatus at the Gran Sasso laboratories. We discuss the mechanical and magnetic properties of the steel and the techniques employed to calibrate the field in the bulk of the magnet. Moreover, results of the tests and issues concerning the mass production of the Resistive Plate Chambers are reported. Final...

  13. Invisible magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach-Batlle, Rosa; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2018-04-01

    Sensing magnetic fields is essential in many applications in biomedicine, transportation, or smart cities. The distortion magnetic sensors create in response to the field they are detecting may hinder their use, for example, in applications requiring dense packaging of sensors or accurately shaped field distributions. For sensing electromagnetic waves, cloaking shells that reduce the scattering of sensors have been introduced. However, the problem of making a magnetic sensor undetectable remains unsolved. Here, we present a general strategy on how to make a sensor magnetically invisible while keeping its ability to sense. The sensor is rendered undetectable by surrounding it with a spherical shell having a tailored magnetic permeability. Our method can be applied to arbitrary shaped magnetic sensors in arbitrary magnetic fields. The invisibility can be made exact when the sensor is spherical and the probed field is uniform. A metasurface composed of superconducting pieces is presented as a practical realization of the ideal invisibility shell.

  14. Magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek; Luque, Rafael L.; Fihri, Aziz; Zhu, Haibo; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    A broad overview on magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts is presented and the use of magnetic nanomaterials as catalysts is discussed. Magnetic materials are used as organocatalysts and their applications range to challenging reactions, such as hydroformylation and olefin metathesis. Magnetic nanomaterials are also being used in environmental applications, such as for photo- and biocatalysis and for the adsorption and removal of pollutants from air and water. These materials show great promise as enantioselective catalysts, which are used extensively for the synthesis of medicines, drugs, and other bioactive molecules. By functionalizing these materials using chiral ligands, a series of chiral nanocatalysts can be designed, offering great potential to reuse these otherwise expensive catalyst systems. Characterization of magnetic catalysts is often a challenging task, and NMR characterization of these catalysts is difficult because the magnetic nature of the materials interferes with the magnetic field of the spectrometer.

  15. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. Based on preliminary tests, it was seen that permanent quadrupole magnets can offer a low cost, reliable solution in applications requiring small, fixed-field focusing devices for use in ion or electron-beam transport systems. Permanent magnets do require special considerations in design, fabrication, handling, and service that are different than encountered in conventional quadrupole magnets. If these basic conditions are satisfied, the resulting beam-focusing device would be stable, maintenance free, with virtually an indefinite lifetime

  16. Magnetism in lanthanide superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Sarthour, R.S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of heavy rare-earth superlattices have revealed the stabilization of novel magnetic phases chat are not present in bulk materials. The most striking result is the propagation of the magnetic ordering through nonmagnetic spacer materials. Here we describe some recent X......-ray magnetic resonant scattering studies of light rare-earth superlattices, which illuminate the mechanism of interlayer coupling, and provide access to different areas of Physics. such as the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. Magnetic X-ray diffraction is found to be particularly well suited...... to the study of the modulated magnetic structures in superlattices, and provides unique information on the conduction-electron spin-density wave responsible for the propagation of magnetic order. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Microscale magnetic compasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Zhang, Desai; Eisterer, Michael; Ayala, Paola; Pichler, Thomas; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.

    2017-09-01

    Microscale magnetic compasses have been synthesized with high yield. These ferromagnetic iron carbide nano-particles, which are encapsulated in a pair of parallel carbon needles, change their orientation in response to an external magnetic field. Electron holography reveals magnetic fields confined to the vicinity of the bicone-shaped particles, which are composed of only a few ferromagnetic domains. Aligned magnetically and encapsulated in an acrylate polymer matrix, these micro-compasses exhibit anisotropic bulk magnetic permeability with an easy axis normal to the needle direction that can be understood as a result of the anisotropic demagnetizing field of a non-spherical single-domain particle. This novel type of material with orthogonal magnetic and structural axes could be highly useful as magnetic components in electromagnetic wave absorbent materials and magnetorheological fluids.

  18. In-situ magnetization of NdFeB magnets for permanent magnet machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.; Eastham, T.R.; Dawson, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    In-situ magnetizers are needed to facilitate the assembly of permanent magnet machines and to remagnetize the magnets after weakening due to a fault condition. The air-core magnetizer in association with the silicon steel lamination structure of the rotor has advantages over its iron-core counterpart. This novel method has been used to magnetize the NdFeB magnets in a 30-hp permanent magnet synchronous motor. The magnetizing capability for different magnetizer geometries was investigated for the magnetization of NdFeB material. The design, testing, and operation of this magnetizer are reported in this paper

  19. Wood construction and magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Hideo; Hojo, Atsushi; Seki, Kyoushiro; Takashiba, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The results of experiments involving the AC and DC magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood were studied by taking into consideration the wood construction and fiber direction. The experimental results show that the sufficient amount of impregnated magnetic fluid varies depending on the fiber direction and length, and the grain face of the wood material. The impregnated type magnetic wood sample that is fully impregnated by magnetic fluid has a 60% saturation magnetization compared to the saturation magnetization of magnetic fluid. Samples for which the wood fiber direction was the same as the direction of the magnetic path had a higher magnetization intensity and permeability

  20. Mercury's Lithospheric Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Phillips, R. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Al Asad, M.; Plattner, A.; Mast, S.; Kinczyk, M. J.; Prockter, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have been used to demonstrate the presence of lithospheric magnetization on Mercury. Larger amplitude fields resulting from the core dynamo and the strongly time-varying magnetospheric current systems are first estimated and subtracted from the magnetic field data to isolate lithospheric signals with wavelengths less than 500 km. These signals (hereafter referred to as data) are only observed at spacecraft altitudes less than 120 km, and are typically a few to 10 nT in amplitude. We present and compare equivalent source dipole magnetization models for latitudes 35°N to 75°N obtained from two distinct approaches to constrain the distribution and origin of lithospheric magnetization. First, models that fit either the data or the surface field predicted from a regional spherical harmonic representation of the data (see Plattner & Johnson abstract) and that minimize the root mean square (RMS) value of the magnetization are derived. Second, models in which the spatial distribution of magnetization required to fit the data is minimized are derived using the approach of Parker (1991). As seen previously, the largest amplitudes of lithospheric magnetization are concentrated around the Caloris basin. With this exception, across the northern hemisphere there are no overall correlations of magnetization with surface geology, although higher magnetizations are found in regions with darker surfaces. Similarly, there is no systematic correlation of magnetization signatures with crater materials, although there are specific instances of craters with interiors or ejecta that have magnetizations distinct from the surrounding region. For the latter case, we observe no correlation of the occurrence of these signatures with crater degradation state (a proxy for age). At the lowest spacecraft altitudes (source depths less than O(10 km) are unlikely in most regions

  1. Magnetic Field Measurements in Beam Guiding Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Henrichsen, K N

    1998-01-01

    Electromagnets used as beam guiding elements in particle accelerators and colliders require very tight tole-rances on their magnetic fields and on their alignment along the particle path. This article describes the methods and equipment used for magnetic measurements in beam transport magnets. Descriptions are given of magnetic resonance techniques, various induction coil methods, Hall generator measurements, the fluxgate magnetometer as well as the recently developed method of beam based alignment. References of historical nature as well as citations of recent work are given. The present commercial availability of the different sensors and asso-ciated equipment is indicated. Finally we shall try to analyze possible future needs for developments in those fields.

  2. Magnetic Excitations and Magnetic Ordering in Praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Chapellier, M.; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The dispersion relations for magnetic excitons propagating on the hexagonal sites of double-hcp Pr provide clear evidence for a pronounced anisotropy in the exchange. The energy of the excitations decreases rapidly as the temperature is lowered, but becomes almost constant below about 7 K......, in agreement with a random-phase-approximation calculation. No evidence of magnetic ordering has been observed above 0.4 K, although the exchange is close to the critical value necessary for an antiferromagnetic state....

  3. The performance of a superconducting micro-undulator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Ingold, G.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.B.

    1990-05-01

    We report on the performance of a prototype of a super-ferric micro-undulator. The micro-undulator consists of a continuous winding of niobium-titanium wire wound on a low carbon steel yoke. It is about 3 periods long with a period of 8.8 mm and a gap of 4.4 mm. The undulator achieves the a peak magnetic field on axis of over 0.5 Tesla. Asymmetry of the field pattern due to a dipole component was identified, analyzed and a correction has been applied to the undulator ends to produce a symmetric field distribution. Within the precision of the measurement the field pattern produced by the super-ferric undulator needed no correction. 4 refs., 7 figs

  4. Performance of Magnetic Filter for Separation of Magnetic Gel Particles

    OpenAIRE

    栗延, 俊太郎; 尾崎, 博明; 渡辺, 恒雄; クリノブ, シュンタロウ; オザキ, ヒロアキ; ワタナベ, ツネオ; Shuntaro, KURINOBU; Hiroaki, OZAKI; Tuneo, WATANABE

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new wastewater treatment process using magnetic gel particles containing immobilized microorganisms and magnetic particles. The performance of magnetic gel particles using a magnetic filter is very important to control the process. In this study, the performance of a magnetic filter was studied for magnetic gel, particles. Agar particles containing magnetite particles were used as gel particles. The recovery and the relative retention area of magnetic gel particles on the ...

  5. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  6. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process

  7. Magnetism in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, John

    2000-03-01

    For centuries physicians, scientists and others have postulated an important role, either as a cause of disease or as a mode of therapy, for magnetism in medicine. Although there is a straightforward role in the removal of magnetic foreign bodies, the majority of the proposed magnetic applications have been controversial and have often been attributed by mainstream practitioners to fraud, quackery or self-deception. Calculations indicate that many of the proposed methods of action, e.g., the field-induced alignment of water molecules or alterations in blood flow, are of negligible magnitude. Nonetheless, even at the present time, the use of small surface magnets (magnetotherapy) to treat arthritis and similar diseases is a widespread form of folk medicine and is said to involve sales of approximately one billion dollars per year. Another medical application of magnetism associated with Mesmer and others (eventually known as animal magnetism) has been discredited, but has had a culturally significant role in the development of hypnotism and as one of the sources of modern psychotherapy. Over the last two decades, in marked contrast to previous applications of magnetism to medicine, magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, has become firmly established as a clinical diagnostic tool. MRI permits the non-invasive study of subtle biological processes in intact, living organisms and approximately 150,000,000 diagnostic studies have been performed since its clinical introduction in the early 1980s. The dramatically swift and widespread acceptance of MRI was made possible by scientific and engineering advances - including nuclear magnetic resonance, computer technology and whole-body-sized, high field superconducting magnets - in the decades following World War Two. Although presently used much less than MRI, additional applications, including nerve and muscle stimulation by pulsed magnetic fields, the use of magnetic forces to guide surgical instruments, and imaging utilizing

  8. Kicker magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the kicker magnet is studied by use of the program POISSON. For using the dc-code POISSON in the ac problem of the kicker magnet, an approximation of the ac effects is made, this simplifying the ac problem into a dc problem. The study of the magnet is taken in two steps: assuming the γ of the ferrite material is fixed in the calculation to get a preliminary design of the magnet; using the real B /minus/ H curve of the CMD5005 ferrite material in the calculation to get the final design of the magnet. The stored energy, the excitation curve and the excitation efficiency of the kicker magnet are also discussed. 10 figs., 7 tabs

  9. The 2017 Magnetism Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, D.; Valenzuela, S. O.; Makarov, D.; Marrows, C. H.; Fullerton, E. E.; Fischer, P.; McCord, J.; Vavassori, P.; Mangin, S.; Pirro, P.; Hillebrands, B.; Kent, A. D.; Jungwirth, T.; Gutfleisch, O.; Kim, C. G.; Berger, A.

    2017-09-01

    Building upon the success and relevance of the 2014 Magnetism Roadmap, this 2017 Magnetism Roadmap edition follows a similar general layout, even if its focus is naturally shifted, and a different group of experts and, thus, viewpoints are being collected and presented. More importantly, key developments have changed the research landscape in very relevant ways, so that a novel view onto some of the most crucial developments is warranted, and thus, this 2017 Magnetism Roadmap article is a timely endeavour. The change in landscape is hereby not exclusively scientific, but also reflects the magnetism related industrial application portfolio. Specifically, Hard Disk Drive technology, which still dominates digital storage and will continue to do so for many years, if not decades, has now limited its footprint in the scientific and research community, whereas significantly growing interest in magnetism and magnetic materials in relation to energy applications is noticeable, and other technological fields are emerging as well. Also, more and more work is occurring in which complex topologies of magnetically ordered states are being explored, hereby aiming at a technological utilization of the very theoretical concepts that were recognised by the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. Given this somewhat shifted scenario, it seemed appropriate to select topics for this Roadmap article that represent the three core pillars of magnetism, namely magnetic materials, magnetic phenomena and associated characterization techniques, as well as applications of magnetism. While many of the contributions in this Roadmap have clearly overlapping relevance in all three fields, their relative focus is mostly associated to one of the three pillars. In this way, the interconnecting roles of having suitable magnetic materials, understanding (and being able to characterize) the underlying physics of their behaviour and utilizing them for applications and devices is well illustrated, thus giving an

  10. The 2017 Magnetism Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander, D; Valenzuela, S O; Makarov, D

    2017-01-01

    Building upon the success and relevance of the 2014 Magnetism Roadmap, this 2017 Magnetism Roadmap edition follows a similar general layout, even if its focus is naturally shifted, and a different group of experts and, thus, viewpoints are being collected and presented. More importantly, key developments have changed the research landscape in very relevant ways, so that a novel view onto some of the most crucial developments is warranted, and thus, this 2017 Magnetism Roadmap article is a timely endeavour. The change in landscape is hereby not exclusively scientific, but also reflects the magnetism related industrial application portfolio. Specifically, Hard Disk Drive technology, which still dominates digital storage and will continue to do so for many years, if not decades, has now limited its footprint in the scientific and research community, whereas significantly growing interest in magnetism and magnetic materials in relation to energy applications is noticeable, and other technological fields are emerging as well. Also, more and more work is occurring in which complex topologies of magnetically ordered states are being explored, hereby aiming at a technological utilization of the very theoretical concepts that were recognised by the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. Given this somewhat shifted scenario, it seemed appropriate to select topics for this Roadmap article that represent the three core pillars of magnetism, namely magnetic materials, magnetic phenomena and associated characterization techniques, as well as applications of magnetism. While many of the contributions in this Roadmap have clearly overlapping relevance in all three fields, their relative focus is mostly associated to one of the three pillars. In this way, the interconnecting roles of having suitable magnetic materials, understanding (and being able to characterize) the underlying physics of their behaviour and utilizing them for applications and devices is well illustrated, thus giving an

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Trohidou, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with diameters in the range of a few nanometers are today at the cutting edge of modern technology and innovation because of their use in numerous applications ranging from engineering to biomedicine. A great deal of scientific interest has been focused on the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The understanding of interparticle interactions is necessary to clarify the physics of these assemblies and their use in the development of high-performance magnetic materials. This book reviews prominent research studies on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanoparticle assemblies, gathering together experimental and computational techniques in an effort to reveal their optimized magnetic properties for biomedical use and as ultra-high magnetic recording media.

  13. Superconducting accelerator magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles and correction magnets are necessary to achieve the high magnetic fields required for big accelerators presently in construction or in the design phase. Different designs of superconducting accelerator magnets are described and the designs chosen at the big accelerator laboratories are presented. The most frequently used cosθ coil configuration is discussed in detail. Approaches for calculating the magnetic field quality including coil end fields are presented. Design details of the cables, coils, mechanical structures, yokes, helium vessels and cryostats including thermal radiation shields and support structures used in superconducting magnets are given. Necessary material properties are mentioned. Finally, the main results of magnetic field measurements and quench statistics are presented. (orig.)

  14. Remanent magnetism at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that a strong case can be made for an intrinsic magnetic field of dynamo origin for Mars earlier in its history. The typical equatorial magnetic field intensity would have been equal to about 0.01-0.1 gauss. The earlier dynamo activity is no longer extant, but a significant remanent magnetic field may exist. A highly non-dipole magnetic field could result from the remanent magnetization of the surface. Remanent magnetization may thus play an important role in the Mars solar wind interactions, in contrast to Venus with its surface temperatures above the Curie point. The anomalous characteristics of Mars'solar wind interaction compared to that of Venus may be explicable on this basis.

  15. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  16. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.; Levush, B.

    1994-05-01

    This task involves the feasibility of high-power pulsed, high- efficiency, millimeter-wave free electron lasers (FEL) for ecr of thermonuclear plasmas. The research undertaken is to develop high average power FEL at voltage below IMV allowing for smaller and less costly power supplies. Linear amplification experiments employing a No. 56 period untapered wiggler have been conducted, and substantial small signal gain was observed at 95 GHz over a wide range of experimental conditions consistent with the prediction of one-dimensional numerical simulation. Progress is also reported on theoretical studies relating to the development of high-power gryotron and the ability to predict and improve the performance of various cavity designs

  17. Magnetic particle separation using controllable magnetic force switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zunghang; Lee, C.-P.; Lai, M.-F.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic particle separation is very important in biomedical applications. In this study, a magnetic particle microseparator is proposed that uses micro magnets to produce open/closed magnetic flux for switching on/off the separation. When all magnets are magnetized in the same direction, the magnetic force switch for separation is on; almost all magnetic particles are trapped in the channel side walls and the separation rate can reach 95%. When the magnetization directions of adjacent magnets are opposite, the magnetic force switch for separation is off, and most magnetic particles pass through the microchannel without being trapped. For the separation of multi-sized magnetic particles, the proposed microseparator is numerically demonstrated to have high separation rate.

  18. Permanent magnet based dipole magnets for next generation light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Watanabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed permanent magnet based dipole magnets for the next generation light sources. Permanent magnets are advantageous over electromagnets in that they consume less power, are physically more compact, and there is a less risk of power supply failure. However, experience with electromagnets and permanent magnets in the field of accelerators shows that there are still challenges to replacing main magnets of accelerators for light sources with permanent magnets. These include the adjustability of the magnetic field, the temperature dependence of permanent magnets, and the issue of demagnetization. In this paper, we present a design for magnets for future light sources, supported by experimental and numerical results.

  19. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  20. Magnetic conditioning in superfluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.

    1988-08-01

    Improvements in superconducting magnet technology have reduced to a handful the number of training quenches typical of dipole magnets. The number of training quenches in long (17 m) and short (1--2 m) SSC magnets are now about the same (operating at 6.6 tesla and 4.4 K). Yet the steps necessary to totally eliminate training are in the future RandD plans for magnet construction and conductor motion prevention. The accepted hypothesis is that Lorentz forces and poor mechanical properties of superconducting cables are the cause of conductor motion. Conductor motion reduces the stored energy in the cable by converting it into heat. The small amount of heat generated (millijoules) during motion is usually enough to quench the magnet when it is close to short sample. During training, the magnet performance normally improves with the number of quenches. It is not the quench itself that improves magnet performance but rather the fact that once conductor motion has occurred it will probably not repeat itself unless subjected to higher forces. Conditioning is a process that enables the magnet to reduce its stored energy without causing a premature quench. During the conditioning process the magnet is further cooled from its operating temperature of 4.4 K to 1.8 K by converting He I into He II. As a result the magnet is placed in a state where it has excess stability as well as excellent heat transfer capabilities. Although this does not eliminate motion, if the magnet is now cycled to /approximately/10% above its operating field at 4.4 K (which is above short sample) the excess stability should be enough to prevent quenching and reduce the probability of conductor motion and training once the magnet has been warmed back up to its operating temperature of 4.4 K. 3 refs., 5 figs

  1. Magnetic conditioning in superfluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.

    1988-08-01

    Improvements in superconducting magnet technology have reduced to a handful the number of training quenches typical of dipole magnets. The number of training quenches in long (17 m) and short (1--2 m) SSC magnets are now about the same (operating at 6.6 tesla and 4.4 K). Yet the steps necessary to totally eliminate training are in the future RandD plans for magnet construction and conductor motion prevention. The accepted hypothesis is that Lorentz forces and poor mechanical properties of superconducting cables are the cause of conductor motion. Conductor motion reduces the stored energy in the cable by converting it into heat. The small amount of heat generated (millijoules) during motion is usually enough to quench the magnet when it is close to short sample. During training, the magnet performance normally improves with the number of quenches. It is not the quench itself that improves magnet performance but rather the fact that once conductor motion has occurred it will probably not repeat itself unless subjected to higher forces. Conditioning is a process that enables the magnet to reduce its stored energy without causing a premature quench. During the conditioning process the magnet is further cooled from its operating temperature of 4.4 K to 1.8 K by converting He I into He II. As a result the magnet is placed in a state where it has excess stability as well as excellent heat transfer capabilities. Although this does not eliminate motion, if the magnet is now cycled to /approximately/10% above its operating field at 4.4 K (which is above short sample) the excess stability should be enough to prevent quenching and reduce the probability of conductor motion and training once the magnet has been warmed back up to its operating temperature of 4.4 K. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Controlling magnetic field profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.

    1979-04-01

    A method for designing solenoid magnets with controlled field profiles is discussed. The method, originated by D.B. Montgomery, minimizes both the field errors and the power consumption. An NOS time-sharing computer program for the CDC-6600, entitled MAGCOR, was constructed to provide an interactive magnet design capability. Results obtained during the design of magnets for a radial line electron accelerator are presented. 9 figures

  3. Generation of magnetic fields for accelerators with permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinander, T.

    1994-01-01

    Commercially available permanent magnet materials and their properties are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of using permanent magnets as compared to electromagnets for the generation of specific magnetic fields are discussed. Basic permanent magnet configurations in multipole magnets and insertion devices are presented. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramarenko, E Yu; Chertovich, A V; Semisalova, A S; Makarova, L A; Perov, N S; Khokhlov, A R; Stepanov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction. (paper)

  5. The dynamic behavior of magnetic fluid adsorbed to small permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Seiichi, E-mail: sudo@akita-pu.ac.j [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Asano, Daisaku [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Takana, Hidemasa; Nishiyama, Hideya [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic behavior of a magnetic fluid adsorbed to a small NdFeB permanent magnet subjected to an alternating magnetic field was studied with a high speed video camera system. The directions of alternating magnetic field are parallel and opposite to that of the permanent magnet. It was found that the surface of magnetic fluid responds to the external alternating magnetic field in elongation and contraction with a lot of spikes. Generation of a capillary magnetic fluid jet was observed in the neighbourhood of a specific frequency of alternating field. The effect of gravitational force on surface phenomena of magnetic fluid adsorbed to the permanent magnet was revealed. - Research Highlights: Magnetic fluid of the system responds to alternating magnetic field with higher frequencies. Large-amplitude surface motions of magnetic fluid occur at the specific frequencies of the external field. Capillary jets of magnetic fluid are generated at the natural frequency of the system.

  6. Magnetic Structure of Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob; Axe, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    We present a synchrotron x-ray scattering study of the magnetic phases of erbium. In addition to the magnetic scattering located at the fundamental wave vector τm we also observe scattering from magnetoelastically induced charge modulations at the fundamental wave vector, at twice the fundamental......, and at positions split symmetrically about the fundamental. As the temperature is lowered below 52 K the charge and magnetic scattering display a sequence of lock-in transitions to rational wave vectors. A spin-slip description of the magnetic structure is presented which explains the wave vectors...

  7. Magnetic S-parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We propose a direct test of the existence of gauge duals for nonsupersymmetric asymptotically free gauge theories developing an infrared fixed point by computing the S-parameter in the electric and dual magnetic description. In particular we show that at the lower bound of the conformal window...... the magnetic S-parameter, i.e. the one determined via the dual magnetic gauge theory, assumes a simple expression in terms of the elementary magnetic degrees of freedom. The results further support our recent conjecture of the existence of a universal lower bound on the S parameter and indicates...

  8. Manufacturing the MFTF magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Hinkle, R.E.; Hodges, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a large mirror program experiment for magnetic fusion energy. It will combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime

  9. Advanced Nanostructured Magnetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sellmyer, David J

    2004-01-01

    ... out. Novel physical systems have been synthesized and studied including: hard/soft nanocomposites, magnetic nanowires, thermally processed multilayer films, and nanoparticle-assembled composites...

  10. Magnets becoming more super

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-09-15

    With the twenty year struggle to master superconducting magnets for accelerators behind them, magnet specialists are now very confident of their ability to use superconductivity in accelerator design. Superconductor performance has improved considerably in the past few years and we may well see the number of these magnets escalate from the present figure of about a thousand to over fifteen thousand within the next decade. This confidence emerged clearly from a recent Workshop at Brookhaven, organized by the Panel on Superconducting Magnets and Cryogenics set up by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA)

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  12. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College and Graduate School, The City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York 10468-1589 (United States); Jaafar, Reem [Department of Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science, LaGuardia Community College, The City University of New York, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, New York 11101 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained.

  13. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2015-01-01

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained

  14. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  15. Cochlear implant magnet retrofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N L; Breda, S D; Hoffman, R A

    1988-06-01

    An implantable magnet is now available for patients who have received the standard Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant and who are not able to wear the headband satisfactorily. This magnet is attached in piggy-back fashion to the previously implanted receiver/stimulator by means of a brief operation under local anesthesia. Two patients have received this magnet retrofit, and are now wearing the headset with greater comfort and satisfaction. It is felt that the availability of this magnet will increase patient compliance in regard to hours of implant usage.

  16. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those

  17. Magnetic rubber inspection (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carro, L.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Rubber Inspection (MRI) was developed to inspect for small cracks and flaws encountered in high performance aircraft. A formula of very fine magnetic particles immersed in a room temperature curing rubber is catalysed and poured into dams (retainers) on the surface of the part to be inspected. Inducing a magnetic field then causes the particles to be drawn to discontinuities in the component under test. These indicating particles are held to the discontinuity by magnetic attraction, as the rubber cures. The solid rubber cast (Replica) is then removed and examined under a microscope for indicating lines of particle concentrations. 3 refs., 6 figs

  18. LHCb experiment magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The leading members of the LHCb magnet project, from left to right: Pierre-Ange Giudici, who organized and supervised the industrial production of the coils; Marcello Losasso, who performed the 3D calculations to optimise the magnetic field; Olivier Jamet, responsible for the 3D design; Jean Renaud, in charge of the magnet assembly, and Wilfried Flegel, project leader. The LHCb detector will investigate matter-antimatter differences in B mesons at the LHC. The coils of the detector's huge dipole magnet are seen here in April 2004.

  19. Magnetism v.5

    CERN Document Server

    Suhl, Harry

    1973-01-01

    Magnetism, Volume V: Magnetic Properties of Metallic Alloys deals with the magnetic properties of metallic alloys and covers topics ranging from conditions favoring the localization of effective moments to the s-d model and the Kondo effect, along with perturbative, scattering, and Green's function theories of the s-d model. Asymptotically exact methods used in addressing the Kondo problem are also described.Comprised of 12 chapters, this volume begins with a review of experimental results and phenomenology concerning the formation of local magnetic moments in metals, followed by a Har

  20. Strong Magnetic Field Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    an advertised surface field of approximately 0.5 T were used to supply the static magnetic field source. The disc magnet had a diameter of 50 mm and... colour bar indicates the magnetic field strength set to an arbitrary 0.25 T. The white area has a field >0.25 T. The size of the arrow is proportional...9 shows the magnetic field strength along a slice in the XZ plane. The colours represent the total UNCLASSIFIED 10 UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TR-2699

  1. Conventional magnets. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.

    1994-01-01

    The design and construction of conventional, steel-cored, direct-current magnets are discussed. Laplace's equation and the associated cylindrical harmonic solutions in two dimensions are established. The equations are used to define the ideal pole shapes and required excitation for dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnets. Standard magnet geometries are then considered and criteria determining the coil design are presented. The use of codes for predicting flux density distributions and the iterative techniques used for pole face design are then discussed. This includes a description of the use of two-dimensional codes to generate suitable magnet end geometries. Finally, standard constructional techniques for cores and coils are described. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic study of turbidites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanty, Cyrielle; Valet, Jean Pierre; Carlut, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Turbidites induce sedimentary reworking and re-deposition caused by tsunami, earthquake, volcanic processes, and other catastrophic events. They result from rapid depositional processes and are thus considered not being pertinent for comparison with pelagic sediments. Turbidites are evidently ruled out from paleomagnetic records dealing with time-series. Consequently, no attention has ever been paid to the magnetization of turbidites which is fully justified if the high level of turbulence governing the depositional processes influences the acquisition of magnetization. In certain conditions like channeled turbidity currents, levees of sediment are generated and then associated with relatively calm although very fast redeposition processes. Such conditions will thus govern the subsequent acquisition of magnetization through mechanical lock-in of the magnetic grains. This situation is actually quite similar to what happens during the experiences of artificial redeposition that are conducted in laboratory. Therefore, combining laboratory experiments and studies of natural turbidites could reveal important information on the processes involved in the acquisition of magnetization, especially if the comparison with the overlying hemipelagic sediments does not show any striking difference. We will present the results of magnetic measurements performed on four different and relatively recent turbidites. We selected different origins associated either with spillover of channeled turbidity currents or with co-seismic faulting. Each event is characterized by a different thickness (ten to few tens of cm), lithology and mean granulometry (few tens of μm to hundreds of μm). We have carried out measurements of magnetic susceptibility, magnetic remanence, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and we also scrutinize the evolution of various rock magnetic parameters (ARM, IRM, S ratio, magnetic grain sizes, hysteresis parameters…). The magnetic characteristics of the

  3. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, O [INRIA Nancy Grand-Est and Institut de Recherche en Mathematiques Avancees, 7 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Hervieux, P-A; Manfredi, G [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: morandi@dipmat.univpm.it

    2009-07-15

    We present a dynamical model that successfully explains the observed time evolution of the magnetization in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum wells after weak laser excitation. Based on the pseudo-fermion formalism and a second-order many-particle expansion of the exact p-d exchange interaction, our approach goes beyond the usual mean-field approximation. It includes both the sub-picosecond demagnetization dynamics and the slower relaxation processes that restore the initial ferromagnetic order in a nanosecond timescale. In agreement with experimental results, our numerical simulations show that, depending on the value of the initial lattice temperature, a subsequent enhancement of the total magnetization may be observed within the timescale of a few hundred picoseconds.

  4. High performance permanent magnet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, S.G.; Herbst, J.F.; Koon, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Initial magnetization behavior of rapidly quenched neodymium-iron-boron magnets; Optimization of liquid dynamic compaction for Fe-Nd-B magnet alloys; Misch-metal and/or aluminum substitutions in Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets; and NdFeB magnets with improved temperature characteristics

  5. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, N.F.; Acuna, M.H.; Burlaga, L.F.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Lepping, R.P.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10 -5 gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R N . The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R N can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R N and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. Within 4 R N , the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes in the diurnally varying magnetosphere configuration. In an astrophysical context, the magnetic field of Neptune, like that of Uranus, may be described as that of an oblique rotator

  6. Magnetic Particle inspection by DC and AC magnetization current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Zhong Soo; Kim, Goo Hwa

    1996-01-01

    Dry magnetic particle inspection was performed to detect the surface defects of the steel billets. The detectability was evaluated according to magnetizing current, temperature, and amount of the magnetic particles on material. We selected a certain set of steel compositions for target materials. Their magnetic properties are measured with B-H hysteresis graph. Results of the magnetic particle inspection(MPI) by direct magnetizing current was compared with results of the finite element method calculations, which were verified by measurement of the magnetic leakage flux above the surface of material. For square rod materials, the magnetic flux density at the corner was about 30% of that at the face center with sufficiently large direct magnetizing current, while it is about 70% with alternating magnetizing current. Alternating magnetizing current generates rather uniform magnetic flux density running from the center to the corner except for the region of about 10 mm extending from the corner.

  7. Tuning magnetic avalanches in the molecular magnet Mn12 -acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S.; Wen, Bo; Ma, Xiang; Sarachik, M. P.; Myasoedov, Y.; Zeldov, E.; Bagai, R.; Christou, G.

    2009-05-01

    Using micron-sized Hall sensor arrays to obtain time-resolved measurements of the local magnetization, we report a systematic study in the molecular magnet Mn12 acetate of magnetic avalanches controllably triggered in different fixed external magnetic fields and for different values of the initial magnetization. The speeds of propagation of the spin-reversal fronts are in good overall agreement with the theory of magnetic deflagration of Garanin and Chudnovsky [Phys. Rev. B 76, 054410 (2007)].

  8. Magnetic moment measurement of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J-W; Lee, E-C; Ju, H; Yoo, I S; Chang, W-S; Chung, B H; Kim, B S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moment per unit mass of magnetic nanoparticles was found by using the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mass of the nanoparticles was acquired from the resonance frequency shift of the particle-attached AFM probe and magnetic force measurement was also carried out with the AFM. Combining with magnetic field strength, the magnetic moment per unit mass of the nanoparticles was determined as a function of magnetic field strength. (technical design note)

  9. Structure and magnetic field of periodic permanent magnetic focusing system with open magnetic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Long; Li Lezhong; Yang Dingyu; Zhu Xinghua; Li Yuanxun

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic field along the central axis for an axially magnetized permanent magnetic ring was investigated by analytical and finite element methods. For open magnetic rings, both calculated and measured results show that the existence of the radial magnetic field creates a remarkable cosine distribution field along the central axis. A new structure of periodic permanent magnet focusing system with open magnetic rings is proposed. The structure provides a satisfactory magnetic field with a stable peak value of 120 mT for a traveling wave tube system. - Research highlights: → For open magnetic rings, both calculated and measured results show that the existence of the radial magnetic field creates a remarkable cosine distribution field along the central axis. → A new structure of periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing system with open magnetic rings is proposed. → The new PPM focusing system with open magnetic rings meets the requirements for TWT system.

  10. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  11. CERN: LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission

  12. Wobbly Corner: Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Lisa; Maklad, Rania; Dunne, Mick; Grace, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    During a final seminar with BA year 4 science specialist trainee teachers, the authors posed a question about the difficulties associated with understanding magnetism. The ensuing discussion focused on a number of concerns commonly identified by students, which may also be of interest to classroom teachers teaching magnetism. Issues raised…

  13. Cosmological magnetic fields - V

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic fields seem to be everywhere that we can look in the universe, from our own ... The field tensor is observer-independent, while the electric and magnetic .... based on string theory [11], in which vacuum fluctuations of the field are ...

  14. Magnetizing the universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Subramanian, ”Magnetizing the Universe”, PoS proceedings, arXiv:0802.2804. IAS Annual ... If this electric field has a curl, can re-generate magnetic fields. ∂B. ∂t .... How to do mean field theory in presence of strong noise? Does the Early ...

  15. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  18. Magnetic field on board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez Radio, H.; Fernandez Arenal, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Here, the calculation of the magnetic field on board ships is performed, using matrix calculus, in a similar way as when the magnetic field in matter is studied. Thus the final formulas are written in a more compact form and they are obtained through a simpler way, more suitable for the university education. (Author)

  19. Magnetic sensor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a sensor device and a method for detg. the presence and/or amt. of target moieties in a sample fluid, the target moieties being labeled with magnetic or magnetizable objects. The sensor device comprises a magnetic field generating means adapted for applying a retention

  20. New permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.-H.; Krabbes, G.; Fink, J.; Gruß, S.; Kirchner, A.; Fuchs, G.; Schultz, L.

    2001-05-01

    Permanent magnets play an important role and are widely spread in daily-life applications. Due to their very low costs, large availability of the row materials and their high chemical stability, hard ferrites are still dominant in the permanent magnet market although their relatively poor magnetic properties are a distinct disadvantage. Today's high-performance magnets are mostly made from Nd 2Fe 14B. The aim of research is to combine the large spontaneous magnetization of 3d metals with strong anisotropy fields known from rare-earth transition-metal compounds and, at the same time, to maintain a high value of the Curie temperature. However, the number of iron-rich rare-earth intermetallics is very limited and, consequently, not much success can be noted in this field for the last 10 years. One alternative concept is to use magnetic fields trapped in type II superconductors where much higher fields can be achieved compared to conventional rare-earth magnets. Very recently, we obtained a trapped field as high as 14.4 T in a melt-textured YBCO bulk sample of a few centimeters in diameter. This is the highest value ever achieved in a bulk superconductor. The trapped field of a superconductor is not governed by the Laplace equation and, therefore, levitation works without any additional (active) stabilization. The disadvantage of these magnets is their low working temperature (of liquid nitrogen and below).

  1. The LHCb magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb magnet consists of two huge 27 tonne coils mounted inside a 1450 tonne iron yoke. As charged particles pass through the magnet's field their trajectories will be bent according to their momentum, allowing their momentum to be measured as they pass through the detector walls. LHCb will study bottom quarks, which will be produced close to the two colliding proton beams.

  2. PS auxiliary magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    Units of the PS auxiliary magnet system. The picture shows how the new dipoles, used for vertical and horizontal high-energy beam manipulation, are split for installation and removal so that it is not necessary to break the accelerator vacuum. On the right, adjacent to the sector valve and the windings of the main magnet, is an octupole of the set.

  3. AGS Booster prototype magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Brodowski, J.; Jablonski, E.; Keohane, G.; McDowell, B.; Rodger, E.

    1987-03-19

    Prototype magnets have been designed and constructed for two half cells of the AGS Booster. The lattice requires 2.4m long dipoles, each curved by 10/sup 0/. The multi-use Booster injector requires several very different standard magnet cycles, capable of instantaneous interchange using computer control from dc up to 10 Hz.

  4. AGS booster prototype magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Brodowski, J.; Jablonski, E.; Keohane, G.; McDowell, B.; Rodger, E.

    1987-01-01

    Prototype magnets have been designed and constructed for two half cells of the AGS Booster. The lattice requires 2.4m long dipoles, each curved by 10 0 . The multi-use Booster injector requires several very different standard magnet cycles, capable of instantaneous interchange using computer control from dc up to 10 Hz

  5. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic field line Hamiltonian and the associated canonical form for the magnetic field are important concepts both for understanding toroidal plasma physics and for practical calculations. A number of important properties of the canonical or Hamiltonian representation are derived and their importance is explained

  6. Superconducting magnets for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Hadron-Electron-Ring Accelerator (HERA) presently under construction at DESY, Hamburg, consists of an electron storage ring of 30 GeV and a proton storage ring of 820 GeV. Superconducting magnets are used for the proton ring. There are 416 superconducting bending magnets of 4.698 T central field and 8.824 m magnetic length, 224 superconducting quadrupoles of 91.2 T/m central gradient and many superconducting correction dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles. The main dipoles and quadrupoles consist of two-layer coils of 75 mm inner diameter clammed with aluminium (for the dipoles) or stainless steel laminations (for the quadrupoles). The collared coils are surrounded by a laminated cold iron yoke and supported inside a low loss cryostat. The protection system uses cold diodes to bypass the current around a quenching magnet. The magnets are cooled with one phase helium supplied by a 3 block central refrigeration system of 20 kW refrigeration power at 4.3 K. Two helium is returned through the magnets in good thermal contact with the one phase helium in the dipoles for temperature control. This paper describes the magnet system and gives the results obtained for prototype magnets

  7. Effective magnetic Hamiltonians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Turek, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 1997-2000 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0775 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : effective magnetic Hamiltonian * ab initio * magnetic structure Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2013

  8. Selected topics in magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, L C

    1993-01-01

    Part of the ""Frontiers in Solid State Sciences"" series, this volume presents essays on such topics as spin fluctuations in Heisenberg magnets, quenching of spin fluctuations by high magnetic fields, and kondo effect and heavy fermions in rare earths amongst others.

  9. One thousand magnets delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The little matchstick-like objects, neatly lined up like colouring pencils in their box, are in fact LHC magnets seen from the air. These particular ones are being stored at Point 19 just alongside SM18, the magnet assembly and testing hall, which can be seen on the right of the picture. On the right in the background, is the Meyrin site.

  10. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF STARS

    OpenAIRE

    Bychkov, V. D.; Bychkova, L. V.; Madej, J.

    2008-01-01

    Now it is known about 1212 stars of the main sequence and giants (from them 610 stars - it is chemically peculiarity (CP) stars) for which direct measurements of magnetic fields were spent (Bychkov et al.,2008). Let's consider, what representations were generated about magnetic fields (MT) of stars on the basis of available observations data.

  11. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Khashab, Niveen M.; Zaher, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  12. CERN: LHC magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-08-15

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission.

  13. Magnetic photon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.

    1987-05-01

    The report reviews, at an introductory level, the theory of photon scattering from condensed matter. Magnetic scattering, which arises from first-order relativistic corrections to the Thomson scattering amplitude, is treated in detail and related to the corresponding interaction in the magnetic neutron diffraction amplitude. (author)

  14. ISR magnet model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    Field measurements being made on the ISR magnet model. In the foreground, the poleface windings can be seen - as distinct from the large exciting coils - together with their supply cables. These windings are mainly used to compensate the saturation effects at high fields. The steel plates forming the yoke are welded together along the whole length of the magnet.

  15. Magnetic-island formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-08-01

    The response of a finite conductivity plasma to resonant magnetic perturbations is studied. The equations, which are derived for the time development of magnetic islands, help one interpret the singular currents which occur under the assumption of perfect plasma conductivity. The relation to the Rutherford regime of resistive instabilities is given

  16. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  17. Solid state magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Crangle, John

    1991-01-01

    Solid state magnetism is important and attempts to understand magnetic properties have led to an increasingly deep insight into the fundamental make up of solids. Both experimental and theoretical research into magnetism continue to be very active, yet there is still much ground to cover before there can be a full understanding. There is a strong interplay between the developments of materials science and of magnetism. Hundreds of new materials have been dis­ covered, often with previously unobserved and puzzling magnetic prop­ erties. A large and growing technology exists that is based on the magnetic properties of materials. Very many devices used in everyday life involve magnetism and new applications are being invented all the time. Under­ standing the fundamental background to the applications is vital to using and developing them. The aim of this book is to provide a simple, up-to-date introduction to the study of solid state magnetism, both intrinsic and technical. It is designed to meet the needs a...

  18. A Magnetic Circuit Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkooy, John; Lowe, June

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration designed to illustrate Faraday's, Ampere's, and Lenz's laws and to reinforce the concepts through the analysis of a two-loop magnetic circuit. Can be made dramatic and challenging for sophisticated students but is suitable for an introductory course in electricity and magnetism. (JRH)

  19. MFTF magnet cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    The prime requirement of the cryogenics of the magnets is to assure a superconducting state for the magnet coils, a large task considering their enormous size. The following presentation addresses the principal topics that have been considered in this cryogenic design

  20. TMX magnets: mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, R.E.; Harvey, A.R.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Chen, F.F.K.; Denhoy, B.S.; Horvath, J.A.; Reed, J.R.; Waugh, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) system, part of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory magnetic mirror program incorporates in its design various types of coils or magnets. This paper describes the physical construction of each coil within the system as well as the structural design required for their support and installation

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  2. Magnetic Particle Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; A. Rios, Rachel V.R.; Fabris, Jose D.; Lago, Rachel M.; Sapag, Karim

    2004-01-01

    An exciting laboratory environment is activated by the preparation and novel use of magnetic materials to decontaminate water through adsorption and magnetic removal of metals and organics. This uncomplicated technique is also adaptable to the possible application of adsorbents to numerous other environmental substances.

  3. Magnetic entropy and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    Some manifestations of magnetism are well-known and utilized on an everyday basis, e.g. using a refrigerator magnet for hanging that important note on the refrigerator door. Others are, so far, more exotic, such as cooling by making use of the magnetocaloric eect. This eect can cause a change...... in the temperature of a magnetic material when a magnetic eld is applied or removed. For many years, experimentalists have made use of dilute paramagnetic materials to achieve milliKelvin temperatures by use of the magnetocaloric eect. Also, research is done on materials, which might be used for hydrogen, helium...... or nitrogen liquefaction or for room-temperature cooling. The magnetocaloric eect can further be used to determine phase transition boundaries, if a change in the magnetic state occurs at the boundary.In this talk, I will introduce the magnetocaloric eect (MCE) and the two equations, which characterize...

  4. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  5. Physics of magnetic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses how the important properties of materials such as the cohesive energy, and the electronic and vibrational structures are affected when materials have at least one length in the nanometer range. The author uses relatively simple models of the solid state to explain why these changes in the size and dimension in the nanometer regime occur. The text also reviews the physics of magnetism and experimental methods of measuring magnetic properties necessary to understanding how nanosizing affects magnetism. Various kinds of magnetic structures are presented by the author in order to explain how nanosizing influences their magnetic properties. The book also presents potential and actual applications of nanomaterials in the fields of medicine and computer data storage.

  6. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  7. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  8. The ELETTRA fast magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasini, D.

    1992-01-01

    The design of the fast magnets to be used to inject the electron beam into the 2 GeV storage ring Elettra is presented and discussed. Injection makes use of two types of fast magnets: the septa and the kickers. There are two identical septa magnets of the so called 'eddy current' type, which will be housed in a vacuum tank. The orbit bump is generated by four identical kicker magnets symmetrically placed around the mid-point of a single straight section: they will be in air with an internal vacuum chamber. Extensive electric and magnetic tests have been performed on prototypes, and the relevant results are presented and discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Hybrid Magnetic Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kevin; Crawford, Christopher; Mullins, Andrew; Porter, Greg; Blanton, Hunter; Johnstone, Connor; Kistler, Ben; Olivera, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    The search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron requires the ambient magnetic field to be on the pT scale which is accomplished with large magnetic shielding rooms. These rooms are fitted with large mu-metal sheets to allow for passive cancellation of background magnetic fields. Active shielding technology cannot uniformly cancel background magnetic fields. These issues can be remedied by combining the methods into a hybrid system. The design used is composed of panels that have an active layer of cancellation between two sheets of mu-metal. The panels form a cube and draw in magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface which can then be reduced using active shielding. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107.

  10. Chiral Magnetic Spirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basar, Goekce; Dunne, Gerald V.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the presence of a very strong magnetic field in the chirally broken phase induces inhomogeneous expectation values, of a spiral nature along the magnetic field axis, for the currents of charge and chirality, when there is finite baryon density or an imbalance between left and right chiralities. This 'chiral magnetic spiral' is a gapless excitation transporting the currents of (i) charge (at finite chirality), and (ii) chirality (at finite baryon density) along the direction of the magnetic field. In both cases it also induces in the transverse directions oscillating currents of charge and chirality. In heavy ion collisions, the chiral magnetic spiral possibly provides contributions both to the out-of-plane and the in-plane dynamical charge fluctuations recently observed at BNL RHIC.

  11. Continuous magnetic flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A method and means for altering the intensity of a magnetic field by transposing flux from one location to the location desired fro the magnetic field are examined. The device described includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, is dimensioned to be insertable into one of the cavities and to substantially fill the cavity. Magnetic flux is first trapped in the cavities by establishing a magnetic field while the superconducting material is above the critical temperature at which it goes superconducting. Thereafter, the temperature of the material is reduced below the critical value, and then the exciting magnetic field may be removed. By varying the ratios of the areas of the two cavities, it is possible to produce a field having much greater flux density in the second, smaller cavity, into which the flux transposed.

  12. Superconducting magnets for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.

    1976-01-01

    The application of superconducting magnet technology to high-energy accelerators has been studied at BNL for many years. Recently this effort has focused on the magnet system for the proposed Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE. Several full-sized dipole and quadrupole magnets were fabricated and tested. A dipole was successfully operated using a high pressure forced circulation refrigeration system similar to that proposed for the accelerator. This magnet reached a maximum central field of 4.9 T, considerably above the design field of 3.9 T. A quadrupole of similar design was equally successful, achieving a gradient of 71 T/m compared to the design value of 53 T/m. A summary is given of the present status of the magnet development program, and the direction of future work is outlined

  13. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  14. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  15. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs

  16. Great magnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Yen Te Lee; Tang, F.; Gonzalez, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    The five largest magnetic storms that occurred between 1971 and 1986 are studied to determine their solar and interplanetary causes. All of the events are found to be associated with high speed solar wind streams led by collisionless shocks. The high speed streams are clearly related to identifiable solar flares. It is found that (1) it is the extreme values of the southward interplanetary magnetic fields rather than solar wind speeds that are the primary causes of great magnetic storms, (2) shocked and draped sheath fields preceding the driver gas (magnetic cloud) are at least as effective in causing the onset of great magnetic storms (3 of 5 events ) as the strong fields within the driver gas itself, and (3) precursor southward fields ahead of the high speed streams allow the shock compression mechanism (item 2) to be particularly geoeffective

  17. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm, covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  18. Magnetic particle inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with magnetic particle inspection and relate it to classification of various defects. Magnetic particle inspection is a method of detecting the presence of cracks, laps, tears, inclusions, and similar discontinuities in ferromagnetic materials such as iron and steel. This method will most clearly show defects that are perpendicular to the magnetic field. The Magnaglo method uses a liquid which is sprayed on the workpiece to be inspected, and the part is magnetized at the same time. The workpiece is then viewed under a black light, and the presence of discontinuity is shown by the formation of a bright indication formed by the magnetic particles over the discontinuity. The equipment and experimental procedures are described.

  19. Halbach Magnets for CBETA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-30

    A principle of the non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) is that different energy beam has orbit oscillations Δx around the central circular orbit in both positive and negative direction within a small radial aperture as: Δx=Dx*δp/p. For the central circular orbit Δx=0, or for the combined function magnets the field is equal to Bo (B (x) = Bo + G*x). The smallest orbit offsets Δx are obtained when the defocusing magnet provides most of the bending for the central energy, while the focusing magnet could be even the regular quadrupole with the central orbit in the middle. Stable orbits for a very large energy range [in the case of CBETA this is 4 times in energy], is obtained using opposite polarity magnets producing linear magnetic fields, small dispersion, and very strong focusing.

  20. Halbach Magnets for CBETA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-01-19

    A principle of the non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) is that different energy beam has orbit oscillations Δx around the central circular orbit in both positive and negative direction within a small radial aperture as: Δx=Dx*δp/p. For the central circular orbit Δx=0, or for the combined function magnets the field is equal to Bo (B (x) = Bo + G* x). The smallest orbit offsets Δx are obtained when the defocusing magnet provides most of the bending for the central energy, while the focusing magnet could be even the regular quadrupole with the central orbit in the middle. Stable orbits for a very large energy range [in the case of CBETA this is 4 times in energy], is obtained using opposite polarity magnets producing linear magnetic fields, small dispersion, and very strong focusing.