WorldWideScience

Sample records for supercritical wet oxidation

  1. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  2. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  3. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  4. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  5. Supercritical water oxidation - Microgravity solids separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killilea, William R.; Hong, Glenn T.; Swallow, Kathleen C.; Thomason, Terry B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) waste treatment and water recycling technology to the problem of waste disposal in-long term manned space missions. As inorganic constituents present in the waste are not soluble in supercritical water, they must be removed from the organic-free supercritical fluid reactor effluent. Supercritical water reactor/solids separator designs capable of removing precipitated solids from the process' supercritical fluid in zero- and low- gravity environments are developed and evaluated. Preliminary experiments are then conducted to test the concepts. Feed materials for the experiments are urine, feces, and wipes with the addition of reverse osmosis brine, the rejected portion of processed hygiene water. The solid properties and their influence on the design of several oxidation-reactor/solids-separator configurations under study are presented.

  6. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications.

  7. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  8. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2 and Sodium Citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Schaef, T.; Wang, Z.; Miller, Q.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Lin Qiu1*, Herbert T. Schaef2, Zhengrong Wang1, Quin R.S. Miller3, BP McGrail2 1. Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA 3. University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA Geologic reservoirs for managing carbon emissions (mostly CO2) have expanded over the last 5 years to include unconventional formations including basalts and fractured shales. Recently, ~1000 metric tons of CO2 was injected into the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) in Eastern Washington as part of the Wallula Pilot Project, Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership. Based on reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is present as a supercritical fluid that dissolves into the formation water over time, and reacts with basalt components to form carbonate minerals. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring when the forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is exposed to wet scCO2 in equilibrium with pure water and sodium citrate solutions. Forsterite was selected as it is an important olivine group mineral present in igneous and mafic rocks. Citrate was selected as it has been shown to enhance mineral dissolution and organic ligands are possible degradation products of the microbial communities present in the formational waters of the CRB. For the supercritical phase, transformation reactions were examined by in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in contact with water and sodium citrate solutions at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration. Experimental results show close-to-complete dissolution of forsterite in contact with scCO2 equilibrated with pure water for 90 hours (90 bar and 50°C). Under these conditions, thin films of water coated the mineral surface, providing a mechanism for silicate dissolution and transport of cations necessary for carbonate formation. The primary crystalline component initially detected with in situ HXRD was the hydrated magnesium carbonate, nesquehonite [Mg

  9. Supercritical water oxidation of products of human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Jefferson W.; Orge A. achelling, Richard K. ADTHOMASSON; Orge A. achelling, Richard K. ADTHOMASSON

    1986-01-01

    Although the efficient destruction of organic material was demonstrated in the supercritical water oxidation process, the reaction kinetics and mechanisms are unknown. The kinetics and mechanisms of carbon monoxide and ammonia oxidation in and reaction with supercritical water were studied experimentally. Experimental oxidation of urine and feces in a microprocessor controlled system was performed. A minaturized supercritical water oxidation process for space applications was design, including preliminary mass and energy balances, power, space and weight requirements.

  10. Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. M. Garcia

    1996-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a high pressure oxidation process that blends air, water, and organic waste material in an oxidizer in which where the temperature and pressure in the oxidizer are maintained above the critical point of water. Supercritical water mixed with hydrocarbons, which would be insoluble at subcritical conditions, forms a homogeneous phase which possesses properties associated with both a gas and a liquid. Hydrocarbons in contact with oxygen and SCW are readily oxidized. These properties of SCW make it an attractive means for the destruction of waste streams containing organic materials. SCWO technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the SCWO technology. The program concentrated on the acquisition of data through pilot plant testing. The Phase I DOE testing used a simulated waste stream that contained a complex machine cutting oil and metals, that acted as surrogates for radionuclides. The Phase II Navy testing included pilot testing using hazardous waste materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SCWO technology. The SCWODAT program demonstrated that the SCWO process oxidized the simulated waste stream containing complex machine cutting oil, selected by DOE as representative of one of the most difficult of the organic waste streams for which SCWO had been applied. The simulated waste stream with surrogate metals in solution was oxidized, with a high destruction efficiency, on the order of 99.97%, in both the neutralized and unneutralized modes of operation.

  11. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2016-10-17

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  12. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of CELSS model wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Wydeven, T.; Koo, C.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium hydroxide with acetic acid and a slurry of human feces, urine, and wipes were used as CELSS model wastes to be wet-oxidized at temperatures from 250 to 500 C, i.e. below and above the critical point of water (374 C and 218 kg/sq cm or 21.4 MPa). The effects of oxidation temperature ( 250-500 C) and residence time (0-120 mn) on carbon and nitrogen and on metal corrosion from the reactor material were studied. Almost all of the organic matter in the model wastes was oxidized in the temperature range from 400 to 500 C, above the critical conditions for water. In contrast, only a small portion of the organic matter was oxidized at subcritical conditions. A substantial amount of nitrogen remained in solution in the form of ammonia at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C suggesting that, around 400 C, organic carbon is completely oxidized and most of the nitrogen is retained in solution. The Hastelloy C-276 alloy reactor corroded during subcritical and supercritical water oxidation.

  13. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  14. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuzhong; Guo, Yang; Chen, Chongming; Zhang, Jie; Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuzhen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N(2) is the main product, and the formation of NO(2) and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 °C, reaction time of 50-300s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH(3) conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH(3) is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH(3) were higher in the presence of MnO(2) than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH(3) conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH(3). The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH(3) oxidation were 107.07 ± 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 ± 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  15. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  16. Evaluation of supercritical water gasification and biomethanation for wet biomass utilization in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Yukihiko [Hiroshima Univ., Dept. of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    Two wet biomass gasification processes, supercritical water gasification and biomethanation, were evaluated from energy, environmental, and economic aspects. Gasification of 1 dry-t/d of water hyacinth was taken as a model case. Assumptions were made that system should be energetically independent, that no environmentally harmful material should be released, and that carbon dioxide should be removed from the product gas. Energy efficiency, carbon dioxide payback time, and price of the product gas were chosen as indices for energy, environmental, and economic evaluations, respectively. Under the conditions assumed here, supercritical water gasifications is evaluated to be more advantageous over biomethanation, but the cost of the product gas is still 1.86 times more expensive than city gas in Tokyo. To improve efficiency of supercritical water gasification, improvement of heat exchanger efficiency is effective. Utilization of fermentation sludge will make biomethanation much more advantageous. (Author)

  17. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  19. Oxidation behavior of Incoloy 800 under simulated supercritical water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulger, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, POB 78, Campului Street, No. 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania)], E-mail: manuela.fulger@nuclear.ro; Ohai, D.; Mihalache, M.; Pantiru, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, POB 78, Campului Street, No. 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Malinovschi, V. [University of Pitesti, Research Center for Advanced Materials, Targul din Vale Street, No. 1, 110040 Pitesti (Romania)

    2009-03-31

    For a correct design of supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) components, data regarding the behavior of candidate materials in supercritical water are necessary. Corrosion has been identified as a critical problem because the high temperature and the oxidative nature of supercritical water may accelerate the corrosion kinetics. The goal of this paper is to investigate the oxidation behavior of Incoloy 800 exposed in autoclaves under supercritical water conditions for up to 1440 h. The exposure conditions (thermal deaerated water, temperatures of 723, 773, 823 and 873 K and a pressure of 25 MPa) have been selected as relevant for a supercritical power plant concept. To investigate the structural changes of the oxide films, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses were used. Results show changes in the oxides chemical composition, microstructure and thickness versus testing conditions (pressure, temperature and time). The oxide films are composed of two layers: an outer layer enriched in Fe oxide and an inner layer enriched in Cr and Ni oxides corresponding to small cavities supposedly due to internal oxidation.

  20. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  1. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

  2. Direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Harvind K. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Muppaneni, Tapaswy [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Patil, Prafulla D. [American Refining Group, Inc., Bradford, PA (United States); Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Cooke, Peter [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Core University Research Resource Lab.; Schaub, Tanner [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Bio Security and Food Safety Center; Deng, Shuguang [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    2013-08-06

    This paper presents a single-step, environmentally friendly approach for the direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions. Ethanol was used for the simultaneous extraction and transesterification of lipids in algae to produce fatty acid ethyl esters at supercritical conditions. In this work the effects of process parameters dry algae to ethanol (wt./vol.) ratio (1:6-1:15), reaction temperature (245-270 C), and reaction time (2-30 min.) on the yield of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were studied. 67% conversion was achieved at 265 C and 20 min of reaction time. The calorific value of a purified biodiesel sample produced at optimum conditions was measured to be 43 MJ/kg, which is higher than that of fatty acid methyl esters produced from the same biomass. The purified fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed using GC-MS and FTIR. TGA analysis of algal biomass and purified FAEE was presented along with TEM images of the biomass captured before and after supercritical ethanol transesterification. This green conversion process has the potential to provide an energy-efficient and economical route for the production of renewable biodiesel production.

  3. Supercritical water oxidation - Concept analysis for evolutionary Space Station application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John B., Jr.; Brewer, Dana A.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) concept to reduce the number of processes needed in an evolutionary Space Station design's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), while reducing resupply requirements and enhancing the integration of separate ECLSS functions into a single Supercritical Water Oxidation process, is evaluated. While not feasible for an initial operational capability Space Station, the SCWO's application to the evolutionary Space Station configuration would aid the integration of eight ECLSS functions into a single one, thereby significantly reducing program costs.

  4. Progress of catalytic wet air oxidation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Jing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process for high strength, toxic, hazardous and non-biodegradable contaminants under milder conditions, which is developed on the basic of wet air oxidation. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The advances in the research on wastewater treatment by CWAO process are summarized in aspects of reaction mechanism investigation, reaction kinetics study and catalyst development. It is pointed out that the preparation of active and stable catalysts, the investigation on reaction mechanisms and the study on reaction kinetics models are very important for the promotion of CWAO application.

  5. Effects of Gravity on Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Uday; Hicks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the fluid mechanics of supercritical water jets are being studied at NASA to develop a better understanding of flow behaviors for purposes of advancing supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies for applications in reduced gravity environments. These studies provide guidance for the development of future SCWO experiments in new experimental platforms that will extend the current operational range of the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrodynamics of supercritical fluid jets is one of the basic unit processes of a SCWO reactor. These hydrodynamics are often complicated by significant changes in the thermo-physical properties that govern flow behavior (e.g., viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressibility, etc), particularly when fluids transition from sub-critical to supercritical conditions. Experiments were conducted in a 150 ml reactor cell under constant pressure with water injections at various flow rates. Flow configurations included supercritical jets injected into either sub-critical or supercritical water. Profound gravitational influences were observed, particularly in the transition to turbulence, for the flow conditions under study. These results will be presented and the parameters of the flow that control jet behavior will be examined and discussed.

  6. Destruction of energetic materials by supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beulow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-10-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is a relatively low-temperature process that can give high destruction efficiencies for a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. Results are presented examining the destruction of high explosives and propellants in supercritical water and the use of low temperature, low pressure hydrolysis as a pretreatment process. Reactions of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), nitroguanidine (NQ), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) are examined in a flow reactor operated at temperatures between 400{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Explosives are introduced into the reactor at concentrations below the solubility limits. For each of the compounds, over 99.9% is destroyed in less than 30 seconds at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. The reactions produce primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O,CO{sub 2}, and some nitrate and nitrite ions. The distribution of reaction products depends on reactor pressure, temperature, and oxidizer concentration. Kinetics studies of the reactions of nitrate and nitrite ions with various reducing reagents in supercritical water show that they can be rapidly and completely destroyed at temperatures above 525{degrees}C. The use of slurries and hydrolysis to introduce high concentrations of explosives into a supercritical water reactor is examined. For some compounds the rate of reaction depends on particle size. The hydrolysis of explosives at low temperatures (<100{degrees}C) and low pressures (<1 atm) under basic conditions produces water soluble, non-explosive products which are easily destroyed by supercritical water oxidation. Large pieces of explosives (13 cm diameter) have been successfully hydrolyzed. The rate, extent, and products of the hydrolysis depend on the type and concentration of base. Results from the base hydrolysis of triple base propellant M31A1E1 and the subsequent supercritical water oxidation of the hydrolysis products are presented.

  7. SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SELECTED EPA PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) evaluated for five compounds: acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, pyridine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (methyl ester). inetic models were developed for acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and pyridine. he test compounds were e...

  8. Aerobic Oxidation of Methyl Vinyl Ketone in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG,Xiao-Yue(欧阳小月); JIANG,Huan-Feng(江焕峰); CHENG,Jin-Sheng(程金生); ZHANG,Qun-Jian(张群健)

    2002-01-01

    Aerobic oxidation of methyl vinyl ketone to acetal in supercritical carbon dioxide are achieved in high conversion and high selectivity when oxygen pressure reaches 0.5MPa. The effects of cocatalysts,additive, pressure and temperature of the reaction are studied in detail.

  9. On the gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water : over de vergassing van natte biomassa in superkritiek water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a challenging thermo-chemical conversion route for wet biomass and waste streams into hydrogen and/or methane. At temperatures and pressures above the critical point the physical properties of water differ strongly from liquid water or steam. Because of the

  10. Supercritical water oxidation of wastewater and sludges - design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, M.J.C.; Sanchez, E.A.; Fernandez-Polanco, F. [Dept. Ingenieria Quimica, Univ. de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process is a promising technology for the treatment of industrial wastewaters and sludges. It has been shown to be effective in destroying recalcitrant, xenobiotic or nonbiodegradable compounds and is an interesting alternative to conventional chemical and biological oxidation processes. This paper describes the basic concepts and state of the art of the SCWO technology and presents the flow sheets and energy and mass balances for diluted wastewater and sludge treatment. (orig.)

  11. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Joly, Alan G.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-07-19

    Carbonation reactions are central to the prospect of CO2 trapping by mineralization in geologic reservoirs. In contrast to the relevant aqueous-mediated reactions, little is known about the propensity for carbonation in the long-term partner fluid: water-containing supercritical carbon dioxide (‘wet’ scCO2). We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg2SiO4) for 24 hr with wet scCO2 at 50°C and 180 atm, using water concentrations corresponding to 0%, 55%, 95%, and 136% saturation. Results show a dramatic dependence of reactivity on water concentration and the presence of liquid water on the forsterite particles. Exposure to neat scCO2 showed no detectable carbonation reaction. At 55% and 95% water saturation, a liquid-like thin water film was detected on the forsterite particles; less than 1% of the forsterite transformed, mostly within the first 3 hours of exposure to the fluid. At 136% saturation, where an (excess) liquid water film approximately several nanometers thick was intentionally condensed on the forsterite, the carbonation reaction proceeded continuously for 24 hr with 10% to 15% transformation. Our collective results suggest constitutive links between water concentration, water film formation, reaction rate and extent, and reaction products in wet scCO2.

  12. Destruction of Navy Hazardous Wastes by Supercritical Water Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    voltmeters and scanning thermocouple meters. The data are acquired, analyzed, filed, and displayed using software written for the LabWindows data...acquisition software from National Instruments Corporation. The code was written by NFESC in the C computer language and compiled to achieve rapid program...Hazards and operability ( HAZOP ) study of a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench scale system. Cambridge, MA, Aug 1992. 8. Arthur D. Little, Inc

  13. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  14. Pilot-scale laboratory waste treatment by supercritical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yoshito; Hayashi, Rumiko; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a reaction in which organics in an aqueous solution can be oxidized by O2 to CO2 and H2O at a very high reaction rate. In 2003, The University of Tokyo constructed a facility for the SCWO process, the capacity of which is approximately 20 kl/year, for the purpose of treating organic laboratory waste. Through the operation of this facility, we have demonstrated that most of the organics in laboratory waste including halogenated organic compounds can be successfully treated without the formation of dioxines, suggesting that SCWO is useful as an alternative technology to the conventional incineration process.

  15. The separation of particulates from supercritical water oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell`Orco, P.C.; Li, L.; Gloyna, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Small hydrocyclones with batch underflow receivers were assessed for their ability to separate micron-sized particulates from near-critical water solutions. Such particulates are expected from the effluent of a supercritical water oxidation reactor. The separation of micron-sized quartz silica, zirconia, and titania particles was investigated. An empirical expression was developed for the prediction of gross removal efficiencies as a function of a Stokes` number. Particle size distributions provided grade efficiencies for all experiments, and from these data, cut sizes were determined. Gross efficiencies up to 99% were observed for zirconia; cut sizes (d{sub 90} and d{sub 95}) near one micron were measured.

  16. wet oxidation of maleic acid by a pumice supported copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    materials were tested in a wet oxidation of maleic acid using air or hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. Results ... textile, pharmaceuticals, paper and pulp .... Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). The ... to analysis and then run at room temperature.

  17. The separation of particles from supercritical water oxidation effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Orco, P.C.

    1991-08-01

    The development of a solids separation system is essential to the implementation of supercritical water oxidation as a commercial process. Like all waste disposal processes, supercritical water oxidation produces a residue. This final ash must eventually be removed from the effluent stream. Limited studies have investigated solids separations near supercritical water conditions (374.2 {degrees}C, 3205 psi). Therefore, a ten millimeter diameter hydrocyclone with an underflow receiver was evaluated for its ability to achieve the separation of fine particles from water. Temperature was varied from 20{degrees}C to 389{degrees}C while pressure was maintained at 3600 psi (24.8 MPa). Mass flow rates varied from 0.015 to 0.049 kg/s. Particle concentrations in feed streams ranged from 400 to 1200 mg/L. Three different particulates, Min-U-Sil 5 (quartz SiO{sub 2}), zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}), and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were studied. These particles ranged in diameter from below one micron to ten microns. Low pressure (0-200 psi), room temperature (20{degrees}C) studies were also conducted where flow rate and feed concentration were variables. Solids removal efficiencies were determined for all experiments. Solid removals were as high as 99% at elevated temperatures. Particle size distributions provided information on particle sizes separated. Particles removed with efficiencies of 50, 90, and 95 per cent (cut sizes) were determined. Ninety per cent cut sizes below one micron were reported for several elevated temperature experiments. Empirical models for use in engineering design were developed for the prediction of solid removal efficiencies and pressure drops.

  18. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  19. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-06-16

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, the implication of these results is that mineral trapping in scCO2 dominated fluids will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  20. Treatment of sewage sludge in supercritical water and evaluation of the combined process of supercritical water gasification and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lili; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Donghai; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying; Wang, Longfei

    2015-01-01

    Influences of temperature and oxidation coefficient (n) on sewage sludge treatment in supercritical water and its corresponding reaction mechanism were studied. Moreover, the combined process of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was also investigated. The results show that ammonia nitrogen, phenols and pyridines are main refractory intermediates. The weight of solid products at 873K and n=4 is only 3.5wt.% of the initial weight, which is lower than that after combustion. Volatile organics in solid phase have almost released at 723K and n=0. Highest yield of combustible gases was obtained at n=0, and H2 yield can reach 11.81mol/kg at 873K. Furthermore, the combination of SCWG at 723K and SCWO at 873K with a total n=1 is feasible for its good effluent quality and low operation costs.

  1. Wet peroxide oxidation and catalytic wet oxidation of stripped sour water produced during oil shale refining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Jaidev; Tardio, James; Jani, Harit; Bhargava, Suresh K; Akolekar, Deepak B; Grocott, Stephen C

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) and wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) of stripped sour water (SSW) from an oil shale refinery was investigated. Greater than 70% total organic carbon (TOC) removal from SSW was achieved using Cu(NO(3))(2) catalysed WO under the following conditions using a glass lined reaction vessel: 200 degrees C, pO(2)=0.5MPa, 3h, [Cu(NO(3))(2)]=67mmol/L. Significant TOC removal ( approximately 31%) also occurred in the system without added oxygen. It is proposed that this is predominantly due to copper catalysed oxidative decarboxylation of organics in SSW based on observed changes in copper oxidation state. Greater than 80% TOC removal was achieved using WPO under the following conditions: 150 degrees C, t=1.5h, [H(2)O(2)]=64g/L. Significantly more TOC could be removed from SSW by adding H(2)O(2) in small doses as opposed to adding the same total amount in one single dose. It was concluded that WPO was a far more effective process for removing odorous compounds from SSW.

  2. [Research on synergy of combining electrochemical oxidation and catalytic wet oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Li, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Fang; Huang, Ju-Wen

    2009-07-15

    A new catalytic wet oxidation fixed-bed reactor combined with three-dimensional electric-field was developed to investigate catalytic wet oxidation, electrochemical oxidation and electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation of the solution containing phenol in the presence of a catalyst Mn-Sn-Sb-3/gamma-Al2O3. Good electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation efficiency was obtained in the setup for the combination system even at mild conditions (T = 130 degrees C, po2 = 1.0 MPa) that the phenol conversion and TOC reduction were up to 94.0% and 88.4% after 27 min treatment, respectively. The result also shows that the rate constants of electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation are much higher than that of not only both catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation process alone but also additive efficiencies of catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation processes, which indicates an apparent synergetic effect between CWO and ECO processes.

  3. Study on Supercritical Water Oxidation of Oily Wastewater with Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wenbing

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conventional treatments are unable to effectively remove the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of oily wastewater, which has seriously threatened the environment and the normal production of oil field. In this paper, an advanced method was proposed for oily wastewater treatment, Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO. The co-oxidative effect of ethanol on oily wastewater is characterized for the initial COD of oily wastewater (4000 mg/L and ethanol concentration (20 mg/L for a range of temperatures (390°C-450°C, a pressure of 23 Mpa for the complete combustion of both ethanol and oily wastewater. High concentrations of ethanol caused an increase in the conversion of oily wastewater at T = 450°C, p = 23 MPa and t = 9 min, the oily wastewater removal increases 8%.

  4. Corrosion of titanium in supercritical water oxidation environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建树; 毛志远; 张九渊; 马淳安; 毛信表; 李肖华

    2002-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) can effectively destroy many kinds of civilian and military wastes. The high temperature and high pressure SCWO operation conditions generate very corrosive environment that many engineering materials fail to withstand. Preliminary test shows that titanium may be a promising material in most of SCWO conditions. Commercially pure titanium is tested in four kinds of SCWO environments. Phenol, sodium dodecyl-benzosulfonate, n-amine phenol, and chlorpyrifos were chosen as typical target pollutants. The results show that titanium is only superficially attacked in the first three SCWO environments while in chlorpyrifos SCWO medium titanium is corroded. The corrosion is temperature dependent, with heavier corrosion occurring at near critical temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the corrosion products consist of titanium oxy- phosphates and titanium oxide, in which Ti5O4(PO4)4 is the main phase.

  5. Oxidation of Styrene with Molecular Oxygen in Supercritical CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao JIANG; Bu Xing HAN; Guo Ying ZHAO; Zhong Hao LI; Yan Hong CHANG; Hai Xiang GAO; Jun Chun LI

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation of styrene with molecular oxygen catalyzed by PdCl2+CuCl2 has been investigated in supercritical CO2 with a batch reactor. The oxidative system of styrene contains four components at the beginning and seven components during the reaction. The critical temperature, critical pressure, and critical density at different conversions are determined by using a high-pressure view cell. The effect of phase behavior on the conversion and selectivity were studied. Experimental results showed that the critical parameters of the reaction mixture at fixed initial molar ratio changed with the conversion of reactant. The conversion of styrene reached maximum near the critical density of the reaction mixture. Product selectivity also varied with density of reaction mixture and could be tuned to some degree.

  6. Supercritical Fluid Facilitated Growth of Copper and Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geoffrey L.; Vohs, Jason K.; Brege, Jonathan J.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCFs) possess properties that are intermediate between liquids and gases. The combination of supercritical fluid technology with advanced characterization techniques such as electron microscopy provided a practical and rewarding undergraduate laboratory experiment.

  7. Treatment of whey wastewater by supercritical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söğüt, Onur Ö; Kıpçak, Ekin; Akgün, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Whey wastewater is a by-product of cheese industry, which causes environmental pollution problems due to its containment of heavy organic pollutants. Conventional methods such as biological treatment and physico-chemical treatment are insufficient or ineffective. In this paper, the treatment of cheese whey wastewater has been carried out by supercritical water oxidation, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The reaction conditions ranged between temperatures of 400-650°C and residence times of 6-21 s under a pressure of 25 MPa. Treatment efficiencies based on TOC removal were obtained between 75.0% and 99.81%. An overall reaction rate model, which consists of the hydrothermal and the oxidation reactions, was determined for the hydrothermal decomposition of the wastewater with an activation energy of 50.022 (±1.7) kJmol(-1) and a pre-exponential factor of 107.72 (±4.1) s(-1). The oxidation reaction rate orders for the TOC and the oxidant were 1.2 (±0.4) and 0.4 (±0.1) respectively, with an activation energy of 20.337 (±0.9) kJmol(-1), and a pre-exponential factor of 1.86 (±0.5) mmol(-0.6)L(0.6)s(-1) in a 95% confidence level.

  8. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, John S; Chen, Jeffrey; Bénézeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S; Washton, Nancy M; Thompson, Christopher J; Martin, Paul F; McGrail, B Peter; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R; Schaef, Herbert T

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and postreaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis mass spectrometry (TGA-MS), and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 μmol/m(2). Above this concentration and up to 76 μmol/m(2), monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 μmol/m(2), crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O

  9. The separation of particulates from supercritical water oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Orco, P.C.; Li, L.; Gloyna, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    Small hydrocyclones with batch underflow receivers were assessed for their ability to separate micron-sized particulates from near-critical water solutions. Such particulates are expected from the effluent of a supercritical water oxidation reactor. The separation of micron-sized quartz silica, zirconia, and titania particles was investigated. A model was developed for the prediction of gross removal efficiencies as a function of a Stokes' number. Particle size distributions provided grade efficiencies for all experiments, and from these data, cut sizes were determined. Gross efficiencies up to 99% were observed for zirconia; cut sizes (d{sub 90} and d{sub 95}) near one micron were measured. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Diffusion Limited Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) in Microgravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, M. C.; Lauver, R. W.; Hegde, U. G.; Sikora, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Tests designed to quantify the gravitational effects on thermal mixing and reactant injection in a Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) reactor have recently been performed in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) at NASA s Glenn Research Center. An artificial waste stream, comprising aqueous mixtures of methanol, was pressurized to approximately 250 atm and then heated to 450 C. After uniform temperatures in the reactor were verified, a controlled injection of air was initiated through a specially designed injector to simulate diffusion limited reactions typical in most continuous flow reactors. Results from a thermal mapping of the reaction zone in both 1-g and 0-g environments are compared. Additionally, results of a numerical model of the test configuration are presented to illustrate first order effects on reactant mixing and thermal transport in the absence of gravity.

  11. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...

  12. Supercritical water

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2012-01-01

    Discover the many new and emerging applications of supercritical water as a green solvent Drawing from thousands of original research articles, this book reviews and summarizes what is currently known about the properties and uses of supercritical water. In particular, it focuses on new and emerging applications of supercritical water as a green solvent, including the catalytic conversion of biomass into fuels and the oxidation of hazardous materials. Supercritical Water begins with an introduction that defines supercritical fluids in general. It then defines supercritical wa

  13. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  14. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  15. Effects of operational conditions on sludge degradation and organic acids formation in low-critical wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Lee, Mikyung; Ahn, Jaehwan; Bae, Wookeun; Lee, Yong-Woo; Shim, Hojae

    2009-02-15

    Wet air oxidation processes are to treat highly concentrated organic compounds including refractory materials, sludge, and night soil, and usually operated at supercritical water conditions of high temperature and pressure. In this study, the effects of operational conditions including temperature, pressure, and oxidant dose on sludge degradation and conversion into subsequent intermediates such as organic acids were investigated at low critical wet oxidation conditions. The reaction time and temperature in the wet air oxidation process was shown an important factor affecting the liquefaction of volatile solids, with more significant effect on the thermal hydrolysis reaction rather than the oxidation reaction. The degradation efficiency of sludge and the formation of organic acids were improved with longer reaction time and higher reaction temperature. For the sludge reduction and the organic acids formation under the wet air oxidation, the optimal conditions for reaction temperature, time, pressure, and oxidant dose were shown approximately 240 degrees C, 30min, 60atm, and 2.0L/min, respectively.

  16. Supercritical water oxidation of spent extraction solvent simulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帅; 秦强; 陈土方方; 夏晓彬; 马洪军; 乔延波; 何柳斌

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of nuclear technology has led to more liquid organic radioactive wastes. Different from the regular aqueous radioactive wastes, these liquids possess a higher hazard potential and cannot be disposed through the conventional methods due to their radioactivity and chemical nature. Spent extraction solvent is a kind of common liquid organic radioactive wastes. In this work, tri-butyl phosphate (TBP), which is more difficult to degrade in the spent extraction solvent, was used as the model compound. Influences of reaction conditions on total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the volume percentage of each gas component under supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) were studied. The SCWO behaviors of spent extraction solvent simulants were studied under the optimal conditions derived from the TBP experiment. The SCWO experiments were studied at 400–550◦C, oxidant stoichiometric ratio of 0–200%, feed concentration of 1.5%–4%and pressure of 25 MPa for 15–75 s. The results show that the TOC removal of the simulants was greater than 99.7%and CH4, H2 and CO were not detected at 550◦C, 25 MPa, oxidant stoichiometric ratio of 150%, feed concentration of 3%, and residence time of 30 s.

  17. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  18. Destruction of representative submarine food waste using supercritical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiying; Qu, Xuan; Zhang, Rong; Bi, Jicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 13 types of organic materials were oxidized using H2O2 in a continuous flow reactor under the condition of supercritical water. The effect of the operational parameters on the conversion of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) was investigated, and the resulting quality of treated water was analyzed. It was found that these materials were easily oxidized with a TOC conversion achieving 99% at temperature of 460 °C and TN conversion reaching 94% at temperature of 500 °C. Rice decomposition was rapid, with TOC and TN decomposition rates of 99% obtained within residence of 100 s at temperature of 460 °C. At temperature of 460 °C, pressure of 24 MPa, residence time of 100 s, and excess oxygen of 100%, the quality of treated water attained levels commensurate with China's Standards for Drinking Water Quality. Reaction rate equation parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the differential equation obtained using the Runge-Kutta algorithm. The decrease of the TOC in water samples exhibited reaction orders of 0.95 for the TOC concentration and 0.628 for the oxygen concentration. The activation energy was 83.018 kJ/mol.

  19. Simulation of wet oxidation of silicon based on the interfacial silicon emission model and comparison with dry oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Masashi; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Silicon oxidation in wet ambients is simulated based on the interfacial silicon emission model and is compared with dry oxidation in terms of the silicon-atom emission. The silicon emission model enables the simulation of wet oxidation to be done using the oxidant self-diffusivity in the oxide with a single activation energy. The amount of silicon emission from the interface during wet oxidation is smaller than that during dry oxidation. The small emission rate for wet oxidation is responsibl...

  20. A supercritical oxidation system for the determination of carbon isotope ratios in marine dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clercq, Martijn; Van der Plicht, Johannes; Meijer, Harro A.J.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical oxidation system employing supercritical oxidation has been developed. It is designed to measure concentration and the natural carbon isotope ratios (C-13, C-14) Of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is especially suited for marine samples. The oxidation takes place in a ceramic tube a

  1. Supercritical water oxidation for wastewater treatment Preliminary study of urea destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, S. H.; Hong, G. T.; Simson, M.; Modell, M.

    1982-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is being investigated as a method of treating spacecraft wastewater for recycle. In this process, oxidation is conducted in an aqueous phase maintained above the critical temperature (374 C) and pressure (215 bar) of water. Organic materials are oxidized with efficiencies greater than 99.99 percent in residence times of less than 1 minute. This paper presents preliminary results for urea destruction. Above 650 C, urea can be completely broken down to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide and water by supercritical water oxidation, without the use of a specific catalyst.

  2. Supercritical water oxidation of acrylic acid production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y M; Wang, S Z; Tang, X Y; Xu, D H; Ma, H H

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of wastewater from an acrylic acid manufacturing plant has been studied on a continuous flow experimental system, whose reactor was made of Hastelloy C-276. Experimental conditions included a reaction temperature (T) ranging from 673 to 773K, a residence time (t) ranging from 72.7 to 339s, a constant pressure (P) of 25 MPa and a fixed oxidation coefficient (alpha) of 2.0. Experimental results indicated that reaction temperature and residence time had significant influences on the oxidation reaction, and increasing the two operation parameters could improve both degradation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N). The COD removal efficiency could reach up to 98.73% at 25 MPa, 773 K and 180.1 s, whereas the destruction efficiency of NH3-N was only 43.71%. We further carried out a kinetic analysis considering the induction period through free radical chain mechanism. It confirms that the power-law rate equation for COD removal was 345 exp(-52200/RT)[COD]1.98[O2]0.17 and for NH3-N removal was 500 exp(-64492.19/RT)[NH3-N]1.87 [O2]0.03. Moreover, the induction time formulations for COD and NH3-N were suspected to be exp(38250/RT)/173 and exp(55690/RT)/15231, respectively. Correspondingly, induction time changed from 2.22 to 5.38 s for COD and 0.38 to 1.38 s for NH3-N. Owing to the catalysis of reactor inner wall surface, more than 97% COD removal was achieved in all samples.

  3. Catalytic wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翬

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatment of o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence of catalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removed by wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperature of 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited high catalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCr was removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had better catalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  4. Low Temperature Synthesis of Metal Oxides by a Supercritical Seed Enhanced Crystallization (SSEC) Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Brummerstedt Iversen, Steen; Joensen, Karsten Dan

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for producing crystalline nanosized metal oxides by a Supercritical Seed Enhanced Crystallization (SSEC) Process has been developed. The process is a modified sol-gel process taking place at temperatures as low as 95 ºC with supercritical CO2 as solvent and polypropylene as seeding....... The crystallinity can be controlled by changing the heating rate of the initial formation of the nanoparticles and the morphology can be altered by changing the process time....

  5. US-UK Phase 3 Task 1 Oxidation in Supercritical Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-03-20

    A presentation of the US-UK Phase 3 Task 1 Oxidation in Supercritical Fluids. Includes slides on Supercritical Steam, sCO2 Power Cycles – Indirect, sCO2 Power Cycles – Direct, Experimental Exposures, Alloys, Why Si, Results—Ni-xCr Alloys (5-24Cr), Fatigue Crack Growth$-$Experiment, and Alloys and Samples, Fatigue Crack Growth—Results (H282).

  6. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  7. Supercritical water oxidation of oil-based drill cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Zeliang; Yin, Fengjun; Wang, Guangwei; Chen, Hongzhen; He, Chunlan; Xu, Yuanjian

    2017-03-09

    Oil-based drill cuttings (OBDC) are a typical hazardous solid waste that arises from drilling operations in oil and gas fields. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of OBDC was comprehensively investigated in a batch reactor under the conditions of various oxygen coefficients (OC, 1.5-3.5), temperatures (T, 400-500°C) and reaction times (t, 0.5-10min). Preheating experiments indicated that most of the organic compounds in the initial OBDC sample were distributed within gaseous, oil, aqueous and solid phases, with no more than 9.8% of organic compounds converted into inorganic carbon. All tested variables, i.e., OC, T and t, positively affect the transformation of carbon compounds from the oil and solid phases to the aqueous phase and, ultimately, to CO2. Carbon monoxide is the primary stable intermediate. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency can reach up to 89.2% within 10min at 500°C. Analysis of the reaction pathways suggests both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions exist in the reactor. The homogeneous reaction is a typical SCWO reaction that is governed by a free radical mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction is dominated by mass transfer. The information obtained in this study is useful for further investigation and development of hydrothermal treatment procedures for OBDC.

  8. Wet Oxidation of PVA-Containing Desizing Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷乐成; 汪大翬

    2000-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-containing desizing wastewater was treated by various wet oxidation methods.Parameters such as reaction temperature, initial solution pH, and the dosage of H2O2 were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate. Up to 90% of the initial CODcr was removed by wet air oxidation(WAO) at 270℃ with stoichiometric oxygen supply, while at temperature of 200℃, the CODcr removal rate was found to be 80%. Similar results were obtained by Promoted WAO (PWAO) and wet peroxide oxidation(WPO) at a lower temperature of 150℃. Reaction temperature was found to have a significant effect on the oxidation performance for all the methods. Initial solution pH was observed to play a significant role in PWAO and WPO where H2O2 was employed. Comparison of WAO, CWAO(catalytic wet air oxidation), PWAO and WPO shows that the rate of CODcr removal increases in the order: WAO, CWAO, PWAO and WPO.

  9. Kinetics of wet oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1997-11-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight carboxylic acids such as formic, acetic, glyoxalic, and oxalic acids is often the rate-controlling step during wet oxidation (WO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WO of formic acid was studied in the absence and presence of a cupric sulfate as catalyst in the temperature range 150--240 C and oxygen partial pressure range 0.345--1.380 MPa. Wet oxidation of acetic acid was carried out in the presence of cupric sulfate in the temperature range 215--235 C. Homogeneous copper sulfate was found to be a very good catalyst for oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid.

  10. The applicability of the catalytic wet-oxidation to CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Nitta, K.; Ohya, H.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The wet oxidation catalysis of Au, Pd, Pt, Rh or Ru on a ceramic honeycomb carrier was traced in detail by 16 to 20 repetitive batch tests each. As a result, Pt or Pd on a honeycomb carrier was shown to catalyze complete nitrogen gasification as N2. Though the catalysts which realize both complete nitrogen gasification and complete oxidation could not be found, the Ru+Rh catalyst was found to be most promising. Ru honeycomb catalyzed both nitrification and nitrogen gasification.

  11. Evolution of toxicity upon wet catalytic oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Yustos, P; Quintanilla, A; García-Ochoa, F; Casas, J A; Rodríguez, J J

    2004-01-01

    This work reports on the evolution of the toxicity of phenol-containing simulated wastewater upon catalytic wet oxidation with a commercial copper-based catalyst (Engelhard Cu-0203T). The results of the study show that this catalyst enhances detoxification, in addition to its effect on the oxidation rate. The EC50 values of the intermediates identified throughout the oxidation route of phenol have been determined and used to predict the evolution of toxicity upon oxidation. The predicted values have been compared with the ones measured directly from the aqueous solution during the oxidation process. To learn about the evolution of toxicity through out the routes of phenol oxidation, experiments have been performed with simulated wastewaters containing separately phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone as original pollutants. The significant increase of toxicity observed during the early stages of phenol oxidation is not directly related to the development of the brown color that derives mainly from catechol oxidation. This increase of toxicity is caused by the formation of hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone as intermediates, the former showing the highest toxicity. Furthermore, synergistic effects, giving rise to a significant increase of toxicity, have been observed. These effects derive from the interactions among copper leached from the catalyst and catechol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone and demand that close attention be paid to this potential problem in catalytic wet oxidation.

  12. Can supercritical oxidation of sewage sludge be an alternative for supercritical gasification?; Kan superkritische oxidatie van zuiveringsslib een alternatief zijn voor superkritische vergassing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rulkens, W. [Wageningen UR, Wageningen (Netherlands); Wentink, J. [Horizon Solutions, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    In the context of the development of The Energy Factory a number of technologies has been identified that may be interesting to develop further. Two of these techniques relate to the conversion of sludge in supercritical water: supercritical gasification of sludge and supercritical oxidation of sludge [Dutch] In het kader van de ontwikkeling van De Energiefabriek is een aantal technologieen geidentificeerd die mogelijk interessant zijn om verder te ontwikkelen. Twee van deze technieken hebben betrekking op de conversie van slib in superkritisch water: superkritische slibvergassing en superkritische sliboxidatie.

  13. Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

  14. Wet oxidation as a waste treatment in closed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1981-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process has been investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life-support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste and oxygen gas was used as oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100% depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas account for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life-support systems are discussed.

  15. Wet Oxidation as a Waste Treatment Method in Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process was investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste, and oxygen gas was used as an oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100%, depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas accounted for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life support systems are discussed.

  16. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  17. Wet oxidation of real coke wastewater containing high thiocyanate concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Coke wastewaters, in particular those with high thiocyanate concentrations, represent an important environmental problem because of their very low biodegradability. In this work, the treatment by wet oxidation of real coke wastewaters containing concentrations of thiocyanate above 17 mM has been studied in a 1-L semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 453 and 493 K, with total oxygen pressures in the range of 2.0-8.0 MPa. A positive effect of the matrix of real coke wastewater was observed, resulting in faster thiocyanate degradation than was obtained with synthetic wastewaters. Besides, the effect of oxygen concentration and temperature on thiocyanate wet oxidation was more noticeable in real effluents than in synthetic wastewaters containing only thiocyanate. It was also observed that the degree of mineralization of the matrix organic compounds was higher when the initial thiocyanate concentration increased. Taking into account the experimental data, kinetic models were obtained, and a mechanism implying free radicals was proposed for thiocyanate oxidation in the matrix considered. In all cases, sulphate, carbonates and ammonium were identified as the main reaction products of thiocyanate wet oxidation.

  18. Molecular Simulation Study of Montmorillonite in Contact with Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2017-03-07

    We perform grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the detailed molecular mechanism of intercalation behavior of CO2 in Na-, Ca-, and Mg- montmorillonite exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 at 323.15 K and 90 bar, The simulations indicate that the intercalation of CO2 strongly depends on the relative humidity (RH). The intercalation of CO2 in the dehydrated interlayer is inhibited, followed by the swelling of the interlayer region due to uptake of water and CO2 as the RH increases. In all of the hydrated clay samples, the amount of the intercalated CO2 generally decreases as a function of increasing RH, which is attributed mainly to the weakening of the interaction between CO2 and clay. At low RH values, Ca- and Mg- montmorillonite are relatively more efficient in capturing CO2. The amount of CO2 trapped in all clay samples shows similar values above RH of similar to 60%. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the diffusion coefficient of each species generally increases with increasing RH due to the associated expansion of the interlayer distance of the clay. For all the hydrated samples, the diffusion coefficients of CO2 and water in the interlayers are mostly comparable due to the fact that CO2 molecules are well solvated. The diffusion of CO2 in each hydration state is mostly independent of the type of cation in accordance with the fact that CO2 molecules hardly migrate into the first hydration shell of the interlayer cations.

  19. Study on mechanism of wet air oxidation of emulsification wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen W; Zeng, Xin P; Xiao, Yao M; Gu, Guo W

    2009-04-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) can effectively be used to treat high-concentration, non-biodegradable emulsification wastewater that contains nonionic matters. Gas chromatograph analysis of emulsification wastewater after oxidation indicated that a catalyst increased production of fatty acids but could not promote its oxidation between 160 and 180 degrees C. When the temperature was greater than or equal to 220 degrees C, the catalyst not only increased production of fatty acids initially but effectively promoted its oxidation in later stages and significantly reduced the concentration of residual surfactants. Experiments proved that fatty acids (especially acetic acid) were the primary intermediate products and that oxidation of these acids was the rate-limiting step. During the process of catalytic WAO of emulsification wastewater, active oxygen molecules attacked organic matters resulting in production of fatty acids, ketone, alcohol, hydrocarbon, and oligo-polyether through radical chain reactions.

  20. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    , and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature......The wet oxidation pretreatment (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, and pressure) of softwood (Picea abies) was investigated for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was preliminarily optimized. Six different combinations of reaction time, temperature, and pH were applied...... of the pretreatment, the residual hemicellulose content of the substrate, and the type of the commercial cellulase preparation used were the most important factors affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest sugar yield in a 72-h hydrolysis, 79% of theoretical, was obtained using a pretreatment of 200degrees...

  1. Microwave assisted wet oxidation of p-nitrophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO; Longli; CHEN; Shuo; QUAN; Xie; LIU; Xitao; ZHAO; Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous solution of p-nitrophenol (PNP) was treated continuously by microwave assisted wet oxidation while flowing through a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed. PNP was pre-adsorbed onto GAC prior to being put into the reactor so as to prevent PNP adsorption on GAC during microwave irradiation. PNP solutions with different initial concentration (218.6 mg/L and 1200 mg/L) were treated under conditions of microwave power 500 W, liquid flow 6.4 mL/min and air flow 40 mL/min or 60 mL/min. The results indicated that the removal of PNP was higher than 90% and more than 65% PNP was mineralized. Phenol, nitrobenzene, hydroquinone and benzoquinone occurred as course products during the operation process, which were degraded further. The biodegradability of the outflow was improved greatly by microwave assisted wet oxidation.

  2. Estimation of Oxidation Kinetics and Oxide Scale Void Position of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliation of oxide scales from high-temperature heating surfaces of power boilers threatened the safety of supercritical power generating units. According to available space model, the oxidation kinetics of two ferritic-martensitic steels are developed to predict in supercritical water at 400°C, 500°C, and 600°C. The iron diffusion coefficients in magnetite and Fe-Cr spinel are extrapolated from studies of Backhaus and Töpfer. According to Fe-Cr-O ternary phase diagram, oxygen partial pressure at the steel/Fe-Cr spinel oxide interface is determined. The oxygen partial pressure at the magnetite/supercritical water interface meets the equivalent oxygen partial pressure when system equilibrium has been attained. The relative error between calculated values and experimental values is analyzed and the reasons of error are suggested. The research results show that the results of simulation at 600°C are approximately close to experimental results. The iron diffusion coefficient is discontinuous in the duplex scale of two ferritic-martensitic steels. The simulation results of thicknesses of the oxide scale on tubes (T91 of final superheater of a 600 MW supercritical boiler are compared with field measurement data and calculation results by Adrian’s method. The calculated void positions of oxide scales are in good agreement with a cross-sectional SEM image of the oxide layers.

  3. Optimization of wet oxidation pretreatment of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A.S.; Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The wet oxidation process (water; oxygen and elevated temperature) was investigated under alkaline conditions for fractionation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin from wheat straw. At higher temperature and longer reaction time, a purified cellulose fraction (69% w/w) was produced with high ...... for by saccharides and carboxylic acids; hence, a significant proportion of reaction products remained unidentified. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin

  5. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin co

  6. Highly water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes amine-functionalized by supercritical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Moon, In-Kyu; Han, Joo-Hee; Do, Seung-Hoe; Lee, Jin-Seo; Jeon, Seong-Yun

    2013-11-07

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been amine-functionalized by eco-friendly supercritical water oxidation. The facilely functionalized MWNTs have high solubility (~84 mg L(-1)) in water and 78% transmittance at 30-fold dilution. The Tyndall effect is also shown for several liquids.

  7. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin co

  8. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  9. Implementing supercritical water oxidation technology in a lunar base environmental control/life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Sedej, M.

    1985-01-01

    A supercritical water oxidation system (SCWOS) offers several advantages for a lunar base environmental control/life support system (ECLSS) compared to an ECLSS based on Space Station technology. In supercritically heated water (630 K, 250 atm) organic materials mix freely with oxygen and undergo complete combustion. Inorganic salts lose solubility and precipitate out. Implementation of SCWOS can make an ECLSS more efficient and reliable by elimination of several subsystems and by reduction in potential losses of life support consumables. More complete closure of the total system reduces resupply requirements from the earth, a crucial cost item in maintaining a lunar base.

  10. Wet-oxidation waste management system for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Ohya, H.

    1986-01-01

    A wet oxidation system will be useful in the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) as a facility to treat organic wastes and to redistribute inorganic compounds and elements. However at rather higher temperatures needed in this reaction, for instance, at 260 deg C, only 80% of organic in a raw material can be oxidized, and 20% of it will remain in the liquid mainly as acetic acid, which is virtually noncombustible. Furthermore, nitrogen is transformed to ammonium ions which normally cannot be absorbed by plants. To resolve these problems, it becomes necessary to use catalysts. Noble metals such as Ru, Rh and so on have proved to be partially effective as these catalysts. That is, oxidation does not occur completely, and the unexpected denitrification, instead of the expected nitrification, occurs. So, it is essential to develop the catalysts which are able to realize the complete oxidation and the nitrification.

  11. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-10-10

    The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and

  12. Determination of the column hold-up volume in supercritical fluid chromatography using nitrous-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-27

    This study introduces a new tracer that is useful for the determination of the hold-up time or volume of packed columns, particularly of those used in supercritical fluid chromatography. The thermodynamic void volume of three columns packed with different adsorbents were determined using the weight difference method. These void volumes were used as the reference point in the further discussion. The hold-up volumes of these columns were determined under dynamic conditions, using nitrous oxide dissolved in methanol as the hold-up time marker. Changes in the hold-up volumes of these columns were monitored during changes of the volumetric flow rate of pure supercritical carbon dioxide and of dilute mixtures of organic modifier and supercritical carbon dioxide. The results suggest significant methanol enrichment on the adsorbent surface.

  13. Enhanced metal recovery through oxidation in liquid and/or supercritical carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Blanco, Mario

    2017-08-24

    Process for enhanced metal recovery from, for example, metal-containing feedstock using liquid and/or supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and a source of oxidation. The oxidation agent can be free of complexing agent. The metal-containing feedstock can be a mineral such as a refractory mineral. The mineral can be an ore with high sulfide content or an ore rich in carbonaceous material. Waste can also be used as the metal-containing feedstock. The metal-containing feedstock can be used which is not subjected to ultrafine grinding. Relatively low temperatures and pressures can be used. The metal-containing feedstock can be fed into the reactor at a temperature below the critical temperature of the carbon dioxide, and an exotherm from the oxidation reaction can provide the supercritical temperature. The oxidant can be added to the reactor at a rate to maintain isothermal conditions in the reactor. Minimal amounts of water can be used as an extractive medium.

  14. Kinetic analysis for destruction of municipal sewage sludge and alcohol distillery wastewater by supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Motonobu; Nada, Takatsugu; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1999-05-01

    Supercritical water oxidation was applied to the destruction of municipal excess sewage sludge and alcohol distillery wastewater of molasses. The reaction was carried out in a batch reactor with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant in the temperature range 673--773 K. Total organic carbon was measured as a function of reaction time. The dynamic data were analyzed by a first-order reaction model. The reaction rate constant coincides with those reported in the literature.

  15. Catalytic properties of carbon materials for wet oxidation of aniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Helder T. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e de Gestao, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus de Santa Apolonia, 5300-857 Braganca (Portugal); Machado, Bruno F.; Ribeiro, Andreia; Moreira, Ivo; Rosario, Marcio; Silva, Adrian M.T.; Figueiredo, Jose L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Joaquim L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: jlfaria@fe.up.pt

    2008-11-30

    A mesoporous carbon xerogel with a significant amount of oxygen functional groups and a commercial activated carbon, were tested in the catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline at 200 deg. C and 6.9 bar of oxygen partial pressure. Both carbon materials showed high activity in aniline and total organic carbon removal, a clear increase in the removal efficiency relatively to non-catalytic wet air oxidation being observed. The best results in terms of aniline removal were obtained with carbon xerogel, an almost complete aniline conversion after 1 h oxidation with high selectivity to non-organic compounds being achieved. The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption, N{sub 2} adsorption and scanning electron microscopy, in order to relate their performances to the chemical and textural characteristics. It was concluded that the removal efficiency, attributed to both adsorption and catalytic activity, is related to the mesoporous character of the materials and to the presence of specific oxygen containing functional groups at their surface. The effect of catalytic activity was found to be more important in the removal of aniline than the effect of adsorption at the materials surface. The results obtained indicate that mesoporous carbon xerogels are promising catalysts for CWAO processes.

  16. Catalytic properties of carbon materials for wet oxidation of aniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helder T; Machado, Bruno F; Ribeiro, Andreia; Moreira, Ivo; Rosário, Márcio; Silva, Adrián M T; Figueiredo, José L; Faria, Joaquim L

    2008-11-30

    A mesoporous carbon xerogel with a significant amount of oxygen functional groups and a commercial activated carbon, were tested in the catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline at 200 degrees C and 6.9 bar of oxygen partial pressure. Both carbon materials showed high activity in aniline and total organic carbon removal, a clear increase in the removal efficiency relatively to non-catalytic wet air oxidation being observed. The best results in terms of aniline removal were obtained with carbon xerogel, an almost complete aniline conversion after 1h oxidation with high selectivity to non-organic compounds being achieved. The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption, N(2) adsorption and scanning electron microscopy, in order to relate their performances to the chemical and textural characteristics. It was concluded that the removal efficiency, attributed to both adsorption and catalytic activity, is related to the mesoporous character of the materials and to the presence of specific oxygen containing functional groups at their surface. The effect of catalytic activity was found to be more important in the removal of aniline than the effect of adsorption at the materials surface. The results obtained indicate that mesoporous carbon xerogels are promising catalysts for CWAO processes.

  17. Supercritical water oxidation: application to reduce industrial wastes. Oxidacion en agua supercritica (OASC): aplicacion a la eliminacion de residuos industriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocero, M.J.; Gonzalez, R.; Fernandez-Polanco, F.

    1994-01-01

    The incineration of wastes presents many problems with environmental laws. A solution could be the Supercritic oxidation water. (SOW). This method is clean, without air pollution. The article analyzes process, depressurization, energetical approvement, and applications for wastes. (Author) 18 refs.

  18. Surface wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane microspheres via wet surface chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-16

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  19. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  20. Wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation of several azodyes from wastewaters: the beneficial role of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; García, J; Ovejero, G; Mestanza, M

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of several azo dyes, Acid Orange 7 (AO7), Acid Orange 74 (AO74), Direct Blue 71 (DB71), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Eriochrome Blue Black B (EBBB), well-known non-biodegradable mono, di and tri azo dyes has been studied using, wet-air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). The efficiency of substrate decolorization and mineralization in each process has been comparatively discussed by evolution concentration, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon content and toxicity of dyes solutions. The most efficient method on decolorization and mineralization (TOC) was observed to be CWAO process. Mineralization efficiency with wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation essays was observed in the order of mono-azo > di-azo > tri-azo dye. Final solutions of CWAO applications after 180 min treatment can be disposed safely to environment.

  1. Kinetics of wet air oxidation (WAO) of alcaloide factory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunukcu, Y Kaçar

    2005-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) of Afyon alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater, was carried out. The process was performed in a specifically designed titanium bubble reactor at temperatures in the range of 140-160 degrees C. The kinetics of WAO of alcaloide factory wastewater was modeled by assuming two distinct steps. The rates of destruction were measured with respect to reduction in COD. The oxidation reaction was found to be first order with respect to COD concentration and also second order with respect to oxygen concentration in both steps. The values of activation energies were found to be in the range of 4.93 x 10(4)-7.85 x 10(4) kJ/kmol.

  2. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  3. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  4. Wet oxidation kinetics of refractory low molecular mass carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Levec, J.

    1999-10-01

    Wet oxidation kinetics of aqueous solutions of formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acids was studied in a titanium autoclave at a temperature range of 150--320 C and oxygen partial pressures between 8 and 60 bar. Oxidation reactions obeyed a first-order kinetics with respect to concentration of all substrates. On the basis of acid concentration decay, the activation energy for acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acid oxidation was 178, 137, and 97 kJ/mol, respectively; whereas on the total organic carbon (TOC) conversion basis, these values were slightly higher, namely 182, 141, and 104 kJ/mol. The activation energy for formic acid took a unique value of 149 kJ/mol regardless of the type of concentration used. The rate of oxidation was proportional to a square root of oxygen concentration (partial pressure) for acetic, formic, and oxalic acids, whereas it was linearly proportional for glyoxalic acid. When sufficiently high oxygen partial pressure was applied ({ge}22 bar), the individual acid conversion in a mixture of these acids was well predicted by the rate expression derived for that acid. The lumped TOC concentration of mixtures did not obey a first-order kinetic behavior, although underlying TOC kinetics for each individual acid was linear. The oxidation results are also discussed in a view of speculated reaction pathways and the reactor material.

  5. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  6. Wet air oxidation of epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Liu, Zhengqian; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Beiping

    2010-06-15

    Epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater contained highly concentrated and toxic organic compounds. The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were used to eliminate pollutants in order to examine the feasibility of the WAO/CWAO as a pre-treatment method for the industrial wastewater. The results showed that in the WAO 63% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 41% total organic carbon (TOC) removals were achieved and biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))/COD ratio increased from 0.13 to 0.72 after 3h reaction at 250 degrees C, 3.5MPa and the initial concentration of 100g(COD)/L. Among homogenous catalysts (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) salts), Cu(2+) salt exhibited better performance. CuO catalyst was used in the CWAO of the wastewater, COD and TOC conversion were 77 and 54%, and good biodegradability was achieved. The results proved that the CWAO was an effective pre-treatment method for the epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

  7. Pretreatment of apramycin wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shao-xia; FENG Yu-jie; WAN Jia-feng; LIN Qing-ying; ZHU Wan-peng; JIANG Zhan-peng

    2005-01-01

    The pretreatment technology of wet air oxidation(WAO) and coagulation and acidic hydrolysis for apramycin wastewater was investigated in this paper. The COD, apramycin, NH4+ concentration, and the ratio of BOD5/COD were analyzed, and the color and odor of the effluent were observed. WAO of apramycin wastewater, without catalyst and with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts, was carried out at degradation temperature of 200℃ and the total pressure of 4 MPa in a 1 L batch reactor. The result showed that the apramycin removals were respectively 50.2% and 55.0%, COD removals were 40.0% and 46.0%, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.49 and 0.54 with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts in catylytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) after the reaction of 150 min. With the pretreatment of coagulation and acidic hydrolysis, COD and apramycin removals were slight decreased, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.45, and the effluents was not suitable to biological treatment. The color and odor of the wastewater were the apramycin wastewater. The addition of CeO2 could promote the activity and stability of RuO2/Al2 O3 in WAO of apramycin wastewater.

  8. Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography of lignin-derived phenols from alkaline cupric oxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhe; Lidén, Gunnar; Sandahl, Margareta; Turner, Charlotta

    2016-08-01

    Traditional chromatographic methods for the analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds in environmental samples are generally time consuming. In this work, an ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method with a diode array detector for the analysis of major lignin-derived phenolic compounds produced by alkaline cupric oxide oxidation was developed. In an analysis of a collection of 11 representative monomeric lignin phenolic compounds, all compounds were clearly separated within 6 min with excellent peak shapes, with a limit of detection of 0.5-2.5 μM, a limit of quantification of 2.5-5.0 μM, and a dynamic range of 5.0-2.0 mM (R(2) > 0.997). The new ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method was also applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds obtained upon alkaline cupric oxide oxidation of a commercial humic acid. Ten out of the previous eleven model compounds could be quantified in the oxidized humic acid sample. The high separation power and short analysis time obtained demonstrate for the first time that supercritical fluid chromatography is a fast and reliable technique for the analysis of lignin-derived phenols in complex environmental samples.

  9. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Guo, Xianglong; Shen, Zhao; Zhang, Lefu

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer.

  10. Supercritical carbon dioxide as an innovative reaction medium for selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeker, F.; Leitner, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Although the catalytic efficiency of all catalytic oxidation processes studied in scCO{sub 2} up to now is far from being satisfactory, the principle possibility to carry out such reactions in this medium is clearly evident. Future research in our group will be directed towards the development of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts that are adopted to the special requirements of both the oxidation process and the supercritical reaction medium. Preliminary results from these studies regarding the epoxidation of olefins with molecular oxygen as oxidant will be presented on the conference poster. (orig.)

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Dihydromyrcene to Citronellal in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAN, Xue-Guang(冉学光); JIANG, Huan-Feng(江焕峰); ZHU, Xin-Hai(朱新海)

    2004-01-01

    Citronellal was the major product of catalytic oxidation of dihydromyrcene with oxygen using the catalyst comprised of (MeCN)2PdClNO2 and CuCl2 in a tertiary alcohol in supercritical carbon dioxide. It was found that the chemoselectivity of the reaction and the yield of citronellal were greatly affected by the pressure of carbon dioxide, the reaction temperature and the molar ratio of Pd/Cu.

  12. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ning [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Descorme, Claude [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: claude.descorme@catalyse.cnrs.fr; Besson, Michele [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO{sub 2}. 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO{sub 2} is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393 K) and lower total pressure (3 MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michèle

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2). 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2) is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393K) and lower total pressure (3MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect.

  14. Transformation and removal of wood extractives from pulp mill sludge using wet oxidation and thermal hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Robinson, Murray; Smit, Anne-Marie; Wijeyekoon, Suren; Gapes, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    In order to remove wood extractive compounds from pulp mill sludge and thereby enhancing anaerobic digestibility, samples were subjected to either oxidative hydrothermal treatment (wet oxidation) or non-oxidative hydrothermal treatment (thermal hydrolysis). Treatments were carried out at 220 °C with initial pressure of 20 bar. More than 90% destruction of extractive compounds was observed after 20 min of wet oxidation. Wet oxidation eliminated 95.7% of phenolics, 98.6% fatty acids, 99.8% resin acids and 100% of phytosterols in 120 min. Acetic acid concentration increased by approximately 2 g/l after 120 min of wet oxidation. This has potential for rendering sludge more amenable to anaerobic digestion. In contrast thermal hydrolysis was found to be ineffective in degrading extractive compounds. Wet oxidation is considered to be an effective process for removal of recalcitrant and inhibitive compounds through hydrothermal pre-treatment of pulp mill sludge.

  15. Wet air oxidation induced enhanced biodegradability of distillery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S N; Saratchandra, T; Tembhekar, P D; Padoley, K V; Mudliar, S L; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a pretreatment option for enhanced biodegradation of complex distillery effluent. Initially, the distillery effluent was pretreated by WAO at different process conditions (pressure, temperature and time) to facilitate enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI = BOD5: COD ratio). The biodegradability of WAO pretreated effluent was evaluated by subjecting it to aerobic biodegradation and anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation. Aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability index (BI = 0.4-0.8) showed enhanced COD reduction of up to 67.7%, whereas the untreated effluent (BI = 0.17) indicated poor COD reduction of only 22.5%. Anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent has shown up to 87.9% COD reduction, while the untreated effluent has shown only 43.1% COD reduction. Bio-kinetic parameters also confirmed the increased rate of bio-oxidation at enhanced BIs. The results indicate that the WAO pretreatment facilitates enhanced bio-oxidation/bio-degradation of complex effluents like the distillery spent wash.

  16. Homogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment oftextile wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An extensive series of experiments was carried out in order to identify suitable catalysts to boost the reaction rate of wet air oxidation of real textile wastewaters at relatively mild temperature and pressure. Experimental results indicated that all catalysts tested in this investigation had shown an impressive increase in the initial COD and TOC removal rate as well as the COD and TOC removal levels in two hours reaction. Among all the catalysts tested, copper salts were more effective than the rest. Anions of the salt soluffonsalso played a role in the catalytic process with nitrate ions having better effect than sulfate ions. Hence copper nitrates were more effective than copper sulfates. It was also found that a mixture of salts with different metals performed better than either of the component single salt alone.

  17. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via...... Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole...... slurry (Filter cake + filtrate) in SSF were also tested. Except ethanol yields, pretreatment methods were evaluated based on achieved glucose yields, amount of water used, recovery of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.The highest ethanol yield obtained was 67% after fermenting the whole slurry...

  18. Oxidation performance of high temperature steels and coatings for future supercritical power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerkari, Pertti; Salonen, Jorma; Toivonen, Aki; Penttilae, Sami [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Haekkilae, Juha [Foster Wheeler Energia, Varkaus (Finland); Aguero, Alina; Gutierrez, Marcos; Muelas, Raul [INTA, Madrid (Spain); Fry, Tony [NPL (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The operating efficiency of current and future thermal power plants is largely dependent on the applied temperature and pressure, which are in part limited by the internal oxidation resistance of the structural materials in the steam systems. Alternative and reference materials for such systems have been tested within the COST 536 (ACCEPT) project, including bulk reference materials (ferritic P92 and austenitic 316 LN steels) and several types of coatings under supercritical combined (oxygen) water chemistry (150 ppb DO) at 650 C/300 bar. The testing results from a circulating USC autoclave showed that under such conditions the reference bulk steels performed poorly, with extensive oxidation already after relatively short term exposure to the supercritical medium. Better protection was attained by suitable coatings, although there were clear differences in the protective capabilities between different coating types, and some challenges remain in applying (and repairing) coatings for the internal surfaces of welded structures. The materials performance seems to be worse in supercritical than in subcritical conditions, and this appears not to be only due to the effect of temperature. The implications are considered from the point of view of the operating conditions and materials selection for future power plants. (orig.)

  19. Oxidation of anthracene using waste Mn oxide minerals: the importance of wetting and drying sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Catherine; Tourney, Janette; Johnson, Karen

    2012-02-29

    PAHs are a common problem in contaminated urban soils due to their recalcitrance. This study presents results on the oxidation of anthracene on synthetic and natural Mn oxide surfaces. Evaporation of anthracene spiked Mn oxide slurries in air results in the oxidation of 30% of the anthracene to anthraquinone. Control minerals, quartz and calcite, also oxidised a small but significant proportion of the anthracene (4.5% and 14% conversion, respectively) when spiked mineral slurries were evaporated in air. However, only Mn oxide minerals showed significant anthracene oxidation (5-10%) when evaporation took place in the absence of oxygen (N2 atmosphere). In the fully hydrated systems where no drying took place, natural Mn oxides showed an increase in anthracene oxidation with decreasing pH, with a conversion of 75% anthracene at pH 4. These results show both acidification and drying favor the oxidation of anthracene on Mn oxide mineral surfaces. It has also been demonstrated that non-redox active mineral surfaces, such as calcite, may play a role in contaminant breakdown during wetting and drying sequences. Given that climate changes suggest that wetting and drying sequences are likely to become more significant these results have important implications for contaminated land remediation technologies.

  20. Catalytic Formation of Propylene Carbonate from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/Propylene Oxide Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Propylene carbonate was synthesized from supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2)/ propylene oxide mixture with phthalocyaninatoaluminium chloride (ClAlPc)/ tetrabutylammon-ium bromide (n-Bu4NBr) as catalyst. The high rate of reaction was attributed to rapid diffusion and the high miscibility of propylene oxide in SC-CO2 under employed conditions. Various reaction periods present different formation rate of propylene carbonate, mainly due to the existence of phase change during the reaction. The experimental results demonstrate that SC-CO2 could be used as not only an environmentally benign solvent but also a carbon precursor in synthesis.

  1. Energetic analysis of gasification of biomass by partial oxidation in supercritical water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingqing Guan; Chaohai Wei; Xinsheng Chai; Ping Ning; Senlin Tian; Junjie Gu; Qiuling Chen; Rongrong Miao

    2015-01-01

    Partial oxidation gasification in supercritical water could produce fuel gases (such as H2, CO and CH4) and signif-icantly reduce the energy consumption. In this work, an energetic model was developed to analyze the partial oxidative gasification of biomass (glucose and lignin) in supercritical water and the related key factors on which gasification under autothermal condition depended upon. The results indicated that the oxidant equiva-lent ratio (ER) should be over 0.3 as the concern about energy balance but less than 0.6 as the concern about fuel gas production. Feedstocks such as glucose and lignin also had different energy recovery efficiency. For ma-terials which can be efficiently gasified, the partial oxidation might be a way for energy based on the combustion of fuel gases. Aromatic materials such as lignin and coal are more potential since partial oxidation could produce similar amount of fuel gases as direct gasification and offer additional energy. Energy recovered pays a key role to achieve an autothermal process. Keeping heat exchanger efficiency above 80%and heat transfer coefficient below 15 kJ·s−1 is necessary to maintain the autothermal status. The results also indicated that the biomass loading should be above 15%but under 20%for an autothermal gasification, since the increase of biomass loading could improve the energy supplied but decrease the efficiency of gasification and gaseous yields. In general, some specific conditions exist among different materials.

  2. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  3. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  4. Wet oxidation of activated sludge: transformations and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Amanda; Díaz, Mario

    2014-12-15

    Wet oxidation (WO) is an interesting alternative for the solubilization and mineralization of activated sludge. The effects of different temperatures (160-200 °C) and pressures (4-8 MPa), on the evolution of chemical composition and rheological characteristics of a thickened activated sludge during WO are analyzed in this work. Soluble COD increases initially to a maximum and then diminishes, while the apparent viscosity of the mixture falls continuously throughout the experiment. Based on the experimental evolution of the compositions and rheological characteristics of the sludge, a mechanism consisting of two stages in series is proposed. Initially, the solid organic compounds are solubilized following a pseudo-second order kinetic model with respect to solid COD. After that, the solubilized COD was oxidized, showing a pseudofirst kinetic order, by two parallel pathways: the complete mineralization of the organic matter and the formation of highly refractory COD. Kinetic parameters of the model, including the activation energies are mentioned, with good global fitting to the experiments described.

  5. Treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiuyi; Zhou, Jinghui; Ma, Jiuli

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production is characterized by high salinity and high chemical oxygen demand (COD). We applied a combination of flocculation and wet air oxidation technology to optimize the reduction of COD in the treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater. The experiments used different values of flocculant, coagulant, and oxidizing agent added to the wastewater, as well as different reaction times and treatment temperatures. The use of flocculants for the pretreatment of fracturing wastewater was shown to improve treatment efficiency. The addition of 500 mg/L of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and 20 mg/L of anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) during pretreatment resulted in a COD removal ratio of 8.2% and reduced the suspended solid concentration of fracturing wastewater to 150 mg/L. For a solution of pretreated fracturing wastewater with 12 mL of added H2O2, the COD was reduced to 104 mg/L when reacted at 300 °C for 75 min, and reduced to 127 mg/L when reacted at the same temperature for 45 min while using a 1 L autoclave. An optimal combination of these parameters produced treated wastewater that met the GB 8978-1996 'Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard' level I emission standard.

  6. Copper on activated carbon for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Dolores Martínez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is an important source of water contamination. Some of the organic contaminants cannot be eliminated by nature in a reasonable period. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation is one of the most effective methods to purify wastewater with organic contaminants. In this work, catalysts based on copper supported on activated carbon were synthesized. The activated carbons were obtained from industrial wastes (apricot core and grape stalk of San Juan, Argentina. These were impregnated with a copper salt and thermically treated in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of specific surface, pore volume, p zc, acidity, basicity and XRD patterns were made in order to characterize the catalysts. The catalytic activity was tested in the oxidation of methylene blue (MB and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in aqueous phase with pure oxygen. Reaction tests were carried out in a Parr batch reactor at different temperatures, with a 0.2 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. The amount of unconverted organics was measured by spectrophotometry. Higher temperatures were necessary for the degradation of PVA compared to those for methylene blue.

  7. Catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment of emulsifying wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-fu; CHEN Ling; LU Yi-cheng; TANG Wen-wei

    2005-01-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic WAO (CWAO) of the high strength emulsifying wastewater containing nonionic surfactants have been investigated in terms of COD and TOC removal. The WAO and homogeneous CWAO processes were carried out at the temperature from 433 K to 513 K, with initial oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa. It was found that homogeneous catalyst copper(Cu ( NO3 )2 )had an fairly good catalytic activity for the WAO process, and the oxidation was catalyzed when the temperature was higher than 473 K.Moreover, several heterogeneous catalysts were proved to be effective for the WAO process. At the temperature 473 K, after 2 h reaction,WAO process could achieve about 75% COD removal and 66% TOC removal, while catalysts Cu/Al2O3 and Mn-Ce/Al2O3 elevated the COD removal up to 86%-89% and that of TOC up to 82%. However, complete elimination of COD and TOC was proved to be difficult even the best non-noble catalyst was used. Therefore, the effluent from WAO or CWAO process need to be further disposed. The bioassay proved that the effluent from WAO process was amenable to the biochemical method.

  8. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: mhashemi@sharif.edu

    2005-09-15

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  9. Oxidation of substituted phenols in supercritical water. Final technical report, September 1992--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, P.E.

    1996-11-01

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or reused. Oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of model pollutants in supercritical water. The decomposition of cresols, hydroxybenzaidehydes, nitrophenols, and benzenediols was studied in dilute aqueous solutions in both the presence and absence of oxygen at 460{degrees}C and 250 atm. Experimental data from the oxidation of these compounds were fit to global, power-law rate expressions. The resulting rate laws showed that the reactivity of the different isomers at 460{degrees}C was in the order of ortho > para > meta for cresols and hydroxybenzaldehydes. Moreover, the CHO-substituted phenol was more reactive than the analogous CH{sub 3}-substituted phenol, and all of these substituted phenols were more reactive than phenol itself. Identifying and quantifying the reaction products of incomplete oxidation allowed us to assemble a general reaction network for the oxidation of cresols in supercritical water. This network comprises parallel primary paths to phenol, to a hydroxybenzaldehyde, and to ring-opening products. The hydroxybenzaldehyde reacts through parallel paths to phenol and to ring-opening products. Phenol also reacts via two parallel paths, but these lead to phenol dimers; and ring-opening products. The dimers are eventually converted to ring-opening products, and the ring-opening products are ultimately converted to CO{sub 2} The relative rates of the different paths in the reaction network are strong functions of the location of the substituent on the phenolic ring.

  10. Decomposition kinetics of dimethyl methylphospate(chemical agent simulant) by supercritical water oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bambang VERIANSYAH; Jae-Duck KIM; Youn-Woo LEE

    2006-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) has been drawing much attention due to effectively destroy a large variety of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical. An important design consideration in the development of supercritical water oxidation is the information of decomposition rate. In this paper, the decomposition rate of dimethyl methylphosphonate(DMMP), which is similar to the nerve agent VX and GB(Sarin) in its structure, was investigated under SCWO conditions. The experiments were performed in an isothermal tubular reactor with a H2O2 as an oxidant. The reaction temperatures were ranged from 398 to 633 ℃ at a fixed pressure of 24 MPa. The conversion of DMMP was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) on the liquid effluent samples. It is found that the oxidative decomposition of DMMP proceeded rapidly and a high TOC decomposition up to 99.99% was obtained within 11 s at 555℃. On the basis of data derived from experiments, a global kinetic equation for the decomposition of DMMP was developed. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental data.

  11. Degradation mechanism of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in supercritical water oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a potential carcinogens and TNT contaminated wastewater, which could not be effectively disposed with conventional treatments. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) to treat TNT contaminated wastewater was studied in this article. The TNT concentration in wastewater was measured by high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and the degraded intermediates were analyzed using GC-MS. The results showed that SCWO could degrade TNT efficiently with O2. The reaction temperature, pressure, residence time and oxygen excess were the main contributing factors in the process. The decomposition of TNT was accelerated as the temperature or residence time increases. At 550℃, 24 MPa, 120 s and oxygen excess 300%, TNT removal rate could exceed 99.9%. Partial oxidation occurs in SCWO without oxygen. It was concluded that supercritical water was a good solvent and had excellent oxidation capability in the existence of oxygen. The main intermediates of TNT during SCWO include toluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, nitrophenol, naphthalene, fluorenone, dibutyl phthalate, alkanes and several dimers based on the intermediate analysis. Some side reactions, such as coupled reaction, hydrolysis reaction and isomerization reaction may take place simultaneously as TNT is oxidized by SCWO.

  12. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.;

    2004-01-01

    profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...... of the waste was evaluated by using biochemical methane potential assays and continuous 3-L methane reactors. Wet oxidation temperature and oxygen pressure (T, 185-220 degreesC; O-2 pressure, 0-12 bar; t, 15 min) were varied for their effect on total methane yield and digestion kinetics of digested biowaste....... Measured methane yields for raw yard waste, wet oxidized yard waste, raw food waste, and wet oxidized food waste were 345, 685, 536, and 571 mL of CH4/g of volatile suspended solids, respectively. Higher oxygen pressure during wet oxidation of digested biowaste considerably increased the total methane...

  13. COD Removal Efficiencies of Some Aromatic Compounds in Supercritical Water Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some aromatic compounds, phenol, aniline and nitrobenzene, were oxidized in supercritical water. It was experimentally found that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of these organic compounds can achieve a high level more than 90% in a short residence time at temperatures high enough. As temperature, pressure and residence time increase, the COD removal efficiencies of the organic compounds would all increase. It is also found that temperature and residence time offer greater influences on the oxidation process than pressure. The difficulty in oxidizing these three compounds is in the order of nitrobenzene > aniline > Phenol. In addition, it is extremely difficult to oxidize aniline and nitrobenzene to CO2 and H2O at the temperature lower than 873.15 K and 923.15 K, respectively. Only at the temperature higher than 873.15 K and 923.15 K, respectively, the COD removal efficiencies of 90% of aniline and nitrobenzene can be achieved.

  14. Oxidation kinetics of model compounds of metabolic waste in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Holgate, Henry R.; Stevenson, David M.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    In this NASA-funded study, the oxidation kinetics of methanol and ammonia in supercritical water have been experimentally determined in an isothermal plug flow reactor. Theoretical studies have also been carried out to characterize key reaction pathways. Methanol oxidation rates were found to be proportional to the first power of methanol concentration and independent of oxygen concentration and were highly activated with an activation energy of approximately 98 kcal/mole over the temperature range 480 to 540 C at 246 bar. The oxidation of ammonia was found to be catalytic with an activation energy of 38 kcal/mole over temperatures ranging from 640 to 700 C. An elementary reaction model for methanol oxidation was applied after correction for the effect of high pressure on the rate constants. The conversion of methanol predicted by the model was in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  16. Supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol and desizing wastewater: influence of NaOH on the organic decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Guo, Yang; Xu, Donghai; Gong, Yanmeng; Tang, Xingying

    2013-08-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol is a refractory compound widely used in industry. Here we report supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol solution and desizing wastewater with and without sodium hydroxide addition. However, it is difficult to implement complete degradation of organics even though polyvinyl alcohol can readily crack under supercritical water treatment. Sodium hydroxide had a significant catalytic effect during the supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol. It appears that the OH- ion participated in the C-C bond cleavage of polyvinyl alcohol molecules, the CO2-capture reaction and the neutralization of intermediate organic acids, promoting the overall reactions moving in the forward direction. Acetaldehyde was a typical intermediate product during reaction. For supercritical water oxidation of desizing wastewater, a high destruction rate (98.25%) based on total organic carbon was achieved. In addition, cases where initial wastewater was alkaline were favorable for supercritical water oxidation treatment, but salt precipitation and blockage issues arising during the process need to be taken into account seriously.

  17. Supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol and desizing wastewater:Influence of NaOH on the organic decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhang; Shuzhong Wang; Yang Guo; Donghai Xu; Yanmeng Gong; Xingying Tang

    2013-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol is a refractory compound widely used in industry.Here we report supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol solution and desizing wastewater with and without sodium hydroxide addition.However,it is difficult to implement complete degradation of organics even though polyvinyl alcohol can readily crack under supercritical water treatment.Sodium hydroxide had a significant catalytic effect during the supercritical water oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol.It appears that the OH-ion participated in the C-C bond cleavage of polyvinyl alcohol molecules,the CO2-capture reaction and the neutralization of intermediate organic acids,promoting the overall reactions moving in the forward direction.Acetaldehyde was a typical intermediate product during reaction.For supercritical water oxidation of desizing wastewater,a high destruction rate (98.25%) based on total organic carbon was achieved.In addition,cases where initial wastewater was alkaline were favorable for supercritical water oxidation treatment,but salt precipitation and blockage issues arising during the process need to be taken into account seriously.

  18. Experimental techniques to determine salt formation and deposition in supercritical water oxidation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.P.C.; LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for destroying aqueous organic waste. Feed material, containing organic waste at concentrations typically less than 10 wt % in water, is pressurized and heated to conditions above water`s critical point where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. An oxidizer, is then added to the feed. Given adequate residence time and reaction temperature, the SCWO process rapidly produces innocuous combustion products. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the feed emerge as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; metals, heteroatoms, and halides appear in the effluent as inorganic salts and acids. The oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms acid anions. In the presence of metal ions, salts are formed and precipitate out of the supercritical fluid. In a tubular configured reactor, these salts agglomerate, adhere to the reactor wall, and eventually interfere by causing a flow restriction in the reactor leading to an increase in pressure. This rapid precipitation is due to an extreme drop in salt solubility that occurs as the feed stream becomes supercritical. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. A phenomenological model is developed in this paper to predict the time that reactor pressure begins to rise as a function of the fluid axial temperature profile and effective solubility curve. The experimental techniques used to generate effective solubility curves for one salt of interest, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, are described, and data is generated for comparison. Good correlation between the model and experiment is shown. An operational technique is also discussed that allows the deposited salt to be redissolved in a single phase and removed from the affected portion of the reactor. This technique is demonstrated experimentally.

  19. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas Søndergaard; Riisager, Anders

    2014-01-01

    conversion to methanol-soluble products, without char formation, were based on copper in combination with other dopants based on relatively earth-abundant metals. Nearly complete conversion of lignin to bio-oil composed of monomers and low-mass oligomers with high aromatic content was obtained in 6. h at 310......An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin...

  20. Supercritical water oxidation for the destruction of toxic organic wastewaters: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VERIANSYAH Bambang; KIM Jae-Duck

    2007-01-01

    The destruction of toxic organic wastewaters from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical clearly becomes an overwhelming problem if left to conventional treatment processes. Two options, incineration and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), exist for the complete destruction of toxic organic wastewaters. Incinerator has associated problems such as very high cost and public resentment; on the other hand, SCWO has proved to be a very promising method for the treatment of many different wastewaters with extremely efficient organic waste destruction 99.99% with none of the emissions associated with incineration. In this review, the concepts of SCWO, result and present perspectives of application, and industrial status of SCWO are critically examined and discussed.

  1. Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

    1995-04-03

    The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

  2. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  3. Direct energy recovery from primary and secondary sludges by supercritical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanström, M; Modell, M; Tester, J

    2004-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) oxidizes organic and biological materials virtually completely to benign products without the need for stack gas scrubbing. Heavy metals are recovered as stabilized solid, along with the sand and clay that is present in the feed. The technology has been under development for twenty years. The major obstacle to commercialization has been developing reactors that are not clogged by inorganic solid deposits. That problem has been solved by using tubular reactors with fluid velocities that are high enough to keep solids in suspension. Recently, system designs have been created that reduce the cost of processing sewage sludges below that of incineration. At 10 wt- % dry solids, sludge can be oxidized with virtually complete recovery of the sludge heating value as hot water or high-pressure steam. Liquid carbon dioxide of high purity can be recovered from the gaseous effluent and excess oxygen can be recovered for recycle. The net effect is to reduce the stack to a harmless vent with minimal flow rate of a clean gas. Complete simulations have been developed using physical property models that accurately simulate the thermodynamic properties of sub- and supercritical water in mixtures with O2, N2, CO2, and organics. Capital and operating cost estimates are given for sewage sludge treatment, which are less costly than incineration. The scenario of direct recovery of energy from sludges has inherent benefits compared to other gasification or liquefaction options.

  4. Supercritical water oxidation of tannery sludge: stabilization of chromium and destruction of organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Daoan; Chi, Yong; Dong, Jun; Fu, Chao; Wang, Fei; Ni, Mingjiang

    2013-10-01

    The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of industrial tannery sludge was investigated to understand the simultaneous destruction of organic pollutants and recovery of high content chromium. Experiments were performed in a batch reactor at temperatures of 350-500 °C, reaction time of 150-300 s and different oxygen ratios, to exhibit the effect of operation conditions. Results showed that removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) increased with higher temperature, larger oxidant amount and reaction time; a maximum value of 96% was obtained. Meanwhile, destruction yield was much higher under supercritical conditions than that in subcritical water. In addition, removal efficiency of Cr from sludge reached more than 98% under all conditions; higher temperature played a positive role. Further, leaching toxicity tests of heavy metals in solid products were conducted based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. All heavy metals except nickel showed a greatly reduced leaching toxicity through their stabilization. The chromium oxide recovered in ash was amorphous below 550 °C, so that the structure of Cr could not be identified by X-ray diffraction pattern. Special attention should be paid on nickel as its leaching toxicity increased due to the corrosion of reactor surface under severe reaction conditions.

  5. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  6. Direct Energy Recovery from Primary and Secondary Sludges by Supercritical Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svanstroem, Magdalena; Modell, Michael; Tester, Jefferson

    2003-07-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) oxidizes organic and biological materials virtually completely to benign products without the need for stack gas scrubbing. Heavy metals are recovered as stabilized solid, along with the sand and clay that is present in the feed. The technology has been under development for twenty years. The major obstacle to commercialization has been developing reactors that are not clogged by inorganic solid deposits. That problem has been solved by using tubular reactors with fluid velocities that are high enough to keep solids in suspension. Recently, system designs have been created that reduce the cost of processing sewage sludges below that of incineration. At 10 wt-% dry solids, sludge can be oxidized with virtually complete recovery of the sludge heating value as hot water or high-pressure steam. Liquid carbon dioxide of high purity can be recovered from the gaseous effluent and excess oxygen can be recovered for recycle. The net effect is to reduce the stack to a harmless vent with minimal flow rate of a clean gas. Complete simulations have been developed using physical property models that accurately simulate the thermodynamic properties of sub- and supercritical water in mixtures with O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}. and organics. Capital and operating cost estimates are given for sewage sludge treatment, which are less costly than incineration. The scenario of direct recovery of energy from sludges has inherent benefits compared to other gasification or liquefaction options. (author)

  7. Supercritical water oxidation of Quinazoline: Effects of conversion parameters and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan

    2016-09-01

    The supercritical water oxidation reaction of quinazoline and a set of related reaction products were investigated in batch reactors by varying the temperature (T, 400-600 °C), time (t, 0-400 s), water density (ρ, 70.79-166.28  kg m(-3)) and oxidation coefficient (OC, 0-4.0). The TOC removal efficiency (CRE) increased significantly as the OC increased, whereas this effect was very limited at high OC (>2.0). Lack of oxygen resulted in low CRE and TN removal efficiency (NRE), also cause coke-formation, and giving high yield of NH3 and nitrogenous organic intermediates. Prolonging reaction time did not provide an appreciable improvement on CRE but remarkably increased NRE at temperature higher than 500 °C. Pyrimidines and pyridines as the nitrogenous intermediates were largely found in GC-MS spectrum. Polymerization among benzene, phenyl radical and benzyl radical played important roles in the formation of PAHs, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, phenanthrene. These collective results showed how the yield of intermediate products responded to changes in the process variables, which permitted the development of a potential reaction network for supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline.

  8. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  9. [Degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Chao-Ying; Zhao, Pei-Qing; Chen, Ge-Xin

    2012-11-01

    A series of MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalysts were prepared and their application in degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated. The catalysts preparation conditions, reaction conditions and its stability were tested. The catalysts had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) measurements. The results showed that the decrease of the COD removal for the degradation of beta-naphthol at high Mn loading was due to the aggregation of the highly dispersed Mn species and the formation of the correlated crystals. The decline of the COD removal at high calcination temperature was probably attributed to the weak electron transfer between Mn2O3 and MnO2 and the formation of the inactive Mn2O3. The COD removal had been falling slightly when the catalyst was used 6 times, and this was likely related to the decrease of the diffraction peaks. The catalyst had a high activity when the Mn loading (mass fraction) was 4% and the calcination temperature was 450 degrees C. The COD removal was up to 96.4% at 110 degrees C and 0.5 MPa with this catalyst. The COD removal of 92.4% could be obtained with the MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalyst was recycled 6 times. The Mn leaching at 50, 80, 110 and 150 degrees C were all less than 9.3 mg x L(-1) by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The probable degradation pathway was proposed according to some publications.

  10. A novel advanced oxidation process——wet electrocatalytic oxidation for high concentrated organic wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI QiZhou; ZHOU MingHua; LEI LeCheng; ZHANG Xing Wang

    2007-01-01

    A novel advanced oxidation process-wet electrocatalytic oxidation(WEO)was studied with p-nitrophenol as model pollutant and β-PbO2 electrode as the anode.Compared with the effect of the individual wet air oxidation(WAO)and electrochemical oxidation(EO),the effect of WEO showed synergistic effect on COD removal under the conditions of temperature 160℃,C=1000mg·L-1,PN2=0.50MPa,Po2=0.9 MPa,current density=3 mA·cm-2,Na2SO4 3 g·L-1.And the synergistic factor got the best value of 0.98 within 120 min after 180 min treatment.The synergistic factor was studied after 120 min treatment at 100℃,120℃,140℃and 160℃,and the effect of 120℃was the best with the value of 1.26.Possible mechanism for the synergistic effect was discussed based on the analysis of free-radical generation and intermediates detected by HPLC and GC/MS.

  11. Catalytic wet air oxidation with Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; Gómez, P; García, J

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation of Basic Yellow 11 (BY11), a basic dye, was studied in a batch reactor. Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing nickel or iron cations have been prepared by coprecipitation and subsequently calcined leading to Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides, respectively. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of BY11, these catalysts showed high activity for total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity and dye removal at 120 degrees C and 50 bars after 120 min. It has been demonstrated that the activity depended strongly on the presence of catalyst. The results show that catalysts containing nickel provide a higher extent of oxidation of the dye whereas the reaction carried out with the iron catalyst is faster. The Ni and Fe dispersion determined from the TPR results was higher for the catalysts with a lower Ni or Fe content and decreased for higher Ni or Fe contents. On the basis of activity and selectivity, the Ni containing catalyst with the medium (3%) Ni content was found to be the best catalyst. Finally, a relationship between metal content of the catalyst and reaction rate has been established.

  12. Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  13. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroz Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300[degree sign] as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  14. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Behroz; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Ebrahimi, Asghar; Mokhtari, Mehdi

    2013-01-02

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  15. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water was investigated. • The process was optimized by Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology. • GY{sub H2}, TRE and CR could exhibit up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56%. • Small amounts of oxidant can decrease the generation of tar and char. - Abstract: To achieve the maximum H{sub 2} yield (GY{sub H2}), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE were established with Box–Behnken design. GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE reached up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH{sub 3} has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient.

  16. Catalytic upgrading of sugar fractions from pyrolysis oils in supercritical mono-alcohols over Cu doped porous metal oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang; Venderbosch, Hendrikus; Bottari, Giovanni; Krawzcyk, Krzysztof K.; Barta, Katalin; Heeres, Hero Jan

    In this work, we report on the catalytic valorization of sugar fractions, obtained by aqueous phase extraction of fast pyrolysis oils, in supercritical methanol (scMeOH) and ethanol (scEtOH) over a copper doped porous metal oxide (Cu-PMO). The product mixtures obtained are, in principle, suitable

  17. Effect of supercritical CO2 on the morphology and fluorescent behavior of fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative/graphene oxide nanohybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Shijun; Wang, Xiaobo; Yang, Hongxia; Loos, Katja; Xu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative, poly [(9-ylidene-{2-tetradecyloxy-5-tetrafluorophthalimide-phenyl}fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(1,4-phenyl)] (PFFB)/graphene oxide (GO) nanohybrids (SC-PFFB/GO) were successfully fabricated via a facile method with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (SC CO2).

  18. Experimental Determination and Modeling of the Phase Behavior for the Selective Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol in Supercritical CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Beier, Matthias Josef; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2011-01-01

    In this study the phase behavior of mixtures relevant to the selective catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by molecular oxygen in supercritical CO2 is investigated. Initially, the solubility of N2 in benzaldehyde as well as the dew points of CO2–benzyl alcohol–O2 and CO2...

  19. Effect of supercritical CO2 on the morphology and fluorescent behavior of fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative/graphene oxide nanohybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Shijun; Wang, Xiaobo; Yang, Hongxia; Loos, Katja; Xu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative, poly [(9-ylidene-{2-tetradecyloxy-5-tetrafluorophthalimide-phenyl}fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(1,4-phenyl)] (PFFB)/graphene oxide (GO) nanohybrids (SC-PFFB/GO) were successfully fabricated via a facile method with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (SC CO2).

  20. Catalytic upgrading of sugar fractions from pyrolysis oils in supercritical mono-alcohols over Cu doped porous metal oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang; Venderbosch, Hendrikus; Bottari, Giovanni; Krawzcyk, Krzysztof K.; Barta, Katalin; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report on the catalytic valorization of sugar fractions, obtained by aqueous phase extraction of fast pyrolysis oils, in supercritical methanol (scMeOH) and ethanol (scEtOH) over a copper doped porous metal oxide (Cu-PMO). The product mixtures obtained are, in principle, suitable fo

  1. Analyses of oxide films grown on AISI 304L stainless steel and Incoloy 800HT exposed to supercritical water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulger, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.fulger@nuclear.ro [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, POB 78, Campului Street, No. 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Mihalache, Maria; Ohai, Dumitru [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, POB 78, Campului Street, No. 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Fulger, Stefan [University Politechnica Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei Street, No. 313, Bucharest 060042 (Romania); Valeca, Serban Constantin [University of Pitesti, Targul din Vale Street, No. 1, 110040 Pitesti (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    Supercritical water (SCW) is being considered as a cooling medium for the next generation nuclear reactors because it provides high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. However, materials corrosion has been identified as a critical problem due to the oxidative nature of supercritical water. Thus, for safety using of these nuclear reactor systems a systematic study of candidate materials corrosion is needed. As in other high temperature environments, corrosion in SCW occurs by the growth of an oxide layer on the materials surface. The current work aims to evaluate oxidation behavior of AISI 304L SS and Incoloy 800HT in water at supercritical temperatures in the range 723-873 K under a pressure of 25 MPa for up to 1680 h. After exposure to deaerated supercritical water, the samples were investigated using gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxide films grown on these materials have a layered structure with an outer layer consisting of a mixture of iron oxide/iron-nickel spinel oxides and an inner layer consisting of chromium oxide in the case of Incoloy 800HT and nickel-chromium spinel oxide in the case of AISI 304L SS. The mass gains for Incoloy 800HT at all temperatures were small, while comparatively with AISI 304L SS which exhibited higher oxidation rates. In the same time the results obtained by EIS indicate the best corrosion resistance of oxides grown on Incoloy 800HT surface.

  2. Wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest region...

  3. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised.

  4. Graphene oxide as an effective catalyst for wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Cui, Yuhong; Sun, Yu; Yang, Hongwei

    2014-09-15

    The graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxides, used as catalysts in absence of any metals, were investigated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol in a batch reactor. The characterization of the materials was measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon materials exhibited good phenol and total organic compounds (TOC) removals in the CWAO of phenol. The GO had the highest catalytic activity, total phenol removal was achieved after 40 min, and ca. 84% TOC removal was obtained after 120 min at reaction temperature of 155°C, total pressure of 2.5 MPa and catalyst loading of 0.2 gL(-1).

  5. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    Ferritic-martensitic and ODS alloys are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural material in Generation IV nuclear power plants, especially the supercritical water reactor. One of the main in-service degradation mechanisms for these alloys is uniform corrosion, thus this project focuses on understanding the oxidation behavior of these alloys in the supercritical water (SCW) environment. This understanding is acquired through the analysis of the oxide microstructure using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence associated with electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence technique provides unique microstructural data of the oxide. This technique simultaneously probes elemental and phase information step by step with a sub-micron spatial resolution throughout the oxide layers. Thus we were able to locate specific phases, such as Cr2O3, at specific locations in the oxide layer, mainly the interfaces. The electron microscopy complemented this analysis by imaging the oxide layers, to yield detailed information on the oxide morphology. All the alloys studied exhibited the same three-layer structure with an outer layer containing only Fe3O4, an inner layer containing a mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O 4, and a diffusion layer containing a mixture of chromium-rich precipitates (Cr2O3 and FeCr2O4) and metal grains. By analyzing samples with various exposure times, we were able to follow the evolution of the oxide microstructure with exposure time. To obtain the corroded samples, several corrosion experiments were performed: some in supercritical water (at 500°C and 600°C) and one experiment in 500°C steam. The test in steam was undertaken to obtain more data points in the kinetic curves, because we thought the corrosion in steam and supercritical water at the same temperature would result in similar kinetics. This turned out not to be the case and the samples in supercritical

  6. Decision criteria for the selection of wet oxidation and conventional biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2012-07-15

    The suitability of wet oxidation or biological treatments for the degradation of industrial wastewaters is here discussed. Advantages of these operations, either singly or in combination, are discussed on the basis of previous experimental results from laboratory and industry. Decision diagrams for the selection of conventional biological treatment, wet oxidation or a combination of both techniques are suggested according to the type of pollutant, its concentration and the wastewater flow rate.

  7. COMPARISON BETWEEN WET OXIDATION AND STEAM EXPLOSION AS PRETREATMENT METHODS FOR ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF SUGARCANE BAGASSE

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Martín; Marcelo Marcet; Anne Belinda Thomsen

    2008-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin, and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one thir...

  8. CuO impregnated activated carbon for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an original approach to the removal of phenol in synthetic wastewater by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with copper binding activated carbon (CuAC) catalysts. The characteristics and oxidation performance of CuAC in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol were studied in a batch reactor at 80 degrees C. Complete conversion of the oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, was observed with CuAC catalyst in 20 min oxidation, and a highly efficient phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement were achieved in the first 30 min. The good oxidation performance of CuAC catalyst was contributed to the activity enhancement of copper oxide, which was binding in the carbon matrix. It can be concluded that the efficiency of oxidation dominated by the residual H2O2 in this study. An over 90% COD removal was achieved by using the multiple-step addition in this catalytic oxidation.

  9. Kinetics study on catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol by several metal oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Jia-feng; FENG Yu-jie; CAI Wei-min; YANG Shao-xia; SUN Xiao-jun

    2004-01-01

    Four metal oxide catalysts composed of copper (Cu), stannum (Sn), copper-stannum (Cu-Sn) and copper-cerium(Cu-Ce) respectively were prepared by the co-impregnation method, and γ-alumina(γ-Al2O3) is selected as support. A first-order kinetics model was established to study the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol at different temperature when these catalysts were used. The model simulations are good agreement with present experimental data. Results showed that the reaction rate constants can be significantly increased when catalysts were used, and the catalyst of 6% Cu-10%Ce/γ-Al2O3 showed the best catalytic activity. This is consistent with the result of catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol and the COD removal can be arrived at 98.2% at temperature 210℃, oxygen partial pressure 3 MPa and reaction time 30 min. The activation energies of each reaction with different catalysts are nearly equal, which is found to be about 42 kJ/mol and the reaction in this study is proved to be kinetics control.

  10. Significant improvement of thermal stability for CeZrPrNd oxides simply by supercritical CO(2 drying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhao Fan

    Full Text Available Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO(2 drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO(2 drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface.

  11. Mineral Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High-Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, R. V.; Hoyt, D. H.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.; Hu, J. Z.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial for accurately predicting long-term storage risks. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information at geologically relevant temperatures and pressures are highly desirable and challenging to develop. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof. However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS sample rotor. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability capable of handling fluid pressure exceeding 170 bars and temperatures up to 80°C, and its application to mineral carbonation in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures. Mineral carbonation reactions of the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite and the magnesium hydroxide brucite reacted with scCO2 (up to 170 bar) and containing variable content of H2O (at, below, and above saturation in scCO2) were investigated at 50 to 70°C. In situ 13C MAS NMR spectra show peaks corresponding to the reactants, intermediates, and the magnesium carbonation products in a single spectrum. For example, Figure 1 shows the reaction dynamics, i.e., the formation and conversion of reaction intermediates, i.e., HCO3- and nesquehonite, to magnesite as a function of time at 70°C. This capability offers a significant advantage over traditional ex situ 13C MAS experiments on similar systems, where, for example, CO2 and HCO3- are not directly observable.

  12. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies.

  13. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    2014-06-01

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin conversion to methanol-soluble products, without char formation, were based on copper in combination with other dopants based on relatively earth-abundant metals. Nearly complete conversion of lignin to bio-oil composed of monomers and low-mass oligomers with high aromatic content was obtained in 6h at 310°C using a catalyst based on a Cu- and La-doped hydrotalcite-like precursor. Product mixtures were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and GC-MS.

  14. Supercritical water oxidation of a model fecal sludge without the use of a co-fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A; Espanani, R; Junker, A; Hendry, D; Wilkinson, N; Bollinger, D; Abelleira-Pereira, J M; Deshusses, M A; Inniss, E; Jacoby, W

    2015-12-01

    A continuous supercritical water oxidation reactor was designed and constructed to investigate the conversion of a feces simulant without the use of a co-fuel. The maximum reactor temperature and waste conversion was determined as a function of stoichiometric excess of oxygen in order to determine factor levels for subsequent investigation. 48% oxygen excess showed the highest temperature with full conversion. Factorial analysis was then used to determine the effects of feed concentration, oxygen excess, inlet temperature, and operating pressure on the increase in the temperature of the reacting fluid as well as a newly defined non-dimensional number, NJa representing heat transfer efficiency. Operating pressure and stoichiometric excess oxygen were found to have the most significant impacts on NJa. Feed concentration had a significant impact on fluid temperature increase showing an average difference of 46.4°C between the factorial levels.

  15. Magnetic carbon xerogels for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of 4-nitrophenol solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, R.; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is a well-known advanced oxidation process for the removal of organic pollutants from industrial process waters and wastewater. Specifically, CWPO employs hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidation source and a suitable catalyst to promote its decomposition via formation of hydroxyl radicals (HO•), which exhibit high oxidizing potential and serve as effective species in the destruction of a huge range of organic pollutants

  16. Destruction of OPA from munitions demilitarization in supercritical water oxidation: kinetics of total organic carbon disappearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol; Hong, Deasik

    2006-01-01

    The destruction of OPA from munitions demilitarization has been accomplished in supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with oxygen as oxidant in an isothermal continuous-flow reactor. The experiments were conducted at a temperature of 689-887 K and a fixed pressure of 25 MPa, with a residence time that ranged from 7 s to 14 s. The destruction efficiency was measured by total organic carbon (TOC) conversion. At the reaction condition, the initial TOC concentrations of OPA were varied from 1.41 mmol/L to 19.57 mmol/L and the oxygen concentrations were varied from 15.03 mmol/L to 81.85 mmol/L. Experimental data showed that all the TOC conversions were >80% under the above experimental conditions. The kinetics of TOC disappearance, which is essential for the design, optimization, and control of reliable commercial SCWO reactor was developed by taking into account the dependence of the oxidant and TOC concentration on the reaction rate. A global TOC disappearance rates expression was regressed from the data of 38 experiments, to a 95% confidence level. The resulting activation energy was determined to be 44.01 +/- 1.52 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor was (1.67 +/- 0.45) x 10(2) L(1.14) mmol(-0.14) s(-1). The reaction orders for the TOC and the oxidant were 0.98 +/- 0.01 and 0.16 +/- 0.02, respectively.

  17. Oxidative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in subcritical and supercritical waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M; Taniguchi, S; Takanami, R; Giri, R R; Ozaki, H

    2010-01-01

    Presence of chlorinated organic compounds in water bodies has become a concern among governments, health authorities and general public. Oxidation of organic compounds in water under high temperature and pressure is considered as a promising technique, but usefulness of the technique to mineralize 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is not well understood. This article aimed to elucidate degradation characteristics of 2,4-D in both subcritical and supercritical waters by laboratory batch experiments. 2,4-D degradation, total organic carbon (TOC) removal and dechlorination increased with increasing reaction time and temperature especially in subcritical waters, while dechlorination was a major step. 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and acetic acid were the main degradation intermediates both in subcritical and supercritical waters. Though 2,4-D disappeared almost completely in subcritical waters near critical region ( approximately 99%), significant amounts of TOC and organic chlorine still remained as 2,4-DCP and acetic acid. But TOC removal and dechlorination were significantly enhanced ( approximately 95 and 91% respectively) in supercritical waters. Complete mineralization of 2,4-D in subcritical waters required a considerably longer reaction period, while the mineralization was almost complete within a short reaction period in supercritical waters. This is an important information of practical significance for oxidative degradation of chlorinated pesticides similar to 2,4-D.

  18. Reacting flow simulations of supercritical water oxidation of PCB-contaminated transformer oil in a pilot plant reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marulanda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The scale-up of a supercritical water oxidation process, based on recent advancements in kinetic aspects, reactor configuration and optimal operational conditions, depends on the research and development of simulation tools, which allow the designer not only to understand the complex multiphysics phenomena that describe the system, but also to optimize the operational parameters to attain the best profit for the process and guarantee its safe operation. Accordingly, this paper reports a multiphysics simulation with the CFD software Comsol Multiphysics 3.3 of a pilot plant reactor for the supercritical water oxidation of a heavily PCB-contaminated mineral transformer oil. The proposed model was based on available information for the kinetic aspects of the complex mixture and the optimal operational conditions obtained in a lab-scale continuous supercritical water oxidation unit. The pilot plant simulation results indicate that it is not feasible to scale-up directly the optimal operational conditions obtained in the isothermal lab-scale experiments, due to the excess heat released by the exothermic oxidation reactions that result in outlet temperatures higher than 600°C, even at reactor inlet temperatures as low as 400°C. Consequently, different alternatives such as decreasing organic flowrates or a new reactor set-up with multiple oxidant injections should be considered to guarantee a safe operation.

  19. An approach to modeling of silicon oxidation in a wet ultra-diluted ambient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Hof, A.J.; Schmitz, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we make steps towards developing a new wet-oxidation model of silicon based on electron-stimulated dissociation of H2O molecules. The need for a new model arises from the fact that existing physical models are inadequate to describe the thin-oxide regime. Two regimes of silicon oxidati

  20. Kinetics of wet air oxidation of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. (Univ. of Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1994-12-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight monobasic and dibasic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, glyoxalic acid, and oxalic acid is often the rate-controlling step during wet air oxidation (WAO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WAO of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid was studied in absence and presence of a cupric sulfate catalyst in the temperature range of 120--245 C and oxygen partial pressure of 0.345--1.380 MPa. The wet oxidation of oxalic acid was found to require more severe conditions as compared to glyoxalic acid. The reaction mechanism and kinetic model have been discussed.

  1. The Oxidation of AlN in Dry and Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Humphrey, Donald; Jacobson, Nathan; Yoshio, Tetsuo; Oda, Kohei

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of AlN containing 3.5 wt% Y2O3 were studied by thermogravimetric analysis in dry oxygen and 10% H2O/balance oxygen at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 C for times between 48 and 100 h. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in dry oxygen were parabolic and of approximately the same magnitude and temperature dependence as other alumina forming materials. In this case, diffusion of oxygen and/or aluminum through the alumina scale is the rate limiting mechanism. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in wet oxygen were nearly linear and much more rapid than rates observed in dry oxygen. Numerous micropores were observed in the alumina formed on AIN in wet oxygen. These pores provide a fast path for oxygen transport. The linear kinetics observed in this case suggest that the interface reaction rate of AlN with wet oxygen is the oxidation rate limiting step.

  2. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Li-Jun, E-mail: lijunwang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Fu-Shen [School of Material Science Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chou, Kuo-Chih [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t{sub d} between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions.

  3. Oxidation of a coal particle in flow of a supercritical aqueous fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, A.A.; Dubov, D.Y.; Psarov, S.A.; Sokol, M.Y. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Kutateladze Instititue for Thermophysics

    2008-03-15

    A study was made of the conversion of single spherical coal particles of diameter 1-5 mm in a supercritical H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} fluid with an oxygen mass fraction of 0-6.6% in a semibatch reactor at a pressure of 30 MPa and a temperature of 673-1023 K. A decrease in the particle mass was observed in two parallel processes: gasification of coal with water and oxidation of coal with oxygen. An activation energy 19 {+-} 7 kJ/mole and a pre-exponential factor 10{sup -2}{+-} 0.4 sec{sup -1} were obtained under the assumption of zero order for the concentration H{sub 2}O and an Arrhenius dependence for the rate of gasification with water. The oxidation with oxygen at a temperature above 780 K was found to be limited by the rate of O{sub 2} diffusion to the coal organic matter. Below 780 K, the rate of heterogeneous oxidation with oxygen is described by a first-order reaction for the concentration of O{sub 2} and a zero-order reaction for the concentration of H{sub 2}O with an activation energy of 150 {+-} 27 kJ/mole and a pre-exponential factor of 10{sup 7.6}{+-} 1.9 cm{sup 3}/(g . sec).

  4. A novel technique for hydrogen production from hog-manure in supercritical partial oxidation (SCWPO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youssef, Emhemmed A.; Charpentier, Paul [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Nakhla, George [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the catalytic hydrogen production from hog manure using supercritical water partial oxidation was investigated in a batch reactor at a temperature of 500 C, and pressure of 28 MPa using several metallic catalysts. Hog manure was characterized by a total and soluble chemical oxygen demand (TCOD, SCOD) of 57000 and 28000 mg/L, total and volatile suspended solids (TSS, VSS) of 25000, 19000, and ammonia of 2400 mg/L, respectively. The order of H{sub 2} production was the following: Pd/AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Ru/AC > AC > NaOH. The order of COD reduction efficiency was as follows: NaOH > Ru/AC > AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pd/AC. The behaviour of the volatile fatty acids (VFA's), ethanol, methanol, ammonia, H{sub 2}S, and Sulfate was investigated experimentally and discussed. A 35 % reduction in the H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} yields was observed in the sequential gasification partial oxidation (oxidant at an 80 % of theoretical requirement) experiments compared to the gasification experiments (catalyst only). Moreover, this reduction in gas yields was coincided with a 45 % reduction in the liquid effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), 60 % reduction of the ammonia concentration in the liquid effluent, and 20 % reduction in the H{sub 2}S concentration in the effluent gas. (orig.)

  5. Kinetics of wet oxidation of propionic and 3-hydroxypropionic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. for Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering]|[Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Oxidation of aqueous solutions of 3-hydroxypropionic (3-HPA) and propionic acids (PA) was studied in a titanium high-pressure reactor at 280--310 C using oxygen partial pressures between 10 and 45 bar. Oxidation of both acids was found to obey first-order kinetic with respect to their concentrations as well as to their lumped TOC concentrations. Oxidation rate revealed a half order dependence with respect to oxygen for oxidation of both acids. In the case of 3-HPA oxidation, the activation energy was found to be 135 kJ/mol, and it was 140 kJ/mol when lumped concentration TOC was used. The activation energy for PA oxidation is 150 kJ/mol, and it is slightly higher, 158 kJ/mol, for TOC reduction. Almost complete conversion of 3-HPA was achieved at 300 C after 1 h, whereas 95% conversion of PA acid was obtained at 310 C after 3 h. During oxidation of 3-HPA, 3-oxopropionic and acetic acids were identified as intermediate products. Oxidation of PA yielded acetic and formic acids as intermediates; at oxygen partial pressures above 25 bar and 310 C, the formation of acetic acid was appreciably reduced. In both cases, however, direct oxidation to carbon dioxide and water was found to be the main reaction route.

  6. Reactive dye house wastewater treatment. Use of hybrid technology: Membrane, sonication followed by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhale, A.D.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    To address problems associated with treatment of an aqueous waste stream from a reactive dye house, a model dye, turquoise blue CI25, was studied. A hybrid technology, membrane separation followed by sonication and wet oxidation, has been demonstrated to treat the wastewater for reuse and discharge. Experiments were first performed with the reactive dye solution in water. A nanofiltration membrane (MPT 30) was found to be suitable to concentrate the dye. The concentrate was then treated with a wet oxidation process. Kinetics studies were performed with and without catalyst, in the temperature range of 170--215 C. The color destruction achieved was > 99%. After process parameters were fixed, studies were conducted with the actual dye waste stream. The actual waste stream was found to be refractory for wet oxidation under the above conditions. Sonication of the concentrate obtained after membrane filtration, in the presence of CuSO{sub 4}, made the waste stream amenable to wet oxidation. Sonication followed by wet oxidation was found to be more effective at near neutral conditions as compared to basic conditions.

  7. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Wet oxidation and fermentation by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Olsson, Lisbeth; Thomsen, A.B.;

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195degreesC) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low......-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested...

  8. Oxidation and mineralisation of substituted phenols by Fenton's reagent and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Rodriguez, S; Garcia-Ochoa, F; Yustos, P

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic abatement of solutions of 1,000 mg/L in phenol, ortho and para nitrophenol and ortho and para cresols was acomplished by using two catalytic systems. Fenton's reagent was used at 50 degrees C by adding 10 mg/L of ferrous cation and different dosages of H2O2. The mixture was reacting isothermically in a batch way during 3 hours. Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) was carried out by using a commercial Activated Carbon, Industrial React FE01606A, CWO runs were carried out in a fixed bed reactor (FBR) with concurrent upflow. Temperature and oxygen pressure of the reactor were set to 160 degrees C and 16 bar, respectively. While phenols are quicky oxidised by the Fenton reagent higher mineralisation was obtained in the CWO process.

  9. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  10. Wet Oxidation Pre-Treatment – the Way To Improve Economics of Energy Production From Manure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Langvad, Niels Bo

    2006-01-01

    and Wheatley, 1993). The combination of high temperature and pressure, together with the addition of oxygen in the wet oxidation process, has shown a superior potential for increasing the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass with subsequent ethanol fermentation. In the present study the wet oxidation process...... was tested as pretreatment for increasing the biogas yield of the fiber fraction of manure. The wet oxidation pretreatment in combination with solid liquid separation of manure by using either chemical precipitation or decanter centrifuge (Møller et al., 2004) could be a promising option for a significant......Throughout recent years, several physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods have been tested with limited success in order to increase hydrolysis of the lignocellulose structure of manure fibers (Fan et al., 1982; Gharpuray et al., 1983; Grethlein, 1984; Hartmann et. al. 2000; Hobson...

  11. Characterization of degradation products from alkaline wet oxidation of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Ahring, B.K.; Schmidt, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation pre-treatment (water, sodium carbonate, oxygen, high temperature and pressure) of wheat straw was performed as a 2(4-1) fractional factorial design with the process parameters: temperature, reaction time, sodium carbonate and oxygen. Alkaline wet oxidation was an efficient...... pre-treatment of wheat straw that resulted in solid fractions with high cellulose recovery (96%) and high enzymatic convertibility to glucose (67%). Carbonate and temperature were the most important factors for fractionation of wheat straw by wet oxidation. Optimal conditions were 10 min at 195...... the solid fraction (62%) did not provide a corresponding increase in the phenol monomer content but was correlated to high carboxylic acid concentrations. The degradation products in the hemicellulose fractions co-varied with the pre-treatment conditions in the principal component analysis according...

  12. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  13. COMPARISON BETWEEN WET OXIDATION AND STEAM EXPLOSION AS PRETREATMENT METHODS FOR ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF SUGARCANE BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin, and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid fraction than steam explosion did. A better enzymatic convertibility of cellulose was achieved for the wet-oxidised material (57.4 % than for the steam-exploded material (48.9 %. Cellulose convertibility was lower for the whole slurry than for the washed solids in both pretreatments, but more significantly in steam explosion. This investigation demonstrates the potential of wet oxidation as a promising pretreatment method for enzyme-based bagasse-to-ethanol processes.

  14. In situ study of CO₂ and H₂O partitioning between Na-montmorillonite and variably wet supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, John S; Ilton, Eugene S; Chen, Jeffrey; Thompson, Christopher J; Martin, Paul F; Bénézeth, Pascale; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R; Schaef, Herbert T

    2014-06-03

    Shale formations play fundamental roles in large-scale geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) aimed primarily to mitigate climate change and in smaller-scale GCS targeted mainly for CO2-enhanced gas recovery operations. Reactive components of shales include expandable clays, such as montmorillonites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays. In this study, in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy were used to investigate the swelling/shrinkage and H2O/CO2 sorption of Na(+)-exchanged montmorillonite, Na-SWy-2, as the clay is exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 50 °C and 90 bar. Measured d001 values increased in stepwise fashion and sorbed H2O concentrations increased continuously with increasing percent H2O saturation in scCO2, closely following previously reported values measured in air at ambient pressure over a range of relative humidities. IR spectra show H2O and CO2 intercalation, and variations in peak shapes and positions suggest multiple sorbed types of H2O and CO2 with distinct chemical environments. Based on the absorbance of the asymmetric CO stretching band of the CO2 associated with the Na-SWy-2, the sorbed CO2 concentration increases dramatically at sorbed H2O concentrations from 0 to 4 mmol/g. Sorbed CO2 then sharply decreases as sorbed H2O increases from 4 to 10 mmol/g. With even higher sorbed H2O concentrations as saturation of H2O in scCO2 was approached, the concentration of sorbed CO2 decreased asymptotically. Two models, one involving space filling and the other a heterogeneous distribution of integral hydration states, are discussed as possible mechanisms for H2O and CO2 intercalations in montmorillonite. The swelling/shrinkage of montmorillonite could affect solid volume, porosity, and permeability of shales. Consequently, the results may aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery operations.

  15. Experimental study of the supercritical water oxidation of recalcitrant compounds under hydrothermal flames using tubular reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Pablo; Bermejo, M Dolores; Jiménez, Cristina; Cocero, M José

    2011-04-01

    The hydrothermal flame is a new method of combustion that takes place in supercritical water oxidation reactions when the temperature is higher than the autoignition temperature. In these conditions, waste can be completely mineralized in residence times of milliseconds without the formation of by-products typical of conventional combustion. The object of this work is to study the hydrothermal flame formation in aqueous streams with high concentrations of recalcitrant compounds: an industrial waste with a high concentration of acetic acid and various concentrated solutions of ammonia. A tubular reactor with a residence time of 0.7 s was used. Oxygen was used as the oxidant and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as co-fuel to reach the operation temperature required. The increase of IPA concentrations in the feeds resulted in a better TOC removal. For mixtures containing acetic acid, 99% elimination of TOC was achieved at temperatures higher than 750 °C. In the case of mixtures containing ammonia, TOC removals reached 99% while maximum total nitrogen removals were never higher than 94%, even for reaction temperatures higher than 710 °C. Ignition was observed at concentrations as high as 6% wt NH(3) with 2% wt IPA while at IPA concentrations below 2% wt IPA, the ammonia did not ignite.

  16. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-09-01

    To achieve the maximum H2 yield (GYH2), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GYH2, CR and TRE were established with Box-Behnken design. GYH2, CR and TRE reached up to 14.32mmol·gTOC(-1), 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO2 and H2 were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH3 has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient.

  17. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veriansyah, Bambang [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: vaveri@kist.re.kr; Kim, Jae-Duck [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jdkim@kist.re.kr; Lee, Jong-Chol [Agency for Defense Development (ADD), P.O. Box 35-1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jcleeadd@hanafos.com

    2007-08-17

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion.

  18. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol

    2007-08-17

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG, (HOC(2)H(4))2S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion.

  19. A process for generating power from the oxidation of coal in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.D. Bermejo; M.J. Cocero; F. Fernandez-Polanco [Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical study of power generation from oxidation of coal by supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is presented. Two versions of SCWO power plant are compared to two of the most efficient conventional power plant processes: pulverised coal power plants and pressurised fluidised bed power plant. The effects of steam pressure and temperature on produced (W{sub p}), consumed (W{sub c}) and net work (W{sub N}) are calculated in order to compare the efficiency of these power plants for the same steam conditions. Enthalpies have been calculated using residual enthalpies by Peng Robinson equation of state. Calculated results show that net work in SCWO power plant is 5% higher than in other power plants, due to the fact that no air surplus is necessary for complete combustion and because steam is produced by direct heating. Energetic efficiency of SCWO increases more quickly with temperature than for the other power plants. The effect of steam pressure is different: until 30 MPa power plant efficiencies increase more quickly in SCWO power plants than in conventional plants, but when steam pressures increases beyond 30 MPa, efficiencies decrease in SCWO power plants. 21 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Destruction of methylphosphonic acid in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale double wall reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bambang Veriansyah; Eun-Seok Song; Jae-Duck Kim

    2011-01-01

    The destruction of methylphosphonic acid (MPA), a final product by hydrolysis/neutralization of organophosphorus agents such as satin and VX (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothionate), was investigated in a a bench-scale, continuous concentric vertical double wall reactor under supercritical water oxidation condition. The experiments were conducted at a temperature range of 450-600~C and a fixed pressure of 25 MPa. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidant. The destruction efficiency (DE) was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) and MPA concentrations using ion chromatography on the liquid effluent samples. The results showed that the DE of MPA up to 99.999% was achieved at a reaction temperature of 600~C, oxygen concentration of 113% storichiometric requirement, and reactor residence time of 8 sec. On the basis of the data derived from experiments, a global kinetic rate equation for the DE of MPA and DE of TOC were developed by nonlinear regression analysis. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental data.

  1. A novel oxidation-based wet etching method for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Jinbao; Wang Jinyan; Liu Yang; Xu Zhe; Wang Maojun; Yu Min; Xie Bing

    2013-01-01

    A novel wet etching method for AlGaN/GaN heterojunction structures is proposed using thermal oxidation followed by wet etching in KOH solution.It is found that an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure after high temperature oxidation above 700 ℃ could be etched off in a homothermal (70 ℃) KOH solution while the KOH solution had no etching effects on the region of the A1GaN/GaN heterostructure protected by a SiO2 layer during the oxidation process.A groove structure with 150 nm step depth on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was formed after 8 h thermal oxidation at 900 ℃ followed by 30 min treatment in 70 ℃ KOH solution.As the oxidation time increases,the etching depth approaches saturation and the roughness of the etched surface becomes much better.The physical mechanism of this phenomenon is also discussed.

  2. Formation and degradation of valuable intermediate products during wet oxidation of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Gapes, Daniel J; Sarmah, Ajit K; Farid, Mohammed M; Young, Brent R

    2016-04-01

    The current study investigated the formation of organic acids and alcohols as major intermediate products of wet oxidation of municipal sludge. Municipal sludge was subjected to 60-min wet oxidation at temperatures ranging from 220 to 240°C, with 20bar oxygen partial pressure. Acetic acid was the main intermediate compound produced in this study, followed by propionic, n-butyric, iso-butyric and pentanoic acids and methanol. It was found that the process severity has a significant influence on the formation and degradation of these intermediate products.

  3. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  4. Fabricating nanostructures through a combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching on silicon wafers with different surface conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the surface conditions of silicon wafers with native oxide layers (NOL) or hydrogen passivated layers (HPL) and how they influence the processes of nano-oxidation and wet etching. We also explore the combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching processes to produce nanostructures. Experimental results reveal that the surface conditions of silicon wafers have a considerable impact on the results of nano-oxidation when combined with wet etching. The height and width of oxides on NOL samples exceeded the dimensions of oxides on HPL samples, and this difference became increasingly evident with an increase in applied bias voltage. The height of oxidized nanolines on the HPL sample increased after wet etching; however, the width of the lines increased only marginally. After wet etching, the height and width of oxides on the NOL were more than two times greater than those on the HPL. Increasing the applied bias voltage during nano-oxidation on NOL samples increased both the height and width of the oxides. After wet etching however, the increase in bias voltage appeared to have little effect on the height of oxidized nanolines, but the width of oxidized lines increased. This study also discovered that the use of higher applied bias voltages on NOL samples followed by wet etching results in nanostructures with a section profile closely resembling a curved surface. The use of this technique enabled researchers to create molds in the shape of a silicon nanolens array and an elegantly shaped nanoscale complex structures mold.

  5. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  6. Preparation of rare-earth metal complex oxide catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; LI Guangming; YAO Zhenya; ZHAO Jianfu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO)is one of the most promising technologies for pollution abatement.Developing catalysts with high activity and stability is crucial for the application of the CWAO process.The Mn/Ce complex oxide catalyrsts for CWAO of high concentration phenol containing wastewater were prepared by coprecipitation.The catalyst preparation conditions were optimized by using an orthogonal layout method and single-factor experimental analysis.The Mn/Ce serial catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET)analysis and the metal cation leaching was measured by inductively coupled plasma torch-atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES).The results show that the catalysts have high catalytic activities even at a low temperature(80℃)and low oxygen partial pressure(0.5 MPa)in a batch reactor.The metallic ion leaching is comparatively low(Mn<6.577 mg/L and Ce<0.6910 mg/L,respectively)in the CWAO process.The phenol,CODCD and TOC removal efficiencies in the solution exceed 98.5% using the optimal catalyst(named CSP).The new catalyst would have a promising application in CWAO treatment of high concentration organic wastewater.

  7. Supercritical water oxidation of colored smoke, dye, and pyrotechnic compositions. Final report: Pilot plant conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Chan, Jennifer P.; Raber, T.N.; Macmillan, D.C.; Rice, S.F.; Tschritter, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    The existing demilitarization stockpile contains large quantities of colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. For many years, these munitions have been stored in magazines at locations within the continental United States awaiting completion of the life-cycle. The open air burning of these munitions has been shown to produce toxic gases that are detrimental to human health and harmful to the environment. Prior efforts to incinerate these compositions have also produced toxic emissions and have been unsuccessful. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly developing hazardous waste treatment method that can be an alternative to incineration for many types of wastes. The primary advantage SCWO affords for the treatment of this selected set of obsolete munitions is that toxic gas and particulate emissions will not occur as part of the effluent stream. Sandia is currently designing a SCWO reactor for the US Army Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC) to destroy colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. This report summarizes the design status of the ARDEC reactor. Process and equipment operation parameters, process flow equations or mass balances, and utility requirements for six wastes of interest are developed in this report. Two conceptual designs are also developed with all process and instrumentation detailed.

  8. Supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline: Reaction kinetics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan; Xu, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a first quantitative kinetic model for supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of quinazoline that describes the formation and interconversion of intermediates and final products at 673-873 K. The set of 11 reaction pathways for phenol, pyrimidine, naphthalene, NH3, etc, involved in the simplified reaction network proved sufficient for fitting the experimental results satisfactorily. We validated the model prediction ability on CO2 yields at initial quinazoline loading not used in the parameter estimation. Reaction rate analysis and sensitivity analysis indicate that nearly all reactions reach their thermodynamic equilibrium within 300 s. The pyrimidine yielding from quinazoline is the dominant ring-opening pathway and provides a significant contribution to CO2 formation. Low sensitivity of NH3 decomposition rate to concentration confirms its refractory nature in SCWO. Nitrogen content in liquid products decreases whereas that in gaseous phase increases as reaction time prolonged. The nitrogen predicted by the model in gaseous phase combined with the experimental nitrogen in liquid products gives an accurate nitrogen balance of conversion process.

  9. Design, fabrication and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for manned space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The wet oxidation of sewage sludge during space flight was studied for water and gas recovery, and the elimination of overboard venting. The components of the system are described. Slurry and oxygen supply modules were fabricated and tested. Recommendations for redesign of the equipment are included.

  10. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    was investigated using 2 1 bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation...

  11. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

    1997-09-30

    'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for

  12. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-12-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. There is a need for non-combustion processes with a wide application range to treat the large majority of these waste forms. The non-combustion process should also be safe, effective, cost-competitive, permit-able, and preferrably mobile. This paper describes the DETOX process of organic waste oxidation.

  13. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  14. Development of Theoretical Methods for Predicting Solvent Effects on Reaction Rates in Supercritical Water Oxidation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Tucker, manuscript in preparation. “Examination of Nonequilibrium Solvent Effects on an SN2 Reaction in Supercritical Water,” R. Behera, B...DATES COVERED Final: 7/1/99 - 12/31/02 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of theoretical methods for predicting solvent effects on reactions ...computational methods for predicting how reaction rate constants will vary with thermodynamic condition in supercritical water (SCW). Towards this

  15. Influence of substrate particle size and wet oxidation on physical surface structures and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis. The yields of glucose and xylose were assessed after treatments with a benchmark cellulase system consisting of Celluclast 1.5 L (Trichoderma reesei) and Novozym 188 beta-glucosidase (Aspergillus niger). Both wet oxidized and not wet oxidized wheat straw particles gave increased glucose release with reduced particle size. After wet oxidation, the glucose release from the smallest particles (53-149 mum) reached 90% of the theoretical maximum after 24 h of enzyme treatment. The corresponding glucose release from the wet oxidized reference samples (2-4 cm) was approximately 65% of the theoretical maximum. The xylose release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind a significant amount of solid, apparently porous structures within all particles size groups of both the not wet oxidized and wet oxidized particles.

  16. Comparison between wet oxidation and steam explosion as pretreatment methods for enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Carlos Martín; Marcet, M.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2008-01-01

    , and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid...... fraction than steam explosion did. A better enzymatic convertibility of cellulose was achieved for the wet-oxidised material (57.4 %) than for the steam-exploded material (48.9 %). Cellulose convertibility was lower for the whole slurry than for the washed solids in both pretreatments, but more...

  17. Quantification of activated carbon contents in soils and sediments using chemothermal and wet oxidation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, Rahel C; Bergsli, Anders; Ghosh, Upal; Hartnik, Thomas; Breedveld, Gijs D; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2009-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) strongly sorbs organic pollutants and can be used for remediation of soils and sediments. A method for AC quantification is essential to monitor AC (re)distribution. Since AC is black carbon (BC), two methods for BC quantification were tested for AC mixed in different soils and sediments: i) chemothermal oxidation (CTO) at a range of temperatures and ii) wet-chemical oxidation with a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid solution. For three soils, the amount of AC was accurately determined by CTO at 375 degrees C. For two sediments, however, much of the AC disappeared during combustion at 375 degrees C, which could probably be explained by catalytic effects by sediment constituents. CTO at lower temperatures (325-350 degrees C) was a feasible alternative for one of the sediments. Wet oxidation effectively functioned for AC quantification in sediments, with almost complete AC recovery (81-92%) and low remaining amounts of native organic carbon (5-16%).

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain); Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10{sup 3} and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +} that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  19. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10(3) and 1.0 x 10(4)kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+) that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  20. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  1. Panax ginseng Fraction F3 Extracted by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Protects against Oxidative Stress in ARPE-19 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Chi; Koo, Malcolm; Yu, Zer-Ran; Wang, Be-Jen

    2016-10-13

    In our previous work, the ethanolic extract of Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer was successively partitioned using supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures in series to yield residue (R), F1, F2, and F3 fractions. Among them, F3 contained the highest deglycosylated ginsenosides and exerted the strongest antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of P. ginseng fractions against cellular oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). Viability of adult retinal pigment epithelium-19 (ARPE-19) cells was examined after treatments of different concentrations of fractions followed by exposure to H₂O₂. Oxidative levels (malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)) and levels of activity of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. Results showed that F3 could dose-dependently protected ARPE-19 cells against oxidative injury induced by H₂O₂. F3 at a level of 1 mg/mL could restore the cell death induced by H₂O₂ of up to 60% and could alleviate the increase in cellular oxidation (MDA, 8-OHdG, and ROS) induced by H₂O₂. Moreover, F3 could restore the activities of antioxidant enzymes suppressed by H₂O₂. In conclusion, F3 obtained using supercritical carbon dioxide fractionation could significantly increase the antioxidant capacity of P. ginseng extract. The antioxidant capacity was highly correlated with the concentration of F3.

  2. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  3. Effect of Alloying Additions on the Oxidation of High Speed Steels under Dry and Wet Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.C. RIZZO; M.J.MONTEIRO; S.R.J.SAUNDERS

    2009-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the effects of chromium and vanadium content on the oxidation rate and on the adhesion of oxide scales grown on three different chemical compositions of high speed steels under dry and wet conditions. The oxidation tests were carried out in a thermobalance at 650 ℃ for up to 14.4 ks. The mass gain of the specimens increased with increasing contents of water vapour. Alloy composition had no effect on the oxidation rate in dry conditions. The "adhesion" of the oxide scale was determined using indentation with a Rockwell C diamond and the pull adhesion test to determine the interfacial toughness and the tensile strength of the oxide metal bond, respectively. Generally, the results of the investigation indicated that oxide adhesion was lowest for the specimens exposed to dry conditions, and that with increasing water vapour content, the scale was more adherent. Indentation test results showed that an increase in the Ⅴ concentration was deleterious to oxidc adhesion in both the dry and wet environments, whereas an increase in the Cr-content had little effect on adhesion.

  4. Phytoxicity study of the products of wet oxidation of a representative biomass (lettuce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to verify the results reported previously concerning the phytotoxicity of wet-oxidation (wet-ox) products, lettuce solids were suspended in water and then heated to 548 K for 3.6 ksec (1 hr) under 4.1x10 to the -7 Pa (400 psig at 294 K) oxygen pressure and 1.52x10 to the 8th (1500 psig at 548 K) total pressure. Such treatment resulted in oxidation of 80% of the initial organic carbon to carbon dioxide. Thirty-three percent of the remaining organic carbon was present in acetic acid. Organic nitrogen in the feed was decreased 90% by the wet-ox treatment. Ammonia and nitrogen gas were the main nitrogen products. Analysis of the liquid product of wet-ox indicated that most of the minerals essential for plant growth were present. However, when tested using a lettuce-root growth-rate assay, the solution was toxic. This toxicity was not due to excessive salt or ammonia or to an improper pH. Analysis of the wet-ox solution revealed the presence of silver and chromium, thus implicating reactor corrosion as the cause of the phytotoxicity. Both cation and anion exchange resins removed the silver and the toxicity of the liquid effluent, indicating silver as the toxic component. Uptake of both silver and chromium by lettuce roots correlated with diminished root growth. Toxicity of the solution from wet-ox was not observed when precautions were taken to minimize contact of the liquid in the reactor with the metal reactor components.

  5. Valuable compounds from sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Iglesias, Octavio; Urrea, José Luis; Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Díaz, Mario

    2017-04-15

    Sewage sludge is considered a costly waste, whose benefit has received a lot of attention for decades. In this sense, a variety of promising technologies, such as thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation, are currently employed. Thermal hydrolysis is used as a pretreatment step ahead of anaerobic digestion processes and wet oxidation is intended for the solubilization and partial oxidation of the sludge. Such processes could be utilized for solubilizing polysaccharides, lipids, fragments of them and phosphorus (thermal hydrolysis) or for generating carboxylic acids (wet oxidation). This article compiles the available information on the production of valuable chemicals by these techniques and comments on their main features. Temperature, reaction duration times and sludge characteristics influence the experimental results significantly, but only the first two variables have been thoroughly studied. For thermal hydrolysis, a rise of temperature led to an increase in the solubilized biomolecules, but also to a greater decomposition of proteins and undesirable reactions of carbohydrates with themselves or with proteins. At constant temperature, the amounts of substances that can be recovered tend to become time independent after several minutes. Diluted and activated sludges seem to be more readily hydrolyzable than the thickened and primary ones. For wet oxidation, the dependence of the production of carboxylic acids with temperature and time is not simple: their concentration can increase, decrease or go through a maximum. At high temperatures, acetic acid is the main carboxylic acid obtained. Concentrated, fermented and secondary sludge seem to be more suitable for yielding higher amounts of acid than diluted, undigested and primary ones.

  6. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  7. Enhanced removal of sodium salts supported by in-situ catalyst synthesis in a supercritical water oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F; Sun, Z R; Fukushi, K; Oshima, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    For practical applications of supercritical water oxidation to wastewater treatment, the deposition of inorganic salts in supercritical phase must be controlled to prevent a reactor from clogging. This study investigated enhanced removal of sodium salts with titanium particles, serving as a salt trapper and a catalyst precursor, and sodium recovery by sub-critical water. When Na(2)CO(3) was tested as a model salt, sodium removal efficiency was higher than theoretically maximum efficiency defined by Na(2)CO(3) solubility. The enhanced sodium removal resulted from in-situ synthesis of sodium titanate, which could catalyse acetic acid oxidation. The kinetics of sodium removal was described well by a diffusion mass-transfer model combined with a power law-type rate model of sodium titanate synthesis. Titanium particles showed positive effect on sodium removal in the case of NaOH, Na(2)SO(4) and Na(3)PO(4). However, they had negligible effect for NaCl and negative effect for Na(2)CrO(4), respectively. More than 99% of trapped sodium was recovered by sub-critical water except for Na(2)CrO(4). In contrast, sodium recovery efficiency remained less than 50% in the case of Na(2)CrO(4). Reused titanium particles showed the same performance for enhanced sodium removal. Enhanced salt removal supported by in-situ catalyst synthesis has great potential to enable both salt removal control and catalytic oxidation.

  8. Uncatalysed wet oxidation of D-glucose with hydrogen peroxide and its combination with hydrothermal electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Teresa; Kouzaki, Goushi; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu; Cocero, María José

    2012-02-15

    An increasing interest in biomass as a renewable feedstock for the chemical industry has risen over the last decades, and glucose, the monomer unit of cellulose, has been widely studied as a source material to produce value-added products such as carboxylic acids, mainly gluconic and formic. In this work, the non-catalysed wet oxidation of glucose using hydrogen peroxide has been analysed, obtaining molar yields to gluconic and formic acids up to 15% and 64%, respectively. Glucose conversion was generally between 40 and 50%, reaching over 80% under the highest temperature (200°C). An appropriate choice of temperature can tune product distribution as well as reaction rates. The interaction of the wet oxidation with an electrolytic reaction was also analysed.

  9. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  10. Ultrasound assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol: kinetics and intraparticle diffusion effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Apostolos N; Igglessi-Markopoulou, Olga; Papayannakos, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    The combination of ultrasound irradiation and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation was used as a means to degrade phenol. Direct and indirect irradiation were employed, while experiments in the absence of ultrasound were used as reference. A mixed (Al-Fe) pillared clay named FAZA, was used as a catalyst in the form of powder, extrudates and crushed extrudates. Ultrasound was found to clearly enhance the extrudates performance, increasing the conversion at 4h by more than 6 times under direct and almost 11 times under indirect irradiation. This observation is attributed to the reduction of diffusion resistance within the catalyst pores. The overall sonication-catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process appears very promising for environmental purposes.

  11. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... by cellulases more than three times compared to the untreated control. During this wet oxidation, 51.7% of the hemicellulose and 58.3% of the lignin were solubilized, whereas 87.1% of the cellulose remained in the solids. After enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated fibers from the same treatment, the conversion......Common reed (Phragmites australis) is often recognized as a promising source of renewable energy. However, it is among the least characterized crops from the bioethanol perspective. Although one third of reed dry matter is cellulose, without pretreatment, it resists enzymatic hydrolysis like...

  12. Glycerol-based carbon materials for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui S.; Silva, Adrián; Pinho, Maria; Figueiredo,José; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2013-01-01

    It is known that metal-free carbon materials can act as catalysts for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process to treat organic pollutants in aqueous solutions [I]. On the other hand, crude glycerol, such as resulting from biodiesel production, is being offered as an abundant and low cost feedstock [2]. In the present work, glycerol-based carbon materials (OBCMs) with distinct properties were produced and tested as catalysts for CWPO, using 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) as a ...

  13. Kinetics of wet oxidation of phenol over an Fe/activated carbon catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintanilla, A.; Casas, J.A.; Rodriquez, J.J.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Wet oxidation of phenol over an Fe/activated carbon catalyst has been studied in a trickle-bed reactor in the following operational window: inlet C phenol=0.5 and 1 g/L, T=100-127 ºC, PT=3-8 atm, W=0-4.8 g, QL=0.125-2 mL/min and QO2=91.6 NmL/min. The experiments were carried out in the absence of ma

  14. Preliminary Test of the Wet Oxidation of Organics in Basin F Wastewater at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    unless other costs such as heating and compression become prohibitive. It is particularly suitable for first-stage treatment of waste source containing...pressures lead to requirements for heavy walled vessels and high pressure pumps . j (2) Wet oxidation tends to produce oxygenated organic compounds of...From Table III, DIMP disappears during the first 10 or 20 percent of the COD reduction. Contrary to our experience with carbon adsorbtion , DIMP is not

  15. Stability of Chromium Carbide/Chromium Oxide Based Porous Ceramics in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziqiang

    This research was aimed at developing porous ceramics as well as ceramic-metal composites that can be potentially used in Gen-IV supercritical water reactors (SCWR). The research mainly includes two parts: 1) fabricating and engineering the porous ceramics and porous ceramic-metal composite; 2) Evaluating the stability of the porous ceramics in SCW environments. Reactive sintering in carbonaceous environments was used to fabricate porous Cr3C2/Cr2O3-based ceramic. A new process consisting of freeze casting and reactive sintering has also been successfully developed to fabricate highly porous Cr3C 2 ceramics with multiple interconnected pores. Various amounts of cobalt powders were mixed with ceramic oxides in order to modify the porous structure and property of the porous carbide obtained by reactive sintering. The hardness of the M(Cr,Co)7C3-Co composite has been evaluated and rationalized based on the solid solution of cobalt in the ceramic phase, the composite effect of soft Co metal and the porous structure of the ceramic materials. Efforts have also been made in fabricating and evaluating interpenetrating Cr3C2-Cu composites formed by infiltrating liquid copper into porous Cr3C2. The corrosion evaluation mainly focused on assessing the stability of porous Cr3C2 and Cr2O3 under various SCW conditions. The corrosion tests showed that the porous Cr3C 2 is stable in SCW at temperatures below 425°C. However, cracking and disintegrating of the porous Cr3C2 occurred when the SCW temperature increased above 425°C. Mechanisms of the corrosion attack were also investigated. The porous Cr2O3 obtained by oxidizing the porous Cr3C2 was exposed to various SCW environments. It was found that the stability of Cr 2O 3 was dependent on its morphology and the SCW testing conditions. Increasing SCW temperature increased the dissociation rate of the Cr2O 3. Adding proper amount of Y2O3 can increase the stability of the porous Cr2O3 in SCW. It was also concluded that decreasing

  16. The degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation on Ru/TiZrO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huangzhao; Yan, Xiaomiao; Li, Xianru; He, Songbo; Sun, Chenglin

    2013-01-15

    The catalyst Ru/TiZrO(4) was applied in the degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation. Mathematical models for the effects of reaction conditions on the Isophorone degradation by catalytic wet air oxidation were developed using a response surface methodology. A model was obtained for each response with multiple regression analysis and then was refined. Analysis of variance revealed that the models developed were adequate. The validity of the models was also verified by experimental data. Analysis of response surface showed that total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion were significantly affected (P≤0.01) by reaction time, temperature and their interactions, and affected (P≤0.05) by the square of reaction time. The point of zero charge of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst was about 1.72. The total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion had a great association with the zeta potential of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst. Finally, the degradation pathway of Isophorone in catalytic wet air oxidation was proposed. Within 410 h, the total organic carbon removal remained above 95%, indicating that the Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst had a good stability.

  17. Catalytic wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol at mild temperatures under alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Fukuta, Tadashi; Yamada, Takehisa; Onyango, Maurice S; Bernardo, Eileen C; Matsuda, Hitoki; Yagishita, Kohichi

    2005-01-01

    Wet oxidation of a 100 ppm aqueous solution of o-chlorophenol (o-CP) was performed in a lab-scale batch reactor using 3% Ru/TiO(2) catalyst at 373 and 413 K, and a partial oxygen pressure of 0.1 MPa. The experiments were conducted by varying the initial pH values of o-CP solution from pH 6.3 to 9.8 and 11.8. From the results, it was revealed that the catalytic decomposition of o-CP occurred most effectively at 413 K and at the initial pH of 9.8. Complete decomposition and dechlorination of o-CP were almost achieved within 1h, and about 85% of TOC was removed in 3.0 h. On the other hand, the catalytic wet oxidation of o-CP at a higher pH value of 11.8 was not effective in the removal of TOC. The incomplete removal of TOC at the initial pH of 11.8 is likely attributed to a low pK(a) of carboxylic acids formed during the wet oxidation of o-CP.

  18. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  19. Integration of advanced oxidation processes at mild conditions in wet scrubbers for odourous sulphur compounds treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of different advanced oxidation processes on the treatment of a multicomponent aqueous solution containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide (0.5 mg L(-1) of each sulphur compound) was investigated with the objective to assess which one is the most suitable treatment to be coupled in wet scrubbers used in odour treatment facilities. UV/H2O2, Fenton, photo-Fenton and ozone treatments were tested at mild conditions and the oxidation efficiency obtained was compared. The oxidation tests were carried out in magnetically stirred cylindrical quartz reactors using the same molar concentration of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide or ozone). The results show that ozone and photo-Fenton are the most efficient treatments, achieving up to 95% of sulphur compounds oxidation and a mineralisation degree around 70% in 10 min. Furthermore, the total costs of the treatments taking into account the capital and operational costs were also estimated for a comparative purpose. The economic analysis revealed that the Fenton treatment is the most economical option to be integrated in a wet scrubber to remove volatile organic sulphur compounds, as long as there are no space constraints to install the required reactor volume. In the case of reactor volume limitation or retrofitting complexities, the ozone and photo-Fenton treatments should be considered as viable alternatives.

  20. Kinetics of oxidation of total sulfite in the ammonia-based wet flue gas desulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.; Zhong, Q.; Fan, X.Y.; Wang, X.R. [Nanjing University of Science & Technology, Nanjing (China). School of Chemical Engineering

    2010-10-15

    Using bubbling apparatus, the kinetics of oxidation of total sulfite in ammonia-based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process was investigated by varying concentrations of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, pH, temperatures and air flow. The concentration range of sulfite is 0.0044-0.026 gmol L{sup -1} and that of sulfate is 0.5-2 gmol L{sup -1}. Experiments were conducted at pH level of 4.5-6.5 and air flow ranging from 50 to 200 L h{sup -1}. In the temperature range of 303.15-333.15K, the reaction was found to be -0.5 order with respect to sulfite. The experimental findings also showed that the bisulfite could be oxidized easier than sulfite. Thus, keeping the pH level of the solution low is conducive to the oxidation of total sulfite. The apparent activation energy for the overall oxidation was calculated to be 28.0 kJ mol{sup -1}. A kinetic model has been derived according to the experimental results. The developed kinetic model, including the operating parameters SO{sub 3}2- concentration, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration, pH, temperature and air flow, can be applied to simulate the oxidation of total sulfite. This model would be useful for the design of the ammonia-based wet FGD system.

  1. Wet Chemical Synthesis and Screening of Thick Porous Oxide Films for Resistive Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm F. Maier

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A method of wet chemical synthesis suitable for high throughput and combinatorial applications has been developed for the synthesis of porous resistive thick-film gas sensors. This method is based on the robot-controlled application of unstable metal oxide suspensions on an array of 64 inter-digital electrodes positioned on an Al2O3 substrate. SnO2, WO3, ZrO2, TiO2, CeO2, In2O3 and Bi2O3 were chosen as base oxides, and were optimised by doping or mixed oxide formation. The parallel synthesis of mixed oxide sensors is illustrated by representative examples. The electrical characteristics and the sensor performance of the films were measured by high-throughput impedance spectroscopy while supplying various test gases (H2, CO, NO, NO2, propene. Data collection, data mining techniques applied and the best potential sensor materials discovered are presented.

  2. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Hun; Ihm, Son-Ki

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The present review is concerned about the literatures published in this regard. Phenolics, carboxylic acids, and nitrogen-containing compounds were taken as model pollutants in most cases, and noble metals such as Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt as well as oxides of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, and Ce were applied as heterogeneous catalysts. Reports on their characterization and catalytic performances for the CWAO of aqueous pollutants are reviewed. Discussions are also made on the reaction mechanisms and kinetics proposed for heterogeneous CWAO and also on the typical catalyst deactivations in heterogeneous CWAO, i.e. carbonaceous deposits and metal leaching.

  3. Direct extraction of palladium and silver from waste printed circuit boards powder by supercritical fluids oxidation-extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-11-15

    The current study was carried out to develop an environmental benign process for direct recovery of palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) powder. The process ingeniously combined supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) and supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) extraction techniques. SCWO treatment could effectively enrich Pd and Ag by degrading non-metallic component, and a precious metal concentrate (PMC) could be obtained, in which the enrichment factors of Pd and Ag reached 5.3 and 4.8, respectively. In the second stage, more than 93.7% Pd and 96.4% Ag could be extracted from PMC by Sc-CO2 modified with acetone and KI-I2 under optimum conditions. Mechanism study indicated that Pd and Ag extraction by Sc-CO2 was a complicated physiochemical process, involving oxidation, complexation, anion exchange, mass transfer and migration approaches. Accordingly, this study established a benign and effective process for selective recovery of dispersal precious metals from waste materials.

  4. Recovery of copper and lead from waste printed circuit boards by supercritical water oxidation combined with electrokinetic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fu-Rong; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2009-06-15

    An effective and benign process for copper and lead recovery from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) was developed. In the process, the PCBs was pre-treated in supercritical water, then subjected to electrokinetic (EK) process. Experimental results showed that supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process was strong enough to decompose the organic compounds of PCBs, and XRD spectra indicated that copper and lead were oxidized into CuO, Cu(2)O and beta-PbO(2) in the process. The optimum SCWO treatment conditions were 60 min, 713 K, 30 MPa, and EK treatment time, constant current density were 11h, 20 mA cm(-2), respectively. The recovery percentages of copper and lead under optimum SCWO+EK treatment conditions were around 84.2% and 89.4%, respectively. In the optimized EK treatment, 74% of Cu was recovered as a deposit on the cathode with a purity of 97.6%, while Pb was recovered as concentrated solutions in either anode (23.1%) or cathode (66.3%) compartments but little was deposited on the electrodes. It is believed that the process is effective and practical for Cu and Pb recovery from waste electric and electronic equipments.

  5. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  6. Influence of Substrate Particle Size and Wet Oxidation on Physical Surface Structures and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S.

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic...... release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron...... microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind...

  7. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of p-nitrophenol by Fe (III) supported on resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Lai, Cheng-Lee; Shih, C Y; Chang, Jing-Song; Hung, Mu-Ya

    2010-01-01

    Fe(III) supported on resin (Fe(III)-resin) as an effective catalyst for peroxide oxidation was prepared and applied for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) experiments with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant were performed in a batch rector with p-nitrophenol as the model pollutant. Under given conditions (PNP concentration 500 mg/L, H(2)O(2) 0.1 M, 80°C, resin dosage 0.6% g/mL), p-nitrophenol was almost completely removed, corresponding to an 84% of COD removal. It was found that the reaction temperature, oxidant concentration. and initial pH of solution significantly affected both p-nitrophenol conversion and COD removal by oxidation. It can be inferred from the experiments that Fe(III) supported on resin was an effective catalyst in the mineralization of p-nitrophenol. In an acidic environment of oxidation, the leaching test showed that there was only a slight leaching effect on the activity of catalytic oxidation. It was also confirmed by the aging test of catalysts in the oxidation.

  8. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analy-sis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ?mol?1, respectively, while the corre-sponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  9. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG XinPing; TANG WenWei; ZHAO JianFu; GU GuoWei

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analysis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ·mol-1, respectively, while the corresponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  10. Treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Luan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the most economical and environmentally-friendly advanced oxidation processes. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. In wet air oxidation aqueous waste is oxidized in the liquid phase at high temperatures (125–320 °C and pressures (0.5–20 MPa in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas (usually air. The advantages of the process include low operating costs and minimal air pollution discharges. The present review is concerned about the literature published in the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters, such as dyes. Phenolics were taken as model pollutants in most cases. Reports on effect of treatment for the WAO of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are reviewed, such as emulsified wastewater, TNT red water, etc. Discussions are also made on the mechanism and kinetics of WAO and main technical parameters influencing WAO. Finally, development direction of WAO is summed up.

  11. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  12. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO{sub 2} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Paola, E-mail: pamassa@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Division Catalizadores y Superficies, INTEMA, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata/CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ivorra, Fernando; Haure, Patricia; Fenoglio, Rosa [Division Catalizadores y Superficies, INTEMA, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata/CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Three 5% CuO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80{sup Degree-Sign }C , during 4 h. Phenol conversion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was also tested.

  13. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO2 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Paola; Ivorra, Fernando; Haure, Patricia; Fenoglio, Rosa

    2011-06-15

    Three 5% CuO/CeO(2) catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80°C, during 4h. Phenol conversion, H(2)O(2) consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H(2)O(2) conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H(2)O(2) was also tested.

  14. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical

  15. Chloride interference in the analysis of dissolved organic carbon by the wet oxidation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Cl- in concentrations greater than 0.02 M is shown to interfere with the analysis of aqueous DOC concentrations by the wet oxidation method of analysis when a reaction time of 5 min is employed. Chloride competes with DOC for S2O82-, lowering the overall oxidation efficiency. The resulting HOCl from the oxidation of Cl- reacts with DOC, producing significant amounts of chlorinated intermediate compounds in addition to CO2. These compounds were found in the waste effluent from the reaction chamber and in the gas stream transporting CO2 to the detector. While a possible Cl- effect has been noted for DOC measurements in the past, it has not previously been demonstrated to be a source of error at the concentrations reported in this paper. The interference can be overcome either by increasing the digestion time or by diluting samples to contain less than 0.02 M Cl-.

  16. Catalytic wet-oxidation of a mixed liquid waste: COD and AOX abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goi, D; de Leitenburg, C; Trovarelli, A; Dolcetti, G

    2004-12-01

    A series of catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reactions, at temperatures of 430-500 K and in a batch bench-top pressure vessel were carried out utilizing a strong wastewater composed of landfill leachate and heavily organic halogen polluted industrial wastewater. A CeO2-SiO2 mixed oxide catalyst with large surface area to assure optimal oxidation performance was prepared. The catalytic process was examined during batch reactions controlling Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Adsorbable Organic Halogen (AOX) parameters, resulting AOX abatement to achieve better effect. Color and pH were also controlled during batch tests. A simple first order-two stage reaction behavior was supposed and verified with the considered parameters. Finally an OUR test was carried out to evaluate biodegradability changes of wastewater as a result of the catalytic reaction.

  17. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the

  18. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanier, Virginie; Zalouk, Sofiane; Barbati, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated. Two step experiment was carried out consisting of a non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275 degrees C, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min. The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 +/- 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 +/- 13.2)% conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4(+)-N. Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid. It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity. The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance. The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution. Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  19. Application of Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation to Treatment of Landfill Leachate on Co/Bi Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-sheng; LIU Liang; ZHANG Rong; DONG De-ming; LIU Hong-liang; LI Yu

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) was employed to reduce the organic compounds in landfill leachate and the effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, catalyst dosage, and concentration of the organic compounds on the TOC and CODCr removal rates were studied. The degradation kinetics of landfill leachate was also investigated and an exponential experiential model consisting of four influential factors was established to describe the reduction of the organic compounds in the landfill leachate. Meanwhile, the GC-MS technique was used to detect the components of the organic intermediates for the inference of the decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate. The results reveal that the reaction temperature and the catalyst dosage are the most important factors affecting the degradation reaction of the organic compounds and that the principal intermediates confirmed by GC-MS are organic acids at a percentage of more than 88% with no aldehydes or alcohols detected. The decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate were inferred based on the GC-MS information as follows: the activated gas phase O2 captured the hydrogen of the organic pollutants to produce free radicals, which then initiated the catalytic reaction. So most of the organic compounds were oxidized into CO2 and H2O ultimately. In general, catalytic wet air oxidation over catalyst Co3O4/Bi2O3 was a very promising technique for the treatment of landfill leachate.

  20. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities.

  1. The effect of oxidation treatment with supercritical water/hydrogen peroxide system on intersurface performance for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; Zhang, Chunhua; Jiang, Zaixing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 410, Harbin 150001 (China); Huang, Yudong, E-mail: ydhuang.hit1@yahoo.com.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 410, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-05-15

    In order to improve the interfacial properties between carbon fibers and epoxy matrix, supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide were used as oxidation medium for the oxidation treatment for carbon fibers. Analysis results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that the oxygen content on the carbon fibers’ surfaces increases by these oxidation treatments. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the surface appearance of oxidized carbon fibers obviously changed. The maximal interlaminar shear strength and interface shear strength of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite in which the fibers were treated by the supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide systems reaches 70.46 MPa and 106.66 MPa, increases by 13.4% and 29.6% respectively compared with untreated carbon fibers.

  2. The effect of oxidation treatment with supercritical water/hydrogen peroxide system on intersurface performance for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; Zhang, Chunhua; Jiang, Zaixing; Huang, Yudong

    2013-05-01

    In order to improve the interfacial properties between carbon fibers and epoxy matrix, supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide were used as oxidation medium for the oxidation treatment for carbon fibers. Analysis results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that the oxygen content on the carbon fibers' surfaces increases by these oxidation treatments. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the surface appearance of oxidized carbon fibers obviously changed. The maximal interlaminar shear strength and interface shear strength of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite in which the fibers were treated by the supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide systems reaches 70.46 MPa and 106.66 MPa, increases by 13.4% and 29.6% respectively compared with untreated carbon fibers.

  3. Comparative kinetic analysis of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhina, Ekaterina V; Repo, Eveliina; Virkutyte, Jurate

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic study of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol in water was performed to qualitatively assess the effect of ultrasound on the process kinetics. Various kinetic parameters such as the apparent kinetic rate constants, the surface utilization coefficient and activation energy of phenol oxidation over RuI(3) catalyst were investigated. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of ultrasound irradiation reduced the energy barrier of the reaction but had no impact on the reaction pathway. The activation energy for the oxidation of phenol over RuI(3) catalyst in the presence of ultrasound was found to be 13kJmol(-1), which was four times smaller in comparison to the silent oxidation process (57kJmol(-1)). Finally, 'figures-of-merit' was utilized to assess different experimental strategies such as sonolysis alone, H(2)O(2)-enhanced sonolysis and sono-catalytic oxidation of phenol in order to estimate the electric energy consumption based on the kinetic rate constants of the oxidation process.

  4. Chloride ions promoted the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over clay-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Zhang, Changbo; Xu, Rui; Gu, Chuantao; Song, Zhengguo; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol over clay-based catalysts in the presence and absence of NaCl was investigated. Changes in the H2O2, Cl(-), and dissolved metal ion concentration, as well as solution pH during phenol oxidation, were also studied. Additionally, the intermediates formed during phenol oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and the chemical bonding information of the catalyst surfaces was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the presence of Cl(-) increased the oxidation rate of phenol to 155%, and this phenomenon was ubiquitous during the oxidation of phenolic compounds by H2O2 over clay-based catalysts. Cl(-)-assisted oxidation of phenol was evidenced by several analytical techniques such as mass spectroscopy (MS) and XPS, and it was hypothesized that the rate-limiting step was accelerated in the presence of Cl(-). Based on the results of this study, the CWPO technology appears to be promising for applications in actual saline phenolic wastewater treatment.

  5. Ethanol production from wet oxidized corn straw by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Q.; Yin, Y.; Thygesen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In order to find out the appropriate process for ethanol production from corn straw, alkaline wet-oxidation pretreatment (195°C, 15 min, Na2CO3 2 g/L, O2 1200 kPa) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were adopted to produce ethanol. The results showed that 90% of cellulose...... was obtained. The estimated total ethanol production was 262.7 kg/t raw material by assuming the consumption of both C-6 and C-5. No obvious inhibition effect occurred during SSF. These offered experiment evidences for ethanol production from corn straw....

  6. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Schmidt, A.S.; Reczey, K.

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure......) was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Six different combinations of reaction temperature, time, and pH were applied. The best conditions (60 g/L of corn stover, 195degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar O-2, 2 g/L of Na2CO) increased the enzymatic conversion of corn stover four times, compared...

  7. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  8. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Sanabria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO. This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase, catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.

  9. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  10. Spin-on metal oxide materials with high etch selectivity and wet strippability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; McKenzie, Douglas; Rahman, Dalil; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Petermann, Claire; Hong, SungEun; Her, YoungJun

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide or metal nitride films are used as hard mask materials in semiconductor industry for patterning purposes due to their excellent etch resistances against the plasma etches. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques are usually used to deposit the metal containing materials on substrates or underlying films, which uses specialized equipment and can lead to high cost-of-ownership and low throughput. We have reported novel spin-on coatings that provide simple and cost effective method to generate metal oxide films possessing good etch selectivity and can be removed by chemical agents. In this paper, new spin-on Al oxide and Zr oxide hard mask formulations are reported. The new metal oxide formulations provide higher metal content compared to previously reported material of specific metal oxides under similar processing conditions. These metal oxide films demonstrate ultra-high etch selectivity and good pattern transfer capability. The cured films can be removed by various chemical agents such as developer, solvents or wet etchants/strippers commonly used in the fab environment. With high metal MHM material as an underlayer, the pattern transfer process is simplified by reducing the number of layers in the stack and the size of the nano structure is minimized by replacement of a thicker film ACL. Therefore, these novel AZ® spinon metal oxide hard mask materials can potentially be used to replace any CVD or ALD metal, metal oxide, metal nitride or spin-on silicon-containing hard mask films in 193 nm or EUV process.

  11. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  12. Wet Oxidation: A Promising Option for the Treatment of Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is used to degrade persistent organic or inorganic impurities present in industrial wastewater. The process utilizes severe oxidation conditions (i.e., high temperature and pressures) to achieve the efficient degradation of pollutants. To obtain high degradation at lower operation conditions, catalytic WO process is being suggested. The wastewater generated from a pulp and paper mill contains several recalcitrant compounds like lignin, hemi-cellulose, phenols, sulfides etc. Therefore, pulp and paper mill effluent have low biodegradability and are not amenable for conventional biological process. With the implementation of stringent regulations, pulp and paper mill operators need a cleaner disposal route for the wastewater. In this mini-review, the results obtained from the recently published studies on WO treatment for pulp and paper mill effluent are compiled and presented. Finally, the recommendations for the future work are also given.

  13. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Sik, H.; Fleury, J. [Sagem Defense Sécurité, 72-74, rue de la tour Billy, 95101, Argenteuil Cedex (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III–V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr–Br{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  14. pH Responsive and Oxidation Resistant Wet Adhesive based on Reversible Catechol-Boronate Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkar, Ameya R; Barker, Brett; Clisch, Matthew; Jiang, Jingfeng; Lee, Bruce P

    2016-08-09

    A smart adhesive capable of binding to a wetted surface was prepared by copolymerizing dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) and 3-acrylamido phenylboronic acid (AAPBA). pH was used to control the oxidation state and the adhesive property of the catechol side chain of DMA and to trigger the catechol-boronate complexation. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the complex at pH 9, which was not present at pH 3. The formation of the catechol-boronate complex increased the cross-linking density of the adhesive network. Most notably, the loss modulus values of the adhesive were more than an order of magnitude higher for adhesive incubated at pH 9 when compared to those measured at pH 3. This drastic increase in the viscous dissipation property is attributed to the introduction of reversible complexation into the adhesive network. Based on the Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics test, adhesive containing both DMA and AAPBA demonstrated strong interfacial binding properties (work of adhesion (Wadh) = 2000 mJ/m(2)) to borosilicate glass wetted with an acidic solution (pH 3). When the pH was increased to 9, Wadh values (180 mJ/m(2)) decreased by more than an order of magnitude. During successive contact cycles, the adhesive demonstrated the capability to transition reversibly between its adhesive and nonadhesive states with changing pH. Adhesive containing only DMA responded slowly to repeated changes in pH and became progressively oxidized without the protection of boronic acid. Although adhesive containing only AAPBA also demonstrated strong wet adhesion (Wadh ∼ 500 mJ/m(2)), its adhesive properties were not pH responsive. Both DMA and AAPBA are required to fabricate a smart adhesive with tunable and reversible adhesive properties.

  15. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  16. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge with a hybrid process of low pressure wet oxidation and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcher, Christoph; Niewersch, Claudia; Melin, Thomas

    2012-04-15

    Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge will become increasingly important within the next decades due to depletion of mineral phosphorus resources. In this work a new process concept was investigated, which aims at realising phosphorus recovery in a synergistic way with the overall sewage sludge treatment scheme. This process combines a low pressure wet oxidation for sewage sludge decomposition as well as phosphorus dissolution and a nanofiltration process to separate phosphorus from heavy metals and obtain a clean diluted phosphoric acid, from which phosphorus can be recovered as clean fertiliser. It was shown that this process concept is feasible for sewage sludge for wastewater treatment plants that apply enhanced biological removal or precipitation with alumina salts for phosphorus removal. The critical parameter for phosphorus dissolution in the low pressure wet oxidation process is the iron concentration, while in the nanofiltration multi-valent cations play a predominant role. In total, a phosphorus recovery of 54% was obtained for an exemplary wastewater treatment plant. Costs of the entire process are in the same range as conventional sewage sludge disposal, with the benefit being phosphorus recovery and reduced emission of greenhouse gases due to avoidance of sludge incineration.

  17. Effect of intermediate compounds and products on wet oxidation and biodegradation rates of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Kinetics of pure compounds in batch agitated reactors are useful data to clarify the characteristics of a given reaction, but they frequently do not provide the required information to design industrial mixed continuous processes because in this case the final and intermediate products interact with the reaction of interest, due to backmixing effects. Simultaneously, the presence and transformations of other compounds, frequent in industrial wastewater treatments, adds more complexity to these types of interactions, whose effect can be different, favorable or unfavorable, for chemical or biological reactions. In this work, batch laboratory reactor data were obtained for the wet oxidation and biodegradation of four phenolic compounds present in a pharmaceutical wastewater and then compared with those collected from industrial continuous stirred tank reactors. For wet oxidation, batch laboratory degradation rates were significantly lower than those found in industrial continuous stirred operation. This behavior was explained by a different distribution of intermediate compounds in lab and industrial treatments, caused by the degree of backmixing and the synergistic effects between phenolic compounds (matrix effects). On the other hand, the specific utilization rates during aerobic biodegradation in the continuous industrial operation were lower than those measured in the laboratory, due to the simultaneous presence of the four pollutants in the industrial process (matrix effects) increasing the inhibitory effects of these compounds and its intermediates.

  18. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  19. Green chemicals from pulp production black liquor by partial wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddassar, Hassan Raja; Melin, Kristian; de Villalba Kokkonen, Daniela; Riera, Gerard Viader; Golam, Sarwar; Koskinen, Jukka

    2015-11-01

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, more sustainable sources of energy, fuel and chemicals are needed. Biomass side streams such as black liquor, which is a by-product of pulp production, has the potential to be used for this purpose. The aim of the study was the production of carboxylic acids, such as lactic acid, formic acid and acetic acid, from kraft and non-wood black liquor. The processes studied were partial wet oxidation (PWO) and catalytic partial wet oxidation (CPWO). The results show that the yield of carboxylic acid is higher when treated by PWO than the results from CPWO at temperatures of 170 °C and 230 °C. The results shows that the PWO process can increase the yield of carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids in black liquor, reduce lignin content and decrease pH, which makes further separation of the acids more favourable. The hydroxy acids are valuable raw materials for biopolymers, and acetic acid and formic acid are commonly used chemicals conventionally produced from fossil feedstock.

  20. Kinetics of Wet Air Oxidation of Wastewater from Natural Fiber Web Desizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This work described the application of wet air oxidation (WAO) to the treatment of desizing wastewater from natural fiber processing. A two-liter autoclave batch reactor was used for the experiments. The range of operating temperature examined was between 150 and 290℃, and partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0.375 to 2.25 MPa standardized at 25℃. Variations in Chemical Oxygen Demand(COD) and Total Organic Carbon(TOC) were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the performance of the process. Experimental results showed that WAO can be an efficient method for the treatment of desizing wnstewater. Furthermore, Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) was applied to reduce the reaction temperature and pressure in WAO process. A higher COD removal ratio was achieved under more mild reaction condition with the aid of CWAO. A mathematical model was also proposed to simulate the WAO process of desizing wastewater, in which three distinct kinetics steps were considered to describe the degradation of starch. The model simulations were in well agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation pretreatment approach to enhance enzymatic convertibility of rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saumita; Sen, Ramkrishna; Mudliar, Sandeep; Pandey, R A; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Satpute, Dewanand

    2011-01-01

    Pretreatment of rice husk by alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation (APAWAO) approach was investigated with the aim to enhance the enzymatic convertibility of cellulose in pretreated rice husk. Rice husk was presoaked overnight in 1% (w/v) H(2)O(2) solution (pH adjusted to 11.5 using NaOH) (equivalent to 16.67 g H(2)O(2) and 3.63 g NaOH per 100 g dry, untreated rice husk) at room temperature, followed by wet air oxidation (WAO). APAWAO pretreatment resulted in solubilization of 67 wt % of hemicellulose and 88 wt % of lignin initially present in raw rice husk. Some amount of oligomeric glucose (˜8.3 g/L) was also observed in the APAWAO liquid fraction. APAWAO pretreatment resulted in 13-fold increase in the amount of glucose that could be obtained from otherwise untreated rice husk. Up to 86 wt % of cellulose in the pretreated rice husk (solid fraction) could be converted into glucose within 24 hours, yielding over 21 g glucose per 100 g original rice husk. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to visualize changes in biomass structure following the APAWAO pretreatment. Enzymatic cellulose convertibility of the pretreated slurry at high dry matter loadings was also investigated.

  2. Advanced oxidation of water soluble organics (WSO) from near- and supercritical hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arturi, Katarzyna Ratajczyk; Nielsen, Rudi Pankratz; Muff, Jens

    . Numerous applications of HTL for conversion of wastes with high water contents (sewage, manure, or lipid-rich algae cultivated on wastewater nutrients) to high-value drop-in biofuels have been studied. The main bulk of the research focuses on the optimization of the biocrude production, while management......The challenges involving procuring the necessary water and energy resources for the future generations are partially entwined. An example of the close water-energy dependency is the production of drop-in biofuels by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass in near- and supercritical water...

  3. Conversion and Estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol During Photolytic/Photocatalytic Oxidation and Catalytic Wet-air Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistan, Mirjana; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), produced by human body and excreted into municipal wastewaters, belongs to the group of endocrine disrupting compounds that are resistant to biological degradation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of E2 removal from aqueous solutions by means of catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) and photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation. CWAO experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor at temperatures up to 230 °C and oxygen partial pressure of 10 bar over TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 solids. Photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in a batch slurry reactor employing a TiO2 P-25 (Degussa) catalyst under visible or UV light. HPLC analysis and yeast estrogen screen assay were used to evaluate the removal of E2 and estrogenicity of treated samples. The latter was completely removed during photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation under UV (365 nm) light and photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. In CWAO experiments, complete removal of both E2 and estrogenicity from the feed solution were noticed in the presence of TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts.

  4. Heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation systems for the treatment of an industrial pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Molina, R; Pariente, M I

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the treatment of wastewater coming from a pharmaceutical plant through a continuous heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process using an Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15 nanocomposite catalyst. This catalyst was preliminary tested in a batch stirred tank reactor (STR), to elucidate the influence of significant parameters on the oxidation system, such as temperature, initial oxidant concentration and initial pH of the reaction medium. In that case, a temperature of 80 degrees C using an initial oxidant concentration corresponding to twice the theoretical stoichiometric amount for complete carbon depletion and initial pH of ca. 3 allow TOC degradation of around 50% after 200 min of contact time. Thereafter, the powder catalyst was extruded with bentonite to prepare pellets that could be used in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Results in the up-flow FBR indicate that the catalyst shows high activity in terms of TOC mineralization (ca. 60% under steady-state conditions), with an excellent use of the oxidant and high stability of the supported iron species. The activity of the catalyst is kept constant, at least, for 55h of reaction. Furthermore, the BOD(5)/COD ratio is increased from 0.20 to 0.30, whereas the average oxidation stage (AOS) changed from 0.70 to 2.35. These two parameters show a high oxidation degree of organic compounds in the outlet effluent, which enhances its biodegradability, and favours the possibility of a subsequent coupling with a conventional biological treatment.

  5. Optical characteristics of wet-thermally oxidized bulk and nanoporous GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sinjae; Kadam, Mahadev; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films deposited on sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were successfully transformed into bulk and nanoporous gallium oxide (Ga2O3) using a wet thermal oxidation technique. Oxidation depth measurements confirmed that the oxide growth appeared to be faster in the case of nanoporous GaN than that of bulk GaN. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to evaluate and compare the optical properties of nanoporous and bulk Ga2O3 films, such as refractive index and extinction coefficient, which revealed improved optical properties for nanoporous Ga2O3 compared to the bulk. The simulations conducted on the ellipsometric spectra for bulk and nanoporous Ga2O3 using the Forouhi-Bloomer model and the Bruggeman effective medium approximation revealed the best fit with a low mean square error value. In the case of nanoporous Ga2O3, zero absorption was observed in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 840 nm, supporting the use of this material as a transparent coating in optoelectronic devices.

  6. Pretreatment of Afyon alcaloide factory's wastewater by wet air oxidation (WAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, Y; Alpay, E; Ceylan, V K

    2003-03-01

    In this study, pretreatment of Afyon (Turkey) alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD)=26.65 kgm(-3), biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))=3.95 kgm(-3)), was carried out by wet air oxidation process. The process was performed in a 0.75 litre specially designed bubble reactor. Experiments were conducted to see the advantages of one-stage and two-stage oxidation and the effects of pressure, pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst loading and air or oxygen as gas source on the oxidation of the wastewater. In addition, BOD(5)/COD ratios of the effluents, which are generally regarded as an important index of biodegradability of a high-strength industrial wastewater, were determined at the end of some runs. After a 2h oxidation (T=150 degrees C, P=0.65 MPa, airflowrate=1.57 x 10(-5)m(3)s(-1), pH=7.0), the BOD(5)/COD ratio was increased from 0.15 to above 0.5 by using the salts of metals such as Co(2+),Fe(2+),Fe(2+)+Ni(2+),Cu(2+)+Mn(2+) as catalyst.

  7. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  8. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  9. Inhibition and deactivation effects in catalytic wet oxidation of high-strength alcohol-distillery liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, K.; Larachi, F.; Hamoudi, S.; Turcotte, G.; Sayari, A. [Laval Univ., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) from raw high-strength alcohol-distillery waste liquors was evaluated using three different treatments: thermolysis (T), noncatalytic wet oxidation (WO), and solid-catalyzed wet oxidation (CWO). The distillery liquors (TOC = 22,500 mg/l, sugars = 18,000 mg/l, and proteins = 13,500 mg/l) were produced by alcoholic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates from steam-exploded timothy grass. TOC-abatement studies were conducted batchwise in a stirred autoclave to evaluate the influence of the catalyst (7:3, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} mixed oxide), oxygen partial pressure (0.5--2.5 MPa), and temperature (453--523 K) on T, WO, and CWO processes. Although CWO outperformed T and WO, TOC conversions did not exceed {approximately}60% at the highest temperature used. Experiments provided prima facie evidence for a gradual fouling of the catalyst and a developing inhibition in the liquors which impaired deep TOC removals. Occurrence of catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proven experimentally through quantitative and qualitative experiments such as elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Inhibition toward further degradation of the liquors was ascribed to the occurrence of highly stable antioxidant intermediates via the Maillard reactions between dissolved sugars and proteins. A lumping kinetic model involving both reaction inhibition by dissolved intermediates and catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proposed to account for the distribution of carbon in the liquid, solid, and the vapor phases.

  10. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Virginie Fontanier; Sofiane Zalouk; Stéphane Barbati

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated.Two step experiment was carried out consisting ofa non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275℃, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min.The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 ± 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 ± 13.2)%conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4+-N.Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid.It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity.The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance.The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution.Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  11. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.;

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... cellulose and hemicellulose convertibility was studied at a constant wet oxidation retention time of 10 minutes. An enzyme convertibility assay at high enzyme loading (25 filter paper unit (FPU) g(-1) dry solids (DS) added) showed that up to 78% of the cellulose and up to 68% of the hemicellulose...... in the treated waste could be converted into respectively hexose and pentose sugars compared to 46% for cellulose and 36% for hemicellulose in the raw waste. For all wet oxidation conditions tested, total carbohydrate recoveries were high (> 89%) and 44-66% of the original lignin could be converted into non...

  12. Comparison of the chemical properties of wheat straw and beech fibers following alkaline wet oxidation and laccase treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A. S.; Mallon, S.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda;

    2002-01-01

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum) and beech (Fagus sylvatica), were used to evaluate the effects of two pre-treatment processes (alkaline wet oxidation and enzyme treatment with laccase) on lignocellulosic materials for applications in particleboards and fiberboards. Wheat straw and beech fibers...... reacted differently in the two processes. The chemical composition changed little following enzyme treatment. After alkaline wet oxidation, fibers enriched in cellulose were obtained. With both materials, almost all hemicellulose (80%) together with a large portion of the lignin were solubilised...... by alkaline wet oxidation, but essentially all cellulose remained in the solid fraction. Following enzyme treatment most material remained as a solid. For wheat straw, reaction with acetic anhydride indicated that both treatments resulted in more hydroxyl groups being accessible for reaction. The enzyme...

  13. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates `losses` of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation.

  14. Studies on the synthesis of europium activated yttrium oxide by wet-chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muresan, Laura [Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)], E-mail: laura_muresan2003@yahoo.com; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Grecu, Rodica [Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tudoran, Lucian Barbu [Electronic Microscopy Center, Babes-Bolyai University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-03-05

    Europium activated yttrium oxide phosphor powders (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}) were prepared from yttrium-europium precursors obtained by wet-chemical method. With this purpose in view, precursors were prepared using the reagent simultaneous addition SimAdd technique from yttrium-europium nitrate and chloride as rare-earth supplier and urea, ammonium oxalate, ammonium carbonate and oxalic acid as precipitating agents. Precursors, obtained under controlled concentration, temperature and pH conditions, were fired at 1200 deg. C in order to generate Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders. Yttrium-europium precursors and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders were investigated by FTIR, TGA-DTA, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) in order to put in evidence the influence of the quality of yttrium-europium precursors obtained by wet-chemical method, using the SimAdd technique on the properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders.

  15. Operational wastes management - 'wet oxidation' - an innovative process to manage radiological spent resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Maggini, F.; Mazzoni, C.; Orlandi, S.; Ricci, C. [Nuclear System Engineering Department, Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16161 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A new system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the organic radioactive waste such spent ion exchange resins. The purpose of the process is to enable a high degree of volume reduction of the waste and compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and it works in mild conditions. Verification tests have been performed in a large scale pilot plant with not contaminated ion exchange resin samples similar to those ones used in NPPs. (authors)

  16. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  17. Manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of organic aqueous wastes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manju Kurian; Divya S Nair

    2015-03-01

    Manganese substituted zinc nanoparticles, MnxZn1−xFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0) prepared by sol gel method were found to be efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of 4-chlorophenol. Complete degradation of the target pollutant occurred within 90 min at 70°C. Zinc substitution enhanced the catalytic efficiency and the unsubstituted ZnFe2O4 oxidized the target compound completely within 45 min. Studies on the effect of reaction variables revealed that only a small amount of the oxidant, H2O2 (3–4 mL) is required for complete degradation of 4-chlorophenol. More than 80% of 4-chlorophenol was removed at catalyst concentrations of 100 mg/L. Direct correlation between the amount of catalyst present and the extent of degradation of 4-chlorophenol was observed, ruling out hesterogeneous-homogeneous mechanism. The catalysts are reusable and complete degradation of target pollutant occurred after five successive runs. The extent of iron leaching was fairly low after five consecutive cycles indicating the mechanism to be heterogeneous.

  18. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol: the role of promoter and ceramic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S Tajammul; Jamil, Sadaf; Mazhar, Muhammad

    2009-04-14

    Complete mineralization of phenol has been achieved over a cerium-manganese catalyst, doped with potassium, supported on a modified zeolite with a high surface area, under very mild conditions (110 degrees C, P(O2) = 0.5 MPa). This newly developed supported catalyst restricts the formation of bulk polymeric species on the surface, thus increasing the lifetime of the catalyst. It demonstrates superior textural, structural and surface oxygen properties compared with the reference cerium-manganese oxide catalyst. The supported catalyst maintains not only the high surface area but also the nanoparticle size during the catalytic run, thereby providing the full availability of the surface for reacting molecules. The geometry of the catalyst is modified electronically by the addition of potassium, and the zeolite addition restricts the conversion of Ce, Mn and K to higher oxidation states, thereby maintaining the geometry of catalytic active sites. The performance measured with this novel catalyst indicates a major improvement in the efficient application of the catalytic wet oxidation process for complete purification ofa complex waste stream.

  20. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of a chemical plant wastewater over platinum-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Andrzej; Trawczyński, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) of wastewater (chemical oxygen demand [COD] = 1800 mg O2/dm3) from a fine chemicals plant was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor at T = 393-473 K under total pressure of 5.0 or 8.0 MPa. Catalysts containing 0.3% wt. of platinum deposited on two supports, mixed silica-titania (SM1) and carbon black composites (CBC) were used. The CBC-supported catalyst appeared to be more active than the SM1-supported one. A slow decrease of activity of the platinum on SM1 (Pt-SM1) during the long-term operation is attributed to recrystallization of titania and leaching of a support component, while the Pt-CBC catalyst is deteriorated, owing to combustion of the support component. The power-law-kinetic equations were used to describe the rate of COD removal at CWAO over the catalysts. The kinetic parameters of COD reduction for the wastewater were determined and compared with the kinetic parameters describing phenol oxidation over the same catalysts. Rates of COD removal for the wastewater were found higher than those for phenol oxidation over the same catalysts and under identical operating conditions.

  1. TOC reduction of alcohol distillery wastewater by wet oxidation using heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, K.; Hamoudi, S.; Larachi, F.; Montero, J.P.; Sayari, A.; Turcotte, G. [Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    We studied the potential of three heterogeneous wet air oxidation (WAO) catalysts to reduce the total organic carbon (TOC) content of two distillery waste liquors. The catalysts were 1% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn/Ce composite oxides, and Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged NaY zeolite. The liquors were produced from alcohol fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates originating from steam- and ammonia-exploded forages and agricultural residues. Initial WAO reaction rates of the liquors were measured batchwise in the temperature range 180 to 250{sup o}C under pure oxygen at 0.5 to 2.5 MPa. The WAO initial rates were first order for TOC, and the activation energies of the catalysts varied between 34 and 51 kJ/mol. The highest TOC abatements were achieved over Mn/Ce oxides and Cu{sup 2+}/NaY catalysts. Kinetic tests over extended times revealed the formation of significant amounts of strongly adsorbed carbonaceous foulants, which were responsible for the loss of catalyst activity. Foulants were tentatively characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). (author)

  2. High solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of wet oxidized corn stover to ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Klinke, H.B.; Reczey, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study ethanol was produced from corn stover pretreated by alkaline and acidic wet oxidation (WO) (195 degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar oxygen) followed by nonisothermal simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In the first step of the SSF, small amounts of cellulases were added at 50....../L) were present in the hemicellulose rich hydrolyzate at subinhibitory levels, thus no detoxification was needed prior to SSF of the whole slurry. Based on the cellulose available in the WO corn stover 83% of the theoretical ethanol yield was obtained under optimized SSF conditions. This was achieved...... with a substrate concentration of 12% dry matter (DM) acidic WO corn stover at 30 FPU/g DM (43.5 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading. Even with 20 and 15 FPU/g DM (corresponding to 29 and 22 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading, ethanol yields of 76 and 73%, respectively, were obtained. After 120 h of SSF the highest...

  3. A 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure synthesized by a wet chemical oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zaizhu; Huang, Baibiao; Ma, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zeyan; Dai, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-07

    A novel 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure, with fast growth along the 〈111〉 directions of cubic seeds, is synthesized by using a wet chemical oxidation method. The morphological structures and the growth process are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures are analyzed by their crystallographic orientations. The surface energy of AgCl facets {100}, {110}, and {111} with absorbance of Cl(-) ions is studied by density functional theory calculations. Based on the experimental and computational results, a plausible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures. With more active sites, the photocatalytic activity of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures is better than those of concave and cubic ones in oxygen evolution under irradiation by visible light.

  4. Optimizing Oily Wastewater Treatment Via Wet Peroxide Oxidation Using Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Xiaoyin [Wuhan Textile Univ., Wuhan (China)

    2014-02-15

    The process of petroleum involves in a large amount of oily wastewater that contains high levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and toxic compounds. So they must be treated before their discharge into the receptor medium. In this paper, wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was adopted to treat the oily wastewater. Central composite design, an experimental design for response surface methodology (RSM), was used to create a set of 31 experimental runs needed for optimizing of the operating conditions. Quadratic regression models with estimated coefficients were developed to describe the COD removals. The experimental results show that WPO could effectively reduce COD by 96.8% at the optimum conditions of temperature 290 .deg. C, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} excess (HE) 0.8, the initial concentration of oily wastewater 3855 mg/L and reaction time 9 min. RSM could be effectively adopted to optimize the operating multifactors in complex WPO process.

  5. Relative influence of process variables during non-catalytic wet oxidation of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Smit, Anne-Marie; Gapes, Daniel James

    2013-11-01

    Individual and interactive effects of process variables on the degradation of fermented municipal sludge were examined during wet oxidation. The process was carried out at 220-240°C using 1:1-2:1 oxygen to biomass ratio and 300-500 rpm stirring speed. Response surface methodology coupled with a faced-centred central composite design was used to evaluate the effect of these variables on total suspended solids, volatile suspended solids and total chemical oxygen demand. Multivariate analysis was conducted for the initial and near completion stages of reaction: 5 and 60 min treatments, respectively. Temperature had the most significant effect on degradation rate throughout. During the initial stage the effect of mixing intensity was less significant than that of oxygen ratio. Mixing intensity did not influence degradation rate at the later stage in the process. During the near completion stage, the interaction of temperature and oxygen ratio had significant effect on sludge degradation.

  6. Fe salts as catalyst for the wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xin-hua; HE Ping; JIN Jian; HAO Zhi-wei

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of o-chlorophenol in wastewater was studied in a stainless steel autoclave using four different Fe catalysts in the temperature range of 100-200 ℃. Experimental results showed that high rate of o-chlorophenol and CODcr (Chemical Oxygen Demand, mg/L) removal by CWAO was obtained at relatively low temperature and pressure. The catalysts Fe2(SO4)3, FeSO4, Fe2O3 and FeCl3 all exhibited high catalytic activity. More than 93.7% of the initial CODCr and nearly100% of o-chlorophenol were removed at 150 ℃ after 150 min with FeSO4 as catalyst. The CWAO of o-chlorophenol was found to be pseudo-first order reaction with respect to o-chlorophenol, with activation energy of 75.56 k J/mol in the temperature range of100-175 ℃.

  7. Study on Catalytic Wet Oxidation of H2S into Sulfur on Fe/Cu Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A wet catalytic oxidation at room temperature was investigated with solution containing ferric, ferrous and cupric ions for H2S removal. The experiments were carried out in a two step process,and the results obtained show that the removal efficiency of H2S can always reach 100% in a 300 mm scrubbing column with four sieve plates, and the regeneration of ferric ions in 200 mm bubble column can match the consumed ferric species in absorption. Removal of H2S, production of elemental sulfur and regeneration of ferric, cupric ions can all be accomplished at the same time. No raw material is consumed except O2 in flue gas or air, the process has no secondary pollution and no problem of catalyst degradation and congestion.

  8. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, Przemyslaw; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard

    2008-09-01

    In this communication, pretreatment of the anaerobically digested (AD) manure and the application of the pretreated AD manure as liquid medium for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were described. Furthermore, fermentation of pretreated maize silage and wheat straw was investigated using 2l bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation. No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage.

  9. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae......, was inhibited compared to the fermentation of a reference glucose solution. Inhibition was more intense for the filtrate of tobacco stalks than for that of orange waste. The inhibition degree of the volumetric productivity of ethanol was higher (79.1-86.8%) than that of the ethanol yield (7.1-9.5%)....

  10. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work.

  11. Extraction of Lepidium apetalum Seed Oil Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Anti-Oxidant Activity of the Extracted Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuchong Tang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE of Lepidium apetalum seed oil and its anti-oxidant activity were studied. The SFE process was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM with a central composite design (CCD. Independent variables, namely operating pressure, temperature, time and flow rate were evaluated. The maximum extraction of Lepidium apetalum seed oil by SFE-CO2 (about 36.3% was obtained when SFE-CO2 extraction was carried out under the optimal conditions of 30.0 MPa of pressure, 70 °C of temperature, 120 min of extraction time and 25.95 L/h of flow rate. GC-MS analysis showed the presence of four fatty acids in Lepidium apetalum seed oil, with a high content (91.0% of unsaturated fatty acid. The anti-oxidant activity of the oil was assessed by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging assay and 2,2′-azino- bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS test. Lepidium apetalum seed oil possessed a notable concentration-dependent antioxidant activity, with IC50 values of 1.00 and 3.75 mg/mL, respectively.

  12. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  13. Enhanced wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation performances based on CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Guan, Qingmeng; Li, Henan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Qian; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Baijing

    2014-01-01

    CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide (CuS NCs/rGO) composites were prepared by a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction. In this solvothermal system, thioacetamide was found to perform the dual roles of sulphide source and reducing agent, resulting in the formation of CuS NCs and simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets to rGO sheets. In addition, CuS NCs/rGO composites were further used as heterogeneous catalysts in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation process, with methylene blue as a model organic dye. The introduction of rGO to CuS NCs could effectively enhance the catalytic activity of CuS NCs, and the resultant CuS NCs/rGO composites with a starting GO amount of 5 wt% showed the highest catalytic activity. Furthermore, the CuS NCs/rGO composites showed high catalytic activity over a broad pH operation range from 3.0 to 11.0 under ambient conditions, and still retained 90% of the original catalytic activity after reuse in five cycles.

  14. The structure of the homogeneous oxidation catalyst, Mn(II)(Br(-1))x, in supercritical water: an X-ray absorption fine-structure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L; Partenheimer, Walter

    2005-10-12

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies were used to probe the first-shell coordination structure about Mn(II) and Br(-1) ions that exist as contact ion pairs in supercritical water. This work was performed to clarify why solutions of MnBr2 in supercritical water are known to effectively catalyze the aerobic oxidative synthesis of terephthalic acid from p-xylene as well as a number of other methylaromatic compounds. The Mn and Br K-edge spectra were collected at the bending magnet beamline (sector 20) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The first-shell coordination structure about the Mn(II) ion changes from octahedral at ambient conditions to tetrahedral at supercritical conditions. Under supercritical conditions, the measured bond distances of Mn-OH2 and Mn-Br are 2.14 and 2.46 A, respectively. Direct contact ion pairs form with about 2 Br(-1) ions present in the first coordination shell of the Mn(II) ion. The structure of dissolved MnBr2, below 1.0 m, changes from essentially [Mn(II)(H2O)6]+2 to [Mn(II)(H2O)2(Br(-1))2] in supercritical water (scH2O). When an excess of Br(-1) ion is added, the bromide coordination number increases and the number of water molecules decreases. The results show that the initial MnBr2 catalyst in scH2O is tetrahedral with two Mn-Br contact ion pairs. The presence of the acetate anion deactivates the catalyst by formation of insoluble MnO.

  15. The structure of the homogeneous oxidation catalyst, Mn(II)-Br(-I)x, in supercritical water: An x-ray absorption fine structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Partenheimer, Walt

    2005-10-12

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies were used to probe the first-shell coordination structure of Mn(II) and Br(-I) ion pairs in supercritical water. This work was performed to clarify why solutions of MnBr2 in supercritical water are known to effectively catalyze the aerobic oxidative synthesis of terephthalic acid from p-xylene. The Mn and Br K-edge spectra were collected at the bending magnet beamline (sector 20) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne. The first-shell coordination structure about the Mn(II) ion changes from octahedral at ambient conditions to tetrahedral at supercritical conditions. Under supercritical conditions, the measured bond distances of Mn-OH2 and Mn-Br are 2.11 and 2.46 ?, respectively. Direct contact ion pairs form with about 2 Br(-I) ions present in the first coordination shell of the Mn(II) ion. The structure of dissolved MnBr2, below 1.0 m, changes from essentially [Mn(II)(H2O)6]+2 to [Mn(II)(H2O)2(Br)2] in supercritical water (scH2O). When an excess of a Br(-I) ion is added, the bromide coordination increases and the number of water molecules decreases. The results show that the initial MnBr2 catalyst in scH2O is tetrahedral with two Mn-Br contact ion pairs. The presence of the acetate anion deactivates the catalyst by formation of insoluble MnO.

  16. The Structure of the Homogeneous Oxidation Catalyst, Mn(II)(Br[superscript -1])[subscript x], in Supercritical Water: An X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Partenheimer, Walter (PNNL)

    2008-09-25

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies were used to probe the first-shell coordination structure about Mn(II) and Br{sup -1} ions that exist as contact ion pairs in supercritical water. This work was performed to clarify why solutions of MnBr{sub 2} in supercritical water are known to effectively catalyze the aerobic oxidative synthesis of terephthalic acid from p-xylene as well as a number of other methylaromatic compounds. The Mn and Br K-edge spectra were collected at the bending magnet beamline (sector 20) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The first-shell coordination structure about the Mn(II) ion changes from octahedral at ambient conditions to tetrahedral at supercritical conditions. Under supercritical conditions, the measured bond distances of Mn-OH{sub 2} and Mn-Br are 2.14 and 2.46 {angstrom}, respectively. Direct contact ion pairs form with about 2 Br{sup -1} ions present in the first coordination shell of the Mn(II) ion. The structure of dissolved MnBr{sub 2}, below 1.0 m, changes from essentially [Mn(II)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup +2} to [Mn(II)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(Br{sup -1}){sub 2}] in supercritical water (scH{sub 2}O). When an excess of Br{sup -1} ion is added, the bromide coordination number increases and the number of water molecules decreases. The results show that the initial MnBr{sub 2} catalyst in scH{sub 2}O is tetrahedral with two Mn-Br contact ion pairs. The presence of the acetate anion deactivates the catalyst by formation of insoluble MnO.

  17. [Copper leaching in catalytic wet oxidation of phenol with Cu-containing spinel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-hua; He, Song-bo; Yang, Min; Du, Hong-zhang; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2008-09-01

    The Cu0.10, Zn0.90 Al1.90 Fe0.10 O4 spinel type catalyst prepared by sol-gel method was tested for catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol. The performances of Cu0.10 Zn0.90 Al1.90 Fe0.10 O4 catalyst in TPR experiment, the influence of phenol as reducer, reaction temperature and phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio on copper leaching were checked respectively. According to the experimental results, it is suggested that the reduced active species can not be easily re-oxidized under low reaction temperature and high phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio are the main reasons for copper leaching. Under high enough reaction temperature and low phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio, the copper leaching reduces remarkably. At 190 degrees C in the presence of 100 mL aqueous solution of 4.29 g x L(-1) of phenol and 2.5 g catalyst, the copper leaching was only 0.96 mg x L(-1) after 2 h of reaction.

  18. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Oxalic Acid using Platinum Catalysts in Bubble Column Reactor: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Saroha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment and re-use of industrial process water are critical issue for the development of human activities andenvironment conservation. Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO is an attractive and useful technique for treatment of effluentswhere the concentrations of organic pollutants are too low, for the incineration and other pollution control techniquesto be economically feasible and when biological treatments are ineffective, e.g. in the case of toxic effluents. In CWAO,combustion takes place on a Pt/Al2O3 catalysts usually at temperatures several degrees below those required forthermal incineration. In CWAO process, the organic contaminants dissolved in water are either partially degraded by meansof an oxidizing agent into biodegradable intermediates or mineralized into innocuous inorganic compounds such as CO2,H2O and inorganic salts, which remain in the aqueous phase. In contrast to other thermal processes CWAO produces no NOx,SO2, HCl, dioxins, furans, fly ash, etc. This review paper presents the application of platinum catalysts in bubble columnreactor for CWAO of oxalic acid.

  19. P-chlorophenol wastewater treatment by microwave-enhanced catalytic wet peroxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guohua; Lv, Baoying; Jin, Yan; Li, Dongming

    2010-02-01

    A microwave-enhanced catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (MW-CWPO) technology was investigated to treat a high concentration of p-chlorophenol wastewater under a mild condition. The MW-CWPO experiments were carried out in a microwave autoclave using copper(II) oxide (CuO)-loaded active carbon as a catalyst. The p-chlorophenol was directly ring-opened within 5 minutes at 343 K and 0.3 MPa and then mineralized to carbon dioxide and water. More than 90% of the total organic carbon was removed within 15 minutes. The reaction activation energy (Ea) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition was decreased from 47.7 to 43.1 kJ/mol under microwave irradiation. The H2O2 catalytic decomposition was fitted to a second-order reaction under microwave irradiation, while it followed a first-order reaction without microwave irradiation. The experimental results indicate that the MW-CWPO method has significant potential applications for a high concentration of p-chlorophenol wastewater.

  20. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yuting; Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong; Kong, Lingjun; Descorme, Claude

    2014-07-15

    A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pHPZC, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120°C under 0.9MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  1. Activity and leaching features of zinc-aluminum ferrites in catalytic wet oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aihua; Yang, Min; Qiao, Ruiping; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin

    2007-08-17

    A series of ZnFe(2-x)Al(x)O(4) spinel type catalysts prepared by sol-gel method have been characterized and tested for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of phenol with pure oxygen. The iron species existed in these materials as aggregated iron oxide clusters and Fe3+ species in octahedral sites. With a decrease in iron content the concentration of the first iron species decreased and the latter increased. Complete phenol conversions and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were obtained for all catalysts during phenol degradation at mild reaction conditions (160 degrees C and 1.0 MPa of oxygen pressure). Increasing with the concentration of Fe3+ species in octahedral sites, induction period became significantly shortened. After phenol was completely degraded, the concomitant recycling of the leaching Fe3+ ions back to the catalyst surface was observed, and in this case it is possible to perform successful CWO reactions with some cycles. It is also suggested that during the reaction the Fe3+ cations coordinated in octahedral sites in the ZnFe(2-x)Al(x)O(4) catalysts are resistant to acid leaching, but the reduced Fe2+ cations become much more labile, leading to increased Fe leaching.

  2. Ruthenium versus platinum on cerium materials in wet air oxidation of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaalova, J. [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6, CZ (Czech Republic); Barbier, J., E-mail: Jacques.barbier.jr@univ-poitiers.fr [University of Poitiers, LACCO UMR 6503, Laboratoire de Catalyse par les Metaux, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, F-86022 POITIERS Cedex (France); Rossignol, S. [University of Limoges, ENSCI, 47 Avenue Albert Thomas 87000 Limoges France (France)

    2010-09-15

    This study was a comparison between Ru-catalysts and similar, previously investigated, Pt-catalysts. In this paper, ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation are prepared, characterized and tested. Both catalysts were supported on commercial CeO{sub 2} as well as mixed oxide Zr{sub 0.1}(Ce{sub 0.75}Pr{sub 0.25}){sub 0.9}O{sub 2}. The catalysts were characterized by measuring the oxygen storage capacities (OSC), BET, XRD, FTIR and chemisorption of hydrogen. In addition, the effect of sintering (treatments under H{sub 2}) was compared with both of the catalysts. The comparison of the results showed that initial intrinsic activity of ruthenium is not significantly influenced by the type of the support, which is contrast to platinum. Furthermore, the particle size of Ru had an important effect on CWAO activity: the higher the particle size, the better the activity. This was different with Pt-catalysts, where the optimal particle size was smaller, having about 15% of metal dispersion.

  3. Analytical aspects of the remediation of soil by wet oxidation - Characterisation of tar contaminants and their degradation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Nielsen, T.; Plöger, A.;

    1999-01-01

    Wet oxidation of tar compounds gives rise to a wide range of products. Due to the incorporation of oxygen, these products become increasingly more water soluble and the analytical strategy has to take into account the different physical/chemicalproperties of the compounds. An interplay between gas...

  4. Experimental coupling and modelling of wet air oxidation and packed-bed biofilm reactor as an enhanced phenol removal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minière, Marine; Boutin, Olivier; Soric, Audrey

    2017-01-25

    Experimental coupling of wet air oxidation process and aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor is presented. It has been tested on phenol as a model refractory compound. At 30 MPa and 250 °C, wet air oxidation batch experiments led to a phenol degradation of 97% and a total organic carbon removal of 84%. This total organic carbon was mainly due to acetic acid. To study the interest of coupling processes, wet air oxidation effluent was treated in a biological treatment process. This step was made up of two packed-bed biofilm reactors in series: the first one acclimated to phenol and the second one to acetic acid. After biological treatment, phenol and total organic carbon removal was 99 and 97% respectively. Thanks to parameters from literature, previous studies (kinetic and thermodynamic) and experimental data from this work (hydrodynamic parameters and biomass characteristics), both treatment steps were modelled. This modelling allows the simulation of the coupling process. Experimental results were finally well reproduced by the continuous coupled process model: relative error on phenol removal efficiency was 1 and 5.5% for wet air oxidation process and packed-bed biofilm reactor respectively.

  5. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  6. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-09-01

    The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution Dit(E), and density Dit,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on concentrated solutions. Therefore, special attention was put on the development of more environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing e.g. hot pure water with low contents of oxygen or hydrochloric acid, and of ozone, working at ambient temperatures. According to our results, these methods could be a high quality and low cost alternative to current approaches with liquid chemicals for the preparation of hydrophobic Si substrate surfaces and ultra-thin passivating oxide layers. As demonstrated for selected examples, the effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositions of Si oxides (SiOx), or amorphous materials such as Si (a-Si:H), Si nitride (a

  8. Adsorption and Wetting in Model Mesoporous Silicas and in Complex Metal Oxide Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Karthik

    The surface of most metal oxides is covered by hydroxyl groups which influence many surface phenomena such as adsorption and wetting, catalysis and surface reactions. Surface chemistry of silica is a subject of exhaustive studies owing to a wide variety of practical applications of silica. In Chapter 1, a brief review of classification, synthesis and characterization of silica is provided. The hydroxylation of silica surface i.e the number of hydroxyl (-OH) groups on the surface is of utmost importance for its practical applications. In Chapter 2, a brief introduction to surface hydration of silica is provided followed by the gas adsorption measurements and characterization. Pore wetting is critical to many applications of mesoporous adsorbents, catalysts, and separation materials. In the work presented in Chapter 3, we employed the combined vapor adsorption study using nitrogen (77K) and water (293K) isotherms to evaluate the water contact angles for a series of ordered mesoporous silicas (ex:SBA-15). The proposed method of contact angle relies on the statistical film thickness (t-curve) of the adsorbed water. There were no t-curves for water for dehydroxylated or hydrophobic surfaces in literature and we addressed this issue by measuring t-curves for a series of model surfaces with known and varying silanol coverage. Using the radius of menisci ((H2O)), statistical film thickness t(H2O) from water isotherm, and the true radius of pores (rp(N 2)), from nitrogen isotherms, the water contact angle inside pores were calculated. As it was anticipated, the results obtained showed that the silica pore contact angles were strongly influenced by the number of the surface silanol groups and, therefore, by the thermal and hydration treatments of silicas. Phthalocyanines (Pcs) present an interesting class of catalytically active of molecules with unique spectroscopic, photoelectric, and sometimes magnetic properties. In the work presented in Chapter 4, we have undertaken a

  9. Low adhesion, non-wetting phosphonate self-assembled monolayer films formed on copper oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, E; DeRose, J A; Bhushan, B; Hipps, K W

    2009-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films have been formed on oxidized copper (Cu) substrates by reaction with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecylphosphonic acid (PFDP), octadecylphosphonic acid (ODP), decylphosphonic acid (DP), and octylphosphonic acid (OP) and then investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement (CAM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The presence of alkyl phosphonate molecules, PFDP, ODP, DP, and OP, on Cu were confirmed by CAM and XPS analysis. No alkyl phosphonate molecules were seen by XPS on unmodified Cu as a control. The PFDP/Cu and ODP/Cu SAMs were found to be very hydrophobic having water sessile drop static contact angles of more than 140 degrees , while DP/Cu and OP/Cu have contact angles of 119 degrees and 76 degrees , respectively. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu SAMs were studied by friction force microscopy, a derivative of AFM, to better understand their micro/nanotribological properties. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, and DP/Cu had comparable adhesive force, which is much lower than that for unmodified Cu. ODP/Cu had the lowest friction coefficient followed by PFDP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu while unmodified Cu had the highest. XPS data gives some indication that a bidentate bond forms between the alkyl phosphonate molecules and the oxidized Cu surface. Hydrophobic phosphonate SAMs could be useful as corrosion inhibitors in micro/nanoelectronic devices and/or as promoters for anti-wetting, low adhesion surfaces.

  10. Effect of wet oxidation on the fingerprints of polymeric substances from an activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Oulego, Paula; Díaz, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Thermal pre-treatments of activated sludge involve the release of a high amount of polymeric substances into the bulk medium. The molecular size of these polymers will largely define the subsequent biological treatment of the liquid effluent generated. In this work, the effects of wet oxidation treatment (WO) on the fingerprints of the polymeric substances which compose the activated sludge, were analysed. For a better understanding of these transformations, the sludge was separated into its main fractions: soluble microbial products (SMP), loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS) and naked cells, and then each one was subjected to WO separately (190 °C and 65 bar), determining the fingerprints evolution by size exclusion technique. Results revealed a fast degradation of larger molecules (over 500 kDa) during the first minutes of treatment (40 min). WO also increases the absorptive properties of proteins (especially for 30 kDa), which is possibly due to the hydroxylation of phenylalanine amino acids in their structure. WO of naked cells involved the formation of molecules between 23 and 190 kDa, which are related to the release of cytoplasmic polymers, and more hydrophobic polymers, probably from the cell membrane. The results allowed to establish a relationship between the location of polymeric material and its facility to become oxidised; thus, the more internal the polymeric material in the cell, the easier its oxidation. When working directly with the raw sludge, hydrolysis mechanisms played a key role during the starting period. Once a high degree of solubilisation was reached, the molecules were rapidly oxidised into other compounds with refractory characteristics. The final effluent after WO showed almost 90% of low molecular weight solubilised substances (0-35 kDa).

  11. Anaerobic treatability of liquid residue from wet oxidation of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Galessi, Raniero; Menoni, Laura; Pedrazzani, Roberta; Salvetti, Roberta; Zanaboni, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Wet Oxidation (WO) of sewage sludge is a chemical oxidation of sludge at high temperatures and pressures by means of an oxygen-containing gas. The liquid stream originated by WO is easily biodegradable, and therefore, the recirculation to the biological Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) may be a feasible solution. However, the WO effluent has a residual organic and nitrogen content so that its treatment may be required when the receiving WWTP has no surplus treatment capacity left. The aim of this research was the assessment of the anaerobic treatability of the WO liquid residue, in order to reduce the organic load to be recirculated to the WWTP, simultaneously promoting energy recovery. For this purpose, the liquid residue obtained during full scale WO tests on two different types of sludge was submitted to anaerobic digestion in a continuous flow pilot reactor (V = 5 L). Furthermore, batch tests were carried out in order to evaluate possible inhibition factors. Experimental results showed that, after the start-up/acclimation period (~130 days), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency was stably around 60% for about 120 days, despite the change in operating conditions. In the last phase of the experimental activity, COD removal reached 70% under the following treatment conditions: Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) = 20 days, Volumetric Organic Loading Rate (VOLR) = 0.868 kg COD/m(3)/day, Organic Loading Rate per Volatile Suspended Solids (OLRvss) = 0.078 kg COD/kg VSS/day, temperature (T) = 36.5 °C, pH = 8. Energy balance calculation demonstrated anaerobic treatment sustainability.

  12. Advanced treatment of wet-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater using three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Qunhui; Shi, Zhining; Fang, Yue; Shi, Shanshan; Wang, Juan; Wu, Chuanfu

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation (3D-EC) reactor with introduction of activated carbon (AC) as particle micro-electrodes was applied for the advanced treatment of secondary wastewater effluent of a wet-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing plant. Under the optimized conditions (current density of 500A/m(2), circulation rate of 5mL/min, AC dosage of 50g, and chloride concentration of 1.0g/L), the average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr), NH3-N, total organic carbon (TOC), and ultraviolet absorption at 254nm (UV254) of the 3D-EC reactor were 64.5%, 60.8%, 46.4%, and 64.8%, respectively; while the corresponding effluent concentrations of CODcr, NH3-N, TOC, and UV254 were 76.6, 20.1, and 42.5mg/L, and 0.08Abs/cm, respectively. The effluent concentration of CODcr was less than 100mg/L, which showed that the treated wastewater satisfied the demand of the integrated wastewater discharge standard (GB 8978-1996). The 3D-EC process remarkably improved the treatment efficiencies with synergistic effects for CODcr, NH3-N, TOC, and UV254 during the stable stage of 44.5%, 38.8%, 27.2%, and 10.9%, respectively, as compared with the sum of the efficiencies of a two-dimensional electrochemical oxidation (2D-EC) reactor and an AC adsorption process, which was ascribed to the numerous micro-electrodes of AC in the 3D-EC reactor. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that electrochemical treatment did not generate more toxic organics, and it was proved that the increase in acute biotoxicity was caused primarily by the production of free chlorine.

  13. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumporn Nikom

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC, is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the system. NaOCl, the strongest oxidative agent, presents an effective toluene removal. As the scrubbed toluene is reacted, recirculation of the scrubbing liquid could be operated with a constant removal efficiency throughout the operting time. The investigated variables affecting the removal efficiency were air flow rate, inlet toluene concentration, NaOCl concentration, scrubbing liquid flow rate and size of spray nozzle. Influence of the scrubbing parameters was experimentally studied to develop a mathematical model of the toluene removal efficiency. The removal model reveals that the increase of scrubbing liquid flow rate, toluene concentration, and NaOCl concentration together with the decrease of air flow rate and size of spray nozzle can increase the toluene removal efficiency. Optimization problem with an objective function and constraints was set to provide the maximum toluene removal efficiency and solved by Matlab optimization toolbox. The optimization constraints were formed from the mathematical model and process limitation. The solution of the optimization was an air flow rate of 100 m3/h, toluene concentration of 1500 ppm, NaOCl concentration of 0.02 mol/l, NaOCl solution feed rate of 0.8 m3/h, and spray nozzle size of 0.5 mm. Solution of the optimization gave the highest toluene removal efficiency of 91.7%.

  14. Studies on affecting factors and mechanism of oily wastewater by wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wenhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of oily wastewater is performed in a batch reactor at reaction temperature between 280 °C and 320 °C, the reaction time between 30 and 90 min. Effect of reaction parameters such as reaction time, reaction temperature, H2O2 excess (HE and initial concentration of oily wastewater is investigated. The results of orthogonal test indicate that reaction temperature is the main factor and the reaction time is the secondary factor. When the reaction temperature is 300 °C, initial concentration of oily wastewater is 1160 mg/L, the reaction time is 30 min, HE is 0.75 and the COD removal of oily wastewater could reach 70%. It will not produce pollutants and it complies with the cleaner production. The preliminary study of mechanism on oily wastewater by WPO is carried out. The result indicates that oily wastewater by WPO can be explained by free radical mechanism.

  15. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions.

  16. Wet adhesion of buckypaper produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on soft animal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Andrea; Carru, Giovanna A; D'Ilario, Lucio; Caprioli, Fabrizio; Chiaretti, Massimo; Crisante, Fernanda; Francolini, Iolanda; Piozzi, Antonella

    2013-05-22

    Buckypaper (BP) is the general definition of a macroscopic assembly of entangled carbon nanotubes. In this paper, a new property of a BP film produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated. In particular, BP shows to be able to promptly and strongly adhere to animal internal soft and wet tissues, as evaluated by peeling and shear tests. BP adhesion strength is higher than that recorded for a commercial prosthetic fabric (sealed to the tissue by fibrin glue) and comparable with that of other reported optimized nanopatterned surfaces. In order to give an interpretation of the observed behavior, the BP composition, morphology, porosity, water wettability, and mechanical properties were analyzed by AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, wicking tests, contact angle, and stress-strain measurements. Although further investigations are needed to assess the biocompatibility and safety of the BP film used in this work, the obtained results pave the way for a possible future use of buckypaper as adhesive tape in abdominal prosthetic surgery. This would allow the substitution of conventional sealants or the reduction in the use of perforating fixation.

  17. Wet oxidation of sewage sludge: full-scale experience and process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Galessi, Raniero; Menoni, Laura; Salvetti, Roberta; Slavik, Edoardo; Zanaboni, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, sewage sludge management represents one of the most important issues in wastewater treatment. Within the European project "ROUTES," wet oxidation (WO) was proposed for sludge minimization. Four different types of sludge were treated in an industrial WO plant: (1) municipal primary sludge (chemical oxygen demand COD: 73.0 g/L; volatile suspended solid VSS: 44.1 g/L); (2) secondary sludge from an industrial wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without primary sedimentation (COD: 71.8 g/L; VSS: 34.2 g/L); (3) secondary sludge from a mixed municipal and industrial WWTP without primary sedimentation (COD: 61.9 g/L; VSS: 38.7 g/L); and (4) mixed primary (70%) and secondary (30%) municipal sludge (COD: 81.2 g/L; VSS: 40.6 g/L). The effect of process parameters (temperature, reaction time, oxygen dosage) on WO performance was investigated. Depending on operating conditions, VSS and COD removal efficiency varied in the range 80-97% and 43-71%, respectively. A correlation between process efficiency and the initial VSS/TSS (total suspended solids) ratio was highlighted. Furthermore, a mathematical model of WO process for simulating VSS and COD profiles was developed.

  18. Decomposition and Mineralization of Dimethyl Phthalate in an Aqueous Solution by Wet Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dar-Ren; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Shih-Yun; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiang, Sheng-Wei; Hung, Zang-Sie; Shie, Je-Lueng; Chen, Yi-Hung; Yuan, Min-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) was treated via wet oxygen oxidation process (WOP). The decomposition efficiency η DMP of DMP and mineralization efficiency η TOC of total organic carbons were measured to evaluate the effects of operation parameters on the performance of WOP. The results revealed that reaction temperature T is the most affecting factor, with a higher T offering higher η DMP and η TOC as expected. The η DMP increases as rotating speed increases from 300 to 500 rpm with stirring enhancement of gas liquid mass transfer. However, it exhibits reduction effect at 700 rpm due to purging of dissolved oxygen by overstirring. Regarding the effects of pressure P T, a higher P T provides more oxygen for the forward reaction with DMP, while overhigh P T increases the absorption of gaseous products such as CO2 and decomposes short-chain hydrocarbon fragments back into the solution thus hindering the forward reaction. For the tested P T of 2.41 to 3.45 MPa, the results indicated that 2.41 MPa is appropriate. A longer reaction time of course gives better performance. At 500 rpm, 483 K, 2.41 MPa, and 180 min, the η DMP and η TOC are 93 and 36%, respectively.

  19. Techno-economic and environmental assessment of sewage sludge wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Canato, Matteo; Heimersson, Sara; Laera, Giuseppe; Salvetti, Roberta; Slavik, Edoardo; Svanström, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Today, several technologies and management strategies are proposed and applied in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to minimise sludge production and contamination. In order to avoid a shifting of burdens between different areas, their techno-economic and environmental performance has to be carefully evaluated. Wet oxidation (WO) is an alternative solution to incineration for recovering energy in sewage sludge while converting it to mostly inorganic residues. This paper deals with an experimentation carried out within the EU project "ROUTES". A mass balance was made for a WWTP (500,000 person equivalents) in which a WO stage for sludge minimisation was considered to be installed. Both bench- and full-scale test results were used. Design of treatment units and estimation of capital and operational costs were then performed. Subsequently, technical and economic aspects were evaluated by means of a detailed methodology which was developed within the ROUTES project. Finally, an assessment of environmental impacts from a life cycle perspective was performed. The integrated assessment showed that for the specific upgrade considered in this study, WO technology, although requiring a certain increase of technical complexity at the WWTP, may contribute to environmental and economic advantages. The paper provides guidance in terms of which aspects need a more thorough evaluation in relation to the specific case in which an upgrade with WO is considered.

  20. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient.

  1. Catalytic wet oxidation of the pretreated synthetic pulp and paper mill effluent under moderate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anurag; Mishra, I M; Chand, Shri

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) was investigated for the destruction of organic pollutants in the thermally pretreated effluent from a pulp and paper mill under moderate temperature and pressure conditions. The thermal pretreatment studies were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 368K using copper sulfate as a catalyst. The thermal pretreatment reduced COD by about 61%. The filtrate of the thermal pretreatment step was used at pH 8.0 for CWO at 383-443K temperature and a total pressure of 0.85MPa for 4h. Catalysts used for the reaction include copper sulfate, 5% CuO/95% activated carbon, 60% CuO/40% MnO(2), and 60% CuO/40% CeO(2). Maximum COD reduction was found to be 89% during CWO step using 5% CuO/95% activated carbon with a catalyst loading of 8gl(-1) at 443K and 0.85MPa total pressure. Overall COD reduction for the pretreatment and the CWO was found to be 96%. Besides this, 60% CuO/40% CeO(2) catalyst also exhibited the similar activity as that of obtained with 5% CuO/95% activated carbon catalyst at 423K temperature and 0.85MPa total pressure. The pH of the solution during the experimental runs decreases initially due to the formation of carboxylic acid and then increases due to the decomposition of acids.

  2. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Eniko; Schmidt, Anette S; Réczey, Kati; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure) was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Six different combinations of reaction temperature, time, and pH were applied. The best conditions (60 g/L of corn stover, 195 degrees C, 15 min, 12 bar O2, 2 g/L of Na2CO3) increased the enzymatic conversion of corn stover four times, compared to untreated material. Under these conditions 60% of hemicellulose and 30% of lignin were solubilized, whereas 90% of cellulose remained in the solid fraction. After 24-h hydrolysis at 50 degrees C using 25 filter paper units (FPU)/g of drymatter (DM) biomass, the achieved conversion of cellulose to glucose was about 85%. Decreasing the hydrolysis temperature to 40 degrees C increased hydrolysis time from 24 to 72 h. Decreasing the enzyme loading to 5 FPU/g of DM biomass slightly decreased the enzymatic conversion from 83.4 to 71%. Thus, enzyme loading can be reduced without significantly affecting the efficiency of hydrolysis, an important economical aspect.

  3. Degradation of acid red 97 dye in aqueous medium using wet oxidation and electro-Fenton techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayan, Berkant; Gözmen, Belgin; Demirel, Muhammet; Gizir, A Murat

    2010-05-15

    Degradation of the acid red 97 dye using wet oxidation, by different oxidants, and electro-Fenton systems was investigated in this study. The oxidation effect of different oxidants such as molecular oxygen, periodate, persulfate, bromate, and hydrogen peroxide in wet oxidation system was compared. Mineralization of AR97 with periodate appeared more effective when compared with that of the other oxidants at equal initial concentration. When 5 mM of periodate was used, at the first minute of the oxidative treatment, the decolorization percentage of AR97 solution at 150 and 200 degrees C reached 88 and 98%, respectively. The total organic carbon removal efficiency at these temperatures also reached 60 and 80%. The degradation of AR97 was also studied by electro-Fenton process. The optimal current value and Fe(2+) concentration were found to be 300 mA and 0.2 mM, respectively. The results showed that electro-Fenton process can lead to 70 and 95% mineralization of the dye solution after 3 and 5h giving carboxylic acids and inorganic ions as final end-products before mineralization. The products obtained from degradation were identified by GC/MS as 1,2-naphthalenediol, 1,1'-biphenyl-4-amino-4-ol, 2-naphthalenol diazonium, 2-naphthalenol, 2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthalenedion, phthalic anhydride, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, phthaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 4-amino-benzoic acid, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid.

  4. Pretreatment of refinery waste water by wet oxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} procedure: Alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes by wet oxidation; Vorbehandlung von Raffinerieabwasser durch Nassoxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} -Verfahren: Alternative Behandlung von sulfidischen Ablaugen durch Nassoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhaeuser, Johannes; Weissenberg, Dirk; Birkenbeul, Udo [Bayer Technology Services GmbH (BTS), Leverkusen (Germany). Technology Development and Engineering; Bloecher, Christoph [Currenta (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on the treatment of refinery wastewater by means of the wet oxidation. The authors present the LOPROX {sup registered} method as an alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes. This method can not only treat successfully organic polluted wastewater from the chemical industry, but also various waste lyes from refinery processes. Based on a customer-specific process optimization in pilot scale, a cost-effective treatment can be achieved.

  5. Effect on nickel loading on hydrogen production and chemical oxygen demand (COD) destruction from glucose oxidation and gasification in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youssef, E.A.; Chowdhury, M.B.I.; Nakhla, G.; Charpentier, P. [Western Ontario University, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass is considered to be an excellent alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Gasification and partial oxidation of glucose was performed in the presence of different metallic nickel (Ni) loadings on different catalyst supports in supercritical water at three temperature levels. For comparison, some experiments were conducted using high loading commercial catalyst Ni on silica-alumina. Hydrogen peroxide was used as a source of oxygen in the partial oxidation experiments. Oxygen to carbon stoichiometric ratios of 0.5 to 0.9 were examined to increase the hydrogen production via carbon monoxide production. The paper described the experimental and methods as well as results and discussion. Results showed that in the absence of catalyst, the optimum stoichiometric ratio was 0.8 of the amount of oxygen required for complete oxidation of glucose. It was concluded that enhancing hydrogen yield and selectivity from glucose by obtaining the desired catalytic property and the optimum process conditions and parameters would be an invaluable addition to the supercritical water oxidation technology. 24 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Wet Supercritical CO2: The Role of H2O Studied by Solid State C-13 and Si-29 NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Turcu, R. V.; Rosso, K. M.; Ilton, E. S.; Wang, C.; Sears, J. A.; Felmy, A. R.; Hoyt, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Selected as a model mineral carbonation system for geological carbon sequestration in mafic host rocks, chemical mechanisms of forsterite carbonation in supercritical CO2 containing water varied from dry to well above saturation, including at saturation, were investigated by a combination of solid state NMR (C-13 SP-, CP-MAS, Si-29 SP-, CP-MAS), XRD, TEM and XPS. Run conditions were 80 degrees (C) and 75 bars. Major findings are as follows. At high water contents where a bulk aqueous solution coexisted with water-saturated scCO2, forsterite was converted into magnesite and a separate Mg-free amorphous SiO2 reaction product characterized by highly polymerized oligomeric Q4, and to a lesser extent by Q3 silica species. As the amount of added water was reduced, hydrated intermediate reaction products that did not evolve to magnesite could be identified until at zero water no reaction intermediates or magnesite carbonation products were observed. The intermediate reaction products identified were a complex mixture of partially hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonate species and a variety of surface silica species with low polymerization extent. The intermediates were mainly in an amorphous state, forming a thin layer on the surface. Formation of these intermediate species consumes water by hydrolysis of Mg-O-Si linkages at the forsterite surface as well as by incorporation of water in the lattice. If insufficient water is available, the reaction is found not to proceed far enough to form magnesite and amorphous SiO2. Water in excess of this limit appears necessary for the intermediates to evolve to anhydrous magnesite, a process that is expected to liberate water for continued reaction. Hence, for a given fluid/forsterite ratio there appears to be a water threshold (i.e., the formation of H2O film with sufficient thickness estimated to be between 3.2 and 18.4 nm) above which a significant portion of the water is recycled in an apparent quasi-catalytic role for the

  7. In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; Benezeth, Pascale; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-06-03

    Shale formations play fundamental roles in large-scale geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) aimed primarily to mitigate climate change, and in smaller-scale GCS targeted mainly for CO2-enhanced gas recovery operations. In both technologies, CO2 is injected underground as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), where interactions with shale minerals could influence successful GCS implementation. Reactive components of shales include expandable clays, such as montmorillonites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays. In this work, we used in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy to investigate the swelling/shrinkage and water/CO2 sorption of a pure montmorillonite, Na-SWy-2, when the clay is exposed to variably hydrated scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Measured interlayer spacings and sorbed water concentrations at varying levels of scCO2 hydration are similar to previously reported values measured in air at ambient pressure over a range of relative humidities. IR spectra show evidence of both water and CO2 intercalation, and variations in peak shapes and positions suggest multiple sorbed types with distinct chemical environments. Based on the intensity of the asymmetric CO stretching band of the CO2 associated with the Na-SWy-2, we observed a significant increase in sorbed CO2 as the clay expands from a 0W to a 1W state, suggesting that water props open the interlayer so that CO2 can enter. However, as the clay transitions from a 1W to a 2W state, CO2 desorbs sharply. These observations were placed in the context of two conceptual models concerning hydration mechanisms for expandable clays and were also discussed in light of recent theoretical studies on CO2-H2O-clay interactions. The swelling/shrinkage of expandable clays could affect solid volume, porosity, and permeability of shales. Consequently, the results from this work could aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS, as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery

  8. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  9. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Olsson, L.; Thomsen, A.B.;

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195degreesC) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low......-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested...

  10. Wet air oxidation as a pretreatment option for selective biodegradability enhancement and biogas generation potential from complex effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoley, K V; Tembhekar, P D; Saratchandra, T; Pandit, A B; Pandey, R A; Mudliar, S N

    2012-09-01

    This study looks at the possibility of wet air oxidation (WAO) based pretreatment of complex effluent to selectively enhance the biodegradability (without substantial COD destruction) and facilitate biogas generation potential. A lab-scale wet air oxidation reactor with biomethanated distillery wastewater (B-DWW) as a model complex effluent (COD 40,000 mg L(-1)) was used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept. The studies were conducted using a designed set of experiments and reaction temperature (150-200°C), air pressure (6-12 bar) and reaction time (15-120 min) were the main process variables of concern for WAO process optimization. WAO pretreatment of B-DWW enhanced the biodegradability of the complex wastewater by the virtue of enhancing its biodegradability index (BI) from 0.2 to 0.88, which indicate favorable Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) for biogas generation. The kinetics of COD destruction and BI enhancement has also been reported.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy).

  12. Catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC as a post-treatment system for coffee wet processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Nancy R; Peralta, Yury M; Montañez, Mardelly K; Rodríguez-Valencia, Nelson; Molina, Rafael; Moreno, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from the anaerobic biological treatment of coffee wet processing wastewater (CWPW) contains a non-biodegradable compound that must be treated before it is discharged into a water source. In this paper, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts was researched as a post-treatment system for CWPW and tested in a semi-batch reactor at atmospheric pressure and 25 °C. The Al-Ce-Fe-PILC achieved a high conversion rate of total phenolic compounds (70%) and mineralization to CO(2) (50%) after 5 h reaction time. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of coffee processing wastewater after wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation was reduced in 66%. The combination of the two treatment methods, biological (developed by Cenicafé) and catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC, achieved a 97% reduction of COD in CWPW. Therefore, the WHPCO using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts is a viable alternative for the post-treatment of coffee processing wastewater.

  13. Wet oxidation pre-treatment of woody yard waste: Parameter optimization and enzymatic digestibility for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Woody yard waste with high lignin content (22% of dry matter (DM)) was subjected to wet oxidation pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation. The effects of temperature (185-200 degreesC), oxygen pressure (3-12 bar) and addition of sodium carbonate (0-3.3 g per 100 g DM...... biomass) on enzymatic cellulose and hemicellulose (xylan) convertibility were studied. The enzymatic cellulose conversion was highest after wet oxidation for 15 min at 185 degreesC with addition of 12 bars of oxygen and 3.3 g Na2CO3 per 100g waste. At 25 FPU (filter paper unit) cellulase g(-1) DM added......% conversion efficiency was still reached at 15 FPU g(-1) DM. Total carbohydrate recoveries were high (91-100% for cellulose and 72-100% for hemicellulose) and up to 49% of the original lignin and 79% of the hemicellulose could be solubilized during wet oxidation treatment and converted into carboxylic acids...

  14. Extraction of rare earth elements from their oxides using organophosphorus reagent complexes with HNO_3 and H_2O in supercritical CO_2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段五华; 曹丕佳; 朱永(贝睿)

    2010-01-01

    Direct extraction of metals from solids with complexing agents in supercritical CO2(SC-CO2) has recently attracted interests in separation,purification,recovery,and analysis of metals.In the present study,the static/dynamic extraction of rare earth elements(Nd,Ce) from their oxides(Nd2O3,CeO2) with organophosphorus complexes with HNO3 and H2O in SC-CO2 was investigated.The static extraction efficiency of Nd from Nd2O3 with the tri-n-butylphosphate(TBP)-HNO3 complex could reach 95% under optimized experiment...

  15. Functionalization of silicon oxide using supercritical fluid deposition of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane for the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Jordi; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Costa, Guillaume; Fontelaye, Caroline; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Ménage, Stéphane; Marchand, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The functionalization of silicon oxide based substrates using silanes is generally performed through liquid phase methodologies. These processes involve a huge quantity of potentially toxic solvents and present some important disadvantages for the functionalization of microdevices or porous materials, for example the low diffusion. To overcome this drawback, solvent-free methodologies like molecular vapor deposition (MVD) or supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) have been developed. In this paper, the deposition process of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) on silicon oxide using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent is studied for the first time. The oxirane ring of epoxy silanes readily reacts with amine group and is of particular interest for the grafting of amino-modified oligonucleotides or antibodies for diagnostic application. Then the ability of this specific EBTMOS layer to react with amine functions has been evaluated using the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide probes. The presence of the probes is revealed by fluorescence using hybridization with a fluorescent target oligonucleotide. The performances of SFD of EBTMOS have been optimized and then compared with the dip coating and molecular vapor deposition methods, evidencing a better grafting efficiency and homogeneity, a lower reaction time in addition to the eco-friendly properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The epoxysilane layers have been characterized by surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast optical technique, atomic force microscopy, multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shelf life of the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane coating layer has also been studied. Finally, two different strategies of NH2-oligonucleotide grafting on EBTMOS coating layer have been compared, i.e. reductive amination and nucleophilic substitution, SN2. This EBTMOS based coating layer can be used for a wide range of applications

  16. Wet Oxidation of Crude Manure and Manure Fibers: Substrate Characteristics Influencing the Pretreatment Efficiency for Increasing the Biogas Yield of Manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The biogas yield of manure is typically lower than 25 m3/t due to its low dry matter content and its high ratio of lignocellulosic fibers that are recalcitrant towards anaerobic digestion. A new pre-treatment method – wet oxidation – has been tested for disruption of the lignocellulosic fiber...... structure with subsequent higher degradation efficiencies and methane yields. A screening of crude manure and the separated fiber fraction shows that wet oxidation is more adequate for treatment of high concentrated solid fraction than for crude manure and an increase of 35% in biogas yield can be gained...... from wet oxidation of digested fibers. The wet oxidation treatment of the manure fiber fraction has to be carefully adjusted in order to achieve the highest increase in biogas yield for the manure fiber fraction under low production of inhibiting compounds and low losses of valuable organic matter....

  17. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  18. Role of Bismuth Oxide in Bi-MCo2O4(M=Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Catalysts for Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Peng-bo; CHENG Tie-xin; ZHUANG Hong; CUI Xiang-hao; BI Ying-li; ZHEN Kai-ji

    2004-01-01

    Two series of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel catalysts were prepared by the decomposition of the corresponding nitrates. The catalysts doped with bismuth oxide exhibit a higher activity in the wet air oxidation of acetic acid than those without dopant bismuth oxide. The catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, ESR, UV-DRS and XPS, and the interaction between Co and Bi was studied as well. It has been found that nano-sized bismuth oxide is paved on the surface of cobalt spinel crystal and the structures of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel are still maintained. The shift of the binding energy of Bi4f7/2 is related to the catalytic activity of these catalysts doped with bismuth oxide.

  19. Wet air oxidation of formic acid using nanoparticle-modified polysulfone hollow fibers as gas-liquid contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Seth R; Muthu, Satish; O'Callaghan, Michael; Lahitte, Jean-Francois; Bruening, Merlin L

    2012-03-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) using membrane contactors is attractive for remediation of aqueous pollutants, but previous studies of even simple reactions such as formic acid oxidation required multiple passes through tubular ceramic membrane contactors to achieve high conversion. This work aims to increase single-pass CWAO conversions by using polysulfone (PS) hollow fibers as contactors to reduce diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. Alternating adsorption of polycations and citrate-stabilized platinum colloids in fiber walls provides catalytically active PS hollow fibers. Using a single PS fiber, 50% oxidation of a 50 mM formic acid feed solution results from a single pass through the fiber lumen (15 cm length) with a solution residence time of 40 s. Increasing the number of PS fibers to five while maintaining the same volumetric flow rate leads to over 90% oxidation, suggesting that further scale up in the number of fibers will facilitate high single pass conversions at increased flow rates. The high conversion compared to prior studies with ceramic fibers stems from shorter diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. However, the activity of the Pt catalyst is 20-fold lower than in previous ceramic fibers. Focusing the Pt deposition near the fiber lumen and limiting pore wetting to this region might increase the activity of the catalyst.

  20. Wetting and evaporation behaviors of molten Mg-Al alloy drops on partially oxidized {alpha}-SiC substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Laixin [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Shen Ping, E-mail: shenping@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhang Dan; Jiang Qichuan [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} The wetting in the Mg-Al/SiC system was coupled with reaction and evaporation. {yields} The effect of the alloy composition on the wettability was investigated. {yields} Representative wetting stages were identified. {yields} A mechanism for the time-dependent diminishing in the drop volume was proposed. {yields} The interfacial reaction was analyzed based on thermodynamic considerations. - Abstract: The wetting and evaporation behaviors of Mg-Al alloys over a full composition range on partially oxidized polycrystalline {alpha}-SiC substrates were studied in a flowing Ar atmosphere using an improved sessile drop method. The time dependence of the changes in contact angle and drop geometry was monitored and representative wetting stages were identified. The initial contact angles at 1173 K were 100{sup o} for pure Al and 76{sup o} for pure Mg, with the maximum value of 106{sup o} for the 7.6 mol.% Mg-Al alloy. The interfacial reaction and the evaporation of Mg led to the decrease in the apparent contact angle in the spreading stage and their respective contribution was evaluated. After the pinning of the triple line, the decrease in the contact angle resulted from the diminishing drop volume as a consequence of the Mg evaporation. The effects of Mg concentration on the wetting and evaporation behaviors were discussed. A mechanism for the time-dependent diminishing drop volume was proposed in light of the competition between the Mg evaporation and its diffusion from the drop bulk to the surface. Finally, the interfacial reaction was analyzed based on thermodynamic considerations.

  1. Effect of wet etching process on the morphology and transmittance of fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, S. L.; Kusumandari; Suryana, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wet etching process was performed on the surface of FTO. The FTO coated glasses subtrates with size of 2×2 cm covered by screen were patterned using zinc powder and concentrated hydrochloric acid (1 M). The substrates were then cleaned in ultrasonic baths of special detergent(helmanex) diluted in deionized water and isopropanol in sequence. The screens with various of hole size denotes by T32, T49 and T55 were used in order to create a pattern of surface textured. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) image revealed that wet etching process changes the morphology of FTO. It indicates that texturization occured. Moreover, from the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer measurement, the transmittance of FTO increase after wet etching process. The time of etching and pattern of screen were affect to the morphology and the transmittance of FTO.

  2. Co-destruction of organic pollutants in municipal solid waste leachate and dioxins in fly ash under supercritical water using H2O2 as oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Daoan; Chi, Yong; Fu, Chao; Dong, Jun; Wang, Fei; Ni, Mingjiang

    2013-03-15

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, is applied to the co-disposal of two distinct waste streams: municipal solid waste leachate and incineration fly ash. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increases rapidly with rising temperature and excess oxygen. Rising residence time from 1 to 2 min has surprisingly little effect. The addition of fly ash accelerates COD conversion markedly and also polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs, dioxins) in the original fly ash are efficiently destroyed. High-chlorinated PCDD/Fs are more likely to be destroyed than low-chlorinated PCDD/Fs, at all experimental conditions. In addition, PCDDs are much more reactive than PCDFs, since the PCDDs/PCDFs ratio declines from 0.17 to 0.12 as excess oxygen rises from 0% to 300%.

  3. Influence of the different oxidation treatment on the performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Wang, Xingang; Yang, Hongwei; Sun, Yu; Liu, Yunxia

    2012-09-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by different oxidants (HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4), H(2)O(2), O(3) and air) have been used as catalysts for the wet air oxidation of phenol. To investigate the effect of the oxidation conditions on the structure of the functionalized MWCNTs, various characterization techniques, e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. The MWCNTs treated with O(3) and H(2)O(2) show higher amounts of oxygen-containing functional groups and carboxylic acid groups, and a weaker acidic nature, in comparison with those treated with other oxidizing agents. All the functionalized MWCNTs exhibit good activity in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. However, the MWCNTs treated with O(3) show the highest activity with desirable stability in comparison with other functionalized MWCNTs, indicating that the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with O(3) is a very promising strategy in synthesizing efficient catalysts for CWAO.

  4. Ruthenium catalysts supported on high-surface-area zirconia for the catalytic wet oxidation of N,N-dimethyl formamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanglu; Xu, Aihua; He, Yu; Yang, Min; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin

    2008-08-15

    Three weight percent ruthenium catalysts were prepared by incipient-wet impregnation of two different zirconium oxides, and characterized by BET, XRD and TPR. Their activity was evaluated in the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) in an autoclave reactor. Due to a better dispersion, Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area zirconia (Ru/ZrO(2)-A) possessed higher catalytic properties. Due to over-oxidation of Ru particles, the catalytic activity of the both catalysts decreased during successive tests. The effect of oxygen partial pressure and reaction temperature on the DMF reactivity in the CWO on Ru/ZrO(2)-A was also investigated. 98.6% of DMF conversion was obtained through hydrothermal decomposition within 300 min at conditions of 200 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of nitrogen pressure. At 240 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of oxygen pressure 98.3% of DMF conversion was obtained within 150 min.

  5. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen.

  6. [Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 catalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-bing; Zhu, Wan-peng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Shao-xia

    2007-07-01

    Wet air oxidation of phenol with Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 was systematically investigated and results showed that Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 could significantly increase the removal of COD and phenol. At the reaction temperature of 170 degrees C and pressure of 3MPa, about 99% COD and 100% phenol was removed respectively after 120 min. The optimal conditions were: reaction temperature, 170 degrees C; reaction pressure, 3 MPa; catalyst dosage, 5 g/L; agitator speed, 500 r/min. By analyzing intermediates, a simplified scheme of phenol oxidation was brought out. It includes two main steps. The first step is the production of organic acids, which is fast. The second step is the oxidation of organic acid, in which the oxidation of acetic acid is slow. Complete oxidation of acetic acid needs high temperature at which the radicals assault the C-H bond of a carbon and acetic acid is oxidized into carbon dioxide and water through formic acid.

  7. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...

  8. Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

    2002-04-01

    Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

  9. Analysis on Affecting Factors and Kinetics of Wastewater Treatment by Catalytic Supercritical Water Oxidation%废水处理催化超临界水氧化法影响因素及动力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦朝海; 王刚; 谢波

    2000-01-01

    Affecting factors and kinetics by catalytic supercritical water oxidation were summed up,and the importance of catalyst in the process of catalytic supercritical water oxidation was emphasised. In addition,general kinetic model for catalytic supercritical water oxidation was deduced. Kinetic parameters and reacting conditions of organic compounds including phenol ,acetic acid and pyridine are expounded. The performance of complex compounds by catalytic supercritical water oxidation was discussed based on the above results. All of which offers theoretical guidance for waste water treatment. In the end,some suggestions were proposed for scale-up and engineering utilization of catalytic supercritical water oxidation.%归纳了催化超临界水氧化法的影响因素并分析其相互间的关系,阐明催化剂作用的重要性。此外,论文还推导了反应体系普遍的动力学模型,分别分析了环状化合物、难降解中间产物及含氮化合物的动力学特征参数及反应条件的制约关系,在此基础上讨论复杂有机化合物废水的反应动力学行为,以期为实际废水处理提供理论指导。论文的最后对催化超临界水氧化法的工程开发与实际应用化问题提出了若干构想与建议。

  10. Combination of wet irrigation and nitrification inhibitor reduced nitrous oxide and methane emissions from a rice cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Guangbin; Xu, Hua; Ma, Jing

    2016-09-01

    To conserve water resources and guarantee food security, a new technology termed as "wet irrigation" is developed and practiced in rice fields; thus, its impact on radiative forcing derived from nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions merits serious attention. Dicyandiamide (DCD), a kind of nitrification inhibitor, is proposed as a viable means to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission while enhancing crop productivity. However, little is known about the response of GHG emission and grain yield to DCD application in a rice system under wet irrigation. In these regard, effects of water regime and DCD application on CH4 and N2O emissions, grain yield, global warming potential (GWP), and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from rice fields were studied. For this study, a field experiment, designed: Treatment II (intermittent irrigation), Treatment WI (wet irrigation), Treatment IID (II plus DCD), and Treatment WID (WI plus DCD), was conducted in Jurong, Jiangsu Province, China, from 2011 to 2012. Relative to Treatment II, Treatment WI decreased CH4 emission significantly by 49-71 % while increasing N2O emission by 33-72 %. By integrating CH4 and N2O emissions and grain yield, Treatment WI was 20-28 and 11-15 % lower than Treatment II in GWP and GHGI, respectively. The use of DCD under wet irrigation reduced N2O emission significantly by 25-38 % (p < 0.05) and CH4 emission by 7-8 %, relative to Treatment WI, resulting in a decline of 18-30 % in GWP. Due to the increase in N use efficiency, maximal grain yield (6-7 %) and minimal GHGI (22-34 %) was observed in Treatment WID. These findings indicate that combined application of N fertilizer and DCD is a win-win strategy in water-saving high-yield rice production with less GHG emission.

  11. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  12. Wet-chemical green synthesis of L-lysine amino acid stabilized biocompatible iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby; Krishna, Rohit; Bardhan, Neelkanth; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Gracio, José

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for the synthesis of L-Lysine (lys) amino acid coated maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The facile and cost effective method permitted preparation of the high-quality superparamagnetic gamma-Fe2O3 MNPs with hydrophilic and biocompatible nature. For this work, first we synthesized magnetite phase Fe3O4/lys by wet chemical method and oxidized to y-Fe2O3 in controlled oxidizing environment, as evidenced by XRD and VSM magnetometry. The crystallite size and magnetization of gamma-Fe2O3/lys MNPs was found to be 14.5 nm, 40.6 emu/gm respectively. The surface functionalization by L-lysine amino acid and metal-ligand bonding was also confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. The hydrodynamic diameter, colloidal stability and surface charge on MNPs were characterized by DLS and zeta potential analyser.

  13. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  14. Catalytic wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater on ruthenium-based eggshell catalysts in a bubbling bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Sun, Y; Xu, A H; Lu, X Y; Du, H Z; Sun, C L; Li, C

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25 wt.% and 0.1 wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

  15. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)/ultraviolet radiations) at 25°C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) at 50°C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)), system operating at 50°C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  16. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azabou, Samia [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Najjar, Wahiba [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouaziz, Mohamed [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, Abdelhamid [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  17. Removal of Hg{sup 0} from flue gases in wet FGD by catalytic oxidation with air - An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrej Stergarsek; Milena Horvat; Peter Frkal; Jost Stergarsek [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-11-15

    Research efforts are being focused on the development of mercury removal technologies, mainly directed to two alternative approaches: (I) the enhancement of homogeneous oxidation in the flue gases of Hg{sup 0} to water soluble Hg{sup 2+} by the addition of chlorides or bromides to the boiler or; (ii) the adsorption of Hg{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 0} on impregnated activated carbon (AC). A third option gaining more attention lately is based on the oxidation and retention of dissolved Hg{sup 0} in the wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) system. The experimental evidence of the present work showed that Hg{sup 0} present in the gaseous phase can be dissolved and oxidized to a high degree (70-90%) by air together with SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in wet FGD solutions. Transition metals such as Fe{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} act as catalysts, chloride enhances the reaction, while some oxosulphur compounds, e.g. tetrathionate, inhibit the oxidation. A combination of several catalysts at a concentration of sulphite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) below 100 mg L{sup -1} and an adequate redox potential of the solution can assure reasonable mercury removal even in the presence of oxidation inhibiting compounds. The main competitive reactions that govern final Hg{sup 0} removal in the FGD are as follows: (1) oxidation of Hg{sup 0} together with SO{sub 2} with air, enhanced by catalysts; (2) removal of catalysts by precipitation in the form of Fe(OH){sub 3} and eventually as MnO{sub 2} (to overcome this problem continuous addition of catalysts to the solution is required); (3) reduction of Fe{sup 3+} by tetrathionate to Fe{sup 2+} which (4) may reduce Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} and probably (5) the complexation of Hg{sup 2+} by anions present which may play an important role in the mechanism by complexing the product(s) of the Hg{sup 0} oxidation reaction. 35 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Direct synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide powders by wet-chemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Srdić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent period there is a great need for increasing the knowledge of tailoring the innovative procedures for the synthesis of electroceramic nanopowders and materials with improved quality for specific application. In order to produce electroceramics with desirable microstructure and properties, synthesis of stoichiometric, ultra-fine and agglomerate free powders with narrow size distributions is one of the most important steps. Within this scope, in the present paper we summarize our recent results on direct synthesis of some important perovskites and ferrites nanopowders by wet-chemical techniques.

  19. Surface Oxidation Study of Uranium Dioxide Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    oxygen [ Colmenares , 1984]. This oxidation rate has been reported in the time frame of minutes to hours. During the preparation of the UO2 powder...Science (Seventh Edition). Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1997. Colmenares , C., Oxidation Mechanisms and Catalytic Properties of the Actinides, Progress in

  20. Assessment of methane emission and oxidation at Air Hitam Landfill site cover soil in wet tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Elfithri, Rahmah

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH₄) emissions and oxidation were measured at the Air Hitam sanitary landfill in Malaysia and were modeled using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change waste model to estimate the CH₄ generation rate constant, k. The emissions were measured at several locations using a fabricated static flux chamber. A combination of gas concentrations in soil profiles and surface CH₄ and carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions at four monitoring locations were used to estimate the CH₄ oxidation capacity. The temporal variations in CH₄ and CO₂ emissions were also investigated in this study. Geospatial means using point kriging and inverse distance weight (IDW), as well as arithmetic and geometric means, were used to estimate total CH₄ emissions. The point kriging, IDW, and arithmetic means were almost identical and were two times higher than the geometric mean. The CH₄ emission geospatial means estimated using the kriging and IDW methods were 30.81 and 30.49 gm(−2) day(−1), respectively. The total CH₄ emissions from the studied area were 53.8 kg day(−1). The mean of the CH₄ oxidation capacity was 27.5 %. The estimated value of k is 0.138 year(−1). Special consideration must be given to the CH₄ oxidation in the wet tropical climate for enhancing CH₄ emission reduction.

  1. Advanced degradation of brominated epoxy resin and simultaneous transformation of glass fiber from waste printed circuit boards by improved supercritical water oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-10-01

    This work investigated various supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) systems, i.e. SCWO1 (only water), SCWO2 (water+H2O2) and SCWO3 (water+H2O2/NaOH), for waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) detoxification and recycling. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the operating conditions of the optimal SCWO3 systems. The optimal reaction conditions for debromination were found to be the NaOH of 0.21g, the H2O2 volume of 9.04mL, the time of 39.7min, maximum debromination efficiency of 95.14%. Variance analysis indicated that the factors influencing debromination efficiency was in the sequence of NaOH>H2O2>time. Mechanism studies indicated that the dissociated ions from NaOH in supercritical water promoted the debromination of brominated epoxy resins (BERs) through an elimination reaction and nucleophilic substitution. HO2, produced by H2O2 could induce the oxidation of phenol ring to open (intermediates of BERs), which were thoroughly degraded to form hydrocarbons, CO2, H2O and NaBr. In addition, the alkali-silica reaction between OH(-) and SiO2 induced the phase transformation of glass fibers, which were simultaneously converted into anorthite and albite. Waste PCBs in H2O2/NaOH improved SCWO system were fully degraded into useful products and simultaneously transformed into functional materials. These findings are helpful for efficient recycling of waste PCBs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of Passive Oxidation of Hi-Nicalon-S SiC Fibers in Wet Air: Relationships between Si02 Scale Thickness, Crystallization, and Fiber Strength (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    crystallize to cristobalite and tridymite in 100 hours at 1000°C or in one hour at 1300°C. Crystallization kinetics for oxidation in wet air were...measured by TEM. Oxidation initially produces an amorphous scale that starts to crystallize to cristobalite and tridymite in 100 hours at 1000°C or in...using reflected light interference fringes observed by optical microscopy. Cross-sectional TEM specimens were prepared from oxidized fibers by

  3. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater%邻氯苯酚废水的催化湿式氧化处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翚

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatmentof o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence ofcatalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removedby wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperatureof 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited highcatalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCrwas removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had bettercatalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  4. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher H; Thomas, Burt; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J; Kharaka, Yousif K

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ(13)C of dissolved organic carbon (δ(13)C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (oxidation despite using high-concentration oxidant, extended reaction time, or post-wet chemical oxidation gas-phase combustion. However, through a combination of dilution, chloride removal, and increasing the oxidant:sample ratio, high-salinity samples with sufficient DOC (>22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  5. Preparation and characteristics of nano-crystalline Cu-Ce-Zr-O composite oxides via a green route: supercritical anti-solvent process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Li; HUANG Pan; SUN Huanhua; JIANG Haoxi; ZHANG Minhua

    2013-01-01

    The nano-crystalline Cu-Ce-Zr-O composite oxides were successfully prepared by the supercritical anti-solvent (SAS) process.The physicochemical properties and catalytic performances were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),Raman spectroscopy,H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR),oxygen storage capacity (OSC) measurement and catalytic activity evaluation.It was found that Cu2+ ions incorporated into CeO2-ZrO2 lattice to forn Cu-Ce-Zr-O solid solution associated with the formation of oxygen vacancies.The Cu-Ce-Zr-O catalysts prepared via the SAS process with the Cu content 2.63 mol.% showed the highest OSC index of 636.9 μmol/g.Compared with the samples prepared by impregnation method,Cu doping using SAS process could improve the dispersion of Cu2+ in the composite oxide,enhance the interaction between Cu2+ and CeO2-ZrO2,improve the reducibility of catalyst,and thus improve the OSC performance and increase the catalytic activity for CO oxidation at low temperature.

  6. Photocatalytic activities of wet oxidation synthesized ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 thick porous films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruiqun; Han, Jie; Yan, Xiaodong; Zou, Chongwen; Bian, Jiming; Alyamani, Ahmed; Gao, Wei

    2011-05-01

    Highly porous zinc oxide (ZnO) film was produced by using reactive magnetron sputtering zinc target followed by wet oxidation. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was mixed to the porous films by using either TiO2 target magnetron sputter deposition or sol-spin method. The film thickness could reach 50 μm with uniform porosity. On the sputtering prepared ZnO-TiO2 film surface, fine nanorods with small anatase TiO2 nano-clusters on the tips were observed by SEM and TEM, and the titanium (Ti) composition was determined by XPS as 0.37%. The sol-spin treatment could increase the Ti composition to 4.9%, with reduced pore size compared to the untreated ZnO porous film. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the Ti containing porous film has strong ultraviolet-visible light emission. In the photo-catalysis testing, ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 have similar photo-catalysis activity under 365 nm UV irradiation, but under visible light, the photocatalysis activities of ZnO-TiO2 films were twice higher than that of ZnO porous film, implying promising applications of this porous oxide composite for industrial and dairy farm wastewater treatment.

  7. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  8. Wetting characteristics of the anodic aluminum oxide template and fabrication of cracks using ultraviolet curable resin solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Yoon, Jae; Phuong, NguyenThi; Hwan Kim, Jeong; Choi, Doo-Sun; Whang, Kyung-hyun; Yoo, Yeong-eun

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the wetting characteristics of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template with ultraviolet curable polymer resin. The wettability of the template depends on the pore size on the surface, where it is improved with smaller pores and vice versa. Plasma treatment on the surface of the template is used to improve the wettability and the adhesion of the cured polymer to the template. And we also introduce the cracks on the polymer layer for possible application as nano-sized cavities. The resin within the pore is cleaved during the curing process so that cavities or cracks could be made which are much smaller than the original pores of the AAO template.

  9. Wet air oxidation pretreatment of biomethanated distillery effluent: mapping pretreatment efficiency in terms color, toxicity reduction and biogas generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarat Chandra, T; Malik, S N; Suvidha, G; Padmere, M L; Shanmugam, P; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The effluents from molasses-based distilleries after biomethanation are beset with problems of intensified dark brown color, high residual COD, low biodegradability index (BOD/COD ratio Wet air oxidation (WAO) pretreatment of biomethanated distillery effluent resulted in substantial enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI) (up to 0.8). WAO pretreated effluent on anaerobic digestion indicated favorable biogas generation with methane content up to 64% along with concomitant COD reduction up to 54.75%. The HPLC analysis indicated that the pretreatment facilitated degradation of major color containing compounds-namely melanoidins, up to 97.8%. The pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability along with substantially reduced color also indicated positive effect on seed germination (up to 100%), implying toxicity reduction of the effluent post WAO pretreatment.

  10. Effect of Composition and Mass Ratio on the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Catalyst Cu–Fe–La/FSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO technology is used for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater and also for investigating the catalyst performance indicators such as catalyst activity and stability. The catalyst activity is mainly reflected from the water decolorization and CODCr removal rates, and the stability of the catalyst is mainly reflected by the quantity of metal dissolution. The experimental results showed that the prepared Cu–Fe–La/FSC catalyst with a 1:1:2 ratio of Cu–Fe–La by the impregnation method exhibited good activity for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater by the CWAO method, and the decolorization and CODCr removal rates using this catalyst were 98.7% and 78.6%, respectively, with a higher catalytic activity, lower concentration of metal dissolution, and good stability.

  11. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, Henrik B.

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...... oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy...

  12. Development of the Monolith Froth Reactor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of CELSS Model Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Martin; Fisher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of acetic acid, used as a model compound for the treatment of CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System) waste, was carried out in the monolith froth reactor which utilizes two-phase flow in the monolith channels. The catalytic oxidation of acetic acid was carried out over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst, prepared at The University of Tulsa, at temperatures and pressures below the critical point of water. The effect of externally controllable parameters (temperature, liquid flow rate, distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate) on the rate of acetic acid oxidation was investigated. Results indicate reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and exhibited a maximum with respect to liquid flow rate. The apparent activation energy calculated from reaction rate data was 99.7 kJ/mol. This value is similar to values reported for the oxidation of acetic acid in other systems and is comparable to intrinsic values calculated for oxidation reactions. The kinetic data were modeled using simple power law kinetics. The effect of "froth" feed system characteristics was also investigated. Results indicate that the reaction rate exhibits a maximum with respect to distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate. Fundamental results obtained were used to extrapolate where the complete removal of acetic acid would be obtained and for the design and operation of a full scale CELSS treatment system.

  13. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  14. Oxidation kinetics of thin copper films and wetting behaviour of copper and Organic Solderability Preservatives (OSP) with lead-free solder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Mauricio, E-mail: mauricio.ramirez2@de.bosch.com [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Strasse 2, 71701 Schwieberdingen (Germany); Chair for Surface Science and Corrosion, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Henneken, Lothar [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Strasse 2, 71701 Schwieberdingen (Germany); Virtanen, Sannakaisa [Chair for Surface Science and Corrosion, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The oxide formation on thin copper films deposited on Si wafer was studied by XPS, SEM and Sequential Electrochemical Reduction Analysis SERA. The surfaces were oxidized in air with a reflow oven as used in electronic assembly at temperatures of 100 deg. C, 155 deg. C, 200 deg. C, 230 deg. C and 260 deg. C. The SERA analyses detected only the formation of Cu{sub 2}O but the XPS analysis done for the calibration of the SERA equipment proved also the presence of a CuO layer smaller than 2 nm above the Cu{sub 2}O oxide. The oxide growth follows a power-law dependence on time within this temperature range and an activation energy of 33.1 kJ/mol was obtained. The wettability of these surfaces was also determined by measuring the contact angle between solder and copper substrate after the soldering process. A correlation between oxide thickness and wetting angle was established. It was found that the wetting is acceptable only when the oxide thickness is smaller than 16 nm. An activation energy of 27 kJ/mol was acquired for the spreading of lead free solder on oxidized copper surfaces. From wetting tests on copper surfaces protected by Organic Solderability Preservatives (OSP), it was possible to calculate the activation energy for the thermal decomposition of these protective layers.

  15. Properties of TRPO-HNO3 complex used for direct dissolution of lanthanide and actinide oxides in supercritical fluid CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mixed trialkylphosphine oxide-nitric acid (TRPO-HNO3) complex prepared by contacting pure TRPO with concentrated HNO3 may be used as additives for direct dissolution of lanthanide and actinide oxides in the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2). Properties of the TRPO-HNO3 complex have been studied. Experimental results show when the initial HNO3/TRPO volume ratio is varied from 1:7 to 5:1, the concentration of HNO3 in the TRPO-HNO3 complex changes from 2.12 to 6.16 mol/L, the [HNO3]/[TRPO] ratio of the TRPO-HNO3 complex changes from 0.93 to 3.38, and the content of H2O in the TRPO-HNO3 complex changes from 0.97% to 2.70%. All of the density, viscosity and surface tension of the TRPO-HNO3 complex change with the concentration of HNO3 in the complex. The protons of HNO3 and H2O in the complex undergo rapid exchange to exhibit a singlet resonance peak in NMR spectra with D2O insert. When the TRPO-HNO3 complex dissolves in a low dielectric constant solvent, small droplets of HNO3 appear which can be detected by NMR.

  16. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  17. [Quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in Buji River in wet season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-mei; Bai, Jiao-jiao; Sun, Wei-ling; Shao, Jun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial community structure and biomass in river water can reflect the situation of water quality in some extent. Nitrogen removal was mainly achieved by the nitrification and denitrification processes, and ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To explore the AOB community structure and biomass in nitrogen polluted river, water samples were collected from Buji River (Shenzhen) in wet season. Quantification of 16S rRNA copy numbers of total bacteria and AOB were performed by real-time PCR, and the microbial community structures were studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that the number of total bacterial 16S rRNA changed from 4.73 x 10(10) - 3.90 x 10(11) copies x L(-1) in the water samples. The copy numbers of AOB varied from 5.44 x 10(6) - 5.96 x 10(8)copies x L(-1). Redundancy discrimination analysis (RDA) showed that the main factors affecting the structure and the numbers of bacteria were different. For total bacteria, nitrate influenced the biomass significantly (P analysis showed that water pollution in downstream resulted in evident difference in microbial community structure between upstream and downstream water samples.

  18. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(Ⅱ)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; YAN Yongsheng; XU Wanzhen

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(Ⅱ) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed.The hydroquinone wouid be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(Ⅱ)/active carbon catalyst.After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltoas nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(Ⅱ) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon.Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(Ⅱ) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone.Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard.Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(Ⅱ).The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃, pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  19. Treatment of refractory nano-filtration reject from a tannery using Pd-catalyzed wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Rao, Nageswara N; Chauhan, Chetan; Pophali, Girish R; Kashyap, Sanjay M; Lokhande, Satish K; Gan, Lihua

    2013-10-15

    We attempted catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of nanofiltration (NF)-reject using Pd based catalyst viz., Pd/activated charcoal (AC) and PdCl2 with the objective of degradation of refractory organic pollutants. Refractory organic pollutants in NF-reject before and after WAO and CWAO were confirmed by GC-MS analysis. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature, catalyst dosage and air partial pressure on the rate of removal of total organic carbon (TOC). The reaction kinetics can be conveniently described by considering two-stage first order kinetics. The use of Pd/AC afforded 85% TOC removal, the corresponding rate constant (k) was 2.90 ± 0.075 × 10(-3)min(-1) (Pd/AC, 100mg/L; T, 473.15K; Pair, 0.69 MPa). On the other hand, 75% TOC was removed with k=2.31 ± 0.075 × 10(-3)min(-1) using Pd(2+) catalyst (Pd(2+), 16.66 mg/L; T, 473.15K; Pair, 0.69 MPa). The observed rate of mineralization under Pd-catalyzed conditions was significantly higher than that of the uncatalyzed oxidation (41%) under the similar experimental conditions. Catalyst stability experiments were performed and TEM, SEM, XRD, Raman and XPS characterization data collected. Despite some morphological transformation of support, Pd catalyst was stable under CWAO conditions.

  20. Wet carbon-based solid acid/potassium permanganate as an efficient heterogeneous reagents for oxidation of alcohols under mild conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arash Shokrolahi; Abbas Zali; Mohammad Hossein Kes

    2008-01-01

    Wet carbon-based solid acid and potassium permanganate were used as new reagents for oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in heterogeneous mixtures.The experiments were done moderately at mild condition and high yields in suitable times were obtained.

  1. Unprecedented Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Glucose to Succinic Acid Induced by the Addition of n-Butylamine to a Ru(III) Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolean, Iunia; Rizescu, Cristina; Bala, Camelia; Rotariu, Lucian; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Coman, Simona M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-09-08

    A new pathway for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of glucose is described. Employing a cationic Ru@MNP catalyst, succinic acid is obtained in unprecedently high yield (87.5 %) for a >99.9 % conversion of glucose, most probably through a free radical mechanism combined with catalytic didehydroxylation of vicinal diols and hydrogenation of the resulted unsaturated intermediate.

  2. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor; Etude par simulation numerique des ecoulements turbulents reactifs dans les reacteurs d'oxydation hydrothermale: application a un reacteur agite double enveloppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussiere, S

    2006-12-15

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  3. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  4. Microbial responses and nitrous oxide emissions during wetting and drying of organically and conventionally managed soil under tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M.; Jackson, L.E.; Lundquist, E.J.; Louie, D.T.; Miller, R.L.; Rolston, D.E.; Scow, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    The types and amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs, as well as irrigation management are likely to influence gaseous emissions and microbial ecology of agricultural soil. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) efflux, with and without acetylene inhibition, inorganic N, and microbial biomass C were measured after irrigation or simulated rainfall in two agricultural fields under tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). The two fields, located in the California Central Valley, had either a history of high organic matter (OM) inputs ("organic" management) or one of low OM and inorganic fertilizer inputs ("conventional" management). In microcosms, where short-term microbial responses to wetting and drying were studied, the highest CO2 efflux took place at about 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS). At this moisture level, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) indicative of microbial nutrient availability were elevated and a PLFA stress indicator was depressed, suggesting peak microbial activity. The highest N 2O efflux in the organically managed soil (0.94 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) occurred after manure and legume cover crop incorporation, and in the conventionally managed soil (2.12 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) after inorganic N fertilizer inputs. Elevated N2O emissions occurred at a WFPS >60% and lasted <2 days after wetting, probably because the top layer (0-150 mm) of this silt loam soil dried quickly. Therefore, in these cropping systems, irrigation management might control the duration of elevated N2O efflux, even when C and inorganic N availability are high, whereas inorganic N concentrations should be kept low during times when soil moisture cannot be controlled.

  5. Study of wet etching thin films of indium tin oxide in oxalic acid by monitoring the resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammana, Suelene S., E-mail: ssmammana@abinfo.com.br [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Greatti, Alessandra; Luiz, Francis H.; Costa, Francisca I. da; Mammana, Alaide P. [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Calligaris, Guilherme A.; Cardoso, Lisandro P. [Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, CEP 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mammana, Carlos I.Z.; Engelsen, Daniel den [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    We describe a study on wet etching of thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) using a simple method by monitoring the resistance of the thin film in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid and hydrochloric acid. Generally three different regimes can be distinguished during etching ITO in acids: (1) initial etching, which is slow, (2) a fast etching phase and (3) slow etching stage at the end. These regimes are explained in terms of a porosity–roughness model. This porosity model has been confirmed largely by X-ray reflection measurements at grazing incidence, roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A reliable method for monitoring the resistance during etching has been developed. This method is based on a 2-strips measuring jig with a very low series contact resistance. The activation energy of the etch rate of ITO films was found to be 80 ± 5 kJ/mol for oxalic acid and 56 ± 5 kJ/mol for HCl. SEM analyses in the final stage of the etching process indicate an enrichment of Sn in the residual film material. These observations are explained in terms of preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. X-ray analyses showed that the density of the ITO film decreased by etching. By adding ferric chloride to the oxalic acid solution we could accelerate the etch rate substantially. - Highlights: • Etching of indium tin oxide thin films by monitoring the resistance. • Oxalic acid has 2–3 times lower etch rate than concentrated HCl. • The etch rate in oxalic acid can be accelerated substantially by adding FeCl{sub 3}. • The proposed etching model for indium tin oxide was confirmed by X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. • Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy analyses showed preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, enriching the film with SnO{sub 2}.

  6. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of an emerging pollutant (enrofloxacin) by catalytic wet air oxidation and ozonation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Yediler, Ayfer

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the degradation efficiency of enrofloxacin (ENR) by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) and ozonation. Results obtained by CWAO experiments show that 99.5% degradation, 37.0% chemical oxidation demand (COD) removal and 51.0% total organic carbon (TOC) conversion were obtained when 100 mol% FeCl(3) and 25 mol% NaNO(2) at 150 °C under 0.5 MPa oxygen pressure after 120 min are used. The degradation products are identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). The oxidation end products, F(-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were determined by IC. The BOD(5)/COD ratio as a measure of the biodegradability of the parent compound increased from 0.01 to 0.12 after 120 min of reaction time, indicating an improved biodegradability of the parent compound. The inhibition of bioluminescence of the marine bacteria V. fischeri decreased from 43% to 12% demonstrating a loss in toxicity of ENR during CWAO. Ozonation of 0.2 mM ENR was carried out with an ozone concentration of 7.3 g m(-3) at pH 7. ENR decomposition with a degradation rate of 87% was obtained corresponding to the reaction time. Moderate changes in COD (18%) and TOC (17%) removal has been observed. The bioluminescence inhibition increased from 8% to 50%, due to the generation of toxic degradation products during ozonation. In comparison to the widely use of well developed method of ozonation CWAO exhibits better performance in terms of COD, TOC removals and generates less toxic products.

  7. Removal of salicylic acid on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Xu, Aihua; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Can

    2007-01-02

    It has been found that salicylic acid can be removal effectively at the lower temperature of 140 degrees C on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Under the same condition, the activities for the CWAO of phenol, benzoic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid have been also investigated. The results indicated that, with compared to the very poor activities for phenol and benzoic acid, the activities for salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid were very high, which are attributed to their same intramolecular H-bonding structures. With the role of hard acidity of intramolecular H-bonding, salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid can be adsorbed effectively on the basic center of LaFeO3 catalyst and are easy to take place the total oxidation reaction. However, at temperatures higher than 140 degrees C, the intramolecular H-bonding structure of salicylic acid was destroyed and the activities at 160 and 180 degrees C decreased greatly, which confirms further the key role of intramolecular H-bonding in the CWAO. Moreover, the LaFeO3 catalyst also indicated a superior stability of activity and structure in CWAO of salicylic acid.

  8. Supercritical fluid attachment of palladium nanoparticles on aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M; Talbot, Jan B; Jin, Sungho

    2005-06-01

    Nanocomposite materials consisting of Pd nanoparticles deposited on aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been fabricated through hydrogen reduction of palladium-beta-diketone precursor in supercritical carbon dioxide. The supercritical fluid processing allowed deposition of high-density Pd nanoparticles (approximately 5-10 nm) on both as-grown (unfunctionalized) and functionalized (using HNO3 oxidation) nanotubes. However, the wet processing for functionalization results in pre-agglomerated, bundle-shaped nanotubes, thus significantly reducing the effective surface area for Pd particle deposition, although the bundling provides more secure, lock-in-place positioning of nanotubes and Pd catalyst particles. The nanotube bundling is substantially mitigated by Pd nanoparticle deposition on the unfunctionalized and geometrically separated nanotubes, which provides much higher catalyst surface area. Such nanocomposite materials utilizing geometrically secured and aligned nanotubes can be useful for providing much enhanced catalytic activities to chemical and electrochemical reactions (e.g., fuel cell reactions), and eliminate the need for tedious catalyst recovery process after the reaction is completed.

  9. Enhancement of dispersion and bonding of graphene-polymer through wet transfer of functionalized graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion of nanomaterials in polymeric matrices plays an important role in determining the final properties of the composites. Dispersion in nano scale, and especially in single layers, provides best opportunity for bonding. In this study, we propose that by proper functionalization and mixing strategy of graphene its dispersion, and bonding to the polymeric matrix can be improved. We then apply this strategy to graphene-epoxy system by amino functionalization of graphene oxide (GO. The process included two phase extraction, and resulted in better dispersion and higher loading of graphene in epoxy matrix. Rheological evaluation of different graphene-epoxy dispersions showed a rheological percolation threshold of 0.2 vol% which is an indication of highly dispersed nanosheets. Observation of the samples by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM, showed dispersion homogeneity of the sheets at micro and nano scales. Study of graphene-epoxy composites showed good bonding between graphene and epoxy. Mechanical properties of the samples were consistent with theoretical predictions for ideal composites indicating molecular level dispersion and good bonding between nanosheets and epoxy matrix.

  10. Wet oxidation of glycerol into fine organic acids: catalyst selection and kinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. N. Brainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase oxidation of glycerol was performed producing fine organic acids. Catalysts based on Pt, Pd and Bi supported on activated carbon were employed to perform the conversion of glycerol into organic acids at 313 K, 323 K and 333 K, under atmospheric pressure (1.0 bar, in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor (MASR. The experimental results indicated glycerol conversions of 98% with production of glyceric, tartronic and glycolic acids, and dihydroxyacetone. A yield of glyceric acid of 69.8%, and a selectivity of this compound of 70.6% were reached after 4 h of operation. Surface mechanisms were proposed and rate equations were formulated to represent the kinetic behavior of the process. Selective formation of glyceric acid was observed, and the kinetic parameter values indicated the lowest activation energy (38.5 kJ/mol for its production reaction step, and the highest value of the adsorption equilibrium constant of the reactant glycerol (10-4 dm³/mol.

  11. Study on Properties of TBP-HNO3 Complex Used for Direct Dissolution of Lanthanide and Actinide Oxides in Supercritical Fluid CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Wu-Hua; ZHU Li-Yang; JING Shan; ZHU Yong-Jun; CHEN Jing

    2007-01-01

    The tri-n-butyl phosphate-nitric acid (TBP-HNO3) complex prepared by contacting the pure TBP with the concentrated HNO3 can be used for direct dissolution of lanthanide and actinide oxides in the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2). Properties of the TBP-HNO3 complex have been studied. Experimental results showed that when the initial HNO3/TBP volume ratio was varied from 1 : 7 to 5 : 1, the concentration of HNO3 in the TBP-HNO3 complex changed from 1.95 to 5.89 mol/L, the [HNO3]/[TBP] ratio of the TBP-HNO3 complex changed from 0.61 to 2.22, and the content of H2O in the TBP-HNO3 complex changed from 2.02% to 4.19%. All of the density, viscosity and surface tension of the TBP-HNO3 complex changed with the concentration of HNO3 in the complex, and were higher than those of the pure TBP. The protons of HNO3 and H2O in the complex underwent rapid exchange to exhibit a singlet resonance peak in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. When the TBP-HNO3 complex was dissolved in a low dielectric constant solvent, small droplets of HNO3 were formed that can be detected by NMR.

  12. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper.

  13. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate by catalytic wet air oxidation: Assessment of the role of operating parameters by factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2011-08-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) of municipal landfill leachate catalyzed by cupric ions and promoted by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effect of operating conditions such as WAO treatment time (15-30min), temperature (160-200°C), Cu(2+) concentration (250-750mgL(-1)) and H(2)O(2) concentration (0-1500mgL(-1)) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated by factorial design considering a two-stage, sequential process comprising the heating-up of the reactor and the actual WAO. The leachate, at an initial COD of 4920mgL(-1), was acidified to pH 3 leading to 31% COD decrease presumably due to the coagulation/precipitation of colloidal and other organic matter. During the 45min long heating-up period of the WAO reactor under an inert atmosphere, COD removal values up to 35% (based on the initial COD value) were recorded as a result of the catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) to reactive hydroxyl radicals. WAO at 2.5MPa oxygen partial pressure advanced treatment further; for example, 22min of oxidation at 200°C, 250mgL(-1) Cu(2+) and 0-1500mgL(-1) H(2)O(2) resulted in an overall (i.e. including acidification and heating-up) COD reduction of 78%. Amongst the operating variables in question, temperature had the strongest influence on both the heating-up and WAO stages, while H(2)O(2) concentration strongly affected the former and reaction time the latter. Nonetheless, the effects of temperature and H(2)O(2) concentration were found to depend on the concentration levels of catalyst as suggested by the significance of their 3rd order interaction term.

  14. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Potassium- Incorporated Titanium Oxide Nanostructures Produced by the Wet Corrosion Process Using Various Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured potassium-incorporated Ti-based oxides have attracted much attention because the incorporated potassium can influence their structural and physico-chemical properties. With the aim of tuning the structural and physical properties, we have demonstrated the wet corrosion process (WCP as a simple method for nanostructure fabrication using various Ti-based materials, namely Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TAV, Ti–Ni (TN alloy and pure Ti, which have 90%, 50% and 100% initial Ti content, respectively. We have systematically investigated the relationship between the Ti content in the initial metal and the precise condition of WCP to control the structural and physical properties of the resulting nanostructures. The WCP treatment involved various concentrations of KOH solutions. The precise conditions for producing K-incorporated nanostructured titanium oxide films (nTOFs were strongly dependent on the Ti content of the initial metal. Ti and TAV yielded one-dimensional nanowires of K-incorporated nTOFs after treatment with 10 mol/L-KOH solution, whereas TN required a higher concentration (20 mol/L-KOH solution to produce comparable nanostructures. The obtained nanostructures revealed a blue-shift in UV absorption spectra due to the quantum confinement effects. A significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed via the chromomeric change and the intermediate formation of methylene blue molecules under UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the WCP as a simple, versatile and scalable method for the production of nanostructured K-incorporated nTOFs to be used as high-performance photocatalysts for environmental and energy applications.

  15. Toxicity to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri of Kraft bleach plant effluents treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Albin; Besson, Michèle; Gallezot, Pierre; Gibert, Janine; Martin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Two Kraft-pulp bleaching effluents from a sequence of treatments which include chlorine dioxide and caustic soda were treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) at T=463 K in trickle-bed and batch-recycle reactors packed with either TiO2 extrudates or Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst. Chemical analyses (TOC removal, color, HPLC) and bioassays (48-h and 30-min acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, respectively) were used to get information about the toxicity impact of the starting effluents and of the treated solutions. Under the operating conditions, complex organic compounds are mostly oxidized into carbon dioxide and water, along with short-chain carboxylic acids. Bioassays were found as a complement to chemical analyses for ensuring the toxicological impact on the ecosystem. In spite of a large decrease of TOC, the solutions of end products were all more toxic to Daphnia magna than the starting effluents by factors ranging from 2 to 33. This observation is attributed to the synergistic effects of acetic acid and salts present in the solutions. On the other hand, toxicity reduction with respect to Vibrio fischeri was achieved: detoxification factors greater than unity were measured for end-product solutions treated in the presence of the Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst, suggesting the absence of cumulative effect for this bacteria, or a lower sensitivity to the organic acids and salts. Bleach plant effluents treated by the CWAO process over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst were completely biodegradable.

  16. Evaluation of wet air oxidation variables for removal of organophosphorus pesticide malathion using Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgoren, Melike; Gengec, Erhan; Veli, Sevil

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with finding optimum reaction conditions for wet air oxidation (WAO) of malathion aqueous solution, by Response Surface Methodology. Reaction conditions, which affect the removal efficiencies most during the non-catalytic WAO system, are: temperature (60-120 °C), applied pressure (20-40 bar), the pH value (3-7), and reaction time (0-120 min). Those were chosen as independent parameters of the model. The interactions between parameters were evaluated by Box-Behnken and the quadratic model fitted very well with the experimental data (29 runs). A higher value of R(2) and adjusted R(2) (>0.91) demonstrated that the model could explain the results successfully. As a result, optimum removal efficiency (97.8%) was obtained at pH 5, 20 bars of pressure, 116 °C, and 96 min. These results showed that Box-Behnken is a suitable design to optimize operating conditions and removal efficiency for non-catalytic WAO process. The EC20 value of raw wastewater was measured as 35.40% for malathion (20 mg/L). After the treatment, no toxicity was observed at the optimum reaction conditions. The results show that the WAO is an efficient treatment system for malathion degradation and has the ability of converting malathion to the non-toxic forms.

  17. Wet air oxidation of resorcinol as a model treatment for refractory organics in wastewaters from the wood processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernd; Chavez, Alma; Morales-Mejia, Julio; Eichenauer, Sabrina; Stadlbauer, Ernst A; Almanza, Rafael

    2015-09-15

    Wastewater treatment systems are important tools to enhance sustainability in terms of reducing environmental impact and complying with sanitary requirements. This work addresses the wet air oxidation (WAO) process for pre-treatment of phenolic wastewater effluents. The aim was to increase biodegradability prior to a subsequent anaerobic stage. In WAO laboratory experiments using a micro-autoclave, the model compound resorcinol was degraded under different oxygen availability regims within the temperature range 150 °C-270 °C. The activation energy was determined to be 51.5 kJ/mol. Analysis of the products revealed that after 3 h of reaction at 230 °C, 97.5% degradation of resorcinol was achieved. At 250 °C and the same reaction time complete removal of resorcinol was observed. In this case the total organic carbon content was reduced down to 29%, from 118.0 mg/L down to 34.4 mg/L. Under these process conditions, the pollutant was only partially mineralized and the ratio of the biological oxygen demand relative to the chemical oxygen demand, which is 0.07 for resorcinol, was increased to a value exceeding 0.5. The main by-product acetic acid, which is a preferred compound for methanogenic bacteria, was found to account for 33% of the total organic carbon.

  18. Resting Study of Tracer Experiment on Catalytic Wet Oxidation Reactor under Micro-gravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji; JIA Jin-ping

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station(ISS) employs catalytic wet oxidation carried out in a Volatile Reactor Assembly (VRA) for water recycling. Previous earth gravity experiments show that the VRA is very effective at removing polar,low molecular weight organics. To compare the reactor performance under micro-gravity and Earth gravity conditions,a tracer study was performed on a space shuttle in 1999 by using 0. 2% potassium carbonate as the chemical tracer.In this paper, the experimental data were analyzed and it is indicated that the reactor can be considered as a plug flow one under both micro-gravity and earth gravity experimental conditions. It has also been proved that dispersion is not important in the VRA reactor under the experimental conditions. Tracer retardation was observed in the experiments and it is most likely caused by catalyst adsorption. It is concluded that the following reasons may also have influence on the retardation of mean residence time: (1) the liquid can be held by appurtenances, which will retard the mean residence time; (2) the pores can hold the tracer, which can also retard the mean residence time.

  19. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  20. Al 2O 3 supported Ru catalysts prepared by thermolysis of Ru 3(CO) 12 for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaoying; Zhao, Peiqing; Chen, Gexin; Hu, Bin

    2011-06-01

    Low loading catalysts Ru/γ-Al 2O 3 and Ru-Ce/γ-Al 2O 3 were prepared by thermolysis of Ru 3(CO) 12 on γ-Al 2O 3. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, XRD and SEM. Two new Ru species (Ru A and Ru B) were detected during the Ru 3(CO) 12 decomposition process due to chemical interaction with the active OH groups on the surface of Al 2O 3 support, and the reduction of them can lead to more dispersed metallic phases. The sample was completely decomposed at 673 K in H 2, and RuO 2 was formed with minor amounts of Ru 0. When the temperature was increased to 773 K to heat the sample, the ratio of Ru 0 to RuO 2 increased. However, after the addition of CeO 2, only RuO 2 was detected on surface. The catalysts exhibited high activities in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of different organic compounds at high concentration such as isopropyl alcohol, phenol, acetic acids and N,N-dimethylformamide, which is attributed to the better dispersion of Ru particles and the addition of CeO 2 further enhanced number of effectively active sites on the cluster-derived catalyst surface.

  1. Low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation of a high-strength industrial wastewater using Fenton's reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biçaksiz, Zeliha; Aytimur, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2008-06-01

    Wastewater from the Afyon Alkaloids Factory (Afyon, Turkey) was subjected to low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) using Fenton's reagent, and the optimal reaction conditions were investigated. The CWAO using Fenton's reagent was applied to the factory effluent, diluted factory effluent, and aerobically pretreated wastewater. To find the optimum quantities of reagents, ferrous iron (Fe(+2))-to-substrate ratios of 1:10, 1:25, and 1:50 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-to-Fe(+2) ratios of 1, 5, and 10 were investigated, and the treatment was carried out at different temperatures. High chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were obtained at 50 degrees C, with the Fe(+2)-to-substrate ratio range between 1:10 and 1:25. The change in H2O2-to-Fe(+2) ratios did not cause any considerable effect. Also, the percentages of COD removals were nearly the same, so the ratio H2O2:Fe(+2):1 is recommended. Aerobic pretreatment seems to be effective. On the other hand, no enhancement was observed in the case of the diluted wastewater.

  2. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uellendahl, H; Wang, G; Møller, H B; Jørgensen, U; Skiadas, I V; Gavala, H N; Ahring, B K

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops. The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy crops competitive to the use of corn and this combination will make the production of biogas from energy crops more sustainable.

  3. System model for gasification of biomass model compounds in supercritical water – a thermodynamic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, Jan A.M.; Smeets, Jules R.; Bramer, Eddy A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a system model for the process of gasification of biomass model compounds in supercritical water. Supercritical water gasification of wet biomass (water content of 70 wt% or more) has as the main advantage that conversion may take place without the costly drying step. The therm

  4. System model for gasification of biomass model compounds in supercritical water - A thermodynamic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.; Smeets, Jules R.; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a system model for the process of gasification of biomass model compounds in supercritical water. Supercritical water gasification of wet biomass (water content of 70 wt% or more) has as the main advantage that conversion may take place without the costly drying step. The therm

  5. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of aniline in wastewater using copper modified SBA-15 as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Liming; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Yuan; Jian, Panming; Diao, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    SBA-15 mesoporous molecular sieves modified with copper (Cu-SBA-15) were prepared by pH-adjusting hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis and (29)Si MAS NMR. The pH of the synthesis gel has a significant effect on the amount and the dispersion of copper on SBA-15. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) (where 4.5 denotes the pH value of the synthesis gel) modified with highly dispersed copper was used as catalyst for the oxidation of aniline by H2O2. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) shows a higher catalytic activity compared to CuO on the surface of SBA-15. The influences of reaction conditions, such as initial pH of the aqueous solutions, temperature, as well as the dosages of H2O2 and catalyst were investigated. Under weakly alkaline aqueous solution conditions, the aniline conversion, the H2O2 decomposition and the total organic carbon (TOC) removal could be increased significantly compared to the acid conditions. The percentage of leaching Cu(2+) could be decreased from 45.0% to 3.66% when the initial pH of solution was increased from 5 to 10. The TOC removal could be enhanced with the increases of temperature, H2O2 and catalyst dosage, but the aniline conversion and H2O2 decomposition change slightly with further increasing dosage of catalyst and H2O2. At 343 K and pH 8.0, 100% aniline conversion and 66.9% TOC removal can be achieved under the conditions of 1.0 g/L catalyst and 0.05 mol/L H2O2 after 180 min. Although copper might be slightly leached from catalyst, the homogeneous Cu(2+) contribution to the whole catalytic activity is unimportant, and the highly dispersed copper on SBA-15 plays a dominant role.

  6. Research on Synergy of Combining Electrochemical Oxidation and Catalytic Wet Oxidation%电场效应与催化湿式氧化协同作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 李光明; 张芳; 黄菊文

    2009-01-01

    A new catalytic wet oxidation fixed-bed reactor combined with three-dimensional electric-field was developed to investigate catalytic wet oxidation, electrochemical oxidation and electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation of the solution containing phenol in the presence of a catalyst Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γ-Al_2O_3 . Good eleetroassisted catalytic wet oxidation efficiency was obtained in the setup for the combination system even at mild conditions ( T = 130℃, po_2 =1.0 MPa) that the phenol conversion and TOC reduction were up to 94.0% and 88.4% after 27 min treatment, respectively. The result also shows that the rate constants of electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation are much higher than that of not only both catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation process alone but also additive efficiencies of catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation processes, which indicates an apparent synergetic effect between CWO and ECO processes.%在自行研制开发的一套固定床和复合三维电场一体化连续式催化湿式氧化反应器中,采用浸渍法制备的Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γAl_2O_3催化剂,实验研究了苯酚催化湿式氧化、电催化氧化以及电场效应下的催化湿式氧化过程的行为.结果表明,一体化反应器在较低反应温度(T=130℃)和氧分压(Po_2=1.0 MPa)下即可获得相当满意的处理效果,空时仅为27min时苯酚和TOC的去除率就分别可达到94.0%和88.4%.电场效应下的催化湿式氧化协同降解苯酚的反应速率常数大于单独电催化或催化湿式氧化降解苯酚的反应速率常数,而且还大大超过两者之和,电催化氧化对催化湿式氧化工艺存在明显的协同增效作用.

  7. Fuel/Oxidizer Injector Modeling in Sub- and Super-Critical Regimes for Deep Throttling Cryogenic Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate CFD modeling of fuel/oxidizer injection and combustion is needed to design and analyze liquid rocket engines. Currently, however, there is no mature...

  8. Preparation and characterization of foxtail millet bran oil using subcritical propane and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi, Yuzhong; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhang, Ruitin; Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2015-01-01

    ...), supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) and subcritical propane extraction (SPE) and analyzed the yield, physicochemical property, fatty acid profile, tocopherol composition, oil oxidative stability in this study...

  9. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by ¤Thermoanaerobacter mathranii¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  10. Reuse of a dyehouse effluent after being treated with the combined catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process and the aerated constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D K; Kim, S C; Yoon, J H

    2007-01-01

    A catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process was combined with the aerated constructed wetland in order to treat the raw dyehouse wastewater to in acceptable level for reuse as washing process water. More than 90% of BOD and CODs could be removed with the wet peroxide oxidation reactor and the remaining pollutants in the treated water were transformed into biodegradable ones which could have been successfully treated at the following aerated constructed wetland. The highest values of BOD5, CODMn, CODCr, SS and T-N in the treated water were 1.6, 1.8, 2.1, 0.5 and 12.8 mg/L, respectively. These values were low enough for the treated water to be reused at the washing process.

  11. Recovery of Minerals in Martian Soils Via Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelak, Kenneth A.; Roth, John A.

    2001-03-01

    We are investigating the use of supercritical fluids to extract mineral and/or carbonaceous material from Martian surface soils and its igneous crust. Two candidate supercritical fluids are carbon dioxide and water. The Martian atmosphere is composed mostly of carbon dioxide (approx. 95.3%) and could therefore provide an in-situ source of carbon dioxide. Water, although present in the Martian atmosphere at only approx. 0.03%, is also a candidate supercritical solvent. Previous work done with supercritical fluids has focused primarily on their solvating properties with organic compounds. Interestingly, the first work reported by Hannay and Hogarth at a meeting of the Royal Society of London in 1879 observed that increasing or decreasing the pressure caused several inorganic salts e.g., cobalt chloride, potassium iodide, and potassium bromide, to dissolve or precipitate in supercritical ethanol. In high-pressure boilers, silica, present in most boiler feed waters, is dissolved in supercritical steam and transported as dissolved silica to the turbine blades. As the pressure is reduced the silica precipitates onto the turbine blades eventually requiring the shutdown of the generator. In supercritical water oxidation processes for waste treatment, dissolved salts present a similar problem. The solubility of silicon dioxide (SiO2) in supercritical water is shown. The solubility curve has a shape characteristic of supercritical systems. At a high pressure (greater than 1750 atmospheres) increasing the temperature results in an increase in solubility of silica, while at low pressures, less than 400 atm., the solubility decreases as temperature increases. There are only a few studies in the literature where supercritical fluids are used in extractive metallurgy. Bolt modified the Mond process in which supercritical carbon monoxide was used to produce nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4). Tolley and Tester studied the solubility of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) in supercritical CO2

  12. Isotopic analysis of dissolved organic carbon in produced water brines by wet chemical oxidation and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randal; Conaway, Christopher; Saad, Nabil; Kharaka, Yousif

    2013-04-01

    Identification of fluid migration and escape from intentionally altered subsurface geologic systems, such as in hydraulic fracturing, enhanced oil recovery, and carbon sequestration activities, is an important issue for environmental regulators based on the traction that the "fracking" process is gathering across the United States. Given diverse injected fluid compositions and the potential for toxic or regulated compounds to be released, one of the most important steps in the process is accurately identifying evidence of injected fluid escape during and after injection processes. An important tool in identifying differences between the natural groundwater and injected fluid is the isotopic composition of dissolved constituents including inorganic components such as Sr and carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds. Since biological processes in the mesothermal subsurface can rapidly alter the organic composition of a fluid, stable carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds (DOC) are an effective means to identify differences in the origin of two fluids, especially when coupled with inorganic compound analyses. The burgeoning field of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for isotopic analysis presents an opportunity to obtain rapid, reliable and cost-effective isotopic measurements of DOC in potentially affected groundwater for the identification of leakage or the improvement of hydrogeochemical pathway models. Here we adapt the use of the novel hyphenated TOC-CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for the analysis of DOC in produced water by wet oxidation and describe the methods to evaluate performance and obtain useful information at higher salinities. Our methods are applied to a specific field example in a CO2-enhanced EOR field in Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) as a means to demonstrate the ability to distinguish natural and injected DOC using the stable isotopic composition of the dissolved organic carbon when employing the novel TOC-CRDS instrumentation

  13. DNS of High Pressure Supercritical Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shao Teng; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical flows have always been important to rocket motors, and more recently to aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines. The purpose of the present study is to understand effects of differential diffusion on reacting scalars using supercritical isotropic turbulence. Focus is on fuel and oxidant reacting in the transcritical region where density, heat capacity and transport properties are highly sensitive to variations in temperature and pressure. Reynolds and Damkohler number vary as a result and although it is common to neglect differential diffusion effects if Re is sufficiently large, this large variation in temperature with heat release can accentuate molecular transport differences. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) for one step chemistry reaction between fuel and oxidizer are used to examine the differential diffusion effects. A key issue investigated in this paper is if the flamelet progress variable approach, where the Lewis number is usually assumed to be unity and constant for all species, can be accurately applied to simulate supercritical combustion.

  14. Catalytic wet oxidation of dyehouse effluents with Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al-Cu pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, G.S.; Yoon, S.B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering/Environmental Protection, Environment and Regional Development Inst., Gyeongsang National Univ., Gyeongnam (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of real dyehouse effluents was performed in a batch reactor and a continuous flow pilot plant scale reactor by using Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al-Cu-PILC catalysts. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the oxidant. The removal of TOC and color was strongly related to the consumption of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the subsequent formation of HO-. Copper components in the catalysts, especially in the Al-Cu-PILCs, showed successful activity toward complete removal of TOC and color. In addition the Al-Cu-PILC catalysts were extremely stable against copper leaching. (orig.)

  15. One-pot wet-chemical co-reduction synthesis of bimetallic gold-platinum nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Jun; Zhang, Qian-Li; Feng, Jin-Xia; Ju, Ke-Jian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a simple, rapid and facile one-pot wet-chemical co-reduction method is developed for synthesis of bimetallic Au-Pt alloyed nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide (Au-Pt NCs/RGO), in which caffeine is acted as a capping agent and a structure-directing agent, while no any seed, template, surfactant or polymer involved. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enlarged electrochemical active surface area, significantly enhanced catalytic activity and better stability for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation, compared with commercial Pt-C (Pt 50 wt%), PtRu-C (Pt 30 wt% and Ru 15 wt%) and Pt black.

  16. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  17. Protection effect of a SiO2 layer in Al0.85Ga0.15As wet oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wenfei; Ye Xiaoling; Xu Bo; Zhang Shizhu; Wang Zhanguo

    2012-01-01

    The Al0.85Ga0.15As layers buried below the GaAs core layer with and without the SiO2 layer were successfully oxidized in a wet ambient environment.The experimental results show that the SiO2 layer has little impact on the lateral-wet-oxidation rate of the Al0.85Ga0.15As layer.The contrast of the SEM image of the oxidized regions and the absence of As-related Raman peaks for samples with the SiO2 layer arise from the removal of As ingredients with the largest atomic number,which leads to improvements in the thermal stability of the oxidized layer.The PL intensities of samples with the SiO2 layer are much stronger than those without the SiO2 layer.The PL emission peak is almost unshifted with a slight broadening under the protection of the SiO2 layer.This is attributed to the SiO2 layer preventing oxidation damage to the GaAs capping layer.

  18. Application of a wet oxidation method for the quantification of ³H and ¹⁴C in low-level radwastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H J; Song, B C; Sohn, S C; Lee, M H; Song, K; Jee, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Wet oxidation methods are utilized to separate and quantify (3)H and (14)C radionuclides in inorganic and organic radwastes generated at nuclear facilities. Because (3)H and (14)C are pure beta emitters with half-lives of 12.3 and 5,730 years, respectively, these radionuclides should be chemically separated from other radionuclides present in radwastes for accurate quantification. In particular, a collection technique for (14)C radionuclide in radwastes is needed because it is converted into (14)CO2 gas by an oxidation reaction. To confirm the recoveries of (3)H and (14)C, various standard radioactive sources were used to verify the proposed method. Because the majority of (3)H radionuclides are distributed in tritiated water (HTO), only tritiated water was used as a standard for (3)H radionuclides. Additionally, (14)C-labeled methanol ((14)CH3OH), lauric acid ((14)CH3(CH2)10COOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaH(14)CO3), and toluene (C6H5(14)CH3) were used as (14)C standards. The compounds were oxidized with chemical oxidants and then separated. The individual species were mixed with a scintillation cocktail and counted using a liquid scintillation counter. The recoveries of (14)C and (3)H were 82-97% and 98%, respectively. The wet oxidation method will be applied to RI wastes for clearance.

  19. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3).

  20. Supercritical fluid extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  1. High Materials Performance in Supercritical CO2 in Comparison with Atmospheric Pressure CO2 and Supercritical Steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carney, Casey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Dogan, Omer N. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2017-02-26

    This presentation covers environments (including advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam boiler/turbine and sCO2 indirect power cycle), effects of pressure, exposure tests, oxidation results, and mechanical behavior after exposure.

  2. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  3. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Electron Microscopy Study of the Wet and Dry High-Temperature Oxidation of Alumina- and Chromia- Forming Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Foils of T347 stainless steel and a developmental alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel were oxidized at 800 C in dry air, air with 10% H2O, and air with 10% D2O. The T347 foils exhibited a transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation between 24 and 72 h of exposure in H2O and D2O, but exhibited protective Cr-rich oxide formation in dry air. In contrast, only thin, protective Al-rich oxide surfaces were observed for the AFA alloy foils under all conditions studied. Changes in the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signal were observed for the T347 stainless steel as a function of oxidation time in dry air, attributed to oxide grain growth and porosity formation/partial scale detachment associated with spinel phase at the scale/gas interface. For the AFA alloy, only minor changes in scattering as a result of oxidation time were observed. For both T347 and AFA, similar scattering was observed in dry and wet air (H2O and D2O) exposure. This finding indicates that water vapor exposure did not induce significant morphological changes in the oxide scales (such as increased porosity) in the 5-300 nm size regime accessed by SANS.

  4. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} catalyst in a slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, A.J. [Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial (INPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: airtonj@inpi.gov.br; Rojas, L.O.A.; Sousa, J.F. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Melo, D.M.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Chemistry; Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE)Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-15

    In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process - Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO). A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3), the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl{sub 2} and CeCl{sub 3} in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130 deg C and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed. (author)

  5. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  6. Application of sludge-based carbonaceous materials in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julcour Lebigue, Carine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; N'Guessan Krou; Ayral, Catherine; Mohamed, Elham; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri; Le Coq, Laurence; Gerente, Claire; Smith, Karl M; Pullket, Suangusa; Fowler, Geoffrey D; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the performance of carbonaceous materials prepared from sewage sludges (SBCMs) in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation; phenol was used as the model pollutant. Three different sewage sludges were treated by either carbonisation or steam activation, and the physico-chemical properties of the resultant carbonaceous materials (e.g. hardness, BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface chemistry) were evaluated and compared with a commercial reference activated carbon (PICA F22). The adsorption capacity for phenol of the SBCMs was greater than suggested by their BET surface area, but less than F22; a steam activated, dewatered raw sludge (SA_DRAW) had the greatest adsorption capacity of the SBCMs in the investigated range of concentrations (oxidation tests, the SBCMs demonstrated catalytic behaviour arising from their substrate adsorptivity and metal content. Recycling of SA_DRAW in successive oxidations led to significant structural attrition and a hardened SA_DRAW was evaluated, but found to be unsatisfactory during the oxidation step. In a combined adsorption-oxidation sequence, both the PICA carbon and a selected SBCM showed deterioration in phenol adsorption after oxidative regeneration, but a steady state performance was reached after 2 or 3 cycles.

  7. Development of novel micro swirl mixer for producing fine metal oxide nanoparticles by continuous supercritical hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shin-ichiro; Sue, Kiwamu; Ookawara, Ryuto; Wakashima, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Novel micro swirl mixers were developed to synthesize nanoparticles, and the effect of their mixing performance on the characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined. The results were compared with those obtained using simple T-shaped mixers under the same reaction conditions. The synthesis of NiO, whose characteristics depend on the mixing performance of the mixer, was chosen as a model reaction. Initial investigations highlighted that the average particle size decreased from 32 to 23 to 20 nm as the inner diameter of the swirl mixers was decreased from 3.2 mm (Swirl mixer, SM-3.2) to 0.8 mm (Micro swirl mixer, MSM-0.8) to 0.5 mm (Micro swirl mixer, MSM-0.5), respectively. On the other hand, a similar decrease in the average particle size from 34 to 20 nm was observed with a decrease in the inner diameter of the T-shaped mixers from 1.3 mm (Tee union, T-1.3) to 0.3 mm (Micro tee union, T-0.3), respectively. Further, narrow particle size distributions were observed with a decrease in the inner diameter of each mixer. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation indicated an excellent mixing mechanism, which contributed to the improvement in the heating rate and the formation of nanoparticles of smaller size with a narrow particle size distribution. The result presented here indicates that the micro swirl mixers produce high-quality metal oxide nanoparticles. The size of the obtained particles with improved size distributions was comparable to that of the particles obtained using the T-shaped mixers, although the inner diameter of the swirl mixers was larger. Therefore, preliminary evidence suggests that the swirl flow mixers have the ability to produce rapid and homogeneous fluid mixing, thus controlling the particle size.

  8. Long-time constant-capacitance DLTS investigations of 6H SiC/MOS structures: comparison of dry and wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassler, M.; Pensl, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1999-07-30

    A long-time constant-capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (LT-CC-DLTS) method has been established to investigate the energy distribution D{sub it} and the capture-cross-section {sigma}{sub n/p} of states at the interface of 6H SiC/MOS structures. A comparison of dry and wet oxidation (1120 C) reveals a change in the distribution of interface states and a different magnitude of capture-cross-sections indicating that the interface states consist of at least two types of defects. (orig.)

  9. Generic supercritical water technology; Generic technology to shite no chorinkaisui riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K.; Ajiri, M.; Inomata, H.; Smith, R.; Hakuta, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokoyama, C. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). The Institute forChemical Reaction Science; Chin, L. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the measurement and analysis for clarifying solution structure of supercritical water and exhibition mechanism of solvent functions. It also describes the development of new processes using supercritical water as reaction solvent. The PVT measurements were conducted in the supercritical region using pure water and NaCl aqueous solution, to confirm the reduction of molar volume of the electrolyte solution. The hydration structure was examined in the supercritical aqueous solution by the molecular dynamic simulation. As a result, presence of hydrogen bond structure, where the contribution of two branching hydrogen bond can not be ignored, was suggested under the supercritical condition. Characteristics of supercritical aqueous solutions are analyzed through in-situ Raman and scattered X-ray spectral measurements. Moreover, this paper introduces developments of some processes in the supercritical water, such as decomposition of wasted polymers, recovery of chemical materials, reforming of heavy hydrocarbons by contact hydrogenation, and synthesis of fine powders of metal oxide by reaction crystallization.

  10. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography, Pressurized Liquid Extraction and Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Matthew C.; Yonker, Clement R.

    2006-06-15

    are regulated as food supplements but are intended to treat disease or maintain health. Antioxidants and beneficial lipid products are major examples in this category. The final major category consists of environmental applications, both as an extraction technique for environmental analysis, and as a possible remediation strategy for removing contaminants that would otherwise be too expensive to recover. Most of the work in this area has focused on non-polar compounds, such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCB’s), where non-polar supercritical (SC) CO2 offers high extraction efficiencies. Co-solvent systems combining CO2 with one or more modifiers extend the utility of SC CO2 to polar and even ionic compounds. Supercritical water can extract polar compounds, and it has the additional advantage of combining extraction and destruction of contaminants via the supercritical water oxidation (SUWOX) process. Supercritical fluids are also useful in various niche applications. Fuel extraction, conversion, and analysis is one such application. Extraction of metals from various matrixes is also an area of continuing interest. The application of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology to production of nano-structured materials is a new area likely to see rapid growth in the next few years.

  11. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  12. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs.

  13. Investigation of Supercritical Water Phenomena for Space and Extraterrestrial Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Fisher, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The cost of carrying or resupplying life support resources for long duration manned space exploration missions such as a mission to Mars is prohibitive and requires the development of suitable recycling technologies. Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) has been identified as an attractive candidate for these extended missions because (i) pre-drying of wet waste streams is not required, (ii) product streams are relatively benign, microbially inert, and easily reclaimed, (iii) waste conversion is complete and relatively fast, and (iv) with proper design and operation, reactions can be self-sustaining. Initial work in this area at NASA was carried out at the Ames Research Center in the 1990 s with a focus on understanding the linkages between feed stock preparation (i.e., particle size and distribution) of cellulosic based waste streams and destruction rates under a range of operating temperatures and pressures. More recently, work in SCWO research for space and extra-terrestrial application has been performed at NASA s Glenn Research Center where various investigations, with a particular focus in the gravitational effects on the thermo-physical processes occurring in the bulk medium, have been pursued. In 2010 a collaborative NASA/CNES (the French Space Agency) experiment on the critical transition of pure water was conducted in the long duration microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS). A follow-on experiment, to study the precipitation of salt in sub-critical, trans-critical and supercritical water is scheduled to be conducted on the ISS in 2013. This paper provides a brief history of NASA s earlier work in SCWO, discusses the potential for application of SCWO technology in extended space and extraterrestrial missions, describes related research conducted on the ISS, and provides a list of future research activities to advance this technology in both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial applications.

  14. Kinetic study of wet oxidation of Si0.5Ge0.5 alloy by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of Si0. sGeo.5 alloy has been investigated at the temperatures of 800℃ and 900 ℃. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been employed to determine the composition and thickness of the oxide layers. Only Sio.5Geo. 5O2 layer formed during the oxidation at 800℃, whilst three layers, Si0.5Ge0.5O2, SiO2 and Ge, are existed after the oxidation at 900℃. Experimental results are interpreted by adding a germanium flux F4 in Deal-Grove oxidation model of Silicon.

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  16. Experimental research on influencing factors of wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated in a self-designed UV-bubble reactor. Several main influencing factors (UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, initial pH value, solution temperature, NO initial concentration, liquid-gas ratio and O2 percentage content) on the NO removal efficiency were studied. The results showed that UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, NO initial concentration and liquid-gas ratio are the main influencing factors. In the best conditions, the highest NO removal efficiency by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process could reach 82.9%. Based on the experimental study, the influencing mechanism of the relevant influencing factors were discussed in depth.

  17. Influence of Minor Alloying Elements on Selective Oxidation and Reactive Wetting of CMnSi TRIP Steel during Hot Dip Galvanizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Lawrence; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the addition of minor alloying elements on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. Five TRIP steels containing small alloying additions of Cr, Ni, Ti, Cu, and Sn were investigated. After intercritical annealing (IA) at 1093 K (820 °C) in a N2 + 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of 213 K (-60 °C), two types of oxides were formed on the strip surface: Mn-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x > 1.5) and Si-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x formation of the inhibition layer during the hot dip galvanizing. The addition of a small amount of Sn is shown to significantly decrease the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  19. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide.

  20. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  1. 生化剩余污泥湿式氧化减量机理研究%MECHANISM OF BIOCHEMICAL EXCESS SLUDGE REDUCTION BY WET AIR OXIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李本高; 孙友; 张超

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of sludge dewater ability is essential to the volume reduction of waste activated sludge (WAS). The wet air oxidation process is used for WAS degradation. It is found that the volatile suspended sludge is decomposed into small molecular organic compounds,such as soluble protein,carbohydrate,short-chain fatty acids and ammonia by wet air oxidation,which improves the sludge dewater ability significantly.%改善污泥脱水性能对大幅减少生化剩余污泥体积意义重大。采用湿式氧化方法对生化剩余污泥进行消解,可将污泥的主要污染物高分子挥发性悬浮物降解,使其转变为水溶性蛋白质、糖、有机酸及氨氮等小分子有机物,使污泥脱水性能得到显著改善而容易脱水。

  2. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    any significant impact on the normal hydrocarbon oxidation kinetics . These are ethanol, dimethyl ether( DME ), and methyl formate (C2H5OH, CH3OCH3...research are to develop stimulated scattering as a diagnostic for supercritical fluids, and to evaluate reaction kinetics inputs involving 2-4...measurements for refractive index measurements, and tested our supercritical cell. On the reaction kinetics task, review and evaluation of reactions, rate

  3. Synthesis of niobium pentoxide nanoparticles in single-flow supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Teruaki; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-10-01

    The development of a new synthesis method is still required for very fine oxide nanoparticles. In this study, a single-flow supercritical fluid system has been developed for the synthesis of highly crystalline nanosized oxide particles. Niobium oxide particles were synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment, batch-type supercritical water treatment and subcritical water treatment. Niobium pentoxide nanoparticles synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment at 673 K, 24.5 MPa, and 15 ml min-1 flow rate had a pseudohexagonal structure. The morphology of the nanoparticle was a rod, and it has a smaller particle size and larger crystallite size than those of the oxide particles synthesized by the other methods, because the particle growth and the decomposition of surfactant were rapidly suppressed in the single-flow supercritical water treatment. The nanosized niobium pentoxide is useful as a catalyst in harsh environments and as a precursor powder of lead-free piezoelectric materials.

  4. The Apeldoorn VerTech wet oxidation plant - experience gathered during permanent operation; VerTech-Nassoxidationsanlage Apeldoorn - Erfahrungen aus dem Dauerbetieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daun, M.

    1996-02-01

    The wet oxidation process has been known since the beginning of this century: its principle is the oxidization of organic and, in part, inorganic substances at temperatures of approximately 150 to 330 centigrades and pressures ranging from 10 to 220 bar, involving the consumption of oxygen. Some wet oxidation processes use the supra-critical range up to about 600 centigrades and 250 bar. The reaction products obtained are carbon dioxide and water. Depending on the initial product and reaction conditions, relatively low concentrations of low-molecular organic acids and, in some, cases, ammonium ions are retained in the watery phase, which are degraded in an integrated biological process step.- Wet oxidation in a deep shaft takes place in the sub-critical range (at pressures less than or equal to 100 bar and at a temperature of 280 centigrades). It is integrated into the multi-stage VerTech process as the most important process step. The first industrial-scale plant using this innovative reactor concept is in operation at Apeldoorn, Netherlands. As the performance of the Apeldoorn plant demonstrates, this technology is excellently suited to ensure compliance with all German statutory regulations and guidelines, especially the technical code on municipal waste and the technical code on clean air. (orig./ABI) [Deutsch] Die Nassoxidation ist ein seit Anfang dieses Jahrhunderts bekanntes Behandlungsverfahren, bei dem organische Stoffe und teilweise auch anorganische Stoffe unter Verbrauch von Sauerstoff bei Temperaturen von ca. 150 bis 330 C und Druecken von ca. 10 bis 220 bar oxidiert werden. Einige Verfahren arbeiten auch im ueberkritischen Bereich bis ca. 600 C und 250 bar. Bei dem Prozess entstehen als Reaktionsprodukte Kohlendioxid und Wasser. In der waessrigen Phase verbleiben je nach Ausgangsprodukt und Reaktionsbedingungen relativ geringe Konzentrationen an niedermolekularen organischen Saeuren und ggf. Ammoniumionen, die in einer biologischen Stufe prozessintern

  5. Wetting Splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Peichun; Dijkstra, Remko; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We present fluid dynamics videos illustrating wetting splashing-produced by water drop impact onto hydrophobic microstructures at high impact velocity ($\\sim 3$ ms$^{-1}$). The substrate consists of regular and transparent microtextures in square or hexagonal lattice, yielding a high contact angle of $\\sim 150 ^\\circ$. Our high speed top-or-bottom view recordings through the transparent surface shed light on the solid-liquid-air interfaces at impact. Despite the superhydrophobicity of the latticed micropillars (of a periodicity of $10 {\\mu}m), water droplet wets a certain central area and moreover entraps an air bubble beneath the droplet. Besides the central wet area, lamella surf on air splashing outward at high impinging velocity. The effects of micropatterns and air pressure on the impact outcome are also examined. We show that microscopic boundary condition, imposed by the solid texture, profoundly influences the macroscopic flow dynamics upon superhydrophobic surfaces at high impinging velocity. In addi...

  6. Comparing oxidative and dilute acid wet explosion pretreatment of Cocksfoot grass at high dry matter concentration for cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2013-01-01

    was investigated for cellulosic ethanol production. The biomass raw materials were pretreated using wet explosion (WEx) at 25% dry matter concentration with addition of oxygen or dilute sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was significantly improved after pretreatment. The highest conversion...... into cellulose monomeric C6 sugars was achieved for WEx condition AC-E (180°C, 15 min, and 0.2% sulfuric acid). For that condition, the highest ethanol yield of 197 g/kg DM (97% of theoretical maximum value) was achieved for SSF process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the highest concentration...

  7. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  8. Factors influencing catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of maleic acid in aqueous phase over copper/micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Lilian; Katima, Jamidu H Y

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of initial maleic acid feed concentration (0.005 to 0.03 M) was carried out in a temperature range of 20-50 degrees Celsius, on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (MTS-AMP) supported copper catalyst. The influence of various operating parameters such as initial feed concentration of maleic acid, temperature, catalyst loading and the stability of the catalyst were investigated. CWPO reactions were performed in a stirred batch reactor at an atmospheric pressure in the presence of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. Total conversion of maleic acid into acetic acid was obtained under mild conditions (i.e. atmospheric pressure and 40 degrees Celsius). Blank experiments showed no measurable maleic acid conversion (i.e. only approximately 0.5% conversion of initial maleic acid), indicating that a significant oxidation reaction of maleic acid is enhanced by the presence of a catalyst. Copper on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst therefore was found to be suitable for aqueous phase oxidation of maleic acid with 100% of maleic acid conversion.

  9. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallet, Ana [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ovejero, Gabriel, E-mail: govejero@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodríguez, Araceli [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peres, José A. [Centro de Química de Vila Real, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); García, Juan, E-mail: juangcia@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min{sup −1} and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min{sup −1}, respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}. After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}, attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  10. Technologies of deep-oxidation under high temperature in wastewater treatment%废水高温深度氧化处理技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国方; 赵红斌

    2001-01-01

    介绍了多种废水高温深度氧化技术,包括湿式空气氧化技术、催化湿式氧化技术、湿式过氧化物氧化技术、超临界水氧化技术和焚烧技术,其中着重比较了焚烧技术中四种炉型的特点。%Some technologies about deep-oxidation under high temperature in wastewater treatment were introduced, including wet air oxidation(WAO),catalyst wet air oxidation(CWAO),wet peroxide oxidation(WPO),supercritical water oxidation(SCWO),and incinerating technology.Four types of incinerators were compared by their features emphatically.

  11. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yang [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Ye, Gang, E-mail: yegang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Jing [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lv, Dachao [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Wang, Jianchen, E-mail: wangjianchen@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in C−O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  12. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process.

  13. Dynamic Wetting of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO Liquid Oxide on MgAl2O4 Spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyazdan, Hamed; Dogan, Neslihan; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Chapman, Michael W.; Monaghan, Brian J.

    2015-02-01

    Inclusion type and content in steel is critical in steelmaking, affecting both productivity through clogging, and downstream physical properties of the steel. They are normally removed from steel by reacting with a slag (liquid oxide) phase. For efficient inclusion removal, the inclusions must attach/bond with this liquid phase. The strength of the attachment can be in part characterized by the wettability of the liquid oxide on the inclusions. In this study, the dynamic wetting of liquid oxides of the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO system on a solid spinel (MgAl2O4) substrate with low porosity of 1.9 pct was measured at 1773 K (1500 °C) using a modified sessile drop technique. The dynamic contact angle between the liquid and solid spinel was determined for different CaO/Al2O3 mass percent ratios ranging from 0.98 to 1.55. Characteristic curves of wettability ( θ) vs time showed a rapid decrease in wetting in the first 10 seconds tending to a plateau value at extended times. A mathematical model for spreading behavior of liquid oxides by Choi and Lee was adopted and shown to provide a reasonable representation of the spreading behavior with time. The chemical interaction at the interface between spinel (MgAl2O4) and slag was analyzed by carrying out detailed thermodynamic evaluation and characterization using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy. There is evidence of liquid penetrating the substrate via pores and along grain boundaries, forming a penetration layer in the substrate. The depth of the penetration layer was found to be a function of substrate porosity and sample cooling rate. It decreased from ~350 µm for 6.7 pct-porous substrate to ~190 µm for substrate with porosity of 1.9 pct and from ~190 µm to ~50 µm for a slow-cooled liquid oxide-spinel substrate sample in the furnace to a rapidly cooled liquid cooled-spinel substrate sample, respectively.

  14. Different shades of oxide: from nanoscale wetting mechanisms to contact printing of gallium-based liquid metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudrick, Kyle; Liu, Shanliangzi; Mutunga, Eva M; Klein, Kate L; Damle, Viraj; Varanasi, Kripa K; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-06-17

    Gallium-based liquid metals are of interest for a variety of applications including flexible electronics, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. Still, nano- to microscale device fabrication with these materials is challenging because, despite having surface tension 10 times higher than water, they strongly adhere to a majority of substrates. This unusually high adhesion is attributed to the formation of a thin oxide shell; however, its role in the adhesion process has not yet been established. In this work, we demonstrate that, dependent on dynamics of formation and resulting morphology of the liquid metal-substrate interface, GaInSn adhesion can occur in two modes. The first mode occurs when the oxide shell is not ruptured as it makes contact with the substrate. Because of the nanoscale topology of the oxide surface, this mode results in minimal adhesion between the liquid metal and most solids, regardless of substrate's surface energy or texture. In the second mode, the formation of the GaInSn-substrate interface involves rupturing of the original oxide skin and formation of a composite interface that includes contact between the substrate and pieces of old oxide, bare liquid metal, and new oxide. We demonstrate that in this latter mode GaInSn adhesion is dominated by the intimate contact between new oxide and substrate. We also show that by varying the pinned contact line length using varied degrees of surface texturing, the adhesion of GaInSn in this mode can be either decreased or increased. Lastly, we demonstrate how these two adhesion modes limit microcontact printing of GaInSn patterns but can be exploited to repeatedly print individual sub-200 nm liquid metal drops.

  15. Wet air oxidation of pretreatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by Cu2+ and [PxWmOy]q- co-catalyst system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guowen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Xiaochen; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin

    2012-05-30

    This study concentrates on the pretreatment of real wastewater using catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). WO(3-) and PO(4)(3-) contained in fosfomycin pharmaceutical wastewater (FPW) and Cu(2+) contained in berberine pharmaceutical wastewater (BPW) were studied as CWAO influent. Mixture of this two streams were reused to form Cu(2+) and [P(x)W(m)O(y)](q-), namely polyoxometalates (POMs) as co-catalyst system to treat themselves. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the initial oxygen pressure and temperature on the COD (chemical oxygen demand), TOC (total organic carbon) removal and biodegradable enhancement, it was discovered that over 40% of COD and TOC removal can be easily realized in an hour of WAO oxidation at 523 K, 1.4 MPa. The BOD(5)/COD (BOD(5), biochemical oxygen demand in 5 days) of this two pharmaceutical mixture ascended from nonexistent to maximum 0.41 depends on the optimal FPW:BPW volume ratio 4:1, to compose POM co-catalyst system. Organic pollutants were incompletely oxidized to propionic acid and other intermediates. Some properties (e.g., TGA, IR, XRF) of POM catalyst separated from effluent, were obtained to provide additional information.

  16. Sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of m-cresol in batch and continuous reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Huangzhao; Yu, Li; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Bin; Sun, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials (SWs) were evaluated for their catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWPO) performance of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. The SWs were produced by carbonization (SW); carbonization with the addition of CaO (CaO-SW); HNO3 pretreatment (HNO3-SW) and steam activation (Activated-SW). The properties of SW catalysts were assessed by thermogravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and zeta potential. The results showed that SW treated by HNO3 (HNO3-SW) had a high conversion of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. Under the conditions of batch reaction (Cm-cresol = 100 mg L(-1), CH2O2 = 15.7 mmol L(-1), initial pH=7.0, 0.5 g L(-1) catalyst, 80°C, 180 min adsorption and 210 min oxidation), the conversion of m-cresol reached 100% and total organic carbon removal was 67.1%. It had a high catalytic activity and stability on the treatment of m-cresol in CWPO for more than 1100 h. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism for the oxidation of m-cresol to 2-methyl-p-benzoquinone by CWPO was proposed.

  17. Improved Ohmic-contact to AlGaN/GaN using Ohmic region recesses by self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhu, L.; Wu, W.

    2017-06-01

    Lower Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact resistance on AlGaN/GaN with wider rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperature window was achieved using recessed Ohmic contact structure based on self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique (STOAWET), in comparison with conventional Ohmic contacts. Even at lower temperature such as 650°C, recessed structure by STOAWET could still obtain Ohmic contact with contact resistance of 1.97Ω·mm, while conventional Ohmic structure mainly featured as Schottky contact. Actually, both Ohmic contact recess and mesa isolation processes could be accomplished by STOAWET in one process step and the process window of STOAWET is wide, simplifying AlGaN/GaN HEMT device process. Our experiment shows that the isolation leakage current by STOAWET is about one order of magnitude lower than that by inductivity coupled plasma (ICP) performed on the same wafer.

  18. Degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution by microwave assisted wet air oxidation using Ni-loaded GAC as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yao-bin; QUAN Xie; ZHAO Hui-min; CHEN Shuo; YANG Feng-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel process, microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation(MW-CWO), was applied for the degradation of H-acid( 1-amino8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution. Ni-loaded granular activated carbon (GAG), prepared by immersion-calcination method, was used as catalyst. The results showed that the MW-CWO process was very effective for the degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution under atmospheric pressure with 87.4% TOC (total organic carbon) reduction in 20 min. Ni on GAC existed in the form of NiO as specified by XRD. Loss of Ni was significant in the initial stage, and then remained almost constant after 20 min reaction. BET surface area results showed that the surface property of GAC after MW-CWO process was superior to that of blank GAC.

  19. Catalytic wet oxidation of aqueous methylamine: comparative study on the catalytic performance of platinum-ruthenium, platinum, and ruthenium catalysts supported on titania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiying; Lu, Gongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of the dispersion of Ru species supported on TiO2 was achieved by introduction of Pt component and the role of Pt in enhancing the catalytic performances of Pt-Ru was investigated with catalytic wet air oxidation of methylamine used as a probing reaction. It was found that Pt-Ru/TiO2 displayed a much better catalytic performance compared with Pt/TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts due to having the highest dispersion of active species. Both high total organic carbon conversion and nitrogen selectivity (∼100%) over Pt-Ru/TiO2 catalyst were achieved at low temperature (200 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization indicated that there were strong interactions between metal particles and the support, which may increase the catalytic performance of catalysts.

  20. [Catalytic stability in wet air oxidation of carboxylic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75 O4 catalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-hua; Yang, Min; Du, Hong-zhang; Peng, Fu-yong; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2007-07-01

    Oxalic, formic and acetic acid are main intermediate products in catalytic wet air oxidation process (CWAO). The catalytic activity and stability in CWAO of the three short-chain organic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst were studied. Oxalic acid is the only oxidizable intermediate and the largest amount of Fe leaching is 9.5 mg L(-1) at 160 degrees C during CWAO process. Formic and acetic acid have little influence on Fe leaching. Due to the strong reducible ability of oxalic acid, the amount of Fe leaching is larger in nitrogen atmosphere than that in oxygen atmosphere. Salicylic acid can be also degraded by ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst with a high catalytic activity and stability.

  1. Treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation: comparative study over CuO/CeO2 and NiO/Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersöz, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2012-12-30

    The treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was studied in a bubble reactor. The experiments were performed to investigate the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, reaction time, air flow rate, and pressure on aniline removal. The catalytic effects of the prepared nanostructured catalysts, CuO/CeO(2) (10% wt) and NiO/Al(2)O(3) (10% wt), on the CWAO treatment efficiency were also examined and compared. The prepared catalysts seem to be active having an aniline removal of 45.7% with CuO/CeO(2) and 41.9% with NiO/Al(2)O(3). The amount of N(2) formed was approximately the same for both of the catalysts.

  2. Performance of the wet oxidation unit of the HPLC isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2014-08-05

    The performance of liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) for polar halogenated compounds was evaluated. Oxidation capacity of the system was tested with halogenated acetic acids and halogenated aromatic compounds. Acetic acid (AA) was selected as a reference compound for complete oxidation and compared on the molar basis to the oxidation of other analytes. The isotope values were proofed with calibrated δ(13)C values obtained with an elemental analyzer (EA). Correct isotope values were obtained for mono- and dichlorinated, fluorinated, and tribrominated acetic acids and also for aniline, phenol, benzene, bromobenzene, chlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, pentafluorophenol, and nitrobenzene. Incomplete oxidation of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) resulted in lower recovery compared to AA (37% and 24%, respectively) and in isotopic shift compared to values obtained with EA (TCA Δδ(13)C(EA/LC-IRMS) = 8.8‰, TFA Δδ(13)C(EA/LC-IRMS) = 6.0‰). Improvement of oxidation by longer reaction time in the reactor and increase in the concentration of sulfate radicals did not lead to complete combustion of TCA and TFA needed for δ(13)C analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such highly chlorinated compounds were studied with the LC-IRMS system. This work provides information for method development of LC-IRMS methods for halogenated contaminants that are known as potential threats to public health and the environment.

  3. CuZnAl Mixed Oxide Catalyst Prepared from Hydrotalcite-like Precursor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Phenol%由类水滑石前驱体制备的CuZnAl复合氧化物催化剂催化湿氧化处理苯酚

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙颖; 杨民; 窦和瑞; 何雨; 王炜; 孙承林

    2003-01-01

    @@ The efficiency of several noble metals for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of various pollutants has been demonstrated[1,2]. However, the noble metals are expensive, affecting greatly the economics of the corresponding process.

  4. Drug delivery goes supercritical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Ginty

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In the field of drug delivery, the ability to control the size, morphology, and release of drug particles is fundamental to good targeting, but is often hampered by harsh processing conditions or inadequate methods; likewise for the processing of polymeric controlled-release systems. However, the use of supercritical fluids such as supercritical CO2 (scCO2 has provided a ‘clean’ and effective alternative to traditional methods of drug and polymer processing. In particular, scCO2 has a number of unique properties that make it possible to process both bioactive molecules and amorphous polymers without using toxic organic solvents or elevated temperatures. Here, we review the positive impact that supercritical fluids have had on the micronization, encapsulation, and impregnation of molecules of interest to both the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  5. Improved method for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon in natural water by silver filter filtration, wet chemical oxidation, and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Brenton, R.W.; Kammer, J.A.; Jha, V.K.; O'Mara-Lopez, P. G.; Woodworth, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample. The quantitation and method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 mg/L. The average percent recovery in five representative matrices was 97 ?? 11%. The errors associated with sampling and sample preparation of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon are also described.Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample

  6. Materials processing using supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting areas of supercritical fluids applications is the processing of novel materials. These new materials are designed to meet specific requirements and to make possible new applications in Pharmaceuticals design, heterogeneous catalysis, micro- and nano-particles with unique structures, special insulating materials, super capacitors and other special technical materials. Two distinct possibilities to apply supercritical fluids in processing of materials: synthesis of materials in supercritical fluid environment and/or further processing of already obtained materials with the help of supercritical fluids. By adjusting synthesis parameters the properties of supercritical fluids can be significantly altered which further results in the materials with different structures. Unique materials can be also obtained by conducting synthesis in quite specific environments like reversed micelles. This paper is mainly devoted to processing of previously synthesized materials which are further processed using supercritical fluids. Several new methods have been developed to produce micro- and nano-particles with the use of supercritical fluids. The following methods: rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS supercritical anti-solvent (SAS, materials synthesis under supercritical conditions and encapsulation and coating using supercritical fluids were recently developed.

  7. Supercritical Synthesis of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Vaultier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of biodiesel fuel from lipids (vegetable oils and animal fats has gained in importance as a possible source of renewable non-fossil energy in an attempt to reduce our dependence on petroleum-based fuels. The catalytic processes commonly used for the production of biodiesel fuel present a series of limitations and drawbacks, among them the high energy consumption required for complex purification operations and undesirable side reactions. Supercritical fluid (SCF technologies offer an interesting alternative to conventional processes for preparing biodiesel. This review highlights the advances, advantages, drawbacks and new tendencies involved in the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs for biodiesel synthesis.

  8. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC CATALYSTS TO THE CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CWPO OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER CONTAINING NON BIODEGRADABLE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Munoz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new ferromagnetic -Al2O3-supported iron catalyst has been prepared and its activity and stability have been compared with those of a previous iron-based conventional catalyst and with the traditional homogeneous Fenton process in the oxidation of chlorophenols. The use of solid catalysts improved significantly the efficiency on the use of H2O2, achieving higher mineralization degrees. The magnetic catalyst led to significantly higher oxidation rates than the conventional one due to the presence of both Fe (II and Fe (III. On the other hand, the use of a catalyst with magnetic properties is of interest, since it allows rapid recovery after treatment using a magnetic field. Moreover, it showed a high stability with fairly low iron leaching (<1% upon CWPO runs. An additional clear advantage of this new catalyst is its easy separation and recovery from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field.

  9. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is

  10. A route to synthesis molybdenum disulfide-reduced graphene oxide (MoS2-RGO) composites using supercritical methanol and their enhanced electrochemical performance for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mugyeom; Koppala, Siva Kumar; Yoon, Dohyeon; Hwang, Jieun; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Jaehoon

    2016-03-01

    A simple and effective approach for the tight anchoring of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) to the surface of supercritical-alcohol-reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) is developed. The MoS2-SRGO composites are synthesized by the one-pot deposition of MoO2 on SRGO and simultaneous reduction of GO to SRGO in supercritical methanol followed by sulfurization. The obtained MoS2-SRGO composites contain a crystalline MoS2 phase comprising 11-14 layers of MoS2. In addition, the composites have mesoporous structures with high porosities, ranging between 55 and 57%. In comparison with bare MoS2 and SRGO, the MoS2-SRGO composites have enhanced electrochemical performances due to their mesoporous structures and the synergetic effect between MoS2 and SRGO sheets. When tested as the anode in a secondary lithium battery, it shows high reversible capacity of 896 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 after 50 cycles, a high rate capacity of 320 mAh g-1 at a high charge-discharge rate of 2.5 A g-1, and long-term cycling of 724 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 after 200 cycles. This unique synthetic approach effectively and tightly anchors MoS2 nanoparticles to the SRGO surface, resulting in improved structural integrity, electron transfer efficiency between the SRGO sheets and MoS2, and Li-ion diffusion kinetics.

  11. Wet Aerobic Oxidation of Lignin into Aromatic Aldehydes Catalysed by a Perovskite-type Oxide: LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The perovskite-type oxide catalyst LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 was prepared by the sol–gel method, and tested as a catalyst in the wet aerobic oxidation (WAO of lignin into aromatic aldehydes. The lignin conversion and the yield of each aromatic aldehyde were significantly enhanced in the catalytic process, compared with the non-catalyzed process. Moreover, it was shown that the stability of activity and structure of LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 remained nearly unchanged after a series of successive recyclings of the catalytic reactions, indicating it was an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the conversion of lignin into aromatic aldehydes in the WAO process.

  12. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  13. Wet oxidation of phenol on Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocevar, S.; Batista, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering]|[Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-05-15

    Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalysts with 0.05 < x < 0.20 for catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in aqueous solutions have been synthesized using the coprecipitation method. The three most important synthesis parameters, the concentration of the mixed metal salt solution, the rate of coprecipitant addition and the stirrer speed during coprecipitation, were optimized with central composite design using the catalytic activity as a response function. The catalytic activity strongly depends on stirrer speed during coprecipitation. A high mutual dispersion of copper oxide and ceria, having the average crystallite size of about 9 nm, enhances solid solution formation. The unit cell parameter of ceria decreases when the overall concentration of copper in the catalyst increases, most probably obeying Vegard`s law. The catalysts proved to be very stable in hydrothermal reaction conditions at low pH values. After 5 h of reaction in the semibatch CST reactor less than 100 ppm of Cu was leached out of catalyst samples that were calcined in a flow of air for 2 h above 1033 K, and only a very low quantity of carbonaceous deposits were formed on the surface of the catalysts (0.6 wt%). The kinetics of phenol degradation could be interpreted by an equation valid for homogeneous autocatalytic reactions, in which the rate constant depends linearly on the heterogeneous catalyst (Cu) concentrations. This demonstrates that the reaction proceeds through a heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-branched chain mechanism.

  14. Degradation of cationic red GTL by catalytic wet air oxidation over Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst under room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Li, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Xiang; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Xueye

    2012-03-06

    To overcome the drawback of catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with high temperature and high pressure, the catalytic activity of Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst for degradation of cationic red GTL under room temperature and atmospheric pressure was investigated. Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst was prepared by coprecipitation and impregnation. XRD, TG-DTG, and XPS were used to characterize the resulting sample. Central composition design using response surface methodology was employed to optimize correlation of factors on the decolorization of cationic red GTL. The results show that the optimal conditions of pH value, initial concentration of dye and catalyst dosage were found to be 4.0, 85 mg/L and 2.72 g/L, respectively, for maximum decolorization of 80.1% and TOC removal of 50.9%. Furthermore, the reaction on the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst and degradation mechanism of cationic red GTL was studied by Electron spin resonance (ESR) and GC-MS technique. The possible reaction mechanism was that the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst can efficiently react with adsorbed oxygen/H(2)O to produce ·OH and (1)O(2) and finally induce the degradation of cationic red GTL. GC-MS analysis of the degradation products indicates that cationic red GTL was initiated by the cleavage of -N ═ N- and the intermediates were further oxidized by ·OH or (1)O(2).

  15. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 catalyst in the batch reactor and the packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng; Wang, Jianbing; Chen, Zhengxiong

    2008-05-30

    CeO2-TiO2 catalysts are prepared by coprecipitation method, and the activity and stability in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol are investigated in a batch reactor and packed-bed reactor. CeO2-TiO2 mixed oxides show the higher activity than pure CeO2 and TiO2, and CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst displays the highest activity in the CWAO of phenol. In a batch reactor, COD and TOC removals are about 100% and 77% after 120 min in the CWAO of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst at reaction temperature of 150 degrees C, the total pressure of 3 MPa, phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L, and catalyst dosage of 4 g/L. In a packed-bed reactor using CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst, over 91% COD and 80% TOC removals are obtained at the reaction temperature of 140 degrees C, the air total pressure of 3.5 MPa, the phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L for 100 h continue reaction. Leaching of metal ions of CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst is very low during the continuous reaction. CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst exhibits the excellent activity and stability in the CWAO of phenol.

  16. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  17. Microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation of H-acid in aqueous solution under the atmospheric pressure using activated carbon as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Yazhi; Yang, Fenglin

    2006-09-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is a promising method for the treatment of heavily contaminated wastewater. However, its application is restricted due to severe operation conditions (high pressure and high temperature). A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation method was investigated aiming to treat heavily contaminated wastewater under milder conditions. H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) was selected as target compound to evaluate the performance of this novel process. The removal of H-acid and TOC (total organic carbon) for H-acid solution of 3000 mg/L reached as high as 92.6% in 20 min and 84.2% in 60 min, respectively under optimal conditions. The existence of activated carbon and oxygen proved to be critical for effective treatment. The activated carbon acted not only as a catalyst for H-acid decomposition, but also as a special material for the absorption of MW energy. Air was supplied to the reactor as an oxygen source at constant flows. The amino group in H-acid was converted ultimately into nitrate, and sulfonic group into sulfate. This observation gave an evidence of H-acid mineralization although other organic intermediates were unable to be determined. The value of BOD(5)/COD (ratio of 5d biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand) increased from 0.008 to 0.467 indicating a significant improvement of biodegradability for the solution, which is beneficial for the further biological treatment of the wastewater.

  18. Treatment of municipal sewage sludge in supercritical water: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lili; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Donghai; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying; Wang, Laisheng

    2016-02-01

    With increasing construction of wastewater treatment plants and stricter policies, municipal sewage sludge (MSS) disposal has become a serious problem. Treatment of MSS in supercritical water (SCW) can avoid the pre-drying procedure and secondary pollution of conventional methods. SCW treatment methods can be divided into supercritical water gasification (SCWG), supercritical water partial oxidation (SCWPO) and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies with increasing amounts of oxidants. Hydrogen-rich gases can be generated from MSS by SCWG or SCWPO technology using oxidants less than stoichiometric ratio while organic compounds can be completely degraded by SCWO technology with using an oxidant excess. For SCWG and SCWPO technologies, this paper reviews the influences of different process variables (MSS properties, moisture content, temperature, oxidant amount and catalysts) on the production of gases. For SCWO technology, this paper reviews research regarding the removal of organics with or without hydrothermal flames and the changes in heavy metal speciation and risk. Finally, typical systems for handling MSS are summarized and research needs and challenges are proposed.

  19. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  20. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Direct Blue 15) using solvothermally synthesized copper hydroxide nitrate as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuzhong; Zhou, Xiang; Fu, Bei; Chen, Yiliang

    2011-03-15

    Copper hydroxide nitrate (Cu(2)(OH)(3)NO(3)) was synthesized solvothermally in anhydrous ethanol and characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA and SEM. The peroxide degradation of an azo dye (Direct Blue 15) on this material was evaluated by examining catalyst loading, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide dosage, initial dye concentration and temperature. The leaching of Cu from the copper hydroxide nitrate during the reaction was also measured. The copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized solvothermally, which was of a novel spherical morphology with complex secondary structures and contained high-dispersed Cu(2)O impurity, showed good performance for oxidation degradation of the azo dye, especially high catalytic activity, high utilization of hydrogen peroxide and a wide pH range, whereas the copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized by the direct reaction of copper nitrate and sodium hydroxide showed low catalytic activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.