WorldWideScience

Sample records for supercritical water reactors

  1. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  2. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  3. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  4. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of a supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.

    2007-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed for a hypothetical design of a Supercritical Water Reactor, with emphasis on Canadian design criteria. The model solves for cycle efficiency, mass flows and physical conditions throughout the plant based on input parameters of operating pressures and efficiencies of components. The model includes eight feedwater heaters, three feedwater pumps, a deaerator, a condenser, the core, three turbines and two reheaters. To perform the calculations, Microsoft Excel was used in conjunction with FLUIDCAL-IAPWS95 and VBA code. The calculations show that a thermal efficiency of 47.5% can be achieved with a core outlet temperature of 625 o C. (author)

  6. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  7. Materials challenges for the supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the materials requirements of the Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) which arise from its severe expected operating conditions: (i) Outlet Temperature (to 650 C); (ii) Pressure of 25 MPa for the coolant containment, (iii) Thermochemical stress in the presence of supercritical water, and (iv) Radiative damage (up to 150 dpa for the fast spectrum variant). These operating conditions are reviewed; the phenomenology of materials in the supercritical water environment that create the materials challenges is discussed; knowledge gaps are identified, and efforts to understand material behaviour under the operating conditions expected in the SCWR are described. (author)

  8. Flow analysis in a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, C.H.; Kochan, R.J.; Beller, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), also known as hydrothermal oxidation (HTO), involves the oxidation of hazardous waste at conditions of elevated temperature and pressure (e.g., 500 C--600 C and 234.4 bar) in the presence of approximately 90% of water and a 10% to 20% excess amount of oxidant over the stoichiometric requirement. Under these conditions, organic compounds are completely miscible with supercritical water, oxygen and nitrogen, and are rapidly oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. The essential part of the process is the reactor. Many reactor designs such as tubular, vertical vessel, and transpiring wall type have been proposed, patented, and tested at both bench and pilot scales. These designs and performances need to be scaled up to a waste throughput 10--100 times that currently being tested. Scaling of this magnitude will be done by creating a numerical thermal-hydraulic model of the smaller reactor for which test data is available, validating the model against the available data, and then using the validated model to investigate the larger reactor performance. This paper presents a flow analysis of the MODAR bench scale reactor (vertical vessel type). These results will help in the design of the reactor in an efficient manner because the flow mixing coupled with chemical kinetics eventually affects the process destruction efficiency

  9. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-01-01

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency (ge)20%; Steam turbine outlet quality (ge)90%; and Pumping power (le)2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  10. European supercritical water cooled reactor (HPLWR Phase 2 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg; Marsault, Philippe; Bittermann, Dietmar; Maraczy, Czaba; Laurien, Eckart; Lycklama, Jan Aiso; Anglart, Henryk; Andreani, Michele; Ruzickova, Mariana; Heikinheimo, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 deg C maximum core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 13 partners from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small, housed fuel assemblies with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The innovative core design with upward and downward flow through its assemblies has been studied with neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and stress analyses and has been reviewed carefully in a mid-term assessment. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. An overview of results achieved up to now, given in this paper, is illustrating the latest scientific and technological advances. (author)

  11. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  12. Development Project of Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Oka, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    A Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor (SCPR) development project (Feb. 2001- Mar. 2005) is being performed by a joint team consisting of Japanese universities and nuclear venders with a national fund. The main objective of this project is to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through concentrating three sub-themes: 'plant conceptual design', 'thermohydraulics', and 'material and water chemistry'. The target of the 'plant conceptual design sub-theme' is simplify the whole plant systems compared with the conventional LWRs while achieving high thermal efficiency of more than 40 % without sacrificing the level of safety. Under the 'thermohydraulics sub-theme', heat transfer characteristics of supercritical-water as a coolant of the SCPR are examined experimentally and analytically focusing on 'heat transfer deterioration'. The experiments are being performed using fron-22 for water at a fossil boiler test facility. The experimental results are being incorporated in LWR analytical tools together with an extended steam/R22 table. Under the 'material and water chemistry sub-theme', material candidates for fuel claddings and internals of the SCPR are being screened mainly through mechanical tests, corrosion tests, and simulated irradiation tests under the SCPR condition considering water chemistry. In particular, stress corrosion cracking sensitivity is being investigated as well as uniform corrosion and swelling characteristics. Influences of water chemistry on the corrosion product characteristics are also being examined to find preferable water condition as well as to develop rational water chemistry controlling methods. (authors)

  13. Canadian supercritical water reactor modeling using G4STORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.; Buijs, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor design was simulated using G4STORK. The results showed the expected trends but the determined Keff of 1.253±0.001 with a Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) of -25mk differed greatly from the results achieved using MCNP of Keff=1.2914 and a CVR of -14mk. This discrepancy is partly due to the different data libraries used and the mixing of different temperature libraries in MCNP, but is also likely due to a difference in the physics methodology. Work is ongoing to further clarify reasons for discrepancies and improve the efficiency of the simulation. (author)

  14. Canadian supercritical water reactor modeling using G4STORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, W.; Buijs, A. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor design was simulated using G4STORK. The results showed the expected trends but the determined Keff of 1.253±0.001 with a Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) of -25mk differed greatly from the results achieved using MCNP of Keff=1.2914 and a CVR of -14mk. This discrepancy is partly due to the different data libraries used and the mixing of different temperature libraries in MCNP, but is also likely due to a difference in the physics methodology. Work is ongoing to further clarify reasons for discrepancies and improve the efficiency of the simulation. (author)

  15. Chemistry control challenges in a supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, David; Tremaine, Peter; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The long-term viability of a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will depend on the ability of designers to predict and control water chemistry to minimize corrosion and the transport of corrosion products and radionuclides. Meeting this goal requires an enhanced understanding of water chemistry as the temperature and pressure are raised beyond the critical point. A key aspect of SCWR water chemistry control will be mitigation of the effects of water radiolysis; preliminary studies suggest markedly different behavior than that predicted from simple extrapolations from conventional water-cooled reactor behavior. The commonly used strategy of adding excess hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to suppress the net radiolytic production of primary oxidizing species may not be effective in an SCWR. The behavior of low concentrations of impurities such as transition metal corrosion products, chemistry control agents, anions introduced via make-up water or from ion-exchange resins, and radionuclides (e.g., 60 Co) needs to be understood. The formation of neutral complexes increases with temperature, and can become important under near-critical and supercritical conditions; the most important region is from 300-450 C, where the properties of water change dramatically, and solvent compressibility effects exert a huge influence on solvation. The potential for increased transport and deposition of corrosion products (active and inactive), leading to (a) increased deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, and (b) increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose, must be assessed. There are also significant challenges associated with chemistry sampling and monitoring in an SCWR. The typical methods used in current reactor designs (grab samples, on-line monitors at the end of a cooled, depressurized sample line) will be inadequate, and in-situ measurements of key parameters will be required. This paper describes current Canadian activities in SCWR chemistry and chemistry

  16. SCRELA, LOCA Analysis of Super-Critical Light-Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Description of program or function: LOCA Analysis Code for the Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor. - Blowdown Module: Calculation of the Blowdown Phase and Refill Phase. - Reflood Module: Calculation of the Reflood Phase

  17. Power flattening and reactivity suppression strategies for the Canadian supercritical water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.; Colton, A.; Pencer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is a conceptual heavy water moderated, supercritical light water cooled pressure tube reactor. In contrast to current heavy water power reactors, the Canadian SCWR will be a batch fuelled reactor. Associated with batch fuelling is a large beginning-of-cycle excess reactivity. Furthermore, radial power peaking arising as a consequence of batch refuelling must be mitigated in some way. In this paper, burnable neutron absorber (BNA) added to fuel and absorbing rods inserted into the core are considered for reactivity management and power flattening. A combination of approaches appears adequate to reduce the core radial power peaking, while also providing reactivity suppression. (author)

  18. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-01-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean/US/laboratory/university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program

  19. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  20. Supercritical-pressure, once-through cycle light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop new reactor concepts for the innovation of light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors. Concept of the once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor was developed. Major aspects of reactor design and safety were analysed by the computer codes which were developed by ourselves. It includes core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant system, safety criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start up and stability. High enthalpy rise as supercritical boiler was achieved by evaluating the cladding temperature directly during transients. Fundamental safety principle of the reactor is monitoring coolant flow rate instead of water level of LWR. The reactor system is compact and simple because of high specific enthalpy of supercritical water and the once-through cycle. The major components are similar to those of LWR and supercritical thermal plant. Their temperature are within the experiences in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The reactor is compatible with tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of the high head pumps and low coolant flow rate. The power rating of the fast reactor is higher than the that of thermal reactor because of the high power density. (author)

  1. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in a circular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mass velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel

  2. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  3. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  4. Design and analysis on super-critical water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    The Super-Critical Water Cooled Power Reactors (SCPR) is cooled by 25 MPa supercritical water of 280degC at reactor inlet and greater than 500degC at reactor outlet and directly connected with turbine/generators with high energy conversion efficiency. This corresponds to the deletion of recirculation system and steam-water separation system of BWR type reactors or of pressurizer and steam generator of PWR type reactors. In addition to the design study of the university of Tokyo, technology development of the SCPR for practical use has started under the collaboration of industry and academia since 2000. Mockup single tube and bundle tests for heat transfer/fluid flow characteristics of the design have been conducted with 3D heat transfer analysis. Materials compatible with coolant conditions for fuel cans and reactor internals are also assessed. Overall evaluation of the reactor concept is under way. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Development status and application prospect of supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Manchang; Wang Mingli

    2006-01-01

    The Supercritical-pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as one of the six Generation IV nuclear systems that will be developed in the future, and it is an innovative design based on the existing technologies used in LWR and supercritical coal-fired plants. Technically, SCWR may be based on the design, construction and operation experiences in existing PWR and supercritical coal-fired plants, which means that there is no insolvable technology difficulties. Since PWR technology will be adopted in the near term and medium term projects in China, and considering the sustainable development of the technology, it is an inevitable choice to research and develop the nuclear system of supercritical light water cooled reactor. (authors)

  6. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2001-07-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  7. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2001-01-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  8. Temperature feedback effects in a supercritical water reactor concept with multiple heat-up steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan-Martinez, A.M., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Jiutepec, Mor (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: vara@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Rescursos Energeticos, Col. Vicentina (Mexico); Martin-del-Campo, C.; Francois, J.L., E-mail: cecilia.martin.del.campo@gmail.com, E-mail: juan.louis.francois@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Jiutepec, Mor (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is one of the most promising and innovative designs selected by the Generation IV International Forum. One of the concepts being studied is the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is the European version of the SCWR. In this paper we present the numerical analysis of the behavior of a HPLWR with temperature feedback effects. The neutronic process, the heat transfer in the fuel rod and the thermalhydraulics in the core of the HPLWR were considered in this study. The neutronic calculations were performed with HELIOS-2 and the obtained results were used to evaluate the reactivity due to fuel temperature and supercritical water density. (author)

  9. Temperature feedback effects in a supercritical water reactor concept with multiple heat-up steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan-Martinez, A.M.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Martin-del-Campo, C.; Francois, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is one of the most promising and innovative designs selected by the Generation IV International Forum. One of the concepts being studied is the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is the European version of the SCWR. In this paper we present the numerical analysis of the behavior of a HPLWR with temperature feedback effects. The neutronic process, the heat transfer in the fuel rod and the thermalhydraulics in the core of the HPLWR were considered in this study. The neutronic calculations were performed with HELIOS-2 and the obtained results were used to evaluate the reactivity due to fuel temperature and supercritical water density. (author)

  10. High temperature and high performance light water cooled reactors operating at supercritical pressure, research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Yamada, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of supercritical-pressure, once-through coolant cycle nuclear power plant (SCR) was developed at the University of Tokyo. The research and development (R and D) started worldwide. This paper summarized the conceptual design and R and D in Japan. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants (FPP) in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants will be fully utilized for SCR. The high temperature, supercritical-pressure light water reactor is the logical evolution of LWR. Boiling evolved from circular boilers, water tube boilers and once-through boilers. It is the reactor version of the once-through boiler. The development from LWR to SCR follows the history of boilers. The goal of the R and D should be the capital cost reduction that cannot be achieved by the improvement of LWR. The reactor can be used for hydrogen production either by catalysis and chemical decomposition of low quality hydrocarbons in supercritical water. The reactor is compatible with tight lattice fast core for breeders due to low outlet coolant density, small coolant flow rate and high head coolant pumps

  11. Development of supercritical water reactors in Russia and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, A.P.; Klushin, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    The results of Russian and foreign studies on the water-cooled high critical parameters reactors are analyzed. Developments on this subject are conducted in more than 15 countries. The advantages of WWER- SCP and characteristics of experimental reactor of WWER-SCP-30 are discussed. It is noted that priority task is to develop a reactor with thermal neutron spectrum with a subsequent transition to the reactor with a fast neutron spectrum [ru

  12. Updated heat transfer correlations for supercritical water-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokry, S.J.; Pioro, I.L.; Farah, A.; King, K.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the development of SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs), research is currently being conducted for heat-transfer at supercritical conditions. Currently, there are no experimental datasets for heat transfer from power reactor fuel bundles to the fuel coolant (Water) available in open literature. Therefore, for preliminary calculations, heat-transfer correlations obtained with bare tube data can be used as a conservative approach. A large set of experimental data, for supercritical water was analyzed and an updated heat-transfer correlation for forced-convective heat-transfer, in the normal heat transfer regime, was developed. This experimental dataset was obtained within conditions similar to those for proposed SCWR concepts. Thus, this new correlation can be used for preliminary heat-transfer calculations in SCWR fuel channels. It has demonstrated a good fit for the analyzed dataset. Experiments with SuperCritical Water (SCW) are very expensive. Therefore, a number of experiments are performed in modeling fluids, such as carbon dioxide and refrigerants. However, there is no common opinion if SC modeling fluids' correlations can be applied to SCW and vice versa. Therefore, a correlation for supercritical carbon dioxide heat transfer was developed as a less expensive alternative to using supercritical water. The conducted analysis also meets the objective of improving our fundamental knowledge of the transport processes and handling of supercritical fluids. These correlations can be used for supercritical water heat exchangers linked to indirect-cycle concepts and the cogeneration of hydrogen, for future comparisons with other independent datasets, with bundle data, for the verification of computer codes for SCWR core thermalhydraulics and for the verification of scaling parameters between water and modeling fluids. (author)

  13. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  14. Prospects for development of an innovative water-cooled nuclear reactor for supercritical parameters of coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyakin, S. G.; Kirillov, P. L.; Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Nikitenko, M. P.; Makhin, V. M.; Churkin, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The state of nuclear power engineering as of February 1, 2014 and the accomplished elaborations of a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor are briefly reviewed, and the prospects of this new project are discussed based on this review. The new project rests on the experience gained from the development and operation of stationary water-cooled reactor plants, including VVERs, PWRs, BWRs, and RBMKs (their combined service life totals more than 15 000 reactor-years), and long-term experience gained around the world with operation of thermal power plants the turbines of which are driven by steam with supercritical and ultrasupercritical parameters. The advantages of such reactor are pointed out together with the scientific-technical problems that need to be solved during further development of such installations. The knowledge gained for the last decade makes it possible to refine the concept and to commence the work on designing an experimental small-capacity reactor.

  15. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of a Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucukboyaci, V.N.; Oriani, L.

    2004-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor

  16. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP

  17. MIF-SCD computer code for thermal hydraulic calculation of supercritical water cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galina P Bogoslovskaia; Alexander A Karpenko; Pavel L Kirillov; Alexander P Sorokin

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Supercritical pressure power plants constitute the basis of heat power engineering in many countries to day. Starting from a long-standing experience of their operation, it is proposed to develop a new type of fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical water, which enables the economical indices of NPP to be substantially improved. In the Thermophysical Department of SSC RF-IPPE, an attempt is made to provide thermal-hydraulic validation of the reactor under discussion. The paper presents the results of analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of fuel subassemblies cooled by supercritical water based on subchannel analysis. Modification of subchannel code MIF - MIF-SCD Code - developed in the SSC RF IPPE is designed as block code and permits one to calculate the coolant temperature and velocity distributions in fuel subassembly channels, the temperature of fuel pin claddings and fuel subassembly wrapper under conditions of irregular geometry and non-uniform axial and radial power generation. The thermal hydraulics under supercritical pressure of water exhibits such peculiarities as abrupt variation of the thermal physical properties in the range of pseudo-critical temperature, the absence of such phenomenon as the critical heat flux which can lead to fuel element burnout in WWERs. As compared with subchannel code for light water, in order to take account of the variation of the coolant properties versus temperature in more detail, a block for evaluating the thermal physical properties of supercritical water versus the local coolant temperature in the fuel subassembly channels was added. The peculiarities of the geometry and power generation in the fuel subassembly of the supercritical reactor are considered as well in special blocks. The results of calculations have shown that considerable preheating of supercritical coolant (several hundreds degrees) can occur in the fuel subassembly. The test calculations according to

  18. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  19. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  20. A flow reactor for the flow supercritical water oxidation of wastes to mitigate the reactor corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have designed a flow tube reactor for supercritical water oxidation of wastes that confines the oxidation reaction to the vicinity of the axis of the tube. This prevents high temperatures and reactants as well as reaction products from coming in intimate contact with reactor walls. This implies a lessening of corrosion of the walls of the reactor. We display numerical simulations for a vertical reactor with conservative design parameters that illustrate our concept. We performed our calculations for the destruction of sodium nitrate by ammonium hydroxide In the presence of supercritical water, where the production of sodium hydroxide causes corrosion. We have compared these results with that for a horizontal set-up where the sodium hydroxide created during the reaction ends up on the floor of the tube, implying a higher probability of corrosion

  1. Predicted Variations of Water Chemistry in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Supercritical Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Liu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Min

    2012-09-01

    In response to the demand over a higher efficiency for a nuclear power plant, various types of Generation IV nuclear reactors have been proposed. One of the new generation reactors adopts supercritical light water as the reactor coolant. While current in-service light water reactors (LWRs) bear an average thermal efficiency of 33%, the thermal efficiency of a supercritical water reactor (SCWR) could generally reach more than 44%. For LWRs, the coolants are oxidizing due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, and the degradation of structural materials has mainly resulted from stress corrosion cracking. Since oxygen is completely soluble in supercritical water, similar or even worse degradation phenomena are expected to appear in the structural and core components of an SCWR. To ensure proper designs of the structural components and suitable selections of the materials to meet the requirements of operation safety, it would be of great importance for the design engineers of an SCWR to be fully aware of the state of water chemistry in the primary coolant circuit (PCC). Since SCWRs are still in the stage of conceptual design and no practical data are available, a computer model was therefore developed for analyzing water chemistry variation and corrosion behavior of metallic materials in the PCC of a conceptual SCWR. In this study, a U.S. designed SCWR with a rated thermal power of 3575 MW and a coolant flow rate of 1843 kg/s was selected for investigating the variations in redox species concentration in the PCC. Our analyses indicated that the [H 2 ] and [H 2 O 2 ] at the core channel were higher than those at the other regions in the PCC of this SCWR. Due to the self-decomposition of H 2 O 2 , the core channel exhibited a lower [O 2 ] than the upper plenum. Because the middle water rod region was in parallel with the core channel region with relatively high dose rates, the [H 2 ] and [H 2 O 2 ] in this region were higher than those in the other regions

  2. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  3. Identification of significant process variables for a flow-through supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    The effects of four process variables on the destruction efficiency of a flow-through supercritical water oxidation reactor were investigated. These process variables included: (1) reactor throughput (GPH), (2) concentration of the surrogate waste (% acetone), (3) maximum reactor tube-wall temperature (OC), and (4) applied stoichiometric oxygen. The analysis was conducted utilizing two-level factorial experiments, steepest ascent methods, and central composite designs. This experimental protocol assures efficient experimentation and allows for an empirical response surface model of the system to be developed. This experimentation identified a significant positive effect for stoichiometric oxygen applied and temperature variations between 400 to 500 degrees C. The increase in destruction efficiency due to stoichiometric 0 2 provides strong evidence that supercritical water oxidations are catalyzed by excess oxygen, and the strong temperature effect is a result of large increases in the kinetic rates for this temperature range. However, increasing temperature between 550 to 650 degrees C does not provide substantial increases in destruction efficiency. In addition, destruction efficiency is significantly unproved by increasing the Reynolds number and residence time. The destruction efficiency of the reactor is also dependent upon the initial concentration of surrogate waste. This concentration dependence may indicate first-order supercritical CO kinetics is inadequate for describing all waste types and reactor configurations. Alternatively, it may indicate reactant mixing, caused by local turbulence at the oxidation fronts of these higher concentration waste streams, results in higher destruction efficiencies

  4. Investigation in justification of innovation supercritical water-cooled reactor - WWER-SCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, P.L.; Baranaev, Yu.D.; Bogoslovskaya, G.P.; Glebov, A.P.; Grabezhnaya, V.A.; Kartashov, K.V.; Klushin, A.V.; Popov, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art, gathered experience and development prospects of water-cooled reactors of next generation are considered. It is pointed out that development of SCWR is more attractive from the viewpoint of the basis principle of infrastructure - NPP adaptation without excessive investments. The results of experimental and calculational study of reactor installations on supercritical parameters (SCP) of water and freon are given. Consideration is given to the data on heat transfer at SCP of coolant, optimization of thermodynamic cycle, codes for thermohydraulic calculations, processes of heat and mass transfer at SCP, mass transfer and corrosion in SCP water, fuel elements and martials [ru

  5. Optimization of the fuel assembly for the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C.; Bonin, H.; Chan, P., E-mail: Corey.French@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A parametric optimization of the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) lattice geometry and fresh fuel content is performed in this work. With the potential to improve core physics and performance, significant gains to operating and safety margins could be achieved through slight progressions. The fuel performance codes WIMS-AECL and SERPENT are used to calculate performance factors, and use them as inputs to an optimization algorithm. (author)

  6. Supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel management and economic comparison and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming; Ruan Liangcheng; Liu Xuechun

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is expected to have an excellent fuel economical efficiency because of its high thermal efficiency. This article compares CSR1OOO with the current mainstream PWR and ABWR on the aspect of the economical efficiency of fuel management, and finally makes an unexpected conclusion that the SCWR has worse fuel economy than others. And it remains to be deliberated whether the SCWR will be the fourth generation of nuclear system. (authors)

  7. RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

    2003-04-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

  8. Research and development of the supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The concept of high temperature reactor cooled by light water (SCR) has been developed at the University of Tokyo since 1989. Major elements of reactor conceptual design and safety were studied. It includes fuel rod design, core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant heat balance, safety design, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start-up and stability. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical FPP in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil Fired Power Plants (FPP) will be fully utilized for SCR. Although the concept was developed at the University of Tokyo mostly with our own funds and resources, four funding was/is provided for the research in Japan so far. Those are TEPCO studies with Japanese vendors in 1994 and 1995. JSPS (Monbusho) funding of pulse radiolysis of supercritical water to the University of Tokyo, Japanese-NERI program of METI to Toshiba team on thermal hydraulics, corrosion and plant system and Japanese-NERI program of MEXT on water chemistry to the University of Tokyo. The concept was taken as the reference of HPLWR study in Europe with funding of EU in 2000 and 2001. The concept was evaluated in the Generation 4 reactor program in USA. It was selected as only one water-cooled Generation 4 reactor. This paper describes the overview of the conceptual design at the University of Tokyo and R and D in the world

  9. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  11. Thermo hydraulic analysis of narrow channel effect in supercritical-pressure light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Chen Juan; Cheng Wanxu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed thermal analysis with different narrow gaps between fuel rods is given. ► Special characteristics of narrow channels effect on heat transfer in supercritical pressure are shown. ► Reasonable size selection of gaps between fuel rods is proposed for SCWR. - Abstract: The size of the gap between fuel rods has important effects on flow and heat transfer in a supercritical-pressure light water reactor. Based on thermal analysis at different coolant flow rates, the reasonable value range of gap size between fuel rods is obtained, for which the maximum cladding temperature safety limits and installation technology are comprehensively considered. Firstly, for a given design flow rate of coolant, thermal hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactor with different gap sizes is provided by changing the fuel rod pitch only. The results show that, by means of reducing the gap size between fuel rods, the heat transfer coefficients between coolant and fuel rod, as well as the heat transfer coefficient between coolant and water rod, would both increase noticeably. Furthermore, the maximum cladding temperature will significantly decrease when the moderator temperature is decreased but coolant temperature remains essentially constant. Meanwhile, the reduction in the maximum cladding temperature in the inner assemblies is much larger than that in the outer assemblies. In addition, the maximum cladding temperature could be further reduced by means of increasing coolant flow rate for each gap size. Finally, the characteristics of narrow channels effect are proposed, and the maximum allowable gap between fuel rods is obtained by making full use of the enhancing narrow channels effect on heat transfer, and concurrently considering installation. This could provide a theoretical reference for supercritical-pressure light water reactor design optimization, in which the effects of gap size and flow rate on heat transfer are both considered.

  12. Optimization of a fuel bundle within a CANDU supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor is one of six nuclear reactor concepts being studied under the Generation IV International Forum. Generation IV nuclear reactors will improve the metrics of economics, sustainability, safety and reliability, and physical protection and proliferation resistance over current nuclear reactor designs. The supercritical water reactor has specific benefits in the areas of economics, safety and reliability, and physical protection. This work optimizes the fuel composition and bundle geometry to maximize the fuel burnup, and minimize the surface heat flux and the form factor. In optimizing these factors, improvements can be achieved in the areas of economics, safety and reliability of the supercritical water reactor. The WIMS-AECL software was used to model a fuel bundle within a CANDU supercritical water reactor. The Gauss' steepest descent method was used to optimize the above mentioned factors. Initially the fresh fuel composition was optimized within a 43-rod CANFLEX bundle and a 61-rod bundle. In both the 43-rod and 61-rod bundle scenarios an online refuelling scheme and non-refuelling scheme were studied. The geometry of the fuel bundles was then optimized. Finally, a homogeneous mixture of thorium and uranium fuel was studied in a 60-rod bundle. Each optimization process showed definitive improvements in the factors being studied, with the most significant improvement being an increase in the fuel burnup. The 43-rod CANFLEX bundle was the most successful at being optimized. There was little difference in the final fresh fuel content when comparing an online refuelling scheme and non-refuelling scheme. Through each optimization scenario the ratio of the fresh fuel content between the annuli was a significant determining cause in the improvements in the factors being optimized. The geometry optimization showed that improvement in the design of a fuel bundle is indeed possible, although it would be more advantageous to pursue it

  13. Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass in a Ceramic Reactor: Long-Time Batch Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Castello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical water gasification (SCWG is an emerging technology for the valorization of (wet biomass into a valuable fuel gas composed of hydrogen and/or methane. The harsh temperature and pressure conditions involved in SCWG (T > 375 °C, p > 22 MPa are definitely a challenge for the manufacturing of the reactors. Metal surfaces are indeed subject to corrosion under hydrothermal conditions, and expensive special alloys are needed to overcome such drawbacks. A ceramic reactor could be a potential solution to this issue. Finding a suitable material is, however, complex because the catalytic effect of the material can influence the gas yield and composition. In this work, a research reactor featuring an internal alumina inlay was utilized to conduct long-time (16 h batch tests with real biomasses and model compounds. The same experiments were also conducted in batch reactors made of stainless steel and Inconel 625. The results show that the three devices have similar performance patterns in terms of gas production, although in the ceramic reactor higher yields of C2+ hydrocarbons were obtained. The SEM observation of the reacted alumina surface revealed a good resistance of such material to supercritical conditions, even though some intergranular corrosion was observed.

  14. Core design of a high breeding fast reactor cooled by supercritical pressure light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Takayuki, E-mail: russell@ruri.waseda.jp; Yamaji, Akifumi

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Core design concept of supercritical light water cooled fast breeding reactor is developed. • Compound system doubling time (CSDT) is applied for considering an appropriate target of breeding performance. • Breeding performance is improved by reducing fuel rod diameter of the seed assembly. • Core pressure loss is reduced by enlarging the coolant channel area of the seed assembly. - Abstract: A high breeding fast reactor core concept, cooled by supercritical pressure light water has been developed with fully-coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations, which takes into account the influence of core pressure loss to the core neutronics characteristics. Design target of the breeding performance has been determined to be compound system doubling time (CSDT) of less than 50 years, by referring to the relationship of energy consumption and economic growth rate of advanced countries such as the G7 member countries. Based on the past design study of supercritical water cooled fast breeder reactor (Super FBR) with the concept of tightly packed fuel assembly (TPFA), further improvement of breeding performance and reduction of core pressure loss are investigated by considering different fuel rod diameters and coolant channel geometries. The sensitivities of CSDT and the core pressure loss with respect to major core design parameters have been clarified. The developed Super FBR design concept achieves fissile plutonium surviving ratio (FPSR) of 1.028, compound system doubling time (CSDT) of 38 years and pressure loss of 1.02 MPa with positive density reactivity (negative void reactivity). The short CSDT indicates high breeding performance, which may enable installation of the reactors at a rate comparable to energy growth rate of developed countries such as G7 member countries.

  15. Startup of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Tin Tin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The startup schemes of high-temperature reactors cooled and moderated by supercritical pressure light water (SCLWR-H) with square lattice and descending flow type water rods are studied by thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study, two kinds of startup systems are investigated. In the constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A flash tank and pressure reducing valves are necessary. The flash tank is designed so that the moisture content in the steam is less than 0.1%. In sliding pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a subcritical pressure. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for two-phase flow at startup. The separator is designed by referring to the water separator used in supercritical fossil-fired power plants. The maximum cladding surface temperature during the power-raising phase of startup is restricted not to exceed the rated value of 620degC. The minimum feedwater flow rate is 25% for constant pressure startup and 35% for sliding pressure startup system. It is found that both constant pressure startup system and sliding pressure startup system are feasible in SCLWR-H from the thermal hydraulic point of view. The core outlet temperature as high as 500degC can be achieved in the present design of SCLWR-H. Since the feedwater flow rate of SCLWR-H (1190 kg/s) is lower than that of the previous SCR designs the weight of the component required for startup is reduced. The sliding pressure startup system is better than constant pressure startup system in order to reduce the required component weight (and hence material expenditure) and to simplify the startup plant system. (author)

  16. IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Aksan, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

  17. Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass in a Ceramic Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castello, Daniele; Rolli, Birgit; Kruse, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    of stainless steel and Inconel 625. The results show that the three devices have similar performance patterns in terms of gas production, although in the ceramic reactor higher yields of C2+ hydrocarbons were obtained. The SEM observation of the reacted alumina surface revealed a good resistance...

  18. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L.; Espinosa P, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  19. Nuclear and thermal analyses of supercritical-water-cooled solid breeder blanket for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshihiko; Sato, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Kikuchi, Shigeto; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kosaku, Yasuo; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    Within a design study of a fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating technologies of fusion power plant, supercritical water is applied as a coolant of solid breeder blanket to attain high thermal efficiency. The blanket has multi-layer composed of solid breeder pebbles (Li{sub 2}O) and neutron multiplier pebbles (Be) which are radially separated by cooling panels. The first wall and the breeding region are cooled by supercritical water below and above the pseudo-critical temperature, respectively. Temperature distribution and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) have been estimated by one-dimensional nuclear and thermal calculations. The local TBR as high as 1.47 has been obtained after optimization of temperature distribution in the breeder region under the following conditions: neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m{sup 2}, {sup 6}Li enrichment of 30% and coolant temperature at inlet of breeder region of 380degC. In the case of the higher coolant temperature 430degC of the breeder region the local TBR was reduced to be 1.40. This means that the net TBR higher than 1.0 could be expected with the supercritical-water-cooled blanket, whose temperature distribution in the breeder region would be optimized by following the coolant temperature, and where a coverage of the breeder region is assumed to be 70%. (author)

  20. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  1. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  2. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  3. Numerical investigation of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor in horizontal rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang Zhi, E-mail: shangzhi@tsinghua.org.c [Faculty of Engineering, Kingston University, London SW15 3DW (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.co [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round rods and rod bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal rods and rod bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. In the rod bundle simulations, it is found that the geometry and orientation of the rod bundle have strong effects on the wall temperature distributions and heat transfers. In one orientation the square bundle has a higher wall temperature difference than other bundles. However, when the bundles are rotated by 90 deg. the highest wall temperature difference is found in the hexagon bundle. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  4. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  5. The research of materials and water chemistry for supercritical water-cooled reactors in Research Centre Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zychova, Marketa; Fukac, Rostislav; Vsolak, Rudolf; Vojacek, Ales; Ruzickova, Mariana; Vonkova, Katerina

    2012-09-01

    Research Centre Rez (CVR) is R and D company based in the Czech Republic. It was established as the subsidiary of the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. One of the main activities of CVR is the research of materials and chemistry for the generation IV reactor systems - especially the supercritical water-cooled one. For these experiments is CVR equipped by a supercritical water loop (SCWL) and a supercritical water autoclave (SCWA) serving for research of material and Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) environment compatibility experiments. SCWL is a research facility designed to material, water chemistry, radiolysis and other testing in SCWR environment, SCWA serves for complementary and supporting experiments. SCWL consists of auxiliary circuits (ensuring the required parameters as temperature, pressure and chemical conditions in the irradiation channel, purification and measurements) and irradiation channel (where specimens are exposed to the SCWR environment). The design of the loop is based on many years of experience with loop design for various types of corrosion/water chemistry experiments. Designed conditions in the test area of SCWL are 600 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL was designed in 2008 within the High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 project and built during 2008 and 2009. The trial operations were performed in 2010 and 2011 and were divided into three phases - the first phase to verify the functionality of auxiliary circuits of the loop, the second phase to verify the complete facility (auxiliary circuits and functional irradiation channel internals) and the third phase to verify the feasibility of corrosion tests with the complete equipment and specimens. All three trial operations were very successful - designed conditions and parameters were reached. (authors)

  6. Solvation in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T.; Karaborni, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the solvation structure in supercritical water composed with that in ambient water and in simple supercritical solvents. Molecular dynamics studies have been undertaken of systems that model ionic sodium and chloride, atomic argon, and molecular methanol in supercritical aqueous solutions using the simple point charge model of Berendsen for water. Because of the strong interactions between water and ions, ionic solutes are strongly attractive in supercritical water, forming large clusters of water molecules around each ion. Methanol is found to be a weakly-attractive solute in supercritical water. The cluster of excess water molecules surrounding a dissolved ion or polar molecule in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to the solvent clusters surrounding attractive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. Likewise, the deficit of water molecules surrounding a dissolved argon atom in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to that surrounding repulsive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in supercritical water was found to be about one third the number in ambient water. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule surrounding a central particle in supercritical water was only mildly affected by the identify of the central particle--atom, molecule, or ion. These results should be helpful in developing a qualitative understanding of important processes that occur in supercritical water. 29 refs., 6 figs

  7. CFD investigation of vertical rod bundles of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhi

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as the numerical simulation tool for the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The numerical simulation is based on the real full 3D rod bundles' geometry of the nuclear reactors. For satisfying the near-wall resolution of y + ≤ 1, the structure mesh with the stretched fine mesh near wall is employed. The validation of the numerical simulation for mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model for the heat transfer of supercritical water is carried out to compare with 3D tube experiments. After the validation, the same mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model are employed to study three types of the geometry frame of the real rod bundles. Through the numerical investigations, it is found that the different arrangement of the rod bundles will induce the different temperature distribution at the rods' walls. The wall temperature distributions are non-uniform along the wall and the values depend on the geometry frame. At the same flow conditions, downward flow gets higher wall temperature than upward flow. The hexagon geometry frame has the smallest wall temperature difference comparing with the others. The heat transfer is controlled by P/D ratio of the bundles.

  8. Analysing supercritical water reactor's (SCWR's) special safety systems using probabilistic tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ituen, I.; Novog, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of reactors, termed Generation IV, has very attractive features -- its superior safety characteristics, high thermal efficiency, and fuel cycle sustainability. A key element of the Generation IV designs is the improvement in safety, which in turn requires improvements in safety system performance and reliability, as well as a reduction in initiating event frequencies. This study compares the response of the systems important to safety in the CANDU-Supercritical Water Reactor to those of the generic CANDU under a main steamline break accident and loss of forced circulation events -- to quantify the improvements in safety for the pre-conceptual CANDU SCWR design. Probabilistic safety analysis is the tool used in this study to test the behavior of the pre- conceptual design during these events. (author)

  9. Operation and Performance of the Supercritical Fluids Reactor (SFR)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanush, R

    1996-01-01

    The Supercritical Fluids Reactor (SFR) at Sandia National Laboratories, CA has been developed to examine and solve engineering, process, and fundamental chemistry issues regarding the development of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO...

  10. Safety system consideration of a supercritical-water cooled fast reactor with simplified PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1999-01-01

    The probabilistic safety of the supercritical-water cooled fast reactor (SCFR) is evaluated with the simplified probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology. SCFR has a once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure. There are no recirculation loops in the once-through direct cycle system, which is the most important difference from the current light water reactor (LWR). The main objective of the present study is to assess the effect of this difference on the safety in the stage of conceptual design study. A safety system configuration similar to the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is employed. At loss of flow events, no natural recirculation occurs. Thus, emergency core flow should be quickly supplied before the completion of the feedwater pump coastdown at a loss of flow accident. The motor-driven high pressure coolant injection (MD-HPCI) system cannot be used for the quick core cooling due to the delay of the emergency diesel generator (D/G) start-up. Accordingly, an MD-HPCI system in an ABWR is substituted by a turbine-driven (TD-) HPCI system for the SCFR. The calculated core damage frequency (CDF) is a little higher than that of the Japanese ABWR and a little lower than that of the Japanese BWR when Japanese data are employed for initiating event frequencies. Four alternatives to the safety system configurations are also examined as a sensitivity analysis. This shows that the balance of the safety systems designed here is adequate. Consequently, though the SCFR has a once-through coolant system, the CDF is not high due to the diversity of feedwater systems as the direct cycle characteristics

  11. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.

    2006-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  12. Development of out-of-core concepts for a supercritical-water, pressure-tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the Generation IV programs at Chalk River Laboratories has as its prime focus the development of out-of-core concepts for the SuperCritical Water (SCW) pressure tube reactor under development in Canada. A number of technical issues associated with the interface of out-of-core components and the pressure tubes of a SCW pressure tube reactor are being investigated. This article focuses on several aspects of out-of-core components and layouts, building upon concepts that have been developed during the past few years. The efforts are strongly focused on concepts for a fuel channel that can be fabricated with the tight lattice pitch (typically 230 to 250 mm) that may be required for some applications such as utilization of a thorium fuel cycle. It is not practical to adapt concepts with a tight lattice pitch while using the thicker materials required for the higher temperatures and pressures required for supercritical operation. A change in lattice pitch or configuration is required to accommodate the component size increases. This presentation will cover a number of new concepts developed to produce feeders and end fittings for the harsh conditions of a SCW pressure tube reactor. These components are then developed into conceptual models of a Gen IV pressure tube reactor mounted in both horizontal and vertical orientations. Full 3-D solid models of both concepts will be demonstrated as well as a 1/10th-scale model of one face of a horizontal concept that has been built from components made with a 3-D printer. (author)

  13. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Shang, E-mail: zhi.shang@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.com [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In a vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in a horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-{epsilon} turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculation region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  14. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Zhi; Lo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-ε turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculating region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR. (author)

  15. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  16. Present status of study on super-critical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ookawa, Masahiro; Shiga, Shigenori; Moriya, Kumiaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Suguru; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    Reactor structure design, the core design and coolant flow in sub-channel of fuel assembly are evaluated in the subtitle of plant concepts of the 2002 fiscal year. High temperature parts and high pressure parts are separated on the reactor structure design. Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is designed under the condition of low temperature and high pressure, while, apparatuses and instruments in the reactor core are designed under the condition of high temperature and low pressure. Design of control rods for cold shut down of the reactor are estimated by using monte carlo computation code (MCNP). It reveals that the number of 16 control rods (0.7 cm in dia) per a fuel assembly is needed for getting control rod worth of conventional light water reactor. Radial power peaking factor reduces to 1.27 by using a load pattern of fuel assembly, number and load position of fuel elements with burnable poison and control rod pattern. Distributions of coolant flow rate in the fuel assembly are studied by sub-channel analysis code, SILFEED, for BWR. The fuel assembly with 1.0 mm gaps between fuel rod and water keeps an uniform flow distribution in which no sub-channel below 90% of flow rate appears in the fuel assembly. Heat transfer experiments for a single test fuel are carried out in the subtitle of heat transfer. The heat transfer data obtained by the experiments are fitted well to Watts' formula. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) for SUS 304 and SUS 316L steels in the subtitle of materials are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the materials under the super-critical pressure water environment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) takes place in SUS 304, but doesn't take place in SUS 316L. (M. Suetake)

  17. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  18. Control of Canadian once-through direct cycle supercritical water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Peiwei; Wang, Baosheng; Zhang, Jianmin; Su, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic characteristics of Canadian SCWR are analyzed. • Hybrid feedforward and feedback control is adopted to deal with cross-coupling. • Gain scheduling control with smooth weight is applied to deal with nonlinearity. • It demonstrates through simulation that the control requirements are satisfied. - Abstract: Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) can be modelled as a Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) system. It has a high power-to-flow ratio, strong cross-coupling and high degree of nonlinearity in its dynamic characteristics. Among the outputs, the steam temperature is strongly affected by the reactor power and the most challenging to control. It is difficult to adopt a traditional control system design methodology to obtain a control system with satisfactory performance. In this paper, feedforward control is applied to reduce the effect on steam temperature from the reactor power. Single-input Single-output (SISO) feedback controllers are synthesized in the frequency domain. Using the feedforward controller, the steam temperature variation due to disturbances at the reactor power has been significantly suppressed. The control system can effectively maintain the overall system stability and regulate the plant around a specified operating condition. To deal with the nonlinearities, gain scheduling control strategy is adopted. Different sets of controllers combined by smooth weight functions are used for the plant at different load conditions. The proposed control strategies have been evaluated under various operating scenarios. Simulation results show that satisfactory performance can successfully achieved by the designed control system

  19. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veriansyah, Bambang [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: vaveri@kist.re.kr; Kim, Jae-Duck [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jdkim@kist.re.kr; Lee, Jong-Chol [Agency for Defense Development (ADD), P.O. Box 35-1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jcleeadd@hanafos.com

    2007-08-17

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion.

  20. Evaluation of tubular reactor designs for supercritical water oxidation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for industrial waste treatment and is being developed for treatment of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes. In the SCWO process, wastes containing organic material are oxidized in the presence of water at conditions of temperature and pressure above the critical point of water, 374 C and 22.1 MPa. DOE mixed wastes consist of a broad spectrum of liquids, sludges, and solids containing a wide variety of organic components plus inorganic components including radionuclides. This report is a review and evaluation of tubular reactor designs for supercritical water oxidation of US Department of Energy mixed waste. Tubular reactors are evaluated against requirements for treatment of US Department of Energy mixed waste. Requirements that play major roles in the evaluation include achieving acceptable corrosion, deposition, and heat removal rates. A general evaluation is made of tubular reactors and specific reactors are discussed. Based on the evaluations, recommendations are made regarding continued development of supercritical water oxidation reactors for US Department of Energy mixed waste

  1. Optimization of the fuel assembly for the Canadian SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C., E-mail: Corey.French@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bonin, H.; Chan, P.K. [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    An approach to develop a parametric optimization tool to support the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) fuel design is presented in this work. The 2D benchmark lattices for 78-pin and 64-pin fuel assemblies are used as the initial models from which fuel performance and subsequent optimization stem from. A tandem optimization procedure is integrated which employs the steepest descent method. The physics codes WIMS-AECL, MCNP6 and SERPENT are used to calculate and verify select performance factors. The results are used as inputs to an optimization algorithm that yield optimal fresh fuel isotopic composition and lattice geometry. Preliminary results on verifications of infinite lattice reactivity are demonstrated in this paper. (author)

  2. Research and development of supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Katsumi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The SCWR is an innovative LWR operating at supercritical pressure with a once-through direct cycle. It has the potential advantage of low capital cost due to its high thermal efficiency and substantial plant system simplifications. This paper outlines the completed and on-going R and D in Japan, and describes plans of the next phase projects for SCWR development. The concept was born at the University of Tokyo fifteen years ago. After a feasibility study by an industry team, a project for key technology development and plant conceptual design was launched in fiscal year (FY) 2000 funded by METI, followed by another project for fundamental study on supercritical water chemistry under radiation field and an I-NERI project for material development, and was completed in FY 2004 presenting an SCWR plant concept. To advance and optimize the plant concept, a new project is proposed in Japan. In addition, another project for developing the SCWR with fast spectrum core is proposed. The SCWR concept has acquired worldwide interest and was selected as one of the six Generation IV nuclear energy systems under GIF Program in FY 2002, and international collaboration for the SCWR RD and D is being established with an aggressive target of constructing a prototype reactor in the next fifteen years. The projects in Japan are expected to promote the development of the SCWR and to contribute the GIF activities. (author)

  3. Development of a porous wall reactor for Oxidation in Supercritical Water. Hydrodynamic Modelling and application to salty wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvel, E.

    2002-01-01

    This report deals with a transpiring wall reactor for supercritical water oxidation of organic effluents. The singularity of the reactor lies on the inner porous tube made of alumina to minimise both limiting problems, corrosion and salt precipitation. The presence of the inner tube implies a rather complex hydrodynamics. Thus, an hydrodynamic study was performed, in an original way, in a supercritical fluid using the method of the residence time distribution. It enabled to determine the hydrodynamic model of the reactor. Moreover, an inspecting device of the resistance of the inner tube to thermal gradients was developed. Lastly, the performances of the transpiring wall reactor were tested on model compounds such as sodium sulphate and the mixture of dodecane/tributylphosphate. (author) [fr

  4. Thermal aspects of mixed oxide fuel in application to supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.; Peiman, W.; Rodriguez-Prado, A.; Villamere, B.; Mikhael, S.; Allison, L.; Pioro, I., E-mail: lisa.grande@mycampus.uoit.ca, E-mail: igor.pioro@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs) are a renewed technology being developed as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts. This reactor type uses a light water coolant at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. These elevated operating conditions will improve Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermal efficiencies by 10 - 15% compared to those of current NPPs. Also, SCWRs will have the ability to utilize a direct cycle, thus decreasing NPP capital and operational costs. The SCWR core has 2 configurations: 1) Pressure Vessel (PV) -type enclosing a fuel assembly and 2) Pressure Tube (PT) -type consisting of individual pressurized channels containing fuel bundles. Canada and Russia are developing PT-type SCWRs. In particular, the Canadian SCWR reactor has an output of 1200 MW{sub el} and will operate at a pressure of 25 MPa with inlet and outlet fuel-channel temperatures of 350 and 625°C, respectively. These extreme operating conditions require alternative fuels and materials to be investigated. Current CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor fuel-channel design is based on the use of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) fuel; zirconium alloy sheath (clad) bundle, pressure and calandria tubes. Alternative fuels should be considered to supplement depleting world uranium reserves. This paper studies general thermal aspects of using Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel in an Inconel-600 sheath in a generic PT-type SCWR. The bulk fluid, sheath and fuel centerline temperatures along with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were calculated at uniform and non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs). (author)

  5. Destruction of an industrial wastewater by supercritical water oxidation in a transpiring wall reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermejo, M.D.; Cocero, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a technology that takes advantage of the special properties of water in the surroundings of critical point of water to completely oxidize wastes in residence times lower than 1 min. The problems caused by the harsh operational conditions of the SCWO process are being solved by new reactor designs, such as the transpiring wall reactor (TWR). In this work, the operational parameters of a TWR have been studied for the treatment of an industrial wastewater. As a result, the process has been optimized for a feed flow of 16 kg/h with feed inlet temperatures higher than 300 deg. C and transpiring flow relation (R) between 0.2 and 0.6 working with an 8% (w/w) isopropanol (IPA) as a fuel. The experimental data and a mathematical model have been applied for the destruction of an industrial waste containing acetic acid and crotonaldehyde as main compounds. As the model predicted, removal efficiencies higher than 99.9% were obtained, resulting in effluents with 2 ppm total organic carbon (TOC) at feed flow of 16 kg/h, 320 deg. C of feed temperature and R = 0.32. An effluent TOC of 35 ppm under conditions feed flow of 18 kg/h, feed inlet temperatures of 290 deg. C, reaction temperatures of 570 deg. C and R = 0.6

  6. Development of a test facility for analyzing transients in supercritical water-cooled reactors by fractional scaling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, Thiago D., E-mail: thiagodbtr@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN—RJ), Rua Hélio de Almeida, 75 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro Caixa-Postal: 68550, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Mário A. B. da, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (CTG/UFPE), Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 1000, Recife 50740-540, PE (Brazil); Lapa, Celso M.F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN—RJ), Rua Hélio de Almeida, 75 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro Caixa-Postal: 68550, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of performing experiments using water under supercritical conditions is limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids that are characterized by feasible supercritical conditions, that is, lower critical pressure and critical temperature. Experimental investigations are normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids reliably represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine the model fluids that represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. Recently, a similar technique known as fractional scaling analysis was developed to establish the conditions under which experiments can be performed using models that represent transients in prototypes. This paper presents a fractional scaling analysis application to determine parameters for a test facility in which transient conditions in supercritical water-cooled reactors are simulated by using carbon dioxide as a model fluid, whose critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. Similarity is obtained between water (prototype) and carbon dioxide (model) by depressurization in a simple vessel. The main parameters required for the construction of a future test facility are obtained using the proposed method.

  7. Development of a test facility for analyzing transients in supercritical water-cooled reactors by fractional scaling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Silva, Mário A. B. da; Lapa, Celso M.F.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of performing experiments using water under supercritical conditions is limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids that are characterized by feasible supercritical conditions, that is, lower critical pressure and critical temperature. Experimental investigations are normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids reliably represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine the model fluids that represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. Recently, a similar technique known as fractional scaling analysis was developed to establish the conditions under which experiments can be performed using models that represent transients in prototypes. This paper presents a fractional scaling analysis application to determine parameters for a test facility in which transient conditions in supercritical water-cooled reactors are simulated by using carbon dioxide as a model fluid, whose critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. Similarity is obtained between water (prototype) and carbon dioxide (model) by depressurization in a simple vessel. The main parameters required for the construction of a future test facility are obtained using the proposed method.

  8. Corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy. Supercritical Water (SCW) has never been used in nuclear power applications. There are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of SCWR will be between 553 K and 893 K with a pressure of 25 MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. Austenitic Fe-base steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel was selected for possible use in supercritical water systems. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in SCW is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in SCW. The SCW corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520T) by using a SCW autoclave. The 1520S and 1520T are the first trial production materials of SCWR cladding candidate material in our group. Corrosion and compatibility tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520T steels in supercritical water were performed at 673, 773 and 600degC with exposures up to 1000 h. We have evaluated the amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale after the corrosion test in SCW for 1520S and 1520T austenitic steels. After 1000 h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m 2 at 400degC and 500degC. But 1520T weight increases more and weight loss than 1520S at 600degC. The SEM observation result of the surface after 1000 h corrosion of an test

  9. Reacting flow simulations of supercritical water oxidation of PCB-contaminated transformer oil in a pilot plant reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marulanda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The scale-up of a supercritical water oxidation process, based on recent advancements in kinetic aspects, reactor configuration and optimal operational conditions, depends on the research and development of simulation tools, which allow the designer not only to understand the complex multiphysics phenomena that describe the system, but also to optimize the operational parameters to attain the best profit for the process and guarantee its safe operation. Accordingly, this paper reports a multiphysics simulation with the CFD software Comsol Multiphysics 3.3 of a pilot plant reactor for the supercritical water oxidation of a heavily PCB-contaminated mineral transformer oil. The proposed model was based on available information for the kinetic aspects of the complex mixture and the optimal operational conditions obtained in a lab-scale continuous supercritical water oxidation unit. The pilot plant simulation results indicate that it is not feasible to scale-up directly the optimal operational conditions obtained in the isothermal lab-scale experiments, due to the excess heat released by the exothermic oxidation reactions that result in outlet temperatures higher than 600°C, even at reactor inlet temperatures as low as 400°C. Consequently, different alternatives such as decreasing organic flowrates or a new reactor set-up with multiple oxidant injections should be considered to guarantee a safe operation.

  10. Feasibility analysis of modified AL-6XN steel for structure component application in supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinggang LI; Qingzhi YAN; Rong MA; Haoqiang WANG; Changchun GE

    2009-01-01

    Modified AL-6XN austenite steel was patterned after AL-6XN superaustenitic stainless steel by introducing microalloy elements such as zirconium and titanium in order to adapt to recrystallizing thermo-mechanical treatment and further improve crevice corrosion resistance. Modified AL-6XN exhibited comparable tensile strength, and superior plasticity and impact toughness to commercial AL-6XN steel. The effects of aging behavior on corrosion resistance and impact toughness were measured to evaluate the qualification of modified AL-6XN steel as an in-core component and cladding material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Attention should be paid to degradation in corrosion resistance and impact toughness after aging for 50 hours when modified AL-6XN steel is considered as one of the candidate materials for in-core components and cladding tubes in supercritical water-cooled reactors.

  11. Study on the LLFPs transmutation in a super-critical water-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Haoliang; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Transmutation of LLFPs with a super-criticial water cooled fast reactor. → Transmutation of iodine and cesium without the isotopic separation. → The transmuted isotope was mixed with UO 2 to reduce the effect of self-shielding. → A weak neutron moderator Al 2 O 3 was used to suppress the creation of 135 Cs from 133 Cs. - Abstract: The performance of the super-critical water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) for the transmutation treatment of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) was evaluated. Two regions with the soft neutron spectrum, which is of great benefit to the LLFPs transmutation, can be utilized in the Super FR. First region is in the blanket assembly due to the ZrH 1.7 layer which was utilized to slow down the fast neutrons to achieve a negative void reactivity. Second region is in the reflector region of core like other metal-cooled fast reactors. The LLFPs selected in the transmutation analysis include 99 Tc, 129 I and 135 Cs discharged from LWR or fast reactor. Their isotopes, such as 127 I, 133 Cs, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were also considered to avoid the separation. By loading the isotopes ( 99 Tc or 127 I and 129 I) in the blanket assembly and the reflector region simultaneously, the transmutation rates of 5.36%/GWe year and 2.79%/GWe year can be obtained for 99 Tc and 129 I, respectively. The transmuted amounts of 99 Tc and 129 I are equal to the yields from 11.8 and 6.2 1000 MWe-class PWRs. Because of the very low capture cross section of 135 Cs and the effect of other cesium isotopes, 135 Cs was loaded with three rings of assemblies in the reflector region to make the transmuted amount be larger than the yields of two 1000 MWe-class PWRs. Based on these results, 99 Tc and 129 I can be transmuted conveniently and higher transmutation performance can be obtained in the Super FR. However, the transmutation of 135 Cs is very difficult and the transmuted amount is less than that produced by the Super FR. It turns out that the

  12. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  13. Coupled 3D neutron kinetics and thermalhydraulic characteristics of the Canadian supercritical water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, David William, E-mail: hummeld@mcmaster.ca; Novog, David Raymond

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • A coupled spatial kinetics and thermalhydraulics model of the PT-SCWR was created. • Positive power excursions were demonstrated during accident-like transients. • The reactor will inherently self-shutdown in such transients with some delay. • A fast-acting shutdown system would limit the consequences of the power pulse. - Abstract: The Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor concept, as an evolution of the CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactor, includes both pressure tubes and a low temperature heavy water moderator. The current Pressure Tube type SCWR (PT-SCWR) concept features 64-element fuel assemblies placed within High Efficiency Re-entrant Channels (HERCs) that connect to core inlet and outlet plena. Among current SCWR concepts the PT-SCWR is unique in that the HERC separates multiple coolant and moderator regions, giving rise to coupled neutronic-thermalhydraulic feedbacks beyond those present in CANDU or contemporary Light Water Reactors. The objective of this work was thus to model the coupled neutronic-thermal hydraulic properties of the PT-SCWR to establish the impact of these multiple regions on the core's transient behavior. To that end, the features of the PT-SCWR were first modeled with the neutron transport code DRAGON to create a database of homogenized and condensed cross-sections and thermalhydraulic feedback coefficients. These were used as input to a core-level neutron diffusion model created with the code DONJON. The behavior of the primary heat transport system was modeled with the thermalhydraulic system code CATHENA. A procedure was developed to couple the outputs of DONJON and CATHENA, facilitating three-dimensional spatial neutron kinetics and coupled thermalhydraulic analysis of the PT-SCWR core. Several postulated transients were initiated within the coupled model by changing the core inlet and outlet boundary conditions. Decreasing coolant density around the fuel was demonstrated to produce positive

  14. Safety analysis of high temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes 'Safety' of a high temperature supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor (SCRLWR-H) with descending flow water rods. The safety system of the SCLWR-H is similar to that of a BWR. It consists of reactor scram, high pressure auxiliary feedwater system (AFS), low pressure core injection system (LPCI), safety relief valves (SRV), automatic depressurization system (ADS), and main steam isolation valves (MSIV). Ten types of transients and five types of accidents are analyzed using a plant transient analysis code SPRAT-DOWN. The sequences are determined referring to LWRs. At the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' transient, the coolant density and the core power are increased by the over-pressurization, and at the same time the core flow rate is decreased by the closure of the turbine control valves. The peak cladding temperature increases to 727degC. The high temperature at this type of transient is one of the characteristics of the SCLWR-H. Conversely at 'feedwater-loss' events, the core power decrease to some extend by density feedback before the reactor scram. The peak cladding temperatures at the 'Partial loss of feedwater' transient and the 'Total loss of feedwater' accident are only 702degC and 833degC, respectively. The cladding temperature does not increase so much at the transients 'Loss of feedwater heating' and 'CR withdrawal' because of the operation of the plant control system. All the transients and accidents satisfy the satisfy criteria with good margins. The highest cladding temperatures of the transients and the accidents are 727degC and 833degC at the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' and 'Total loss of feedwater', respectively. The duration of the high cladding temperature is very short at the transients. According to the parametric survey, the peak cladding temperature are sensitive to the parameters such as the pump coast-down time, delay of pump trip, AFS capacity, AFS delay, CR worth, and SRV setpoint

  15. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide turbomachinery design for water-cooled Small Modular Reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jekyoung; Lee, Jeong Ik; Yoon, Ho Joon; Cha, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We described the concept of coupling the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle to the water-cooled SMRs. • We describe a turbomachinery design code called KAISD T MD that can use real gases too. • We suggest changes to the S-CO 2 cycle layout with multiple-independent shafts. • KAIST T MD was used to design the turbomachinery of suggested layout. - Abstract: The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO 2 ) Brayton cycle has been gaining attention due to its compactness and high efficiency at moderate turbine inlet temperature. Previous S-CO 2 cycle research works in the field of nuclear engineering were focused on its application to the next generation reactor with higher turbine inlet temperature than the existing conventional water-cooled nuclear power plants. However, it was shown in authors’ previous paper that the advantages of the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle can be also further applied to the water-cooled Small Modular Reactor (SMR) with a success, since SMR requires minimal overall footprint while retaining high performance. One of the major issues in the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle is the selection and design of appropriate turbomachinery for the designed cycle. Because most of the nuclear industry uses incompressible working fluids or ideal gases in the turbomachinery, a more detailed examination of the design of the turbomachinery is required for a power system that uses S-CO 2 as working fluid. This is because the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle high efficiency is the result of the non-ideal variation of properties near the CO 2 critical point. Thus, the major focus of this paper is to suggest the design of the turbomachinery necessary for the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle coupled to water cooled SMRs. For this reason, a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle turbomachinery design methodology was suggested and the suggested design methodology was first tested with the existing experimental data to verify its capability. After then, it was applied to the proposed reference system to demonstrate its

  16. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide turbomachinery design for water-cooled Small Modular Reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jekyoung, E-mail: leejaeky85@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon, E-mail: hojoon.yoon@kustar.ac.ae [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cha, Jae Eun, E-mail: jecha@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We described the concept of coupling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle to the water-cooled SMRs. • We describe a turbomachinery design code called KAISD{sub T}MD that can use real gases too. • We suggest changes to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle layout with multiple-independent shafts. • KAIST{sub T}MD was used to design the turbomachinery of suggested layout. - Abstract: The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been gaining attention due to its compactness and high efficiency at moderate turbine inlet temperature. Previous S-CO{sub 2} cycle research works in the field of nuclear engineering were focused on its application to the next generation reactor with higher turbine inlet temperature than the existing conventional water-cooled nuclear power plants. However, it was shown in authors’ previous paper that the advantages of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can be also further applied to the water-cooled Small Modular Reactor (SMR) with a success, since SMR requires minimal overall footprint while retaining high performance. One of the major issues in the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is the selection and design of appropriate turbomachinery for the designed cycle. Because most of the nuclear industry uses incompressible working fluids or ideal gases in the turbomachinery, a more detailed examination of the design of the turbomachinery is required for a power system that uses S-CO{sub 2} as working fluid. This is because the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle high efficiency is the result of the non-ideal variation of properties near the CO{sub 2} critical point. Thus, the major focus of this paper is to suggest the design of the turbomachinery necessary for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to water cooled SMRs. For this reason, a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle turbomachinery design methodology was suggested and the suggested design methodology was first tested with the existing experimental data to verify its capability. After then, it was

  17. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of heat transfer in subchannels of the European high performance supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor for different CFD turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Landy Y.; Rojas, Leorlen Y.; Gamez, Abel; Rosales, Jesus; Gonzalez, Daniel; Garcia, Carlos, E-mail: lcastro@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: agamezgmf@gmail.com, E-mail: jrosales@instec.cu, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Oliveira, Carlos Brayner de, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dominguez, Dany S., E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional

    2015-07-01

    Chosen as one of six Generation‒IV nuclear-reactor concepts, Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are expected to have high thermal efficiencies within the range of 45 - 50% owing to the reactor's high pressures and outlet temperatures. In this reactor, the primary water enters the core under supercritical-pressure condition (25 MPa) at a temperature of 280 deg C and leaves it at a temperature of up to 510 deg C. Due to the significant changes in the physical properties of water at supercritical-pressure, the system is susceptible to local temperature, density and power oscillations. The behavior of supercritical water into the core of the SCWR, need to be sufficiently studied. Most of the methods available to predict the effects of the heat transfer phenomena within the pseudocritical region are based on empirical one-directional correlations, which do not capture the multidimensional effects and do not provide accurate results in regions such as the deteriorated heat transfer regime. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water flows in sub-channels of a typical European High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) fuel assembly using commercial CFD code CFX-14. It was determined the steady-state equilibrium parameters and calculated the temperature and density distributions. A comparative study for different turbulence models were carried out and the obtained results are discussed. (author)

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of heat transfer in subchannels of the European high performance supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor for different CFD turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Landy Y.; Rojas, Leorlen Y.; Gamez, Abel; Rosales, Jesus; Gonzalez, Daniel; Garcia, Carlos; Oliveira, Carlos Brayner de; Dominguez, Dany S.

    2015-01-01

    Chosen as one of six Generation‒IV nuclear-reactor concepts, Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are expected to have high thermal efficiencies within the range of 45 - 50% owing to the reactor's high pressures and outlet temperatures. In this reactor, the primary water enters the core under supercritical-pressure condition (25 MPa) at a temperature of 280 deg C and leaves it at a temperature of up to 510 deg C. Due to the significant changes in the physical properties of water at supercritical-pressure, the system is susceptible to local temperature, density and power oscillations. The behavior of supercritical water into the core of the SCWR, need to be sufficiently studied. Most of the methods available to predict the effects of the heat transfer phenomena within the pseudocritical region are based on empirical one-directional correlations, which do not capture the multidimensional effects and do not provide accurate results in regions such as the deteriorated heat transfer regime. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water flows in sub-channels of a typical European High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) fuel assembly using commercial CFD code CFX-14. It was determined the steady-state equilibrium parameters and calculated the temperature and density distributions. A comparative study for different turbulence models were carried out and the obtained results are discussed. (author)

  19. Code Development in Coupled PARCS/RELAP5 for Supercritical Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The new capability is added to the existing coupled code package PARCS/RELAP5, in order to analyze SCWR design under supercritical pressure with the separated water coolant and moderator channels. This expansion is carried out on both codes. In PARCS, modification is focused on extending the water property tables to supercritical pressure, modifying the variable mapping input file and related code module for processing thermal-hydraulic information from separated coolant/moderator channels, and modifying neutronics feedback module to deal with the separated coolant/moderator channels. In RELAP5, modification is focused on incorporating more accurate water properties near SCWR operation/transient pressure and temperature in the code. Confirming tests of the modifications is presented and the major analyzing results from the extended codes package are summarized.

  20. A Conceptual Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor Design Using a Cruciform Solid Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Bae, Kang Mok; Yoo, Jae Woon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man; Bae, Yoon Yong

    2006-01-15

    A Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor(SCWR) concept proposed by Gen-IV has an advantage of a high thermal efficiency. However, there are some difficulties in neutronic core design for a SCWR due to lower moderator density resulting from the high operating temperature over the pseudo-critical temperature. In this report, the design concepts for the fuel assembly and the core for a SCWR were described as a feasibility study on the SCWR core design. HELIOS lattice code which will be used for group constants generation was verified for the application to the low coolant density condition of a SCWR. The TAF module for a thermal hydraulic feedback in MASTER was modified to consider high pressure and temperature of the supercritical coolant with single-phase fluid. A cruciform ZrH{sub 2} solid moderator was proposed for the SCWR fuel assembly design to compensate the lower coolant density. The axial zoning concept with three different enrichments for a fuel rod was used for the axial power shape control. Gadolinia burnable poison rods were used to reduce excess reactivity. Control rod system was grouped into 6 banks to control the excess reactivity of the core during normal operation. An orifice concept for each assembly was applied to control a coolant flow rate individually. As a result of the neutronic analysis for the equilibrium SCWR core, the maximum linear heat generation rete limit was satisfied and the maximum coolant temperature of the core outlet was {approx}590 .deg. C which is lower than 620 .deg. C of the maximum clad temperature limit.

  1. Ion exchange resins destruction in a stirred supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A.; Guichardon, P.; Boutin, O.

    2010-01-01

    Spent ion exchange resins (IERs) are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation offers a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins, used to remove radioactivity. Up to now, studies carried out in supercritical water for IER destruction showed that degradation rates higher than 99% are difficult to obtain even using a catalyst or a large oxidant excess. In this study, a co-fuel, isopropanol, has been used in order to improve degradation rates by initiating the oxidation reaction and increasing temperature of the reaction medium. Concentrations up to 20 wt% were tested for anionic and cationic resins. Total organic carbon reduction rates higher than 99% were obtained from this process, without the use of a catalyst. The influence of operating parameters such as IERs feed concentration, nature and counterions of exchanged IERs were also studied. (authors)

  2. Study on neutronics performance of flower shape advanced supercritical water cooled fast reactor with different solid moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Li Zhifeng; Xie Jinsen; Peng Honghua

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical water cooled fast reactors worked at such harsh condition with high temperature and high pressure, huge hydrogen balance pressure and thermal shock can result in a great loss of hydrogen. The released hydrogen would be out of control under accident situations. K_e_f_f, conversion ratio, moderator temperature effect, Doppler effect and void effect of different material such as ZrH_1_._7, Bp, BeO, C and SiC are discussed. BeO and SiC hold better integrated performance among these materials. Besides, moderators have less effect on the Doppler effect of fuel. (authors)

  3. A study on physical characteristics of supercritical light - water reactor loaded with (232U-238Th-238U) oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, E. G.; Shmelev, A. N.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, G. G.

    2007-01-01

    The attractiveness of using (U-Th)-fuel in supercritical light water reactor is considered. The dilution of 2 33U in 2 38U is proposed with the purpose of increasing non-proliferation of this fissile isotope. Comparison of different fuel compositions is accomplished from the point of view of fissile isotope breeding and achieved burn-up; parasitic neutron absorption cross-sections are also compared. It is analyzed the impact for neutron balance of both cladding materials: zirconium alloy and stainless steel

  4. 2D and 3D CFD modelling of a reactive turbulent flow in a double shell supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.; Roubaud, A.; Fournel, B.; Joussot-Dubien, C.; Boutin, O.; Guichardon, P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to design and define appropriate dimensions for a supercritical oxidation reactor, a comparative 2D and 3D simulation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer during an oxidation process has been performed. The solver used is a commercial code, Fluent 6.2 (R). The turbulent flow field in the reactor, created by the stirrer, is taken into account with a k-omega model and a swirl imposed to the fluid. In the 3D case the rotation of the stirrer can be modelled using the sliding mesh model and the moving reference frame model. This work allows comparing 2D and 3D velocity and heat transfer calculations. The predicted values (mainly species concentrations and temperature profiles) are of the same order in both cases. The reactivity of the system is taken into account with a classical Eddy Dissipation Concept combustion model. Comparisons with experimental temperature measurements validate the ability of the CFD modelling to simulate the supercritical water oxidation reactive medium. Results indicate that the flow can be considered as plug flow-like and that heat transfer is strongly enhanced by the stirring. (authors)

  5. Thermal and stability considerations for a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor during power-raising phase of plant startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes thermal analyses and linear stability analyses of the Supercritical Water-cooled Fast Reactor with 'two-path' flow scheme during the power-raising phase of plant startup. For thermal consideration, the same criterion of the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) as applied to the normal operating condition is used. For thermal-hydraulic stability consideration, the decay ratio of 0.5 is applied, which is taken from BWRs. Firstly, we calculated the flow rate distribution among the parallel flow paths from the reactor vessel inlet nozzles to the mixing plenum below the core using a system analysis code. The parallel flow paths consist of the seed fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow, the blanket fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow and the downcomer. Then, the MCSTs are estimated for various reactor powers and feedwater flow rates with system analyses. The decay ratios are estimated with linear stability analyses. The available range of the reactor power and feedwater flow rate to satisfy the thermal and stability criteria is obtained. (author)

  6. Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty for the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor II: Full core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, S.E.; Buijs, A.; Pencer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H-2, Pu-239, and Th-232 make large contributions to SCWR modelling sensitivity. • H-2, Pu-239, and Th-232 make large contributions to SCWR modelling uncertainty. • Isotopes of Zr make large contributions to SCWR modelling uncertainty. - Abstract: Uncertainties in nuclear data are a fundamental source of uncertainty in reactor physics calculations. To determine their contribution to uncertainties in calculated reactor physics parameters, a nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty study is performed on the Canadian supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to the neutron multiplication factor k eff are 6.31 mk for the SCWR at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and 6.99 mk at the end of cycle (EOC). Both of these uncertainties have a statistical uncertainty of 0.02 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) are 1.0 mk and 0.9 mk for BOC and EOC, respectively, both with statistical uncertainties of 0.1 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to other reactivity parameters range from as low as 3% of to as high as ten times the values of the reactivity coefficients. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in the reactor physics parameters are Pu-239, Th-232, H-2, and isotopes of zirconium

  7. Upgrading of bitumen using supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayukawa, T. [JGC Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation outlined the technical and economic aspects of thermal cracking by supercritical water. Supercritical water (SCW) is a commonly used method for upgrading heavy oil to produce pipeline-transportable oil from high-viscous bitumen. The process uses water and does not require hydrogen nor catalysts. Pre-heated bitumen and water enter a vertical reactor with flows of counter current at the supercritical point of water. The upgraded synthetic crude oil (SCO) and pitch are obtained from the top of the reactor when the bitumen is thermally cracked. Bench-scale studies have shown that Canadian oil sands bitumen can be converted to 80 volume per cent of SCO and 20 volume per cent of pitch. The SCO has satisfied Canadian pipeline specifications in terms of API gravity and kinetic viscosity. The kinetic viscosity of the pitch has also satisfied boiler fuel specifications. tabs., figs.

  8. Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

  9. Physical aspects of the Canadian generation IV supercritical water-cooled pressure tube reactor plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudet, M.; Yetisir, M.; Haque, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The form of the containment building is a function of the requirements imposed by various systems. In order to provide sufficient driving force for naturally-circulated emergency cooling systems, as well as providing a gravity-driven core flooding pool function, the Canadian SCWR reactor design relies on elevation differences between the reactor and the safety systems. These elevation differences, the required cooling pool volumes and the optimum layout of safety-related piping are major factors influencing the plant design. As a defence-in-depth, the containment building and safety systems also provide successive barriers to the unplanned release of radioactive materials, while providing a path for heat flow to the ultimate heat sink, the atmosphere. Access to the reactor for refuelling is from the top of the reactor, with water used as shielding during the refuelling operations. The accessibility to the reactor and protection of the environment are additional factors influencing the plant design. This paper describes the physical implementation of the major systems of the Canadian SCWR within the reactor building, and the position of major plant services relative to the reactor building. (author)

  10. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  11. Exergy analysis of a system using a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, M.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M. A.; Pioro, I

    2007-01-01

    The power generation efficiency of nuclear plants is mainly determined by the permissible temperatures and pressures of the nuclear reactor fuel and coolants. These parameters are limited by materials properties and corrosion rates and their effect on nuclear reactor safety. The advanced materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ steam as a coolant and heat carrier, permit the increased steam parameters (outlet temperature up to 625 degree C and pressure of about 25 MPa). Supercritical water-cooled (SCW) nuclear power plants are expected to increase the power generation efficiency from 35 to 45%. Supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors can be linked to thermochemical water splitting cycles for hydrogen production. An increased steam temperature from the nuclear reactor makes it also possible to utilize its energy in thermochemical water splitting cycles. These cycles are considered by many as one of the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require a heat supply at the temperatures over 550-600 degree C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump which increases the temperature the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. A high temperature chemical heat pump which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with a SCW nuclear plant on one side and thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature level of the 'nuclear' heat and, thus, the intensity of

  12. Potential advantages of coupling supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle to water cooled small and medium size reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho Joon; Ahn, Yoonhan; Lee, Jeong Ik; Addad, Yacine

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► S-CO 2 cycle as candidate for SMS. ► MATLAB code used for S-CO 2 cycle analysis. ► Pressure ratio and split ratio comparison analyzed. - Abstract: The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) Brayton cycle is being considered as a favorable candidate for the next generation nuclear reactors power conversion systems. Major benefits of the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle compared to other Brayton cycles are: (1) high thermal efficiency in relatively low turbine inlet temperature, (2) compactness of the turbomachineries and heat exchangers and (3) simpler cycle layout at an equivalent or superior thermal efficiency. However, these benefits can be still utilized even in the water-cooled reactor technologies under special circumstances. A small and medium size water-cooled nuclear reactor (SMR) has been gaining interest due to its wide range of application such as electricity generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. Another key advantage of a SMR is that it can be transported from one place to another mostly by maritime transport due to its small size, and sometimes even through a railway system. Therefore, the combination of a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle with a SMR can reinforce any advantages coming from its small size if the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle has much smaller size components, and simpler cycle layout compared to the currently considered steam Rankine cycle. In this paper, SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), a 330 MW th integral reactor developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Institute) for multipurpose utilization, is considered as a potential candidate for applying the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle and advantages and disadvantages of the proposed system will be discussed in detail. In consideration of SMART condition, the turbine inlet pressure and size of heat exchangers are analyzed by using in-house code developed by KAIST–Khalifa University joint research team. According to the cycle evaluation, the maximum cycle efficiency

  13. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production Progress Report for Year 1, Quarter 2 (January - March 2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-03-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  14. Computational fluid dynamic model for glycerol gasification in supercritical water in a tee junction shaped cylindrical reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yukananto, Riza; Pozarlik, Artur K.; Brem, Gerrit

    2018-01-01

    Gasification in supercritical water is a very promising technology to process wet biomass into a valuable gas. Providing insight of the process behavior is therefore very important. In this research a computational fluid dynamic model is developed to investigate glycerol gasification in

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  16. Thermal performance and efficiency of supercritical nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romney Duffey; Tracy Zhou; Hussam Khartabil

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the major advances and innovative aspects of the thermal performance of recent concepts for super-critical water-cooled nuclear reactors (SCWR). The concepts are based on the extensive experience in the thermal power industry with super and ultra-supercritical boilers and turbines. The challenges and goals of increased efficiency, reduced cost, enhanced safety and co-generation have been pursued over the last ten years, and have resulted both in viable concepts and a vibrant defined R and D effort. The supercritical concept has wide acceptance among industry, as it reflects standard engineering practices and current thermal plant technology that is being already deployed. The SCWR concept represents a continuous development of water-cooled reactor technology, which utilizes the best and latest advances made in the thermal power industry. (author)

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of the use a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water-splitting cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved 'steam' parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625degC and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600degC. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the 'nuclear' heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Diego, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  19. CFD analysis of flow and heat transfer in Canadian supercritical water reactor bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podila, K.; Rao, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer in SCWR fuel bundle design by AECL is studied using CFD. • Bare-rod bundle geometry is tested at 23.5, 25 and 28 MPa using STAR-CCM+ code. • SST k–ω low-Re model was used to study occurrence of heat transfer deterioration. - Abstract: Within the Gen-IV International Forum, AECL is leading the effort in developing a conceptual design for the Canadian SCWR. AECL proposed a new fuel bundle design with two rings of fuel elements placed between central flow tube and the pressure tube. In line with the scope of the conceptual design, the objective of the present CFD work is to aid in developing a bundle heat transfer correlation for the Canadian SCWR fuel bundle design. This paper presents results from an ongoing effort in determining the conditions favorable for occurrence of HTD in the supercritical bundle flows. In the current investigation, bare-rod bundle geometry was tested for the proposed fuel bundle design at 23.5, 25 and 28 MPa using STAR-CCM+ CFD code. Taking advantage of the design symmetry of the fuel bundle, only 1/32 of the computational domain was simulated. The low-Reynolds number modification of SST k–ω turbulence model along with y + < 1 was used in the simulations. For lower mass flow simulations, the increase of inlet temperature and operational pressure was found effective in reducing the occurrence of HTD. For higher mass flow simulations, normal heat transfer behaviour was observed except for the lower pressure range (23.5 MPa)

  20. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  1. Destruction of polyphasic systems in supercritical water reaction media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leybros, A.

    2009-12-01

    Spent ion exchange resins (IER) are, hence, radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation offers a viable alternative treatment to destroy the organic structure of resins by using supercritical water properties. The reactor used in Supercritical Fluids and Membranes Laboratory is a double shell stirred reactor. Total Organic Carbon reduction rates higher than 99% were obtained thanks to POSCEA2 experimental set-up when using a co-fuel, isopropyl alcohol. Influence of operating parameters was studied. A detailed reactional mechanism for cationic and anionic resins is created. For the solubilization of the particles in supercritical water, a mechanism has been created with the identified rate determining species and implemented into Fluent software through the EDC approach. Experimental temperature profiles are well represented by EDC model. Reaction rates are hence controlled by the chemical species mixing. (author)

  2. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-01

    D.O levels. The strain rate was 1.5X10 -7 or 0.8X10 -7 /sec. In comparison with the stress-strain curve of T92 in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O) T92 appeared to experience SCC in SCW of 100 or 500 D.O, showing the decrease of the elongation and the tensile strength. A part of the fracture surface reveals a brittle fracture manner. (3) Crack growth rate (CGR) of T91 specimen under cyclic strain in a SCW was investigated using CT specimens. The CGR's in 370 .deg. C water and 500 .deg. C SCW were about 40% faster than those in the atmosphere. (4) In SCW of 25 ppb D.O the corrosion resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel (D9) at 500 .deg. C was significantly better than that of type 316 stainless steel, and 9Cr Fe-base ODS alloy also showed a clearly better corrosion resistance than T92 (NF616) and T122 (HCM12A) steels. (by UW) Characterization of the Irradiation Behavior (1) Using the accelerator at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources), T91 and ODS alloy (MA956) specimens were irradiated with 8 MeV Fe 4+ ions up to 1 dpa at room temperature. Nano-indentation tests were done on the cross sections of the irradiated specimens, and the hardness increase of T91 was about 15%, and that of MA956 was about 25%. (2) T122 and alloy 800H were irradiated with Ni ions at 500 .deg. C up to 5 dpa and 50 dpa respectively. In the case of T122 fine precipitates of V-Nb (about 50%V-17%Cr-12%Nb) were found in addition to the frequently observed M 23 C 6 carbide. In alloy 800H faulted dislocation loops were frequently observed with the fine precipitates containing Cr, Si and Al. However, cavities were not observed in both specimens. (3) One sides of the T91, T91CSL, T122 and HT 9 specimens were irradiated with 3 MeV protons at 400 and 500 .deg. C respectively, and the SCC tested in SCW. Only the irradiated HT9 specimen showed some clue to SCC through the decrease of the elongation and the reduction of area, but the fracture surface did not show

  3. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    D.O levels. The strain rate was 1.5X10{sup -7} or 0.8X10{sup -7}/sec. In comparison with the stress-strain curve of T92 in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O) T92 appeared to experience SCC in SCW of 100 or 500 D.O, showing the decrease of the elongation and the tensile strength. A part of the fracture surface reveals a brittle fracture manner. (3) Crack growth rate (CGR) of T91 specimen under cyclic strain in a SCW was investigated using CT specimens. The CGR's in 370 .deg. C water and 500 .deg. C SCW were about 40% faster than those in the atmosphere. (4) In SCW of 25 ppb D.O the corrosion resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel (D9) at 500 .deg. C was significantly better than that of type 316 stainless steel, and 9Cr Fe-base ODS alloy also showed a clearly better corrosion resistance than T92 (NF616) and T122 (HCM12A) steels. (by UW) Characterization of the Irradiation Behavior (1) Using the accelerator at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources), T91 and ODS alloy (MA956) specimens were irradiated with 8 MeV Fe{sup 4+} ions up to 1 dpa at room temperature. Nano-indentation tests were done on the cross sections of the irradiated specimens, and the hardness increase of T91 was about 15%, and that of MA956 was about 25%. (2) T122 and alloy 800H were irradiated with Ni ions at 500 .deg. C up to 5 dpa and 50 dpa respectively. In the case of T122 fine precipitates of V-Nb (about 50%V-17%Cr-12%Nb) were found in addition to the frequently observed M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. In alloy 800H faulted dislocation loops were frequently observed with the fine precipitates containing Cr, Si and Al. However, cavities were not observed in both specimens. (3) One sides of the T91, T91CSL, T122 and HT 9 specimens were irradiated with 3 MeV protons at 400 and 500 .deg. C respectively, and the SCC tested in SCW. Only the irradiated HT9 specimen showed some clue to SCC through the decrease of the elongation and the reduction of area, but the

  4. Development and validation of models for simulation of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycles and application to self-propelling heat removal systems in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venker, Jeanne

    2015-03-31

    The objective of the current work was to develop a model that is able to describe the transient behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles, to be applied to self-propelling residual heat removal systems in boiling water reactors. The developed model has been implemented into the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. By means of this improved ATHLET version, novel residual heat removal systems, which are based on closed sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles, can be assessed as a retrofit measure for present light water reactors. Transient simulations are hereby of great importance. The heat removal system has to be modeled explicitly to account for the interaction between the system and the behavior of the plant during different accident conditions. As a first step, transport and thermodynamic fluid properties of supercritical carbon dioxide have been implemented in ATHLET to allow for the simulation of the new working fluid. Additionally, a heat transfer correlation has been selected to represent the specific heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide. For the calculation of pressure losses due to wall friction, an approach for turbulent single phase flow has been adopted that is already implemented in ATHLET. In a second step, a component model for radial compressors has been implemented in the system code. Furthermore, the available model for axial turbines has been adapted to simulate the transient behavior of radial turbines. All extensions have been validated against experimental data. In order to simulate the interaction between the self-propelling heat removal system and a generic boiling water reactor, the components of the sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycle have been dimensioned with first principles. An available input deck of a generic BWR has then been extended by the residual heat removal system. The modeled application has shown that the extended version of ATHLET is suitable to simulate sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles and to evaluate the introduced

  5. Development and validation of models for simulation of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycles and application to self-propelling heat removal systems in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venker, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to develop a model that is able to describe the transient behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2 ) Brayton cycles, to be applied to self-propelling residual heat removal systems in boiling water reactors. The developed model has been implemented into the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. By means of this improved ATHLET version, novel residual heat removal systems, which are based on closed sCO 2 Brayton cycles, can be assessed as a retrofit measure for present light water reactors. Transient simulations are hereby of great importance. The heat removal system has to be modeled explicitly to account for the interaction between the system and the behavior of the plant during different accident conditions. As a first step, transport and thermodynamic fluid properties of supercritical carbon dioxide have been implemented in ATHLET to allow for the simulation of the new working fluid. Additionally, a heat transfer correlation has been selected to represent the specific heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide. For the calculation of pressure losses due to wall friction, an approach for turbulent single phase flow has been adopted that is already implemented in ATHLET. In a second step, a component model for radial compressors has been implemented in the system code. Furthermore, the available model for axial turbines has been adapted to simulate the transient behavior of radial turbines. All extensions have been validated against experimental data. In order to simulate the interaction between the self-propelling heat removal system and a generic boiling water reactor, the components of the sCO 2 Brayton cycle have been dimensioned with first principles. An available input deck of a generic BWR has then been extended by the residual heat removal system. The modeled application has shown that the extended version of ATHLET is suitable to simulate sCO 2 Brayton cycles and to evaluate the introduced heat removal system

  6. Reducing the fuel temperature for pressure-tube supercritical-water-cooled reactors and the effect of fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: eleodor.nichita@uoit.ca; Kovaltchouk, V., E-mail: vitali.kovaltchouk@uoit.ca

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Typical PT-SCWR fuel uses single-region pins consisting of a homogeneous mixture of ThO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. • Using two regions (central for the ThO{sub 2} and peripheral for the PuO{sub 2}) reduces the fuel temperature. • Single-region-pin melting-to-average power ratio is 2.5 at 0.0 MW d/kg and 2.3 at 40 MW d/kg. • Two-region-pin melting-to-average power ratio is 36 at 0.0 MW d/kg and 10.5 at 40 MW d/kg. • Two-region-pin performance drops with burnup due to fissile-element buildup in the ThO{sub 2} region. - Abstract: The Pressure-Tube Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (PT-SCWR) is one of the concepts under investigation by the Generation IV International Forum for its promise to deliver higher thermal efficiency than nuclear reactors currently in operation. The high coolant temperature (>625 K) and high linear power density employed by the PT-SCWR cause the fuel temperature to be fairly high, leading to a reduced margin to fuel melting, thus increasing the risk of actual melting during accident scenarios. It is therefore desirable to come up with a fuel design that lowers the fuel temperature while preserving the high linear power ratio and high coolant temperature. One possible solution is to separate the fertile (ThO{sub 2}) and fissile (PuO{sub 2}) fuel materials into different radial regions in each fuel pin. Previously-reported work found that by locating the fertile material at the centre and the fissile material at the periphery of the fuel pin, the fuel centreline temperature can be reduced by ∼650 K for fresh fuel compared to the case of a homogeneous (Th–Pu)O{sub 2} mixture for the same coolant temperature and linear power density. This work provides a justification for the observed reduction in fuel centreline temperature and suggests a systematic approach to lower the fuel temperature. It also extends the analysis to the dependence of the radial temperature profile on fuel burnup. The radial temperature profile is

  7. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor; Etude par simulation numerique des ecoulements turbulents reactifs dans les reacteurs d'oxydation hydrothermale: application a un reacteur agite double enveloppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussiere, S

    2006-12-15

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  8. Experimental study on the operating characteristics of an inner preheating transpiring wall reactor for supercritical water oxidation: Temperature profiles and product properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fengming; Xu, Chunyan; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Shouyan; Chen, Guifang; Ma, Chunyuan

    2014-01-01

    A new process to generate multiple thermal fluids by supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was proposed to enhance oil recovery. An inner preheating transpiring wall reactor for SCWO was designed and tested to avoid plugging in the preheating section. Hot water (400–600 °C) was used as auxiliary heat source to preheat the feed to the reaction temperature. The effect of different operating parameters on the performance of the inner preheating transpiring wall reactor was investigated, and the optimized operating parameters were determined based on temperature profiles and product properties. The reaction temperature is close to 900 °C at an auxiliary heat source flow of 2.79 kg/h, and the auxiliary heat source flow is determined at 6–14 kg/h to avoid the overheating of the reactor. The useful reaction time is used to quantitatively describe the feed degradation efficiency. The outlet concentration of total organic carbon (TOC out ) and CO in the effluent gradually decreases with increasing useful reaction time. The useful reaction time needed for complete oxidation of the feed is 10.5 s for the reactor. - Highlights: • A new process to generate multiple thermal fluids by SCWO was proposed. • An inner preheating transpiring wall reactor for SCWO was designed and tested. • Hot water was used as auxiliary heat source to preheat the feed at room temperature. • Effect of operating parameters on the performance of the reactor was investigated. • The useful reaction time required for complete oxidation of the feed is 10.5 s

  9. Supercritical water natural circulation flow stability experiment research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Dongliang; Zhou, Tao; Li, Bing [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Nuclear Science and Engineering; North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear Thermalhydraulic Safety and Standardization; North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). Beijing Key Lab. of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy; Huang, Yanping [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China). Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Lab.

    2017-12-15

    The Thermal hydraulic characteristics of supercritical water natural circulation plays an important role in the safety of the Generation-IV supercritical water-cooled reactors. Hence it is crucial to conduct the natural circulation heat transfer experiment of supercritical water. The heat transfer characteristics have been studied under different system pressures in the natural circulation systems. Results show that the fluctuations in the subcritical flow rate (for natural circulation) is relatively small, as compared to the supercritical flow rate. By increasing the heating power, it is observed that the amplitude (and time period) of the fluctuation tends to become larger for the natural circulation of supercritical water. This tends to show the presence of flow instability in the supercritical water. It is possible to observe the flow instability phenomenon when the system pressure is suddenly reduced from the supercritical pressure state to the subcritical state. At the test outlet section, the temperature is prone to increase suddenly, whereas the blocking effect may be observed in the inlet section of the experiment.

  10. Transient Model of a 10 MW Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for Light Water Reactors by using MARS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo-Hyun; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung Won; Cha, Jae-Eun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, recuperation cycle was chosen as a reference loop design and the MARS code was chosen as the transient cycle analysis code. Cycle design condition is focus on operation point of the light-water reactor. Development of a transient model was performed for 10MW-electron SCO{sub 2} coupled with light water reactors. In order to perform transient analysis, cycle transient model was developed and steady-state run was performed and presented in the paper. In this study, the transient model of SCO{sub 2} recuperation Brayton cycle was developed and implemented in MARS to study the steady-state simulation. We performed nodalization of the transient model using MARS code and obtained steady-state results. This study is shown that the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can be used as a power conversion system for light water reactors. Future work will include transient analysis such as partial road operation, power swing, start-up, and shutdown. Cycle control strategy will be considered for various control method.

  11. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  12. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  13. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  14. Effects of Gravity on Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Uday; Hicks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the fluid mechanics of supercritical water jets are being studied at NASA to develop a better understanding of flow behaviors for purposes of advancing supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies for applications in reduced gravity environments. These studies provide guidance for the development of future SCWO experiments in new experimental platforms that will extend the current operational range of the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrodynamics of supercritical fluid jets is one of the basic unit processes of a SCWO reactor. These hydrodynamics are often complicated by significant changes in the thermo-physical properties that govern flow behavior (e.g., viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressibility, etc), particularly when fluids transition from sub-critical to supercritical conditions. Experiments were conducted in a 150 ml reactor cell under constant pressure with water injections at various flow rates. Flow configurations included supercritical jets injected into either sub-critical or supercritical water. Profound gravitational influences were observed, particularly in the transition to turbulence, for the flow conditions under study. These results will be presented and the parameters of the flow that control jet behavior will be examined and discussed.

  15. CFD analysis of the dynamic behaviour of a fuel rod subchannel in a supercritical water reactor with point kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel; Akaho, Edward H.K.; Nyarko, Benjamin J.B.; Ambrosini, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of flow stability of nuclear fuel subchannels with supercritical water is presented. • The results obtained by a CFD code are compared with those of a system code. • The model includes also heat conduction in the fuel rod and point neutron kinetics. - Abstract: The paper presents the analysis by a CFD code of coupled neutronic–thermal hydraulic instabilities in a subchannel slice belonging to a square lattice assembly. The work represents a further phase in the assessment of the suitability of CFD codes for studies of flow stability of supercritical fluids; the research started in previous work with the analysis of bare 2D circular pipes and already addressed 3D subchannel slices with no allowance for heat conduction or neutronic effects. In the present phase, a more realistic system is considered, dealing with a slice of a fuel assembly subchannel containing the regions of the pellet, the gap and the cladding and including also the effect of inlet and outlet throttling. The adopted neutronic model is a point kinetics one, including six delayed neutron groups with global Doppler and fluid density feedbacks. The response of the model to perturbations applied starting from a steady-state condition at the rated power is compared with that of a similar model developed for a 1D system code. Upward, horizontal and downward flow orientations are addressed making use of a uniform power profile and changing relevant parameters as the gap equivalent conductance and the density reactivity coefficient. A bottom-peaked power profile is also considered in the case of vertical upward flow. Though the adopted model can still be considered simple in comparison with actual details of fuel assemblies, the obtained results demonstrate the potential of the adopted methodology for more accurate analyses to be made with larger computational resources

  16. NOMAGE4 activities 2011, Part II, Supercritical water loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vierstraete, Pierre; Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Lauritzen, Bent

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the six different reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. Several countries have shown interest to this concept but up to now, there exist no in-pile facilities to perform the required material...... and fuel tests. Working on this direction, the Halden Reactor Project has started an activity in collaboration with Risoe-DTU (with Mr. Rudi Van Nieuwenhove as the project leader) to study the feasibility of a SCW loop in the Halden Reactor, which is a Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The ultimate goal...

  17. Destruction of energetic materials by supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beulow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is a relatively low-temperature process that can give high destruction efficiencies for a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. Results are presented examining the destruction of high explosives and propellants in supercritical water and the use of low temperature, low pressure hydrolysis as a pretreatment process. Reactions of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), nitroguanidine (NQ), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) are examined in a flow reactor operated at temperatures between 400 degrees C and 650 degrees C. Explosives are introduced into the reactor at concentrations below the solubility limits. For each of the compounds, over 99.9% is destroyed in less than 30 seconds at temperatures above 600 degrees C. The reactions produce primarily N 2 , N 2 O,CO 2 , and some nitrate and nitrite ions. The distribution of reaction products depends on reactor pressure, temperature, and oxidizer concentration. Kinetics studies of the reactions of nitrate and nitrite ions with various reducing reagents in supercritical water show that they can be rapidly and completely destroyed at temperatures above 525 degrees C. The use of slurries and hydrolysis to introduce high concentrations of explosives into a supercritical water reactor is examined. For some compounds the rate of reaction depends on particle size. The hydrolysis of explosives at low temperatures (<100 degrees C) and low pressures (<1 atm) under basic conditions produces water soluble, non-explosive products which are easily destroyed by supercritical water oxidation. Large pieces of explosives (13 cm diameter) have been successfully hydrolyzed. The rate, extent, and products of the hydrolysis depend on the type and concentration of base. Results from the base hydrolysis of triple base propellant M31A1E1 and the subsequent supercritical water oxidation of the hydrolysis products are presented

  18. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  19. Control-rod, pressure and flow-induced accident and transient analysis of a direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitoh, Kazuaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1996-01-01

    The features of the direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled fast breeder reactor (SCFBR) are high thermal efficiency and simple reactor system. The safety principle is basically the same as that of an LWR since it is a water-cooled reactor. Maintaining the core flow is the basic safety requirement of the reactor, since its coolant system is the one through type. The transient behaviors at control rod, pressure and flow-induced abnormalities are analyzed and presented in this paper. The results of flow-induced transients of SCFBR were reported at ICONE-3, though pressure change was neglected. The change of fuel temperature distribution is also considered for the analysis of the rapid reactivity-induced transients such as control rod withdrawal. Total loss of flow and pump seizure are analyzed as the accidents. Loss of load, control rod withdrawal from the normal operation, loss of feedwater heating, inadvertent start of an auxiliary feedwater pump, partial loss of coolant flow and loss of external power are analyzed as the transients. The behavior of the flow-induced transients is not so much different from the analyses assuming constant pressure. Fly wheels should be equipped with the feedwater pumps to prolong the coast-down time more than 10s and to cope with the total loss of flow accident. The coolant density coefficient of the SCFBR is less than one tenth of a BWR in which the recirculation flow is used for the power control. The over pressurization transients at the loss of load is not so severe as that of a BWR. The power reaches 120%. The minimum deterioration heat flux ratio (MDHFR) and the maximum pressure are sufficiently lower than the criteria; MDHFR above 1.0 and pressure ratio below 1.10 of 27.5 MPa, maximum pressure for operation. Among the reactivity abnormalities, the control rod withdrawal transient from the normal operation is analyzed

  20. Supercritical Water Nuclear Steam Supply System: Innovations In Materials, Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Mark; Corradini, M.L.; Sridharan, K.; Wilson, P.; Cho, D.; Kim, T.K.; Lomperski, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the 1990's supercritical light-water reactors were considered in conceptual designs. A nuclear reactor cooled by supercritical waster would have a much higher thermal efficiency with a once-through direct power cycle, and could be based on standardized water reactor components (light water or heavy water). The theoretical efficiency could be improved by more than 33% over that of other water reactors and could be simplified with higher reliability; e.g., a boiling water reactor without steam separators or dryers

  1. Supercritical Water Oxidation Program (SCWOP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Purpose of SCWOP is to develop and demonstrate supercritical water oxidation as a viable technology for treating DOE hazardous and mixed wastes and to coordinate SCWO research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities. The process involves bringing together organic waste, water, and an oxidant (air, O 2 , etc.) to temperatures and pressures above water's critical point (374 C, 22.1 MPa); organic destruction is >99.99% efficient, and the resulting effluents (mostly water, CO 2 ) are relatively benign. Pilot-scale (300--500 gallons/day) SCWO units are to be constructed and demonstrated. Two phases will be conducted: hazardous waste pilot plant demonstration and mixed waste pilot demonstration. Contacts for further information and for getting involved are given

  2. A Simplified Supercritical Fast Reactor with Thorium Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Kan Wang; Ganglin Yu

    2014-01-01

    Super-Critical water-cooled Fast Reactor (SCFR) is a feasible option for the Gen-IV SCWR designs, in which much less moderator and thus coolant are needed for transferring the fission heat from the core compared with the traditional LWRs. The fast spectrum of SCFR is useful for fuel breeding and thorium utilization, which is then beneficial for enhancing the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. A SCFR core is constructed in this work, with the aim of simplifying the mechanical structure ...

  3. Oxidation of oily sludge in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Baochen; Cui Fuyi; Jing Guolin; Xu Shengli; Huo Weijing; Liu Shuzhi

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of oily sludge in supercritical water is performed in a batch reactor at reaction temperatures between 663 and 723 K, the reaction times between 1 and 10 min and pressure between 23 and 27 MPa. Effect of reaction parameters such as reaction time, temperature, pressure, O 2 excess and initial COD on oxidation of oily sludge is investigated. The results indicate that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate of 92% can be reached in 10 min. COD removal rate increases as the reaction time, temperature and initial COD increase. Pressure and O 2 excess have no remarkable affect on reaction. By taking into account the dependence of reaction rate on COD concentration, a global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data. The resulting pre-exponential factor was 8.99 x 10 14 (mol L -1 ) -0.405 s -1 ; the activation energy was 213.13 ± 1.33 kJ/mol; and the reaction order for oily sludge (based on COD) is 1.405. It was concluded that supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly emerging oily sludge processing technology.

  4. The effect of low-concentration inorganic materials on the behaviour of supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imre, A.R., E-mail: imre@aeki.kfki.h [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, POB 49, Budapest (Hungary); Hazi, G.; Horvath, A.; Maraczy, Cs. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, POB 49, Budapest (Hungary); Mazur, V.; Artemenko, S. [Odessa State Academy of Refrigeration, 1/3 Dvoryanslaya Str., 65026, Odessa (Ukraine)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Small amount of inorganic materials (like corrosion products) can be dissolved in the supercritical water. Pseudo-critical temperature and other properties will be changed. Thermal and hydraulic behaviours of the SCW with small amount of contaminants differ in great extent from the behaviour of pure SCW. - Abstract: Supercritical water is a promising working fluid in the new Generation IV nuclear power plants. Due to the presence of the pseudo-critical line, the thermo-hydraulics (thermal and flow properties) and the physical chemistry of the supercritical water differ significantly from the pressurized hot water used in pressurized water reactors. In this study we would like to analyse the effect of small amount of inorganic material on the thermo-hydraulics of the supercritical water cooled nuclear reactors and other, non-nuclear supercritical water loops.

  5. Corrosion in the SCWR: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of the supercritical water - iron hydroxide interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallikragas, D.; Plugatyr, A.; Svishchev, I.M., E-mail: dimitrioskallikragas@trentu.ca [Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption properties of supercritical water confined between parallel iron (II) hydroxide surfaces were determined through molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations were conducted at temperatures and water densities typically found in the heat transport system of the supercritical water cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). Surface water layer densities were compared to those of the bulk water. Adsorption coverage was calculated as a function of the number of waters per surface OH group. Images of the water molecules configurations are provided along with the density profile of the adsorption layer. The observed localized adsorption and surface clustering of supercritical water, would likely produce more localized corrosion phenomena in the water bearing components of the SCWR. (author)

  6. Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high-temperature and supercritical light-water reactors. Final report; Rechenmethoden zur Bewertung der Sicherheit von gasgekuehlten Hochtemperaturreaktoren und superkritischen Leichtwasserreaktoren. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, S.; Cron, D. von der; Hristov, H.; Lerchl, G.; Papukchiev, A.; Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Weis, J.; Weyermann, F.

    2012-12-15

    This report documents developments and results in the frame of the project RS1191 ''Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high temperature and supercritical light-water reactors''. The report is structured according to the five work packages: 1. Reactor physics modeling of gas-cooled high temperature reactors; 2. Coupling of reactor physics and 3-D thermal hydraulics for the core barrel; 3. Extension of ATHLET models for application to supercritical reactors (HPLWR); 4. Further development of ATHLET for application to HTR; 5. Further development and validation of ANSYS CFX for application to alternative reactor concepts. Chapter 4 describes the extensions made in TORT-TD related to the simulation of pebble-bed HTR, e.g. spectral zone buckling, Iodine-Xenon dynamics, nuclear decay heat calculation and extension of the cross section interpolation algorithms to higher dimensions. For fast running scoping calculations, a time-dependent 3-D diffusion solver has been implemented in TORT-TD. For the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 as well as for the HTR-10 reactor, appropriate TORT-TD models have been developed. Few-group nuclear cross sections have been generated using the spectral codes MICROX- 2 and DRAGON4. For verification and validation of nuclear cross sections and deterministic reactor models, MCNP models of reactor core and control rod of the HTR-10 have been developed. Comparisons with experimental data have been performed for the HTR-10 first criticality and control rod worth. The development of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D is documented in chapter 5. Similar to the couplings with ATHLET and COBRA-TF, the ''internal'' coupling approach has been implemented. Regarding the review of experiments and benchmarks relevant to HTR for validation of the coupled code system, the PBMR-400 benchmarks and the HTR-10 test reactor have been selected

  7. Stability analysis of a heated channel cooled by supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, M. C.; Delmastro, D. F; Marcel, C. P

    2009-01-01

    A simple model to study thermal-hydraulic stability of a heated cannel under supercritical conditions is presented. Single cannel stability analysis for the SCWR (Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor) design was performed. The drastic change of fluid density in the reactor core of a SCWR may induce DWO (Density Wave Oscillations) similar to those observed in BWRs. Due to the similarities between subcritical and supercritical systems we may treat the supercritical fluid as a pseudo two-phase system. Thus, we may extend the modeling approach often used for boiling flow stability analysis to supercritical pressure operation conditions. The model developed in this work take into account three regions: a heavy fluid region, similar to an incompressible liquid; a zone where a heavy fluid and a light fluid coexist, similar to two-phase mixture; and a light fluid region which behaves like superheated steam. It was used the homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) for the pseudo boiling zone, and the ideal gas model for the pseudo superheated steam zone. System stability maps were obtained using linear stability analysis in the frequency domain. Two possible instability mechanisms are observed: DWO and excursive Ledinegg instabilities. Also, a sensitivity analysis showed that frictions in pseudo superheated steam zone, together with acceleration effect, are the most destabilizing effects. On the other hand, frictions in pseudo liquid zone are the most important stabilizing effect. [es

  8. Muonium kinetics in sub- and supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandi, K.; Addison-Jones, B.; Brodovitch, J.C.; Kecman, S.; McKenzie, I.; Percival, P.W

    2003-02-01

    Muonium is long-lived in pure water and has been studied over a very wide range of temperatures and pressures, from 5 deg. C to over 400 deg. C and from 1 to 400 bar. We have determined rate constants for representative reactions of muonium in aqueous solution; equivalent data on H atom kinetics is sparse and stops well short of the maximum temperature and pressure attained in our experiments. The results show remarkable deviations from the predictions of standard reaction theories. In particular, rate constants pass through a maximum with temperature well below the critical point. This seems to be a general phenomenon, since we have observed it for spin-exchange and chemical reactions that are diffusion limited at low temperatures, as well as for activated reactions. We believe that a key factor in the drop of rate constants at high temperature is the cage effect, in particular the number of collisions between a pair of reactants over the duration of their encounter. Whatever the reason, the implications are profound for both the efficiency of supercritical water oxidation reactors and for the modelling of radiation chemistry in pressurized water nuclear reactors.

  9. Muonium kinetics in sub- and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, K.; Addison-Jones, B.; Brodovitch, J.C.; Kecman, S.; McKenzie, I.; Percival, P.W.

    2003-01-01

    Muonium is long-lived in pure water and has been studied over a very wide range of temperatures and pressures, from 5 deg. C to over 400 deg. C and from 1 to 400 bar. We have determined rate constants for representative reactions of muonium in aqueous solution; equivalent data on H atom kinetics is sparse and stops well short of the maximum temperature and pressure attained in our experiments. The results show remarkable deviations from the predictions of standard reaction theories. In particular, rate constants pass through a maximum with temperature well below the critical point. This seems to be a general phenomenon, since we have observed it for spin-exchange and chemical reactions that are diffusion limited at low temperatures, as well as for activated reactions. We believe that a key factor in the drop of rate constants at high temperature is the cage effect, in particular the number of collisions between a pair of reactants over the duration of their encounter. Whatever the reason, the implications are profound for both the efficiency of supercritical water oxidation reactors and for the modelling of radiation chemistry in pressurized water nuclear reactors

  10. Pulse radiolysis study of supercritical water-G-value measurement up to 450 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the understanding of water radiolysis at elevated temperatures is inevitably important in the field of water chemistry in light water reactors because water radiolysis is closely related to many subjects such as hydrogen water chemistry (H 2 injection), SCC (stress corrosion cracking), dose accumulation and so on. This situation would also be applied to the future reactor using supercritical water (>374 C, 22.1MPa) as a coolant, so called supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). Therefore, it is important to investigate water radiolysis of supercritical water. In 1989 Prof. Oka, University of Tokyo, proposed the SCWR as a future reactor and done much design study. This reactor has many advantages such as high energy efficiency, applicability of experience accumulated in light water reactors and supercritical fissile plant, and compact structure. In 2002 the Department of Energy in USA has selected the SCWR as one of the six Generation IV reactors and fundamental research has started in different countries as a national or an international project. In the present research G-values of water radiolysis have been measured by using a pulse radiolysis method up to 450 degree C to obtain the fundamental data relevant to the development of the SCWR. In supercritical water, the pressure controls the density of water easily and it was found that the G-values are strongly dependent not only on temperature but also on density in supercritical water. After presentation of experimental method and its difficulties, temperature and density dependent G-values of water decomposition products in supercritical water would be summarized. (authors)

  11. The light water integral reactor with natural circulation of the coolant at supercritical pressure B-500 SKDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.A.; Voznesensky, V.A.; Afrov, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure increase in the primary circuit over the critical value gives a possibility to construct the B-500SKDI (500 MWe) lightwater integral reactor with natural circulation of the coolant in the vessel with a diameter less than 5 m. The given reactor has a high safety level, simple operability, its specific capital cost and fuel expenditure being lower as compared to a conventional PWR. The development of the reactor is carried out taking into consideration verified technical decisions of current NPPs on the basis of Russian LWR technology. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  13. Successful treatment with supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) operates in a totally enclosed system. It uses water at high temperatures and high pressure to chemically change wastes. Oily substances become soluble and complex hydrocarbons are converted into water and carbon dioxide. Research and development on SCWO is described

  14. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part II, Supercritical water loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierstraete, P. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des mines, Paris (France)); Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), Kjeller (Norway)); Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2012-01-15

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the six different reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. Several countries have shown interest to this concept but up to now, there exist no in-pile facilities to perform the required material and fuel tests. Working on this direction, the Halden Reactor Project has started an activity in collaboration with Risoe-DTU (with Mr. Rudi Van Nieuwenhove as the project leader) to study the feasibility of a SCW loop in the Halden Reactor, which is a Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The ultimate goal of the project is to design a loop allowing material and fuel test studies at significant mass flow with in-core instrumentation and chemistry control possibilities. The present report focusses on the main heat exchanger required for such a loop in the Halden Reactor. The goal of this heat exchanger is to assure a supercritical flow state inside the test section (the core side) and a subcritical flow state inside the pump section. The objective is to design the heat exchanger in order to optimize the efficiency of the heat transfer and to respect several requirements as the room available inside the reactor hall, the maximal total pressure drop allowed and so on. (Author)

  15. Fundamental R and D program on water chemistry of supercritical pressure water under radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yosuke; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Wada, Yoichi; Yotsuyanagi, Tadasu

    2003-01-01

    In a supercritical water-cooled reactor, property of water changes significantly around the critical point. It is expected that irradiation and change of water property will affect the chemistry and material corrosion. Deep understanding of interactions between supercritical water and materials under irradiation is important. However, comprehensive data on radiolysis, kinetics, corrosion and thermodynamics have not been obtained due to the severe experimental condition. To get such data by experiments and computer simulations, a national program funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) has been started since December 2002. (author)

  16. Feasibility analysis of the modified ATHLET code for supercritical water cooled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Chong, E-mail: ch.zhou@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Fusion and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Priessnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Yang Yanhua [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cheng Xu [Institute of Fusion and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Priessnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of system code ATHLET for supercritical water application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development and assessment of a heat transfer package for supercritical water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Validation of the modified code at supercritical pressures with the theoretical point-hydraulics model and the SASC code. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of the modified code to LOCA analysis of a supercritical water cooled in-pile fuel qualification test loop. - Abstract: Since the existing thermal-hydraulic computer codes for light water reactors are not applicable to supercritical water cooled reactors (SCWRs) owing to the limitation of physical models and numerical treatments, the development of a reliable thermal-hydraulic computer code is very important to design analysis and safety assessment of SCWRs. Based on earlier modification of ATHLET for SCWR, a general interface is implemented to the code, which serves as the platform for information exchange between ATHLET and the external independent physical modules. A heat transfer package containing five correlations for supercritical water is connected to the ATHLET code through the interface. The correlations are assessed with experimental data. To verify the modified ATHLET code, the Edwards-O'Brian blow-down test is simulated. As first validation at supercritical pressures, a simplified supercritical water cooled loop is modeled and its stability behavior is analyzed. Results are compared with that of the theoretical model and SASC code in the reference and show good agreement. To evaluate its feasibility, the modified ATHLET code is applied to a supercritical water cooled in-pile fuel qualification test loop. Loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) due to break of coolant supply lines are calculated for the loop. Sensitivity analysis of some safety system parameters is performed to get further knowledge about their influence on the function of the

  17. CANDU with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced CANDU reactor, with supercritical water as coolant, has many attractive design features. The pressure exceeds 22 MPa but coolant temperatures in excess of 370 degrees C can be reached without encountering the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dry-out and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. Increased coolant temperature leads to reduced void reactivity via reduced coolant in-core density. Light water becomes a coolant option. To preserve neutron economy, an advanced fuel channel is needed and is described below. A supercritical-water-cooled CANDU can evolve as fuel capabilities evolve to withstand increasing coolant temperatures. (author)

  18. Supercritical water gasification with decoupled pressure and heat transfer modules

    KAUST Repository

    Dibble, Robert

    2017-09-14

    The present invention discloses a system and method for supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of biomass materials wherein the system includes a SCWG reactor and a plurality of heat exchangers located within a shared pressurized vessel, which decouples the function of containing high pressure from the high temperature function. The present invention allows the heat transfer function to be conducted independently from the pressure transfer function such that the system equipment can be designed and fabricated in manner that would support commercial scaled-up SCWG operations. By using heat exchangers coupled to the reactor in a series configuration, significant efficiencies are achieved by the present invention SCWG system over prior known SCWG systems.

  19. Supercritical water decontamination of town gas soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, B.S.; Azzam, F.O.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    Town gas sites represent a large environmental problem that exists in more than 2,000 sites across North America alone. The major contaminants in town gas sods are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These are stable compounds that migrate deep into the soil and are traditionally very difficult to remove by conventional remediation processes. Supercritical fluids offer enhanced solvating properties along with reduced mass transfer resistances that make them ideal for removing compounds that are difficult or impossible to remove by conventional processes. Supercritical water is ideal for removing PAHs and other hydrocarbons from soil due to its high solvating power towards most hydrocarbon species. Supercritical water was investigated for its ability to remediate two different town gas sods containing from 3--20 wt% contamination. The sod was remediated in a 300-cc semi-continuous system to a more environmentally acceptable level

  20. A novel spiral reactor for biodiesel production in supercritical ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farobie, Obie; Sasanami, Kazuma; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel spiral reactor for biodiesel production in supercritical ethanol was proposed. • The spiral reactor employed in this study successfully recovered heat. • The effects of temperature and time on FAEE yield were investigated. • FAEE yield as high as 0.937 mol/mol was obtained at 350 °C after 30 min. • The second-order kinetic model expressed the experimental yield well. - Abstract: A spiral reactor is proposed as a novel reactor design for biodiesel production under supercritical conditions. Since the spiral reactor serves as a heat exchanger, it offers the advantage of reduced apparatus space compared to conventional supercritical equipment. Experimental investigations were carried out at reaction temperatures of 270–400 °C, pressure of 20 MPa, oil-to-ethanol molar ratio of 1:40, and reaction times of 3–30 min. An FAEE yield of 0.937 mol/mol was obtained in a short reaction time of 30 min at 350 °C and oil-to-ethanol molar ratio of 1:40 under a reactor pressure of 20 MPa. The spiral reactor was not only as effective as conventional reactor in terms of transesterification reactor but also was superior in terms of heat recovery. A second-order kinetic model describing the transesterification of canola oil in supercritical ethanol was proposed, and the reaction was observed to follow Arrhenius behavior. The corresponding reaction rate constants and the activation energies as well as pre-exponential factors were determined

  1. Supercritical water gasification of Victorian brown coal: Experimental characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Doki; Aye, Lu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Vic 3010 (Australia); Sanderson, P. John; Lim, Seng [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    Supercritical water gasification is an innovative thermochemical conversion method for converting wet feedstocks into hydrogen-rich gaseous products. The non-catalytic gasification characteristics of Victorian brown coal were investigated in supercritical water by using a novel immersion technique with quartz batch reactors. Various operating parameters such as temperature, feed concentration and reaction time were varied to investigate their effect on the gasification behaviour. Gas yields, carbon gasification efficiency and the total gasification efficiency increased with increasing temperature and reaction time, and decreasing feed concentration. The mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gases was lowest at 600 C, and increased to over 30 % at a temperature of 800 C. Varying parameters, especially reaction time, did not improve the coal utilisation for gas production significantly and the measured data showed a large deviation from the equilibrium level. (author)

  2. Destruction of Energetic Materials in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-25

    controls and difficulties associated with controlling processes and obtaining permits can negate potential advantages . Supercritical water oxidation...for H2 and an Alltech CTR-1 column with a temperature ramp program from -10 °C to 180 °C was used for the other gases. A mass spectrometer (HP 5971

  3. A Simplified Supercritical Fast Reactor with Thorium Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-Critical water-cooled Fast Reactor (SCFR is a feasible option for the Gen-IV SCWR designs, in which much less moderator and thus coolant are needed for transferring the fission heat from the core compared with the traditional LWRs. The fast spectrum of SCFR is useful for fuel breeding and thorium utilization, which is then beneficial for enhancing the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. A SCFR core is constructed in this work, with the aim of simplifying the mechanical structure and keeping negative coolant void reactivity during the whole core life. A core burnup simulation scheme based on Monte Carlo lattice homogenization is adopted in this study, and the reactor physics analysis has been performed with DU-MOX and Th-MOX fuel. The main issues discussed include the fuel conversion ratio and the coolant void reactivity. The analysis shows that thorium-based fuel can provide inherent safety for SCFR without use of blanket, which is favorable for the mechanical design of SCFR.

  4. Method and apparatus for waste destruction using supercritical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldsen, Brent Lowell; Wu, Benjamin Chiau-pin

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for initiating and sustaining an oxidation reaction. A hazardous waste, is introduced into a reaction zone within a pressurized containment vessel. An oxidizer, preferably hydrogen peroxide, is mixed with a carrier fluid, preferably water, and the mixture is heated until the fluid achieves supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The heating means comprise cartridge heaters placed in closed-end tubes extending into the center region of the pressure vessel along the reactor longitudinal axis. A cooling jacket surrounds the pressure vessel to remove excess heat at the walls. Heating and cooling the fluid mixture in this manner creates a limited reaction zone near the center of the pressure vessel by establishing a steady state density gradient in the fluid mixture which gradually forces the fluid to circulate internally. This circulation allows the fluid mixture to oscillate between supercritical and subcritical states as it is heated and cooled.

  5. Supercritical water: On a road from CFD to NPP simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintala, Lauri; Danielyan, Davit; Salomaa, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The Fission and Radiation Physics Group at the Aalto University is contributing to the Finnish SCWR activities within the GEN4FIN-network. Our research involves reactor core thermal hydraulics, and in particular, heat transfer phenomena in supercritical water including both theoretical studies and simulations with APROS and OpenFOAM. APROS is a software applicable to full-scale power plant simulations and OpenFOAM an open source CFD code. The complicated heat transfer in the supercritical region is a very challenging problem for the design of SCWRs and their safety assessment. The steam tables of APROS have been extended to the supercritical region and their functionality has been tested with, e.g. blowdown simulations where the transient is rapid, hence mainly challenging for numerical stability whereas heat transfer has negligible effects. Numerous different heat correlations for supercritical water have been suggested , but simulations of benchmark experiments have shown that for instance fuel clad temperatures generally cannot be described sufficiently accurately. This discrepancy has been encountered in several process simulation codes. The largest errors occur near the pseudo critical line, during the heat transfer deterioration. It turns out that the physics in supercritical water is clearly more intricate than in ordinary boiling heat transfer where rather satisfactory heat transfer correlations are available. Full 3D CFD calculations allow a better description of various aspects of heat transfer in the supercritical region, i.e., effects arising from turbulence , buoyancy , varying material properties etc. On the other hand, CFD calculations are not feasible for plant-scale simulations. We have selected some simplified geometries and parameter ranges to study SCW heat transfer in a reactor. Old experiments have been calculated with satisfactory results with OpenFOAM to check its validity. A steady state case of heat transfer in a circular pipe with upward

  6. Error analysis of supercritical water correlations using ATHLET system code under DHT conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, J., E-mail: jeffrey.samuel@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic computer code ATHLET (Analysis of THermal-hydraulics of LEaks and Transients) is used for analysis of anticipated and abnormal plant transients, including safety analysis of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Russian Graphite-Moderated High Power Channel-type Reactors (RBMKs). The range of applicability of ATHLET has been extended to supercritical water by updating the fluid-and transport-properties packages, thus enabling the code to the used in analysis of SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs). Several well-known heat-transfer correlations for supercritical fluids were added to the ATHLET code and a numerical model was created to represent an experimental test section. In this work, the error in the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) calculation by the ATHLET model is studied along with the ability of the various correlations to predict different heat transfer regimes. (author)

  7. Supercritical water oxidation test bed effluent treatment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents effluent treatment options for a 50 h Supercritical Water Test Unit. Effluent compositions are calculated for eight simulated waste streams, using different assumed cases. Variations in effluent composition with different reactor designs and operating schemes are discussed. Requirements for final effluent compositions are briefly reviewed. A comparison is made of two general schemes. The first is one in which the effluent is cooled and effluent treatment is primarily done in the liquid phase. In the second scheme, most treatment is performed with the effluent in the gas phase. Several unit operations are also discussed, including neutralization, mercury removal, and evaporation

  8. Features of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle coupled with reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Chengjie; Wang Jie; Yang Xiaoyong

    2010-01-01

    In order to obtain acceptable cycle efficiency, current helium gas turbine power cycle technology needs high cycle temperature which means that the cycle needs high core-out temperature. The technology has high requirements on reactor structure and fuel elements materials, and also on turbine manufacture. While utilizing CO 2 as cycle working fluid, it can guarantee to lower the cycle temperature and turbo machine Janume but achieve the same cycle efficiency, so as to enhance the safety and economy of reactor. According to the laws of thermodynamics, a calculation model of supercritical CO 2 power cycle was established to analyze the feature, and the decisive parameters of the cycle and also investigate the effect of each parameter on the cycle efficiency in detail were obtained. The results show that supercritical CO 2 power cycle can achieve quite satisfied efficiency at a lower cycle highest temperature than helium cycle, and CO 2 is a promising working fluid. (authors)

  9. Etching of glass microchips with supercritical water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Grym, Jakub; Roth, Michal; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2015), s. 311-318 ISSN 1473-0197 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0182 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : glass microchips * channel etching * supercritical water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.586, year: 2015

  10. Plastic reactor suitable for high pressure and supercritical fluid electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branch, Jack; Alibouri, Mehrdad; Cook, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a reactor suitable for high pressure, particularly supercritical fluid, electrochemistry and electrodeposition at pressures up to 30 MPa at 115◦C. The reactor incorporates two key, new design concepts; a plastic reactor vessel and the use of o-ring sealed brittle electrodes...... by the deposition of Bi. The application of the reactor to the production of nanostructures is demonstrated by the electrodeposition of ∼80 nm diameter Te nanowires into an anodic alumina on silicon template. Key advantages of the new reactor design include reduction of the number of wetted materials, particularly...... glues used for insulating electrodes, compatability with reagents incompatible with steel, compatability with microfabricated planar multiple electrodes, small volume which brings safety advantages and reduced reagent useage, and a significant reduction in experimental time....

  11. Kinetics of Chemical Agents Destruction in Supercritical Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tester, Jefferson

    2003-01-01

    .... An experimental study of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) oxidation has been completed that includes macroscopic modeling of the overall global rate law for MPA oxidation in supercritical water (SCW...

  12. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  13. Investigation on flow stability of supercritical water cooled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, X.; Kuang, B.

    2006-01-01

    Research activities are ongoing worldwide to develop nuclear power plants with supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) with the purpose to achieve a high thermal efficiency and to improve their economical competitiveness. However, the strong variation of the thermal-physical properties of water in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical line results in challenging tasks in various fields, e.g. thermal-hydraulic design of a SCWR. One of the challenging tasks is to understand and to predict the dynamic behavior of supercritical water cooled systems. Although many thermal-hydraulic research activities were carried out worldwide in the past as well as in the near present, studies on dynamic behavior and flow stability of SC water cooled systems are scare. Due to the strong density variation, flow stability is expected to be one of the key items which need to be taken into account in the design of a SCWR. In the present work, the dynamic behavior and flow stability of SC water cooled systems are investigated using both numerical and theoretical approaches. For this purpose a new computer code SASC was developed, which can be applied to analysis the dynamic behavior of systems cooled by supercritical fluids. In addition, based on the assumptions of a simplified system, a theoretical model was derived for the prediction of the onset of flow instability. A comparison was made between the results obtained using the theoretical model and those from the SASC code. A good agreement was achieved. This gives the first evidence of the reliability of both the SASC code and the theoretical model

  14. Investigation of R-134a as a modeling fluid for supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvin, J.C.; Pioro, I.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of using Refrigerant-134a (R-134a) as a potential modeling fluid by comparing the thermophysical properties with those of water. Operating conditions of SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are scaled into those of R-134a, in order to provide proper SCWR-equivalent conditions. The thermophysical properties for R-134a are obtained from NIST REFPROP software. The results indicate that the thermophysical properties of R-134a undergo significant changes within the critical and pseudocritical regions similar to that of supercritical water. An investigation into the pseudocritical region of R-134a was also conducted. (author)

  15. Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided

  16. Steady state and linear stability analysis of a supercritical water natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manish; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has excellent heat transfer characteristics as a coolant for nuclear reactors. Besides it results in high thermal efficiency of the plant. However, the flow can experience instabilities in supercritical water reactors, as the density change is very large for the supercritical fluids. A computer code SUCLIN using supercritical water properties has been developed to carry out the steady state and linear stability analysis of a SCW natural circulation loop. The conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy have been linearized by imposing small perturbation in flow rate, enthalpy, pressure and specific volume. The equations have been solved analytically to generate the characteristic equation. The roots of the equation determine the stability of the system. The code has been qualitatively assessed with published results and has been extensively used for studying the effect of diameter, height, heater inlet temperature, pressure and local loss coefficients on steady state and stability behavior of a Supercritical Water Natural Circulation Loop (SCWNCL). The present paper describes the linear stability analysis model and the results obtained in detail.

  17. Supercritical Water Oxidation Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The work presented here is the evaluation of the modified wet‐oxidation method described as Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) for the analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) in very difficult oil/gas produced water sample matrices.

  18. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  19. Supercritical water oxidation of ion exchange resins: Degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A. [CEA Marcoule, DEN DTCD SPDE LFSM, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Guichardon, P. [Ecole Cent Marseille, F-13451 Marseille 20 (France); Boutin, O. [Aix Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS 6181, F-13545 Aix En Provence 4 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Spent ion exchange resins are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins and contain radioactivity. IER degradation experiments were carried out in a continuous supercritical water reactor. Total organic carbon degradation rates in the range of 95-98% were obtained depending on operating conditions. GC-MS chromatography analyses were carried out to determine intermediate products formed during the reaction. Around 50 species were identified for cationic and anionic resins. Degradation of poly-styrenic structure leads to the formation of low molecular weight compounds. Benzoic acid, phenol and acetic acid are the main compounds. However, other products are detected in appreciable yields such as phenolic species or heterocycles, for anionic IERs degradation. Intermediates produced by intramolecular rearrangements are also obtained. A radical degradation mechanism is proposed for each resin. In this overall mechanism, several hypotheses are foreseen, according to HOO center dot radical attack sites. (authors)

  20. ULTRA SCWR+: Practical advanced water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, Romney; Khartabil, Hussam; Kuran, Sermet; Zhou, Tracy; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Modern thermal power plants now utilize supercritical steam cycles with thermal efficiencies of over 45%. Recent developments have lead to Ultra-SuperCritical (USC) systems, which adopt reheat turbines that can attain efficiencies of over 50%. Because these turbines are already developed, demonstrated and deployed worldwide, and use existing and traditional steam cycle technology, the simplest nuclear advance is to utilize these proven thermal cycle conditions by coupling this turbine type to a reactor. This development direction is fundamentally counter to the usual approach of adopting high-temperature gas-cooled (helium-cooled) reactor cycles, for which turbines have yet to be demonstrated on commercial scale unlike the supercritical steam turbines. The ULTRA (Ultra-supercritical Light water Thermal ReActor) SCWR+ concept adopts the fundamental design approach of matching a water and steam-cooled reactor to the ultra-supercritical steam cycle, adopting the existing and planned thermal power plant turbines. The HP and IP sections are fed with conditions of 25 MPa/625degC and 7 MPa/700degC, respectively, to achieve operating plant thermal efficiencies in excess of 50%, with a direct turbine cycle. By using such low-pressure reheated steam, this concept also adopts technology that was explored and used many years ago in existing water reactors, with the potential to produce large quantities of low cost heat, which can be used for other industrial and district processes. Pressure-Tube (PT) reactors are suitable for adoption of this design approach and, in addition, have other advantages that will significantly improve water-cooled reactor technology. These additional advantages include enhanced safety and improved resource utilization and proliferation resistance. This paper describes the PT-SCWR+ concept and its potential enhancements. (author)

  1. Muonium in sub- and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, P.W.; Brodovitch, J.-C.; Ghandi, K.; Addison-Jones, B.; Schuth, J.; Bartels, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Muonium has been studied in muon-irradiated water over a wide range of conditions, from standard temperature and pressure (STP) up to 350 bar and up to 420 o C, corresponding to water densities from 1.0 down to 0.1 g cm -3 . This is the first report of muonium in supercritical water. Muonium was unambiguously identified from its spin precession frequencies in small transverse magnetic fields. The hyperfine constant was determined and found to be similar to the published values for muonium in water at STP and in vacuum. Muonium was found to be long-lived over the whole range of conditions studied. The fraction of muons which form muonium was found to vary markedly over the density range studied. Correlation of the muonium fraction with the ionic product of water suggests a common cause, such as the rate of proton transfer between molecules involved in the radiolysis of water and the formation of MuOH, which competes with muonium formation

  2. Supercritical water oxidation benchscale testing metallurgical analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norby, B.C.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes metallurgical evaluation of witness wires from a series of tests using supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) to process cutting oil containing a simulated radionuclide. The goal of the tests was to evaluate the technology's ability to process a highly chlorinated waste representative of many mixed waste streams generated in the DOE complex. The testing was conducted with a bench-scale SCWO system developed by the Modell Development Corporation. Significant test objectives included process optimization for adequate destruction efficiency, tracking the radionuclide simulant and certain metals in the effluent streams, and assessment of reactor material degradation resulting from processing a highly chlorinated waste. The metallurgical evaluation described herein includes results of metallographic analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of witness wires exposed to the SCWO environment for one test series

  3. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Wadim, E-mail: wadim.jaeger@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hurtado, Antonio [Technical University of Dresden, Institute of Power Engineering, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. > Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. > Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. > Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  4. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Hurtado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. → Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. → Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. → Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  5. Modeling of biomass to hydrogen via the supercritical water pyrolysis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divilio, R.J. [Combustion Systems Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A heat transfer model has been developed to predict the temperature profile inside the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor. A series of heat transfer tests were conducted on the University of Hawaii`s apparatus to calibrate the model. Results of the model simulations are shown for several of the heat transfer tests. Tests with corn starch and wood pastes indicated that there are substantial differences between the thermal properties of the paste compared to pure water, particularly near the pseudo critical temperature. The assumption of constant thermal diffusivity in the temperature range of 250 to 450 C gave a reasonable prediction of the reactor temperatures when paste is being fed. A literature review is presented for pyrolysis of biomass in water at elevated temperatures up to the supercritical range. Based on this review, a global reaction mechanism is proposed. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the test results from the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor when corn starch and corn starch and wood pastes were being fed. The calculations indicate that the data from the reactor falls both below and above the equilibrium hydrogen concentrations depending on test conditions. The data also indicates that faster heating rates may be beneficial to the hydrogen yield. Equilibrium calculations were also performed to examine the impact of wood concentration on the gas mixtures produced. This calculation showed that increasing wood concentrations favors the formation of methane at the expense of hydrogen.

  6. CFD validation of a supercritical water flow for SCWR design heat and mass fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Komen, E.M.J.; Lowenberg, M.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    The applicability of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for water under supercritical conditions in supercritical water reactors (SCWR) has still to be verified. In the recent past, CFD validation analyses were performed by various institutes for supercritical water in vertical tubes based on the well known experimental data from Yamagata. However, validation using data from experiments with working conditions closer to the actual operational conditions of such reactors is needed. From a literature survey the experiments performed by Herkenrath are selected to perform validation analyses at higher heat fluxes and a higher mass flux. The accuracy of CFD using RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) turbulence modelling for supercritical fluids under conditions close to the operational conditions of a supercritical water reactor is determined. It is concluded that the wall temperature can be predicted by RANS CFD, using the RNG k-ε turbulence model, with accuracy in the range of 5% for heat fluxes up to 1100 kW/m 2 and for a bulk enthalpy up to 2200 kJ/kg. For a bulk enthalpy exceeding 2200 kJ/kg, a significant lower accuracy of the CFD predictions (about 3%) is found for the simulations of the experiments of Yamagata in comparison with the simulations of the experiments of Herkenrath. For these experiments, the accuracy is about 18 per cent. This might be a result of the fact that the CFD analyses do not simulate the flattening of the temperature profile at about 2200 kJ/kg which is found in the experiments of Herkenrath. However, the obtained accuracies ranging from 3% to 18% are still deemed to be acceptable for many design purposes. (authors)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  8. Supercritical water gasification of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aye, L.; Yamaguchi, D. [Melbourne Univ. International Technologies Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an attractive technology for producing fuels from biomass and waste materials. As a result of greenhouse gas emissions and issues related to local air pollutants, hydrogen production from these renewable energy resources has been gaining in popularity. Disposal of sewage sludge is another environmental problem that have led to severe regulations. Incineration has been one of the most commonly used means of sewage sludge disposal. Thermal gasification produces gaseous fuel, making it a better option over incineration. However, due to its high moisture content, this process is not feasible to make use of sewage sludge directly. In order to analyze SCWG of sewage sludge, it has been determined that equilibrium analysis is most suitable since the maximum achievable amount of hydrogen in a given reacting condition can be estimated. The equilibrium model can be divided into two types of models, namely stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric. This paper presented the results of a study that used a computer program to develop a nonstoichiometric model with the direct Gibbs free energy minimization technique. In addition, various biomass were simulated for comparisons in order to identify if sewage sludge is a potential feedstock for hydrogen production. Last, the effects of reaction pressure and temperature on product distribution were also examined. It was shown that the proposed model is capable of estimating the product distribution at equilibrium. 33 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Challenges of selecting materials for the process of biomass gasification in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukis, N.; Habicht, W.; Hauer, E.; Dinjus, E. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie

    2010-07-01

    A new process for the gasification of wet biomass is the reaction in supercritical water. The product is a combustible gas, rich in hydrogen with a high calorific value. The reaction is performed under high temperatures - up to 700 C - and pressures up to 30 MPa. The combination of these physical conditions and the corrosive environment is very demanding for the construction materials of the reactor. Only few alloys exhibit the required mechanical properties, especially the mechanical strength at temperatures higher than 600 C. Ni-Base alloys like alloy 625 can be applied up to a temperature of 700 C and are common materials for application under supercritical water conditions. During gasification experiments with corn silage and other biomasses, corrosion of the reactor material alloy 625 appears. The gasification of an aqueous methanol solution in supercritical water at temperatures up to 600 C and 25 - 30 MPa pressure results in an product gas rich in hydrogen, carbon dioxide and some methane. Alloy 625 shows very low corrosion rates in this environment. It is obvious that the heteroatoms and salts present in biomass cause corrosion of the reactor material. (orig.)

  10. Sensitivity analysis of CFD code FLUENT-12 for supercritical water in vertical bare tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, A.; Haines, P.; Harvel, G.; Pioro, I., E-mail: amjad.farah@yahoo.com, E-mail: patrickjhaines@gmail.com, E-mail: glenn.harvel@uoit.ca, E-mail: igor.pioro@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science,Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The ability to use FLUENT 12 or other CFD software to accurately model supercritical water flow through various geometries in diabatic conditions is integral to research involving coal-fired power plants as well as Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWR). The cost and risk associated with constructing supercritical water test loops are far too great to use in a university setting. Previous work has shown that FLUENT 12, specifically realizable k-ε model, can reasonably predict the bulk and wall temperature distributions of externally heated vertical bare tubes for cases with relatively low heat and mass fluxes. However, sizeable errors were observed for other cases, often those which involved large heat fluxes that produce deteriorated heat transfer (DHT) regimes. The goal of this research is to gain a more complete understanding of how FLUENT 12 models supercritical water cases and where errors can be expected to occur. One control case is selected where expected changes in bulk and wall temperatures occur and they match empirical correlations' predictions, and the operating parameters are varied individually to gauge their effect on FLUENT's solution. The model used is the realizable k-ε, and the parameters altered are inlet pressure, mass flux, heat flux, and inlet temperature. (author)

  11. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  12. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  13. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  14. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  15. Development of an Accelerated Methodology to Study Degradation of Materials in Supercritical Water for Application in High Temperature Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David

    The decreasing supply of fossil fuel sources, coupled with the increasing concentration of green house gases has placed enormous pressure to maximize the efficiency of power generation. Increasing the outlet temperature of these power plants will result in an increase in operating efficiency. By employing supercritical water as the coolant in thermal power plants (nuclear reactors and coal power plants), the plant efficiency can be increased to 50%, compared to traditional reactors which currently operate at 33%. The goal of this dissertation is to establish techniques to characterize the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of materials exposed to supercritical water. Traditionally, these tests have been long term exposure tests spanning months. The specific goal of this dissertation is to develop a methodology for accelerated estimation of corrosion rates in supercritical water that can be sued as a screening tool to select materials for long term testing. In this study, traditional methods were used to understand the degradation of materials in supercritical water and establish a point of comparison to the first electrochemical studies performed in supercritical water. Materials studied included austenitic steels (stainless steel 304, stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50) and nickel based alloys (Inconel 625 and 718). Surface chemistry of the oxide layer was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Stainless steel 304 was subjected to constant tensile load creep tests in water at a pressure of 27 MPa and at temperatures of 200 °C, 315 °C and supercritical water at 450 °C for 24 hours. It was determined that the creep rate for stainless steel 304 exposed to supercritical water would be unacceptable for use in service. It was observed that the formation of hematite was favored in subcritical temperatures, while magnetite was formed in the supercritical region. Corrosion of

  16. Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

    1995-04-03

    The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of methane oxidation in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rofer, C.K.; Streit, G.E.

    1988-10-01

    This project, is a Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Research and Development task being carried out by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its objective is to achieve an understanding of the technology for use in scaling up and applying oxidation in supercritical water as a viable process for treating a variety of Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE-DP) waste streams. This report presents experimental results for the kinetics of the oxidation of methane and methanol in supercritical water and computer modeling results for the oxidation of carbonmonoxide and methane in supercritical water. The experimental and modeling results obtained to date on these one-carbon model compounds indicate that the mechanism of oxidation in supercritical water can be represented by free-radical reactions with appropriate modifications for high pressure and the high water concentration. If these current trends are sustained, a large body of existing literature data on the kinetics of elementary reactions can be utilized to predict the behavior of other compounds and their mixtures. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Design and technology development of solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoeda, M.; Kosaku, Y.; Hatano, T.; Kuroda, T.; Miki, N.; Honma, T.; Akiba, M.; Konishi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kawamura, Y.; Sato, S.; Furuya, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents results of conceptual design activities and associated R&D of a solid breeder blanket system for demonstration of power generation fusion reactors (DEMO blanket) cooled by supercritical water. The Fusion Council of Japan developed the long-term research and development programme of the blanket in 1999. To make the fusion DEMO reactor more attractive, a higher thermal efficiency of more than 40% was strongly recommended. To meet this requirement, the design of the DEMO fusion reactor was carried out. In conjunction with the reactor design, a new concept of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was proposed and design and technology development of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was performed. By thermo-mechanical analyses of the first wall, the tresca stress was evaluated to be 428 MPa, which clears the 3Sm value of F82H. By thermal and nuclear analyses of the breeder layers, it was shown that a net TBR of more than 1.05 can be achieved. By thermal analysis of the supercritical water power plant, it was shown that a thermal efficiency of more than 41% is achievable. The design work included design of the coolant flow pattern for blanket modules, module structure design, thermo-mechanical analysis and neutronics analysis of the blanket module, and analyses of the tritium inventory and permeation. Preliminary integration of the design of a solid breeder blanket cooled by supercritical water was achieved in this study. In parallel with the design activities, engineering R&D was conducted covering all necessary issues, such as development of structural materials, tritium breeding materials, and neutron multiplier materials; neutronics experiments and analyses; and development of the blanket module fabrication technology. Upon developing the fabrication technology for the first wall and box structure, a hot isostatic pressing bonded F82H first wall mock-up with embedded rectangular cooling channels was

  19. Heat transfer in vertical pipe flow at supercritical pressures of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenberg, M.F.

    2007-05-01

    A new reactor concept with light water at supercritical conditions is investigated in the framework of the European project ''High Performance Light Water Reactor'' (HPLWR). Characteristics of this reactor are the system pressure and the coolant outlet temperature above the critical point of water. Water is regarded as a single phase fluid under these conditions with a high energy density. This high energy density should be utilized in a technical application. Therefore in comparison with up to date nuclear power plants some constructive savings are possible. For instance, steam dryers or steam separators can be avoided in contrast to boiling water reactors. A thermal efficiency of about 44% can be accomplished at a system pressure of 25MPa through a water heat-up from 280 C to 510 C. To ensure this heat-up within the core reliable predictions of the heat transfer are necessary. Water as the working fluid changes its fluid properties dramatically during the heat up in the core. As such; the density in the core varies by the factor of seven. The motivation to develop a look-up table for heat transfer predications in supercritical water is due to the significant temperature dependence of the fluid properties of water. A systematic consolidation of experimental data was performed. Together with further developments of the methods to derive a look-up table made it possible to develop a look-up table for heat transfer in supercritical water in vertical flows. A look-up table predicts the heat transfer for different boundary conditions (e.g. pressure or heat flux) with tabulated data. The tabulated wall temperatures for fully developed turbulent flows can be utilized for different geometries by applying hydraulic diameters. With the developed look-up table the difficulty of choosing one of the many published correlations can be avoided. In general, the correlations have problems with strong fluid property variations. Strong property variations combined with high heat

  20. Assessment of gas cooled fast reactor with indirect supercritical CO2 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Driscoll, M. J.; Dostal, V.; Dumaz, P.; Poullennec, G.; Alpy, N.

    2006-01-01

    Various indirect power cycle options for a helium cooled Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) with particular focus on a supercritical CO 2 (SCO 2 ) indirect cycle are investigated as an alternative to a helium cooled direct cycle GFR. The Balance Of Plant (BOP) options include helium-nitrogen Brayton cycle, supercritical water Rankine cycle, and SCO 2 recompression Brayton power cycle in three versions: (1) basic design with turbine inlet temperature of 550 .deg. C, (2) advanced design with turbine inlet temperature of 650 .deg. C and (3) advanced design with the same turbine inlet temperature and reduced compressor inlet temperature. The indirect SCO 2 recompression cycle is found attractive since in addition to easier BOP maintenance it allows significant reduction of core outlet temperature, making design of the primary system easier while achieving very attractive efficiencies comparable to or slightly lower than, the efficiency of the reference GFR direct cycle design. In addition, the indirect cycle arrangement allows significant reduction of the GFR 'proximate-containment' and the BOP for the SCO 2 cycle is very compact. Both these factors will lead to reduced capital cost

  1. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included

  2. Numerical comparison of thermal hydraulic aspects of supercritical carbon dioxide and subcritical water-based natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Milan Krishna Singhar; Basu, Dipankar Narayan [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati (India)

    2017-02-15

    Application of the supercritical condition in reactor core cooling needs to be properly justified based on the extreme level of parameters involved. Therefore, a numerical study is presented to compare the thermalhydraulic performance of supercritical and single-phase natural circulation loops under low-to-intermediate power levels. Carbon dioxide and water are selected as respective working fluids, operating under an identical set of conditions. Accordingly, a three-dimensional computational model was developed, and solved with an appropriate turbulence model and equations of state. Large asymmetry in velocity and temperature profiles was observed in a single cross section due to local buoyancy effect, which is more prominent for supercritical fluids. Mass flow rate in a supercritical loop increases with power until a maximum is reached, which subsequently corresponds to a rapid deterioration in heat transfer coefficient. That can be identified as the limit of operation for such loops to avoid a high temperature, and therefore, the use of a supercritical loop is suggested only until the appearance of such maxima. Flow-induced heat transfer deterioration can be delayed by increasing system pressure or lowering sink temperature. Bulk temperature level throughout the loop with water as working fluid is higher than supercritical carbon dioxide. This is until the heat transfer deterioration, and hence the use of a single-phase loop is prescribed beyond that limit.

  3. System Design of a Supercritical CO_2 cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seongkuk; Yu, Hwanyeal; Kim, Yonghee; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2014-01-01

    Small modular reactor (SMR) systems that have advantages of little initial capital cost and small restriction on construction site are being developed by many research organizations around the world. Existing SMR concepts have the same objective: to achieve compact size and a long life core. Most of small modular reactors have much smaller size than the large nuclear power plant. However, existing SMR concepts are not fully modularized. This paper suggests a complete modular reactor with an innovative concept for reactor cooling by using a supercritical carbon dioxide. The authors propose the supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle (S-CO_2 cycle) as a power conversion system to achieve small volume of power conversion unit (PCU) and to contain the reactor core and PCU in one vessel. A conceptual design of the proposed small modular reactor was developed, which is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). The supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle for the S-CO_2 cooled reactor core was optimized and the size of turbomachinery and heat exchanger were estimated preliminary. The nuclear fuel composed with UN was proposed and the core lifetime was obtained from a burnup versus reactivity calculation. Furthermore, a system layout with fully passive safety systems for both normal operation and emergency operation was proposed. (author)

  4. An experimental investigation of flow instability between two heated parallel channels with supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xi; Xiao, Zejun, E-mail: fabulous_2012@sina.com; Yan, Xiao; Li, Yongliang; Huang, Yanping

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Flow instability experiment between two heated channels with supercritical water is carried out. • Two kinds of out of phase flow instability are found and instability boundaries under different working conditions are obtained. • Dynamics characteristics of flow instability are analyzed. - Abstract: Super critical water reactor (SCWR) is the generation IV nuclear reactor in the world. Under normal operation, water enters SCWR from cold leg with a temperature of 280 °C and then leaves the core with a temperature of 500 °C. Due to the sharp change of temperature, there is a huge density change in the core, which could result in potential flow instability and the safety of reactor would be threatened consequently. So it is necessary to carry out relevant investigation in this field. An experimental investigation which concerns with out of phase flow instability between two heated parallel channels with supercritical water has been carried out in this paper. Due to two INCONEL 625 pipes with a thickness of 6.5 mm are adopted, more experimental results are attained. To find out the influence of axial power shape on the onset of flow instability, each heated channel is divided into two sections and the heating power of each section can be controlled separately. Finally the instability boundaries are obtained under different inlet temperatures, axial power shapes, total inlet mass flow rates and system pressures. The dynamics characteristics of out of phase oscillation are also analyzed.

  5. Research and development of super light water reactors and super fast reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Morooka, S.; Yamakawa, M.; Ishiwatari, Y.; Ikejiri, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Muroya, Y.; Terai, T.; Sasaki, K.; Mori, H.; Hamamoto, Y.; Okumura, K.; Kugo, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ezato, K.; Akasaka, N.; Hotta, A.

    2011-01-01

    Super Light Water Reactors (Super LWR) and Super Fast Reactors (Super FR) are the supercritical- pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWR) that are developed by the research group of University of Tokyo since 1989 and now jointly under development with the researchers of Waseda University, University of Tokyo and other organizations in Japan. The principle of the reactor concept development, the results of the past Super LWR and Super FR R&D as well as the R&D program of the Super FR second phase project are described. (author)

  6. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  7. Generic supercritical water technology; Generic technology to shite no chorinkaisui riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K; Ajiri, M; Inomata, H; Smith, R; Hakuta, Y [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokoyama, C [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). The Institute forChemical Reaction Science; Chin, L [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the measurement and analysis for clarifying solution structure of supercritical water and exhibition mechanism of solvent functions. It also describes the development of new processes using supercritical water as reaction solvent. The PVT measurements were conducted in the supercritical region using pure water and NaCl aqueous solution, to confirm the reduction of molar volume of the electrolyte solution. The hydration structure was examined in the supercritical aqueous solution by the molecular dynamic simulation. As a result, presence of hydrogen bond structure, where the contribution of two branching hydrogen bond can not be ignored, was suggested under the supercritical condition. Characteristics of supercritical aqueous solutions are analyzed through in-situ Raman and scattered X-ray spectral measurements. Moreover, this paper introduces developments of some processes in the supercritical water, such as decomposition of wasted polymers, recovery of chemical materials, reforming of heavy hydrocarbons by contact hydrogenation, and synthesis of fine powders of metal oxide by reaction crystallization.

  8. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment in the High Temperature Insert-Reflight (HTI-R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Zappoli, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Current research on supercritical water processes on board the International Space Station (ISS) focuses on salt precipitation and transport in a test cell designed for supercritical water. This study, known as the Supercritical Water Mixture Experiment (SCWM) serves as a precursor experiment for developing a better understanding of inorganic salt precipitation and transport during supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) processes for the eventual application of this technology for waste management and resource reclamation in microgravity conditions. During typical SCWO reactions any inorganic salts present in the reactant stream will precipitate and begin to coat reactor surfaces and control mechanisms (e.g., valves) often severely impacting the systems performance. The SCWM experiment employs a Sample Cell Unit (SCU) filled with an aqueous solution of Na2SO4 0.5-w at the critical density and uses a refurbished High Temperature Insert, which was used in an earlier ISS experiment designed to study pure water at near-critical conditions. The insert, designated as the HTI-Reflight (HTI-R) will be deployed in the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on the International Space Station (ISS). Objectives of the study include measurement of the shift in critical temperature due to the presence of the inorganic salt, assessment of the predominant mode of precipitation (i.e., heterogeneously on SCU surfaces or homogeneously in the bulk fluid), determination of the salt morphology including size and shapes of particulate clusters, and the determination of the dominant mode of transport of salt particles in the presence of an imposed temperature gradient. Initial results from the ISS experiments will be presented and compared to findings from laboratory experiments on the ground.

  9. Solubility of 1:1 Alkali Nitrates and Chlorides in Near-Critical and Supercritical Water : 1 Alkali Nitrates and Chlorides in Near-Critical and Supercritical Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusbrock, Ingo; Metz, Sybrand J.; Rexwinkel, Glenn; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2009-01-01

    To increase the available data oil systems containing supercritical water and inorganic compounds, all experimental setup was designed to investigate the solubilities of inorganic compounds Ill supercritical water, In this work, three alkali chloride salts (LiCl, NaCl, KCl) and three alkali nitrate

  10. Study of thermal hydraulic behavior of supercritical water flowing through fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, Sachin; Lakshmanan, S.P.; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Pandey, Manmohan

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on thermal-hydraulic behavior in Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) fuel assembly have obtained a significant attention in the international SCWR community because of its potential to obtain high thermal efficiency and compact design. Present work deals with CFD analysis to study the flow and heat transfer behavior of supercritical water in 4 metre long 7-pin fuel bundle using commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX for single phase steady state conditions. Considering the symmetric conditions, 1/12th part of the fuel rod bundle is taken as a domain of analysis. RNG K-epsilon model with scalable wall functions is used for modeling the turbulence behavior. Constant heat flux boundary condition is applied at the fuel rod surface. IAPWS equations of state are used to compute thermo-physical properties of supercritical water. Sharp variations in its thermo-physical properties (specific heat, density) are observed near the pseudo-critical temperature causing sharp change in heat transfer coefficient. The pseudo-critical point initially appears in the gaps among heated fuel rods, and then spreads radially outward reaching the adiabatic wall as the flow goes downstream. The enthalpy gain in the centre of the channel is much higher than that in the wall region. Non-uniformity in the circumferential distribution of surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient is observed which is in agreement with published literature. Heat transfer coefficient is high on the rod surface near the tight region and decreases as the distance between rod surfaces increases. (author)

  11. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  12. Transformation of heavy metals in lignite during supercritical water gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guifang; Yang, Xinfei; Chen, Shouyan; Dong, Yong; Cui, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiqiang; Ma, Chunyuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The transformations of heavy metals during lignite SCWG were investigated. • The risks of heavy metals in lignite and residues after SCWG were evaluated. • The effects of experimental conditions on corrosion during SCWG were studied. - Abstract: Transformation characteristics of heavy metals during lignite supercritical water gasification (SCWG) were studied. A sequential extraction procedure (modified Tessier method) was used to selectively extract different fractions of Pb, Cd, Cr, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn. Heavy metals transformed into more stable fractions after SCWG. For Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn, SCWG reduced the bioavailability and the risks posed by heavy metals in lignite. Under the experimental conditions, the conversion rates for Pb and Cd were 16.0%–25.2% and 16.3%–23.4%, respectively, whereas those for Mn, Cu, and Zn were much lower. Solid products enriched with Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were obtained after SCWG; the contents of these metals varied slightly in the liquid products under different experimental conditions. Excess Cr and Ni that did not originate from lignite were found in the residues, owing to reactor corrosion during lignite SCWG. Higher temperatures alleviated corrosion, whereas higher pressures and equivalence ratios (ER) had the opposite effect. None of the heavy metals were detected in the gas phase under the experimental conditions used in the present study. The correlation between the distributions of heavy metals and the experimental conditions were also studied. The transformation pathways of Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn during SCWG were deduced according to the experimental results.

  13. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes, in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the US Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Operations Office awarded Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation, of Boston Massachusetts and its sub-contractor MODAR, Inc. of Natick Massachusetts a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program was contracted through a Cooperative Agreement that was co-funded by the US Department of Energy and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. The SCWODAT testing scope outlined by the DOE in the original Cooperative Agreement and amendments thereto was initiated in June 1994 and successfully completed in December 1995. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the MODAR SCWO technology

  14. CFD analysis of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in single channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Xie Hongyan; Yu Tao

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wane in supercritical water reactor is investigated with CFX. The mixing vane elevation influenced on temperature distribution and flow field are simulated in the model. The results showed the mixing vane cause fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improve the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45, 50, 60 and 70 angle, the 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  15. Supercritical water corrosion of high Cr steels and Ni-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Han, Chang Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    High Cr steels (9 to 12% Cr) have been widely used for high temperature high pressure components in fossil power plants. Recently the concept of SCWR (supercritical water-cooled reactor) has aroused a keen interest as one of the next generation (Generation IV) reactors. Consequently Ni-base (or high Ni) alloys as well as high Cr steels that have already many experiences in the field are among the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or reactor internals. Tentative inlet and outlet temperatures of the anticipated SCWR are 280 and 510 .deg. C respectively. Among many candidate alloys there are austenitic stainless steels, Ni base alloys, ODS alloys as well as high Cr steels. In this study the corrosion behavior of the high Cr steels and Ni base (or high Ni) alloys in the supercritical water were investigated. The corrosion behavior of the unirradiated base metals could be used in the near future as a guideline for the out-of-pile or in-pile corrosion evaluation tests

  16. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR technology with the supercritical (SC steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and development. The MHTGR SC plant coupling the existing technologies of current MHTGR module design with operation experiences of SC FPP will achieve high cycle efficiency in addition to its inherent safety. The standard once-reheat SC steam turbine cycle and the once-reheat steam cycle with life-steam have been studied and corresponding parameters were computed. Efficiencies of thermodynamic processes of MHTGR SC plants were analyzed, while comparisons were made between an MHTGR SC plant and a designed advanced passive PWR - AP1000. It was shown that the net plant efficiency of an MHTGR SC plant can reach 45% or above, 30% higher than that of AP1000 (35% net efficiency. Furthermore, an MHTGR SC plant has higher environmental competitiveness without emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

  17. Reactions of nitrate salts with ammonia in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, P.C.; Gloyna, E.F.; Buelow, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Reactions involving nitrate salts and ammonia were investigated in supercritical water at temperatures from 450 to 530 C and pressures near 300 bar. Reaction products included nitrite, nitrogen gas, and nitrous oxide. Observed reaction rates and product distributions provided evidence for a free-radical reaction mechanism with NO 2 , NO, and NH 2 · as the primary reactive species at supercritical conditions. In the proposed elementary mechanism, the rate-limiting reaction step was determined to be the hydrolysis of MNO 3 species, which resulted in the formation of nitric acid and subsequently NO 2 . A simple second-order reaction model was used to represent the data. In developing an empirical kinetic model, nitrate and nitrate were lumped as an NO x - reactant. Empirical kinetic parameters were developed for four MNO x /NH 3 reacting systems, assuming first orders in both NH 3 and NO x - . Observed MNO x /NH 3 reaction rates and mechanisms suggest immediately a practical significance of these reactions for nitrogen control strategies in supercritical water oxidation processes

  18. Supercritical Water Oxidation: A Solution for the Elimination of Back-End Organic Reprocessing Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A.; Turc, H.A.; Fournel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a very efficient technique for total elimination of organic wastes from reprocessing activities on the way of 'zero wastes' facilities. This technology uses the properties of supercritical water (P > 221 bars and T > 647 K) to obtain a good mixing between oxygen (the oxidant) and the organic waste. Thereby, the oxidation reaction is fast and complete. Using the SCWO process, contamination contained in organic materials like spent solvents can be confined in a closed space, like a reactor in a glovebox. A new application is tested for the treatment of solid organic wastes like ion exchange resins (IER). Experiments are made with suspensions of IER in water and isopropyl-alcohol. A nuclear version of the process with the double shell reactor has been constructed and is being tested. The aim of this work is to obtain a treatment capacity of 1 kg/h for the nuclear version with the same global set-up, concept of process and security as well as contamination management as for a 200 g/h pilot. (authors)

  19. Supercritical Water Oxidation: A Solution for the Elimination of Back-End Organic Reprocessing Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A.; Turc, H.A.; Fournel, B. [Supercritical fluids and membranes Laboratory, CEA Valrho, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a very efficient technique for total elimination of organic wastes from reprocessing activities on the way of 'zero wastes' facilities. This technology uses the properties of supercritical water (P > 221 bars and T > 647 K) to obtain a good mixing between oxygen (the oxidant) and the organic waste. Thereby, the oxidation reaction is fast and complete. Using the SCWO process, contamination contained in organic materials like spent solvents can be confined in a closed space, like a reactor in a glovebox. A new application is tested for the treatment of solid organic wastes like ion exchange resins (IER). Experiments are made with suspensions of IER in water and isopropyl-alcohol. A nuclear version of the process with the double shell reactor has been constructed and is being tested. The aim of this work is to obtain a treatment capacity of 1 kg/h for the nuclear version with the same global set-up, concept of process and security as well as contamination management as for a 200 g/h pilot. (authors)

  20. Assessment of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water in the frame of best-estimate code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Espinoza, Victor H. Sanchez; Schneider, Niko; Hurtado, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Within the frame of the Generation IV international forum six innovative reactor concepts are the subject of comprehensive investigations. In some projects supercritical water will be considered as coolant, moderator (as for the High Performance Light Water Reactor) or secondary working fluid (one possible option for Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Reactors). Supercritical water is characterized by a pronounced change of the thermo-physical properties when crossing the pseudo-critical line, which goes hand in hand with a change in the heat transfer (HT) behavior. Hence, it is essential to estimate, in a proper way, the heat-transfer coefficient and subsequently the wall temperature. The scope of this paper is to present and discuss the activities at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS) related to the implementation of correlations for wall-to-fluid HT at supercritical conditions in Best-Estimate codes like TRACE as well as its validation. It is important to validate TRACE before applying it to safety analyses of HPLWR or of other reactor systems. In the past 3 decades various experiments have been performed all over the world to reveal the peculiarities of wall-to-fluid HT at supercritical conditions. Several different heat transfer phenomena such as HT enhancement (due to higher Prandtl numbers in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical point) or HT deterioration (due to strong property variations) were observed. Since TRACE is a component based system code with a finite volume method the resolution capabilities are limited and not all physical phenomena can be modeled properly. But Best -Estimate system codes are nowadays the preferred option for safety related investigations of full plants or other integral systems. Thus, the increase of the confidence in such codes is of high priority. In this paper, the post-test analysis of experiments with supercritical parameters will be presented. For that reason various correlations for the HT, which considers the characteristics

  1. Prediction and analysis of onset of turbulent convective heat transfer deterioration in supercritical water flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, H.; Gallaway, T.; Antal, St.P.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Supercritical water is considered as a coolant in one of the six systems defined as Generation IV reactors. Such reactor will operate at pressures higher than the thermodynamic critical point of water (374 C degrees and 22.1 MPa), allowing for a significant increase of the system thermal efficiency. During normal operation no boiling crisis will occur, thereby sudden temperature excursions will be avoided. However, since the physical properties of supercritical fluids change rapidly with temperature in the pseudo critical region, the local heat transfer coefficient may still show unusual behaviour depending upon the heat flux. It can be either enhanced or deteriorated, depending on flow conditions and heat flux. It has been shown that the complexity of the phenomena involved makes it very difficult to develop acceptable predictive capabilities solely based on phenomenological models and correlations. It has also been shown that a multidimensional approach based on CFD (computational fluid dynamics) concepts is capable of properly capturing local effects that may lead to either heat transfer deterioration or enhancement

  2. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  3. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  4. Studies of super-critical CO2 gas turbine power generation fast reactor (Contract research, translated document)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisohara, Naoyuki; Kotake, Shoji; Sakamoto, Toshihiko

    2008-08-01

    The following studies have been executed for a super-critical CO 2 turbine system of an SFR. (1) Preliminary design of a SFR adopting a super-critical CO 2 cycle turbine. Preliminary system design of an SFR that adopts a super-critical CO 2 cycle turbine has been made. This SFR system eliminates secondary sodium circuits because of no sodium/water reaction. The power generation efficiency of the SFR has been estimated to be approximately 42%. Compared to a conventional SFR that adopts a steam Rankine cycle with secondary sodium circuits, the volume of the reactor building of the SC-CO 2 SFR has been reduced by 20%. (2) Thermal-hydraulic experiment of a super-critical CO 2 cycle loop. A test loop that simulates a super-critical CO 2 whole cycle was fabricated. An electrical heater was used for a heat source of the test loop. The high efficiency of the compressor has been experimentally confirmed near the super-critical region. The temperature efficiencies of PCHE recuperators have been approximately 98-99% (hot leg), and the recuperators have exhibited high heat transfer performance. No significant flow instability has been observed in the test loop operation. (3) Liquid sodium/CO 2 reaction test. Reaction tests have been executed by contacting a small amount of liquid sodium and CO 2 gas. Continuous sodium/CO 2 reactions with flame have occurred at the temperature higher than 570-580degC. Main reaction products have been Na 2 CO 3 and CO gas. The reaction heat has been also measured to be 50-75kJ/Na-mol. (4) Computer code safety analysis for tube failure of sodium/CO 2 heat exchanger. Safety calculation has been done for one double ended guillotine tube failure (1 DEG) of a helical coil type sodium/CO 2 heat exchanger. The analysis has showed that the maximum pressure in the primary sodium circuit is 0.28MPa due to a gas leak. It has been, however, below the allowed level of the primary circuit structural integrity. The void reactivity of the reactor core has

  5. Risk analysis for a radiolysis gas detonation in an in-pile loop with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeiger, T.; Raque, M.; Kuznetsov, M.; Redlinger, R.; Schulenberg, T.

    2012-01-01

    The SCWR (supercritical water reactor) -FQT project is a cooperation between European and Chinese partners aimed to test the fuel SCWR elements under reactor conditions. In the frame of this work the risk of radiolysis gas production in the active range of the test track was assessed. The radiolysis gas could accumulate in an emergency cooling system with stagnating coolant. The ignition of this radiolysis gas could cause pressure peaks that are able to damage the primary coolant circuit. Pressure increase and deformations in case of ignition of accumulated gas were investigated. As piping material the Ti stabilized austenitic steel 08Ch18N10T was assumed, the simulation was performed using the ANSYS code. The results show that pipes without significant wall thickness enhancement cannot withstand the radiolysis gas detonation.

  6. Computational Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine for Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Wi S.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Energy demands at a remote site are increased as the world energy requirement diversifies so that they should generate power on their own site. A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) becomes a viable option for these sites. Generally, the economic feasibility of a high power reactor is greater than that for SMR. As a result the supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle is being considered for a power conversion system to increase economic competitiveness of SMR. The Brayton cycle efficiency is much higher than that for the Rankine cycle. Moreover, the components of the Brayton cycle are smaller than Rankine cycle's due to high heat capacity when a supercritical fluid is adopted. A lead (Pb) cooled SMR, BORIS, and a supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle, MOBIS, are being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU). Dostal et al. have compared some advanced power cycles and proposed the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) driven Brayton cycle. According to their suggestion SCO{sub 2} is adopted as a working fluid for MOBIS. The turbo machineries are most important components for the Brayton cycle. The turbo machineries of Brayton cycle consists of a turbine to convert kinetic energy of the fluid into mechanical energy of the shaft, and a compressor to recompress and recover the driving force of the working fluid. Therefore, turbine performance is one of the pivotal factors in increasing the cycle efficiency. In MOBIS a supercritical gas turbine is designed in the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation (GATO) and analyzed in the Turbine Integrated Numerical Analysis (TINA). A three-dimensional (3D) numerical analysis is employed for more detailed design to account for the partial flow which the one-dimensional (1D) analysis cannot consider.

  7. Computational Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine for Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Wi S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2008-01-01

    Energy demands at a remote site are increased as the world energy requirement diversifies so that they should generate power on their own site. A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) becomes a viable option for these sites. Generally, the economic feasibility of a high power reactor is greater than that for SMR. As a result the supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle is being considered for a power conversion system to increase economic competitiveness of SMR. The Brayton cycle efficiency is much higher than that for the Rankine cycle. Moreover, the components of the Brayton cycle are smaller than Rankine cycle's due to high heat capacity when a supercritical fluid is adopted. A lead (Pb) cooled SMR, BORIS, and a supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle, MOBIS, are being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU). Dostal et al. have compared some advanced power cycles and proposed the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO 2 ) driven Brayton cycle. According to their suggestion SCO 2 is adopted as a working fluid for MOBIS. The turbo machineries are most important components for the Brayton cycle. The turbo machineries of Brayton cycle consists of a turbine to convert kinetic energy of the fluid into mechanical energy of the shaft, and a compressor to recompress and recover the driving force of the working fluid. Therefore, turbine performance is one of the pivotal factors in increasing the cycle efficiency. In MOBIS a supercritical gas turbine is designed in the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation (GATO) and analyzed in the Turbine Integrated Numerical Analysis (TINA). A three-dimensional (3D) numerical analysis is employed for more detailed design to account for the partial flow which the one-dimensional (1D) analysis cannot consider

  8. Oxidation behavior of steels and Alloy 800 in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Bordoni, R.; Dominguez, G.; Alvarez, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a ferritic-martensitic steel T91 and a martensitic steel AISI 403 up to 750 h, and of AISI 316L and Alloy 800 up to 336 h in deaerated supercritical water, 450ºC-25 MPa, was investigated in this paper. After exposure up to 750 h, the weight gain data, for steels T91 and AISI 403, was fitted by ∆W=k t n , were n are similar for both steels and k is a little higher for T91. The oxide films grown in the steels were characterized using gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction. The films were adherent and exhibited a low porosity. For this low oxygen content supercritical water exposure, the oxide scale exhibited a typical duplex structure, in which the scale is composed of an outer iron oxide layer of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and an inner iron/chromium oxide layer of a non-stoichiometric iron chromite (Fe,Cr) 3 O 4 . Preliminary results, with AISI 316L and Alloy 800, for two exposure periods (168 and 336 h), are also reported. The morphology shown for the oxide films grown on both materials up to 336 h of oxidation in supercritical water, resembles that of a duplex layer film like that shown by stainless steels and Alloy 800 oxide films grown in a in a high temperature and pressure (220-350ºC) of a primary or secondary coolant of a plant. (author) [es

  9. Lewis-acid catalyzed depolymerization of Protobind lignin in supercritical water and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güvenatam, B.; Heeres, E.H.J.; Pidko, E.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of metal acetates, metal chlorides and metal triflates as Lewis acid catalysts for the depolymerization of soda lignin under supercritical conditions was investigated. The reactions were carried out at 400°C in water and ethanol. Lignin conversion in supercritical water led to formation of

  10. Lewis-acid catalyzed depolymerization of Protobind lignin in supercritical water and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenatam, Burcu; Heeres, Erik H.J.; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Ernie J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal acetates, metal chlorides and metal triflates as Lewis acid catalysts for the depolymerization of soda lignin under supercritical conditions was investigated. The reactions were carried out at 400 degrees C in water and ethanol. Lignin conversion in supercritical water led to

  11. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  12. CFD study on the supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dali, E-mail: ydlmitd@outlook.com; Peng, Minjun; Wang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • An innovation concept of supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor is proposed. • Body-centered cuboid (BCCa) arrangement is adopted for the pebbles. • S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor. - Abstract: The thermal hydraulic study of using supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}), a superior fluid state brayton cycle medium, in pebble bed type nuclear reactor is assessed through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. Preliminary concept design of this S-CO{sub 2} cooled pebble bed reactor (PBR) is implemented by the well-known KTA heat transfer correlation and Ergun pressure drop equation. Eddy viscosity transport turbulence model is adopted and verified by KTA calculated results. Distributions of the temperature, velocity, pressure and Nusselt (Nu) number of the coolant near the surface of the middle spherical fuel element are obtained and analyzed. The conclusion of the assessment is that S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor due primarily to its good heat transfer characteristic and large mass density, which could lead to achieve lower pressure drop and higher power density.

  13. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  14. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of alkaline black liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Changqing; Guo, Liejin; Chen, Yunan; Lu, Youjun [Xi' an Jiatong Univ. (China)

    2010-07-01

    Black liquor was gasified continuously in supercritical water successfully and the main gaseous products were H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with little amount of CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The increase of the temperature and the decrease of the flow rate and black liquor concentration enhanced SCWG of black liquor. The change of the system pressure had limited influence on the gasification effect. The maximal COD removal efficiency of 88.69 % was obtained at the temperature of 600 C. The pH values of the aqueous residue were all decreased to the range of 6.4{proportional_to}8 while the pH value of cooling effluence below 360 C increased to about 11 and the sodium content was much higher than that in the aqueous residue. The reaction rate for COD degradation in supercritical water was obtained by assuming pseudo first order reaction. And the activation energy and pre-exponential for COD removal in SCWG were 74.38kJ/mol and 1.11 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1} respectively. (orig.)

  15. Practical Suggestions for Calculating Supercritical Water-Steam Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongil; Choi, Sangmin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A standard procedure for determining water-steam properties has been established through an international collaboration in addition to a domestic effort. The current accepted international standard for industrial application is based on the IAPWS-IF97 (International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam-Industrial Formation 97). Based on this standard, the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers)/NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology) developed the REPROP program in the USA, and the JSME (Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers) developed the steam table and calculation code. Upon applying this standard procedure, modified procedures were proposed for computational convenience, particularly in the supercritical pressure region where non-smooth variations of water-steam properties were distinctively observed. In this paper, the internationally adopted procedures and the progress of related activities are briefly summarized. Some practical considerations are presented for the efficient execution of computational code.

  16. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  17. Destruction of DOE/DP surrogate wastes with supercritical water oxidation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlette, T.T.; Mills, B.E.; Hencken, K.R.; Brynildson, M.E.; Johnston, S.C.; Hruby, J.M.; Freemster, H.C.; Odegard, B.C.; Modell, M.

    1990-11-01

    Surrogate wastes of specific interest to DOE/DP production facilities (Hanford and Rocky Flats), and the electronics industry have been successfully processed in a laboratory-scale, supercritical water oxidation flow reactor. In all cases, the observed destruction/reduction efficiencies for the organic components were in excess of 99.9%, limited by instrumentation detection capability. Separation of the inorganic components of the Hanford process stream was more difficult to accomplish than destruction of the organic component. Large fractions of all metals contained in this stream were found both in the solids separator effluent and in deposits removed from the reactor. Mass closure was not achieved. Of the process stream's non-metallic, inorganic components, the sulfates and phosphates precipitated, while the nitrates tended to stay in solution. The inorganic material that did precipitate from the simulated Hanford mixed waste accumulated in zones that may be associated with changes in the chemical and physical properties of the supercritical fluid. Corrosion is expected to be a significant problem. Witness wires of Inconel 625, Hastalloy C-276, and titanium placed in the preheater, reactor and cooldown exchanger indicated selective dissolution of chromium, nickel, and molybdenum for some conditions, and non-selective dissolution for others. While these results are very promising, further research is required to evaluate the scalability, reliability, and economics of SCWO reactor components and systems, particularly for mixed wastes. Future research must explore a parameter space (temperature, pressure, pH, residence time, etc.) focused on selecting conditions and materials for specific process streams

  18. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in upward flows of supercritical water in circular tubes and tight fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jue; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu Jie; Yoo, Jaewoon

    2007-01-01

    Heat transfer in upward flows of supercritical water in circular tubes and in tight fuel rod bundles is numerically investigated by using the commercial CFD code STAR-CD 3.24. The objective is to have more understandings about the phenomena happening in supercritical water and for designs of supercritical water cooled reactors. Some turbulence models are selected to carry out numerical simulations and the results are compared with experimental data and other correlations to find suitable models to predict heat transfer in supercritical water. The comparisons are not only in the low bulk temperature region, but also in the high bulk temperature region. The two-layer model (Hassid and Poreh) gives a better prediction to the heat transfer than other models, and the standard k-ε high Re model with the standard wall function also shows an acceptable predicting capability. Three-dimensional simulations are carried out in sub-channels of tight square lattice and triangular lattice fuel rod bundles at supercritical pressure. Results show that there is a strong non-uniformity of the circumferential distribution of the cladding surface temperature, in the square lattice bundle with a small pitch-to-diameter ratio (P/D). However, it does not occur in the triangular lattice bundle with a small P/D. It is found that this phenomenon is caused by the large non-uniformity of the flow area in the cross-section of sub-channels. Some improved designs are numerically studied and proved to be effective to avoid the large circumferential temperature gradient at the cladding surface

  19. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Yohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the rapid response of the waterlevel control converting a reactor water level signal into a non-linear type, when the water level is near to a set value, to stabilize the water level reducting correlatively the reactor water level variation signal to stabilize greatly from the set value, and increasing the variation signal. Constitution: A main vapor flow quality transmitter detects the vapor flow generated in a reactor and introduced into a turbine. A feed water flow transmitter detects the quantity of a feed water flow from the turbine to the reactor, this detected value is sent to an addition operating apparatus. On the other hand, the power signal of the reactor water level transmitter is sent to the addition operating apparatus through a non-linear water level signal converter. The addition operation apparatus generates a signal for requesting the feed water flow quantity from both signals. Upon this occasion, the reactor water level signal converter makes small the reactor water level variation when the reactor level is close the set value, and when the water level deviates greatly from the set value, the reactor water level variation is made large thereby to improve the rapid response of the reactor coater level control. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Hazard classification for the supercritical water oxidation test bed. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    A hazard classification of ''routinely accepted by the public'' has been determined for the operation of the supercritical water oxidation test bed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This determination is based on the fact that the design and proposed operation meet or exceed appropriate national standards so that the risks are equivalent to those present in similar activities conducted in private industry. Each of the 17 criteria for hazards ''routinely accepted by the public,'' identified in the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Safety Manual, were analyzed. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed will treat simulated mixed waste without the radioactive component. It will be designed to operate with eight test wastes. These test wastes have been chosen to represent a broad cross-section of candidate mixed wastes anticipated for storage or generation by DOE. In particular, the test bed will generate data to evaluate the ability of the technology to treat chlorinated waste and other wastes that have in the past caused severe corrosion and deposition in SCWO reactors

  1. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wenhua [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Guo, Xianglong, E-mail: guoxianglong@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shen, Zhao [Department of Materials Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Zhang, Lefu, E-mail: lfzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer. - Highlights: • We evaluated the corrosion resistance of three different Cr content ODS steels at 650 °C in supercritical water. • Corrosion behavior of ODS steels is rarely reported and ODS steel may be promising material for generation IV reactors. • We found total opposite phenomenon compared to Lee's work before. Our result may be more reasonable.

  2. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water was investigated. • The process was optimized by Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology. • GY H2 , TRE and CR could exhibit up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC −1 , 82.54% and 94.56%. • Small amounts of oxidant can decrease the generation of tar and char. - Abstract: To achieve the maximum H 2 yield (GY H2 ), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GY H2 , CR and TRE were established with Box–Behnken design. GY H2 , CR and TRE reached up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC −1 , 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO 2 and H 2 were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH 3 has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient

  3. High-frequency dynamics of liquid and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencivenga, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Krisch, M.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Ruocco, G.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) of water has been determined by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) in a momentum (Q) and energy (E) transfer range extending from 2 to 4 nm -1 and from ±40 meV. IXS spectra have been recorded along an isobaric path (400 bar) in a temperature (T) interval ranging from ambient up to supercritical (T>647 K) conditions. The experimental data have been described in the frame of the generalized hydrodynamic theory, utilizing a model based on the memory function approach. This model allows identifying the active relaxation processes which affect the time decay of density fluctuations, as well as a direct determination of the Q, T, and density (ρ) dependencies of the involved transport parameters. The experimental spectra are well described by considering three different relaxation processes: the thermal, the structural, and the instantaneous one. On approaching supercritical conditions, we observe that the microscopic mechanism responsible for the structural relaxation is no longer related to the making and breaking of intermolecular bonds, but to binary intermolecular collisions

  4. Thermophysical properties of supercritical water and bond flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvab, I; Sadus, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics results are reported for the thermodynamic properties of supercritical water using examples of both rigid (TIP4P/2005) and flexible (TIP4P/2005f) transferable interaction potentials. Data are reported for pressure, isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, speed of sound, self-diffusion coefficient, viscosities, and thermal conductivity. Many of these properties have unusual behavior in the supercritical phase such as maximum and minimum values. The effectiveness of bond flexibility on predicting these properties is determined by comparing the results to experimental data. The influence of the intermolecular potential on these properties is both variable and state point dependent. In the vicinity of the critical density, the rigid and flexible potentials yield very different values for the compressibilities, heat capacities, and thermal expansion coefficient, whereas the self-diffusion coefficient, viscosities, and thermal conductivities are much less potential dependent. Although the introduction of bond flexibility is a computationally expedient way to improve the accuracy of an intermolecular potential, it can be counterproductive in some cases and it is not an adequate replacement for incorporating the effects of polarization.

  5. Supercritical fluid extraction of selected pharmaceuticals from water and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, B R; Stewart, J T

    1997-01-24

    Selected drugs from benzodiazepine, anabolic agent and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapeutic classes were extracted from water and serum using a supercritical CO2 mobile phase. The samples were extracted at a pump pressure of 329 MPa, an extraction chamber temperature of 45 degrees C, and a restrictor temperature of 60 degrees C. The static extraction time for all samples was 2.5 min and the dynamic extraction time ranged from 5 to 20 min. The analytes were collected in appropriate solvent traps and assayed by modified literature HPLC procedures. Analyte recoveries were calculated based on peak height measurements of extracted vs. unextracted analyte. The recovery of the benzodiazepines ranged from 80 to 98% in water and from 75 to 94% in serum. Anabolic drug recoveries from water and serum ranged from 67 to 100% and 70 to 100%, respectively. The NSAIDs were recovered from water in the 76 to 97% range and in the 76 to 100% range from serum. Accuracy, precision and endogenous peak interference, if any, were determined for blank and spiked serum extractions and compared with classical sample preparation techniques of liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction reported in the literature. For the benzodiazepines, accuracy and precision for supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) ranged from 1.95 to 3.31 and 0.57 to 1.25%, respectively (n = 3). The SFE accuracy and precision data for the anabolic agents ranged from 4.03 to 7.84 and 0.66 to 2.78%, respectively (n = 3). The accuracy and precision data reported for the SFE of the NSAIDs ranged from 2.79 to 3.79 and 0.33 to 1.27%, respectively (n = 3). The precision of the SFE method from serum was shown to be comparable to the precision obtained with other classical preparation techniques.

  6. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  7. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Ross, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in parallel channels with water at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Shitsi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal phenomena such as heat transfer enhancement, heat transfer deterioration, and flow instability observed at supercritical pressures as a result of fluid property variations have the potential to affect the safety of design and operation of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor SCWR, and also challenge the capabilities of both heat transfer correlations and Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD physical models. These phenomena observed at supercritical pressures need to be thoroughly investigated.An experimental study was carried out by Xi to investigate flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures under different mass flow rates, pressures, and axial power shapes. Experimental data on flow instability at inlet of the heated channels were obtained but no heat transfer data along the axial length was obtained. This numerical study used 3D numerical tool STAR-CCM+ to investigate heat transfer at supercritical pressures along the axial lengths of the parallel channels with water ahead of experimental data. Homogeneous axial power shape HAPS was adopted and the heating powers adopted in this work were below the experimental threshold heating powers obtained for HAPS by Xi. The results show that the Fluid Centre-line Temperature FCLT increased linearly below and above the PCT region, but flattened at the PCT region for all the system parameters considered. The inlet temperature, heating power, pressure, gravity and mass flow rate have effects on WT (wall temperature values in the NHT (normal heat transfer, EHT (enhanced heat transfer, DHT (deteriorated heat transfer and recovery from DHT regions. While variation of all other system parameters in the EHT and PCT regions showed no significant difference in the WT and FCLT values respectively, the WT and FCLT values respectively increased with pressure in these regions. For most of the system parameters considered, the FCLT and WT values obtained in the two channels were nearly the

  9. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in parallel channels with water at supercritical pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitsi, Edward; Kofi Debrah, Seth; Yao Agbodemegbe, Vincent; Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    Thermal phenomena such as heat transfer enhancement, heat transfer deterioration, and flow instability observed at supercritical pressures as a result of fluid property variations have the potential to affect the safety of design and operation of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor SCWR, and also challenge the capabilities of both heat transfer correlations and Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD physical models. These phenomena observed at supercritical pressures need to be thoroughly investigated. An experimental study was carried out by Xi to investigate flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures under different mass flow rates, pressures, and axial power shapes. Experimental data on flow instability at inlet of the heated channels were obtained but no heat transfer data along the axial length was obtained. This numerical study used 3D numerical tool STAR-CCM+ to investigate heat transfer at supercritical pressures along the axial lengths of the parallel channels with water ahead of experimental data. Homogeneous axial power shape HAPS was adopted and the heating powers adopted in this work were below the experimental threshold heating powers obtained for HAPS by Xi. The results show that the Fluid Centre-line Temperature FCLT increased linearly below and above the PCT region, but flattened at the PCT region for all the system parameters considered. The inlet temperature, heating power, pressure, gravity and mass flow rate have effects on WT (wall temperature) values in the NHT (normal heat transfer), EHT (enhanced heat transfer), DHT (deteriorated heat transfer) and recovery from DHT regions. While variation of all other system parameters in the EHT and PCT regions showed no significant difference in the WT and FCLT values respectively, the WT and FCLT values respectively increased with pressure in these regions. For most of the system parameters considered, the FCLT and WT values obtained in the two channels were nearly the same. The

  10. Reactor water injection facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1997-05-02

    A steam turbine and an electric generator are connected by way of a speed convertor. The speed convertor is controlled so that the number of rotation of the electric generator is constant irrespective of the speed change of the steam turbine. A shaft coupler is disposed between the turbine and the electric generator or between the turbine and a water injection pump. With such a constitution, the steam turbine and the electric generator are connected by way of the speed convertor, and since the number of revolution of the electric generator is controlled to be constant, the change of the number of rotation of the turbine can be controlled irrespective of the change of the number of rotation of the electric generator. Accordingly, the flow rate of the injection water from the water injection pump to a reactor pressure vessel can be controlled freely thereby enabling to supply stable electric power. (T.M.)

  11. Design of a supercritical carbon dioxide cooled reactor for marine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollardiere, T. Paris de; Verchere, T.; Wilson, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; Heap, S.; Thompson, A.; Jewer, S.; Beeley, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    The reactor physics and thermal hydraulics aspects of a feasibility study conducted to assess the potential of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) cooled nuclear reactor for marine propulsion are presented. Supercritical carbon dioxide cycles have been proposed for next generation nuclear plants as such cycles take advantage of sCO2 property changes near the critical point which leads to improved plant efficiency over existing nuclear plant cycles at the same temperatures and pressures. Selecting two 192 MWth cores and a recompression Brayton cycle it was determined that a maximum power conversion efficiency of 47.5 % could be achieved. The core design employs TRISO particles in a graphite matrix forming a fuelled annulus in a prismatic graphite moderating block. The design of this plant has been modeled using WIMS/MONK (neutronics) and Flownex (plant thermal hydraulics and power conversion). Plant modeling found that the core remains within thermal safety limits in the event of a LOCA. The major limitation of the design was found to be the high xenon levels produced as a result of the high neutron flux required of a gas cooled reactor and the effect it has on the versatility of the plant to cope with changes in power demand. (author)

  12. Performance Estimation of Supercritical Co2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) for Varying Cooling Air Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2015-01-01

    A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) receives interests for the various application such as electricity co-generation, small-scale power generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. As a part of SMR development, supercritical CO2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) of 36.2MWth in power is under development by the KAIST research team. To enhance the mobility, the entire system including the power conversion system is designed for the full modularization. Based on the preliminary design, the thermal efficiency is 31.5% when CO2 is sufficiently cooled to the design temperature. A supercritical CO2 MMR is designed to supply electricity to the remote regions. The ambient temperature of the area can influence the compressor inlet temperature as the reactor is cooled with the atmospheric air. To estimate the S-CO2 cycle performance for various environmental conditions, A quasi-static analysis code is developed. For the off design performance of S-CO2 turbomachineries, the experimental result of Sandia National Lab (SNL) is utilized

  13. Effect of supercritical water shell on cavitation bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Wei-Hang; Chen Wei-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Based on reported experimental data, a new model for single cavitation bubble dynamics is proposed considering a supercritical water (SCW) shell surrounding the bubble. Theoretical investigations show that the SCW shell apparently slows down the oscillation of the bubble and cools the gas temperature inside the collapsing bubble. Furthermore, the model is simplified to a Rayleigh–Plesset-like equation for a thin SCW shell. The dependence of the bubble dynamics on the thickness and density of the SCW shell is studied. The results show the bubble dynamics depends on the thickness but is insensitive to the density of the SCW shell. The thicker the SCW shell is, the smaller are the wall velocity and the gas temperature in the bubble. In the authors’ opinion, the SCW shell works as a buffering agent. In collapsing, it is compressed to absorb a good deal of the work transformed into the bubble internal energy during bubble collapse so that it weakens the bubble oscillations. (paper)

  14. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of wastewater from food waste treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Gu [Korea Institute of Energy Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Korean food wastes have high moisture content (more than 85 wt%) and their major treatment processes such as drying or biological fermentations generate concentrated organic wastewater (CODs of about 100,000 mgO{sub 2}/L). For obtaining both wastewater treatment and hydrogen production from renewable resources, supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of the organic wastewater was carried out in this work. The effect of catalyst, reaction temperature, and reactor residence time on COD destruction and composition of gas products was examined. As a result, a SCWG of the wastewater over Ni- Y/activated charcoal at 700 C, 28 MPa yielded 99 % COD destruction and hydrogen-rich gas production (45 vol% H{sub 2}). A liquid-phase thermal pretreatment to destroy solid particles from the wastewater was proposed for more effective operation of the SCWG system. (orig.)

  15. Oxidation kinetics of model compounds of metabolic waste in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Holgate, Henry R.; Stevenson, David M.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    In this NASA-funded study, the oxidation kinetics of methanol and ammonia in supercritical water have been experimentally determined in an isothermal plug flow reactor. Theoretical studies have also been carried out to characterize key reaction pathways. Methanol oxidation rates were found to be proportional to the first power of methanol concentration and independent of oxygen concentration and were highly activated with an activation energy of approximately 98 kcal/mole over the temperature range 480 to 540 C at 246 bar. The oxidation of ammonia was found to be catalytic with an activation energy of 38 kcal/mole over temperatures ranging from 640 to 700 C. An elementary reaction model for methanol oxidation was applied after correction for the effect of high pressure on the rate constants. The conversion of methanol predicted by the model was in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Corrosion mechanism of a Ni-based alloy in supercritical water: Impact of surface plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, Mickaël; Marchetti, Loïc; Tabarant, Michel; Chevalier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dissolution of Ni and Fe cations occurs during corrosion of Ni-based alloys in SCW. • The nature of the oxide layer depends locally on the alloy microstructure. • The corrosion mechanism changes when cold-work increases leading to internal oxidation. - Abstract: Ni–Fe–Cr alloys are expected to be a candidate material for the generation IV nuclear reactors that use supercritical water at temperatures up to 600 °C and pressures of 25 MPa. The corrosion resistance of Alloy 690 in these extreme conditions was studied considering the surface finish of the alloy. The oxide scale could suffer from dissolution or from internal oxidation. The presence of a work-hardened zone reveals the competition between the selective oxidation of chromium with respect to the oxidation of nickel and iron. Finally, corrosion mechanisms for Ni based alloys are proposed considering the effects of plastically deformed surfaces and the dissolution.

  17. Conceptual design of a commercial supercritical CO2 gas turbine for the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design results of turbine and compressors of a supercritical CO 2 gas turbine connected to the commercial sodium cooled fast reactor. Power output of the gas turbine-generator system is 750 MWe. The system consists of turbine, main compressor and bypass compressor. Turbine is axial flow type. Both axial flow and centrifugal compressors were designed. Aerodynamic, blade strength and rotor dynamics calculations were conducted. Achievable adiabatic efficiencies and cross-sectional structures are given. For this design conditions, the axial flow compressor is superior to the centrifugal compressor due to the large mass flow rate. (authors)

  18. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utagawa, Kazuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    A device of the present invention can effectively control fluctuation of a reactor water level upon power change by reactor core flow rate control operation. That is, (1) a feedback control section calculates a feedwater flow rate control amount based on a deviation between a set value of a reactor water level and a reactor water level signal. (2) a feed forward control section forecasts steam flow rate change based on a reactor core flow rate signal or a signal determining the reactor core flow rate, to calculate a feedwater flow rate control amount which off sets the steam flow rate change. Then, the sum of the output signal from the process (1) and the output signal from the process (2) is determined as a final feedwater flow rate control signal. With such procedures, it is possible to forecast the steam flow rate change accompanying the reactor core flow rate control operation, thereby enabling to conduct preceding feedwater flow rate control operation which off sets the reactor water level fluctuation based on the steam flow rate change. Further, a reactor water level deviated from the forecast can be controlled by feedback control. Accordingly, reactor water level fluctuation upon power exchange due to the reactor core flow rate control operation can rapidly be suppressed. (I.S.)

  19. In-Situ Synchrotron Radiation Study of Formation and Growth of Crystalline CexZr1-xO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized in Supercritical Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Becker-Christensen, Jacob; Hald, Peter

    2010-01-01

    -zirconia system, the growth of ceria and zirconia nanoparticles is fundamentally different under supercritical water conditions. For comparison, ex situ synthesis has also been performed using an in-house supercritical flow reactor. The resulting samples were analyzed using PXRD, small-angle X-ray scattering......In situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements have been conducted to follow the nucleation and growth of crystalline CexZr1-xO2 nanoparticles synthesized in supercritical water with a full substitution variation (x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0). Direction-dependent growth curves...... are determined and described using reaction kinetic models. A distinct change in growth kinetics is observed with increasing cerium content. For x = 0.8 and 1.0 (high cerium content), the growth is initially limited by the surface reaction kinetics; however, at a size of ∼6 nm, the growth changes and becomes...

  20. PCU arrangement of a supercritical CO{sub 2} cooled micro modular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Baik, Seungjoon; Cho, Seong Kuk; Oh, Bong Seong; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As part of the SMR(Small Modular Reactor)s development effort, the authors propose a concept of supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cooled fast reactor combined with the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. The reactor concept is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has many strong points when it is used for SMR's power conversion unit. It occupies small footprints due to the compact cycle components and simple layout. Thus, a concept of one module containing the S-CO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor and power conversion system is possible. This module can be shipped via ground transportation (by trailer) or marine transportation. In this study, the authors propose a new conceptual layout for the S-CO{sub 2} cooled direct cycle while considering various issues for arranging cycle components. The new design has an improved cycle efficiency (from 31% to 34%) than the earlier version of MMR by reducing pressure drops in the heat exchangers. As a more efficient option, a recompression recuperated cycle was also designed. It improves 5% of thermal efficiency while 18tons of mass can be added in comparison to the simple recuperated cycle. Even if we adopt recompression cycle as a PCU, the weight of module (152tons) is less than the ground transportable limit (260tons)

  1. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Kotaro; Ishida, Masayoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To connect a feedwater pipe to a recycling pipe line, the recycling pipe line being made smaller in diameter, thereby minimizing loss of coolant resulting from rupture of the pipe and improving safety against trouble of coolant loss. Structure: A feedwater pipe is directly connected to a recycling pipe line before a booster pump, and a mixture of recycling water and feedwater is increased in pressure by the booster pump, after which it is introduced into a jet pump in the form of water for driving the jet pump to suck surrounding water causing it to be flown into the core. In accordance with the abovementioned structure, since the flow of feedwater can be used as a part of water for driving the jet pump, the flow within the recycling pipe line may be decreased so that the recycling pipe line can be made smaller in diameter to reduce the flow of coolant in the reactor, which flows out when the pipe is ruptured. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  3. Pourbaix diagrams for the iron–water system extended to high-subcritical and low-supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, William G.; Olive, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pourbaix diagrams for iron–water are extended to low-supercritical temperatures. ► Thermodynamic properties for use in R-HKF model re-evaluated. ► Above the critical point, magnetite solubility is between 10 −11 and 10 −10 mol/kg. - Abstract: The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is a Generation IV reactor concept that will operate at temperatures and pressures above water’s thermodynamic critical point. Pourbaix diagrams for the iron–water system at temperatures slightly below and above the critical point at 25 MPa have been constructed to aid the evaluation and development of potential construction materials. High temperature data extrapolation was performed using a revised Helgeson–Kirkham–Flowers model and fit to data on magnetite and hematite solubility in high-temperature water. A low-concentration diagram at 350 °C reveals the importance of water chemistry control to avoid transitioning to an active corrosion region.

  4. Computational analysis of supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, Burhanuddin; Suh, Kune Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computational analysis of S-CO 2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. ► Validation of numerical model with literature data. ► Recompression S-CO 2 Brayton cycle thermal efficiency of 42.44%. ► Reheating concept to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. ► Higher efficiency achieved by the proposed concept. - Abstract: The Optimized Supercritical Cycle Analysis (OSCA) code is being developed to analyze the design of a supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) driven Brayton cycle for a fusion reactor as part of the Modular Optimal Balance Integral System (MOBIS). This system is based on a recompression Brayton cycle. S-CO 2 is adopted as the working fluid for MOBIS because of its easy availability, high density and low chemical reactivity. The reheating concept is introduced to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. The helium-cooled lithium lead model AB of DEMO fusion reactor is used as reference in this paper.

  5. Simulation of Thermal Hydraulic at Supercritical Pressures with APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurki, Joona [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The proposed concepts for the fourth generation of nuclear reactors include a reactor operating with water at thermodynamically supercritical state, the Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR). For the design and safety demonstrations of such a reactor, the possibility to accurately simulate the thermal hydraulics of the supercritical coolant is an absolute prerequisite. For this purpose, the one-dimensional two-phase thermal hydraulics solution of APROS process simulation software was developed to function at the supercritical pressure region. Software modifications included the redefinition of some parameters that have physical significance only at the subcritical pressures, improvement of the steam tables, and addition of heat transfer and friction correlations suitable for the supercritical pressure region. (author)

  6. Partial oxidation of municipal sludge with activited carbon catalyst in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yang; Wang Shuzhong; Gong Yanmeng; Xu Donghai; Tang Xingying; Ma Honghe

    2010-01-01

    The partial oxidation (POX) characteristics of municipal sludge in supercritical water (SCW) were investigated by using batch reactor. Effects of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio (OER), reaction time and temperature were investigated. Activated carbon (AC) could effectively improve the mole fraction of H 2 in gas product at low OER. However, high OER (greater than 0.3) not only led to the combustion reaction of CO and H 2 , but also caused corrosion of reactor inner wall. Hydrogenation and polymerization of the intermediate products are possible reasons for the relative low COD removal rate in our tests. Metal oxide leached from the reactor inner wall and the main components of the granular sludge were deposited in the AC catalyst. Reaction time had more significant effect on BET surface area of AC than OER had. Long reaction time led to the methanation reaction following hydrolysis and oxidation reaction of AC in SCW in the presence of oxygen. Correspondingly, the possible reaction mechanisms were proposed.

  7. Core design concepts for high performance light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Light water reactors operated under supercritical pressure conditions have been selected as one of the promising future reactor concepts to be studied by the Generation IV International Forum. Whereas the steam cycle of such reactors can be derived from modern fossil fired power plants, the reactor itself, and in particular the reactor core, still need to be developed. Different core design concepts shall be described here to outline the strategy. A first option for near future applications is a pressurized water reactor with 380 .deg. C core exit temperature, having a closed primary loop and achieving 2% pts. higher net efficiency and 24% higher specific turbine power than latest pressurized water reactors. More efficiency and turbine power can be gained from core exit temperatures around 500 .deg. C, which require a multi step heat up process in the core with intermediate coolant mixing, achieving up to 44% net efficiency. The paper summarizes different core and assembly design approaches which have been studied recently for such High Performance Light Water Reactors

  8. Efficiency of water removal from water/ethanol mixtures using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rodrigues

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Techniques involving supercritical carbon dioxide have been successfully used for the formation of drug particles with controlled size distributions. However, these processes show some limitations, particularly in processing aqueous solutions. A diagram walking algorithm based on available experimental data was developed to evaluate the effect of ethanol on the efficiency of water removal processes under different process conditions. Ethanol feeding was the key parameter resulting in a tenfold increase in the efficiency of water extraction.

  9. A Conceptual Study of a Supercritical CO2-Cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanyeal Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A neutronics conceptual study of a supercritical CO2-cooled micro modular reactor (MMR has been performed in this work. The suggested MMR is an extremely compact and truck-transportable nuclear reactor. The thermal power of the MMR is 36.2 MWth and it is designed to have a 20-year lifetime without refueling. A salient feature of the MMR is that all the components including the generator are integrated in a small reactor vessel. For a minimal volume and long lifetime of the MMR core, a fast neutron spectrum is utilized in this work. To enhance neutron economy and maximize the fuel volume fraction in the core, a high-density uranium mono-nitride U15N fuel is used in the fast-spectrum MMR. Unlike the conventional supercritical CO2-cooled fast reactors, a replaceable fixed absorber (RFA is introduced in a unique way to minimize the excess reactivity and the power peaking factor of the core. For a compact core design, the drum-type control absorber is adopted as the primary reactivity control mechanism. In this study, the neutronics analyses and depletions have been performed by using the continuous energy Monte Carlo Serpent code with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VII.1 Library. The MMR core is characterized in view of several important safety parameters such as control system worth, fuel temperature coefficient (FTC and coolant void reactivity (CVR, etc. In addition, a preliminary thermal-hydraulic analysis has also been performed for the hottest channel of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST MMR.

  10. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1970-04-01

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  11. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  12. Supercritical heat transfer phenomena in nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyoung Woo; Kim, Moo Hwan; Anderson, Mark H.; Corradini, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    A supercritical water (SCW) power cycle has been considered as one of the viable candidates for advanced fission reactor designs. However, the dramatic variation of thermo-physical properties with a modest change of temperature near the pseudo-critical point make existing heat transfer correlations such as the Dittus-Boelter correlation not suitably accurate to calculate the heat transfer in supercritical fluid. Several other correlations have also been suggested but none of them are able to predict the heat transfer over a parameter range, needed for reactor thermal-hydraulics simulation and design. This has prompted additional research to understand the characteristic of supercritical fluid heat transfer

  13. The initial study on supercritical water flow and heat transfer in square rod bundle channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Cao Can; Yu Tao

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wine in supercritical water reactor was studied in the paper using the FLUENT software. The mixing wing elevation influence on temperature distribution and flow field were studied in the model. The results showed the mixing wing caused fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improved the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the four cases of mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45 and 50 angle, 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  14. Development of a lab-scale contaminated organic effluents treatment process using evaporation and supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turc, H.A.; Joussot-Dubien, C

    2004-07-01

    The organic liquid waste produced in the ATALANTE facility have to be treated in order to reduce the fire and contamination risks. Therefore, the Mini-DELOS process has been developed, which combines a low pressure evaporator in a shielded enclosure and a continuous supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor in a glovebox. Evaporation makes it possible to evacuate the main organic stream as decontaminated distillates to an industrial incinerator. The remaining residue, concentrating the radioactivity can be converted through SCWO into a contaminated aqueous effluent, fully compatible with the existing outlets of the facility. The preliminary results of the first year of active operation of the Mini- DELOS process are here presented. (authors)

  15. Oxidation of hazardous waste in supercritical water: A comparison of modeling and experimental results for methanol destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, P.B.; Bergan, N.E.; Bramlette, T.T.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories conducted in conjunction with MODEC Corporation have demonstrated successful clean- up of contaminated water in a supercritical water reactor. These experiments targeted wastes of interest to Department of Energy production facilities. In this paper we present modeling and experimental results for a surrogate waste containing 98% water, 2% methanol, and parts per million of chlorinated hydrocarbons and laser dyes. Our initial modeling results consider only methanol and water. Experimental data are available for inlet and outlet conditions and axial temperature profiles along the outside reactor wall. The purpose of our model is to study the chemical and physical processes inside the reactor. We are particularly interested in the parameters that control the location of the reaction zone. The laboratory-scale reactor operates at 25 MPa., between 300 K and 900 K; it is modeled as a plug-flow reactor with a specified temperature profile. We use Chemkin Real-Gas to calculate mixture density, with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The elementary reaction set for methanol oxidation and reactions of other C 1 and C 2 hydrocarbons is based on previous models for gas-phase kinetics. Results from our calculations show that the methanol is 99.9% destroyed at 1/3 the total reactor length. Although we were not able to measure composition of the fluid inside the experimental reactor, this prediction occurs near the location of the highest reactor temperature. This indicates that the chemical reaction is triggered by thermal effects, not kinetic rates. Results from ideal-gas calculations show nearly identical chemical profiles inside the reactor in dimensionless distance. However, reactor residence times are overpredicted by nearly 150% using an ideal-gas assumption. Our results indicate that this oxidation process can be successfully modeled using gas-phase chemical mechanisms. 23 refs., 8 figs

  16. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  17. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  18. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water was investigated. • The process was optimized by Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology. • GY{sub H2}, TRE and CR could exhibit up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56%. • Small amounts of oxidant can decrease the generation of tar and char. - Abstract: To achieve the maximum H{sub 2} yield (GY{sub H2}), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE were established with Box–Behnken design. GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE reached up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH{sub 3} has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient.

  19. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ziqiang; Chen Weixing; Zheng Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion behavior of porous Cr 3 C 2 in various SCW conditions was investigated. ► Cr 3 C 2 is stable in SCW at temperature below 420–430 °C. ► Cracks and disintegration were observed at elevated testing temperatures. ► Degradation of Cr 3 C 2 is related to the intermediate product CrOOH. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25–30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in supercritical water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, R.; Haehner, P.; Ripplinger, S.; Siegl, J.; Penttilae, Sami; Toivonen, Aki

    2009-01-01

    Within the 6th Framework Program HPLWR-2 project (High Performance Light Water Reactor - Phase 2), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibilities of selected austenitic stainless steels, 316L and 316NG, were studied in supercritical water (SCW) with the aim to identify and describe the specific failure mechanisms prevailing during slow strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests in ultra-pure demineralised SCW water solution. The SSRT tests were performed using a step-motor controlled loading device in an autoclave at 350 deg. C, 500 deg. C and 550 deg. C. Besides water temperature, the pressure, the oxygen content and the strain rate (resp. crosshead speed) were varied in the series of tests. The specimens SSRT tested to failure were subjected to fractographic analysis, in order to characterise the failure mechanisms. The fractography confirmed that failure was due to a combination of transgranular SCC and transgranular ductile fracture. The share of SCC and ductile fracture in the failure process of individual specimens was affected by the parameters of the SSRT tests, so that the environmental influence on SCC susceptibility could be assessed, in particular, the SCC sensitising effects of increasing oxygen content, decreasing strain rate and increasing test temperature. (author)

  1. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Norring, K.

    1994-01-01

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  2. Burst wait time simulation of CALIBAN reactor at delayed super-critical state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, P.; Authier, N.; Richard, B.; Grivot, P.; Casoli, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, the super prompt critical wait time probability distribution was measured on CALIBAN fast burst reactor [4]. Afterwards, these experiments were simulated with a very good agreement by solving the non-extinction probability equation [5]. Recently, the burst wait time probability distribution has been measured at CEA-Valduc on CALIBAN at different delayed super-critical states [6]. However, in the delayed super-critical case the non-extinction probability does not give access to the wait time distribution. In this case it is necessary to compute the time dependent evolution of the full neutron count number probability distribution. In this paper we present the point model deterministic method used to calculate the probability distribution of the wait time before a prescribed count level taking into account prompt neutrons and delayed neutron precursors. This method is based on the solution of the time dependent adjoint Kolmogorov master equations for the number of detections using the generating function methodology [8,9,10] and inverse discrete Fourier transforms. The obtained results are then compared to the measurements and Monte-Carlo calculations based on the algorithm presented in [7]. (authors)

  3. Burst wait time simulation of CALIBAN reactor at delayed super-critical state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbert, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91297 Arpajon (France); Authier, N.; Richard, B.; Grivot, P.; Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    In the past, the super prompt critical wait time probability distribution was measured on CALIBAN fast burst reactor [4]. Afterwards, these experiments were simulated with a very good agreement by solving the non-extinction probability equation [5]. Recently, the burst wait time probability distribution has been measured at CEA-Valduc on CALIBAN at different delayed super-critical states [6]. However, in the delayed super-critical case the non-extinction probability does not give access to the wait time distribution. In this case it is necessary to compute the time dependent evolution of the full neutron count number probability distribution. In this paper we present the point model deterministic method used to calculate the probability distribution of the wait time before a prescribed count level taking into account prompt neutrons and delayed neutron precursors. This method is based on the solution of the time dependent adjoint Kolmogorov master equations for the number of detections using the generating function methodology [8,9,10] and inverse discrete Fourier transforms. The obtained results are then compared to the measurements and Monte-Carlo calculations based on the algorithm presented in [7]. (authors)

  4. Flow method for rapid production of Batio3 nanoparticles in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atashfaraz, M.; Shariati-Niassar, M.; Ohara, Satoshi; Takami, S.; Umetsu, M.; Naka, T.; Adschiri, T.

    2006-01-01

    Fine BaTiO 3 nanoparticles were obtained by hydrothermal synthesis under supercritical conditions with batch and flow type experimental methods. Mixture of barium hydroxide and titanium oxide starting solution was treated in the supercritical wafer at 400 d eg C and 30 MPa. The size of nanoparticles synthesized in the flow type experiment was smaller than that in the batch type. Rapid heating in a flow, reactor is effective to synthesize smaller size and narrower particle size distribution for the BaTiO 3 , nanoparticles. The mechanism for this result was discussed based on the solubility of titanium oxide

  5. The heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudermueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    This is a survey of the development so far of this reactor line which is in operation all over the world in various types (e.g. BHWR, PHWR). MZFR and the CANDU-type reactors are discussed in more detail. (UA) [de

  6. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  7. Supercritical water oxidation of colored smoke, dye, and pyrotechnic compositions. Final report: Pilot plant conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Chan, Jennifer P.; Raber, T.N.; Macmillan, D.C.; Rice, S.F.; Tschritter, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    The existing demilitarization stockpile contains large quantities of colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. For many years, these munitions have been stored in magazines at locations within the continental United States awaiting completion of the life-cycle. The open air burning of these munitions has been shown to produce toxic gases that are detrimental to human health and harmful to the environment. Prior efforts to incinerate these compositions have also produced toxic emissions and have been unsuccessful. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly developing hazardous waste treatment method that can be an alternative to incineration for many types of wastes. The primary advantage SCWO affords for the treatment of this selected set of obsolete munitions is that toxic gas and particulate emissions will not occur as part of the effluent stream. Sandia is currently designing a SCWO reactor for the US Army Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC) to destroy colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. This report summarizes the design status of the ARDEC reactor. Process and equipment operation parameters, process flow equations or mass balances, and utility requirements for six wastes of interest are developed in this report. Two conceptual designs are also developed with all process and instrumentation detailed.

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  9. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  10. Supercritical water oxidation of dioxins and furans in waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and industrial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Safari; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2014-08-01

    Three environmental samples containing dioxins and furans have been oxidized in the presence of hydrogen peroxide under supercritical water oxidation conditions. The samples consisted of a waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and contaminated industrial soil. The reactor system was a batch, autoclave reactor operated at temperatures between 350 degrees C and 450degrees C, corresponding to pressures of approximately 20-33.5 MPa and with hydrogen peroxide concentrations from 0.0 to 11.25 vol%. Hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature/pressure had a strong positive effect on the oxidation of dioxins and furans. At the highest temperatures and pressure of supercritical water oxidation of 4500C and 33.5 MPa and with 11.25 vol% of hydrogen peroxide, the destruction efficiencies of the individual polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) isomers were between 90% and 99%. There did not appear to be any significant differences in the PCDD/PCDF destruction efficiencies in relation to the different sample matrices of the waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and contaminated industrial soil.

  11. A Conceptual Study on a Supercritical CO_2-cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hwanyeal; Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2014-01-01

    A Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) using Supercritical-CO_2 (S-CO_2) as coolant has been investigated from the neutronics perspective. The MMR is designed to be transportable so it can reach the remote areas. The thermal power of the reactor is 36.2 M Wth. The size of the active core is limited to 1.2 m length and 93.16 cm width. The size of whole core is 2.8 m length and 166.9 cm width. The reactor lifetime design target is 20 years. To maximize the fuel volume fraction in the core, high density uranium nitride UN"1"5 was used. The PbO/MgO reflector was also utilized to improve the neutron economy. The S-CO_2 is chosen as the coolant because it offers a higher thermal efficiency. In this study, neutronics calculations and depletion using McCARD Monte Carlo code has been done to determine the lifetime and behavior of the core. Several important safety parameters such as Control Rod worth, Doppler reactivity coefficients and coolant void reactivity coefficient have also been analyzed. (author)

  12. Development of liquefaction process of coal and biomass in supercritical water; Chorinkaisui wo mochiita sekitan biomass doji ekika process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, H.; Matsumura, Y.; Tsutsumi, A.; Yoshida, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Masuno, Y.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Liquefaction of coal and biomass in supercritical water has been investigated, in which strong solubilization force of supercritical water against hydrocarbons is utilized. Free radicals are formed through the cleavage of covalent bonds in coal under the heating condition at around 400{degree}C during coal liquefaction. It is important to stabilize these unstable intermediate products by hydrogen transfer. On the other hand, hydrogen is not required for the liquefaction of biomass having higher H/C atomic ratio and oxygen content than those of coal. Co-liquefaction of coal and biomass was conducted using supercritical water, in which excess hydrogen from the liquefaction of biomass would be transferred to coal, resulting in the effective liquefaction of coal. Mixture of coal and cellulose was liquefied in supercritical water at 390{degree}C under the pressure of 25 MPa using a semi-continuous reactor, and the results were compared with those from the separate liquefaction of them. The co-liquefaction of coal and cellulose did not show any difference in the residue yield from the separate liquefaction of these, but led to the increased production of compounds with lower molecular weight. The liquefaction was completed in 15 minutes. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  14. Conceptual design of solid breeder blanket system cooled by supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    This report is a summary of the design works, which was discussed in the design workshop held in 2000 for the demonstration (DEMO) blanket aimed to strengthen the commercial competitiveness and technical feasibility simultaneously. The discussion of the Fusion Council in 1999 updated the assessment of the mission of DEMO blanket. Updated mission of the DEMO blanket is to be the prototype of the commercially competitive power plant. The DEMO blanket must supply the feasibility and experience of the total design of the power plant and the materials. From such standing point, the conceptual design study was performed to determine the updated strategy and goal of the R and D of the DEMO blanket which applies the supercritical water cooling proposed in A-SSTR, taking into account the recent progress of the plasma research and reactor engineering technology. The DEMO blanket applies the solid breeder materials and supercritical water cooling. The product tritium is purged out by helium gas stream in the breeder region. In the breeder region, the pebble bed concept was applied to withstand instable cracking of the breeder and multiplier materials in high neutron irradiation and high temperature operation. Inlet temperature of the coolant is planned to be 280degC and final outlet temperature is 510degC to obtain high energy conversion efficiency up to 43%. Reduced activation ferritic steel, F82H and ODS ferritic steel were selected as the structural material. Lithium ceramics, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 2}O were selected as the breeder materials. Beryllium or its inter-metallic compound Be12Ti was selected as the neutron multiplier materials. Basic module structure was selected as the box type structure which enables the remote handling replacement of the module from in-vessel access. Dimension of the box is limited to 2 m x 2 m, or smaller, due to the dimension of the replacement port. In the supercritical water cooling, the high coolant temperature is the merit for

  15. Conceptual design of solid breeder blanket system cooled by supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    2001-12-01

    This report is a summary of the design works, which was discussed in the design workshop held in 2000 for the demonstration (DEMO) blanket aimed to strengthen the commercial competitiveness and technical feasibility simultaneously. The discussion of the Fusion Council in 1999 updated the assessment of the mission of DEMO blanket. Updated mission of the DEMO blanket is to be the prototype of the commercially competitive power plant. The DEMO blanket must supply the feasibility and experience of the total design of the power plant and the materials. From such standing point, the conceptual design study was performed to determine the updated strategy and goal of the R and D of the DEMO blanket which applies the supercritical water cooling proposed in A-SSTR, taking into account the recent progress of the plasma research and reactor engineering technology. The DEMO blanket applies the solid breeder materials and supercritical water cooling. The product tritium is purged out by helium gas stream in the breeder region. In the breeder region, the pebble bed concept was applied to withstand instable cracking of the breeder and multiplier materials in high neutron irradiation and high temperature operation. Inlet temperature of the coolant is planned to be 280degC and final outlet temperature is 510degC to obtain high energy conversion efficiency up to 43%. Reduced activation ferritic steel, F82H and ODS ferritic steel were selected as the structural material. Lithium ceramics, Li 2 TiO 3 or Li 2 O were selected as the breeder materials. Beryllium or its inter-metallic compound Be12Ti was selected as the neutron multiplier materials. Basic module structure was selected as the box type structure which enables the remote handling replacement of the module from in-vessel access. Dimension of the box is limited to 2 m x 2 m, or smaller, due to the dimension of the replacement port. In the supercritical water cooling, the high coolant temperature is the merit for the energy

  16. Water simulation of sodium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system

  17. Experimental study of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongbo; Yang Jue; Lu Donghua; Gu Hanyang; Zhao Meng

    2012-01-01

    The experiment of flow and heat transfer of supercritical water has been performed on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop co-constructed by China Guangdong Nuclear Power Group and Shanghai Jiao Tong University with a 7.6 mm vertical tube. Heat transfer experimental data is obtained. The results of experimental research of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: (1) Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the bulk temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity; (2) The heat transfer co- efficient and Nusselt number are decreased with the increasing of heat flux; (3) The wall temperature is decreased, but the heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number are increased with the increasing of mass flow velocity; (4) The wall temperature is increased, but the heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number are decreased with the increasing of sys- tem pressure. (authors)

  18. Oxidation behavior of austenitic iron-base ODS alloy in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Dong, Z.; Zahiri, R.; Kohandehghan, A.; Mitlin, D., E-mail: behnamia@ualberta.ca, E-mail: zdong@ualberta.ca, E-mail: kohandeh@ualberta.ca, E-mail: rzahiris@ualberta.ca, E-mail: dave.mitlin@ualberta.ca [Univ. of Alberta, Edmondon, AB (Canada); Zhou, Z., E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Univ. of Science and Tech. Beijing, Beijing (China); Chen, W.; Luo, J., E-mail: weixing.chen@ualberta.ca, E-mail: Jingli.luo@ualberta.ca [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Zheng, W., E-mail: wenyue@nrcan.gc.ca [Natural Resources Canada, Canmet MATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effect of exposure time on the corrosion of the 304 stainless steel based oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, SS304ODS, in supercritical water was investigated at 650 {sup o}C with constant dissolved oxygen concentration. The results show that the oxidation of SS304ODS in supercritical water followed a parabolic law at 650 {sup o}C. Discontinuous oxide scale with two distinct layers has formed after 550 hours. The inner layer was chromium-rich while the outer layer was iron-rich (Magnetite). The oxide islands grow with increasing the exposure time. With increasing exposure time, the quantity of oxide islands increased in which major preferential growth along oxide-substrate interface was observed. The possible mechanism of SS304ODS oxidation in supercritical water was also discussed. (author)

  19. The effect of alkali on the product distribution from black liquor conversion under supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawangchu, Y; Atong, D; Sricharoenchaikul, V

    2017-07-01

    Lignin in chemical pulping waste, or black liquor (BL), can be converted into various products via supercritical water gasification (SCWG). However, the inherited alkaline contents from the pulping chemicals may affect the product yields and properties. In this research, the influence of the residual alkali on the product distribution via SCWG of soda BL and kraft BL was evaluated. The SCWG was performed in a batch quartz reactor for 10 min at various temperatures (673, 773 and 873 K) and pressures (250, 300 and 400 bar). The highest hydrogen (H 2 ) production occurred at 873 K for the soda BL. The water-gas shift reaction with sodium ions played an important part in the H 2 production, while only small amounts of methane and carbon monoxide were detected. Hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids and esters were the dominant substrates in the liquid products, which denoted the potential of this method for bond cleaving of the lignin macromolecule. As a result, BL, which typically contains alkali salt, was an appropriate feedstock for the SCWG reaction to produce renewable fuel. This method not only has a positive influence on the generation of value added products from highly corrosive waste but also helps avoid some technical problems commonly encountered with direct firing in a recovery boiler.

  20. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  1. The solubilities of phosphate and sulfate salts in supercritical water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusbrock, Ingo; Metz, Sybrand J.; Rexwinkel, Glenn; Versteeg, Geert F.

    Inorganic compounds are regularly present in aqueous streams. To understand their influence and behavior on these streams at supercritical conditions, little to no property data is available, which can be used as starting point for further research or application design. Since inorganic compounds

  2. Study of steam, helium and supercritical CO2 turbine power generations in prototype fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro; Muto, Yasushi; Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nishio, Satoshi; Hayashi, Takumi; Nomoto, Yasunobu

    2008-01-01

    Power generation systems such as steam turbine cycle, helium turbine cycle and supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) turbine cycle are examined for the prototype nuclear fusion reactor. Their achievable cycle thermal efficiencies are revealed to be 40%, 34% and 42% levels for the heat source outlet coolant temperature of 480degC, respectively, if no other restriction is imposed. In the current technology, however, low temperature divertor heat source is included. In this actual case, the steam turbine system and the S-CO 2 turbine system were compared in the light of cycle efficiency and plant cost. The values of cycle efficiency were 37.7% and 36.4% for the steam cycle and S-CO 2 cycle, respectively. The construction cost was estimated by means of component volume. The volume became 16,590 m 3 and 7240 m 3 for the steam turbine system and S-CO 2 turbine system, respectively. In addition, separation of permeated tritium from the coolant is much easier in S-CO 2 than in H 2 O. Therefore, the S-CO 2 turbine system is recommended to the fusion reactor system than the steam turbine system. (author)

  3. Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for application to the Very High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out of the feasibility of applying the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) Brayton cycle to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Direct application of the standard S-CO 2 recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the inherent temperature drops across the He and CO 2 sides of the reactor heat exchanger resulting in a relatively low cycle efficiency of 45 % compared to 48 % for a direct helium cycle. Two approaches consisting of either a cascaded cycle arrangement with three separate cascaded S-CO 2 cycles or, alternately, operation of a single S-CO 2 cycle with the minimum pressure below the critical pressure and the minimum temperature above the critical temperature have been identified and shown to successfully enable the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle to be adapted to the VHTR such that the benefits of the higher S-CO 2 cycle efficiency can be realized. For both approaches, S-CO 2 cycle efficiencies in excess of 49 % are calculated. (authors)

  4. On the gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water : over de vergassing van natte biomassa in superkritiek water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a challenging thermo-chemical conversion route for wet biomass and waste streams into hydrogen and/or methane. At temperatures and pressures above the critical point the physical properties of water differ strongly from liquid water or steam. Because of the

  5. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  6. Experiments in a natural circulation loop with supercritical water at low powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkhwal, D.S.; Sharma, Manish; Jana, S.S.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-05-01

    Earlier, 1/2 ″ uniform diameter Supercritical Pressure Natural Circulation Loop (SPNL) was set-up in hall-7, BARC for carrying out experiments related to supercritical fluids. The loop is a rectangular loop having two heaters and two coolers. Experiments were carried out with CO 2 under supercritical conditions for various pressures and different combinations of heater and cooler orientations. Since, the design conditions are more severe for supercritical water (SCW) experiments, the loop was modified for SCW by installing new test sections, pressurizer and power supply for operation with supercritical water. Experimental data were generated on steady state, heat transfer and stability under natural circulation conditions for the horizontal heater and horizontal cooler (HHHC) orientation with SCW up to a heater power of 8.5 kW. The flow rate data and instability data were compared with the predictions of in-house developed 1-D code NOLSTA, which showed reasonable agreement. The heat transfer coefficient data were also compared with the predictions of various correlations exhibit peak at bulk temperature lower than that obtained in the experiments. Most of these correlations predicted experimental data well in the pseudo-critical region. However, all correlations are matching well with experimental data beyond the pseudo-critical region. The details of the experimental facility, Experiments carried out and the results presented in this report. (author)

  7. Literature survey of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of water, carbon dioxide, helium and other fluids at supercritical and near-critical pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioro, I.L.; Duffey, R.B

    2003-04-01

    This survey consists of 430 references, including 269 Russian publications and 161 Western publications devoted to the problems of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of a fluid at near-critical and supercritical pressures. The objective of the literature survey is to compile and summarize findings in the area of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance at supercritical pressures for various fluids for the last fifty years published in the open Russian and Western literature. The analysis of the publications showed that the majority of the papers were devoted to the heat transfer of fluids at near-critical and supercritical pressures flowing inside a circular tube. Three major working fluids are involved: water, carbon dioxide, and helium. The main objective of these studies was the development and design of supercritical steam generators for power stations (utilizing water as a working fluid) in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Carbon dioxide was usually used as the modeling fluid due to lower values of the critical parameters. Helium, and sometimes carbon dioxide, were considered as possible working fluids in some special designs of nuclear reactors. (author)

  8. Heat Transfer to Supercritical Water in Gaseous State or Affected by Mixed Convection in Vertical Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pis'menny, E.N.; Razumovskiy, V.G.; Maevskiy, E.M.; Koloskov, A.E.; Pioro, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    The results on heat transfer to supercritical water heated above the pseudo-critical temperature or affected by mixed convection flowing upward and downward in vertical tubes of 6.28-mm and 9.50-mm inside diameter are presented. Supercritical water heat-transfer data were obtained at a pressure of 23.5 MPa, mass flux within the range from 250 to 2200 kg/(m 2 s), inlet temperature from 100 to 415 deg. C and heat flux up to 3.2 MW/m 2 . Temperature regimes of the tubes cooled with supercritical water in a gaseous state (i.e., supercritical water at temperatures beyond the pseudo-critical temperature) were stable and easily reproducible within a wide range of mass and heat fluxes. An analysis of the heat-transfer data for upward and downward flows enabled to determine a range of Gr/Re 2 values corresponding to the maximum effect of free convection on the heat transfer. It was shown that: 1) the heat transfer coefficient at the downward flow of water can be higher by about 50% compared to that of the upward flow; and 2) the deteriorated heat-transfer regime is affected with the flow direction, i.e., at the same operating conditions, the deteriorated heat transfer may be delayed at the downward flow compared to that at the upward flow. These heat-transfer data are applicable as the reference dataset for future comparison with bundle data. (authors)

  9. Delocalized organic pollutant destruction through a self-sustaining supercritical water oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavric, E.D.; Weyten, H.; Ruyck, J. de; Plesu, V.; Lavric, V.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a recent development aiming at the destruction of organic pollutants present with low concentrations in waste waters. The present paper focuses on the process simulation of SCWO with emphasis on the proper modelling of supercritical thermodynamic conditions and on the possibility to make the SCWO process self-sufficient from the energetic viewpoint. Self-sufficiency may be of interest to encourage more delocalization of waste water treatment. The process of SCWO for dilute waste water (no more than 5 wt.%) is modelled through the ASPEN Plus copyright process simulator. Studies were made to search for energetic self-sufficiency conditions using various technologies for power production from the heat of reaction, like supercritical water expansion in a turbine, use of a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) and use of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The results obtained showed that the process is energetically self-sufficient using either a small supercritical turbine, or an ORC. In less restrictive conditions regarding the component efficiencies, the CBC, in theory, also leads to self-sufficiency, but from the analysis, it appears that this solution is less realistic

  10. Heat Transfer Phenomena of Supercritical Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krau, Carmen Isabella; Kuhn, Dietmar; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In concepts for supercritical water cooled reactors, the reactor core is cooled and moderated by water at supercritical pressures. The significant temperature dependence of the fluid properties of water requires an exact knowledge of the heat transfer mechanism to avoid fuel pin damages. Near the pseudo-critical point a deterioration of heat transfer might happen. Processes, that take place in this case, are not fully understood and are due to be examined systematically. In this paper a general overview on the properties of supercritical water is given, experimental observations of different authors will be reviewed in order to identify heat transfer phenomena and onset of occurrence. The conceptional design of a test rig to investigate heat transfer in the boundary layer will be discussed. Both, water and carbon dioxide, may serve as operating fluids. The loop, including instrumentation and safety devices, is shown and suitable measuring methods are described. (authors)

  11. Thorium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.

    1984-12-01

    Advanced heavy water reactors can provide energy on a global scale beyond the foreseeable future. Their economic and safety features are promising: 1. The theoretical feasibility of the Self Sufficient Equilibrium Thorium (SSET) concept is confirmed by new calculations. Calculations show that the adjuster rod geometry used in natural uranium CANDU reactors is adequate also for SSET if the absorption in the rods is graded. 2. New fuel bundle designs can permit substantially higher power output from a CANDU reactor. The capital cost for fuel, heavy water and mechanical equipment can thereby be greatly reduced. Progress is possible with the traditional fuel material oxide, but the use of thorium metal gives much larger effects. 3. A promising long range possibility is to use pressure tanks instead of pressure tubes. Heat removal from the core is facilitated. Negative temperature and void coefficients provide inherent safety features. Refuelling under power is no longer needed if control by moderator displacement is used. Reduced quality demand on the fuel permits lower fuel costs. The neutron economy is improved by the absence of pressure and clandria tubes and also by the use of radial and axial blankets. A modular seed blanket design can reduce the Pa losses. The experience from construction of tank designs is good e.g. AAgesta, Attucha. It is now also possible to utilize technology from LWR reactors and the implementation of advanced heavy water reactors would thus be easier than HTR or LMFBR systems. (Author)

  12. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Y. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, W. [CanmetMATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Chalk River Laboratories, ON (Canada); Cook, W.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Kish, J.R., E-mail: kishjr@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  13. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D. A.; Cook, W. G.; Kish, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M23C6), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  14. Development of sub-channel/system coupled code and its application to a supercritical water-cooled test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.J.; Yang, T.; Cheng, X.

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the local thermal-hydraulic parameters in the supercritical water reactor-fuel qualification test (SCWR-FQT) fuel bundle with a flow blockage, a coupled sub-channel and system code system is developed in this paper. Both of the sub-channel code and system code are adapted to transient analysis of SCWR. Two codes are coupled by data transfer and data adaptation at the interface. In the coupled code, the whole system behavior including safety system characteristic is analyzed by system code ATHLET-SC, whereas the local thermal-hydraulic parameters are predicted by the sub-channel code COBRA-SC. Sensitivity analysis are carried out respectively in ATHLET-SC and COBRA-SC code, to identify the appropriate models for description of the flow blockage phenomenon in the test loop. Some measures to mitigate the accident consequence are also trialed to demonstrate their effectiveness. The results indicate that the new developed code has good feasibility to transient analysis of supercritical water-cooled test. And the peak cladding temperature caused by blockage in the fuel assembly can be reduced effectively by the safety measures of SCWR-FQT. (author)

  15. Isoelectric focusing in continuously tapered fused silica capillary prepared by etching with supercritical water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlais, Karel; Horká, Marie; Karásek, Pavel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 9 (2013), s. 4296-4300 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522; GA MV VG20102015023 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing * resolution of ampholytes * supercritical water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.825, year: 2013

  16. Solubility of fused silica in sub- and supercritical water: Estimation from a thermodynamic model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Šťavíková, Lenka; Planeta, Josef; Hohnová, Barbora; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, NOV (2013), s. 72-77 ISSN 0896-8446 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : amorphous silica * fused silica * supercritical water * aqueous solubility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.571, year: 2013

  17. Heat transfer in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water (1). Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Dairaku, Masayuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Mori, H.; Oka, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer experiments in a seven-rod test bundle with supercritical pressure water has been carried out. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) in the test section are evaluated. In the present limited conditions, difference between HTCs at the surface facing the sub-channel center and those at the surface in the narrowest region between rods is not observed. (author)

  18. Near- and supercritical water as a diameter manipulation and surface roughening agent in fused silica capillaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2013), s. 327-333 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/11/0138 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : supercritical water * fused silica capillary * surface treatment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.825, year: 2013

  19. Catalytic reforming of glycerol in supercritical water over bimetallic Pt-Ni catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakinala, A.G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; de Vlieger, Dennis; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of pure glycerol for the production of hydrogen at low temperature and short residence times in supercritical water was investigated using a bimetallic Pt–Ni catalyst supported on alumina. Initial tests were carried out to study the reforming activity of bimetallic Pt–Ni

  20. An Energy Analysis on Gasification of Sewage Sludge by a Direct Injection in Supercritical Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yukananto, Riza; Louwes, Alexander Charnchai; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Supercritical Water Gasification is an efficient technology in converting wet biomass into H2 and CH4 in comparison to other conventional thermochemical processes. Coke deposition, however, remains as a major challenge in this technology. Coke formation is the result of polymerization reactions that

  1. Supercritical water gasification of sewage sludge: gas production and phosphorus recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acelas Soto, N.Y.; Lopez, D.P.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Kootstra, A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of the gasification of dewatered sewage sludge in supercritical water (SCW) for energy recovery combined with P-recovery from the solid residue generated in this process was investigated. SCWG temperature (400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C) and residence time (15 min, 30 min, 60

  2. Hydrogen water chemistry for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Cowan, R.L.; Kass, J.N.; Law, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) is now a practical countermeasure for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of reactor structural materials in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The concept, which involves adding hydrogen to the feedwater to suppress the formation of oxidizing species in the reactor, has been extensively studied in both the laboratory and in several operating plants. The Dresden-2 Unit of Commonwealth Edison Company has completed operation for one full 18-month fuel cycle under HWC conditions. The specifications, procedures, equipment, instrumentation and surveillance programs needed for commercial application of the technology are available now. This paper provides a review of the benefits to be obtained, the side affects, and the special operational considerations needed for commercial implementation of HWC. Technological and management ''Lessons Learned'' from work conducted to date are also described

  3. Green biodiesel production: a review on feedstock, catalyst, monolithic reactor, and supercritical fluid technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizo Edwin Gumba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of alternative energy is primarily catalyzed by the negative environmental impacts and energy depletion caused by the excessive usage of fossil fuels. Biodiesel has emerged as a promising substitute to petrodiesel because it is biodegradable, less toxic, and reduces greenhouse gas emission. Apart from that, biodiesel can be used as blending component or direct replacements for diesel fuel in automotive engines. A diverse range of methods have been reported for the conversion of renewable feedstocks (vegetable oil or animal fat into biodiesel with transesterification being the most preferred method. Nevertheless, the cost of producing biodiesel is higher compared to fossil fuel, thus impeding its commercialization potentials. The limited source of reliable feedstock and the underdeveloped biodiesel production route have prevented the full-scale commercialization of biodiesel in many parts of the world. In a recent development, a new technology that incorporates monoliths as support matrices for enzyme immobilization in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 for continuous biodiesel production has been proposed to solve the problem. The potential of SC-CO2 system to be applied in enzymatic reactors is not well documented and hence the purpose of this review is to highlight the previous studies conducted as well as the future direction of this technology.

  4. Enhanced arrangement for recuperators in supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycle for energy conversion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, I.P.; Linares, J.I.; Cantizano, A.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We propose an enhanced power conversion system layout for a Model C fusion reactor. •Proposed layout is based on a modified recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle. •New arrangement in recuperators regards to classical cycle is used. •High efficiency is achieved, comparable with the best obtained in complex solutions. -- Abstract: A domestic research program called TECNO F US was launched in Spain in 2009 to support technological developments related to a dual coolant breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors. This concept of blanket uses Helium (300 °C/400 °C) to cool part of it and a liquid metal (480 °C/700 °C) to cool the rest; it also includes high temperature (700 °C/800 °C) and medium temperature (566 °C/700 °C) Helium cooling circuits for divertor. This paper proposes a new layout of the classical recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle which replaces one of the recuperators (the one with the highest temperature) by another which by-passes the low temperature blanket source. This arrangement allows reaching high turbine inlet temperatures (around 600 °C) with medium pressures (around 225 bar) and achieving high cycle efficiencies (close to 46.5%). So, the proposed cycle reveals as a promising design because it integrates all the available thermal sources in a compact layout achieving high efficiencies with the usual parameters prescribed in classical recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles

  5. Investigation of the precipitation of Na2SO4 in supercritical water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voisin, T.; Erriguible, A.; Philippot, G.

    2017-01-01

    solubility in sub-and supercritical water is determined on a wide temperature range using a continuous set-up. Crystallite sizes formed after precipitation are measured with in situ synchrotron wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). Combining these experimental results, a numerical modeling of the precipitation......SuperCritical Water Oxidation process (SCWO) is a promising technology for treating toxic and/or complex chemical wastes with very good efficiency. Above its critical point (374 degrees C, 22.1 MPa), water exhibits particular properties and organic compounds can be easily dissolved and degraded...... with the addition of oxidizing agents. But these interesting properties imply a main drawback regarding inorganic compounds. Highly soluble at ambient temperature in water, these inorganics (such as salts) are no longer soluble in supercritical water and precipitate into solids, creating plugs in SCWO processes...

  6. Assessment of a general methodology for the analysis of natural circulation stability with water at supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrah, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    To advance nuclear energy to meet future energy needs, the concept of Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) as part or Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors was introduced with plans to deploy by 2030. Supercritical water-cooled reactors pose new challenges in stability and natural circulation phenomena at supercritical pressures because of the strong variability of thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. ln this research, included in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) fellowship and Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on H eat transfer Behavior and Thermo hydraulics Codes Testing for SCWRs , the natural circulation H 2 O experimental data at supercritical pressures of 25 MPa obtained at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) of China, was used to evaluate the predictions of different system codes: RELAP5/MOD3.3, STAR-CCM+ as well as three (3) different and independent developed in-house codes (Ishii-sup loop, NCLoop T ran and NCLoop L ine). Stability analyses of an idealized loop (loop equivalent to CIAE natural circulation loop) of uniform diameter equivalent to the CIAE natural circulation loop at 25 MPa was performed using RELAP5 and an in-house code (Ishii-sup Loop). It was found for both RELAP and Ishii-sup Loop that, when heat structures are accounted for in models equipped with heat transfer and friction correlations for 'normal' fluids, the comparison with experimental data is not completely satisfactory because the observed experimental oscillations were delayed in simulation. It has also been found that the stability margin was slightly earlier than the peak of the flow rate-power curve at a given inlet enthalpy. Results from STAR-CCM+ was also compared with results obtained with RELAP5 and the in-house code of NCLoop. Even though STAR-CCM+ predicted a lower flow rate than the in-house codes, all codes exhibited the ability to predict the instability and results from all codes compared favorably. Stability

  7. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  8. The European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The present state of development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is outlined. During the so-called harmonization phase, the French and German utilities drew up their common requirements and evaluated the reactor concept developed until then with respect to these requirements. A main result of the harmonization phase was the issue, in September 1993, of the 'EPR Conceptual Safety Feature Review File' to be jointly assessed by the safety authorities in France and Germany. The safety objectives to be met by the EPR are specified in the second part of the paper, and some details of the primary and secondary side safety systems are given. (orig.) [de

  9. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  10. Design and operational parameters of transportable supercritical water oxidation waste destruction unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, R.D.; Brewer, G.R.; Rofer, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is the destruction of hazardous waste by oxidation in the presence of water at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. A 1 gal/h SCWO waste destruction unit (WDU) has been designed, built, and operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This unit is transportable and is intended to demonstrate the SCWO technology on wastes at Department of Energy sites. This report describes the design of the WDU and the preliminary testing phase leading to demonstration

  11. Synergetic effect of copper-plating wastewater as a catalyst for the destruction of acrylonitrile wastewater in supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Ho; Lee, Hong-shik; Lee, Young-Ho [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Processes, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jae-Duck [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Energy and Environment Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youn-Woo, E-mail: ywlee@snu.ac.kr [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Processes, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    A new supercritical water oxidation process for the simultaneous treatment of mixed wastewater containing wastewater from acrylonitrile manufacturing processes and copper-plating processes was investigated using a continuous tubular reactor system. Experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 deg. C and a pressure of 25 MPa. The residence time was fixed at 2 s by changing the flow rates of feeds, depending on reaction temperature. The initial total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the wastewaters and the O{sub 2} concentration at the reactor inlet were kept constant at 0.49 and 0.74 mol/L. It was confirmed that the copper-plating wastewater accelerated the TOC conversion of acrylonitrile wastewater from 17.6% to 67.3% at a temperature of 450 deg. C. Moreover, copper and copper oxide nanoparticles were generated in the process of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of mixed wastewater. 99.8% of copper in mixed wastewater was recovered as solid copper and copper oxides at a temperature of 600 deg. C, with their average sizes ranging from 150 to 160 nm. Our study showed that SCWO provides a synergetic effect for simultaneous treatment of acrylonitrile and copper-plating wastewater. During the reaction, the oxidation rate of acrylonitrile wastewater was enhanced due to the in situ formation of nano-catalysts of copper and/or copper oxides, while the exothermic decomposition of acrylonitrile wastewater supplied enough heat for the recovery of solid copper and copper oxides from copper-plating wastewater. The synergetic effect of wastewater treatment by the newly proposed SCWO process leads to full TOC conversion, color removal, detoxification, and odor elimination, as well as full recovery of copper.

  12. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  13. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  14. Mechanism study of c.f.c Fe-Ni-Cr alloy corrosion in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, M.

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical water can be use as a high pressure coolant in order to improve the thermodynamic efficiency of power plants. For nuclear concept, lifetime is an important safety parameter for materials. Thus materials selection criteria concern high temperature yield stress, creep resistance, resistance to irradiation embrittlement and also to both uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking.This study aims for supplying a new insight on uniform corrosion mechanism of Fe-Ni-Cr f.c.c. alloys in deaerated supercritical water at 600 C and 25 MPa. Corrosion tests were performed on 316L and 690 alloys as sample autoclaves taking into account the effect of surface finishes. Morphologies, compositions and crystallographic structure of the oxides were determined using FEG scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. If supercritical water is expected to have a gas-like behaviour in the test conditions, the results show a significant dissolution of the alloy species. Thus the corrosion in supercritical water can be considered similar to corrosion in under-critical water assuming the higher temperature and its effect on the solid state diffusion. For alloy 690, the protective oxide layer formed on polished surface consists of a chromia film topped with an iron and nickel mixed chromite or spinel. The double oxide layer formed on 316L steel seems less protective with an outer porous layer of magnetite and an inhomogeneous Cr-rich inner layer. For each alloy, the study of the inner protective scale growth mechanisms by marker or tracer experiments reveals that diffusion in the oxide scale is governed by an anionic process. However, surface finishes impact deeply the growth mechanisms. Comparisons between the results for the steel suggest that there is a competition between the oxidation of iron and chromium in supercritical water. Sufficient available chromium is required in order to form a thin oxide layer. Highly deformed or ultra fine

  15. Applications of subcritical and supercritical water conditions for extraction, hydrolysis, gasification, and carbonization of biomass: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lachos-Perez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the recent essential aspects of subcritical and supercritical water technology applied tothe extraction, hydrolysis, carbonization, and gasification processes. These are clean and fast technologies which do not need pretreatment, require less reaction time, generate less corrosion and residues, do not usetoxic solvents, and reduce the synthesis of degradation byproducts. The equipment design, process parameters, and types of biomass used for subcritical and supercritical water process are presented. The benefits of catalysis to improve process efficiency are addressed. Bioactive compounds, reducing sugars, hydrogen, biodiesel, and hydrothermal char are the final products of subcritical and supercritical water processes. The present review also revisits advances of the research trends in the development of subcriticaland supercritical water process technologies.

  16. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixtures of oxides containing Ni, Fe, Cr and Nb formed on the surface. • Short term exposure tests observed breakdown of native film. • Formation of a Fe rich oxide layer on Inconel 718 prevents mass loss. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO_4"2"− based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFe_xCr_2_-_xO_4 spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFe_xCr_2_-_xO_4 spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe_2O_4 when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  18. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev

    2017-05-01

    Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO42- based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe2O4 when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  19. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev, E-mail: dcc@unr.edu

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Mixtures of oxides containing Ni, Fe, Cr and Nb formed on the surface. • Short term exposure tests observed breakdown of native film. • Formation of a Fe rich oxide layer on Inconel 718 prevents mass loss. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−} based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  20. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  1. Thermodynamic Optimization of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhim, Dong-Ryul; Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Hyun; Yeom, Choong-Sub [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has been studied for nuclear applications, mainly for one of the alternative power conversion systems of the sodium cooled fast reactor, since 1960's. Although the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has not been expected to show higher efficiency at lower turbine inlet temperature over the conventional steam Rankine cycle, the higher density of supercritical CO{sub 2} like a liquid in the supercritical region could reduce turbo-machinery sizes, and the potential problem of sodium-water reaction with the sodium cooled fast reactor might be solved with the use of CO{sub 2} instead of water. The supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle was proposed for the better thermodynamic efficiency than for the simple supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Thus this paper presents the efficiencies of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle along with several decision variables for the thermodynamic optimization of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle. The analytic results in this study show that the system efficiency reaches its maximum value at a compressor outlet pressure of 200 bars and a recycle fraction of 30 %, and the lower minimum temperature approach at the two heat exchangers shows higher system efficiency as expected.

  2. Supercritical water treatment of heavy metal and arsenic metalloid-bioaccumulating-biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxin; Chen, Jinbo; Chen, Shan

    2018-08-15

    Hyperaccumulator biomass, as a promising resource for renewable energy that can be converted into valuable fuel productions with high conversion efficiency, must be considered as hazardous materials and be carefully treated before further reuse due to the high contents of heavy metals. In this study, Pteris vittata L., an As-hyperaccumulator biomass was treated by an effective and environmental friendly method-supercritical water gasification (SCWG) using a bench-scale batch reactor. The contents of heavy metals (Cd, Pb and Zn) and arsenic metalloid in solid, liquid and gaseous products during SCWG process were thoroughly investigated. The speciation fractions including exchangeable, reducible, oxidizable and residual fractions of each heavy metal as the proportion of the total contents in solid residue were presented and the transformations trend of these heavy metals during the SCWG process was especially demonstrated. The significant operating parameters, including reaction temperature (395-445 °C), pressure (21-27 MPa) and residence time (0-40 min) were varied to explore their effects on the contents and forms. Moreover, the environmental risks of heavy metals in solid residues were evaluated based on risk assessment code, taking into consideration the speciation fractions and bioavailability. It was highlighted that although heavy metals particularly Pb and Zn tended to accumulate in solid residues with a maximum increment of about 50% in the total content, they were mostly converted to more stable oxidizable and residual fractions, and thus the ecotoxicity and bioavailability were greatly mitigated with no obvious increase in direct toxicity fractions. Each tested heavy metal presented no or low risk to the environments after SCWG treatments, meaning that the environmental pollution levels were markedly reduced with no or low risk to the environment. This study highlights the remarkable ability of SCWG for the heavy metal stabilization. Copyright

  3. Direct Conversion of Cellulose into Ethyl Lactate in Supercritical Ethanol-Water Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lisha; Yang, Xiaokun; Tian, Elli; Lin, Hongfei

    2016-01-08

    Biomass-derived ethyl lactate is a green solvent with a growing market as the replacement for petroleum-derived toxic organic solvents. Here we report, for the first time, the production of ethyl lactate directly from cellulose with the mesoporous Zr-SBA-15 silicate catalyst in a supercritical mixture of ethanol and water. The relatively strong Lewis and weak Brønsted acid sites on the catalyst, as well as the surface hydrophobicity, were beneficial to the reaction and led to synergy during consecutive reactions, such as depolymerization, retro-aldol condensation, and esterification. Under the optimum reaction conditions, ∼33 % yield of ethyl lactate was produced from cellulose with the Zr-SBA-15 catalyst at 260 °C in supercritical 95:5 (w/w) ethanol/water. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  6. Numerical investigation of flow instability in parallel channels with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitsi, Edward; Debrah, Seth Kofi; Agbodemegbe, Vincent Yao; Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Supercritical flow instability in parallel channels is investigated. •Flow dynamics and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed. •Mass flow rate, pressure, heating power, and axial power shape have significant effects on flow instability. •Numerical results are validated with experimental results. -- Abstract: SCWR is one of the selected Gen IV reactors purposely for electricity generation in the near future. It is a promising technology with higher efficiency compared to current LWRs but without the challenges of heat transfer and its associated flow instability. Supercritical flow instability is mainly caused by sharp change in the coolant properties around the pseudo-critical point of the working fluid and research into this phenomenon is needed to address concerns of flow instability at supercritical pressures. Flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures is investigated in this paper using a three dimensional (3D) numerical tool (STAR-CCM+). The dynamics characteristics such as amplitude and period of out-of-phase inlet mass flow oscillation at the heated channel inlet, and heat transfer characteristic such as maximum outlet temperature of the heated channel outlet temperature oscillation are discussed. Influences of system parameters such as axial power shape, pressure, mass flow rate, and gravity are discussed based on the obtained mass flow and temperature oscillations. The results show that the system parameters have significant effect on the amplitude of the mass flow oscillation and maximum temperature of the heated outlet temperature oscillation but have little effect on the period of the mass flow oscillation. The amplitude of mass flow oscillation and maximum temperature of the heated channel outlet temperature oscillation increase with heating power. The numerical results when compared to experiment data show that the 3D numerical tool (STAR-CCM+) could capture dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of

  7. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500 o C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  8. Supercritical water-treated fused silica capillaries in analytical separations: Status review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1539, MAR (2018), s. 1-11 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA MV VI20172020069; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03749S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29916A Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : supercritical water * fused silica capillary * surface treatment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  9. Formation mechanism and luminescence appearance of Mn-doped zinc silicate particles synthesized in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takesue, Masafumi; Suino, Atsuko; Hakuta, Yukiya; Hayashi, Hiromichi; Smith, Richard Lee

    2008-01-01

    Luminescence appearance of Mn-doped zinc silicate (Zn 2 SiO 4 :Mn 2+ , ZSM) formed in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 29 MPa at reaction times from 1 to 4320 min was studied in the relation to its phase formation mechanism. Appearance of luminescent ZSM from green emission by α-ZSM and yellow emission by β-ZSM occurred over the same time period during the onset of phase formation at a reaction time of 2 min. Luminescence appeared at a much lower temperature and at shorter reaction times than the conventional solid-state reaction. Needle-like-shaped α-ZSM was the most stable particle shape and phase in the supercritical water reaction environment and particles formed via two routes: a homogenous nucleation route and a heterogenous route that involves solid-state diffusion and recrystallization. - Graphical abstract: Luminescence appearance of Mn-doped zinc silicate (Zn 2 SiO 4 :Mn 2+ , ZSM) formed in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 29 MPa were studied in the relation to its phase formation mechanism. Green emission by α-ZSM and yellow emission by β-ZSM occurred over the same time period during the onset of phase formation

  10. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  11. Enhanced arrangement for recuperators in supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@dim.icai.upcomillas.es; Cantizano, A.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose an enhanced power conversion system layout for a Model C fusion reactor. •Proposed layout is based on a modified recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. •New arrangement in recuperators regards to classical cycle is used. •High efficiency is achieved, comparable with the best obtained in complex solutions. -- Abstract: A domestic research program called TECNO{sub F}US was launched in Spain in 2009 to support technological developments related to a dual coolant breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors. This concept of blanket uses Helium (300 °C/400 °C) to cool part of it and a liquid metal (480 °C/700 °C) to cool the rest; it also includes high temperature (700 °C/800 °C) and medium temperature (566 °C/700 °C) Helium cooling circuits for divertor. This paper proposes a new layout of the classical recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle which replaces one of the recuperators (the one with the highest temperature) by another which by-passes the low temperature blanket source. This arrangement allows reaching high turbine inlet temperatures (around 600 °C) with medium pressures (around 225 bar) and achieving high cycle efficiencies (close to 46.5%). So, the proposed cycle reveals as a promising design because it integrates all the available thermal sources in a compact layout achieving high efficiencies with the usual parameters prescribed in classical recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles.

  12. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  13. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  14. Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power conversion cycle for battery optimized reactor integral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. W.; Kim, N. H.; Suh, K. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO 2 ) promises a high power conversion efficiency of the recompression Brayton cycle due to its excellent compressibility reducing the compression work at the bottom of the cycle and to a higher density than helium or steam decreasing the component size. The SCO 2 Brayton cycle efficiency as high as 45% furnishes small sized nuclear reactors with economical benefits on the plant construction and maintenance. A 23 MWth lead-cooled Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System (BORIS) is being developed as an ultra-long-life, versatile-purpose, fast-spectrum reactor. BORIS is coupled to the SCO 2 Brayton cycle needing less room relative to the Rankine steam cycle because of its smaller components. The SCO 2 Brayton cycle of BORIS consists of a 16 MW turbine, a 32 MW high temperature recuperator, a 14 MW low temperature recuperator, an 11 MW precooler and 2 and 2.8 MW compressors. Entering six heat exchangers between primary and secondary system at 19.9 MPa and 663 K, the SCO 2 leaves the heat exchangers at 19.9 MPa and 823 K. The promising secondary system efficiency of 45% was calculated by a theoretical method in which the main parameters include pressure, temperature, heater power, the turbine's, recuperators' and compressors' efficiencies, and the flow split ratio of SCO 2 going out from the low temperature recuperator. Development of Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System (MOBIS) is being devised as the SCO 2 Brayton cycle energy conversion cycle for BORIS. MOBIS consists of Loop Operating Brayton Optimization Study (LOBOS) for experimental Brayton cycle loop and Gas Advanced Turbine Operation Study (GATOS) for the SCO 2 turbine. Liquid-metal Energy Exchanger Integral System (LEXIS) serves to couple BORIS and MOBIS. LEXIS comprises Physical Aspect Thermal Operation System (PATOS) for SCO 2 thermal hydraulic characteristics, Shell-and-tube Overall Layout Optimization Study (SOLOS) for shell-and-tube heat exchanger, Printed

  15. Supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycles for DEMO fusion reactor based on Helium Cooled Lithium Lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, José Ignacio; Herranz, Luis Enrique; Fernández, Iván; Cantizano, Alexis; Moratilla, Beatriz Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Fusion energy is one of the most promising solutions to the world energy supply. This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the suitability of supercritical CO 2 Brayton power cycles (S-CO 2 ) for low-temperature divertor fusion reactors cooled by helium (as defined by EFDA). Integration of three thermal sources (i.e., blanket, divertor and vacuum vessel) has been studied through proposing and analyzing a number of alternative layouts, achieving an improvement on power production higher than 5% over the baseline case, which entails to a gross efficiency (before self-consumptions) higher than 42%. In spite of this achievement, the assessment of power consumption for the circulating heat transfer fluids results in a penalty of 20% in the electricity production. Once the most suitable layout has been selected an optimization process has been conducted to adjust the key parameters to balance performance and size, achieving an electrical efficiency (electricity without taking into account auxiliary consumptions due to operation of the fusion reactor) higher than 33% and a reduction in overall size of heat exchangers of 1/3. Some relevant conclusions can be drawn from the present work: the potential of S-CO 2 cycles as suitable converters of thermal energy to power in fusion reactors; the significance of a suitable integration of thermal sources to maximize power output; the high penalty of pumping power; and the convenience of identifying the key components of the layout as a way to optimize the whole cycle performance. - Highlights: • Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles have been proposed for BoP of HCLL fusion reactor. • Low temperature sources have been successfully integrated with high temperature ones. • Optimization of thermal sources integration improves 5% the electricity production. • Assessment of pumping power with sources and sink loops results on 20% of gross power. • Matching of key parameters has conducted to 1/3 of reduction in heat

  16. Thermal analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} power cycles: Assessment of their suitability to the forthcoming sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Pichel, G.D., E-mail: gdp@icai.es [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies, Comillas Pontifical University, Madrid (Spain); Linares, J.I. [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies, Comillas Pontifical University, Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E.; Moratilla, B.Y. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper investigates the potential use of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in SFRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A wide range of configurations have been explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is feasible to reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study have been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycles for their balance of plant. - Abstract: Sodium fast reactors (SFRs) potential to meet Gen. IV requirements is broadly acknowledged worldwide. The scientific and technological experience accumulated by operating test reactors and, even, by running commercial reactors, makes them be considered as the closest Gen. IV option in the near future. In the past their balance of plant has been always based on Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the potential use of supercritical recompression CO{sub 2} cycles (S-CO{sub 2}) in SFRs on the basis of the working parameters foreseen within the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) project. A wide range of configurations have been explored, from the simplest one to combined cycles (with organic Rankine cycles, ORC), and a comparison has been set in terms of thermal efficiency. As a result, it has been found out that the most basic configuration could reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.31%, which is comparable to that obtained through super-critical Rankine cycles proposed elsewhere. A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study of this configuration, pointed the pre-cooler and IHX{sub Na-CO{sub 2}} as key components in the cycle performance. These results highlight a main conclusion: the potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycles for their balance of plant, whenever a sound and extensive database is built-up on S-CO{sub 2} turbo-machinery and IHX performance.

  17. Thermal analysis of supercritical CO2 power cycles: Assessment of their suitability to the forthcoming sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Pichel, G.D.; Linares, J.I.; Herranz, L.E.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper investigates the potential use of S-CO 2 cycles in SFRs. ► A wide range of configurations have been explored. ► It is feasible to reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.5%. ► A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study have been done. ► Potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO 2 cycles for their balance of plant. - Abstract: Sodium fast reactors (SFRs) potential to meet Gen. IV requirements is broadly acknowledged worldwide. The scientific and technological experience accumulated by operating test reactors and, even, by running commercial reactors, makes them be considered as the closest Gen. IV option in the near future. In the past their balance of plant has been always based on Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the potential use of supercritical recompression CO 2 cycles (S-CO 2 ) in SFRs on the basis of the working parameters foreseen within the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) project. A wide range of configurations have been explored, from the simplest one to combined cycles (with organic Rankine cycles, ORC), and a comparison has been set in terms of thermal efficiency. As a result, it has been found out that the most basic configuration could reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.31%, which is comparable to that obtained through super-critical Rankine cycles proposed elsewhere. A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study of this configuration, pointed the pre-cooler and IHX Na–CO 2 as key components in the cycle performance. These results highlight a main conclusion: the potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO 2 cycles for their balance of plant, whenever a sound and extensive database is built-up on S-CO 2 turbo-machinery and IHX performance.

  18. FY1995 generic supercritical water technology; 1995 nendo generic technology to shite no chorinkai riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the establishment of the basis of supercritical fluid technology, we perform elucidation of the specific feature of the supercritical fluid as a reaction media and development of some new process. In this study, we first studied the fluid structure of SCF through in-situ spectroscopy and MD simulation. As a result, significant hydrogen bonding amongst water molecules and a solvation structure around the solute were observed in the supercritical state. This fluid structure has new features different from that of high temperature steam or liquid water. We found that this is closely related to the difference of bulk properties of SCF and local one around the solute. On the basis of these fundamental findings and with the better understanding of the specific features of SCF as a reaction media, development of some new process had been conducted more efficiently and successfully. The processes being developed in this study include 1) waste biomass and plastic conversion to recover chemicals, 2) hydrogenation of heavy oil for desulphurization through partial oxidation 1 and 3) hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide fine particles. (NEDO)

  19. Determination of fat- and water-soluble vitamins by supercritical fluid chromatography: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyśkiewicz, Katarzyna; Dębczak, Agnieszka; Gieysztor, Roman; Szymczak, Tomasz; Rój, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that take part in all basic functions of an organism but also are subject of number of studies performed by different researchers. Two groups of vitamins are distinguished taking into consideration their solubility. Chromatography with supercritical CO 2 has found application in the determination, separation, and quantitative analyses of both fat- and water-soluble vitamins. The methods of vitamins separation have developed and improved throughout the years. Both groups of compounds were separated using supercritical fluid chromatography with different detection on different stationary phases. The main aim of this review is to provide an overview of the studies of vitamins separation that have been determined so far. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Reactor water level measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Reiji; Asano, Tamotsu.

    1996-01-01

    A condensation vessel is connected to the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The lower portion of the condensation vessel is connected to a low pressure side of a differential pressure transmission device by way of a reference leg pipeline. The high pressure side of the differential pressure transmission device is connected to the lower portion of the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The condensation vessel is equipped with a temperature sensor. When a temperature of a gas phase portion in the condensation vessel is lowered below a predetermined level, and incondensible gases in the condensation vessel starts to be dissolved in water, signals are sent from the temperature sensor to a control device and a control valve is opened. With such a constitution, CRD driving water flows into the condensation vessel, and water in which gases at the upper portion of the condensation vessel is dissolved flows into the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. Then, gases dissolved in a reference water column in the reference leg pipeline are eliminated and the value of a reference water pressure does not change even upon abrupt lowering of pressure. (I.N.)

  1. Preliminary conceptual design of the secondary sodium circuit-eliminated JSFR (Japan Sodium Fast Reactor) adopting a supercritical CO2 turbine system (2). Turbine system and plant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisohara, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshihiko; Kotake, Shoji

    2014-09-01

    Research and development of the supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) cycle turbine system is underway in various countries for further improvement of the safety and economy of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The Component Design and Balance-Of-Plant (CD and BOP) of the Generation IV International Nuclear Forum (Gen-IV) has addressed this study, and their analytical and experimental results have been discussed between the relevant countries. JAEA, who is a member of the CD and BOP, has performed a design study of an S-CO 2 gas turbine system applied to the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR). In this study, the S-CO 2 cycle turbine system was directly connected to the primary sodium system of the JSFR to eliminate the secondary sodium circuit, aiming for further economical improvement. This is because there is no risk of sodium-water reaction in the S-CO 2 cycle turbine system of SFRs. This report describes the system configuration, heat/mass balance, and main components of the S-CO 2 turbine system, based on the JSFR specifications. The layout of components and piping in the reactor and turbine buildings were examined and the dimensions of the buildings were estimated. The study has revealed that the reactor and turbine buildings could be reduced by 7% and 40%, respectively, in comparison with those in the existing JSFR design with the secondary sodium circuit employing the steam turbine. The cycle thermal was also calculated as 41.9-42.3%, which is nearly the same as that of the JSFR with the water/steam system. (author)

  2. Multi-Phase Equilibrium and Solubilities of Aromatic Compounds and Inorganic Compounds in Sub- and Supercritical Water: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinli; Ding, Xin; Du, Bowen; Fang, Tao

    2017-11-02

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), as a novel and efficient technology, has been applied to wastewater treatment processes. The use of phase equilibrium data to optimize process parameters can offer a theoretical guidance for designing SCWO processes and reducing the equipment and operating costs. In this work, high-pressure phase equilibrium data for aromatic compounds+water systems and inorganic compounds+water systems are given. Moreover, thermodynamic models, equations of state (EOS) and empirical and semi-empirical approaches are summarized and evaluated. This paper also lists the existing problems of multi-phase equilibria and solubility studies on aromatic compounds and inorganic compounds in sub- and supercritical water.

  3. Gasification of fruit wastes and agro-food residues in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Sonil; Isen, Jamie; Dalai, Ajay K.; Kozinski, Janusz A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical water gasification of various fruit wastes and agro-food residues. • Coconut shell had superior carbon content and calorific value due to high lignin. • Maximum H_2 yields at 600 °C with 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio, 45 min and 23–25 MPa. • High H_2 yields from coconut shell, bagasse and aloe vera rind with 2 wt% K_2CO_3. • High CH_4 yields from coconut shell with 2 wt% NaOH due to methanation reaction. - Abstract: Considerable amounts of fruit wastes and agro-food residues are generated worldwide as a result of food processing. Converting the bioactive components (e.g., carbohydrates, lipids, fats, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in food wastes to biofuels is a potential remediation approach. This study highlights the characterization and hydrothermal conversion of several fruit wastes and agro-food residues such as aloe vera rind, banana peel, coconut shell, lemon peel, orange peel, pineapple peel and sugarcane bagasse to hydrogen-rich syngas through supercritical water gasification. The agro-food wastes were gasified in supercritical water to study the impacts of temperature (400–600 °C), biomass-to-water ratio (1:5 and 1:10) and reaction time (15–45 min) at a pressure range of 23–25 MPa. The catalytic effects of NaOH and K_2CO_3 were also investigated to maximize the hydrogen yields and selectivity. The elevated temperature (600 °C), longer reaction time (45 min) and lower feed concentration (1:10 biomass-to-water ratio) were optimal for higher hydrogen yield (0.91 mmol/g) and total gas yield (5.5 mmol/g) from orange peel. However, coconut shell with 2 wt% K_2CO_3 at 600 °C and 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio for 45 min revealed superior hydrogen yield (4.8 mmol/g), hydrogen selectivity (45.8%) and total gas yield (15 mmol/g) with enhanced lower heating value of the gas product (1595 kJ/Nm"3). The overall findings suggest that supercritical water gasification of fruit wastes and agro-food residues could serve as

  4. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Chase C.

    complete recycling loop. After showing the feasibility and power of this technology, the third phase of the study was focused on the fundamentals on the degradation of highly cross-linked polymer network by sub- and near-critical water. A methodology framework was established to study the apparent kinetics of the degradation of epoxy in sub-critical water. The reaction rate was modeled by a phenomenological rate model of nth order, and the rate constant was modeled by taking into account of the contributions of important physical parameters, e.g., pressure, temperature and dielectric constants. The applicability of the established model to describe the degradation kinetics was confirmed by the validation runs. This model is a suitable starting point to gain the knowledge required for eventual industrial process design. The final phase of this research consisted of a preliminary foray into investigating the economic feasibility of this technology. A process model was designed around a reactor which was sized according to considerations of industrial relevancy. The simulation of the process was done using Aspen Plus, powerful and comprehensive process simulation software. Economic analysis of this pseudo-realistic process suggested that such technology was economically viable and competitive comparing to other recycling technologies. In summary, this dissertation work represents the first comprehensive investigation on recycling aerospace-grade, multilayer woven fabric composites using supercritical and sub-critical water. The fundamental knowledge gained and process technology developed during this research is anticipated to play an important role in advancing this recycling technology toward potential adoption and implementation by the recycling and composite industry.

  5. To the analysis of reactor noise in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1972-01-01

    The paper contains some basic thoughts on the problem of neutron flux oscillations in power reactors. The advantages of self-powered detectors and their function are explained. In addition, noise measurements of the boiling water reactors at Lingen and Holden are described, and the possibilities of an employment of vanadium detectors for the analysis of reactor noise are discussed. The final pages of the paper contain a complete list of the author's publications in the field of reactor noise analysis. (RW/AK) [de

  6. Experimental study on the minimum drag coefficient of supercritical pressure water in horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Xianliang; Li, Huixiong; Guo, YuMeng; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum drag coefficient phenomenon (MDC) has been observed and further investigated. • Effects of heat flux, mass flux and pressure to MDC have been discussed. • A series of comparisons between existing correlations and data have been conducted. • Two correlations of drag coefficient are proposed for isothermal and nonisothermal flow. - Abstract: Hydraulic resistance and its components are of great importance for understanding the turbulence nature of supercritical fluid and establishing prediction methods. Under supercritical pressures, the hydraulic resistance of the fluid exhibits a “pit” in the regions near its pseudo-critical point, which is hereafter called the minimum drag coefficient phenomenon. However, this special phenomenon was paid a little attention before. Hence systematical experiments have been carried out to investigate the hydraulic resistance of supercritical pressure water in both adiabatic and heated horizontal tubes. Parametric effects of heat flux, pressure and mass fluxes to drag coefficient are further compared. It is found that almost all of the existing correlations don’t agree well with the experimental data due to the insufficient consideration of thermal-properties near the pseudocritical point. Two correlations of the drag coefficients are finally proposed by introducing the new variable of the derivative of density with respect to temperature or Prandtl number, which can better predict the drag coefficient of isothermal and nonisothermal flow respectively.

  7. Supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycles for DEMO (demonstration power plant) fusion reactor based on dual coolant lithium lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, José Ignacio; Cantizano, Alexis; Moratilla, Beatriz Yolanda; Martín-Palacios, Víctor; Batet, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the suitability of supercritical CO 2 Brayton power cycles as alternative energy conversion systems for a future fusion reactor based on a DCLL (dual coolant lithium-lead) blanket, as prescribed by EUROfusion. The main issue dealt is the optimization of the integration of the different thermal sources with the power cycle in order to achieve the highest electricity production. The analysis includes the assessment of the pumping consumption in the heating and cooling loops, taking into account additional considerations as control issues and integration of thermal energy storage systems. An exergy analysis has been performed in order to understand the behavior of each layout. Up to ten scenarios have been analyzed assessing different locations for thermal sources heat exchangers. Neglecting the worst four scenarios, it is observed less than 2% of variation among the other six ones. One of the best six scenarios clearly stands out over the others due to the location of the thermal sources in a unique island, being this scenario compatible with the control criteria. In this proposal 34.6% of electric efficiency (before the self-consumptions of the reactor but including pumping consumptions and generator efficiency) is achieved. - Highlights: • Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles have been proposed for BoP of DCLL fusion reactor. • Integration of different available thermal sources has been analyzed considering ten scenarios. • Neglecting the four worst scenarios the electricity production varies less than 2%. • Control and energy storage integration issues have been considered in the analysis. • Discarding the vacuum vessel and joining the other sources in an island is proposed.

  8. Non-Catalytic and MgSO4 - Catalyst based Degradation of Glycerol in Subcritical and Supercritical Water Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Mahfud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the glycerol degradation reaction in subcritical and supercritical water media. The degradation of glycerol into other products was performed both with sulphate salt catalysts and without catalyst. The reactant was made from glycerol and water with the mass ratio of 1:10. The experiments were carried out using a batch reactor at a constant pressure of 250 kgf/cm2, with the temperature range of 200-400oC, reaction time of 30 minutes, and catalyst mol ratio in glycerol of 1:10 and 1:8. The products of the non-catalytic glycerol degradation were acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. The use of sulphate salt as catalyst has high selectivity to acetaldehyde and still allows the formation alcohol product in small quantities. The mechanism of ionic reaction and free radical reaction can occur at lower temperature in hydrothermal area or subcritical water. Conversion of glycerol on catalytic reaction showed a higher yield when compared with the reaction performed without catalyst

  9. Corrosion testing of NiCrAl(Y) coating alloys in high-temperature and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljan, S.; Huang, X.; Qian, Y.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear power reactors, materials capable of operating in high-temperature and supercritical water environment are essential. This study focuses on the corrosion behavior of five alloys with compositions of Ni20Cr, Ni5Al, Ni50Cr, Ni20Cr5Al and Ni20Cr10AlY above and below the critical point of water. Corrosion tests were conducted at three different pressures, while the temperature was maintained at 460 o C, in order to examine the effects of water density on the corrosion. From the preliminary test results, it was found that the binary alloys Ni20Cr and Ni50Cr showed weight loss above the critical point (23.7 MPa and 460 o C). The higher Cr content alloy Ni50Cr suffered more weight loss than Ni-20Cr under the same conditions. Accelerated weight gain was observed above the critical point for the binary alloy Ni5Al. The combination of Cr, Al and Y in Ni20Cr10AlY provides stable scale formation under all testing conditions employed in this study. (author)

  10. New Linear Partitioning Models Based on Experimental Water: Supercritical CO2 Partitioning Data of Selected Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burant, Aniela; Thompson, Christopher; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2016-05-17

    Partitioning coefficients of organic compounds between water and supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) are necessary to assess the risk of migration of these chemicals from subsurface CO2 storage sites. Despite the large number of potential organic contaminants, the current data set of published water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients is very limited. Here, the partitioning coefficients of thiophene, pyrrole, and anisole were measured in situ over a range of temperatures and pressures using a novel pressurized batch-reactor system with dual spectroscopic detectors: a near-infrared spectrometer for measuring the organic analyte in the CO2 phase and a UV detector for quantifying the analyte in the aqueous phase. Our measured partitioning coefficients followed expected trends based on volatility and aqueous solubility. The partitioning coefficients and literature data were then used to update a published poly parameter linear free-energy relationship and to develop five new linear free-energy relationships for predicting water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients. A total of four of the models targeted a single class of organic compounds. Unlike models that utilize Abraham solvation parameters, the new relationships use vapor pressure and aqueous solubility of the organic compound at 25 °C and CO2 density to predict partitioning coefficients over a range of temperature and pressure conditions. The compound class models provide better estimates of partitioning behavior for compounds in that class than does the model built for the entire data set.

  11. Effect of sub- and supercritical water treatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell chitin and its enzymatic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Mitsumasa; Miura, Chika; Nakagawa, Yuko S; Kaihara, Mikio; Nikaido, Mitsuru; Totani, Kazuhide

    2015-12-10

    This study examined the effects of sub- and supercritical water pretreatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell α-chitin and its enzymatic degradation to obtain N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc)2. Following sub- and supercritical water pretreatments, the protein in the crab shell was removed and the residue of crab shell contained α-chitin and CaCO3. Prolonged pretreatment led to α-chitin decomposition. The reaction of pure α-chitin in sub- and supercritical water pretreatments was investigated separately; we observed lower mean molecular weight and weaker hydrogen bonds compared with untreated α-chitin. (GlcNAc)2 yields from enzymatic degradation of subcritical (350 °C, 7 min) and supercritical water (400 °C, 2.5 min) pretreated crab shell were 8% and 6%, compared with 0% without any pretreatment. This study shows that sub- and supercritical water pretreatments of crab shell provide to an alternative method to the use of acid and base for decalcification and deproteinization of crab shell required for (GlcNAc)2 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Egashira, Yasuo; Shimada, Fumie; Igarashi, Noboru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To save a low temperature reactor water clean-up system indispensable so far and significantly simplify the system by carrying out the reactor water clean-up solely in a high temperature reactor water clean-up system. Constitution: The reactor water clean-up device comprises a high temperature clean-up pump and a high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. The high temperature adsorption device is filled with amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents, or amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents and anionic adsorbing inorganic adsorbents. The reactor water clean-up device introduces reactor water by the high temperature clean-up pump through a recycling system to the high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. Since cations such as cobalt ions and anions such as chlorine ions in the reactor water are simultaneously removed in the device, a low temperature reactor water clean-up system which has been indispensable so far can be saved to realize the significant simplification for the entire system. (Seki, T.)

  14. Pre-conceptual core design of a small modular fast reactor cooled by supercritical CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Baolin; Cao, Liangzhi; Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Yuan, Xianbao, E-mail: ztsbaby@163.com [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); College of Mechanical & Power Engineering, China Three Gorges University, No 8, Daxue Road, Yichang 443002, Hubei (China); Wang, Kunpeng [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, PO Box 8088, Beijing 100082 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Abstracts: A Small Modular fast reactor cooled by Supercritical CO{sub 2} (SMoSC) is pre-conceptually designed through three-dimensional coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analysis. The power rating of the SMoSC is designed to be 300 MW{sub th} to meet the energy demand of small electrical grids. The excellent thermal properties of supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) are employed to obtain a high thermal efficiency of about 40% with an electric output of 120 MWe. MOX fuel is utilized in the core design to improve fuel efficiency. The tube-in-duct (TID) assembly is applied to get lower coolant volume fraction and reduce the positive coolant void reactivity. According to the coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations, the coolant void reactivity is kept negative throughout the whole core life. With a specific power density of 9.6 kW/kg and an average discharge burnup of 70.1 GWd/tHM, the SmoSC can be operated for 20 Effective Full Power Years (EFPYs) without refueling.

  15. Economic and environmental performance of oil transesterification in supercritical methanol at different reaction conditions: Experimental study with a batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomic, Milan; Micic, Radoslav; Kiss, Ferenc; Dedovic, Nebojsa; Simikic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of reaction parameters on FAME yields has been investigated. • The highest yield (93%) was achieved after 15 min at 350 °C and 12 MPa. • Models which predict with high certainty yields at different reaction conditions. • Economic and environmental performance of supercritical transesterification. • The lowest costs and impacts are always achieved at the highest yields. - Abstract: This study aims to investigate the influence of various reaction parameters (temperatures, working pressures and reaction time) on biodiesel yields and environmental and economic performance of rapeseed oil transesterification in supercritical methanol. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. Results were statistically analysed and multiple regression models which describe and predict biodiesel yields with high certainty at different reaction conditions were provided. The highest biodiesel yield (93 wt%) was achieved at 350 °C and 12 MPa after 15 min of reaction. The lowest direct costs and life cycle environmental impacts (in terms of GHG emissions and fossil energy demand) are achieved at the highest yield due to the lowest oil consumption per unit of biodiesel produced. The results of sensitivity analysis showed that even at significantly lower oil feedstock prices this observation stands firm

  16. Reaction rate prediction in the supercritical region of H · + OH"- → e"-_a_q + H_2O using μSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, T.; Liu, G.; Beninger, J.; Ghandi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reaction rates in the supercritical region for reactions caused by the radiolysis of water is needed to prevent damage to future Supercritical Water-Cooled reactors. In particular, the H · + OH"- → e"-_a_q + H_2O reaction is examined experimentally within the supercritical region by usage of muon spin rotation spectroscopy. Using the obtained data and the 'cage effect' theory, the reaction was modelled and plateau-like behaviour near the critical point was accounted for. (author)

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation of heat transfer from a narrow annulus to supercritical pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Han; Bi, Qincheng; Yang, Zhendong; Wang, Linchuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat transfer of supercritical water in a narrow annulus is investigated. • Effects of system parameters and flow direction on heat transfer are studied. • Deteriorated heat transfer is analyzed both experimentally and numerically. - Abstract: Heat transfer characteristics of supercritical pressure water in a narrow annulus with vertically upward and downward flows were investigated experimentally and numerically. The outer diameter of the inner heated rod is 8 mm with an effective heated length of 620 mm. Experimental parameters covered the pressure of 23–28 MPa, mass flux of 400–1000 kg/m 2 s and heat flux on the outer surface of the heated rod from 200 to 1000 kW/m 2 . The general heat transfer behaviors were discussed with respect to various mass fluxes and pressures. According to the experimental data, it was found that the effect of flow direction on heat transfer depends on the heat-flux to mass-flux ratio (q/G). Heat transfer is much improved in the downward flow compared to that of upward flow at high q/G ratios. At the pressure of 25 MPa, low-mass-flux deteriorated heat transfer occurred in the upward flow but not in the downward flow. At the same test parameters, however, heat transfer deterioration was observed at both of the two flow directions when the pressure was lowered to 23 MPa. The experimental results indicate that buoyancy plays an important role for this type of deterioration, but is not the only mechanism that leads to the heat transfer deterioration. Three turbulence models were assessed against the annulus test data, it was found that the SST k-ω model gives a satisfying prediction of heat transfer deterioration especially for the case of downward flow. The mechanisms for the low-mass-flow heat transfer deterioration were investigated from the viewpoints of buoyancy and property variations of the supercritical water

  18. Development of a test facility for analyzing supercritical fluid blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2015-01-01

    The generation IV nuclear reactors under development mostly use supercritical fluids as the working fluid because higher temperatures improve the thermal efficiency. Supercritical fluids are used by modern nuclear power plants to achieve thermal efficiencies of around 45%. With water as the supercritical working fluid, these plants operate at a high temperature and pressure. However, experiments on supercritical water are limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids, which have more feasible supercritical conditions and exhibit a lower critical pressure and temperature. Experimental research is normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine model fluids that can represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. This paper presents an application of fractional scale analysis to determine the simulation parameters for a depressurization test facility. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and R134a gas were considered as the model fluids because their critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. The similarities of water (prototype), CO 2 (model) and R134a (model) for depressurization in a pressure vessel were analyzed. (author)

  19. Reactivities of polystyrenic polymers with supercritical water under nitrogen or air. Identification and formation of degradation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, M.A.; Dozol, J.F.; Massiani, C.; Ambrosio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of ion-exchange resins (IER) that are radioactive process wastes and which contain radioactivity. The GC/MS technique was used successfully to identify the low-concentration degradation compounds that are present in the cold liquid effluent after SCWO of polystyrenic IER at 380 C (25.5 MPa). The study of the behavior of these IER in supercritical water enhances the role of temperature and the role of supercritical water in the degradation process. With the exception of acetic acid, the identified compounds are aromatic. The functional groups are released during the heating time, and they do not interfere in the degradation process. The oxidation involves a complex set of reaction pathways. A mechanism including parallel and competitive reactions is proposed

  20. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Zheng, W. [Materials Technology Laboratory, NRCan, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500{sup o}C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  1. Effect of Heating Method on Hydrogen Production by Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhui Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose as a test sample of biomass is gasified in supercritical water with different heating methods driven by renewable solar energy. The performance comparisons of hydrogen production of glucose gasification are investigated. The relations between temperature raising speed of reactant fluid, variation of volume fraction, combustion enthalpy, and chemical exergy of H2 of the product gases with reactant solution concentration are presented, respectively. The results show that the energy quality of product gases with preheating process is higher than that with no preheating unit for hydrogen production. Hydrogen production quantity and gasification rate of glucose decrease obviously with the increase of concentration of material in no preheating system.

  2. A Conceptual Study on a Supercritical CO2-cooled KAIST Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, HwanYeal; Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2015-01-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are nuclear reactors that are completely built in a factory and shipped to the designated site for installation. As such, the SMR is especially advantageous as a flexible and cost-effective energy source for remote and isolated areas. Furthermore, the concept requires a relatively low capital cost, which makes it attractive for developing countries with limited electricity grid. In addition, the SMR concepts also generate more interest after the Fukushima accident since it can easily be designed with a passive decay heat removal system. One of the major advantages of a water-cooled SMR is its relatively small core size. Nonetheless, in spite of its small core size, the volume and area required for its steam-cycle power conversion unit is still significant. In this study, neutronics feasibility of a fully compact and transportable KAIST micro-modular reactor (MMR) was demonstrated. Rated thermal power of the core was 36.2 MWth with total weight of about 39.6 tons. The core was loaded with 15.5 w/o uranium mono-nitride U15N fuels in order to achieve a targeted lifetime of 20 EFPYs. To achieve targeted lifetime, initial excess reactivity of the core should be quite high, around 4,707 pcm. To reduce the high excess reactivity to about 2,500 pcm, a replaceable burnable absorber was utilized in the design. As a result, the MMR has a 20-year lifetime with a relatively small burnup reactivity swing. Several important safety parameters of the KAIST MMR core were also determined in this study. The Doppler reactivity coefficients and CVRs were demonstrated to negative. Worth of the primary control drums and secondary control rod were much higher than initial excess reactivity

  3. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  4. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, M.E.; Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m 3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m 3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Continuous production of phosphor YAG:Tb nanoparticles by hydrothermal synthesis in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakuta, Yukiya; Haganuma, Tsukasa; Sue, Kiwamu; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Arai, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    Phosphor YAG:Tb ((Y 2.7 Tb 0.3 )Al 5 O 12 ) nano particles were synthesized by a hydrothermal method at supercritical conditions (400 deg. C and 30 MPa) using a flow reactor. Hydroxide sol solutions formed by stoichiometric aluminum nitrate, yttrium nitrate, terbium nitrate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The relationship between particle size and experimental variables including pH, concentration of coexistent ions and hydroxide sol were investigated. Particles were characterized by XRD, TEM and photo-luminescence measurements. Particle size of YAG:Tb became finer as pH was increased or potassium nitrate concentration of the starting metal salt solution was increased. By removing the coexisting ions (NO 3 - , K + ) from the metal salt solution, single phase YAG:Tb particles with 20 nm particle size were obtained. The emission spectra of YAG:Tb particles of 14 nm shows a blue shift

  6. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  7. Failure Analysis of 600 MW Supercritical Boiler Water Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Huilin; Cai Zhengchun; Yan Xiaozhong; He Jinqiao; Zhou Yucai

    2013-01-01

    Boiler tube often causes abnormal boiler outage, bringing greater economic losses. This thesis mainly comes from the dynamics of boiler water, boiler furnace accident location of wall temperature distribution to explore the cause of the accident boiler. Calculation results show that the deformation will seriously reduce the boiler allowable maximum temperature difference between the screens. And the boiler is not over-temperature, low temperature difference between the screens, which have bur...

  8. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  9. Enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, Sharif Md; Hyun, Sang-Min; Kim, Jun-Hee; Park, Hee Jun; Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Jeong-Sook; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2018-03-01

    Poor water solubility and poor bioavailability are problems with many pharmaceuticals. Increasing surface area by micronization is an effective strategy to overcome these problems, but conventional techniques often utilize solvents and harsh processing, which restricts their use. Newer, green technologies, such as supercritical fluid (SCF)-assisted particle formation, can produce solvent-free products under relatively mild conditions, offering many advantages over conventional methods. The antisolvent properties of the SCFs used for microparticle and nanoparticle formation have generated great interest in recent years, because the kinetics of the precipitation process and morphologies of the particles can be accurately controlled. The characteristics of the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique make it an ideal tool for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. This review article focuses on SCFs and their properties, as well as the fundamentals of overcoming poorly water-soluble drug properties by micronization, crystal morphology control, and formation of composite solid dispersion nanoparticles with polymers and/or surfactants. This article also presents an overview of the main aspects of the SAS-assisted particle precipitation process, its mechanism, and parameters, as well as our own experiences, recent advances, and trends in development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Corrosion behavior of ceramic-coated ZIRLO™ exposed to supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Cahyadi, Rico S.; Yalisove, Steven; Kuang, Wenjun; Sickafus, K.; Patel, Maulik K.; Was, Gary S.

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of ceramic coated ZIRLO™ tubing was evaluated in a supercritical water (SCW) environment to determine its behavior in high temperature water. Two coating architectures were analyzed; a 4 bi-layer TiAlN/TiN coating with Ti bond coat, and a TiN monolithic coating with Ti bond layer on ZIRLO™ tubes using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD) technique. Femtosecond laser ablation was used to introduce reproducible defects in some of the coated tubes. On exposure to deaerated supercritical water at 542 °C for 48 h, coated tubes exhibited significantly higher weight gain compared to uncoated ZIRLO™. Examination revealed formation of a uniform ZrO2 layer beneath the coating of a thickness similar to that on the uncoated tube inner surface. The defects generated during the coating process acted as preferential paths for diffusion of oxygen resulting in the oxidation of substrate ZIRLO™. However, there was no delamination of the coating. There were insignificant differences in the oxidation weight gain between laser ablated and non-ablated tubes and the laser induced defects did not spread beyond their original size.

  11. Reactor vessel pressure transient protection for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, G.

    1978-09-01

    During the past few years the NRC has been studying the issue of protection of the reactor pressure vessels at Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) from transients when the vessels are at a relatively low temperature. This effort was prompted by concerns related to the safety margins available to vessel damage as a result of such events. Nuclear Reactor Regulation Category A Technical Activity No. A-26 was established to set forth the NRC plan for resolution of the generic aspects of this safety issue. The purpose of the report is to document the completion of this generic technical activity

  12. Landfill leachate treatment by batch supercritical water oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fernando Marulanda Cardona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento de lixiviados por medio de diferentes procesos fisicoquímicos y biológicos ha sido ampliamente estudiado. Sin embargo, ningún proceso logra las eficiencias de destruc- ción requeridas en cuanto a materia orgánica y nitrógeno, razón por la cual el tratamiento se realiza por medio de tecnologías combinadas. La oxidación en agua supercrítica o SCWO, proceso que se lleva a cabo a temperaturas y presiones superiores a las del punto crítico del agua en presencia de una fuente de oxígeno, se ha aplicado exitosamente al tratamiento de distintos tipos de aguas residuales de forma eficiente. Por lo tanto, este trabajo presenta un estudio experimental de la oxidación en agua supercrítica de lixiviados de relleno sanitario en un reactor batch, en el rango de temperatura de 400-500°C, tiempos de reacción de 15 a 30 mi- nutos y excesos de oxígeno (OE de 100 % a 300 %. Se midieron las eficiencias de destrucción de carbono orgánico total (COT y nitrógeno total (NT, y se determinó el efecto combinado de los factores estudiados por medio del Análisis de Varianza (ANOVA. Las condiciones de operación óptimas para la destrucción de COT fueron 400°C, 30 min y 100 % OE, y 500°C, 30 min y 100 % OE para el NT. A diferencia de lo reportado en estudios similares, los resultados su- gieren que es posible llevar a cabo la destrucción simultánea del COT y el NT en los lixiviados por medio de SCWO a 400°C, 100 % OE y tiempos de residencia de más de 30 min sin usar un catalizador, ya sea en un proceso batch o continuo, siempre y cuando tanto el oxidante como el agua residual se mezclen y se calienten juntos a la temperatura de reacción.

  13. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  14. COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-01-01

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO(sub 2), bulk TiO(sub 2), and CuO supported on Al(sub 2) O(sub 3). We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO(sub 2) yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO(sub 2) and TiO(sub 2) catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO(sub 2) formation rates during SCWO. MnO(sub 2) does not affect the selectivity to CO(sub 2), or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO(sub 2) are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO(sub 2) , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of

  15. Method of operating heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stabilized reactor control, and improve the working rate and the safety of the reactor by removing liquid poison in heavy water while maintaining the power level constant to thereby render the void coefficient of the coolants negative in the low power operation. Method: The operation device for a heavy water moderated reactor comprises a power detector for the reactor, a void coefficient calculator for coolants, control rods inserted into the reactor, a poison regulator for dissolving poisons into or removing them out of heavy water and a device for removing the poisons by the poison regulator device while maintaining the predetermined power level or inserting the control rods by the signals from the power detector and the void coefficient calculator in the high temperature stand-by conditions of the reactor. Then, the heavy water moderated reactor is operated so that liquid poisons in the heavy water are eliminated in the high temperature stand-by condition prior to the start for the power up while maintaining the power level constant and the plurality of control rods are inserted into the reactor core and the void coefficient of the coolants is rendered negative in the low power operation. (Seki, T.)

  16. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  17. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  18. Boiling water reactor fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of compensating, without the use of control rods or burnable poisons for power shaping, for reduced moderation of neutrons in an uppermost section of the active core of a boiling water nuclear reactor containing a plurality of elongated fuel rods vertically oriented therein, the fuel rods having nuclear fuel therein, the fuel rods being cooled by water pressurized such that boiling thereof occurs. The method consists of: replacing all of the nuclear fuel in a portion of only the upper half of first predetermined ones of the fuel rods with a solid moderator material of zirconium hydride so that the fuel and the moderator material are axially distributed in the predetermined ones of the fuel rods in an asymmetrical manner relative to a plane through the axial midpoint of each rod and perpendicular to the axis of the rod; placing the moderator material in the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods in respective sealed internal cladding tubes, which are separate from respective external cladding tubes of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods, to prevent interaction between the moderator material and the external cladding tube of each of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods; and wherein the number of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods is at least thirty, and further comprising the steps of: replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the upper quarter of each of the at least thirty rods; and also replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the adjacent lower quarter of at least sixteen of the at least thirty rods

  19. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  20. Chemical recycling of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites in oxygen in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yongping; Wang, Zhi; Feng, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    The carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites were recovered in oxygen in supercritical water at 30 ± 1 MPa and 440 ± 10 o C. The microstructure of the recovered carbon fibers was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed that the clean carbon fibers were recovered and had higher tensile strength relative to the virgin carbon fibers when the decomposition rate was above 85 wt.%, although the recovered carbon fibers have clean surface, the epoxy resin on the surface of the recovered carbon fibers was readily observed. As the decomposition rate increased to above 96 wt.%, no epoxy resin was observed on the surface of the carbon fibers and the oxidation of the recovered carbon fibers was readily measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The carbon fibers were ideally recovered and have original strength when the decomposition rates were between 94 and 97 wt.%. This study clearly showed the oxygen in supercritical water is a promising way for recycling the carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced resin composites.

  1. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  2. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  3. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental study on heat transfer to supercritical water flowing in 1- and 4-m-long vertical tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, Pavel; Pomet'ko, Richard; Smirnov, Aleksandr; Grabezhnaia, Vera; Pioro, Igor; Duffey, Romney; Khartabil, Hussam

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents selected on heat transfer to supercritical water flowing upward in 1- and 4-m-long vertical tubes. Supercritical water heat-transfer data were obtained at pressures of 24-25 MPa, mass fluxes of 200 - 1500 kg/m 2 s, heat fluxes up to 1050 kW/m 2 and inlet temperature from 300 to 380degC for several combinations of wall and bulk fluid temperatures that were below, at or above the pseudocritical temperature. In general, the experiments confirmed that there are three heat transfer modes for water at supercritical pressures: (1) normal heat transfer characterized in general with heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) similar to those of subcritical convective heat transfer far from critical or pseudocritical regions, which are calculated according to the Dittus-Boelter type correlations, (2) deteriorated heat transfer with lower values of the HTC and hence higher values of wall temperature within some part of a test section compared to those of normal heat transfer and (3) improved heat transfer with higher values of the HTC and hence lower values of wall temperature within some part of a test section compared to those of normal heat transfer. These new heat-transfer data are applicable as a reference dataset for future comparison with supercritical water bundle data and for the verification of scaling parameters between water and modelling fluids. (author)

  5. Water feeding method upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Takahara, Kuniaki; Hamamura, Kenji; Arakawa, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of feeding water upon reactor isolation in a plural loop type reactor having a plurality of reactor cooling systems. Water can be injected to a plurality of pools even if the pressure between the pools is not balanced and the water level in the reactor cooling system is optimally controlled. That is, water can be injected in accordance with the amount required for each of the pools by setting the opening of a turbine inlet steam control valve to somewhat higher than the cooling system pressure of the highest pressure loop. Water feeding devices upon reactor isolation were required by the same number as that for the reactor cooling systems. Whereas since pumps and turbines are used in common without worsening the water injection controllability to each of the loops according to the method of this invention and, accordingly, the cost performance can be improved. Further, since the opening degree of the turbine inlet steam control valve is controlled while making the difference pressure constant between the turbine inlet pressure and the pump exhaust pressure, the amount of the turbine exhausted steams can be reduced and, further, water injection controllability of the flow rate control valve in the injection line is improved. (I.S.)

  6. Nuclear fuel performance in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, R.B.; Baily, W.E.; Proebstle, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major development program is described to improve the performance of Boiling Water Reactor fuel. This sustained program is described in four parts: 1) performance monitoring, 2) fuel design changes, 3) plant operating recommendations, and 4) advanced fuel programs

  7. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Reactor water quality degradation suppressing method upon reactor start up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuharu.

    1993-01-01

    Preceding to reactor start-up, vacuum degree in a condenser is increased, and after the vacuum degree has been increased sufficiently, a desalting tower is inserted. Then, water feed to the reactor is started and the reactor is operated so that water is supplied gradually. Thus, dissolved oxygen in the feedwater and condensates is kept low and an entire organic carbon leaching rate from resins in the condensate desalting tower is reduced. Further, since feedwater is gradually supplied after the start-up, the entire organic carbon brought into the reactor is decomposed by heat and radiation and efficiently removed by a reactor coolant cleanup system. As a result, corrosion of stainless steel or the like is suppressed, as well as integrity of fuels can be maintained. Further, degradation of water quality can be suppressed effectively not by additionally putting the condensate desalting towers to in-service in accordance with the increase of the feedwater flow rate accompanying the power up but by previously putting the condensate desalting towers to in-service. (N.H.)

  10. Water chemistry in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, V.A.; Mamet, V.A.; Shestakov, Yu.M.; Amosov, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper ''Water Chemistry in WWER Reactors'', are briefly described the 30 WWERs in Russian and the Ukraine, and are pointed out the essential differences between the 440s and 1000s. The primary coolant in the six loops of the former type operates at 270-290 deg. C, while the four loops of the latter type are at 290-320 deg. C. Performance of the fuel has been generally good with some fission product activities emanating from tramp uranium. Incidents causing unusually high fission product levels were overheating of the 16th fuel load at Kola NPP in 1990 by a reduced coolant flow, and fuel defects at Novovoronezh NPP resulting from deposits of carbon and corrosion products. Organic carbon, depositing from the coolant in regions of high turbulence (i.e. at the spacer grids), provokes corrosion product deposition. The source of the organic is not known. New chemistry guidelines have been implemented since 1992-93 for Russian and Ukrainian WWERs. These include higher pH T values (7.0-7.1 as opposed to 6.6-6.9) and tighter controls on oxygen and impurities. Lower dose rates in steam generator channels are reported. Significant reduction in operator doses are achieved by these methods coupled with a ''soft decontamination'' involving changing the KOH concentration and, hence, the pH T before shutdown. The benefits of hydrazine treatment for deoxygenating feedwater and coolant prior to start up, for injecting before shutdown and for general chemistry control on radiation fields are described. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs, 8 tabs

  11. Water chemistry in WWER reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurmanov, V A; Mamet, V A; Shestakov, Yu M; Amosov, M M [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. for Nuclear Power Plants Operation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-02-01

    In this paper ``Water Chemistry in WWER Reactors``, are briefly described the 30 WWERs in Russian and the Ukraine, and are pointed out the essential differences between the 440s and 1000s. The primary coolant in the six loops of the former type operates at 270-290 deg. C, while the four loops of the latter type are at 290-320 deg. C. Performance of the fuel has been generally good with some fission product activities emanating from tramp uranium. Incidents causing unusually high fission product levels were overheating of the 16th fuel load at Kola NPP in 1990 by a reduced coolant flow, and fuel defects at Novovoronezh NPP resulting from deposits of carbon and corrosion products. Organic carbon, depositing from the coolant in regions of high turbulence (i.e. at the spacer grids), provokes corrosion product deposition. The source of the organic is not known. New chemistry guidelines have been implemented since 1992-93 for Russian and Ukrainian WWERs. These include higher pH{sub T} values (7.0-7.1 as opposed to 6.6-6.9) and tighter controls on oxygen and impurities. Lower dose rates in steam generator channels are reported. Significant reduction in operator doses are achieved by these methods coupled with a ``soft decontamination`` involving changing the KOH concentration and, hence, the pH{sub T} before shutdown. The benefits of hydrazine treatment for deoxygenating feedwater and coolant prior to start up, for injecting before shutdown and for general chemistry control on radiation fields are described. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs, 8 tabs.

  12. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  13. Water-immersion type ship reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Hiroki; Yamamura, Toshio.

    1996-01-01

    In a water immersion-type ship reactor in which a water-tight wall is formed around a pressure vessel by way of an air permeable heat insulation layer and immersing the wall under water in a reactor container, a pressure equalizing means equipped with a back flow check valve and introducing a gas in a gas phase portion above the water level of the container into a water tight wall and a relief valve for releasing the gas in the water tight wall to the reactor container are disposed on the water tight wall. When the pressure in the water tight wall exceeds the pressure in the container, the gas in the water tight wall is released from the relief valve to the reactor container. On the contrary, when the pressure in the container exceeds the pressure in the water tight wall, the gas in the gas phase portion is flown from the pressure equalizing means equipped with a back flow check valve to the inside of the water tight wall. Thus, a differential pressure between both of them is kept around 0kg/cm 2 . A large differential pressure is not exerted on the water tight wall thereby capable of preventing rupture of them to improve reliability, as well as the thickness of the plate can be decreased thereby enabling to moderate the design for the pressure resistance and reduce the weight. (N.H.)

  14. Emergency cooling of presurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1981-01-01

    The method described of emergency core cooling in the pressurized water reactor is characterized by the fact that water is transported to the disturbed primary circuit or direct to the reactor by the action of the energy and mass of the steam and/or liquid phase of the secondary circuit coolant, which during emergency core cooling becomes an emergency cooling medium. (B.S.)

  15. Pressurized water reactors: the EPR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.; Yvon, M.

    2007-01-01

    EPR (originally 'European pressurized water reactor', and now 'evolutionary power reactor') is a model of reactor initially jointly developed by French and German engineers which fulfills the particular safety specifications of both countries but also the European utility requirements jointly elaborated by the main European power companies under the initiative of Electricite de France (EdF). Today, two EPR-based reactors are under development: one is under construction in Finland and the other, Flamanville 3 (France), received its creation permit decree on April 10, 2007. This article presents, first, the main objectives of the EPR, and then, describes the Flamanville 3 reactor: reactor type and general conditions, core and conditions of operation, primary and secondary circuits with their components, main auxiliary and recovery systems, man-machine interface and instrumentation and control system, confinement and serious accidents, arrangement of buildings. (J.S.)

  16. A comparison of the mechanisms of photooxidative degradation of organic molecules on irradiated semiconductor powders and in aerated supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Marye Anne [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-08-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to survey evidence that suggests that control of the local environment is important in both heterogeneous TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis and in thermal oxidation reactions taking place in supercritical fluids, i.e. that the expected influences of these very different methods for microcompartmentalization do indeed influence the observed reaction kinetics in an easily observable way. Variations in reaction kinetics and the photophysical properties are described for (1) small semiconductor clusters, including their altered photocatalytic activity in and on inert supports; and (2) molecular probes dispersed within the self-aggregating clusters formed within supercritical water

  17. Formation of ZnO at zinc oxidation by near- and supercritical water under the constant electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, A. V.; Sokol, M. Ya.; Shatrova, A. V.; Fedyaeva, O. N.; Vostrikov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The work has detected an influence of a constant electric field (up to E = 300 kV/m) on the structure of a nanocrystalline layer of zinc oxide, formed on the surface of a planar zinc anode in water under supercritical (673 K and 23 MPa) and near-critical (673 K and 17. 5 MPa) conditions. The effect of an increase of zinc oxidation rate with an increase in E is observed under supercritical conditions and is absent at near-critical ones. Increase in the field strength leads to the formation of a looser structure in the inner part of the zinc oxide layer.

  18. Study on corrosion behavior of candidate materials in 650℃ supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shuli; Luo Ying; Zhang Qiang; Wang Hao; Qiu Shaoyu

    2014-01-01

    The general corrosion behavior of three candidate materials (347, HR3C and In-718) was investigated in 650 ℃/25 MPa deionized water. Morphology and composition of the surface oxide film with different exposure time were observed through FEG-SEM and EDS. The phase constitute was analyzed by GIXRD. For all the test materials, the weight loss follows typical parabolic law and the weight loss of 347 shows more than 40 times higher than that of HR3C and In-718. The oxide film of three alloys mainly consists of Ni(Cr, Fe) 2 O 4 . In-718 shows severe pitting and the oxide film of 347 appears significant spalling, while HR3C has compact oxide film. In the high temperature supercritical water, the high Cr content may enhance the general corrosion property of the alloys, while addition of Nb may be detrimental to the pitting resistance of alloys. (authors)

  19. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Heat-Transfer characteristics of Supercritical Water flowing upward in bare-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidawi, K., E-mail: khalil.sidawi@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Sciences, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    There has been many correlations developed for Supercritical Water (SCW) flowing in bare-tubes. These correlations, generally, have limits based on the experimental trials. However, this does not indicate the true range to which these correlations can be applied. Furthermore, increases in heat flux and decreases in mass flux have been known to lead to Deteriorated Heat-Transfer (DHT). One way to classify fluids in the supercritical region is to use the Eckert Number to differentiate between two different sub-states{sup 1} ; when T < T{sub pc}, SCW is considered to be liquid-like, whereas at T > T{sub pc}, SCW is considered to be gas-like. There is a significant decrease in RMS error for calculated HTC in trials where there is a single sub-state across the cross-section. Trials where there is a combination of sub-states have drastically higher RMS error for HTC. Furthermore, some trials indicate a decrease in HTC at the interphase between the two sub-states. (author)

  1. Pressurised water reactor in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Since the Three Mile Island accident there has been much debate about the safety considerations of Pressurised Water Reactors. Their development will continue throughout the world but it will be based upon the lessons learned from that unfortunate accident. In the United Kingdom there is a public enquiry discussing all aspects of the reactor. The papers given in this book provide an informed addition to the literature. The design, safety and licensing and construction of a pressurised water reactor system are discussed in detail. Considerations stemming from the Three Mile Island accident are presented

  2. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  3. Water injection device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, Isao.

    1996-01-01

    A pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core is placed and secured on a pedestal in a dry well of a reactor container. A pedestal water injection line is disposed opened at one end in a pedestal cavity passing through the side wall of the pedestal and led at the other end to the outside of the reactor container. A substitution dry well spray line is connected to a spray header disposed at the upper portion of the dry well. When the pressure vessel should be damaged by a molten reactor core and the molten reactor core should drop to the dry well upon occurrence of an accident, the molten reactor core on the floor of the pedestal is cooled by water injection from the pedestal water injection line. At the same time, the elevation of the pressure and the temperature in the reactor container is suppressed by the water injection of the substitution dry well spray line. This can avoid large scaled release of radioactive materials to the environmental circumference. (I.N.)

  4. Emergency water supply facility for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Water is stored previously in an equipment storage pit disposed on an operator floor of a reactor building instead of a condensate storage vessel. Upon occurrence of an emergency, water is supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a sucking pipeline to a pump of a high pressure reactor core water injection circuit and a pump of a reactor-isolation cooling circuit to supply water to a reactor. The equipment storage pit is arranged in a building so that the depth thereof is determined to keep the required amount of water by storing water at a level lower than the lower end of a pool gate during normal operation. Water is also supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a supply pipeline to a spent fuel storage pool on the operation floor of the reactor building. Namely, water is supplied to the spent fuel storage pool by a pump of a fuel pool cooling and cleaning circuit. This can eliminate a suppression pool cleaning circuit. (I.N.)

  5. Water desalination using different capacity reactors options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, G.; Vargas, S.; Del Valle, E.; Ramirez, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Northwest region of Mexico has a deficit of potable water, along this necessity is the region growth, which requires of additional energy capacity, cogeneration of potable water production and nuclear electricity is an option to be assessed. In this paper we will perform an economical comparison for cogeneration using a big reactor, the AP1000, and a medium size reactor, the IRIS, both of them are PWR type reactors and will be coupled to the desalination plant using the same method. For this cogeneration case we will assess the best reactor option that can cover both needs using the maximum potable water production for two different desalination methods: Multistage Flash Distillation and Multi-effect Distillation. (authors)

  6. New lineup of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Koichiro; Kitsukawa, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    Toshiba is promoting technical studies for upcoming nuclear power plants based on its large accumulation of experience in boiling water reactor (BWR) design, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. Our goal is to achieve higher reliability, lower life-cycle costs, and better competitiveness for nuclear power plants compared with other energy sources. In addition, we are developing a new light water reactor (LWR) lineup featuring the safest and most economical LWRs in the world as next-generation reactors almost at new construction and replacement in the Japanese and international markets expected to start from the 2020s. We are committed not only to developing BWRs with the world's highest performance but also to participating in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) market, taking advantage of the synergistic effect of both Toshiba's and Westinghouse's experience. (author)

  7. Heat Transfer Experiment with Supercritical CO{sub 2} Flowing Upward in a Circular Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Hee Dong; Bae, Yoon Yeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    SCWR (SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor) is one of the six reactor candidates selected in the Gen-IV project, which aims at the development of new reactors with enhanced economy and safety. Heat transfer experiments under supercritical conditions are required in relevant geometries for the proper prediction of thermo-hydraulic phenomena in a reactor core. A heat transfer test loop, named as SPHINX (Supercritical Pressure Heat Transfer Investigation for NeXt generation), has been constructed in KAERI. The loop uses carbon dioxide as a surrogate fluid for water since the critical pressure and temperature of CO{sub 2} are much lower those of water. As a first stage of heat transfer experiments, a single tube test is being performed in the test loop. Controlled parameters for the tests are operating pressure, mass flux, and heat flux. Wall temperatures are measured along the tube. Experimental data are compared with existing correlations.

  8. Heat Transfer Experiment with Supercritical CO2 Flowing Upward in a Circular Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Hee Dong; Bae, Yoon Yeong

    2005-01-01

    SCWR (SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor) is one of the six reactor candidates selected in the Gen-IV project, which aims at the development of new reactors with enhanced economy and safety. Heat transfer experiments under supercritical conditions are required in relevant geometries for the proper prediction of thermo-hydraulic phenomena in a reactor core. A heat transfer test loop, named as SPHINX (Supercritical Pressure Heat Transfer Investigation for NeXt generation), has been constructed in KAERI. The loop uses carbon dioxide as a surrogate fluid for water since the critical pressure and temperature of CO 2 are much lower those of water. As a first stage of heat transfer experiments, a single tube test is being performed in the test loop. Controlled parameters for the tests are operating pressure, mass flux, and heat flux. Wall temperatures are measured along the tube. Experimental data are compared with existing correlations

  9. Inherently safe light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu

    1987-01-01

    Today's large nuclear power reactors of world-wise use have been designed based on the philosophy. It seems that recent less electricity demand rates, higher capital cost and the TMI accident let us acknowledge relative small and simplified nuclear plants with safer features, and that Chernobyl accident in 1983 underlines the needs of intrinsic and passive safety characteristics. In such background, several inherently safe reactor concepts have been presented abroad and domestically. First describing 'Can inherently safe reactors be designed,' then I introduce representative reactor concepts of inherently safe LWRs advocated abroad so far. All of these innovative reactors employ intrinsic and passive features in their design, as follows: (1) PIUS, an acronym for Process Inherent Ultimate Safety, or an integral PWR with passive heat sink and passive shutdown mechanism, advocated by ASEA-ATOM of Sweden. (2) MAP(Minimum Attention Plant), or a self-pressurized, natural circulation integral PWR, promoted by CE Inc. of the U.S. (3) TPS(TRIGA Power System), or a compact PWR with passive heat sink and inherent fuel characteristics of large prompt temperature coefficient, prompted by GA Technologies Inc. of the U.S. (4) PIUS-BWR, or an inherently safe BWR employing passively actuated fluid valves, in competition with PIUS, prompted by ORNL of the U.S. Then, I will describe the domestic trends in Japan and the innovative inherently safe LWRs presented domestically so far. (author)

  10. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen and power production by supercritical water reforming of glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galera, S.; Gutiérrez Ortiz, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The environmental performance of the supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was assessed. • Biogenic CO 2 emissions allowed quantifying a realistic GHG inventory of 3.8 kg CO 2 -eq/kg H 2 . • The environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to those of other technologies. • A good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol was obtained. - Abstract: The environmental performance of hydrogen and electricity production by supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was evaluated following a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. The heat-integrated process was designed to be energy self-sufficient. Mass and energy balances needed for the study were performed using Aspen Plus 8.4, and the environmental assessment was carried out through SimaPro 8.0. CML 2000 was selected as the life cycle impact assessment method, considering as impact categories the global warming, ozone layer depletion, abiotic depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, eutrophication, acidification, and cumulative energy demand. A distinction between biogenic and fossil CO 2 emissions was done to quantify a more realistic GHG inventory of 3.77 kg CO 2 -eq per kg H 2 produced. Additionally, the environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to other H 2 production technologies such as steam methane reforming, carbon gasification, water electrolysis and dark fermentation among others. This way, it is shown that SCWR of glycerol allows reducing greenhouse gas emissions and obtaining a favorable positive life cycle energy balance, achieving a good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol

  11. Method of measuring reactor water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kaoru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a water level measuring system so that a reactor water level detecting signal can be corrected in correspondence to a recirculation flow, thereby to carry out a correct water level detection in a wide range of the reactor. Method: According to the operation record of a precursor reactor, the ratio Δh of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow is lowered in proportion to the ratiowith respect to the rated differential pressure of the recirculation flow. Accordingly, the flow of recirculation pump is measured by an elbow differential pressure generator utilizing an elbow of a pipe, and the measured value is multiplied by a gain by a ratio setter, and therefter, an addition computation is carried out by an adder for correcting the signal from a water level detector. When the signal from the water level detector is corrected in this manner, the influence of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow can be removed, and an interlocker predetermined in the defined water level can be actuated, thus the influence of the dynamic pressure due to the recirculation flow acting on the instrumental pipe line detecting the reactor water level can be removed effectively. (Yoshino, Y.)

  12. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  13. Preliminary Design of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Radial Turbine for Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jekyoung; Kim, Seong Gu; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jae Eun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The KAIST research team suggested an innovative concept of SMR called KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). It is aimed for achieving complete modularization of a nuclear power plant including the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) for simple transportation and installation. In consideration of the maintenance, S-CO{sub 2} has superior characteristic to the light water because it is less corrosive. Table I represents summary of the main design results of KAIST MMR. As such efforts the study on S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery has been actively conducted because the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle operates under extreme conditions such as high rotational speed, high pressure, and dramatic change of thermodynamic properties near the critical point (30.98 .deg. C, 7377kPa). To achieve higher thermal efficiency, the operation near the critical point is prerequisite in the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. For these reasons, research works on the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery naturally have been focused on the compressor which operates near the critical point. Due to the absence of loss models in S-CO{sub 2} field, loss models with air turbine were first utilized to design and predict the off design performance of a S-CO{sub 2} turbine. To check propriety of the code logic the code results compared with experimental data measured in air condition. The predicted values showed good agreement with the experiment data. Lastly, performance maps for S-CO{sub 2} turbine for the MMR were generated with change of mass flow rate and rotational speed.

  14. Requirements for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, F.

    2009-01-01

    The EUR (European Utilities Requirements) is an organization founded in 1991 whose aim was to write down the European specifications and requirements for the future reactors of third generation. EUR gathers most of the nuclear power producers of Europe. The EUR document has been built on the large and varied experience of EUR members and can be used to elaborate invitations to tender for nuclear projects. 4000 requirements only for the nuclear part of the plant are listed, among which we have: -) the probability of core meltdown for a reactor must be less than 10 -6 per year, -) the service life of every component that is not replaceable must be 60 years, -) the capacity of the spent fuel pool must be sufficient to store 10-15 years of production without clearing out. The EUR document is both open and complete: every topic has been considered, it does not favor any type of reactor but can ban any technology that is too risky or has an unfavourable feedback experience. The assessment of the conformity with the EUR document of 7 reactor projects (BWR 90/, EPR, EP1000, SWR1000, ABWR, AP1000 and VVER-AES-92) has already be made. (A.C.)

  15. Superior corrosion resistance properties of TiN-based coatings on Zircaloy tubes in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatkhatay, Fauzia [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3128 (United States); Jiao, Liang [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3003 (United States); Jian, Jie [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3128 (United States); Zhang, Wenrui [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3003 (United States); Jiao, Zhijie [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Gan, Jian; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Zhang, Xinghang [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3003 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3128 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3003 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Thin films of TiN and Ti{sub 0.35}Al{sub 0.65}N nanocomposite were deposited on polished Zircaloy-4 tubes. After exposure to supercritical water for 48 h, the coated tubes are remarkably intact, while the bare uncoated tube shows severe oxidation and breakaway corrosion. X-ray diffraction patterns, secondary electron images, backscattered electron images, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data from the tube surfaces and cross-sections show that a protective oxide, formed on the film surface, effectively prevents further oxidation and corrosion to the Zircaloy-4 tubes. This result demonstrates the effectiveness of thin film ceramics as protective coatings under extreme environments.

  16. A Review of Laboratory-Scale Research on Upgrading Heavy Oil in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for energy and the depletion of conventional crude oil, heavy oil in huge reserve has attracted extensive attention. However, heavy oil cannot be directly refined by existing processes unless they are upgraded due to its complex composition and high concentration of heteroatoms (N, S, Ni, V, etc.. Of the variety of techniques for heavy oil upgrading, supercritical water (SCW is gaining popularity because of its excellent ability to convert heavy oil into valued, clean light oil by the suppression of coke formation and the removal of heteroatoms. Based on the current status of this research around the world, heavy oil upgrading in SCW is summarized from three aspects: Transformation of hydrocarbons, suppression of coke, and removal of heteroatoms. In this work, the challenge and future development of the orientation of upgrading heavy oil in SCW are pointed out.

  17. Design and study of water supply system for supercritical unit boiler in thermal power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zenghui

    2018-04-01

    In order to design and optimize the boiler feed water system of supercritical unit, the establishment of a highly accurate controlled object model and its dynamic characteristics are prerequisites for developing a perfect thermal control system. In this paper, the method of mechanism modeling often leads to large systematic errors. Aiming at the information contained in the historical operation data of the boiler typical thermal system, the modern intelligent identification method to establish a high-precision quantitative model is used. This method avoids the difficulties caused by the disturbance experiment modeling for the actual system in the field, and provides a strong reference for the design and optimization of the thermal automation control system in the thermal power plant.

  18. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  19. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  20. Results of the mid-term assessment of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2' project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T.; Marsault, P.

    2009-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor (LWR) operating at supercritical pressure (p>22.1 MPa). In Europe, investigations on the HPLWR have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 (HPLWR Phase 2), which is co-funded by the European Commission. Within the second year of the project, the design of the reactor core, the pressure vessel and its internals have been analysed in detail by means of advanced codes and methods. The mechanical design has been assessed and shows that stresses inside components and possible deformations keep within acceptable limits. The neutronics and the flow inside the core have been investigated. The addition of a water layer in the reflector helps to flatten the radial power profile. The moderator flow path must be changed because of possible reverse flow in the gaps between the assemblies (downward flow). First calculations of transients showed an acceptable behaviour of the cladding temperatures. Material oxidation experiments were successfully performed. The auxiliary loop of the Supercritical Water Loop has been constructed. Heat transfer has been investigated numerically analysing heat transfer deterioration (HTD) and flow around fuel pins with wire wrap spacers. (author)

  1. Reliability of reactor plant water cleanup pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carolina Power and Light Company's Brunswick 2 nuclear plant experienced a high reactor water cleanup pump-failure rate until inlet temperature and flow were reduced and mechanical modifications were implemented. Failures have been zero for about one year, and water cleanup efficiency has increased

  2. Assessment and comparison of oxides grown on 304l ods steel and 304l ss in water environment in supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, M.; Dinu, A.; Fulger, M.; Zhou, Z.; Mihalache, M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to fulfil superior cladding for new reactor generation G IV, the austenitic 3 04 L stainless steel was improved by oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS), using two nano-oxides: titanium and yttrium oxides. The behaviour of the new material resulted, 304 ODS, in water at supercritical temperature of about 550 O C and 25 MPa pressure, was considered. The oxidation kinetics by weigh gain measurements for both materials have been estimated and compared. The weight gain of ODS samples is higher than basic austenitic steel up to 1320 hours. The oxides developed on the ODS samples in SCPW are layered and more uniform than in 304 L SS. The protectively character of oxide films was estimated by different techniques. The morphology of oxide surface, the layering and chemical formula of oxides films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersion X-Ray Spectrometry (EDS), electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and by Small Angle X-ray Diffraction (SAXD). 1. (authors)

  3. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  4. Utility requirements for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, A.; Gray, S.; Mulford, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is actively engaged in developing advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs for the next century. The new designs take advantage of the thousands of reactor-years of experience that have been accumulated by operating over 400 plants worldwide. The EPRI effort began in the early 1980's, when a survey of utility executives was conducted to determine their prerequisites for ordering nuclear power plants. The results were clear: new plants had to be simpler and safer, and have greater design margins, i.e., be more forgiving. The utility executives also supported making improvements to the established light water reactor technology, rather than trying to develop new reactor concepts. Finally, they wanted the option to build mid-size plants (∼600 MWe) in addition to full-size plants of more than 1200 MWe. 4 refs

  5. Safety aspects of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This submission to the Health and Safety Executive has been prepared by the Institution of Professional Civil Servants (IPCS) as a contribution to the debate on safety aspects associated with Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Although supporting an energy policy which includes the development of nuclear power, assurances are sought on a number of safety issues if it is decided that this should be generated by a PWR-type reactor. These issues are listed. In particular the following are mentioned: the wider publication of design information, the use of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics as the basis for determining pressure vessel integrity, the failure rate of steam generating units, water coolant quality control, greater investigation of two-phase flow accident conditions, the components of the reactor cooling system and training of reactor personnel in the understanding of LOCA effects. (U.K.)

  6. Estimation of Oxidation Kinetics and Oxide Scale Void Position of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliation of oxide scales from high-temperature heating surfaces of power boilers threatened the safety of supercritical power generating units. According to available space model, the oxidation kinetics of two ferritic-martensitic steels are developed to predict in supercritical water at 400°C, 500°C, and 600°C. The iron diffusion coefficients in magnetite and Fe-Cr spinel are extrapolated from studies of Backhaus and Töpfer. According to Fe-Cr-O ternary phase diagram, oxygen partial pressure at the steel/Fe-Cr spinel oxide interface is determined. The oxygen partial pressure at the magnetite/supercritical water interface meets the equivalent oxygen partial pressure when system equilibrium has been attained. The relative error between calculated values and experimental values is analyzed and the reasons of error are suggested. The research results show that the results of simulation at 600°C are approximately close to experimental results. The iron diffusion coefficient is discontinuous in the duplex scale of two ferritic-martensitic steels. The simulation results of thicknesses of the oxide scale on tubes (T91 of final superheater of a 600 MW supercritical boiler are compared with field measurement data and calculation results by Adrian’s method. The calculated void positions of oxide scales are in good agreement with a cross-sectional SEM image of the oxide layers.

  7. Corrosion of low alloy steel containing 0.5% chromium in supercritical CO2-saturated brine and water-saturated supercritical CO2 environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Gao, Kewei; Li, Qian

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of P110 low-Cr alloy steel in supercritical CO2-saturated brine (aqueous phase) and water-saturated supercritical CO2 (SC CO2 phase) was investigated. The results show that P110 steel primarily suffered general corrosion in the aqueous phase, while severe localized corrosion occurred in the SC CO2 phase. The formation of corrosion product scale on P110 steel in the aqueous phase divided into three stages: formation of the initial corrosion layer containing amorphous Cr(OH)3, FeCO3 and a small amount of Fe3C; transformation of initial corrosion layer to mixed layer, which consisted of FeCO3 and a small amount of Cr(OH)3 and Fe3C; growth and dissolution of the mixed layer. Finally, only a single mixed layer covered on the steel in the aqueous phase. However, the scale formed in SC CO2 phase consisted of two layers: the inner mixed layer and the dense outer FeCO3 crystalline layer.

  8. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Jayasree; Vijayan, K.; Kain, Vivekanad; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent stability tests in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have indicated that these reactors can exhibit the special nonlinear behavior of following a closed trajectory called limit cycle. The existence of a limit cycle corresponds to an oscillation of fixed amplitude and period. During these tests, such oscillations had their amplitudes limited to about +- 15% of the operating power. Since limit cycles are fairly insensitive to parameter variations, it is possible to operate a BWR under conditions that sustain a limit cycle (of fixed amplitude and period) over a finite range of reactor parameters

  10. Thermohydraulic analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program PANTERA is applied in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Cores (PWR). It is a version of COBRA-IIIC in which a new thermal conduction model for fuel rods was introduced. The results calculated by this program are compared with experimental data obtained from bundles of fuel rods, simulating reactor conditions. The validity of the new thermal model is checked too. The PANTERA code, through a simplified procedure of calculation, is used in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Indian Point, Unit 2, reactor core, in stationary conditions. The results are discussed and compared with design data. (Autor) [pt

  11. Steam explosions in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report deals with a postulated accident caused by molten fuel falling into the lower plenum of the containment of a reactor. The analysis which is presented in the report shows that the thermal energy released in the resulting steam explosion is not enough to destroy the pressure vessel or the containment. The report was prepared for the Swedish Governmental Committee on steam explosion in light water reactors. It includes statements issued by internationally well-known specialists. (G.B.)

  12. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  13. Wollastonite Carbonation in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2: Effects of Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yujia; Li, Qingyun; Voltolini, Marco; Kneafsey, Timothy; Jun, Young-Shin

    2017-11-07

    The performance of geologic CO 2 sequestration (GCS) can be affected by CO 2 mineralization and changes in the permeability of geologic formations resulting from interactions between water-bearing supercritical CO 2 (scCO 2 ) and silicates in reservoir rocks. However, without an understanding of the size effects, the findings in previous studies using nanometer- or micrometer-size particles cannot be applied to the bulk rock in field sites. In this study, we report the effects of particle sizes on the carbonation of wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ) at 60 °C and 100 bar in water-bearing scCO 2 . After normalization by the surface area, the thickness of the reacted wollastonite layer on the surfaces was independent of particle sizes. After 20 h, the reaction was not controlled by the kinetics of surface reactions but by the diffusion of water-bearing scCO 2 across the product layer on wollastonite surfaces. Among the products of reaction, amorphous silica, rather than calcite, covered the wollastonite surface and acted as a diffusion barrier to water-bearing scCO 2 . The product layer was not highly porous, with a specific surface area 10 times smaller than that of the altered amorphous silica formed at the wollastonite surface in aqueous solution. These findings can help us evaluate the impacts of mineral carbonation in water-bearing scCO 2 .

  14. Structural assessment of intermediate printed circuit heat exchanger for sodium-cooled fast reactor with supercritical CO2 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We numerically model PCHE stress arising from pressure, and thermal loadings. • Stress levels are the highest around S-CO 2 channels, due to high pressure of S-CO 2 . • The conventional analytic models for PCHE underestimate actual stress levels. • Plasticity sufficiently lowers stress levels at channel tips. • PCHE for SFR-SCO 2 is anticipated to assure compliance with ASME design standards. - Abstract: Structural integrity of intermediate Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) attached to Supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) is investigated. ANSYS-Mechanical was used to simulate stress fields of representative PCHE channels, with temperature fields imported from FLUENT simulation. Mechanical stress induced by pressure loading is found to be the primary source of stress. As plasticity sufficiently lowers local stress concentration at PCHE channel tips, PCHE type intermediate heat exchangers made of SS316 are anticipated to reliably assure compliance with design standards prescribed in the ASME standards, thanks to the structure temperature that is below the effective creep inducing point. The actual life time of PCHE for SFR-SCO 2 is likely to be affected by mechanical behavior change of SS316 with reactions with S-CO 2 and fatigue

  15. Non-catalytic production of fatty acid ethyl esters from soybean oil with supercritical ethanol in a two-step process using a microtube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Camila da; Lima, Ana Paula de; Castilhos, Fernanda de; Cardozo Filho, Lucio; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the production of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from the transesterification of soybean oil in supercritical ethanol in a continuous catalyst-free process using different reactor configurations. Experiments were performed in a microtube reactor with experimental simulation of two reactors operated in series and a reactor with recycle, both configurations at a constant temperature of 573 K, pressure of 20 MPa and oil to ethanol mass ratio of 1:1. Results show that the configurations studied with intermediate separation of glycerol afford higher conversions of vegetable oil to its fatty acid ethyl ester derivatives when compared to the one-step reaction, with relatively low decomposition of fatty acids (<3.0 wt%).

  16. Study on the possibility of supercritical fluid extraction for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Wuhua; Zhu Liyang; Zhu Yongjun; Xu Jingming

    2011-01-01

    International interest in high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has been increasing in recent years. It is important to study on reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from HTGR for recovery of nuclear resource and reduction of nuclear waste. Treatment of UO 2 pellets for preparing fuel elements of the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) using supercritical fluid extraction was investigated. UO 2 pellets are difficult to be directly dissolved and extracted with TBP-HNO 3 complex in supercritical CO 2 (SC-CO 2 ), and the extraction efficiency is only about 7% under experimental conditions. UO 2 pellets are also difficult to be converted completely into nitrate with N 2 O 4 . When UO 2 pellets break spontaneously into U 3 O 8 powders with particle size below 100 μm under O 2 flow and 600degc, the extraction efficiency of U 3 O 8 powders with TBP-HNO 3 complex in SC-CO 2 can reach more than 98%. U 3 O 8 powders are easy to be completely converted into nitrate with N 2 O 4 . The extraction efficiency of the nitrate product with TBP in SC-CO 2 can reach more than 99%. So it has a potential prospect that application of supercritical fluid extraction in reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from HTGR. (author)

  17. A universal salt model based on under-ground precipitation of solid salts due to supercritical water `out-salting'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueslåtten, H.; Hovland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    One of the common characteristics of planets Earth and Mars is that both host water (H2O) and large accumulations of salt. Whereas Earth’s surface-environment can be regarded as ‘water-friendly’ and ‘salt hostile’, the reverse can be said for the surface of Mars. This is because liquid water is stable on Earth, and the atmosphere transports humidity around the globe, whereas on planet Mars, liquid water is unstable, rendering the atmosphere dry and, therefore, ‘salt-friendly’. The riddle as to how the salt accumulated in various locations on those two planets, is one of long-lasting and great debate. The salt accumulations on Earth are traditionally termed ‘evaporites’, meaning that they formed as a consequence of the evaporation of large masses of seawater. How the accumulations on Mars formed is much harder to explain, as an ocean only existed briefly. Although water molecules and OH-groups may exist in abundance in bound form (crystal water, adsorbed water, etc.), the only place where free water is expected to be stable on Mars is within underground faults, fractures, and crevices. Here it likely occurs as brine or in the form of ice. Based on these conditions, a key to understanding the accumulation of large deposits of salt on both planets is linked to how brines behave in the subsurface when pressurized and heated beyond their supercritical point. At depths greater than about 3 km (P>300 bars) water will no longer boil in a steam phase. Rather, it becomes supercritical and will attain the phase of supercritical water vapor (SCRIW) with a specific gravity of typically 0.3 g/cm3. An important characteristic of SCRIW is its inability to dissolve the common sea salts. The salt dissolved in the brines will therefore precipitate as solid particles when brines (seawater on the Earth) move into the supercritical P&T-domain (T>400°C, P>300 bars). Numerical modeling of a hydrothermal system in the Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea indicates that a

  18. Heavy water cycle in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanis, R.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen atom has two isotopes: deuterium 1 H 2 and tritium 1 H 3 . The deuterium oxide D 2 O is called heavy water due to its density of 1105.2 Kg/m 3 . Another important physical property of the heavy water is the low neutron capture section, suitable to moderate the neutrons into natural uranium fission reactor as CANDU. Due to the fact that into this reactor the fuel is cooled into the pressure tubes surrounded by a moderator, the usage of D 2 O as primary heat transport (PHT) agent is mandatory. Therefore a large amount of heavy water (approx. 500 tons) is used in a CANDU reactor. Being a costly resource - it represents 20% of the initial plant capital cost, D 2 O management is required to preserve it. (author)

  19. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Sankichi; Takashima, Yoshie.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently eliminate radioactive materials such as iron oxide and cobalt ions with less heat loss by the use of an electrode assembly applied with a direct current. Constitution: In a reactor water clean-up device adapted to pass reactor water through an electrode assembly comprising at least a pair of anode and cathode applied with a direct current to eliminate various types of ions contained in the reactor water by way of the electrolysis or charge neutralization at the anode, the cathode is constituted with a corrosion resistant grid-like or porous metal plate and a layer to the upper portion of the metal plate filled with a plurality of metal spheres of about 1 - 5 mm diameter, and the anode is made of insoluble porous or spirally wound metal material. (Seki, T.)

  20. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Analysis of CO2 draining in the supercritical subchannel of an MMR reactor using CFD techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, Carolina S.B.; Ribeiro, Felipe P.; Su, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to analyze the steady state thermal hydraulic behavior of the supercritical CO 2 by means of the computational modeling of the triangular arrangement subchannel of the KAIST MMR (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology). The mathematical model is composed of Navier-Stokes equations of Reynolds average (RANS), with the model of turbulence k-omega SST (Shear Stress Transport) for the fluid refrigerant in the subchannel and the heat conduction equation for the fuel and coating. The thermodynamic properties of CO 2 are implemented from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) data. The transport equations were solved using a commercial CFD (Fluid Dynamics) tool, ANSYS FLUENT. Initially, a geometric model was constructed, using the ICEM software, composed of fuel, interstice, coating, refrigerant and two adiabatic regions of the fuel rod. The numerical solution used was validated by simulation of a simpler vertical circular tube and by comparisons with numerical and experimental results available in the literature. Using these results, we performed the mesh convergence study and initialized the simulations in the subchannel

  2. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  3. Drying of supercritical carbon dioxide with membrane processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohaus, Theresa; Scholz, Marco; Koziara, Beata; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In supercritical extraction processes regenerating the supercritical fluid represents the main cost constraint. Membrane technology has potential for cost efficient regeneration of water-loaded supercritical carbon dioxide. In this study we have designed membrane-based processes to dehydrate

  4. A proposal for the handling of out of control supercritical nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.C.; Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper suggests a means of returning a critical mass of uranium metal to a non critical state by dilution with iron. The iron is in the form of partially reduced iron oxide pellets, that are used as a convenient blast furnace feed in a number of countries. The pellets are cheap and plentiful, and have the added advantage of being relatively free flowing for delivery to a critical reactor. Additional benefits are the removal of the graphite moderator, and the eventual creation of a slag cap. Of additional note are the suggestions of using pellets of iron oxide/iron in measures to limit the degree of damage from a reactor accident

  5. Beyond the light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    One of the strong interests in examining alternative nuclear fuel cycles is to search for schemes that are more efficient than LWRs in their use of uranium, but that do not carry the additional proliferation hazard associated with widespread plutonium utilization. One possibility is to improve the uranium efficiency of current reactor types by other means than recycling. A second possibility, offering greater potential for improvement, is to utilize thorium-uranium fuel cycles in which uranium-233 is denatured by the addition of uranium-238, making enrichment necessary to yield weapons-usable material. The bulk of the reactor's fuel material would be thorium-232, so that most of the fissile material produced would be uranium-233. It is important to recognize that these two possibilities - once through improvements and denatured thorium-uranium - could be introduced sequentially in reactor types that are currently in use. Fuel cycles may change over time, but it is equally significant from the point of view of non-proliferation that they will also vary from place to place and, most importantly, from country to country. The author argues that alternative nuclear power systems and a slower growth may affect the diversion of nuclear materials to weapons. A real question, though, is whether we have time to explore the possibilities. It has become apparent that predictions made of the growth rate for nuclear power were too high. The 1000 large power plants the US was to have by the year 2000 have been reduced to fewer than 300. This reduces the pressure, resulting from our limited uranium resources, to push the LMFBR. Extra time gives us a chance to examine the possibilities

  6. EPRI program in water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Gelhaus, F.; Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The basis for EPRI's water reactor safety program is twofold. First is compilation and development of fundamental background data necessary for quantified light-water reactor (LWR) safety assurance appraisals. Second is development of realistic and experimentally bench-marked analytical procedures. The results are expected either to confirm the safety margins in current operating parameters, and to identify overly conservative controls, or, in some cases, to provide a basis for improvements to further minimize uncertainties in expected performance. Achievement of these objectives requires the synthesis of related current and projected experimental-analytical projects toward establishment of an experimentally-based analysis for the assurance of safety for LWRs

  7. Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This meeting contains articles of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008 of Korean Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Chinese Nuclear Society, European Nuclear Society and American Nuclear Society. It was held on Oct. 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea and subject of Meeting is 'New Clear' Fuel - A green energy solution. This proceedings is comprised of 5 tracks. The main topic titles of track are as follows: Advances in water reactor fuel technology, Fuel performance and operational experience, Transient fuel behavior and safety-related issues, Fuel cycle, spent fuel storage and transportations and Fuel modeling and analysis. (Yi, J. H.)

  8. Investigation of forced convection heat transfer of supercritical pressure water in a vertically upward internally ribbed tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianguo; Li Huixiong; Guo Bin; Yu Shuiqing; Zhang Yuqian; Chen Tingkuan

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the forced convection heat transfer characteristics of water in a vertically upward internally ribbed tube at supercritical pressures were investigated experimentally. The six-head internally ribbed tube is made of SA-213T12 steel with an outer diameter of 31.8 mm and a wall thickness of 6 mm and the mean inside diameter of the tube is measured to be 17.6 mm. The experimental parameters were as follows. The pressure at the inlet of the test section varied from 25.0 to 29.0 MPa, and the mass flux was from 800 to 1200 kg/(m 2 s), and the inside wall heat flux ranged from 260 to 660 kW/m 2 . According to experimental data, the effects of heat flux and pressure on heat transfer of supercritical pressure water in the vertically upward internally ribbed tube were analyzed, and the characteristics and mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement, and also that of heat transfer deterioration, were also discussed in the so-called large specific heat region. The drastic changes in thermophysical properties near the pseudocritical points, especially the sudden rise in the specific heat of water at supercritical pressures, may result in the occurrence of the heat transfer enhancement, while the covering of the heat transfer surface by fluids lighter and hotter than the bulk fluid makes the heat transfer deteriorated eventually and explains how this lighter fluid layer forms. It was found that the heat transfer characteristics of water at supercritical pressures were greatly different from the single-phase convection heat transfer at subcritical pressures. There are three heat transfer modes of water at supercritical pressures: (1) normal heat transfer, (2) deteriorated heat transfer with low HTC but high wall temperatures in comparison to the normal heat transfer, and (3) enhanced heat transfer with high HTC and low wall temperatures in comparison to the normal heat transfer. It was also found that the heat transfer deterioration at supercritical pressures was

  9. The water chemistry of CANDU PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This review will discuss the chemistry of the three major water circuits in a CANDU-PHW reactor, viz., the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) water, the moderator and the boiler water. An important consideration for the PHT chemistry is the control of corrosion and of the transport of corrosion products to minimize the growth of radiation fields. In new reactors the PHT will be allowed to boil, requiring reconsideration of the methods used to radiolytic oxygen and elevate the pH. Separation of the moderator from the PHT in the pressure-tubed CANDU design permits better optimization of the chemistry of each system, avoiding the compromises necessary when the same water serves both functions. Major objectives in moderator chemistry are to control (a) the radiolytic decomposition of D 2 0; (b) the concentration of soluble neutron poisons added to adjust reactivity; and (c) the chemistry of shutdown systems. The boiler water and its feed water are treated to avoid boiler tube corrosion, both during normal operation and when perturbations are caused to the feed by, for example, leaks in the condenser tubes which permit ingress of untreated condenser cooling water. Development of a system for automatic analysis and control of feed water to give rapid, reliable response to abnormal conditions is a novel feature which has been developed for incorporation in future CANDU-PHW reactors. (author)

  10. Improving the understanding of thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer for super critical water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, S.; Aksan, N.

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring the exchange of information and fostering the collaboration among Member States on the development of technology advances for future nuclear power plants are among the key roles of the IAEA. There is high interest internationally in both developing and industrialized countries in the design of innovative super-critical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs). This interest arises from the high thermal efficiencies (44-45%) and improved economic competitiveness promised by for this concept, utilizing and building on the recent developments of highly efficient fossil power plants. The SCWR is one of the six concepts included in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). Following the advice of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Dept.'s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), with the feedback from the Gen-IV SCWR Steering Committee, and in coordination with the OECD-NEA, IAEA is working on a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) in the areas of heat transfer behaviour and testing of thermo-hydraulic computer methods for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors. The second Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP was held at the IAEA Headquarters, in Vienna (Austria)) in August 2009. This paper summarizes the current status of the CRP, as well as the major achievements to date. (authors)

  11. Semi-analytical prediction of hydraulic resistance and heat transfer for pipe and channel flows of water at supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurien, E.

    2012-01-01

    Within the Generation IV International Forum the Supercritical Water Reactor is investigated. For its core design and safety analysis the efficient prediction of flow and heat transfer parameters such as the wall-shear stress and the heat-transfer coefficient for pipe and channel flows is needed. For circular pipe flows a numerical model based on the one-dimensional conservation equations of mass, momentum end energy in the radial direction is presented, referred to as a 'semi-analytical' method. An accurate, high-order numerical method is employed to evaluate previously derived analytical solutions of the governing equations. Flow turbulence is modeled using the algebraic approach of Prandtl/van-Karman, including a model for the buffer layer. The influence of wall roughness is taken into account by a new modified numerical damping function of the turbulence model. The thermo-hydraulic properties of water are implemented according to the international standard of 1997. This method has the potential to be used within a sub-channel analysis code and as wall-functions for CFD codes to predict the wall shear stress and the wall temperature. The present study presents a validation of the method with comparison of model results with experiments and multi-dimensional computational (CFD) studies in a wide range of flow parameters. The focus is laid on forced convection flows related to reactor design and near-design conditions. It is found, that the method can accurately predict the wall temperature even under deterioration conditions as they occur in the selected experiments (Yamagata el al. 1972 at 24.5 MPa, Ornatski et al. 1971 at 25.5 and Swenson et al. 1963 at 22.75 MPa). Comparison of the friction coefficient under high heat flux conditions including significant viscosity and density reductions near the wall with various correlations for the hydraulic resistance will be presented; the best agreement is achieve with the correlation of Pioro et al. 2004. It is

  12. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concen