WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductivity-induced self-energy effects

  1. Self-energy Effects in the Superfluidity of Neutron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, U; Zuo, W

    2001-01-01

    The superfluidity of neutron matter in the channel $^1 S_0$ is studied by taking into account the effect of the ground-state correlations in the self-energy. To this purpose the gap equation has been solved within the generalized Gorkov approach. A sizeable suppression of the energy gap is driven by the quasi-particle strength around the Fermi surface.

  2. Self-energy effects in the Polchinski and Wick-ordered renormalization-group approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katanin, A, E-mail: katanin@mail.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, 620041, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-09

    I discuss functional renormalization group (fRG) schemes, which allow for non-perturbative treatment of the self-energy effects and do not rely on the one-particle irreducible functional. In particular, I consider the Polchinski or Wick-ordered scheme with amputation of full (instead of bare) Green functions, as well as more general schemes, and establish their relation to the 'dynamical adjustment propagator' scheme by Salmhofer (2007 Ann. Phys., Lpz. 16 171). While in the Polchinski scheme the amputation of full (instead of bare) Green functions improves treatment of the self-energy effects, the structure of the corresponding equations is not suitable to treat strong-coupling problems; it is also not evident how the mean-field solution of these problems is recovered in this scheme. For the Wick-ordered scheme, fully or partly excluding tadpole diagrams one can obtain forms of fRG hierarchy, which are suitable to treat strong-coupling problems. In particular, I emphasize the usefulness of the schemes, which are local in the cutoff parameter, and compare them to the one-particle irreducible approach. (paper)

  3. Self-energy Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Parameters within Quantum Electrodynamics Perturbation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Aucar

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A theory for the calculation of self-energy corrections to the nuclear magnetic parameters is given in this paper. It is based on the S-matrix formulation of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED. Explicit expressions for the various terms of the S-matrix are given. The interpretation of the self-energy, one- and two-vertex terms and some perspective for possible future developments are discussed.

  4. Contributions to the nonlinear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect: Birkinshaw-Gull effect and gravitational self-energy density

    CERN Document Server

    Merkel, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we recompute contributions to the spectrum of the nonlinear integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW)/Rees-Sciama effect in a dark energy cosmology. Focusing on the moderate nonlinear regime, all dynamical fields involved are derived from the density contrast in Eulerian perturbation theory. Shape and amplitude of the resulting angular power spectrum are similar to that derived in previous work. With our purely analytical approach we identify two distinct contributions to the signal of the nonlinear iSW-effect: the change of the gravitational self-energy density of the large scale structure with (conformal) time and gravitational lenses moving with the large scale matter stream. In the latter we recover the Birkinshaw-Gull effect. As the nonlinear iSW-effect itself is inherently hard to detect, observational discrimination between its individual contributions is almost excluded. Our analysis, however, yields valuable insights into the theory of the nonlinear iSW-effect as a post-Newtonian relativistic effec...

  5. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XVI. Inclusion of self-energy effects in pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Extending our earlier work, a new family of three Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-30, HFB-31, and HFB-32, is presented, along with their underlying interactions, BSk30, BSk31, and BSk32, respectively. The principle new feature is a purely phenomenological pairing term that depends on the density gradient. This enables us to have a bulk pairing term that is fitted to realistic nuclear-matter calculations in which for the first time the self-energy corrections are included, while the behavior of the nucleon effective masses in asymmetric homogeneous nuclear matter is significantly improved. Furthermore, in the particle-hole channel all the highly realistic constraints of our earlier work are retained. In particular, the unconventional Skyrme forces containing t4 and t5 terms are still constrained to fit realistic equations of state of neutron matter stiff enough to support the massive neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. All unphysical long-wavelength spin and spin-isospin instabilities of nuclear matter, including the unphysical transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated. Our three interactions are characterized by values of the symmetry coefficient J of 30, 31, and 32 MeV, respectively. The best fit to the database of 2353 nuclear masses is found for model HFB-31 (J =31 MeV ) with a model error of 0.561 MeV. This model also fits the charge-radius data with an root-mean-square error of 0.027 fm.

  6. Momentum-resolved electron-phonon coupling and self-energy effects in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}: an LDA study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (Germany); Zeyher, Roland; Manske, Dirk [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The observation of kinks in the electronic dispersion of high-T{sub c} cuprates by angle resolved photoemission experiments has revived the discussion about the importance of electron-phonon interaction in the cuprates. Here we determine the effect of the electron-phonon coupling on the electronic self-energy in the normal state within the local-density approximation. Using a realistic phonon spectrum we determine the momentum and frequency dependence of {alpha}{sup 2}F(k,{omega}) in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} for the bonding, antibonding, and chain band. We find that the maximum in the real part of the self-energy at low frequencies is about a factor 5 too small compared to the experiment. The renormalization factor Z(k,{omega}), which determines the change in the slope of the electronic dispersion due to the interaction, varies smoothly as a function of frequency and momentum. These findings show that, at least within the LDA, phonons cannot produce well-pronounced kinks in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  7. Bosonic self-energy functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügel, Dario; Werner, Philipp; Pollet, Lode; Strand, Hugo U. R.

    2016-11-01

    We derive the self-energy functional theory for bosonic lattice systems with broken U(1) symmetry by parametrizing the bosonic Baym-Kadanoff effective action in terms of one- and two-point self-energies. The formalism goes beyond other approximate methods such as the pseudoparticle variational cluster approximation, the cluster composite boson mapping, and the Bogoliubov+U theory. It simplifies to bosonic dynamical-mean-field theory when constraining to local fields, whereas when neglecting kinetic contributions of noncondensed bosons, it reduces to the static mean-field approximation. To benchmark the theory, we study the Bose-Hubbard model on the two- and three-dimensional cubic lattice, comparing with exact results from path integral quantum Monte Carlo. We also study the frustrated square lattice with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, which is beyond the reach of Monte Carlo simulations. A reference system comprising a single bosonic state, corresponding to three variational parameters, is sufficient to quantitatively describe phase boundaries and thermodynamical observables, while qualitatively capturing the spectral functions, as well as the enhancement of kinetic fluctuations in the frustrated case. On the basis of these findings, we propose self-energy functional theory as the omnibus framework for treating bosonic lattice models, in particular, in cases where path integral quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from severe sign problems (e.g., in the presence of nontrivial gauge fields or frustration). Self-energy functional theory enables the construction of diagrammatically sound approximations that are quantitatively precise and controlled in the number of optimization parameters but nevertheless remain computable by modest means.

  8. The dielectric environment dependent exchange self-energy of the energy structure in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.H., E-mail: chyang@nuist.edu.c [Faculty of Maths and Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Xu, W. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-10-01

    We theoretically calculate the energy dispersion in the presence of the screened exchange self-energy in extrinsic monolayer graphene. It is found that the exchange self-energy enhances the renormalized Fermi velocity. With decreasing the dielectric constant, the screening effect and the electron correlation effect increase which induces the Fermi velocity increasing. The screened exchange energy has an energy shift at the Dirac points. The self-energy from the valance band carriers gives the main contribution to the effective energy. We also discuss the electron density dependence of the self-energy.

  9. Momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling and self-energy effects in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 within the local density approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter; Zeyher, Roland; Manske, Dirk

    2008-04-04

    Using the local density approximation and a realistic phonon spectrum we determine the momentum and frequency dependence of alpha(2)F(k,omega) in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) for the bonding, antibonding, and chain band. The resulting self-energy Sigma is rather small near the Fermi surface. For instance, for the antibonding band the maximum of ReSigma as a function of frequency is about 7 meV at the nodal point in the normal state and the ratio of bare and renormalized Fermi velocities is 1.18. These values are a factor of 3-5 too small compared to the experiment showing that only a small part of Sigma can be attributed to phonons. Furthermore, the frequency dependence of the renormalization factor Z(k,omega) is smooth and has no anomalies at the observed kink frequencies which means that phonons cannot produce well-pronounced kinks in stoichiometric YBa(2)Cu()3)O(7), at least, within the local density approximation.

  10. Validity of the local self-energy approximation: Application to coupled quantum impurities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, A.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the quality of the local self-energy approximation, applied here to models of multiple quantum impurities coupled to an electronic bath. The local self-energy is obtained by solving a single-impurity Anderson model in an effective medium that is determined self-consistently, similar to

  11. Nonrelativistic QED expansion for the electron self-energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkóš, V.; Šimsa, D.; Zamastil, J.

    2017-01-01

    The recently proposed relativistic multipole expansion (RME) of the self-energy effect suggests some observations on the nonrelativistic expansion of the effect. First, the nature of the series for the one-loop self-energy of an electron bound by the Coulomb field of the nucleus is clarified. It is shown that the expansion of the energy shift caused by the self-energy effect contains terms of the form α (Zα ) 7ln(Z α ) , α (Zα ) 8ln3(Z α ) , α (Zα ) 9ln2(Z α ) , α (Zα ) 10ln4(Z α ) , and so on. Here Z is the charge of the nucleus. The origin of these terms is traced back to the logarithmic divergence of the Dirac S -wave function at the origin. These terms eventually lead to breakdown of the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics approach. Second, at leading order relativistic multipole expansion requires an evaluation of the "extended Bethe logarithm" (EBL). When expanded in series in Z α EBL reduces at leading order to the ordinary Bethe logarithm. However, it is argued that it is both more accurate and easier to calculate the EBL than the ordinary Bethe logarithm. Both variants of the Bethe logarithm can be calculated by means of the pseudostate method. An improvement of this method is suggested. Finally, the contribution of the combined self-energy vacuum polarization contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen for the 1 s -4 s and 2 p -4 p states by means of the EBL is calculated. For cases that had already been calculated the results reported here are more accurate than the previous ones.

  12. Graviton self-energy from worldlines

    CERN Document Server

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Worldline approaches, when available, often simplify and make more efficient the calculation of various observables in quantum field theories. In this contribution we first review the calculation of the graviton self-energy due to a loop of virtual particles of spin 0, 1/2 and 1, all of which have a well-known worldline description. For the case of the graviton itself, an elegant worldline description is still missing, though one can still describe it by constructing a worldline representation of the differential operators that arise in the quadratic approximation of the Einstein-Hilbert action. We have recently analyzed the latter approach, and we use it here to calculate the one-loop graviton self energy due to the graviton itself in this formalism.

  13. Quark self-energy in an ellipsoidally anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kasmaei, Babak S; Strickland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the quark self-energy in a quark-gluon plasma that possesses an ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy in the local rest frame. By introducing additional transverse momentum anisotropy parameters into the parton distribution functions, we generalize previous results which were obtained for the case of a spheroidal anisotropy. Our results demonstrate that the presence of anisotropies in the transverse directions affects the real and imaginary parts of quark self-energy and, consequently, the self-energy depends on both the polar and azimuthal angles in the local rest frame of the matter. Our results for the quark self-energy set the stage for the calculation of the effects of ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy on quark-gluon plasma photon spectra and collective flow.

  14. Atomic orbital self-energy and electronegativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In this work, atomic calculations were performed within the local-density and generalized-gradient approximations of exchange and correlation density functionals within density-functional theory to provide accurate periodic trends of first ionization energies and electron affinities of the atomic series from hydrogen to xenon. Electronegativities were determined directly from Mulliken's formula and were shown to be equivalently calculated rather by using Slater-Janak's transition state or by calculating the electrostatic self-energies of the orbitals involved in the transition to ions. Finally, comparisons were made with other theoretical and experimental results, including Mulliken-Jaff\\'e's electronegativity scale.

  15. Nucleon self-energies for supernova equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Nucleon self-energies and interaction potentials in supernova (SN) matter, which are known to have an important effect on nucleosynthesis conditions in SN ejecta are investigated. Corresponding weak charged-current interaction rates with unbound nucleons that are consistent with existing SN equations of state (EOSs) are specified. The nucleon self-energies are made available online as electronic tables. The discussion is mostly restricted to relativistic mean-field models. In the first part of the article, the generic properties of this class of models at finite temperature and asymmetry are studied. It is found that the quadratic expansion of the EOS in terms of asymmetry works reasonably well at finite temperatures and deviations originate mostly from the kinetic part. The interaction part of the symmetry energy is found to be almost temperature independent. At low densities, the account of realistic nucleon masses requires the introduction of a linear term in the expansion. Finally, it is shown that the important neutron-to-proton potential difference is given approximately by the asymmetry of the system and the interaction part of the zero-temperature symmetry energy. The results of different interactions are then compared with constraints from nuclear experiments and thereby the possible range of the potential difference is limited. In the second part, for a certain class of SN EOS models, the formation of nuclei is considered. Only moderate modifications are found for the self-energies of unbound nucleons that enter the weak charged-current interaction rates. This is because in the present approach the binding energies of bound states do not contribute to the single-particle energies of unbound nucleons.

  16. Nucleon self-energy in the relativistic Brueckner theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waindzoch, T.; Fuchs, C.; Faessler, A. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    The self-energy of the nucleon in nuclear matter is calculated in the relativistic Brueckner theory. We solve the Thompson equation for the two nucleon scattering in the medium using different Bonn potentials. The self-energy has a rather strong momentum dependence while the equation of state compares well with previous calculations. (orig.)

  17. The Imaginary Part of Nucleon Self-energy in hot nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Oset, E

    1996-01-01

    A semiphenomenological approach to the nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter at finite temperatures is followed. It combines elements of Thermo Field Dynamics for the treatment of finite temperature with a model for the self-energy, which evaluates the second order diagrams taking the needed dynamics of the NN interaction from experiment. The approach proved to be accurate at zero temperature to reproduce Im(Sigma) and other properties of nucleons in matter. In the present case we apply it to determine Im(Sigma) at finite temperatures. An effective NN cross section is deduced which can be easily used in analyses of heavy ion reactions.

  18. Fermi-Surface Topology and Superconductivity Induced by Jahn-Teller Phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Yuji; Hotta, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We discuss emergence of superconductivity in a two-dimensional eg-electron system coupled with Jahn-Teller phonons in the framework of the Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Here we focus on the dependence of superconducting transition temperature Tc on the Fermi-surface structure controlled by the Slater-Koster integrals of eg-electron hopping. When the Fermi-surface structure is abruptly changed, in general, there appears the van Hove singularity in the density of states, leading to the enhancement of Tc. In addition to it, for the superconductivity induced by Jahn-Teller phonons, we also observe the increase of Tc apart from the van Hove singularity point, when the eg-electron system exhibits disconnected Fermi surfaces. Even for the pocket-like Fermi-surface structure, we find the relatively high Tc in comparison with the case of single Fermi surface. This is understood by the fact that the pair-hopping attraction between Cooper pairs on different Fermi surfaces is enhanced by Jahn-Teller phonons.

  19. Scalar Contribution to the Graviton Self-Energy During Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sohyun [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We use dimensional regularization to evaluate the one loop contribution to the graviton self-energy from a massless, minimally coupled scalar on a locally de Sitter background. For noncoincident points our result agrees with the stress tensor correlators obtained recently by Perez-Nadal, Roura and Verdaguer. We absorb the ultraviolet divergences using the R2 and C2 counterterms first derived by ’t Hooft and Veltman, and we take the D = 4 limit of the finite remainder. The renormalized result is expressed as the sum of two transverse, 4th order differential operators acting on nonlocal, de Sitter invariant structure functions. In this form it can be used to quantum-correct the linearized Einstein equations so that one can study how the inflationary production of infrared scalars affects the propagation of dynamical gravitons and the force of gravity. We have seen that they have no effect on the propagation of dynamical gravitons. Our computation motivates a conjecture for the first correction to the vacuum state wave functional of gravitons. We comment as well on performing the same analysis for the more interesting contribution from inflationary gravitons, and on inferring one loop corrections to the force of gravity.

  20. Electron thermal self-energy in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, D

    1995-01-01

    Using the general form of the static energy solutions to the Dirac equation with a magnetic field, we calculate a general self-energy matrix in the Furry-picture. In the limit of high temperatures, but even higher magnetic fields, a self-consistent dispersion relation is solved. In contrast to the high temperature limit, this merely results in a small mass shift. The electron anomalous magnetic moment is calculated. The contribution from thermal fermions is found to be different from the corresponding contribution using perturbation theory and plane-wave external states. In the low temperature limit the self-energy is shown to exhibit de Haas--van Alphen oscillations. In the limit of low temperatures and high densities, the self-energy becomes very large.

  1. [pi][sup 0] electromagnetic self-energy and its implications for incorporating electromagnetism in few-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltman, K. (Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, 4700 Keele St., North York, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada) Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-08-01

    By investigating the electromagnetic (EM) chiral series for the pseudoscalar mesons at next-to-leading order, it is shown that the [pi][sup 0] EM self-energy is [ital O]([alpha][sub EM][ital m][sub [ital u],][ital d]), and hence small. This observation completes the crucial step in an earlier argument, which employed previously the vanishing of the [pi][sup 0] EM self-energy in the chiral limit, and which demonstrates that the effects of not only one-photon-exchange- but also one-photon-loop graphs must be included in order to incorporate the effects of electromagnetism in hadronic systems.

  2. Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green's function (GF2) method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction (FCI) method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to $n-$electron valence state second-order perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the same active...

  3. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Tran Nguyen, E-mail: latran@umich.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green’s function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  4. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green's function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  5. Superconductivity-induced phononic effects in high-temperature superconductors: Raman study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limonov, M. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Superconductivity Research Laboratory, International Superconductivity Technology Center, 10-13, Shinonome 1-Chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Lee, S.; Masui, T.; Uchiyama, H.; Tajima, S. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, International Superconductivity Technology Center, 10-13, Shinonome 1-Chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Yamanaka, A. [Chitose Institute of Science and Technology, Chitose, Hokkaido 066-8655 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Raman scattering spectra of (123) and Bi-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) with different doping levels have been investigated. It is demonstrated that phonons in HTSC can provide unique information on energy, symmetry, temperature- and doping-dependencies of the superconducting gap and pseudogap. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. The pion electromagnetic structure with self-energy

    CERN Document Server

    Mello, Clayton Santos; Frederico, T

    2016-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic structure of the pion in terms of the quantum cromodynamic~(QCD) model on the Breit-frame. We calculated the observables, such as the electromagnetic form factor. The priori to have a calculation covariant need to get the valence term of the eletromagnetic form factor. We use the usual formalism in quantum field theory (QFT) and light-front quantum field theory (LFQFT) in order to test the properties of form factor in nonperturbative QCD. In this particular case, the form factor can be obtained using the pion Light-Front (LF) wave function including self-energy from Lattice-QCD. Specifically, these calculations was performed in LF formalism. We consider a quark-antiquark vertex model having a quark self-energy. Also we can use other models to compare the pion electromagnetic form factor with different wave function and to observe the degree of agreement between them.

  7. Weak-coupling approach to the semi-infinite Hubbard model: Non-locality of the self-energy

    OpenAIRE

    Potthoff, M.; Nolting, W.

    1997-01-01

    The Hubbard model on a semi-infinite three-dimensional lattice is considered to investigate electron-correlation effects at single-crystal surfaces. The standard second-order perturbation theory in the interaction U is used to calculate the electronic self-energy and the quasi-particle density of states (QDOS) in the bulk as well as in the vicinity of the surface. Within a real-space representation we fully account for the non-locality of the self-energy and examine the quality of the local a...

  8. Parquet decomposition calculations of the electronic self-energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schäfer, T.; LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Merino, J.; Sangiovanni, G.; Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.

    2016-06-01

    The parquet decomposition of the self-energy into classes of diagrams, those associated with specific scattering processes, can be exploited for different scopes. In this work, the parquet decomposition is used to unravel the underlying physics of nonperturbative numerical calculations. We show the specific example of dynamical mean field theory and its cluster extensions [dynamical cluster approximation (DCA)] applied to the Hubbard model at half-filling and with hole doping: These techniques allow for a simultaneous determination of two-particle vertex functions and self-energies and, hence, for an essentially "exact" parquet decomposition at the single-site or at the cluster level. Our calculations show that the self-energies in the underdoped regime are dominated by spin-scattering processes, consistent with the conclusions obtained by means of the fluctuation diagnostics approach [O. Gunnarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 236402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.236402]. However, differently from the latter approach, the parquet procedure displays important changes with increasing interaction: Even for relatively moderate couplings, well before the Mott transition, singularities appear in different terms, with the notable exception of the predominant spin channel. We explain precisely how these singularities, which partly limit the utility of the parquet decomposition and, more generally, of parquet-based algorithms, are never found in the fluctuation diagnostics procedure. Finally, by a more refined analysis, we link the occurrence of the parquet singularities in our calculations to a progressive suppression of charge fluctuations and the formation of a resonance valence bond state, which are typical hallmarks of a pseudogap state in DCA.

  9. Toward high-precision values of the self energy of non-S states in hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bigot, E O; Jentschura, U D; Mohr, P J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Indelicato, Paul; Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Mohr, Peter J.; ccsd-00003072, ccsd

    2004-01-01

    The method and status of a study to provide numerical, high-precision values of the self-energy level shift in hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions is described. Graphs of the self energy in hydrogen-like ions with nuclear charge number between 20 and 110 are given for a large number of states. The self-energy is the largest contribution of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) to the energy levels of these atomic systems. These results greatly expand the number of levels for which the self energy is known with a controlled and high precision. Applications include the adjustment of the Rydberg constant and atomic calculations that take into account QED effects.

  10. Validity of the local self-energy approximation: Application to coupled quantum impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew K.; Bulla, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    We examine the quality of the local self-energy approximation, applied here to models of multiple quantum impurities coupled to an electronic bath. The local self-energy is obtained by solving a single-impurity Anderson model in an effective medium that is determined self-consistently, similar to the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) for correlated lattice systems. By comparing to exact results obtained by using the numerical renormalization group, we determine situations where "impurity-DMFT" is able to capture the physics of highly inhomogeneous systems and those cases where it fails. For two magnetic impurities separated in real space, the onset of the dilute limit is captured, but RKKY-dominated interimpurity singlet formation cannot be described. For parallel quantum dot devices, impurity-DMFT succeeds in capturing the underscreened Kondo physics by self-consistent generation of a critical pseudogapped effective medium. However, the quantum phase transition between high- and low-spin states upon tuning interdot coupling cannot be described.

  11. Superconductivity induced by U doping in the SmFeAsO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Yang, Jijun; Tang, Jun; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Liu, Ning; Mu, Gang; Hu, Tao; Shen, Xiaoping; Feng, Donglai

    2013-02-01

    Through partial substitution of Sm by U in SmFeAsO, a different member of the family of iron-based superconductors was successfully synthesized. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the lattice constants along the a and c axes are both squeezed through U doping, indicating a successful substitution of U at the Sm site. The parent compound shows a strong resistivity anomaly near 150 K, associated with spin-density-wave instability. U doping suppresses this instability and leads to a transition to the superconducting state at temperatures up to 49 K. Magnetic measurements confirm the bulk superconductivity in this system. For the sample with a doping level of x=0.2, the external magnetic field suppresses the onset temperature very slowly, indicating a rather high upper critical field. In addition, the Hall effect measurements show that U clearly dopes electrons into the material.

  12. Complete Form of Fermion Self-energy in NJL Model with External Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Song; Cui, Zhu-Fang; Xia, Yong-Hui; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to study the complete form of self-energy in fermion propagator within two-flavor NJL model in the case of finite temperature, chemical potential and external magnetic field. Through self-consistency analysis we prove that the self-energy is not simply proportional to dynamical mass in the presence of chemical potential, moreover, it could be more complicated after introducing external magnetic field. We find out the appropriate and complete form of self-energy and establish new gap equations. The numerical results show that the dynamical mass only has small quantitative modification rather than qualitative change by using these new gap equations, but the new self-energy does generate split in the dispersion relation with fixed momentum and Landau level.

  13. Multiple Scattering Expansion of the Self-Energy at Finite Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, S; Jeon, Sangyong; Ellis, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    An often used rule that the thermal correction to the self-energy is the thermal phase-space times the forward scattering amplitude from target particles is shown to be the leading term in an exact multiple scattering expansion. Starting from imaginary-time finite-temperature field theory, a rigorous expansion for the retarded self-energy is derived. The relationship to the thermodynamic potential is briefly discussed.

  14. $\\phi$ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from $\\phi N$ resonant interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, D; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The $\\phi$-meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant $\\phi N$ interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several $N^*$-like states are dynamically generated in these models around $2$ GeV, in the vicinity of the $\\phi N$ threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the $\\phi$ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the $\\bar K K$ cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to $\\phi N$) we report a $\\phi$ broadening up to about $40$-$50$ MeV, to be added to the $\\phi\\to\\bar K K$ in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about $35$ MeV at normal matter density. The $\\phi$ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole mo...

  15. ϕ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from ϕ N resonant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, D.; Hiller Blin, A. N.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The ϕ -meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant ϕ N interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several N*-like states are dynamically generated in these models around 2 GeV, in the vicinity of the ϕ N threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the ϕ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the K ¯K cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to ϕ N ) we report a ϕ broadening up to about 40-50 MeV, to be added to the ϕ →K ¯K in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about 35 MeV at normal matter density. The ϕ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole modes with the ϕ quasiparticle peak. The former results point in the direction of making up for missing absorption as reported in ϕ nuclear production experiments.

  16. The 1-loop self-energy of an electron in a strong external magnetic field revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machet, B.

    2016-05-01

    I calculate the 1-loop self-energy of the lowest Landau level of an electron of mass m in a strong, constant and uniform external magnetic field B, beyond its always used truncation at (ln L)2, L = |e|B m2. This is achieved by evaluating the integral deduced in 1953 by Demeur and incompletely calculated in 1969 by Jancovici, which I recover from Schwinger’s techniques of calculation. It yields δm ≃ αm 4π ln L - γE -3 22 -9 4 + π β-1 + π2 6 + πΓ[1-β] Lβ-1 + 1 L π 2-β - 5 + 𝒪 1 L≥2 with β ≃ 1.175 for 75 ≤ L ≤ 10, 000. The (ln L)2 truncation exceeds the precise estimate by 45% at L = 100 and by more at lower values of L, due to neglecting, among others, the single logarithmic contribution. This is doubly unjustified because it is large and because it is needed to fulfill appropriate renormalization conditions. Technically challenging improvements look therefore necessary, for example, when resumming higher loops and incorporating the effects of large B on the photonic vacuum polarization, like investigated in recent years.

  17. Time-dependent scattering of a composite particle: A local self-energy approach for internal excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-09-01

    When composite particles—such as small molecules, nuclei, or photogenerated excitons in semiconductors—are scattered by an external potential, energy may be transferred between the c.m. and the internal degrees of freedom. An accurate dynamical modeling of this effect is pivotal in predicting diverse scattering quantities and reaction cross sections, and allows us to rationalize time-resolved energy and localization spectra. Here, we show that time-dependent scattering of a quantum composite particle with an arbitrary, nonperturbative external potential can be obtained by propagating the c.m. degrees of freedom with a properly designed local self-energy potential. The latter embeds the effect of internal virtual transitions and can be obtained by the knowledge of the stationary internal states. The case is made by simulating Wannier-Mott excitons in one- and two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. The self-energy approach shows very good agreement with numerically exact Schrödinger propagation for scattering potentials where a mean-field model cannot be applied, at a dramatically reduced computational cost.

  18. Perturbative expansions from Monte Carlo simulations at weak coupling Wilson loops and the static-quark self-energy

    CERN Document Server

    Trottier, H D; Lepage, G P; MacKenzie, P B

    2002-01-01

    Perturbative coefficients for Wilson loops and the static-quark self-energy are extracted from Monte Carlo simulations at weak coupling. The lattice volumes and couplings are chosen to ensure that the lattice momenta are all perturbative. Twisted boundary conditions are used to eliminate the effects of lattice zero modes and to suppress nonperturbative finite-volume effects due to Z(3) phases. Simulations of the Wilson gluon action are done with both periodic and twisted boundary conditions, and over a wide range of lattice volumes (from $3^4$ to $16^4$) and couplings (from $\\beta \\approx 9$ to $\\beta \\approx 60$). A high precision comparison is made between the simulation data and results from finite-volume lattice perturbation theory. The Monte Carlo results are shown to be in excellent agreement with perturbation theory through second order. New results for third-order coefficients for a number of Wilson loops and the static-quark self-energy are reported.

  19. Numerical integration for ab initio many-electron self energy calculations within the GW approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Fang; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Lischner, Johannes; Kemper, Alexander F; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; da Jornada, Felipe Homrich; Deslippe, Jack; Yang, Chao; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Louie, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical integration scheme for evaluating the convolution of a Green's function with a screened Coulomb potential on the real axis in the GW approximation of the self energy. Our scheme takes the zero broadening limit in Green's function first, replaces the numerator of the integrand with a piecewise polynomial approximation, and performs principal value integration on subintervals analytically. We give the error bound of our numerical integration scheme and show by numerical examples that it is more reliable and accurate than the standard quadrature rules such as the composite trapezoidal rule. We also discuss the benefit of using different self energy expressions to perform the numerical convolution at different frequencies.

  20. Non-transversality of the gluon self-energy and the DDT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetschny, W.

    1982-12-01

    It is found that the one-loop corrections to the propagator induced by the non-transversality of the gluon self energy in the planar gauge are not kinematically suppressed in the leading logarithm approximation. As a consequence the multiplicative renormalization of the bare gluon propagator assumed by Dokshitzer, Dyakonov and Troyan is lost.

  1. SINGLE-PARTICLE SELF-ENERGY AND OPTICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE SIMPLIFIED HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Pedro; Michielsen, Kristel; Raedt, Hans De

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the single-particle self-energy of the one and two-dimensional simplified Hubbard model exhibits different behavior characterized by Fermi-liquid, non-Fermi-liquid quasiparticle, or non-quasiparticle excitations, as a function of the strength of the on-site Coulomb repulsion U, temp

  2. Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices in electron transport calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Petersen, D. E.;

    2008-01-01

    We present a Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices used in the Green's function formulation of electron transport in nanoscale devices. A procedure based on the Arnoldi method is employed to obtain solutions of the quadratic eigenvalue problem associated with the infinite...

  3. Consistent off-shell pi NN vertex and nucleon self-energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, S; Scholten, O

    1999-01-01

    We present a consistent calculation of half-off-shell form factors in the pion-nucleon vertex and the nucleon self-energy. Numerical results are presented. Near the on-shell point the pion-nucleon vertex is dominated by the pseudovector coupling, while at large nucleon invariant masses we find a siz

  4. Consistent off-shell πNN vertex and nucleon self-energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, S.; Scholten, O.

    1999-01-01

    We present a consistent calculation of half-off-shell form factors in the pion-nucleon vertex and the nucleon self-energy. Numerical results are presented. Near the on-shell point the pion-nucleon vertex is dominated by the pseudovector coupling, while at large nucleon invariant masses we find a siz

  5. Behavior of three modes of decay channels and their self-energies of elliptic dielectric microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jaewan; Jeong, Kabgyun

    2016-09-01

    The Lamb shift (self-energy) of an elliptic dielectric microcavity is studied. We show that the size of the Lamb shift, which is a small energy shift due to the system-environment coupling in the quantum regime, is dependent on the geometry of the boundary conditions. It shows a global transition depending on the eccentricity of the ellipsis. These transitions can be classified into three types of decay channels known as whispering-gallery modes, stable-bouncing-ball modes, and unstable-bouncing-ball modes. These modes are manifested through the Poincaré surface of section with the Husimi distribution function in classical phase space. It is found that the similarity (measured in Bhattacharyya distance) between the Husimi distributions below critical lines of two different modes increases as the difference of their self-energies decreases when the quality factors of the modes are on the same order of magnitude.

  6. Numerical integration for ab initio many-electron self energy calculations within the GW approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang, E-mail: fliu@lsec.cc.ac.cn [School of Statistics and Mathematics, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Lin, Lin, E-mail: linlin@math.berkeley.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vigil-Fowler, Derek, E-mail: vigil@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lischner, Johannes, E-mail: jlischner597@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kemper, Alexander F., E-mail: afkemper@lbl.gov [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sharifzadeh, Sahar, E-mail: ssharifz@bu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Jornada, Felipe H. da, E-mail: jornada@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Deslippe, Jack, E-mail: jdeslippe@lbl.gov [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yang, Chao, E-mail: cyang@lbl.gov [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    We present a numerical integration scheme for evaluating the convolution of a Green's function with a screened Coulomb potential on the real axis in the GW approximation of the self energy. Our scheme takes the zero broadening limit in Green's function first, replaces the numerator of the integrand with a piecewise polynomial approximation, and performs principal value integration on subintervals analytically. We give the error bound of our numerical integration scheme and show by numerical examples that it is more reliable and accurate than the standard quadrature rules such as the composite trapezoidal rule. We also discuss the benefit of using different self energy expressions to perform the numerical convolution at different frequencies.

  7. Thermal right-handed neutrino self-energy in the non-relativistic regime

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, M

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue of radiative corrections to leptogenesis has been raised. Considering the "strong washout" regime, in which OPE-techniques permit to streamline the setup, we report the thermal self-energy matrix of heavy right-handed neutrinos at NLO (resummed 2-loop level) in Standard Model couplings. The renormalized expression describes flavour transitions and "inclusive" decays of chemically decoupled right-handed neutrinos. Although CP-violation is not addressed, the result may find use in existing leptogenesis frameworks.

  8. Systematics of High Temperature Perturbation Theory: The Two-Loop Electron Self-Energy in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, Emil; 10.1103/PhysRevD.81.025014

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the systematics of the loop expansion in high temperature gauge theories beyond the leading order hard thermal loop (HTL) approximation, we calculate the two-loop electron proper self-energy in high temperature QED. The two-loop bubble diagram contains a linear infrared divergence. Even if regulated with a non-zero photon mass M of order of the Debye mass, this infrared sensitivity implies that the two-loop self-energy contributes terms to the fermion dispersion relation that are comparable to or even larger than the next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions at one-loop. Additional evidence for the necessity of a systematic restructuring of the loop expansion comes from the explicit gauge parameter dependence of the fermion damping rate at both one and two-loops. The leading terms in the high temperature expansion of the two-loop self-energy for all topologies arise from an explicit hard-soft factorization pattern, in which one of the loop integrals is hard, nested inside a second loop...

  9. Superconductivity induced by In substitution into the topological crystalline insulator Pb0.5Sn0.5Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Liu, T. S.; Camino, F. E.; Tranquada, J. M.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-07-01

    Indium substitution turns the topological crystalline insulator (TCI) Pb0.5Sn0.5Te into a possible topological superconductor. To investigate the effect of the indium concentration on the crystal structure and superconducting properties of (Pb0.5Sn0.5)1-xInxTe, we have grown high-quality single crystals using a modified floating-zone method and have performed systematic studies for indium content in the range 0≤x≤0.35. We find that the single crystals retain the rocksalt structure up to the solubility limit of indium (x ˜0.30). Experimental dependencies of the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) and the upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) on the indium content x have been measured. The maximum Tc is determined to be 4.7 K at x =0.30, with μ0Hc2(T =0)≈5 T.

  10. $\\Delta$ self-energy at finite temperature and density and the $\\pi N$ cross-section

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sourav

    2016-01-01

    The self energy of $\\Delta$-baryon is evaluated at finite temperature and density using the real time formalism of thermal field theory. The Dyson-Schwinger equation is used to get the exact thermal propagator followed by the spectral function of $\\Delta$. The $\\pi N$ scattering cross section obtained using explicit $\\Delta$ exchange is normalized to the experimental data in vacuum and its medium modification is implemented by means of the exact thermal propagator. A significant suppression of the peak is observed at higher temperature and baryon density.

  11. Self-Energy Closure for Inhomogeneous Turbulent Flows and Subgrid Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgen S. Frederiksen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows and subgrid modeling is presented. This Self-Energy (SE closure represents all eddy interactions through nonlinear dissipation or forcing ‘self-energy’ terms in the mean-field, covariance and response function equations. This makes the renormalization of the bare dissipation and forcing, and the subgrid modeling problem, transparent. The SE closure generalizes the quasi-diagonal direct interaction closure to allow for more complex interactions. The SE closure is applicable to flows in different geometries, is exact near maximum entropy states corresponding to canonical equilibrium, and provides a framework for deriving simpler realizable closures.

  12. Where is the electrostatic self-energy localized in general relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Barcelo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We discuss an alternative way of prescribing the spacetime geometry associated with a non-radiating distribution of charged matter. It is based on the possibility that the electrostatic self-energy does not reside on the Coulombian field but in a matter pressure term of electromagnetic origin localized at the sources. We work out completely the well controlled spherically symmetric case, questioning the realization of Reissner-Nordstrom geometry in nature. Finally, we sketch an experiment that could distinguish between the standard and the alternative scenario.

  13. Scalar and vector self-energies of heavy baryons in nuclear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2017-04-01

    The in-medium sum rules are employed to calculate the shifts in the mass and residue as well as the scalar and vector self-energies of the heavy ΛQ ,ΣQ and ΞQ baryons, with Q being b or c quark. The maximum shift in mass due to nuclear matter belongs to the Σc baryon and it is found to be ΔmΣc = - 936 MeV. In the case of residue, it is obtained that the residue of Σb baryon is maximally affected by the nuclear medium with the shift ΔλΣb = - 0.014 GeV3. The scalar and vector self-energies are found to be ΣΛbS = 653 MeV, ΣΣbS = - 614 MeV, ΣΞbS = - 17 MeV, ΣΛcS = 272 MeV, ΣΣcS = - 936 MeV, ΣΞcS = - 5 MeV and ΣΛbν = 436 ± 148 MeV, ΣΣbν = 382 ± 129 MeV, ΣΞbν = 15 ± 5 MeV, ΣΛcν = 151 ± 45 MeV, ΣΣcν = 486 ± 144 MeV and ΣΞcν = 1.391 ± 0.529 MeV.

  14. Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2013-07-21

    Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm(-1) at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail.

  15. Self-energies, renormalization factor, Luttinger sum rule and quasiparticle structure of the Hubbard systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J. (Dept. de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona (ES))

    1992-07-10

    In this paper, the authors give a method for obtaining the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of the self-energy beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. This self-energy is constructed from several dielectric response functions. The second step is the determination of the quasiparticle band structure calculation which is performed from an appropriate modification of the augmented plane wave method. The third step consists in the determination of the renormalized density of states deduced from the spectral functions. The analysis of the renormalized density of states of the strongly correlated systems leads to the conclusion that there exist three types of resonances in their electronic structures, the lower energy resonances (LER), the middle energy resonances (MER) and the upper energy resonances (UER). In addition, the authors analyze the conditions for which the Luttinger theorem is satisfied. All of these questions are determined in a characteristic example which allows to test the theoretical method.

  16. Improved GWγ scheme for the first-principles calculation of the electron self-energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasutami

    2010-03-01

    Improvements are made on the self-consistent calculation scheme for the electron self-energy with the vertex function γ satisfying the Ward identity, originally proposed in 2001 [1]. Although it is basically equivalent to the original one, this improved scheme not only shortens the computational time by about one hundredth but also opens new horizons in its applications: (i) If it is applied to semiconductors and insulators, the obtained quasiparticle dispersion is virtually the same as that in the one-shot GW approximation (or G0W0A), indicating that the G0W0A actually takes proper account of both vertex and high-order self-energy corrections in a mutually cancelling manner [2]. (ii) If it is applied to the Tomonaga-Luttinger model, it is reduced to the Dzyaloshinskii-Larkin theory, implying that it is a unified theory to treat both Fermi- and Luttinger-liquids on the same footing. (iii) In contrast with the original one, it can provide the convergent self-consistent solution for the low-density electron liquid where an intrinsic difficulty arises due the dielectric catastrophe associated with the negative electronic compressibility. [1]YT, PRL87, 226402 (2001). [2] S. Ishii, H. Maebashi, and YT, unpublished.

  17. Displacement fields and self-energies of circular and polygonal dislocation loops in homogeneous and layered anisotropic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanfei; Larson, Bennett C.

    2015-10-01

    There are large classes of materials problems that involve the solutions of stress, displacement, and strain energy of dislocation loops in elastically anisotropic solids, including increasingly detailed investigations of the generation and evolution of irradiation induced defect clusters ranging in sizes from the micro- to meso-scopic length scales. Based on a two-dimensional Fourier transform and Stroh formalism that are ideal for homogeneous and layered anisotropic solids, we have developed robust and computationally efficient methods to calculate the displacement fields for circular and polygonal dislocation loops. Using the homogeneous nature of the Green tensor of order -1, we have shown that the displacement and stress fields of dislocation loops can be obtained by numerical quadrature of a line integral. In addition, it is shown that the sextuple integrals associated with the strain energy of loops can be represented by the product of a pre-factor containing elastic anisotropy effects and a universal term that is singular and equal to that for elastic isotropic case. Furthermore, we have found that the self-energy pre-factor of prismatic loops is identical to the effective modulus of normal contact, and the pre-factor of shear loops differs from the effective indentation modulus in shear by only a few percent. These results provide a convenient method for examining dislocation reaction energetic and efficient procedures for numerical computation of local displacements and stresses of dislocation loops, both of which play integral roles in quantitative defect analyses within combined experimental-theoretical investigations.

  18. The GW space-time method for the self-energy of large systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Martin M.; Steinbeck, L.; White, I. D.; Rojas, H. N.; Godby, R. W.

    1999-03-01

    We present a detailed account of the GW space-time method. The method increases the size of systems whose electronic structure can be studied with a computational implementation of Hedin's GW approximation. At the heart of the method is a representation of the Green function G and the screened Coulomb interaction W in the real-space and imaginary-time domain, which allows a more efficient computation of the self-energy approximation Σ = iGW. For intermediate steps we freely change between representations in real and reciprocal space on the one hand, and imaginary time and imaginary energy on the other, using fast Fourier transforms. The power of the method is demonstrated using the example of Si with artificially increased unit cell sizes.

  19. The static quark self-energy at O($\\alpha^{20}$) in perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Gunnar S; Pineda, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In Refs. [1,2] we determined the infinite volume coefficients of the perturbative expansions of the self-energies of static sources in the fundamental and adjoint representations in SU(3) gluodynamics to order $\\alpha^{20}$. We used numerical stochastic perturbation theory [3], where we employed a new second order integrator and twisted boundary conditions. The expansions were obtained in lattice regularization with the Wilson action and two different discretizations of the covariant time derivative within the Polyakov loop. Overall, we obtained four different perturbative series. For all of them the high order coefficients displayed the factorial growth predicted by the conjectured renormalon picture, based on the operator product expansion. This enabled us to determine the normalization constants of the leading infrared renormalons of heavy quark and heavy gluino pole masses. Here we present improved determinations of the normalization constants and the perturbative coefficients by incorporating the four-lo...

  20. Classical electrodynamics with vacuum polarization: electron self-energy and radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinder, S. M.

    2001-04-01

    The region very close to an electron ( r ⪅ r0 = e2/ mc2 ≈ 2.8 × 10 -13 cm) is, according to quantum electrodynamics, a seething maelstrom of virtual electron-positron pairs flashing in and out of existence. To take account of this well-established physical reality, a phenomenological representation for vacuum polarization is introduced into the framework of classical electrodynamics. Such a model enables a consistent picture of classical point charges with finite electromagnetic self-energy. It is further conjectured that the reaction of a point charge to its own electromagnetic field is tantamount to interaction with its vacuum polarization charge or "aura." This leads to a modification of the Lorentz-Dirac equation for the force on an accelerating electron, a new differential-difference equation which avoids the pathologies of preacceleration and runaway solutions.

  1. Series expansion of the photon self-energy in QED and the photon anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, H Perez; Chavez, S Villalba

    2008-01-01

    We start from the analytical expression of the eigenvalues $\\kappa^{(i)}$ of the photon self-energy tensor in an external constant magnetic field $B$ calculated by Batalin Shabad in the Furry representation, and in the one-loop approximation. We expand in power series of the external field and in terms of the squared photon transverse momentum $z_2$ and (minus) transverse energy $z_1=k^2-z_2$, in terms of which are expressed $\\kappa^{(i)}$. A general expression is given for the photon anomalous magnetic moment $\\mu_{\\gamma}>0$ in the region of transparency, below the first threshold for pair creation, and it is shown that it is positive, i.e. paramagnetic. The results of the numerical calculation for $\\mu_{\\gamma}>0$ are displayed in a region close to the threshold.

  2. Relationship between Population Dynamics and the Self-Energy in Driven Non-Equilibrium Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Kemper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the decay rates of excited populations directly calculated within a Keldysh formalism to the equation of motion of the population itself for a Hubbard-Holstein model in two dimensions. While it is true that these two approaches must give the same answer, it is common to make a number of simplifying assumptions, within the differential equation for the populations, that allows one to interpret the decay in terms of hot electrons interacting with a phonon bath. Here, we show how care must be taken to ensure an accurate treatment of the equation of motion for the populations due to the fact that there are identities that require cancellations of terms that naively look like they contribute to the decay rates. In particular, the average time dependence of the Green’s functions and self-energies plays a pivotal role in determining these decay rates.

  3. Unraveling the interlayer-related phonon self-energy renormalization in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Paulo T.; Mafra, Daniela L.; Sato, Kentaro; Saito, Riichiro; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we present a step towards understanding the bilayer graphene (2LG) interlayer (IL)-related phonon combination modes and overtones as well as their phonon self-energy renormalizations by using both gate-modulated and laser-energy dependent inelastic scattering spectroscopy. We show that although the IL interactions are weak, their respective phonon renormalization response is significant. Particularly special, the IL interactions are mediated by Van der Waals forces and are fundamental for understanding low-energy phenomena such as transport and infrared optics. Our approach opens up a new route to understanding fundamental properties of IL interactions which can be extended to any graphene-like material, such as MoS2, WSe2, oxides and hydroxides. Furthermore, we report a previously elusive crossing between IL-related phonon combination modes in 2LG, which might have important technological applications. PMID:23264879

  4. Self-Energy in the Lorentzian ERPL-FK Spin Foam Model of Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Riello, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the most divergent contribution to the self-energy (or "melonic") graph in the context of the Lorentzian EPRL-FK Spin Foam model of Quantum Gravity. We find that such a contribution is logarithmically divergent in the cut-off over the SU(2)-representation spins when one chooses the face amplitude guaranteeing the face-splitting invariance of the foam.We also find that the dependence on the boundary data is different from that of the bare propagator. This fact has its origin in the non-commutativity of the EPRL-FK Y-map with the projector onto SL(2,C)-invariant states. In the course of the paper, we discuss in detail the approximations used during the calculations, its geometrical interpretation as well as the physical consequences of our result.

  5. Lowest-order corrections to the RPA polarizability and GW self-energy of a semiconducting wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, H. J.; Ummels, R. T. M.; Bobbert, P. A.; van Haeringen, W.

    1996-07-01

    We present the results of the addition of lowest-order vertex and self-consistency corrections to the RPA polarizability and the GW self-energy for a semiconducting wire. It is found that, when starting from a local density approximation zeroth-order Green function and systematically including these corrections in both the polarizability and the self-energy, the correction to the non-self-consistent RPA-GW band gap is small. Partial inclusion of these corrections leads to very different band gaps. This sheds new light on the puzzling question why non-self-consistent RPA-GW calculations of band gaps have been so very successful.

  6. Quantum fluctuations in semiconductor quantum dots and their contributions to the self-energy functions of exciton states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutygullina, A. A.; Khamadeev, M. A.; Blum, D. O.; Shirdelhavar, A. H.

    2017-06-01

    Influence of quantum fluctuations in a system consisting of a quantum dot and the reservoir of acoustic phonons on processes in which the quantum dot takes part is investigated. Under some conditions this influence is shown to be very strong. We find a contribution from the quantum fluctuations to the self-energy function of the exciton coupled to the quantum dot.

  7. Electrostatic Self-energy of a Charged Particle in the Surroundings of a Topologically Charged Black Hole in the Brane

    CERN Document Server

    Larranaga, Alexis; Torres, Daniel Alexdy

    2014-01-01

    We determine the self-energy for a point charge held stationary in a topologically charged black hole spacetime arising from the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, showing that it has two contributions, one of geometric origin and the other of topological one.

  8. The 1-loop self-energy of an electron in a strong external magnetic field revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Machet, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    I revisit the 1-loop self-energy of an electron in a strong, constant and uniform external magnetic field B. First, I show, after Tsai (1974), how, for an electron in the lowest Landau level, Schwinger's techniques, as explained by Dittrich and Reuter (1985) lead to the same integral deduced by Demeur (1953) and used later by Jancovici (1969). Then, I calculate the Demeur-Jancovici integral in the range $75 \\leq L\\equiv\\frac{|e|B}{m^2} \\leq 10\\,000$, which yields $\\delta m \\simeq \\frac{\\alpha m}{4\\pi} \\left[\\left(\\ln L-\\gamma_E-\\frac32\\right)^2 -\\frac94 +\\frac{\\pi}{\\beta-1} +\\frac{\\pi^2}{6} +\\frac{\\pi\\;\\Gamma[1-\\beta]}{L^{\\beta-1}} +\\frac{1}{L}\\left(\\frac{\\pi}{2-\\beta}-5\\right) +{\\cal O}(\\frac{1}{L^{\\geq 2}})\\right],\\ \\beta \\simeq 1.175$, close to Jancovici's last estimate $\\delta m \\simeq \\frac{\\alpha m}{4\\pi}\\left[\\left(\\ln 2L-\\gamma_E-\\frac32\\right)^2 +A+\\ldots\\right]$ with $A\\simeq 3.5$ (previously undetermined). The term proportional to $(\\ln\\frac{|e|B}{m^2})^2$ can never be considered to be leading and ...

  9. Minimal Standard Model self-energies at finite temperature in the presence of weak magnetic fields: towards a full symmetry restoration study

    CERN Document Server

    Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria E; Sanchez, Angel; Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The study of the universe's primordial plasma at high temperature plays an important role when tackling different questions in cosmology, such as the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry. In the Minimal Standard Model (MSM) neither the amount of CP violation nor the strength of the phase transition are enough to produce and preserve baryon number during the Electroweak Phase Transition (EWPT), which are two of the three ingredients needed to develop baryon asymmetry. In this talk we present the first part of the analysis done within a scenario where it is viable to have improvements to the aforementioned situation: we work with the degrees of freedom in the broken symmetry phase of the MSM and analyze the development of the EWPT in the presence of a weak magnetic field. More specifically, we calculate the particle self-energies that include the effects of the weak magnetic field, needed for the MSM effective potential up to ring diagrams.

  10. CdSe/CdTe interface band gaps and band offsets calculated using spin-orbit and self-energy corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M. [Centro de Pesquisas Avancadas Wernher von Braun, Av. Alice de Castro P.N. Mattosinho 301, CEP 13098-392 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, L.G. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, L.R.C. [Center for Semiconductor Components, State University of Campinas, R. Pandia Calogeras 90, 13083-870 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramprasad, R. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We performed ab initio calculations of the electronic structures of bulk CdSe and CdTe, and their interface band alignments on the CdSe in-plane lattice parameters. For this, we employed the LDA-1/2 self-energy correction scheme to obtain corrected band gaps and band offsets. Our calculations include the spin-orbit effects for the bulk cases, which have shown to be of importance for the equilibrium systems and are possibly degraded in these strained semiconductors. Therefore, the SO showed reduced importance for the band alignment of this particular system. Moreover, the electronic structure calculated along the transition region across the CdSe/CdTe interface shows an interesting non-monotonic variation of the band gap in the range 0.8-1.8 eV, which may enhance the absorption of light for corresponding frequencies at the interface between these two materials in photovoltaic applications.

  11. Explaining the apparent arbitrariness of the LDA-1/2 self-energy correction method applied to purely covalent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Kan-Hao; Miao, Xiang-Shui

    2016-01-01

    The LDA-1/2 method expands Slater's half occupation technique to infinite solid state materials by introducing a self-energy potential centered at the anions to cancel the energy associated with electron-hole self-interaction. To avoid an infinite summation of long-ranged self-energy potentials they must be trimmed at a variationally-defined cutoff radius. The method has been successful in predicting accurate band gaps for a large number of elementary and binary semiconductors. Nevertheless, there has been some confusion regarding carbon and silicon, both in the cubic diamond structure, which require different ionizations of the valence charge, 1/2 for carbon and 1/4 for silicon respectively, to yield band gaps in agreement with experimental data. We here analyze the spatial distribution of the valence electrons of these two materials to conclude that in silicon and in carbon LDA-1/4 and LDA-1/2, respectively, must be adopted for the proper cancellation of the self-energies. Such analysis should be applied to...

  12. Multiple Bosonic Mode Coupling in Electron Self-Energy of (La_2-xSr_x)CuO_4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-06-02

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data with significantly improved statistics reveal tne structure in the electron self-energy of the underdoped (La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}) CuO{sub 4} (x=0.03, 0.036 and 0.07) samples in the normal state. Four fine structure have been identified near 27, 45, 61 and 75 meV. These features show good correspondence to the structure in the phonon density of states as measured from neutron scattering.

  13. Eikonal field theory description of interacting pomerons. [Total cross sections, Feynman graphs, self-energy radiative correction, unitarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Starting from an underlying field theory in Eikonal approximation, interacting Pomerons are produced by retaining those Feynman graphs that correspond to self-energy and related radiative corrections. Multiple Reggeon t-channel thresholds may be viewed in a simple s-channel field theory framework, while the degree of s-channel unitarity required depends upon the spin content of the underlying field theory and the classes of permitted processes. An approximate Eikonal calculation suggests how restricted triple-Pomeron interactions can serve to remove the bare Pomeron, and substitute an alternate asymptotic expression for o/sub TOT/.

  14. Baryon Self-Energy With QQQ Bethe-Salpeter Dynamics In The Non-Perturbative QCD Regime n-p Mass Difference

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, A N

    1999-01-01

    A qqq BSE formalism based on DB{\\chi}S of an input 4-fermion Lagrangian of `current' u,d quarks interacting pairwise via gluon-exchange-propagator in its self-energy via quark-loop integrals. To that end the baryon-qqq vertex function is derived under Covariant Instantaneity Ansatz (CIA), using Green's function techniques. This is a 3-body extension of an earlier q{\\bar q} (2-body) result on the exact 3D-4D interconnection for the respective BS wave functions under 3D kernel support, precalibrated to both q{\\bar q} and qqq spectra plus other observables. The quark loop integrals for the neutron (n) - proton (p) mass difference receive contributions from : i) the strong SU(2) effect arising from the d-u mass difference (4 MeV); ii) the e.m. effect of the respective quark charges. The resultant n-p difference comes dominantly from d-u effect (+1.71 Mev), which is mildly offset by e.m.effect (-0.44), subject to gauge corrections. To that end, a general method for QED gauge corrections to an arbitrary momentum de...

  15. Quantum electrodynamics and the electron self-energy in a deformed space with a minimal length scale

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Apollo V; Neves, M J

    2016-01-01

    The main motivation to study models in the presence of a minimal length is to obtain a quantum field theory free of the divergences. In this way, in this paper, we have constructed a new framework for quantum electrodynamics embedded in a minimal length scale background. New operators are introduced and the Green function method was used for the solution of the field equations, i.e., the Maxwell, Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We have analyzed specifically the scalar field and its one loop propagator. The mass of the scalar field regularized by the minimal length was obtained. The QED Lagrangian containing a minimal length was also constructed and the divergences were analyzed. The electron and photon propagators, and the electron self-energy at one loop as a function of the minimal length was also obtained.

  16. The Electromagnetic Self-Energy Contribution to M_p - M_n and the Isovector Nucleon Magnetic Polarizability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre Walker-Loud, Carl E. Carlson, Gerald A. Miller

    2012-06-01

    We update the determination of the isovector nucleon electromagnetic self-energy, valid to leading order in QED. A technical oversight in the literature concerning the elastic contribution to Cottingham's formula is corrected and modern knowledge of the structure functions is used to precisely determine the inelastic contribution. We find {delta}M{sub p-n}{sup {gamma}} = 1.30(03)(47) MeV. The largest uncertainty arises from a subtraction term required in the dispersive analysis, which can be related to the isovector magnetic polarizability. With plausible model assumptions, we can combine our calculation with additional input from lattice QCD to constrain this polarizability as: {beta}{sub p-n} = -0.87(85) x 10{sup -4} fm{sup 3}.

  17. Rigorous ab initio quantum embedding for quantum chemistry using Green's function theory: screened interaction, non-local self-energy relaxation, orbital basis, and chemical accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed discussion of self-energy embedding theory (SEET) which is a quantum embedding scheme allowing us to describe a chosen subsystem very accurately while keeping the description of the environment at a lower cost. We apply SEET to molecular examples where commonly our chosen subsystem is made out of a set of strongly correlated orbitals while the weakly correlated orbitals constitute an environment. Such a self-energy separation is very general and to make this procedure applicable to multiple systems a detailed and practical procedure for the evaluation of the system and environment self-energy is necessary. We list all the intricacies for one of the possible procedures while focusing our discussion on many practical implementation aspects such as the choice of best orbital basis, impurity solver, and many steps necessary to reach chemical accuracy. Finally, on a set of carefully chosen molecular examples, we demonstrate that SEET which is a controlled, systematically improvable Green's fu...

  18. Atomic Energy Levels with QED and Contribution of the Screened Self-Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Indelicato, Paul

    2000-01-01

    We present an introduction to the principles behind atomic energy level calculations with Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and the two-time Green's function method; this method allows one to calculate an effective Hamiltonian that contains all QED effects and that can be used to predict QED Lamb shifts of degenerate, quasidegenerate and isolated atomic levels.

  19. Self-energy modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations: WKB and finite-difference approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhenli; Liu, Pei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model to investigate charge transport in ionic fluids of inhomogeneous dielectric environment. The model includes the induced-charge effect due to the dielectric inhomogeneity and the ionic correlation effect by coupling the self-Green's function through solving a generalized Debye-Huckel (DH) equation. We develop numerical methods for the system composed of the Nernst-Planck, Poisson, and DH equations. Particularly, towards the numerical challenge of solving the high-dimensional DH equation, we developed an analytical WKB approximation and a numerical approach based on the sparse inversion of symmetric and positive definite matrix. The model and numerical methods are validated by simulating the charge diffusion in electrolytes between two electrodes, for which effects of dielectrics and correlation are investigated by comparing with the prediction by the classical PNP results. We find that, at the length scale of the interface separation ~10nm, the results of...

  20. Self-Energy Correction to the Two-Photon Decay Width in Hydrogenlike Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the gauge invariance of the leading logarithmic radiative correction to the two-photon decay width in hydrogenlike atoms. It is shown that an effective treatment of the correction using a Lamb-shift "potential" leads to equivalent results in both the length as well as the velocity gauges provided all relevant correction terms are taken into account. Specifically, the relevant radiative corrections are related to the energies that enter into the propagator denominators, to the Hamiltonian, to the wave functions, and to the energy conservation condition that holds between the two photons; the form of all of these effects is different in the two gauges, but the final result is shown to be gauge invariant, as it should be. Although the actual calculation only involves integrations over nonrelativistic hydrogenic Green functions, the derivation of the leading logarithmic correction can be regarded as slightly more complex than that of other typical logarithmic terms. The dominant radiative correctio...

  1. High temperature superconductivity induced by incipient magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, M.; Pereg, Y.

    1990-10-01

    We consider the BCS gap equation, with an attractive interaction λ with an upper cutoff ω 0 and lower cutoff ω 1, and a repulsive interaction μ with cutoffΓ. We consider parameters such that a superconducting solution does not exist. We add a repulsive interaction ν eith cutoff ω1 ( ω1 < ω0), and show that this repulsive interaction (that we attribute to incipient magnetism) induces a superconducting state possessing a high transition temperature. In this state, the gap function Δ(ɛ) oscillates as function of ɛ, with a period of order ω 0. We also find solutions antisymmetric in energy [ Δ( ɛ) = - Δ(- ɛ) ], which turn out to be almost degenerate with the normal, symmetric ones. We discuss the physical implications of this model. Our model thus combines a low frequency repulsion due to antiferromagnetic interactions, with excitonic attraction at intermediate frequencies, and ordinary Coulomb repulsion above that. All frequency ranges, and coupling strengths, are comparable with the bandwidth.

  2. Unconventional superconductivity induced by interfaces and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschrig, Matthias [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Ordered many-body states in solids are often characterized by an order parameter that breaks one or more of the symmetries of the crystal. Such unconventional states lead to interesting new physics associated with the spontaneously broken symmetries. However, in order that such a symmetry breaking can occur it has to be energetically favored. Some of the most interesting symmetry broken states have never been found experimentally in bulk materials for that reason. However, symmetries can be broken also by introducing interfaces with other materials. In this case, the evasive unconventional states might be induced locally near the interface, and can then penetrate as correlations into bulk materials. The properties of the induced states depend on the scattering characteristics of the interfaces and on the proximity induced states produced by the adjacent materials. We discuss in particular interface-induced unconventional superconductivity in heterostructures with magnetically active materials, that may exhibit e.g. odd-frequency pairing or equal-spin triplet pairing states. We study the conditions under which such unconventional pairing amplitudes are induced and demonstrate how they can be tested in experiment and used for quantum devices.

  3. Topological superconductivity induced by ferromagnetic metal chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; MacDonald, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent experiments have provided evidence that one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductivity can be realized experimentally by placing transition-metal atoms that form a ferromagnetic chain on a superconducting substrate. We address some properties of this type of system by using a Slater-Koster tight-binding model to account for important features of the electronic structure of the transition-metal chains on the superconducting substrate. We predict that topological superconductivity is nearly universal when ferromagnetic transition-metal chains form straight lines on superconducting substrates and that it is possible for more complex chain structures. When the chain is weakly coupled to the substrate and is longer than superconducting coherence lengths, its proximity-induced superconducting gap is ˜Δ ESO/J where Δ is the s -wave pair potential on the chain, ESO is the spin-orbit splitting energy induced in the normal chain state bands by hybridization with the superconducting substrate, and J is the exchange splitting of the ferromagnetic chain d bands. Because of the topological character of the 1D superconducting state, Majorana end modes appear within the gaps of finite length chains. We find, in agreement with the experiment, that when the chain and substrate orbitals are strongly hybridized, Majorana end modes are substantially reduced in amplitude when separated from the chain end by less than the coherence length defined by the p -wave superconducting gap. We conclude that Pb is a particularly favorable substrate material for ferromagnetic chain topological superconductivity because it provides both strong s -wave pairing and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, but that there is an opportunity to optimize properties by varying the atomic composition and structure of the chain. Finally, we note that in the absence of disorder, a new chain magnetic symmetry, one that is also present in the crystalline topological insulators, can stabilize multiple Majorana modes at the end of a single chain.

  4. Real-Time Thermal Schwinger-Dyson Equation for Quark Self-energy in Landau Gauge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By means of a formal expression of Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis effective potential for quark propagator at finite temperatures and finite quark chemical potentials, we derive the real-time thermal Schwinger-Dyson equation for quark propagator in Landau gauge. Denote the inverse quark propagator by A(p2)p - B(p2), we argue that, when temperature T is lower than the given infrared momentum cutoff pc, A(p2) = 1 is a feasible approximation and can be assumed in discussions of chiral symmetry phase transition problem in QCD.

  5. Self-energy and interaction energy of stacking fault in fcc metals calculated by embedded-atom method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何刚; 戎咏华; 徐祖耀

    2000-01-01

    The stacking fault energies of five fcc metals (Cu, Ag, Au, Ni and Al) with various quan-tivalences have been calculated by embedded-atom method (EAM). It indicated that the stacking fault energy is mainly determined by the metallic bond-energy and the lattice constant. Thus, monovalent fcc metals should have different stacking fault energies, contrary to Attree’s conclusion. The interaction energy between stacking faults one I 111 I layer apart in a fcc metal is found to be 1/40-1/250 of its self-energy, while it becomes zero when the two stacking faults are two layers apart. The twin energy is just half of the energy of intrinsic stacking fault energy without the consideration of lattice relaxation and the energy of a single intrinsic stacking fault is almost the same as that of extrinsic stacking fault, which are consistent with the results from the calculation of Lennard-Jones force between atoms, but differ from Attree’s result.

  6. Two-loop fermion self-energy in reduced quantum electrodynamics and application to the ultra-relativistic limit of graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Kotikov, A V

    2013-01-01

    We compute the two-loop fermion self-energy in massless reduced quantum electrodynamics for an arbitrary gauge using the method of integration by parts. Focusing on the limit where the photon field is four-dimensional, our formula involves only recursively one-loop integrals and can therefore be evaluated exactly. From this formula, we deduce the anomalous scaling dimension of the fermion field as well as the renormalized fermion propagator up to two loops. The results are then applied to the ultra-relativistic limit of graphene and compared with similar results obtained for four-dimensional and three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics.

  7. Screened self-energy correction to the 2p3/2-2s transition energy in Li-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    Yerokhin, V A; Shabaev, V M; Plunien, G; Soff, G

    2004-01-01

    We present an ab initio calculation of the screened self-energy correction for (1s)^2 2p3/2 and (1s)^2 2s states of Li-like ions with nuclear charge numbers in the range Z = 12-100. The evaluation is carried out to all orders in the nuclear-strength parameter Z \\alpha. This investigation concludes our calculations of all two-electron QED corrections for the 2p3/2-2s transition energy in Li-like ions and thus considerably improves theoretical predictions for this transition for high-Z ions.

  8. Theory and Measures of Self-energy Development of Vocational Students%高职学生自能发展的理论与措施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先法

    2011-01-01

    目前,高职教育十分重视教育的基本功能,注重专业技能的提高,但缺乏对高职学生的整体关心和终身关怀,学生的发展受到很大的制约.要使高职学生从根本上提高,必须提高高职学生的自能发展能力.笔者就高职学生的知识结构、心理缺陷、发展后劲等问题,提出自能发展的概念、自能发展的培养措施等.%At present the vocational education attaches great importance to the basic functions of education. pays attention to improvement of professional skills, but it is lack of overall concem and lifelong care for vocational students, so the development of students has been greatly restricted. To radically improve the development of vocational students, we need to improve the self-energy development of vocational students. Based on the issues in the knawledge structure, psychological defects development potential of vocational students. the writer proposed the concept and measures of self-energy development.

  9. Direct observation of self-energy signatures of the resonant collective mode in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Kaminski, Adam; Gu, Genda

    2017-05-01

    We use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the resonant, collective excitation mode in the superconducting state of Bi2212. By collecting very high-quality data we found noteworthy features in the self-energy in the antinodal region, where the interaction of electrons with the mode is the strongest. This interaction leads to a pronounced peak in the scattering rate and we demonstrate that this feature is directly responsible for the well-known peak-dip-hump structure in cuprates. By studying how the weight of this peak changes with temperature we unequivocally demonstrate that interaction of electrons with the resonant mode in cuprates vanishes at Tc and is very much localized in the momentum space close to the antinode. These findings present a consistent picture of line shape and self-energy signatures of the electron-boson coupling in cuprates and resolve long-standing controversy surrounding this issue. The momentum dependence of the strength of electron-mode interaction enables development of quantitative theory of this phenomenon in cuprates.

  10. Two-Loop Quark Self-Energy in a New Formalism; 2, Renormalization of the Quark Propagator in the Light-Cone Gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Leibbrandt, George; Leibbrandt, George; Williams, Jimmy D.

    2000-01-01

    The complete two-loop correction to the quark propagator, consisting of the spider, rainbow, gluon bubble and quark bubble diagrams, is evaluated in the noncovariant light-cone gauge (lcg). (The overlapping self-energy diagram had already been computed.) The chief technical tools include the powerful matrix integration technique, the n^*-prescription for the spurious poles of 1/qn, and the detailed analysis of the boundary singularities in five- and six-dimensional parameter space. It is shown that the total divergent contribution to the two-loop correction Sigma_2 contains both covariant and noncovariant components, and is a local function of the external momentum p, even off the mass-shell, as all nonlocal divergent terms cancel exactly. Consequently, both the quark mass and field renormalizations are local. The structure of Sigma_2 implies a quark mass counterterm of the form $\\delta m (lcg) = m\\tilde\\alpha_s C_F(3+\\tilde\\alpha_sW) + {\\rm O} (\\tilde\\alpha_s^3)$, the dimensional regulator epsilon, and on th...

  11. Two-loop quark self-energy in a new formalism; 2, Renormalization of the quark propagator in the light-cone gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Leibbrandt, G

    2000-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.440, p.537-602, 1995. The complete two-loop correction to the quark propagator, consisting of the spider, rainbow, gluon bubble and quark bubble diagrams, is evaluated in the non-covariant light-cone gauge (LCG), n.A/sup a/(x)=0, n/sup 2/=0. (The overlapping self-energy diagram had already been computed.) The chief technical tools include the powerful matrix integration technique, the n*/sub mu /-prescription for the spurious poles of (q.n)/sup -1/, and the detailed analysis of the boundary singularities in five- and six-dimensional parameter space. It is shown that the total divergent contribution to the two-loop correction Sigma /sub 2/ contains both covariant and non-covariant components, and is a local function of the external momentum p, even off the mass-shell, as all non-local divergent terms cancel exactly. Consequently, both the quark mass and field renormalizations are local. The structure of Sigma /sub 2/ implies a quark mass counterterm of the form delta m(LCG)=m alpha /sub...

  12. Filling- and interaction-driven Mott transition. Quantum cluster calculations within self-energy-functional theory; Fuellungs- und wechselwirkungsabhaengiger Mott-Uebergang. Quanten-Cluster-Rechnungen im Rahmen der Selbstenergiefunktional-Theorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzer, Matthias

    2008-07-01

    The central goal of this thesis is the examination of strongly correlated electron systems on the basis of the two-dimensional Hubbard model. We analyze how the properties of the Mott insulator change upon doping and with interaction strength. The numerical evaluation is done using quantum cluster approximations, which allow for a thermodynamically consistent description of the ground state properties. The framework of self-energy-functional theory offers great flexibility for the construction of cluster approximations. A detailed analysis sheds light on the quality and the convergence properties of different cluster approximations within the self-energy-functional theory. We use the one-dimensional Hubbard model for these examinations and compare our results with the exact solution. In two dimensions the ground state of the particle-hole symmetric model at half-filling is an antiferromagnetic insulator, independent of the interaction strength. The inclusion of short-range spatial correlations by our cluster approach leads to a considerable improvement of the antiferromagnetic order parameter as compared to dynamical mean-field theory. In the paramagnetic phase we furthermore observe a metal-insulator transition as a function of the interaction strength, which qualitatively differs from the pure mean-field scenario. Starting from the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator a filling-controlled metal-insulator transition in a paramagnetic metallic phase can be observed. Depending on the cluster approximation used an antiferromagnetic metallic phase may occur at first. In addition to long-range antiferromagnetic order, we also considered superconductivity in our calculations. The superconducting order parameter as a function of doping is in good agreement with other numerical methods, as well as with experimental results. (orig.)

  13. Electrostatic self-energy of a partially formed spherical shell in salt solution: application to stability of tethered and fluid shells -- viruses and vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Bozic, Anze Losdorfer; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the electrostatics of a partially formed, charged spherical shell in a salt solution. We solve the problem numerically at the Poisson-Boltzmann level and analytically in the Debye-Huckel regime. From the results on energetics of partially formed shells we examine the stability of tethered (crystalline) and fluid shells towards rupture. We clearly delineate different regimes of stability towards rupture, where, for fluid shells, we also include the effects of bending elasticity of the shells. Our analysis shows how charging of the shell induces its instability towards rupture but also provides insight regarding growth of charged shells.

  14. Self-energy production applied to buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlo, Fabricio Ramos del; Balestieri, Jose Antonio Perrella [Sao Paulo State University Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: perrella@feg.unesp.br; Holanda, Marcelo Rodrigues de [Sao Paulo Univ. (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Engineering School], E-mail: marcelo@debas.eel.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    The decentralization of energy production in order to obtain better environmental conditions, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the cost reduction of electricity and thermal energy consumed in residential buildings has been proposed in the literature. This paper proposes to demonstrate what are the chances of having a microcogeneration system toward the residential application. In this study, we contemplate the technologies involved and their possible inputs that are arranged in a superstructure to be studied. As a first step we obtain the cost of the products generated by the configuration that consists basically of two sources of power generation, and through optimization calculations intended to obtain the best configuration, taking into consideration the selection between four fuels, two equipment generators (Fuel Cell and Internal Combustion Engine)and three levels of energy production for each one. An economic analysis is also presented to evaluate the opportunity of selling the energy generated considering the fluctuations of the residential building consumption needs. (author)

  15. Quantum Gravitational Effects on Massive Fermions during Inflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    We compute the one loop graviton contribution to the self-energy of a very light fermion on a locally de Sitter background. This result can be used to study the effect that a small mass has on the propagation of fermions through the sea of infrared gravitons generated by inflation. We employ

  16. Nuclear medium effects in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

  17. Raman scattering from a superconductivity-induced bound state in MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyher, R

    2003-03-14

    It is shown that the sharp peak in the E(2g) Raman spectrum of superconducting MgB2 is due to a bound state caused by the electron-phonon coupling. Our theory explains why this peak appears only in the spectra with E(2g) symmetry and only in the sigma but not the pi bands. The properties of the bound state and the Raman spectrum are investigated, also in the presence of impurity scattering.

  18. Exchange effects in a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.

    1990-04-01

    We calculate the electron exchange of a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a quantum-well wire of radius R0. A two-subband model is considered and the exchange self-energy for the first and second subband is calculated under the assumption that only the lowest subband is partially filled with electrons. Band-bending effects are also discussed. Results for the total energy per electron including kinetic and exchange energy are presented.

  19. Dependence of Quark Effective Mass on Gluon Propagators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiao-Rong; ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on Dyson-Schwinger Equations (DSEs) in the "rainbow" approximation, the dependence of quark effective mass on gluon propagator is investigated by use of three different phenomenological gluon propagators with two parameters, the strength parameter x and range parameter △. Our theoretical calculations for the quark effective mass Mf(p2), defined by the self-energy functions Af(p2) and Bf(p2) of the DSEs, show that the dynamically running quark effective mass is strongly dependent on gluon propagator. Therefore, because gluon propagator is completely unknown,the quark effective mass cannot be exactly determined theoretically.

  20. Effect of Holstein phonons on the optical conductivity of gapped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbani, Kh.; Asgari, R.

    2010-01-01

    We study the optical conductivity of a doped graphene when a sublattice symmetry breaking is occurred in the presence of the electron-phonon interaction. Our study is based on the Kubo formula that is established upon the retarded self-energy. We report new features of both the real and imaginary parts of the quasiparticle self-energy in the presence of a gap opening. We find an analytical expression for the renormalized Fermi velocity of massive Dirac Fermions over broad ranges of electron densities, gap values and the electron-phonon coupling constants. Finally we conclude that the inclusion of the renormalized Fermi energy and the band gap effects are indeed crucial to get reasonable feature for the optical conductivity.

  1. Two loop low temperature corrections to electron self energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; Samina S. Masood

    2011-01-01

    We recalculate the two loop corrections in the background heat bath using real time formalism. The procedure of the integrations of loop momenta with dependence on finite temperature before the momenta without it has been followed. We determine the mass a

  2. Two loop low temperature corrections to electron self energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; Samina S. Masood

    2011-01-01

    We xecalculate the two loop corrections in the background heat bath using real time formalism.The procedure of the integrations of loop momenta with dependence on finite temperature before the moments without it has been followed. We determine the mass and wavefunction renormalization constants in the low temperature limit of QED, for the first time with this preferred order of integrations. The correction to electron mass and spinors in this limit is important in the early universe at the time of primordial nucleosynthesis as well as in astrophysics.

  3. Analytic properties of the quark propagator from an effective infrared interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, I investigate the analytic properties of the quark propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) in the Landau gauge. In the quark self-energy, the combined gluon propagator and quark-gluon vertex is modeled by an effective interaction (the so-called Maris-Tandy interaction), where the ultraviolet term is neglected. This renders the loop integrand of the quark self-energy analytic on the cut plane -π Supplemental Material, which can be used to parametrize solutions of the complex quark propagator for a wide range of bare mass values and for large bound-state masses. This study is a first step towards an extension of previous work on the analytic continuation of perturbative one-loop integrals, with the long-term goal of establishing a framework that allows for the numerical extraction of the analytic properties of the quark propagator with a truncation that extends beyond the rainbow by making adequate adjustments in the contour of the radial integration of the quark self-energy.

  4. Pseudogap and proximity effect in the Bi2Te3/Fe1+yTe interfacial superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M Q; Shen, J Y; Petrović, A P; He, Q L; Liu, H C; Zheng, Y; Wong, C H; Chen, Q H; Wang, J N; Law, K T; Sou, I K; Lortz, R

    2016-01-01

    In the interfacial superconductor Bi2Te3/Fe1+yTe, two dimensional superconductivity occurs in direct vicinity to the surface state of a topological insulator. If this state were to become involved in superconductivity, under certain conditions a topological superconducting state could be formed, which is of high interest due to the possibility of creating Majorana fermionic states. We report directional point-contact spectroscopy data on the novel Bi2Te3/Fe1+yTe interfacial superconductor for a Bi2Te3 thickness of 9 quintuple layers, bonded by van der Waals epitaxy to a Fe1+yTe film at an atomically sharp interface. Our data show highly unconventional superconductivity, which appears as complex as in the cuprate high temperature superconductors. A very large superconducting twin-gap structure is replaced by a pseudogap above ~12 K which persists up to 40 K. While the larger gap shows unconventional order parameter symmetry and is attributed to a thin FeTe layer in proximity to the interface, the smaller gap is associated with superconductivity induced via the proximity effect in the topological insulator Bi2Te3.

  5. Superconductivity-induced magnetization depletion in a ferromagnet through an insulator in a ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor hybrid oxide heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, C L; Singh, Surendra; Paul, Amitesh; Bhattacharya, D; Singh, M R; Mattauch, S; Ravikumar, G; Basu, S

    2016-05-21

    Coupling between superconducting and ferromagnetic states in hybrid oxide heterostructures is presently a topic of intense research. Such a coupling is due to the leakage of the Cooper pairs into the ferromagnet. However, tunneling of the Cooper pairs though an insulator was never considered plausible. Using depth sensitive polarized neutron reflectivity we demonstrate the coupling between superconductor and magnetic layers in epitaxial La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO)/SrTiO3/YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) hybrid heterostructures, with SrTiO3 as an intervening oxide insulator layer between the ferromagnet and the superconductor. Measurements above and below the superconducting transition temperature (TSC) of YBCO demonstrate a large modulation of magnetization in the ferromagnetic layer below the TSC of YBCO in these heterostructures. This work highlights a unique tunneling phenomenon between the epitaxial layers of an oxide superconductor (YBCO) and a magnetic layer (LCMO) through an insulating layer. Our work would inspire further investigations on the fundamental aspect of a long range order of the triplet spin-pairing in hybrid structures.

  6. Topological Quantum Phase Transition and Superconductivity Induced by Pressure in the Bismuth Tellurohalide BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Naumov, Pavel G; Kumar, Nitesh; Sankar, Raman; Schnelle, Walter; Shekhar, Chandra; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Medvedev, Sergey A

    2017-03-06

    A pressure-induced topological quantum phase transition has been theoretically predicted for the semiconductor bismuth tellurohalide BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting. In this work, evolution of the electrical transport properties in BiTeI and BiTeBr is investigated under high pressure. The pressure-dependent resistivity in a wide temperature range passes through a minimum at around 3 GPa, indicating the predicted topological quantum phase transition in BiTeI. Superconductivity is observed in both BiTeI and BiTeBr, while resistivity at higher temperatures still exhibits semiconducting behavior. Theoretical calculations suggest that superconductivity may develop from the multivalley semiconductor phase. The superconducting transition temperature, Tc , increases with applied pressure and reaches a maximum value of 5.2 K at 23.5 GPa for BiTeI (4.8 K at 31.7 GPa for BiTeBr), followed by a slow decrease. The results demonstrate that BiTeX (X = I, Br) compounds with nontrivial topology of electronic states display new ground states upon compression.

  7. Topological quantum phase transition and superconductivity induced by pressure in the bismuth tellurohalide BiTeI

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Naumov, Pavel G.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sankar, Raman; Schnelle, Walter; Shekhar, Chandra; Chou, F. C.; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Medvedev, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    A pressure-induced topological quantum phase transition has been theoretically predicted for the semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting. In this work, the evolution of the electrical transport properties in BiTeI and BiTeBr is investigated under high pressure. The pressure-dependent resistivity in a wide temperature range passes through a minimum at around 3 GPa, indicating the predicted transition in BiTeI. Superconductivity is observed in both BiTeI and BiTeBr while the resist...

  8. Superconductivity-induced magnetization depletion in a ferromagnet through an insulator in a ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor hybrid oxide heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, Surendra; Paul, Amitesh; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, M. R.; Mattauch, S.; Ravikumar, G.; Basu, S.

    2016-05-01

    Coupling between superconducting and ferromagnetic states in hybrid oxide heterostructures is presently a topic of intense research. Such a coupling is due to the leakage of the Cooper pairs into the ferromagnet. However, tunneling of the Cooper pairs though an insulator was never considered plausible. Using depth sensitive polarized neutron reflectivity we demonstrate the coupling between superconductor and magnetic layers in epitaxial La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO)/SrTiO3/YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) hybrid heterostructures, with SrTiO3 as an intervening oxide insulator layer between the ferromagnet and the superconductor. Measurements above and below the superconducting transition temperature (TSC) of YBCO demonstrate a large modulation of magnetization in the ferromagnetic layer below the TSC of YBCO in these heterostructures. This work highlights a unique tunneling phenomenon between the epitaxial layers of an oxide superconductor (YBCO) and a magnetic layer (LCMO) through an insulating layer. Our work would inspire further investigations on the fundamental aspect of a long range order of the triplet spin-pairing in hybrid structures.

  9. Superconductivity-induced re-entrance of the orthorhombic distortion in Ba1-xKxFe2As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, A E; Hardy, F; Wang, L; Wolf, T; Schweiss, P; Meingast, C

    2015-07-31

    Detailed knowledge of the phase diagram and the nature of the competing magnetic and superconducting phases is imperative for a deeper understanding of the physics of iron-based superconductivity. Magnetism in the iron-based superconductors is usually a stripe-type spin-density-wave, which breaks the tetragonal symmetry of the lattice, and is known to compete strongly with superconductivity. Recently, it was found that in some systems an additional spin-density-wave transition occurs, which restores this tetragonal symmetry, however, its interaction with superconductivity remains unclear. Here, using thermodynamic measurements on Ba1-xKxFe2As2 single crystals, we show that the spin-density-wave phase of tetragonal symmetry competes much stronger with superconductivity than the stripe-type spin-density-wave phase, which results in a novel re-entrance of the latter at or slightly below the superconducting transition.

  10. Quantum Gravitational Effects on Massive Fermions during Inflation I

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, S P

    2012-01-01

    We compute the one loop graviton contribution to the self-energy of a very light fermion on a locally de Sitter background. This result can be used to study the effect that a small mass has on the propagation of fermions through the sea of infrared gravitons generated by inflation. We employ dimensional regularization and obtain a fully renormalized result by absorbing all divergences with BPHZ counterterms. An interesting technical aspect of this computation is the need for two noninvariant counterterms owing to the breaking of de Sitter invariance by our gauge condition.

  11. Quantized Faraday effect in 3D+1 and 2D+1 systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L Cruz; Rojas, H Perez; Querts, E Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    We study Faraday rotation in the quantum relativistic limit. Starting from the photon self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field the rotation of the polarization vector of a plane electromagnetic wave which travel along the fermion-antifermion gas is studied. The connection between Faraday Effect and Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) is discussed. The Faraday Effect is also investigated for a massless relativistic 2D+1 fermion system which is derived by using the compactification along the dimension parallel to the magnetic field. Faraday angle shows a quantized behavior as Hall conductivity in two and three dimensions.

  12. Status of effective potential calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Quiros, M.

    1995-01-01

    We review various effective potential methods which have been useful to compute the Higgs mass spectrum and couplings of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We compare results where all-loop next-to-leading-log corrections are resummed by the renormalization group, with those where just the leading-log corrections are kept. Pole masses are obtained from running masses by addition of convenient self-energy diagrams. Approximate analytical expressions are worked out, providing an excellent approximation to the numerical results which include all next-to-leading-log terms. An appropriate treatment of squark decoupling allows to consider large values of the stop and/or sbottom mixing parameters and thus fix a reliable upper bound on the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass.

  13. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order.

  14. Three-dimensional noncommutative Yukawa theory: Induced effective action and propagating modes

    CERN Document Server

    Bufalo, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the analysis of noncommutative Yukawa theory, encompassing neutral and charged scalar fields. We approach the analysis by considering carefully the derivation of the respective effective actions. Hence, based on the obtained results, we compute the one-loop contributions to the neutral and charged scalar field self-energy, as well as to the Chern-Simons polarization tensor. In order to properly define the behaviour of the quantum fields, the known UV/IR mixing due to radiative corrections is analysed in the one-loop physical dispersion relation of the scalar and gauge fields.

  15. Many-body effects in doped graphene on a piezoelectric substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, David G.; Zapata, Ivar; Schiefele, Jürgen; Sols, Fernando; Guinea, Francisco

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the many-body properties of graphene on top of a piezoelectric substrate, focusing on the interaction between graphene electrons and piezoelectric acoustic phonons. We calculate the electron and phonon self-energies as well as the electron mobility limited by the substrate phonons. We emphasize the importance of proper screening of the electron-phonon vertex, and we discuss the various limiting behaviors as a function of electron energy, temperature, and doping level. The effect of piezoelectric acoustic phonons on graphene electrons is compared with that of intrinsic deformation acoustic phonons. Substrate phonons tend to dominate over intrinsic ones for low doping levels at high and low temperatures.

  16. Effect of electron-phonon interaction on resistivity of some heavy fermion (HF) systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, J., E-mail: jitendrasahoo2008@gmail.com [Assistant Director, Regional Office of Vocational Education, Sambalpur, Odisha-768004 (India); Shadangi, N. [Dept. of Physics, Silicon Institute of Technology, Sambalpur, Odisha-768200 (India); Nayak, P. [School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Sambalpur, Odisha-768019 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the electron-phonon interaction in the Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) to describe the temperature dependence of resistivity in some heavy fermion (HF) systems for finite wave vector (q) and for finite temperature (T). Since the resistivity is related to the imaginary part of the electron self energy, the expression for the same is evaluated through double time temperature dependant Green function technique of the Zubarev type. The effect of different system parameters namely the position of 4f level, E{sub 0} and the electron - phonon coupling strengths on resistivity have been studied. The results obtained give satisfactory explanations to the experimental observations.

  17. Lifetime Effects in Color Superconductivity at Weak Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, C

    2000-01-01

    Present computations of the gap of color superconductivity in weak coupling assume that the quarks which participate in the condensation process are infinitely long-lived. However, the quasiparticles in a plasma are characterized by having a finite lifetime. In this article we take into account this fact to evaluate its effect in the computation of the color gap. By first considering the Schwinger-Dyson equations in weak coupling, when one-loop self-energy corrections are included, a general gap equation is written in terms of the spectral densities of the quasiparticles. To evaluate lifetime effects, we then model the spectral density by a Lorentzian function. We argue that the decay of the quasiparticles limits their efficiency to condense. The value of the gap at the Fermi surface is then reduced. To leading order, these lifetime effects can be taken into account by replacing the coupling constant of the gap equation by a reduced effective one.

  18. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Jamie I

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new mechanism -- radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis -- for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrat...

  19. Ab Initio Calculation of the Electronic and Optical Excitations in Polythiophene: Effects of Intra- and Interchain Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, J.-W.; Bobbert, P. A.; Michels, M. A. J.; Brocks, G.; Kelly, P. J.

    1999-11-01

    We present an ab initio calculation of the electronic and optical excitations of an isolated polythiophene chain as well as of bulk polythiophene. We use the GW approximation for the electronic self-energy and include excitonic effects by solving the electron-hole Bethe-Salpeter equation. The inclusion of interchain screening in the case of bulk polythiophene drastically reduces both the quasiparticle band gap and the exciton binding energies, but the optical gap is hardly affected. This finding is relevant for conjugated polymers in general.

  20. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Rovibrational Spectra of Molecular Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Jacek; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Łach, Grzegorz; Przybytek, Michał; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2011-10-11

    The dissociation energies from all rovibrational levels of H2 and D2 in the ground electronic state are calculated with high accuracy by including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in the nonadiabatic treatment of the nuclear motion. For D2, the obtained energies have theoretical uncertainties of 0.001 cm(-1). For H2, similar uncertainties are for the lowest levels, while for the higher ones the uncertainty increases to 0.005 cm(-1). Very good agreement with recent high-resolution measurements of the rotational v = 0 levels of H2, including states with large angular momentum J, is achieved. This agreement would not have been possible without accurate evaluation of the relativistic and QED contributions and may be viewed as the first observation of the QED effects, mainly the electron self-energy, in a molecular spectrum. For several electric quadrupole transitions, we still observe certain disagreement with experimental results, which remains to be explained.

  1. Dynamical and anharmonic effects on the electron-phonon coupling and the zero-point renormalization of the band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonius, Gabriel; Poncé, Samuel; Lantagne-Hurtubise, Étienne; Auclair, Gabriel; Côté, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The electron-phonon coupling in solids renormalizes the band structure, reducing the band gap by several tenths of an eV in light-atoms semiconductors. Using the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory (AHC), we compute the zero-point renormalization (ZPR) as well as the quasiparticle lifetimes of the full band structure in diamond, BN, LiF and MgO. We show how dynamical effects can be included in the AHC theory, and still allow for the use of a Sternheimer equation to avoid the summation over unoccupied bands. The convergence properties of the electron-phonon coupling self-energy with respect to the Brillouin zone sampling prove to be strongly affected by dynamical effects. We complement our study with a frozen-phonon approach, which reproduces the static AHC theory, but also allows to probe the phonon wavefunctions at finite displacements and include anharmonic effects in the self-energy. We show that these high-order components tend to reduce the strongest electron-phonon coupling elements, which affects significantly the band gap ZPR.

  2. Effect

    OpenAIRE

    M.F. Sabry; M.R. Hamed; El Sayed, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Stress alters psychological diseases such as anxiety and depression. Protein malnutrition (PM) contributes to psychological disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of biphenyl dimethyl dicarboxylate (DDB) on anxiety of psychologically stressed protein malnourished mice as compared to its effect in normally-fed mice. Fluoxetine (FLX) was used as reference standard. Animals were randomly divided into two major groups, normally-fed group provided with 20% casein diet and a p...

  3. Quantum transport of a nanowire field-effect transistor with complex phonon self–energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valin, R., E-mail: r.valinferreiro@swansea.ac.uk; Aldegunde, M., E-mail: m.a.aldegunderodriguez@swansea.ac.uk; Martinez, A., E-mail: a.e.Martinez@swansea.ac.uk [Electronic Systems Design Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Barker, J. R., E-mail: john.barker@glasgow.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-28

    In this work, the impact of the real part of the phonon self-energy on the transfer characteristics of a silicon nanowire transistor is investigated. The physical effects of the real part of the self-energy are to create a broadening and a shift on the density of states. This increases the drain current in the sub–threshold region and decreases it in the above–the–threshold region. In the first region, the current is increased as a result of an increase of charge in the middle of the channel. In the second one, the electrostatic self–consistency or the enforcement of charge neutrality in the channel reduces the current because a substantial amount of electrons are under the first subband and have imaginary wave vectors. The change in the phonon–limited mobility due to the real part of self–energy is evaluated for a nanowire transistor and a nanowire in which there is not source to drain barrier. We also assess the validity of Mathiessen's rule using the self–consistent NEGF simulations and the Kubo–Greenwood formalism.

  4. Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Abdou Seleem; Fakhr El-Din M. Lashein

    2016-01-01

    Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that belongs to the phenylalkylamine group. It has been clinically used for various diseases such as combating hypertension, ischemic heart diseases, supraventricular antiarrhythmic and tycolysis. The study was conducted to investigate the effect of verapamil on selected pro- and apoptotic factors during prenatal retinal differentiation of mice at E14 and E17 of gestation. The pregnant females were classified into two groups, the first is the control and...

  5. Quark Loop Effects on Dressed Gluon Propagator in Framework of Global Color Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; SUN Wei-Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the global color symmetry model (GCM), a method for obtaining the quark loop effects on the dressed gluon propagator in GCM is developed. In the chiral limit, it is found that the dressed gluon propagator containing the quark loop effects in the Nambu-Goldstone and Wigner phases are quite different. In solving the quark self-energy functions in the two different phases and subsequent study of bag constant one should use the above dressed gluon propagator as input. The above approach for obtaining the current quark mass effects on the dressed gluon propagator is quite general and can also be used to calculate the chemical potential dependence of the dressed gluon propagator.

  6. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  7. Linear Response Theory for Symmetry Improved Two Particle Irreducible Effective Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J; Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O(N) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective action formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are over-determined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the over-determining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O(N)-covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear respo...

  8. Effects of electronic relaxation processes on vibrational linewidths of adsorbates on surfaces: The case of CO/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novko, D.; Alducin, M.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate nonadiabatic effects for the vibrational stretch mode of the CO molecule adsorbed on the top site of the Cu(100) surface. By studying the long-wavelength (q ≈0 ) imaginary and real parts of the density functional theory based phonon self-energy due to the electron-phonon coupling Πλ we obtain the phonon linewidth and the frequency renormalization of the CO stretch mode, respectively. To simulate electronic scattering processes that lead to further damping of the phonon modes we include a phenomenological damping in the phonon self-energy, as well as in the single-electron spectral function that enters Πλ, through the momentum distribution function. For the specific case of electron-impurity scattering we explicitly show how this process opens the indirect intraband channel and broadens the linewidth of the CO stretch mode. To emphasize the importance of accounting for electronic scattering processes we compare the phonon linewidths in the clean noninteracting limit (infinite electron lifetime) and when electronic scattering processes are phenomenologically included (finite electron lifetime) with available experimental data. We find that the agreement with experiments is improved in the latter case.

  9. Acoustic effective wavenumber in continuous complex media: beyond the Helmholtz equation

    CERN Document Server

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Derode, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the ensemble-averaged (a.k.a. effective or coherent) wavefield propagating in a heterogeneous medium considered as one realization of a random process. It is usually assumed that heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random scalar function of the space coordinates, termed the potential. Physically, this amounts to replacing the constant wavespeed in Helmholtz' equation by a space-dependent speed. In the case of acoustic waves, we show that this simplification may be completely wrong for the scattering mean-free path, even with weak fluctuations. The calculation of the coherent wavefield must take into account both a scalar and an operator part in the random potential. We present two approaches to overcome this problem. Based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering, theoretical results are obtained for the self-energy and the effective wavenumber, within Bourret's and on-shell approximations.

  10. Bound-state field theory approach to proton structure effects in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter J; Sapirstein, J

    2013-01-01

    A bound-state field theory approach to muonic hydrogen is set up using a variant of the Furry representation in which the lowest-order Hamiltonian describes a muon in the presence of a point Coulomb field, but the origin of the binding field is taken to be three charged quarks in the proton which are modeled as Dirac particles that move freely within a spherical well. Bound-state field theory techniques are used to evaluate one- and two-photon effects. Particular attention is paid to two-photon exchange diagrams, which include the effect of proton polarizability. In addition the modification of the electromagnetic self energy of the proton by the electric field of the muon is examined. Finally, the model is used to carry out a calculation of the static electric polarizability of the proton.

  11. Many-body effects of Coulomb interaction on Landau levels in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, A. A.; Zabolotskiy, A. D.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2017-03-01

    In strong magnetic fields, massless electrons in graphene populate relativistic Landau levels with the square-root dependence of each level energy on its number and magnetic field. Interaction-induced deviations from this single-particle picture were observed in recent experiments on cyclotron resonance and magneto-Raman scattering. Previous attempts to calculate such deviations theoretically using the unscreened Coulomb interaction resulted in overestimated many-body effects. This work presents many-body calculations of cyclotron and magneto-Raman transitions in single-layer graphene in the presence of Coulomb interaction, which is statically screened in the random-phase approximation. We take into account self-energy and excitonic effects as well as Landau level mixing, and achieve good agreement of our results with the experimental data for graphene on different substrates. The important role of a self-consistent treatment of the screening is found.

  12. Self-energies in itinerant magnets: A focus on Fe and Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponza, Lorenzo; Pisanti, Paolo; Vishina, Alena; Pashov, Dimitar; Weber, Cedric; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Acharya, Swagata; Vidal, Julien; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed study of local and nonlocal correlations in the electronic structure of elemental transition metals carried out by means of the quasiparticle self-consistent GW (QS GW ) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). Recent high resolution ARPES and Haas-van Alphen data of two typical transition metal systems (Fe and Ni) are used as a case study. (i) We find that the properties of Fe are very well described by QS GW . Agreement with cyclotron and very clean ARPES measurements is excellent, provided that final-state scattering is taken into account. This establishes the exceptional reliability of QS GW also in metallic systems. (ii) Nonetheless QS GW alone is not able to provide an adequate description of the Ni ARPES data due to strong local spin fluctuations. We surmount this deficiency by combining nonlocal charge fluctuations in QS GW with local spin fluctuations in DMFT. (iii) Finally we show that the dynamics of the local fluctuations are actually not crucial. The addition of an external static field can lead to similarly good results if nonlocal correlations are included through QS GW .

  13. On the gluon plasmon self-energy at O(g)

    CERN Document Server

    Flechsig, F; Flechsig, F; Schulz, H

    1995-01-01

    The next-to-leading order contribution \\d\\P\\omn (\\o ,\\vc q ) to the polarization function of the hot gluon system is analysed at non-zero wave vectors \\vc q \\,. Using Braaten-Pisarski resummation and general covariant gauges, \\d\\P\\omn is found to be gauge-fixing independent and transverse on the longitudinal mass-shell. The real part of the longitudinal component \\d\\P_\\ell is UV and IR stable (for real q). At imaginary q it is IR singular, and at the point \\o=0, q^2=-3m^2 it coincides with the result of Rebhan for next-to-leading order Debye screening. When q approaches the lightcone \\d\\P_\\ell diverges like 1 / \\wu {\\o^2 - q^2} , reflecting the breakdown of the Braaten-Pisarski decomposition scheme in this limit.

  14. Renormalization and additional degrees of freedom within the chiral effective theory for spin-1 resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kampf, Karol; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    We study in detail various aspects of the renormalization of the spin-1 resonance propagator in the effective field theory framework. First, we briefly review the formalisms for the description of spin-1 resonances in the path integral formulation with the stress on the issue of propagating degrees of freedom. Then we calculate the one-loop 1-- meson self-energy within the Resonance chiral theory in the chiral limit using different methods for the description of spin-one particles, namely the Proca field, antisymmetric tensor field and the first order formalisms. We discuss in detail technical aspects of the renormalization procedure which are inherent to the power-counting non-renormalizable theory and give a formal prescription for the organization of both the counterterms and one-particle irreducible graphs. We also construct the corresponding propagators and investigate their properties. We show that the additional poles corresponding to the additional one-particle states are generated by loop corrections...

  15. Optical spectrum of MoS2: many-body effects and diversity of exciton states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diana Y; da Jornada, Felipe H; Louie, Steven G

    2013-11-22

    We present first-principles calculations of the optical response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide employing the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approach including self-energy, excitonic, and electron-phonon effects. We show that monolayer MoS2 possesses a large and diverse number of strongly bound excitonic states with novel k-space characteristics that were not previously seen experimentally or theoretically. The absorption spectrum is shown to be dominated by excitonic states with a binding energy close to 1 eV and by strong electron-phonon broadening in the visible to ultraviolet range. Our results explain recent experimental measurements and resolve inconsistencies between previous GW-BSE calculations.

  16. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  17. Reverse process of usual optical analysis of boson-exchange superconductors: impurity effects on s- and d-wave superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-03-04

    We performed a reverse process of the usual optical data analysis of boson-exchange superconductors. We calculated the optical self-energy from two (MMP and MMP+peak) input model electron-boson spectral density functions using Allen's formula for one normal and two (s- and d-wave) superconducting cases. We obtained the optical constants including the optical conductivity and the dynamic dielectric function from the optical self-energy using an extended Drude model, and finally calculated the reflectance spectrum. Furthermore, to investigate impurity effects on optical quantities we added various levels of impurities (from the clean to the dirty limit) in the optical self-energy and performed the same reverse process to obtain the optical conductivity, the dielectric function, and reflectance. From these optical constants obtained from the reverse process we extracted the impurity-dependent superfluid densities for two superconducting cases using two independent methods (the Ferrel-Glover-Tinkham sum rule and the extrapolation to zero frequency of -ϵ1(ω)ω(2)); we found that a certain level of impurities is necessary to get a good agreement on results obtained by the two methods. We observed that impurities give similar effects on various optical constants of s- and d-wave superconductors; the greater the impurities the more distinct the gap feature and the lower the superfluid density. However, the s-wave superconductor gives the superconducting gap feature more clearly than the d-wave superconductor because in the d-wave superconductors the optical quantities are averaged over the anisotropic Fermi surface. Our results supply helpful information to see how characteristic features of the electron-boson spectral function and the s- and d-wave superconducting gaps appear in various optical constants including raw reflectance spectrum. Our study may help with a thorough understanding of the usual optical analysis process. Further systematic study of experimental

  18. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  19. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-05

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  20. Theoretical approach to study the effect of free volumes on the physical behavior of polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, T.; Majumder, T. Pal

    2011-06-01

    It was clearly indicative that the polymer chains make a tremendous interaction with the tilt angle in case of a polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (PSFLC). After suitable consideration of such interaction, we expanded the Landau free energy for a PSFLC system. We theoretically demonstrated the effect of free volumes, which expected to create bulk self-energy, on the physical functionalities of a PSFLC system. Then we obtained spontaneous polarization, tilt angle, rotational viscosity and dielectric constant strongly correlated with the assumed interactions. We also observed a shift of transition temperature highly influenced by this interaction between polymer network and liquid crystal molecules. A microscopical picture of this polymer-liquid crystal interaction is provided in view of the free volume charge density present in the composite system.

  1. Giant many-body effects in liquid ammonia absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we accurately calculate the absorption spectrum of liquid ammonia up to 13 eV using many-body perturbation approach. The electronic bandgap of liquid NH3 is perfectly described as the combination of density functional theory, Coulomb-hole screened exchange, and G0W0 approximation to the electronic self-energy, yielding a direct gap (Γ → Γ) of 7.71 eV, fully consistent with the experimentally measured gap from photo-emission spectroscopy. With respect to the NH3 optical properties, the entire spectrum in particular the low lying first absorption band is extremely affected by electron-hole interactions, leading to a fundamental redistribution of spectral weights of the independent-particle spectrum. Three well separated but broad main peaks are identified at 7.0, 9.8, and 11.8 eV with steadily increasing intensities in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe a giant net blue-shift of the first absorption peak of about 1.4 eV from gaseous to liquid phase as the direct consequence of many-body effects, allowing the associated liquid ammonia absorption band exciton to delocalize and feel more effectively the repulsion effects imposed by the surrounding solvent shells. Further, the spectrum is insensitive to the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions. Concerning electronic response structure of liquid NH3, it is most sensitive to excitations at energies lower than its electronic gap.

  2. One-particle reducibility in effective scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshagin, V.

    2016-10-01

    To construct the reasonable renormalization scheme suitable for the effective theories one needs to resolve the "problem of couplings" because the number of free parameters in a theory should be finite. Otherwise the theory would loose its predictive power. In the case of effective theory already the first step on this way shows the necessity to solve the above-mentioned problem for the 1-loop 2-leg function traditionally called self energy. In contrast to the customary renormalizable models the corresponding Feynman graph demonstrates divergencies that require introducing of an infinite number of prescriptions. In the recent paper [1] it has been shown that the way out of this difficulty requires the revision of the notion of one-particle reducibility. The point is that in effective scattering theory one can introduce two different notions: the graphic reducibility and the analytic one. Below we explain the main ideas of the paper [1] and recall some notions and definitions introduced earlier in [2] and [3].

  3. The Vector Meson Mass in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Jonathan M M

    2014-01-01

    A brief overview of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as a non-Abelian gauge field theory, including symmetries and formalism of interest, will precede a focused discussion on the use of an Effective Field Theory (EFT) as a low energy perturbative expansion technique. Regularization schemes involved in Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\c{hi}PT) will be reviewed and compared with EFT. Lattices will be discussed as a useful procedure for studying large mass particles. An Effective Field Theory will be formulated, and the self energy of the \\r{ho} meson for a Finite-Range Regulated (FRR) theory will be calculated. This will be performed in both full QCD and the simpler quenched approximation (QQCD). Finite-volume artefacts, due to the finite box size on the lattice, will be quantified. Currently known lattice results will be used to calculate the \\r{ho} meson mass, and the possibility of unquenching will be explored. The aim of the research was to determine whether a stable unquenching procedure for the \\r{ho} meson could...

  4. Correlation effects in ruthenates: LDA+DMFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, Evgeny; Pavarini, Eva [IAS-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The ruthenates of the Ruddlesden-Popper family A{sub n+1}Ru{sub n} O{sub 3n+1} where A=(Sr,Ca) are unique among transition-metal oxides, because the change of cation A and/or in the number n of RuO{sub 2} layers leads to a variety of collective phenomena, ranging from multi-band Mott transitions to ferro- and meta-magnetism. To understand these systems, it is necessary to disentangle the effects of Coulomb repulsion in the 4d{sup 4}Ru shell from those of lattice distortions and chemistry. By using the LDA+DMFT approach, we show how such disentanglement explains the nature of the metal-insulator transition in single-layered Ca ruthenates and the evolution of electronic structure in n-layered Sr ruthenates. We use LDA+DMFT scheme based on the N-th Order Muffin-Tin Orbital approach and the weak-coupling CT-quantum Monte Carlo method as impurity solver. This method allows us to take into account the full rotationally-invariant Coulomb interaction, as well as full on-site self-energy matrix in orbital space with spin-orbit coupling. We discuss changes in effective mass and orbital polarization as a result of spin-flip processes and spin-orbit interaction.

  5. Investigation of renormalization effects in high temperature cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B.

    2008-04-16

    It has been found that the self-energy of high-T{sub C} cuprates indeed exhibits a well pronounced structure, which is currently attributed to coupling of the electrons either to lattice vibrations or to collective magnetic excitations in the system. To clarify this issue, the renormalization effects and the electronic structure of two cuprate families Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were chosen as the main subject for this thesis. With a simple example of an electronic system coupled to a collective mode unusual renormalization features observed in the photoemission spectra are introduced. It is shown that impurity substitution in general leads to suppression of the unusual renormalization. Finally an alternative possibility to obtain a purely superconducting surface of Y-123 via partial substitution of Y atoms with Ca is introduced. It is shown that renormalization in the superconducting Y-123 has similar strong momentum dependence as in the Bi-2212 family. It is also shown that in analogy to Bi-2212 the renormalization appears to have strong dependence on the doping level (no kinks for the overdoped component) and practically vanishes above T{sub C} suggesting that coupling to magnetic excitations fits much better than competing scenarios, according to which the unusual renormalization in ARPES spectra is caused by the coupling to single or multiple phononic modes. (orig.)

  6. An effective field theory during inflation II: stochastic dynamics and power spectrum suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the non-equilibrium effective action of an inflaton like scalar field --the system-- by tracing over sub Hubble degrees of freedom of ``environmental'' light scalar fields. The effective action is stochastic leading to effective Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and stochastic noise correlators that obey a de Sitter space-time analog of a fluctuation dissipation relation. We solve the Langevin equation implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation of the leading secular terms and obtain the corrections to the power spectrum of super Hubble fluctuations of the inflaton field, $\\mathcal{P}(k;\\eta) = \\mathcal{P}_0(k)\\,e^{-\\gamma(k;\\eta)}$ where $\\mathcal{P}_0(k)$ is the nearly scale invariant power spectrum in absence of coupling. $\\gamma(k;\\eta)>0$ describes the suppression of the power spectrum, it features Sudakov-type double logarithms and entails violations of scale invariance. We also obtain the effective action...

  7. Chiral Symmetry Restoration with a Chiral Chemical Potential: the Role of Momentum Dependent Quark Self-energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, M

    2016-01-01

    In this article we study restoration of chiral symmetry at finite temperature for quark matter with a chiral chemical potential, $\\mu_5$, by means of a nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This model allows to introduce in the simplest way possible a Euclidean momentum, $p_E$, dependent quark mass function which decays (neglecting logarithms) as $1/p_E^2$ for large $p_E$ in agreement with asymptotic behaviour expected in presence of a nonperturbative quark condensate. We show that the momentum dependence of the quark mass function, which has been neglected in all of the previous model studies, drastically affects the dependence of the critical temperature versus $\\mu_5$. We explain this in terms of a natural removal of ultraviolet modes at $T>0$ in the gap equation, as well as of the natural addition of these modes at $T=0$ which help to catalyze chiral symmetry breaking. As a result we find that within this model the critical temperature increases with $\\mu_5$.

  8. Effects of AMM on the EoS of Magnetized Dense Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Paret, D Manreza; Ferrer, E J; de la Incera, V

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the anomalous magnetic moment (AMM) in the EoS of a fermion system in the presence of a magnetic field. In the region of strong magnetic fields ($B>m^2$) the AMM is found from the one-loop fermion self-energy. In contrast to the weak-field AMM found by Schwinger, in the strong magnetic field case, the AMM depends on the Landau level (LL) and decreases with it. The effects of the AMM in the EoS at intermediate-to-large fields can be found introducing the one-loop, LL-dependent AMM in the effective Lagrangian that is then used to find the thermodynamic potential of the system. We compare the plots of the parallel and perpendicular pressures versus the magnetic field in the strong field region considering the LL-dependent AMM, the Schwinger AMM, and no AMM at all. The results clearly show a separation between the physical magnitudes found using the Schwinger AMM and the LL-dependent AMM. This is an indication of the inconsistency of considering the Schwinger AMM beyond the weak fiel...

  9. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the radiative potential method [V. V. Flambaum and J. S. M. Ginges, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052115 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.052115], which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms and ions over the range 10 ≤Z ≤120 , where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s , p , and d waves over the series of alkali-metal atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s -wave shifts. It is shown that taking into account many-body effects is essential for an accurate description of the Lamb shift.

  10. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    CERN Document Server

    Ginges, J S M

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the Flambaum-Ginges radiative potential method which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms, ions, and molecules over the range 10<=Z<=120, where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s, p, and d waves over the series of alkali atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s-wave shifts. It is shown th...

  11. Supernova equations of state including full nuclear ensemble with in-medium effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse supernova simulations. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set for nucleons, the quantum approach for d, t, h and α as well as the liquid drop model for the other nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the model of the light nuclei other than d, t, h and α based on the quasi-particle description. Furthermore, we modify the model so that the temperature dependences of surface and shell energies of heavy nuclei could be taken into account. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei and the Pauli- and self-energy shifts for d, t, h and α are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that nuclear composition is considerably affected by the modifications in this work, whereas thermodynamical quantities are not changed much. In particular, the washout of shell effect has a great impact on the mass distribution above T ∼ 1 MeV. This improvement may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores.

  12. QED effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of the noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, J.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present calculations on the quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of noble gases from Ne to Rn as perturbations on relativistic four-component Dirac-Fock wavefunctions. The most dominant effect originates from the self-energy of the core-electron that yields corrections of similar order as the transverse interaction. For 1s ionization potentials, a match within few eV against the known experimental values is obtained, and our work reveals considerable QED effects in the photoelectron binding energies across the periodic table—most strikingly even for Ne. We perform power-law fits for the corrections as a function of Z and interpolate the QED correction of ˜-0.55 eV for S1s. Due to this, the K-edge electron spectra of the third row and below need QED for a match in the absolute energy when using state-of-the-art instrumentation.

  13. Fermi Surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4}: Spin-Orbit and Anisotropic Coulomb Interaction Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva

    2016-03-11

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4} is well described by local-density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction alone worsens or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to account for the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and the isotropic Coulomb term in determining the Fermi surface shape. Its effects are likely sizable in other correlated multiorbital systems. In addition, we find that the low-energy self-energy matrix-responsible for the reshaping of the Fermi surface-sizably differs from the static Hartree-Fock limit. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement; this supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr_{2}RuO_{4}.

  14. QED radiative corrections and many-body effects in atoms: the Uehling potential and shifts in alkali metals

    CERN Document Server

    Ginges, J S M

    2015-01-01

    We consider the largest (Uehling) contribution to the one-loop vacuum polarization correction to the binding energies in neutral alkali atoms, from Na through to the superheavy element E119. We use the relativistic Hartree-Fock method to demonstrate the importance of core relaxation effects. These effects are sizeable everywhere, though particularly important for orbitals with angular momentum quantum number l > 0. For d waves, the Uehling shift is enhanced by many orders of magnitude: for Cs the enhancement is more than four orders of magnitude and for the lighter alkali atoms it is even larger. We also study the effects of second- and higher-order many-body perturbation theory on the valence level shifts through inclusion of the correlation potential. The many-body enhancement mechanisms that operate in the case of the Uehling potential apply also to the case of the larger QED self-energy radiative corrections. The huge enhancement for d level shifts makes high-precision studies of transition frequencies in...

  15. Quantum Effects in Plasma Dielectric Response: Plasmons and Shielding in Normal Systems and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    A brief review of quantum plasma theory and phenomenology in solid-state plasmas is presented here, with attention to dynamic and nonlocal features of dielectric response. Focussing on the random-phase approximation, we discuss the RPA screening and dielectric functions in three, two, and one dimensions corresponding to bulk, quantum well, and quantum wire plasmas, respectively, taking care to distinguish quantum effects from classical ones mandated by the correspondence principle. In particular, we exhibit plasmon dispersion, damping, and static shielding in these various dimensionalities. We also review Landau-quantized magnetoplasma phenomenology, with emphasis on de Haas-van Alphen oscillatory features in intermediate strength magnetic fields and the quantum strong field limit in which only the lowest Landau eigenstate is populated. Graphene is an exceptionally device-friendly material, with a massless relativistic Dirac energy spectrum for electrons and holes. We exhibit its RPA dynamic, nonlocal dielectric function in detail, discussing Graphene plasmons and electromagnetic modes in the THz range, self-energy, fast particle energy loss spectroscopy, atom/van der Waals interaction, and static shielding of impurity scatterers limiting dc transport in Graphene.

  16. Dynamical generation of hadronic resonances in effective models with derivative interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolkanowski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Light scalar mesons can be understood as dynamically generated resonances. They arise as 'companion poles' in the propagators of quark-antiquark seed states when accounting for hadronic loop contributions to the self-energies of the latter. Such a mechanism may explain the overpopulation in the scalar sector - there exist more resonances with total spin $J=0$ than can be described within a quark model. Along this line, we study an effective Lagrangian approach where the isovector state $a_{0}(1450)$ couples via both non-derivative and derivative interactions to pseudoscalar mesons. It is demonstrated that the propagator has two poles: a companion pole corresponding to $a_{0}(980)$ and a pole of the seed state $a_{0}(1450)$. The positions of these poles are in quantitative agreement with experimental data. Besides that, we investigate similar models for the isodoublet state $K_{0}^{\\ast}(1430)$ by performing a fit to $\\pi K$ phase shift data in the $I=1/2,$ $J=0$ channel. We show that, in order to fit the data...

  17. Transversality of gluon mass generation through an effective loop expansion in covariant and background field gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, F A

    2016-01-01

    Gluon mass generation is investigated for 4-dimensional $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills in conventional covariant and in background field gauges within an effective description that, through a parameterization, can be regarded as a massive gluon model, or as a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-like expansion around a massive leading order while preserving the Yang-Mills Lagrangian. We employ a renormalization scheme that introduces the ratio of the gluon mass parameter $m$ to the saturation value of the gluon propagator. This, along with the mass $m(\\mu)$ and the strong coupling $\\alpha_s(\\mu)$, provided the fit parameters for comparison with $SU(3)$ lattice results renormalized at the scale $\\mu$. We obtain two types of solutions with satisfactory fits. Within the proposed expansion, we show that it is possible to obtain an exactly vanishing longitudinal self-energy for any gauge parameter $\\xi$ in the background field case. However, such a result in conventional covariant gauges is unattainable by the given expansion as it is, indicat...

  18. Effect of Holstein phonons on the optical conductivity of gapped graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Jahanbani, Kh.; Asgari, Reza

    2009-01-01

    We study the optical conductivity of a doped graphene when a sublattice symmetry breaking is occurred in the presence of the electron-phonon interaction. Our study is based on the Kubo formula that is established upon the retarded self-energy. We report new features of both the real and imaginary parts of the quasiparticle self-energy in the presence of a gap opening. We find an analytical expression for the renormalized Fermi velocity of massive Dirac Fermions over broad ranges of electron d...

  19. Bipartite bosonic modes and magnetic memory effects in superconducting Sr4V2O6Fe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jhinhwan; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jang, Won-Jun; Ok, Jong Mok; Choi, Hyun Woo; Jung, Jin Oh; Son, Dong Hyun; Suh, Hwan Soo; Semertzidis, Yannis; Kim, Jun Sung

    Using a homemade variable temperature high field spin-polarized STM, we have performed spectroscopic-imaging STM measurement on the parent-state superconductor Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 with each unit cell composed of superconducting FeAs layer sandwiched by two nearly Mott-insulating Sr2VO3 layers. The hybridization between the localized V electrons and the itinerant Fe electrons causes electron transfer to the FeAs bands and generates a Gamma-centered electron pocket, as well as a Fano resonance at -18 meV with signature of Fano lattice. In the QPI measurement, we observed two distinct bosonic modes, i.e. the kinks and the partial replicas of the QPI dispersion with characteristic mode energies around 14 meV and 20 meV respectively, which agree with the self-energies due to two distinct electron-boson mode coupling functions in Migdal approximation. In spin-polarized STM mode, we observed atomic scale magnetic memory effect of the V atoms controlled with low energy (around 50 meV) spin-polarized tunneling current and used it to reveal underlying magnetic domains in the FeAs layer. Variable temperature spin-polarized STM measurements on some known antiferromagnetic materials will also be presented and discussed.

  20. Coulomb correlation effects and density dependence of radiative recombination rates in polar AlGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Bertazzi, Francesco; Garrett, Gregory; Wraback, Michael

    2013-03-01

    AlGaN narrow quantum wells are important elements of deep-ultraviolet light emitting devices. The electron-hole radiative recombination rates are important characteristics of these nanostructures. In this work we evaluated their dependence on carrier density and lattice temperature and compared our theoretical results with the experimentally determined radiative lifetimes in the c-plane grown AlGaN quantum wells. The bands were determined in the k .p approximation for a strained c-plane wurtzite quantum well and polarization fields were included in the model. In order to account for Coulomb correlations at relatively high densities of photo-excited electron-hole plasma and arbitrary temperature, we employed real-time Green's function formalism with self-energies evaluated in the self-consistent T-matrix approximation. The luminescence spectrum was obtained from the susceptibility by summing over scattering in-plane directions and polarization states. The recombination coefficient was obtained from the integrated photo-luminescence. The density dependence of the radiative recombination rate shows effects of strong screening of the polarization electric field at high photo-excitation density.

  1. Correlation effects of π electrons on the band structures of conjugated polymers using the self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-14

    Many-body perturbation theory is used to investigate the effect of π-electron correlations on the quasi-particle band structures of conjugated polymers at the level of the Pariser-Parr-Pople model. The self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections to both the self-energy and the polarization in Hedin's equations is employed in order to eliminate self-interaction errors and include the effects of electron-hole attraction in screening processes. The dynamic inverse dielectric function is constructed from the generalized plasmon-pole approximation with the static dressed polarization given by the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equation. The bandgaps of trans-polyacetylene, trans-polyphenylenevinylene and poly(para)phenylene are calculated by both the Hartree-Fock and GW approximation, and a lowering of bandgaps due to electron correlations is found. We conclude that both dielectric screening and vertex corrections are important for calculating the quasi-particle bandgaps of conjugated polymers.

  2. Pseudogap in cuprates driven by d-wave flux-phase order proximity effects: a theoretical analysis from Raman and ARPES experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Andrés; Bejas, Matías

    2014-12-01

    One of the puzzling characteristics of the pseudogap phase of high-Tc cuprates is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. While the nodal quasiparticles have a Fermi liquid behaviour, the antinodal ones show non-Fermi liquid features and an associated pseudogap. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and electronic Raman scattering are two valuable tools which have shown universal features which are rather material-independent, and presumably intrinsic to the pseudogap phase. The doping and temperature dependence of the Fermi arcs and the pseudogap observed by photoemission near the antinode correlates with the non-Fermi liquid behaviour observed by Raman for the B1g mode. In contrast, and similar to the nodal quasiparticles detected by photoemission, the Raman B2g mode shows Fermi liquid features. We show that these two experiments can be analysed, in the context of the t-J model, by self-energy effects in the proximity to a d-wave flux-phase order instability. This approach supports a crossover origin for the pseudogap, and a scenario of two competing phases. The B2g mode shows, in an underdoped case, a depletion at intermediate energy which has attracted renewed interest. We study this depletion and discuss its origin and relation with the pseudogap.

  3. Correlation effects and spin-orbit interaction in Sr{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}: LDA+DMFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, Evgeny; Zhang, Guoren; Pavarini, Eva [IAS-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The layered ruthenates of the Ruddlesden-Popper family Sr{sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} are interesting examples of strongly correlated transition metal compounds. Due to competing kinetic and Coulomb energies, that are of the same order for Ru 4d electrons, these compounds have very rich phase diagram, including Mott-insulator, ferro- and meta-magnetic phases. Among layered ruthenates the bilayered compound Sr{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} is particularly interesting. It is known to be a paramagnetic metal close to ferro-magnetism and exhibits a metamagnetic behavior in external magnetic field. By using the LDA+DMFT (local-density approximation + dynamical mean-field theory) approach, we study magnetic properties and electron mass renormalization due to correlation effects. In our LDA+DMFT scheme we use maximally-localized Wannier orbitals obtained from Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (LAPW) calculations to build a low-energy Hubbard model for the Ru d bands; we use the weak-coupling CT-quantum Monte Carlo method to solve the quantum impurity problem. We take into account the full rotationally-invariant Coulomb interaction, as well as full on-site self-energy matrix in orbital space with spin-orbit coupling.

  4. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  5. QED effects in the pseudoscalar meson sector

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, R; Perlt, H; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Stokes, R; Stüben, H; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M

    2015-01-01

    We present results on the pseudoscalar meson masses from a fully dynamical simulation of QCD+QED. We concentrate particularly on violations of isospin symmetry. We calculate the $\\pi^+$-$\\pi^0$ splitting and also look at other isospin violating mass differences. We have presented results for these isospin splittings in arXiv:1508.06401 [hep-lat]. In this paper we give more details of the techniques employed, discussing in particular the question of how much of the symmetry violation is due to QCD, arising from the different masses of the $u$ and $d$ quarks, and how much is due to QED, arising from the different charges of the quarks. This decomposition is not unique, it depends on the renormalisation scheme and scale. We suggest a renormalisation scheme in which Dashen's theorem for neutral mesons holds, so that the electromagnetic self-energies of the neutral mesons are zero, and discuss how the self-energies change when we transform to a scheme such as $\\overline{MS}$, in which Dashen's theorem for neutral ...

  6. Total and self-energies beyond LDA and GGA: exact-exchange, GW and MP2 united by numeric atom-centered orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Andrea; Ren, Xinguo; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Blum, Volker; Reuter, Karsten; Scheffler, Matthias [Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Rinke, Patrick [Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (Germany); University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Well known deficiencies of present-day exchange-correlation functionals in density-functional theory (DFT) comprise the spurious self-interaction, the absence of non-local correlation (van der Waals, image interactions), and the absence of the derivative discontinuity with respect to changes in the electron number. We present a unified framework to overcome these deficiencies by many-body perturbation theory in the bare (Hartree-Fock,MP2) and the screened Coulomb interaction (Hedin's GW approximation). Using numeric atomic-centered orbitals as basis sets, the efficiency of our formulation relies on the representation of intermediate quantities like the polarizability, and bare and screened Coulomb potentials by a second, auxiliary set of atom-centered basis functions. For an extended set of finite systems spanning individual atoms, small molecules (water dimer, methane, silane, benzene), metal clusters (Na{sub n}), and biomolecules (alanine) we demonstrate that our implementation in the new DFT code FHI-aims is significantly more efficient than existing formulations based on traditional plane wave or Gaussian basis sets.

  7. Numerical study of the effect of disorder and magnetic field on the quantum transport of two-dimensional nanostructures modeled by tight-binding approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Taghizdehsiskht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In recent years, semiconductor nanostructures have become the model systems of choice for investigation of electrical conduction on short length scales. Quantum transport is studied in a two dimensional electron gas because of the combination of a large Fermi wavelength and large mean free path. In the present work, a numerical method is implemented in order to contribute to the understanding of quantum transport in narrow channels in different conditions of disorder and magnetic fields. We have used an approach that has proved to be very useful in describing mesoscopic transport. We have assumed zero temperature and phase coherent transport. By using the trick that a conductor connected to infinite leads can be replaced by a finite conductor with the effect of the leads incorporated through a 'self-energy' function, a convenient method was provided for evaluating the Green's function of the whole device numerically. Then, Fisher-Lee relations was used for calculating the transmission coefficients through coherent mesoscopic conductors. Our calculations were done in a model system with Hard-wall boundary conditions in the transverse direction, and the Anderson model of disorder was used in disordered samples. We have presented the results of quantum transport for different strengths of disorder and introduced magnetic fields. Our results confirmed the Landauer formalism for calculation of electronic transport. We observed that weak localization effect can be removed by application of a weak perpendicular magnetic field. Finally, we numerically showed the transition to the integral quantum Hall effect regime through the suppression of backscattering on a disordered model system by calculating the two­ terminal conductance of a quasi-one-dimensional quantum conductor as a strong magnetic field is applied. Our results showed that this regime is entered when there is a negligible overlap between electron edge states localized at opposite sides of

  8. Optically induced effective mass renormalization: the case of graphite image potential states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, M.; Pagliara, S.; Galimberti, G.; Dal Conte, S.; Ferrini, G.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-10-01

    Many-body interactions with the underlying bulk electrons determine the properties of confined electronic states at the surface of a metal. Using momentum resolved nonlinear photoelectron spectroscopy we show that one can tailor these many-body interactions in graphite, leading to a strong renormalization of the dispersion and linewidth of the image potential state. These observations are interpreted in terms of a basic self-energy model, and may be considered as exemplary for optically induced many-body interactions.

  9. Optically induced effective mass renormalization: the case of graphite image potential states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, M; Pagliara, S; Galimberti, G; Dal Conte, S; Ferrini, G; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Parmigiani, F

    2016-10-14

    Many-body interactions with the underlying bulk electrons determine the properties of confined electronic states at the surface of a metal. Using momentum resolved nonlinear photoelectron spectroscopy we show that one can tailor these many-body interactions in graphite, leading to a strong renormalization of the dispersion and linewidth of the image potential state. These observations are interpreted in terms of a basic self-energy model, and may be considered as exemplary for optically induced many-body interactions.

  10. Anharmonic effects in light scattering due to optical phonons in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkanski, M.; Wallis, R. F.; Haro, E.

    1983-08-01

    Systematic measurements by light scattering of the linewidth and frequency shift of the q-->=0 optical phonon in silicon over the temperature range of 5-1400 K are presented. Both the linewidth and frequency shift exhibit a quadratic dependence on temperature at high temperatures. This indicates the necessity of including terms in the phonon proper self-energy corresponding to four-phonon anharmonic processes.

  11. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD WHAT ... placebo: a “dummy” medication that should have no effect on the condition. Placebos are not only drugs. ...

  12. Effect of Fermion Velocity on Phase Structure of QED3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Feng, Hong-Tao; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) in thermal QED3 with fermion velocity is studied in the framework of Dyson-Schwinger equations. By adopting instantaneous approximation and neglecting the transverse component of gauge boson propagator at finite temperature, we numerically solve the fermion self-energy equation in the rainbow approximation. It is found that both DCSB and fermion chiral condensate are suppressed by fermion velocity. Moreover, the critical temperature decreases as fermion velocity increases. Supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11535005 and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province under Grant No. BK20130387

  13. Doping dependence of correlation effects in K1 - x Fe2 - y Se2 superconductors: LDA' + DMFT investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasov, I. A.; Pavlov, N. S.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed LDA' + DMFT investigation of the doping dependence of correlation effects in the novel K1 - x Fe2 - y Se2 superconductor. Calculations are performed at four different hole doping levels, starting from a hypothetical stoichiometric composition with the total number of electrons equal to 29 per unit cell through 28 and 27.2 electrons toward the case of 26.52, which corresponds to the chemical composition K0.76Fe1.72Se2 studied in recent ARPES experiments. In the general case, the increase in hole doping leads to quasiparticle bands in a wide energy window ±2 eV around the Fermi level becoming more broadened by lifetime effects, while correlation-induced compression of Fe-3 d LDA' bandwidths stays almost the same, of the order of 1.3 for all hole concentrations. However, close to the Fermi level, the situation is more complicated. In the energy interval from -1.0 eV to 0.4 eV, the bare Fe-3 d LDA' bands are compressed by significantly larger renormalization factors up to 5 with increased hole doping, while the value of Coulomb interaction remains the same. This fact manifests the increase in correlation effects with hole doping in the K1 - x Fe2 - y Se2 system. Moreover, in contrast to typical pnictides, K1 - x Fe2 - y Se2 does not have well-defined quasiparticle bands on the Fermi levels, but has a "pseudogap"-like dark region instead. We also find that with the growth of hole doping, Fe-3 d orbitals of various symmetries are affected by correlations differently in different parts of the Brillouin zone. To illustrate this, we determine the quasiparticle mass renormalization factors and energy shifts that transform the bare Fe-3 d LDA' bands of various symmetries into LDA' + DMFT quasiparticle bands. These renormalization factors effectively mimic more complicated energy-dependent self-energy effects and can be used to analyze the available ARPES data.

  14. Effect of a buried ion pair in the hydrophobic core of a protein: An insight from constant pH molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup K

    2015-03-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) is a commonly used sampling method, which incorporates the coupling of conformational flexibility and protonation state of a protein during the simulation by using pH as an external parameter. The effects on the structure and stability of a hyperstable variant of staphylococcal nuclease (Δ+PHS) protein of an artificial charge pair buried in its hydrophobic core are investigated by applying both CpHMD and accelerated molecular dynamics coupled with constant pH (CpHaMD) methods. Generalized Born electrostatics is used to model the solvent water. Two sets of starting coordinates of V23E/L36K variant of Δ+PHS, namely, Maestro generated coordinates from Δ+PHS and crystal structure coordinates of the same are considered for detail investigations. On the basis of root mean square displacement (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) calculations, it is observed that this variant is stable over a wide range of pH. The calculated pKa values for aspartate and glutamate residues based on both CpHMD and CpHaMD simulations are consistent with the reported experimental values (within ± 0.5 to ± 1.5 pH unit), which clearly indicates that the local chemical environment of the carboxylic acids in V23E/L36K variant are comparable to the parent form. The strong salt bridge interaction between the mutated pair, E23/K36 and additional hydrogen bonds formed in the V23E/L36K variant, may help to compensate for the unfavorable self-energy experienced by the burial of these residues in the hydrophobic core. However, from RMSD, RMSF, and pKa analysis, no significant change in the global conformation of V23E/L36K variant with respect to the parent form, Δ+PHS is noticed.

  15. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  16. "Further Effects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  17. The phonon buckling mode in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} measured by inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichle, Markus; Bakr, Mohammed; Hinkov, Vladimir; Ulrich, Clemens; Broell, Markus; Lin, Chengtian; Keimer, Bernhard [MPI fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Reznik, Dmitry; Lamago, Daniel; Bourges, Philippe; Sidis, Yvan [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, Paris (France); Hradil, Klaudia [Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Cuk et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 117003 (2004)] and Devereaux et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 117004 (2004)] relate the antinoidal kink in ARPES measurements with the B1g phonon buckling mode. However, this assumption is controversial as this kink has also been related to the magnetic resonance mode by Kaminski et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 1070 (2001)] and Kim et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 167002 (2003)]. Until now inelastic neutron scattering measurements on this phonon mode on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} by Reznik et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2396 (1995)] has only been done on twinned samples for x=1. Here we present high resolution neutron measurements on the buckling mode on YBCO for x=0.6 and x=1.0. These measurements performed at Puma and 1T1 at Saclay have been made on fully detwinned samples. Thus we could show that this phonon mode performes an anisotropic superconductivity-induced interaction with a neighboring phonon mode. Hence these measurements enrich the experimental evidence for superconductivity induced phonon effects in high temperature superconductors.

  18. Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Policy Partners Climate Effects on Health Air Pollution Allergens Wildfires Temperature Extremes Precipitation Extremes Diseases Carried by Vectors Food and Waterborne Diarrheal Disease Food Security Mental Health and Stress-Related Disorders Climate-Ready States and ...

  19. Effects of

    OpenAIRE

    Gowthaman, S.; A. P. Sathiyagnanam

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of both inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure on performance and emission behaviour of homogeneous charge compression ignition engine (HCCI) fuelled with diesel fuel. In this investigation, HCCI engine operates with different inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure, and analysis the effect of these variables on HCCI engine performance and emissions. The inlet air temperatures are varied between 40 °C and 70 °C and the injection pressure ...

  20. Facebook Effect

    OpenAIRE

    STOICA, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    This research paper is intended to understand the effects that Facebook, the social networking site has upon us, whether it influences our lives in a good or in a bad way. In order to understand the Facebook Effect we are trying to see how it impacts our lives at economic level,social level, political level, terminology level , psychological level and cultural level . Starting from the question : What does Facebook want? we found several answers consisting in pros and cons of this phenomenon ...

  1. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  2. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  3. Monday effect

    OpenAIRE

    Vicent Almela, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Treball final de Grau en Economia. Codi: EC1049. Curs acadèmic 2013-2014 Monday effect consists of fuel price falling between Monday and Sunday, followed by price increases during the following days. It is coincidentally on Monday when the European Commission collects fuel prices data to be able to elaborate statistics. In this essay we have firstly studied which has been the recent evolution of the Monday effect in our country. After that we have analysed the magnitude and the...

  4. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  5. Doping dependence of correlation effects in K{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2−y}Se{sub 2} superconductors: LDA’ + DMFT investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekrasov, I. A.; Pavlov, N. S., E-mail: pavlov@iep.uran.ru; Sadovskii, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Electrophysics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    We present a detailed LDA’ + DMFT investigation of the doping dependence of correlation effects in the novel K{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2−y}Se{sub 2} superconductor. Calculations are performed at four different hole doping levels, starting from a hypothetical stoichiometric composition with the total number of electrons equal to 29 per unit cell through 28 and 27.2 electrons toward the case of 26.52, which corresponds to the chemical composition K{sub 0.76}Fe{sub 1.72}Se{sub 2} studied in recent ARPES experiments. In the general case, the increase in hole doping leads to quasiparticle bands in a wide energy window ±2 eV around the Fermi level becoming more broadened by lifetime effects, while correlation-induced compression of Fe-3d LDA’ bandwidths stays almost the same, of the order of 1.3 for all hole concentrations. However, close to the Fermi level, the situation is more complicated. In the energy interval from −1.0 eV to 0.4 eV, the bare Fe-3d LDA’ bands are compressed by significantly larger renormalization factors up to 5 with increased hole doping, while the value of Coulomb interaction remains the same. This fact manifests the increase in correlation effects with hole doping in the K{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2−y}Se{sub 2} system. Moreover, in contrast to typical pnictides, K{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2−y}Se{sub 2} does not have well-defined quasiparticle bands on the Fermi levels, but has a “pseudogap”-like dark region instead. We also find that with the growth of hole doping, Fe-3d orbitals of various symmetries are affected by correlations differently in different parts of the Brillouin zone. To illustrate this, we determine the quasiparticle mass renormalization factors and energy shifts that transform the bare Fe-3d LDA’ bands of various symmetries into LDA’ + DMFT quasiparticle bands. These renormalization factors effectively mimic more complicated energy-dependent self-energy effects and can be used to analyze the available ARPES data.

  6. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.;

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy...

  7. and Effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes and Effects. Viljoen 1/W, PhD, Panzer/l, MBChB, PhD. Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Faculty .... transducer, while a type II IL-1 receptor ... and indirectly cause all symptoms of .... e.g. the fear motivational state may take.

  8. Tectonomagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the actual stress within the Earth and its changes with time are very difficult. It is much easier to monitor the direct effects of this stress, such as ground strain, or the indirect effects, such as changes in resistivity, strain, changes in seismic velocity or changes in magnetic field, and so forth. The latter technique is one of the more promising methods for monitoring substantial volumes of the Earth's crust near active faults with only a few instruments. It derives from the piezomagnetic properties of rocks (that is, the change in rock magnetization and, therefore, local magnetic field due to a change in applied stress). AS stress and strain fields along active faults vary, these variations should be reflected in changing local magnetic fields. In particular, rapidly changing fields might be expected to occur just before a large earthquake.

  9. Health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, L

    1998-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of health effects at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study; (4) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (5) to assess the genetic risks of material exposure to ionizing radiation; (6) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (7) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas for 1997 are reported.

  10. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  11. AFTER EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    创建物体动画最快速的方法是使用运动捕捉,这是一种以真实世界物体为动画而提供的运动。现在打开光盘After Effects Shortcut文件夹中的文件,依照我们循序渐进的技巧教程来学习如何使用这种方法。

  12. Effects of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gowthaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of both inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure on performance and emission behaviour of homogeneous charge compression ignition engine (HCCI fuelled with diesel fuel. In this investigation, HCCI engine operates with different inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure, and analysis the effect of these variables on HCCI engine performance and emissions. The inlet air temperatures are varied between 40 °C and 70 °C and the injection pressure in the port fuel injector is varied from 3 bar to 5 bar respectively. From the results, the optimum inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure for efficient HCCI engine operation are identified. The result shows that, brake thermal efficiency of HCCI is nearer to the value of conventional diesel engine, and can be obtained if HCCI engine operates with 5 bar injection pressure and 60 °C air temperature and a simultaneous reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx and smoke emissions compared to conventional diesel engine. However, when inlet air is heated for improvement of vaporisation of diesel fuel, the higher inlet air temperature limits the operation range of HCCI engine, due to high knocking intensity, high NOx emissions and misfire of charge. The fuel injection pressure is also limited due to high level of HC and NOx emissions.

  13. Effective Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Keinan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article defines a new term, Effective Area, K, of a given territory as a function of four independent parameters: its nominal acreage, A, the intellectual competence of its inhabitants, B, their social competence, C, and their global influence, D, using a simple formalism: K = A x B x C x D. This analysis demonstrates that in our current world any consideration of the physical area of a given territory is meaningless if the quality of its population is ignored. K is a much more useful parameter than A, certainly for political and economical considerations, explaining why claims for territorial expansion are placed low on the national ladder of priorities in the developed countries. In many respects, large geographical areas may become a burden rather than an advantage. Thus, the importance of armed conflicts over geographical territories, which have taken a dominant part of the entire human history, is fading away. Furthermore, although the global acreage is constant, the total effective area of planet Earth keeps growing, providing sufficient room for the growing human population.

  14. Effective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. King Miller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the educational strategies that can be used to support female students of African descent in their persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM education and careers. STEM careers have historically been White male and White female dominated, which has yielded an underrepresentation of those of African descent. Drawing from a grounded qualitative case study, the data used for this article share the responses of Afro-Caribbean females in STEM who have immigrated to the United States from the country of Panama. As Latinas, they are representative of the changing face in the American educational system—bilingual, multicultural, and of African descent. The strategies offered reflect their own teaching practices, their former teachers, or experiences with their children’s teachers. What emerged were descriptions of four strategies and behaviors of effective teachers that align with Ladson-Billings’s culturally relevant pedagogy and Gay’s culturally responsive teaching. Included in the findings are the high standards and expectations embodied by effective teachers that serve to positively inspire their students. Culturally responsive teachers create an atmosphere of learning that supports academic success, conveying their belief in their students’ ability based upon their own reflectivity. As the U.S. educational system continues to become multilingual and multicultural, there is need for strategies for the successful inclusion and progression of students in STEM educational pathways and careers. This will occur as teachers challenge themselves to be the agents of change in the lives of their students.

  15. Chiral pions in a magnetic background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, G., E-mail: colucci@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, J.W. Goethe-University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fraga, E.S., E-mail: fraga@if.ufrj.br [Institute for Theoretical Physics, J.W. Goethe-University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21945-970 (Brazil); Sedrakian, A., E-mail: sedrakian@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, J.W. Goethe-University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    We investigate the modification of the pion self-energy at finite temperature due to its interaction with a low-density, isospin-symmetric nuclear medium embedded in a constant magnetic background. To one loop, for fixed temperature and density, we find that the pion effective mass increases with the magnetic field. For the π{sup −}, interestingly, this happens solely due to the trivial Landau quantization shift ∼|eB|, since the real part of the self-energy is negative in this case. In a scenario in which other charged particle species are present and undergo an analogous trivial shift, the relevant behavior of the effective mass might be determined essentially by the real part of the self-energy. In this case, we find that the pion mass decreases by ∼10% for a magnetic field |eB|∼m{sub π}{sup 2}, which favors pion condensation at high density and low temperatures.

  16. Chiral pions in a magnetic background

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, Giuseppe; Sedrakian, Armen

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the modification of the pion self-energy at finite temperature due to its interaction with a low-density, isospin-symmetric nuclear medium embedded in a constant magnetic background. To one loop, for fixed temperature and density, we find that the pion effective mass increases with the magnetic field. For the $\\pi^{-}$, interestingly, this happens solely due to the trivial Landau quantization shift $\\sim |eB|$, since the real part of the self-energy is negative in this case. In a scenario in which other charged particle species are present and undergo an analogous trivial shift, the relevant behavior of the effective mass might be determined essentially by the real part of the self-energy. In this case, we find that the pion mass decreases by $\\sim 10%$ for a magnetic field $|eB|\\sim m_\\pi^2$, which favors pion condensation at high density and low temperatures.

  17. Chiral pions in a magnetic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, G.; Fraga, E. S.; Sedrakian, A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the modification of the pion self-energy at finite temperature due to its interaction with a low-density, isospin-symmetric nuclear medium embedded in a constant magnetic background. To one loop, for fixed temperature and density, we find that the pion effective mass increases with the magnetic field. For the π-, interestingly, this happens solely due to the trivial Landau quantization shift ∼|eB|, since the real part of the self-energy is negative in this case. In a scenario in which other charged particle species are present and undergo an analogous trivial shift, the relevant behavior of the effective mass might be determined essentially by the real part of the self-energy. In this case, we find that the pion mass decreases by ∼10% for a magnetic field |eB|∼mπ2, which favors pion condensation at high density and low temperatures.

  18. Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck model with accurate Coulomb correlation in variable media

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Pei; Xu, Zhenli

    2016-01-01

    We derive a set of modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations for ion transport from the variation of the free energy functional which includes the many-body Coulomb correlation in media of variable dielectric coefficient. The correlation effects are considered through the Debye charging process in which the self energy of an ion is governed by the generalized Debye-H\\"uckel equation. We develop the asymptotic expansions of the self energy taking the ion radius as the small parameter such that the multiscale model can be solved efficiently by numerical methods. We show that the variations of the energy functional give the self-energy-modified PNP equations which satisfy a proper energy law. We present the numerical results from different asymptotic expansions with a semi-implicit conservative numerical method and investigate the effect of the Coulomb correlation.

  19. Three-generation neutrino oscillations in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hao; Li, Xue-Qian

    2016-10-01

    Three-generation MSW effect in curved spacetime is studied and a brief discussion on the gravitational correction to the neutrino self-energy is given. The modified mixing parameters and corresponding conversion probabilities of neutrinos after traveling through celestial objects of constant densities are obtained. The method to distinguish between the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy is discussed in this framework. Due to the gravitational redshift of energy, in some extreme situations, the resonance energy of neutrinos might be shifted noticeably and the gravitational effect on the self-energy of neutrino becomes significant at the vicinities of spacetime singularities.

  20. Three-generation neutrino oscillations in curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Three-generation MSW effect in curved spacetime is studied and a brief discussion on the gravitational correction to the neutrino self-energy is given. The modified mixing parameters and corresponding conversion probabilities of neutrinos after traveling through celestial objects of constant densities are obtained. The method to distinguish between the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy is discussed in this framework. Due to the gravitational redshift of energy, in some extreme situations, the resonance energy of neutrinos might be shifted noticeably and the gravitational effect on the self-energy of neutrino becomes significant at the vicinities of spacetime singularities.

  1. Three-generation neutrino oscillations in curved spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-generation MSW effect in curved spacetime is studied and a brief discussion on the gravitational correction to the neutrino self-energy is given. The modified mixing parameters and corresponding conversion probabilities of neutrinos after traveling through celestial objects of constant densities are obtained. The method to distinguish between the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy is discussed in this framework. Due to the gravitational redshift of energy, in some extreme situations, the resonance energy of neutrinos might be shifted noticeably and the gravitational effect on the self-energy of neutrino becomes significant at the vicinities of spacetime singularities.

  2. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  3. Transport and Magnetism in Mesoscopic Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fauchère, A L

    1999-01-01

    Superconductivity, discovered by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, continues to be a fascinating subject of condensed matter physics today. Much interest has been devoted to the study of the superconductivity induced in a metal which by itself is not superconducting but is in electrical contact with a superconductor. As the carriers of superconductivity, the Cooper pairs, diffuse across the contact into the metal they remain correlated, although the pairing mechanism is lifted; we call this the proximity effect. The observation of these superconducting correlations has come within the reach of experiments in the last decade. With state-of-the-art fabrication techniques mesoscopic samples have been produced which are small and clean enough for the quantum mechanical coherence of the electrons to be preserved over the sample size. This theoretical thesis focuses on the variety of signatures of single-particle physics that appear in the electrical transport and the magnetic screening properties of these systems. We stud...

  4. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  5. On Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  6. On Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  7. Decomposable Effectivity Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, G.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Decomposable effectivity functions are introduced as an extension of additive effectivity functions. Whereas additive effectivity functions are determined by pairs of additive TU-games, decomposable effectivity functions are generated by pairs of TU-games that need not be additive. It turns out that

  8. Hall effect accompanying a static skin effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkenshtein, N.V.; Marchenkov, V.V.; Startsev, V.E.; Cherepanov, A.N.; Glin' skii, M.

    1985-05-10

    The Hall effect and the magnetoresistance of tungsten single crystals with rho/sub 293K//rho/sub 4.2K/ = 80 000 have been measured at 4.2 K in magnetic fields up to 150 kOe. The results reveal that a static skin effect gives rise to an anomalously pronounced increase in the Hall coefficient.

  9. Experiences with effects specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effects-specification process from a project that was conducted during the fall 2010 and spring of 2011 in this chapter. The project configured and implemented an electronic patient record system at a maternity ward at a hospital located in a European region. The process comprised...... for measuring effects were designed. The project is analyzed and lessons learned are discussed....... workshops with effects specification with management and end-users and an agile development process including prototypes configured from the effects specifications. We describe the project and the effects-specification process through which effects were related to the system design and instruments...

  10. DAFX Digital Audio Effects

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development in various fields of Digital Audio Effects, or DAFX, has led to new algorithms and this second edition of the popular book, DAFX: Digital Audio Effects has been updated throughout to reflect progress in the field. It maintains a unique approach to DAFX with a lecture-style introduction into the basics of effect processing. Each effect description begins with the presentation of the physical and acoustical phenomena, an explanation of the signal processing techniques to achieve the effect, followed by a discussion of musical applications and the control of effect parameter

  11. TREATMENT EFFECTS 101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma J. Mielenz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical therapy researchers are interested in how beneficial an intervention is or the “treatment effect.” There are many measures of treatment effect that are applicable for understanding the efficacy and effectiveness of health interventions. Given that each treatment effect has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, understanding these characteristics can help guide which measure is most appropriate for a specific study. This article presents the more common treatment effects for both dichotomous and continues outcomes. The overall aim is to serve as a guide to newer physical therapy researchers on using and interpreting treatment effects.

  12. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting.

  13. Effective Business Communication requires effective practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨福明

    2011-01-01

    @@ The topic of this essay is that effective businees communication requires effective practices.This essay will focus on communication practices that can assist an organi- zation in reaching its strategic goals and objectives.This article will present this topic by analyzing the communication theory, writing process and business writing style, team building and interpersonal communication, negotiation and persuasion tech- niques and intercultural communication.

  14. Memory effects in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  15. Characteristics of Effective Argumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frana, Adrian W.

    1989-01-01

    Examines how the 1988 Presidential Debates provide a resource for effective instruction in public argument. Provides several examples of effective (and ineffective) argumentative speaking taken from the debates. (MM)

  16. Side Effects (Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer care is relieving side effects, called symptom management, palliative care, or supportive care. It is important ... treat them. To learn about the symptoms and management of the long-term side effects of cancer ...

  17. Gravitomagnetic Effect in Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2016-01-01

    Rotating bodies in General Relativity produce frame dragging (or Lense-Thirring effect), also known as the {\\it Gravitomagnetic effect} in analogy with Classical Electromagnetism. In this work, we study the effect of strong magnetic fields in neutron stars on the Gravitomagnetic effect, which is produced as a result of its rotation. We show that the magnetic field has a non-negligible impact on frame dragging. The maximum effect of the magnetic field appears along the polar direction, where the Lense-Thirring frequency decreases with increase in magnetic field, and along the equatorial direction, where its magnitude increases. For intermediate angles, the effect of the magnetic field decreases, and goes through a minimum for a particular angular value at which magnetic field has no effect on Gravitomagnetism. Beyond that particular angle Gravitomagnetic effect increases with increasing magnetic field. We try to identify this "Null Region" for the case of magnetars, both inside and outside, as a function of th...

  18. Multipollutant health effect simulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Resulting betas (health effects) from a variety of copollutant epidemiologic models used to analyze the impact of exposure measurement error on health effect...

  19. Prooxidant effects of nitrofurantoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, O O; Pokrovskii, M V; Konovalenko, A B

    2002-08-01

    We studied the possibility of using prooxidant effects of nitrofurantoin (furadonin) for stimulation of the natural antioxidant systems for preventing myocardial damage after coronary occlusion. A pronounced cardioprotective effect of the drug was observed.

  20. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  1. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  2. Complex-mass renormalization in hadronic EFT: applicability at two-loop order

    CERN Document Server

    Djukanovic, D; Gegelia, J; Krebs, H; Meißner, U -G

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the application of the complex-mass scheme to multi-loop diagrams in hadronic effective field theory by considering as an example a two-loop self-energy diagram. We show that the renormalized two-loop diagram satisfies the power counting.

  3. Complex-mass renormalization in hadronic EFT: Applicability at two-loop order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, D. [University of Mainz, Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Epelbaum, E.; Krebs, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (Germany); Gegelia, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Meissner, U.G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    We discuss the application of the complex-mass scheme to multi-loop diagrams in hadronic effective field theory by considering as an example a two-loop self-energy diagram. We show that the renormalized two-loop diagram satisfies the power counting. (orig.)

  4. Charmed hadrons in nuclear medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, L.; Gamermann, D.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Molina, R.; Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Ramos, A.

    2010-01-01

    We study the properties of charmed hadrons in dense matter within a coupled-channel approach which accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner We analyze the behaviour in this dense environment of dynamically-generated baryonic resonances as well as the op

  5. Pions in the nuclear medium and Drell-Yan scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, AEL; Korpa, CL

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the modification of the pion cloud in the nuclear medium and its effect on the nuclear Drell-Yan process. The pion's in-medium self-energy is calculated in a self-consistent delta-hole model, with particle-hole contributions also included. Both the imaginary and real parts of the pion

  6. Heavy meson production in hot dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; Nieves, JM; Oset, E; Vacas, MJV

    2010-01-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in dense matter are studied using a unitary coupled-channel approach in the nuclear medium which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense nuclear env

  7. Conserving GW scheme for nonequilibrium quantum transport in molecular contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Rubio, Angel

    2008-01-01

    We give a detailed presentation of our recent scheme to include correlation effects in molecular transport calculations using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The scheme is general and can be used with any quasiparticle self-energy, but for practical reasons, we mainly specialize to the so-c...

  8. Heavy mesons in dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; LlanesEstrada, FJ; Pelaez,

    2011-01-01

    Charmed mesons in dense matter are studied within a unitary coupled-channel approach which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense medium, and discuss their implications on hidden c

  9. Effective graph resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Spieksma, F.M.; Mieghem, P. van; Jamakovic, A.; Kooij, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies an interesting graph measure that we call the effective graph resistance. The notion of effective graph resistance is derived from the field of electric circuit analysis where it is defined as the accumulated effective resistance between all pairs of vertices. The objective of the

  10. Photon thermal Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A near-field thermal Hall effect (i.e.Righi-Leduc effect) in lattices of magneto-optical particles placed in a constant magnetic field is predicted. This effect is related to a symetry breaking in the system induced by the magnetic field which gives rise to preferential channels for the heat-transport by photon tunneling thanks to the particles anisotropy tuning.

  11. Magnetic effects in electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEBOJSA D. NIKOLIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of imposed magnetic fields onto the electrodeposition of magnetic (nickel and non – magnetic (copper metals was analysed. Also, magnetic properties of electrochemically obtained nanocontacts were examined. An effort to establish a possible correlation between the morphologies of the nanocontacts and the effect of the very large ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR effect was made.

  12. Binary effectivity rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Peleg, Bezalel

    2006-01-01

    is binary if it is rationalized by an acyclic binary relation. The foregoing result motivates our definition of a binary effectivity rule as the effectivity rule of some binary SCR. A binary SCR is regular if it satisfies unanimity, monotonicity, and independence of infeasible alternatives. A binary...... effectivity rule is regular if it is the effectivity rule of some regular binary SCR. We characterize completely the family of regular binary effectivity rules. Quite surprisingly, intrinsically defined von Neumann-Morgenstern solutions play an important role in this characterization...

  13. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  14. EFFECTIVE DISCHARGE CALCULATION GUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S.BIEDENHARN; C.R.THORNE; P.J.SOAR; R.D.HEY; C.C.WATSON

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for calculating the effective discharge for rivers with alluvial channels.An alluvial river adjusts the bankfull shape and dimensions of its channel to the wide range of flows that mobilize the boundary sediments. It has been shown that time-averaged river morphology is adjusted to the flow that, over a prolonged period, transports most sediment. This is termed the effective discharge.The effective discharge may be calculated provided that the necessary data are available or can be synthesized. The procedure for effective discharge calculation presented here is designed to have general applicability, have the capability to be applied consistently, and represent the effects of physical processes responsible for determining the channel, dimensions. An example of the calculations necessary and applications of the effective discharge concept are presented.

  15. The Hubble effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T.M.; Miao, S.P.; Prokopec, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R.P., E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We generalize the effective potential to scalar field configurations which are proportional to the Hubble parameter of a homogeneous and isotropic background geometry. This may be useful in situations for which curvature effects are significant. We evaluate the one loop contribution to the Hubble Effective Potential for a massless scalar with arbitrary conformal and quartic couplings, on a background for which the deceleration parameter is constant. Among other things, we find that inflationary particle production leads to symmetry restoration at late times.

  16. Effective School Counseling Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Lilley, Stacey Custer

    2007-01-01

    Despite much attention given to effective teams in the workplace, school counseling teams have been neglected in the research. The primary purpose of this mixed methods study was to learn what characteristics secondary counselors perceive contribute to an effective school counseling team. The first research phase conducted six team interviews; themes emerging from the interviews yielded the development of the Effective School Counseling Team Questionnaire (ESCTQ). The following research quest...

  17. Educational effectiveness: Key findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent and advanced studies on educational effectiveness. Section on integrated school effectiveness research is followed by a section on conceptually integrated models. The subsequent two sections focus on more methodological limitations of past research: the failure to accommodate the hierarchical nature of schooling and the inability to capture teacher effects. Finally, the last section sums up all relevant facts and research strands.

  18. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  19. The Atomic Lighthouse Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Máximo, C E; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  20. On the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shnirelman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The term "butterfly effect" means an extreme sensitivity of a dynamical system to small perturbations: "The beating of a butterfly wing in South America can result in the considerable change of positions and force of a tropical cyclon in Atlantic 2 weeks later". Numerical simulations of R.Robert show the absence of the butterfly effect in some simple flows of 2-d ideal incompressible fluid which is a model of the atmosphere. In this work a more complicated flow is considered. Numerical simulation demonstrates the butterfly effect in the strongest form. The effect is robust, and the experiment is 100% reproducible.

  1. Multicaloric effect: An outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2017-05-01

    In 2017 the scientific community celebrates 100 years since Weiss and Piccard made the first observation of a caloric effect in magnetic materials, when studying temperature changes in Nickel subjected to applied magnetic fields near the Curie transition temperature [1]. The effect was called the magneto-caloric effect. A thermodynamic formulation of the adiabatic magneto-caloric refrigeration was given independently by Debye [2] and Giauque [3] in 1920s, followed by the first experimental confirmation of adiabatic refrigeration in 1933 [4]. Since then, the research field has expanded considerably and other interesting caloric effects have been discovered in materials displaying different forms of ferroic order.

  2. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  3. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  4. CCTV Effectiveness Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorthuijsen, G.P. van; Hoof, H.A.J.M. van; Klima, M.; Roubik, K.; Bernas, M.; Pata, P.

    2006-01-01

    The field of CCTV surveillance is topical and widely used in many different applications. The fundamental part of the CCTV system is a reliable image evaluation by a human observer, whose effectiveness is influenced by many variables. Optimization of the effectiveness is a multidimensional problem r

  5. Relative Effects at Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeken, Johan; Mulder, Joris; Wood, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of predictors has been of historical importance in a variety of disciplines including management, medicine, economics, and psychology. When approaching hypotheses on the relative ordering of the magnitude of predicted effects (e.g., the effects of discrimination

  6. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  7. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  8. PLEYOTROPIC EFFECTS OF METFORMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ju. Morgunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, traditionally used for the therapy of diabetes mellitus, possesses a number of diverse pleyotropic effects. The drug, in addition to the glucose-lowering actions, has a beneficial effect on components of the metabolic syndrome, significantly reduces body weight.

  9. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  10. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  11. Network effects in railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Railway operation is often affected by network effects as a change in one part of the network can influence other parts of the network. Network effects occur because the train runs may be quite long and since the railway system has a high degree of interdependencies as trains cannot cross...

  12. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  13. School effectiveness research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, J.; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    School effectiveness research is described as the scientific approach to determine the causal influence of malleable conditions of schooling. The article describes how different strands of school effectiveness have developed and are now increasingly combined into more integrative approaches. The kno

  14. Occlusion effects, Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    The present report studies the mechanism of the occlusion effect by means of literature studies, experiments and model estimates. A mathematical model of the occlusion effect is developed. The model includes the mechanical properties of the earmould and the airborne sound as well as the body...

  15. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  16. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  17. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  19. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  20. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  1. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  2. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    in a questionnaire based on their daily experience with their personal hearing aid. It turned out that 73% of these persons experienced a change in own voice, but both occlusion effects of acoustic, mechanical and biological origin were experienced. The same persons came into Oticon's clinic, where their hearing aid...... fitting and occlusion effect were evaluated. Occlusion effect was measured as the difference in real ear sound pressure level with and without hearing aid while the person was speaking. It was done both with the hearing aid turned off and with the hearing aid turned on. Relations between their experienced...

  4. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  5. Seebeck effect in electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikina, I; Shikin, V; Varlamov, A A

    2012-07-01

    We study Seebeck effect in liquid electrolytes, starting from its simple neutral analog--thermodiffusion (so-called Ludwig-Soret or Soret effect). It is observed that when two or more subsystems of mobile particles are subjected to the temperature gradient, various types of them respond to it differently. In the case when these fractions, with different mobility parameters (Soret coefficients), are oppositely charged (a case typical for electrolytes), the nonhomogeneous internal electric field is generated. The latter field prevents these fractions from space separation and determines the intensity of the appearing Seebeck effect.

  6. Cohomology of Effect Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Roumen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We will define two ways to assign cohomology groups to effect algebras, which occur in the algebraic study of quantum logic. The first way is based on Connes' cyclic cohomology. The resulting cohomology groups are related to the state space of the effect algebra, and can be computed using variations on the Kunneth and Mayer-Vietoris sequences. The second way involves a chain complex of ordered abelian groups, and gives rise to a cohomological characterization of state extensions on effect algebras. This has applications to no-go theorems in quantum foundations, such as Bell's theorem.

  7. Complex Effective Action and Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous pair production from background fields or spacetimes is one of the most prominent phenomena predicted by quantum field theory. The Schwinger mechanism of production of charged pairs by a strong electric field and the Hawking radiation of all species of particles from a black hole are the consequence of nonperturbative quantum effects. In this review article, the vacuum structure and pair production is reviewed in the in-out formalism, which provides a consistent framework for quantum field theory in the sense that the complex action explains not only the vacuum persistence but also pair production. The current technology of intense lasers is still lower by a few order than the Schwinger limit for electron-positron pair production, while magnetic fields of magnetars on the surface are higher than the Schwinger limit and even higher at the core. On the other hand, the zero effective mass of electron and hole in graphene and Dirac or Weyl semimetals will open a window for experimental test of quantum...

  8. Vaccine herd effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  9. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  10. Developing Effective Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-14

    University When Performance Measurement Goes Bad Laziness Vanity Narcissism Too Many Pettiness Inanity 52 Developing Effective...Kasunic, October 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Narcissism Measuring performance from the organization’s point of view, rather than from

  11. The Effective Volunteer Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides information for volunteer teachers of adults and older youth on how to conduct an effective presentation. Topics include focus of presentation, characteristics of the learners, teaching methods, visual aides and evaluations.

  12. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  13. Developing Effective Working Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two workshops are described in detail. One explores ways to increase the effectiveness of work groups and includes the workshop leader's personal observations. The second involves training transformational leaders, whose characteristics include idealized influence, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational…

  14. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it safely and effectively. By Mayo Clinic Staff Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right? Not so fast. Stretching may help you: ...

  15. Vascular Effects of Histamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype ... Keywords: Histamine, Vascular smooth muscle, Endothelium .... responses to histamine, but not those to acetylcholine, were.

  16. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Side Effects of Chemotherapy Each of the chemotherapy drugs available today works in a slightly different ... few rules of thumb when it comes to chemotherapy that should always be kept in mind. Ignore ...

  17. Effects of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  18. Dynamic Treatment Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, James J; Humphries, John Eric; Veramendi, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops robust models for estimating and interpreting treatment effects arising from both ordered and unordered multistage decision problems. Identification is secured through instrumental variables and/or conditional independence (matching) assumptions. We decompose treatment effects into direct effects and continuation values associated with moving to the next stage of a decision problem. Using our framework, we decompose the IV estimator, showing that IV generally does not estimate economically interpretable or policy relevant parameters in prototypical dynamic discrete choice models, unless policy variables are instruments. Continuation values are an empirically important component of estimated total treatment effects of education. We use our analysis to estimate the components of what LATE estimates in a dynamic discrete choice model.

  19. the effects of Garlic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appetite and food selection. ... It is therefore recommended that garlic intake should be regulated to avoid some possible adverse effects ..... particularly reproductive hormones, on the peripheral ... the taste modulatory mechanism of raw garlic.

  20. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  1. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditions The Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for...

  2. Strategies for Effective Outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, Larry; Dillon, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes strategies that can be employed for effective outsourcing in higher education settings. Several models of outsourcing are identified and described, and examples of institutions using each model are provided. (GCP)

  3. The Effects: Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient pollution has diverse and far-reaching effects on the U.S. economy, impacting tourism, property values, commercial fishing, recreational businesses and many other sectors that depend on clean water.

  4. Ultrafast quenching of electron-boson interaction and superconducting gap in a cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wentao; Hwang, Choongyu; Smallwood, Christopher L; Miller, Tristan L; Affeldt, Gregory; Kurashima, Koshi; Jozwiak, Chris; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Tadashi; Koike, Yoji; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy is an emerging technique with great promise in the study of quantum materials, as it makes it possible to track similarities and correlations that are not evident near equilibrium. Thus far, however, the way in which these processes modify the electron self-energy--a fundamental quantity describing many-body interactions in a material--has been little discussed. Here we use time- and angle-resolved photoemission to directly measure the ultrafast response of self-energy to near-infrared photoexcitation in high-temperature cuprate superconductor. Below the critical temperature of the superconductor, ultrafast excitations trigger a synchronous decrease of electron self-energy and superconducting gap, culminating in a saturation in the weakening of electron-boson coupling when the superconducting gap is fully quenched. In contrast, electron-boson coupling is unresponsive to ultrafast excitations above the critical temperature of the superconductor and in the metallic state of a related material. These findings open a new pathway for studying transient self-energy and correlation effects in solids.

  5. 'True' bosonic coupling strength in strongly correlated superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Izumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aiura, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Clarifying the coupling between electrons and bosonic excitations (phonons or magnetic fluctuations) that mediate the formation of Cooper pairs is pivotal to understand superconductivity. Such coupling effects are contained in the electron self-energy, which is experimentally accessible via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). However, in unconventional superconductors, identifying the nature of the electron-boson coupling remains elusive partly because of the significant band renormalization due to electron correlation. Until now, to quantify the electron-boson coupling, the self-energy is most often determined by assuming a phenomenological 'bare' band. Here, we demonstrate that the conventional procedure underestimates the electron-boson coupling depending on the electron-electron coupling, even if the self-energy appears to be self-consistent via the Kramers-Kronig relation. Our refined method explains well the electron-boson and electron-electron coupling strength in ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, calling for a critical revision of the bosonic coupling strength from ARPES self-energy in strongly correlated electron systems.

  6. ‘True’ bosonic coupling strength in strongly correlated superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Izumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aiura, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Clarifying the coupling between electrons and bosonic excitations (phonons or magnetic fluctuations) that mediate the formation of Cooper pairs is pivotal to understand superconductivity. Such coupling effects are contained in the electron self-energy, which is experimentally accessible via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). However, in unconventional superconductors, identifying the nature of the electron-boson coupling remains elusive partly because of the significant band renormalization due to electron correlation. Until now, to quantify the electron-boson coupling, the self-energy is most often determined by assuming a phenomenological ‘bare’ band. Here, we demonstrate that the conventional procedure underestimates the electron-boson coupling depending on the electron-electron coupling, even if the self-energy appears to be self-consistent via the Kramers-Kronig relation. Our refined method explains well the electron-boson and electron-electron coupling strength in ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, calling for a critical revision of the bosonic coupling strength from ARPES self-energy in strongly correlated electron systems. PMID:23722675

  7. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to m...

  8. Performance effect of Lean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    relevant to Denmark, but the approach is empirically more generalizable. We show that the effect of Lean standardized flow production practices on performance is mediated by analytical continuous improvement empowerment practices and by delegation of decision rights practices. Thus, standardized flow...... practices do not have direct effects on performance. Instead, standardized flow provided that foundation for companies to implement continuous improvement, which, in turn, directly affect performance positively. Another cause, in addition to flow practices, of continuous improvement was the delegation...

  9. Pharmacological Effects of Mangiferin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zhi-quan; DENG Jia-gang; YAN Li

    2011-01-01

    Mango leaves have been widely used in the clinical practice for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine.Mangiferin,an effective constituent in the mango leaves,has multiple pharmacological actions involved in some basic pathological processes,such as inflammation,oxidative injury,tumor growth,micro-organism infections,metabolic regulations,and immunological regulations.The pharmacological effects of mangiferin from some published data are reviewed in this article.

  10. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  11. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People's Bank of China,the country's central bank,published an article concerning China's managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank's website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China's macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.

  12. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  13. Extracardiac Effects of Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are one of the most commonly used drugs in the world. Although it plays a valuable role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, it has some extracardiac effects which are frequently ignored by physicians during routine practice. In this review we would like to summarise the potential beneficial or harmful extracardiac effects of statins which comprise a wide spectrum of systems and organs.

  14. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  15. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasaraju Kavalipati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe.

  16. The Vampire Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erfgen, Carsten; Zenker, Sebastian; Sattler, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus that fea......Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus...... that features a celebrity endorser versus the same stimulus with an unknown but equally attractive endorser. Because there is no agreement about whether this overshadowing really exists, this research analyzes the existence of the vampire effect and its moderators in a series of experiments with a total of 4......,970 respondents. The results provide important insights into how to avoid the vampire effect by creating appropriate conditions, such as high endorser–brand congruence or a strong cognitive link between the celebrity and the brand. Surprisingly, brand familiarity does not significantly moderate the effect....

  17. Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David L; Secura, Gina M; Madden, Tessa E; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine women's knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a contraceptive knowledge questionnaire that had been completed by 4144 women who were enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project before they received comprehensive contraceptive counseling and chose their method. For each contraceptive method, women were asked "what percentage would get pregnant in a year: 10%, don't know." Overall, 86% of subjects knew that the annual risk of pregnancy is >10% if no contraception is used. More than 45% of women overestimate the effectiveness of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, pills, the patch, the ring, and condoms. After adjustment for age, education, and contraceptive history, the data showed that women who chose the intrauterine device (adjusted relative risk, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-8.5) or implant (adjusted relative risk, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-7.3) were significantly more likely to identify the effectiveness of their method accurately compared with women who chose either the pill, patch, or ring. This cohort demonstrated significant knowledge gaps regarding contraceptive effectiveness and over-estimated the effectiveness of pills, the patch, the ring, depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, and condoms. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Paramagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We report the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, we generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. Using this technique at low temperatures (<20 K ), we resolve the paramagnetic spin Seebeck effect in the insulating paramagnets Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and DyScO3 (DSO), using either W or Pt as the spin detector layer. By taking advantage of the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of DSO, we eliminate contributions from the Nernst effect in W or Pt, which produces a phenomenologically similar signal.

  19. The Mozart Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R.

    2001-10-01

    This review deals with the Mozart Effect, an improvement of performance while listening to Mozart music. Previous studies have shown improved spatial temporal reasoning and improved IQ test results and neurophysiological changes, mainly increased coherence among different groups of subjects. This review emphasizes the effect on epileptiform patterns, both generalized and focal; provides an example of a chronic effect over a period of 1-2 days; addresses the distinctive aspects of the music to account for this phenomenon and shows that long-term periodicity in the power of the music is a special quality; and deals with the melodic line and shows that Mozart repeats the melodic line much more frequently than other well-known composers. It is likely that the superorganization of the cerebral cortex resonates with great organization found in Mozart music.

  20. The quantum sweeper effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  1. Cosmological memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  2. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tolish, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of $(1 + z)$.

  3. Quantum Hamlet Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Panković, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, by use of a formalism similar to formalism of the quantum Zeno effect (decrease of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (increase of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements), we introduce so-called quantum Hamlet effect. It represents a complete destruction of the quantum predictions on the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurement. Precisely, by means of some especial, correctly defined, frequent measurements, decay probability of an unstable quantum system can behave as a divergent series without any definite value. In this way there is quantum mechanically completely unsolvable ``Hamlet dilemma'', to decay or not to decay.

  4. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  5. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouprianova, I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Ek, D.; Showalter, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE.

  6. Conditional Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) studies the effect of development aid using econometrics on macro data. It contains about 100 papers of which a third analyzes conditional models where aid effectiveness depends upon z, so that aid only works for a certain range of the variable. The key term...... in this family of AEL models is thus an interaction term of z times aid. The leading candidates for z are a good policy index and aid itself. In this paper, meta-analysis techniques are used (i) to determine whether the AEL has established the said interaction terms, and (ii) to identify some of the determinants...... of the differences in results between studies. Taking all available studies in consideration, we find no support for conditionality with respect to policy, while conditionality regarding aid itself is dubious. However, the results differ depending on the authors’ institutional affiliation....

  7. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  8. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2017-02-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 108 A m-2 K-1 .

  9. Picosecond spin Seebeck effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect driven by an interfacial temperature difference between itinerant electrons and magnons. The measured time-evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser-excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across Au/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ and Cu/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ interfaces on a picosecond time-scale. The product of spin-mixing conductance and interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is...

  10. Casimir edge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, H; Gies, Holger; Klingmuller, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    We compute Casimir forces in open geometries with edges, involving parallel as well as perpendicular semi-infinite plates. We focus on Casimir configurations which are governed by a unique dimensional scaling law with a universal coefficient. With the aid of worldline numerics, we determine this coefficient for various geometries for the case of scalar-field fluctuations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our results facilitate an estimate of the systematic error induced by the edges of finite plates, for instance, in a standard parallel-plate experiment. The Casimir edge effects for this case can be reformulated as an increase of the effective area of the configuration.

  11. Magnetic Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes in continuous media predicts the existence of a magnetic Nernst effect that results from a magnetic analog to the Seebeck effect in a ferromagnet and magnetophoresis occurring in a paramagnetic electrode in contact with the ferromagnet. Thus, a voltage that has DC and AC components is expected across a Pt electrode as a response to the inhomogeneous magnetic induction field generated by magnetostatic waves of an adjacent YIG slab subject to a temperature gradient. The voltage frequency and dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic induction field are quite distinct from that of spin pumping.

  12. Erythropoietin and Nonhematopoietic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoui, Alireza; Blaise, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the main regulator of red blood cell production. Since the 1990s, EPO has been used for the treatment of anemia associated with end-stage renal failure and chemotherapy. The erythropoietin receptors were found on other organs such as the brain, spinal cord, heart and skin. In addition, it has been shown that many tissues produce and locally release EPO in response to hypoxic, biochemical and physical stress. In cellular, animal and clinical studies, EPO protects tissues from ischemia and reperfusion injury, has antiapoptotic effects and improves regeneration after injury. In this article, we mainly review the nonhematopoietic effects and new possible clinical indications for EPO.

  13. The effect of Ad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小艳

    2010-01-01

    There is the trend that now people appreciate those who are slim and regard slim even thin people beautiful. The thinner a person is, the more beautiful. Women, born to pursuit beauty, try various means to follow the trend. We all watch TV, and find a lot of advertisements on diet. The effect of them is tremendous. We all know the fact that it is not at all the better mouse trap will catch mouse. The sales methods are more important. If an advertisement is very interesting and seemingly effective, people will be lured by the ad and then try some of the products.

  14. The Lazarus effect

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    Members of the RD39 collaboration stage a demonstration of the Lazarus effect in the CERN cryolab. At the LHC experiments, the front-line inner detectors - trackers - will be traversed by a mammoth thousand million million passing particles per square centimetre over the lifetimes of the experiments. After long exposure to passing particles, defects appear in the silicon and the signal is destroyed. A group of physicists at Bern University have found that at temperatures below 100 K, dead detectors apparently come back to life. They're calling their discovery the Lazarus effect after the Biblical character raised from the dead by Jesus after he had been entombed for four days.

  15. Level Width Broaden Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Shang

    2004-01-01

    In fitting the double-differential measurements thelevelwidth broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg uncertainty.Besides level width broadening effect the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in this procedure.In general,the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed.However,the research indicates that to do so in this way the energy balance could not hold.For this reason,the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced,with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could hold exactly in the analytical form.

  16. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People’s Bank of China,the country’s central bank, published an article concerning China’s managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank’s website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China’s macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.Edited excerpts follow

  17. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  18. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton.

  19. Imagineering the butterfly effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Diane Elza Lea Winie

    2014-01-01

    Het is een ‘inconvenient truth’ zowel in de wetenschap als in de praktijk dat conventioneel verandermanagement dat gericht is op gedragsverandering slechts beperkt effectief is. Slechts 1 op de 3 verander-inspanningen zou enig positief effect hebben. Mensen laten zich namelijk niet veranderen. Als m

  20. What Effective Schools Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Martin R.; Gabrieli, Christopher F. O.; Finn, Amy S.; Kraft, Matthew A.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Research has been showing that the most important development in K-12 education over the past decade has been the emergence of a growing number of urban schools that have been convincingly shown to have dramatic positive effects on the achievement of disadvantaged students. Those with the strongest evidence of success are oversubscribed charter…

  1. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results...

  2. Matthew Effects for Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Hibel, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Which children are most at risk of experiencing a Matthew effect in reading? We investigated this question using population-based methodology. First, we identified children entering kindergarten on socio-demographic factors (i.e., gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status) known to index the relative risks and resources available to them as…

  3. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  4. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  5. The Last Line Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beller, M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Karpov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-clones are tiny duplicated pieces of code; they typically comprise only a few statements or lines. In this paper, we expose the “last line effect,” the phenomenon that the last line or statement in a micro-clone is much more likely to contain an error than the previous lines or statements. We

  6. EFFECTIVE TEACHING PRACTICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    Before the cognitive shift in educational psychology research on teaching practices that bring about the desired learning outcomes on the part of the students was dominated by the process-product research program. The findings of this confirmative research approach show that an effective lesson may

  7. Cost-Effective Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlieb, S

    2001-01-01

    Small Beowulf clusters can effectively serve as personal or group supercomputers. In such an environment, a cluster can be optimally designed for a specific problem (or a small set of codes). We discuss how theoretical analysis of the code and benchmarking on similar hardware lead to optimal systems.

  8. Heavy quarkonium effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mannel, T

    1995-01-01

    We formulate a QCD-based effective theory approach to heavy quarkonia-like systems as \\bar{c} c and \\bar{b} b resonances and B_c states. We apply the method to inclusive decays, working out a few examples in detail.

  9. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia. The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the "glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones" of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-1 7-37 and GLP1 7-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP. GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine, central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health.

  10. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  11. Challenges to effective protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Kimotho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With sexual violence now recognised as a weapon of war and a punishable violation of human rights, it is incumbent upon the international community, national governments and humanitarian organisations to provide more effective protection of women and girls.

  12. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  13. Drug effects on melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koomen, Elsje Rosalie

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and its incidence among Caucasian populations has increased whereas mortality rates are stabilizing or decreasing. The total burden of melanoma is expected to be increasing. As effective treatment options for advanced melanoma are lackin

  14. [Pharmacological effects of hordenine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, H J; Strathmann, W

    1995-06-01

    Hordenine is an ingredient of some plants which are used as feed for animals, i.e. in sprouting barley. After ingestion of such feed hordenine may be detected in blood or urine of horses which in case of racing horses may be the facts of using prohibited compounds. Results of some experiments in pharmacological models show that hordenine is an indirectly acting adrenergic drug. It liberates norepinephrine from stores. In isolated organs and those structures with reduced epinephrine contents the hordenine-effect is only very poor. Experiments in intact animals (rats, dogs) show that hordenine has a positive inotropic effect upon the heart, increases systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow volume, inhibits gut movements but has no effect upon the psychomotorical behaviour of mice. All effects are short and only possible after high doses which are not to be expected after ingestion of hordenine containing feed for horses. A measurable increase of the performance of racing horses is quite improbable.

  15. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    annoyances and the objective measurements were analysed. Persons suffering from tinnitus behaved differently than person without tinnitus. The latter group showed significant relations between the measured occlusion effect, hearing loss and the personal of occlusion. The actual sensation level is also...

  16. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  17. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  18. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results...

  19. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  20. Globalisation, Effectiveness and Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimore, Peter

    This paper reports principally on two studies, prompted by research on school effectiveness in the United States and England, which indicate globalization is beginning to affect school improvement. The first study cites case studies of two schools--from working-class, multi-ethnic, poorly educated areas of Singapore and London--to determine if…

  1. The Negative Repetition Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  2. Analgesic effects of calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyritis, G P; Trovas, G

    2002-05-01

    The analgesic activity of salmon calcitonin (subcutaneous or intranasal) has been demonstrated in several prospective clinical trials, in patients suffering different painful skeletal conditions, including recent nontraumatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The mechanism of the analgesic effect of calcitonin is not clear. It is possible that specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin exist in the brain. Another explanation is that changes in descending serotonergic modification on the sensory transmission mediated by C afferents contribute to the analgesic effects of calcitonin on pain in osteoporotic patients. From the clinical point of use, the analgesic effect of calcitonin is beneficial throughout the whole period of medical treatment of osteoporotic patients. Salmon calcitonin in a daily dose of 100 IU subcutaneously or 200 IU intranasally reduces dramatically the back pain (p salmon calcitonin effectively controls severe pain in osteoporotic patients with a recent vertebral fracture, allowing them earlier mobility in combination with a reduction of the urinary hydroxyproline excretion, and a limitation of the considerable bone loss that may occur during prolonged bed rest, make this therapeutic scheme attractive.

  3. Side effects of ergotamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyler, WJ

    1996-01-01

    Ergotamine has been used for many years in the treatment of migraine, although there is Little formal clinical evidence that it is significantly more efficacious than placebo. A number of side effects associated with ergotamine have been reported in the literature, including myocardial infarction, i

  4. The Binggeli effect

    CERN Document Server

    Biernacka, Monika; Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Bajan, Katarzyna; Flin, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We found the alignement of elongated clusters of BM type I and III (the excess of small values of the \\Delta\\theta angles is observed), having range till about 60Mpc/h. The first one is probably connected with the origin of supergiant galaxy, while the second one with environmental effects in clusters, originated on the long filament or plane.

  5. Drug effects on melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koomen, Elsje Rosalie

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and its incidence among Caucasian populations has increased whereas mortality rates are stabilizing or decreasing. The total burden of melanoma is expected to be increasing. As effective treatment options for advanced melanoma are

  6. Cannabis its clinical effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be enhanced and short-term memory and judgement may be impaired. These effects ... realisation, a sense of loss of control, fear of dying, panic reactions and ... A mild withdrawal state from long-term use has been described. It consists ...

  7. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in ...

  8. The Kaye effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, J M; Landig, A J [Student Research Center Suedwuerttemberg, Gutenbergstrasse 18, 88348 Bad Saulgau (Germany)], E-mail: jan.binder@sfz-bw.de, E-mail: andreas.landig@sfz-bw.de

    2009-11-15

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  9. Haemodynamic effects of eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høost, U; Kelbaek, H; Rasmusen, H

    1996-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fractional meal stimulation on postprandial haemodynamic changes, the possible correlation between these changes and the potential mediating role of circulating catecholamines and insulin. 2. Healthy young subjects were studied before...

  10. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  11. Systemic effects in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, E.F.M.; Creutzberg, E.C.; Schols, A.M.W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic effects in COPD. Wouters EF, Creutzberg EC, Schols AM. Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Maastricht, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands. ewo@ms-azm-3.azm.nl The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of COPD are not restricted to pulmonary inflammation an

  12. QCD Interconnection Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    1999-01-01

    Heavy objects like the W, Z and t are short-lived compared with typical hadronization times. When pairs of such particles are produced, the subsequent hadronic decay systems may therefore become interconnected. We study such potential effects at Linear Collider energies.

  13. Systemic effects in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, E.F.M.; Creutzberg, E.C.; Schols, A.M.W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic effects in COPD. Wouters EF, Creutzberg EC, Schols AM. Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Maastricht, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands. ewo@ms-azm-3.azm.nl The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of COPD are not restricted to pulmonary inflammation an

  14. Effective Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapalparvi, Ramesh; Protas, Bartosz

    2010-11-01

    In this investigation we introduce the concept of an "effective free surface" arising as a solution of time--averaged equations in the presence of free boundaries. This work is motivated by applications of optimization theory to problems involving free surfaces, such as droplets impinging on the weld pool surface in welding processes. In such problems the time--dependent governing equations lead to technical difficulties, many of which are alleviated when methods of optimization are applied to a steady problem with effective free surfaces. The corresponding equations are obtained by performing the Reynolds decomposition and averaging of the time--dependent free--boundary equations based on the volume--of--fluid (VoF) formalism. We identify the terms representing the average effect of fluctuating free boundaries which, in analogy with the Reynolds stresses in classical turbulence models, need to be modelled and propose some simple algebraic closures for these terms. We argue that effective free boundaries can be computed using methods of shape optimization and present some results.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of gliptins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile.

  16. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Belch, M.A.; Belch, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  17. Open Access policy effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alma

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses the policy elements that are necessary for an effective open access policy, according to the findings of the analysis of the revamped ROARMAP tool for open access policies by PASTEUR4OA. It contains graphs, charts and numbers for evidence-based arguments

  18. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...

  19. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Belch, M.A.; Belch, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  20. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  1. Aristotle and Double Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    There are some interesting similarities between Aristotle’s ‘mixed actions’ in Book III of the Nicomachean Ethics and the actions often thought to be justifiable with the Doctrine of Double Effect. Here I analyse these similarities by comparing Aristotle’s examples of mixed actions with standard ...

  2. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  3. Immunological effects of vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo, J R

    1982-06-01

    It is only recently that the adverse effects of vasectomy have become the subject of numerous scientific and at times speculative articles in medical and in lay periodicals. In this review of the literature on the immunological effects of vasectomy, attention is directed to the following: immunological response; cellular immunity; effects on testes and epididymis, and systemic effects of sperm autoantibodies. In 1970, 50% of vasectomized men were found to have circulating spermatozoal antibodies. A more recent survey provides confirmation for this finding and presents an incidence of only 2% of agglutinating antibodies and 0% of immobilizing antibodies in a fertile control population. Some recent and convincing studies have shown sperm agglutinating and immobilizing antibodies to remain either at the same titer level or actually to increase 5-12 years postoperatively. Titers range from 2 to 2048 among different patients. The highest incidence of titers is 1 year after vasectomy, but titers can be found as early as 6 months or as late as 20 years postoperatively. The wide range in titers can be explained in terms of technical problems in immune assays, since only immunoglobulins and not those antibodies part of immune complex systems can be measured. Since sperm antigens are in abundant supply in vasectomized men because of the continuous resorption of spermatozoa after vasectomy, possibly undetectable antibody titers actually reflect high levels of antisperm antibodies circulating in the form of immune complexes. Also it may be possible that the variety in measured titers of autoantibodies, as well as the nonuniversal (70%) antibody response in a vasectomized population, is a variable dependent on genetic content and, therefore, an individual characteristic. The fact that hormonal reponse takes place rather readily after vasectomy makes at least some degree of cellular response a necessary occurrence. Studies by Alexander and Anderson, which show delayed

  4. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  5. Separating Gender Composition Effects from Peer Effects in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Babak

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of controlling for endogenous peer effects in estimating the influence of gender peer effects on educational outcomes. Using Manski's linear-in-means model, this paper illustrates that the estimation of gender peer effects is potentially biased in the presence of endogenous peer effect in education.…

  6. Effects and Side Effects of Flemish School Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninckx, Maarten; Vanhoof, Jan; De Maeyer, Sven; Van Petegem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increased importance of school inspection in recent years, the current knowledge base does not provide a clear view on the effects and side effects of being inspected. More evidence is needed in more diverse educational contexts. This article responds to this need with a quantitative study on the effects and side effects of school…

  7. Integrating teacher education effectiveness research into educational effectiveness models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and to connect research about teacher education effectiveness and school effectiveness to arrive at an integrative conceptualization that has the potential of improving empirical research in both fields. Teacher education effectiveness addresses effects of te

  8. Integrating teacher education effectiveness research into educational effectiveness models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and to connect research about teacher education effectiveness and school effectiveness to arrive at an integrative conceptualization that has the potential of improving empirical research in both fields. Teacher education effectiveness addresses effects of

  9. 75 FR 10411 - Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... 12 CFR Part 617 RIN 3052-AC45 Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date AGENCY: Farm Credit Administration. ACTION: Notice of effective date. SUMMARY: The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or... efficient manner. In accordance with 12 U.S.C. 2252, the effective date of the final rule is 30 days...

  10. Effective Vaccination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, L; Spears, W; Billings, L; Maxim, P

    2010-10-01

    We present a framework for modeling the spread of pathogens throughout a population and generating policies that minimize the impact of those pathogens on the population. This framework is used to study the spread of human viruses between cities via airplane travel. It combines agent-based simulation, mathematical analysis, and an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) optimizer. The goal of this study is to develop tools that determine the optimal distribution of a vaccine supply in the model. Using plausible benchmark vaccine allocation policies of uniform and proportional distribution, we compared their effectiveness to policies found by the EA. We then designed and tested a new, more effective policy which increased the importance of vaccinating smaller cities that are flown to more often. This "importance factor" was validated using U.S. influenza data from the last four years.

  11. Viscoelectric Effects in Nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Davidson, Malcolm R; Dunstan, David E; Hwang, Junho; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic transport behavior in nanochannels is different to that in larger sized channels. Specifically, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in nanochannels have demonstrated two barely understood phenomena which are not observed in microchannels, being: (i) the decrease of average electroosmotic mobility at high surface charge density, and (ii) the decrease of channel conductance at high salt concentrations, as the surface charge is increased. However, current electric double layer models do not capture these results. In this study we provide evidence that this inconsistency primarily arises from the neglect of the viscoelectric effect (being the increase of local viscosity near charged surfaces due to water molecule orientation) in conventional continuum models. It is shown that predictions of electroosmotic mobility in a slit nanochannel, derived from a viscoelectric-modified continuum model, are in quantitative agreement with previous MD simulation results. Furthermore, viscoelectric effects are fou...

  12. [Herbs and cardiotoxic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffè, Stefano; Paffoni, Paola; Laura Colombo, Maria; Davanzo, Franca; Dellavesa, Pierfranco; Cucchi, Lorenzo; Zenone, Franco; Paino, Anna Maria; Franchetti Pardo, Nicolò; Bergamasco, Luca; Signorotti, Fabiana; Parravicini, Umberto

    2013-06-01

    Accidental or deliberate ingestion of poisonous herbs has become an increasingly common phenomenon over the last years. From existing literature data and case reports from emergency room visits or poison control centers, an overview is presented of the potential cardiotoxic manifestations following intoxication by wild herbal plants of the territory. The effects of the consumption of cardiac glycoside-containing plants (e.g., digitalis) are discussed along with tachyarrhythmias induced by Aconitum napellus L., Atropa belladonna L., Mandragora officinarum L. or Ephedra distachya L. herbs, and hypertensive crises associated with licorice abuse. For each plant, a brief historical and botanical background is provided, focusing on pathophysiology of intoxication and cardiotoxic effects on the basis of the most recent literature. Finally, medical management of intoxication, from both a general and cardiological viewpoint, is reviewed.

  13. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, SM; W. Zhang; Kc, A; Borisov, P.; Pearson, JE; Jiang, JS; Lederman, D.; Hoffmann, A.; Bhattacharya, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop t...

  14. Context effects in games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Vlaev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment exploring sequential context effects on strategy choices in one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma (PD game. Rapoport and Chammah (1965 have shown that some PDs are cooperative and lead to high cooperation rate, whereas others are uncooperative. Participants played very cooperative and very uncooperative games, against anonymous partners. The order in which these games were played affected their cooperation rate by producing perceptual contrast, which appeared only between the trials, but not between two separate sequences of games. These findings suggest that people may not have stable perceptions of absolute cooperativeness. Instead, they judge the cooperativeness of each fresh game only in relation to the previous game. The observed effects suggest that the principles underlying judgments about highly abstract magnitudes such as cooperativeness may be similar to principles governing the perception of sensory magnitudes.

  15. Being an effective speaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Cosgray, R

    1991-08-01

    Communication in a group is an essential quality for success in nursing. Despite this, many nurses who must have communication skills to advance have little training in public speaking. Some nurses seek to correct such deficiencies in their education by taking courses in the evenings or on weekends to improve their understanding of the elements of effective speaking. Other nurses learn by self-reflection, study, and ongoing practice. This article has presented guidelines for speaking in a group that can offer assistance in mastering this important nursing skill. Elements of nonverbal communication are crucial for effective communication. However, despite the importance of non-verbal communication to the message, language is what makes communication possible. It is language that allows people to communicate new ideas and thoughts and to solve problems.

  16. The Uniform Rugosity Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnivard, Matthieu; Bucur, Dorin

    2012-06-01

    Relying on the effect of microscopic asperities, one can mathematically justify that viscous fluids adhere completely on the boundary of an impermeable domain. The rugosity effect accounts asymptotically for the transformation of complete slip boundary conditions on a rough surface in total adherence boundary conditions, as the amplitude of the rugosities vanishes. The decreasing rate (average velocity divided by the amplitude of the rugosities) computed on close flat layers is definitely influenced by the geometry. Recent results prove that this ratio has a uniform upper bound for certain geometries, like periodical and "almost Lipschitz" boundaries. The purpose of this paper is to prove that such a result holds for arbitrary (non-periodical) crystalline boundaries and general (non-smooth) periodical boundaries.

  17. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest that translating a design theory (DT) into practice (e.g. creating an instance design artifact (IDA)) is hardly straight-forward and requires substantial creativity. Specifically the authors suggest that adopting a DT embodies a creativity passdown...... effect in which the creative thinking of a team of design theorist(s) inherent in DT invokes a creative mind of a team of artifact instance designer(s) in creating an IDA. In this study, the authors empirically investigate the creativity passdown effect through an action case in which a DT (DT nexus...... designer team introducing a previously published DT as a basis for creating an IDA. Findings – The experience in the action case suggests that using a DT in creating an IDA may encourage design thinking, and in certain way increase its power and practical relevance by fostering the creative mind...

  18. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  19. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency

  20. Safety Intervention Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

    2001-10-16

    Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

  1. Electricity Distribution Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Szpyra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the basic concepts of cost accounting in the power industry and selected ways of assessing the effectiveness of electricity distribution. The results of effectiveness analysis of MV/LV distribution transformer replacement are presented, and unit costs of energy transmission through various medium-voltage line types are compared. The calculation results confirm the viability of replacing transformers manufactured before 1975. Replacing transformers manufactured after 1975 – only to reduce energy losses – is not economically justified. Increasing use of a PAS type line for energy transmission in local distribution networks is reasonable. Cabling these networks under the current calculation rules of discounts for excessive power outages is not viable, even in areas particularly exposed to catastrophic wire icing.

  2. Renormalization and effective lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong intuitive understanding of renormalization, due to Wilson, in terms of the scaling of effective lagrangians. We show that this can be made the basis for a proof of perturbative renormalization. We first study renormalizability in the language of renormalization group flows for a toy renormalization group equation. We then derive an exact renormalization group equation for a four-dimensional λø 4 theory with a momentum cutoff. We organize the cutoff dependence of the effective lagrangian into relevant and irrelevant parts, and derive a linear equation for the irrelevant part. A lengthy but straightforward argument establishes that the piece identified as irrelevant actually is so in perturbation theory. This implies renormalizability. The method extends immediately to any system in which a momentum-space cutoff can be used, but the principle is more general and should apply for any physical cutoff. Neither Weinberg's theorem nor arguments based on the topology of graphs are needed.

  3. Quantum Cosmology: Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cosmology has traditionally been studied at the level of symmetry-reduced minisuperspace models, analyzing the behavior of wave functions. However, in the absence of a complete full setting of quantum gravity and detailed knowledge of specific properties of quantum states, it remained difficult to make testable predictions. For quantum cosmology to be part of empirical science, it must allow for a systematic framework in which corrections to well-tested classical equations can be derived, with any ambiguities and ignorance sufficiently parameterized. As in particle and condensed-matter physics, a successful viewpoint is one of effective theories, adapted to specific issues one encounters in quantum cosmology. This review presents such an effective framework of quantum cosmology, taking into account, among other things, space-time structures, covariance, the problem of time and the anomaly issue.

  4. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  5. Magnetoviscous effects in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles or ferrofluids can be effectively controlled by magnetic fields, which opens up a fascinating field for basic research into fluid dynamics as well as a host of applications in engineering and medicine. The introductory chapter provides the reader with basic information on the structure, and magnetic and viscous properties of ferrofluids. The bulk of this monograph is based on the author's own research activity and deals with ferrohydrodynamics, especially with the magnetoviscous effects. In particular, the author studies in detail the interparticle interactions so far often neglected but of great importance in concentrated ferrofluids. The basic theory and the most recent experimental findings are presented, making the book interesting reading for physicists or engineers interested in smart materials.

  6. Establishing effective working relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-02-24

    This article, the second in a series of 11, provides support and offers advice to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence. In particular, the article discusses how to establish effective working relationships and emphasises the importance of the student-mentor or student-practice teacher relationship. It examines the essential qualities, attributes and characteristics of an effective mentor or practice teacher. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements for these roles as stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

  7. Developing Effective Clinical Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Khamarko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education and training provides a means to improve performance among health care professionals (HCP. Research shows, however, that continuing professional education activities have inconsistent effects on HCP competence, performance, and patient health outcomes. Furthermore, the trainer’s role as a facilitator of knowledge translation (KT has been understudied. To understand how clinical trainers support their trainees in translating what they learned into practice, we conducted 16 in-depth interviews with expert trainers. These interviews yielded a variety of KT-enhancing strategies, including tailoring training activities to their trainees’ needs. In addition, participants recommended trainers familiarize themselves with their trainees’ work environments, be able to identify their knowledge deficits, and devote time to provide trainees with post-training support. Creating an effective training, one that leads to transfer, requires active planning, communication, and command of the training topic by skilled trainers.

  8. The Blazhko Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacs, Geza

    2009-01-01

    Current status of (the lack of) understanding Blazhko effect is reviewed. We focus mostly on the various components of the failure of the models and touch upon the observational issues only at a degree needed for the theoretical background. Attention is to be paid to models based on radial mode resonances, since they seem to be not fully explored yet, especially if we consider possible non-standard effects (e.g., heavy element enhancement). To aid further modeling efforts, we stress the need for accurate time-series spectral line analysis to reveal any possible non-radial component(s) and thereby let to include (or exclude) non-radial modes in explaining the Blazhko phenomenon.

  9. Coulomb Effects in Femtoscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Maj, Radoslaw

    2009-01-01

    The correlation function of two identical particles - pions or kaons - interacting via Coulomb potential is computed. The particles are emitted from an anisotropic particle's source of finite lifetime. In the case of pions, the effect of halo is taken into account as an additional particle's source of large spatial extension. The relativistic effects are discussed in detail. The Bowler-Sinyukov procedure to remove the Coulomb interaction is carefully tested. In the absence of halo the procedure is shown to work very well even for an extremely anisotropic source. When the halo is taken into account the free correlation function, which is extracted by means of the Bowler-Sinyukov procedure, is distorted at small relative momenta but the source parameters are still correctly reproduced.

  10. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  11. Phytoestrogens and their effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2014-10-15

    The chemical structure, classification, source, metabolism, physiological and health effects of plant phytoestrogens and mechanisms of their action are reviewed. The available knowledge suggests that phytoestrogens can affect a number of physiological and pathological processes related to reproduction, bone remodeling, skin, cardiovascular, nervous, immune systems and metabolism. Due to these effects, phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing diet can be useful for the prevention and treatment of menopausal symptoms, skin aging, osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, immune and metabolic diseases. Possible problems in understanding and application of phytoestrogens (multiple targets and multiple estrogen receptor -dependent and -independent mechanisms of action, the discrepancy between the results of experimental and clinical studies, adequate source of phytoestrogen) have been discussed.

  12. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... betweenstudies is real. In particular, the aid-growth association is stronger for Asian countries, and the aid-growth association is shown to have been weaker in the 1970s....

  13. Relativistic Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2011-01-01

    We consider the relativistic deformation of quantum waves and mechanical bodies carrying intrinsic angular momentum (AM). When observed in a moving reference frame, the centroid of the object undergoes an AM-dependent transverse shift. This is the relativistic analogue of the spin Hall effect, which occurs in free space without any external fields. Remarkably, the shifts of the geometric and energy centroids differ by a factor of 2, and both centroids are crucial for the correct Lorentz transformations of the AM tensor. We examine manifestations of the relativistic Hall effect in quantum vortices, mechanical flywheel, and discuss various fundamental aspects of the phenomenon. The perfect agreement of quantum and relativistic approaches allows applications at strikingly different scales: from elementary spinning particles, through classical light, to rotating black-holes.

  14. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... betweenstudies is real. In particular, the aid-growth association is stronger for Asian countries, and the aid-growth association is shown to have been weaker in the 1970s....

  15. The Music Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    into the six musical elements of periodicity, melody, harmony, dynamics, timbre, and form. And about how these elements define emotion, evoke responses, alter physiological and mental function, and the manner in which they can be combined to effect profound emotional sensations and responses. As central......http://www.njmt.no/bookreview_2006071.html "The music effect is not about a particular composer, musical style, geographic location, language, or performance group. It is, at once, about all of these" (p. 249). This book is written by two people with very different educational backgrounds. Dr....... Schneck is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and Dorita S. Berger, MA, is a Board Certified music therapist. They have in common that both play music and perform professionally, and together they integrate various theories from scientific reality and music aesthetic...

  16. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  17. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  18. Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2008-01-01

    We consider non minimal coupling between matters and gravity in modified theories of gravity. In contrary to the current common sense, we report that quantum mechanics can effectively emerge when the space-time geometry is sufficiently flat. In other words, quantum mechanics might play no role when and where the space-time geometry is highly curved. We study the first two simple models of Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics(EEQM): R-dependent EEQM and G-dependent EEQM where R is the Ricci scalar and G is the Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian density. We discuss that these EEQM theories might be fine tuned to remain consistent with all the implemented experiments and performed observations. In particular, we observe that G-dependent EEQM softens the problem of quantum gravity.

  19. Effects for Funargs

    CERN Document Server

    Siek, Jeremy G; Turner, Jonathan D

    2012-01-01

    Stack allocation and first-class functions don't naturally mix together. In this paper we show that a type and effect system can be the detergent that helps these features form a nice emulsion. Our interest in this problem comes from our work on the Chapel language, but this problem is also relevant to lambda expressions in C++ and blocks in Objective C. The difficulty in mixing first-class functions and stack allocation is a tension between safety, efficiency, and simplicity. To preserve safety, one must worry about functions outliving the variables they reference: the classic upward funarg problem. There are systems which regain safety but lose programmer-predictable efficiency, and ones that provide both safety and efficiency, but give up simplicity by exposing regions to the programmer. In this paper we present a simple design that combines a type and effect system, for safety, with function-local storage, for control over efficiency.

  20. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  1. Planar Hall Effect MRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Bason, Y.; Klein, L.; Yau, J. -B.; Hong, X.; Hoffman, J.; Ahn, C. H.

    2005-01-01

    We suggest a new type of magnetic random access memory (MRAM) that is based on the phenomenon of the planar Hall effect (PHE) in magnetic films, and we demonstrate this idea with manganite films. The PHE-MRAM is structurally simpler than currently developed MRAM that is based on magnetoresistance tunnel junctions (MTJ), with the tunnel junction structure being replaced by a single layer film.

  2. Developmental effects of corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Frøystad, Mona

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, typical measures of corruption have been broad, composite indices which are often meant to measure overall corruption level in a country. In this thesis I study how different types of corruption can have different effects on development, measured by GDP growth, GDP per capita growth and GDP per capita. Thereby, I wanted to see if some types of corruption could be concluded as more damaging than others. I have discussed and empirically tested the consequences of corruption in pu...

  3. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  4. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  5. Transgenerational effects of NMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Anna; Colafarina, Sabrina; Fontecchio, Gabriella; Chichiriccò, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are present in a number of commercially available products but there are uncertainties as to whether the unique properties that support their commercial use may also pose potential health risks. Information is missing concerning the influence of nanomaterials on the overall reproductive outcome and transgenerational effects in animals and plants. To obtain this information, long-term studies would be required using animal models phylogenetically close to humans and exposure conditions that reflect realistic scenarios with regard to dosages and admission. The nanoreprotoxicology literature published to date is largely descriptive in nature regarding the effects of nanoparticles. The mechanisms, which determine particle reproduction compatibility, are mostly elusive at the moment. Thus, it is recommended that future research explore the interactions between nanomaterials and transgenerational matter on a molecular level. It would, for instance, be of major importance to understand the behaviour of nanoparticles inside the cells but also their genotoxic and epigenetic effects. Recent studies have shown that intravenous and/or intra-abdominal administration of nanoparticles to mice results in their accumulation in the cells of many tissues, including the brain and the testis, suggesting that they easily pass through the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers. In parallel embryo development after exposure to nanoparticles should be comparatively investigated. The majority of studies on embryo toxicology have concentrated on piscine embryos, mostly derived from zebrafish. Plants for human food as an important component of the ecosystem need also to be taken into account when evaluating transgenerational effects of engineered nanomaterials in crops.

  6. Tasting edge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, L

    2006-01-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  7. The Immersion Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These facts suggest that immersion for the purpose of learning language and culture should precede grammar teaching just as it does for children. That...support the execution of SOF core tasks based on learned and acquired language and cultural proficiency. MISO planning draws from multiple sciences...their native language effectively helps individuals cope with their culture , and learning to use it appropriately is an important part of

  8. Effectively calculable quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    According to mathematical constructivism, a mathematical object can exist only if there is a way to compute (or "construct") it; so, what is non-computable is non-constructive. In the example of the quantum model, whose Fock states are associated with Fibonacci numbers, this paper shows that the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics is non-constructive since it permits an undecidable (or effectively impossible) subset of Hilbert space. On the other hand, as it is argued in the paper, if...

  9. Effects of 5-FU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, Peter M; Mustafa, Sarah; El-Beltagy, Maha; Lyons, Laura; Umka, Jariya; Bennett, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a chemotherapeutical agent used to treat cancers including breast and colorectal. Working as an antimetabolite to prevent cell proliferation, it primarily inhibits the enzyme thymidylate synthase blocking the thymidine formation required for DNA synthesis. Although having a relatively short half-life (fog" These accounts have come primarily from patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer who report symptoms including confusion and memory impairment, which can last for months to years. Psychometric studies of patients have suffered from confounding variables, which has led to the use of rodent models to assess the cognitive effects of this drug. Researchers have used behavioral and physiological tests including the Morris water maze, novel object location/recognition tests, shock motivated T-maze, sensory gating and conditioning, to investigate the effect of this drug on cognition. The variety of cognitive tests and the difference in dosing and administration of 5-FU has led to varied results, possibly due to the different brain regions associated with each test and the subtlety of the drug's effect, but overall these studies indicates that 5-FU has a negative effect on memory, executive function and sensory gating. 5-FU has also been demonstrated to have biochemical and structural changes on specific regions of the brain. Evidence shows it can induce apoptosis and depress cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain including the sub granular zone (SGZ) within the hippocampus and in oligodendrocyte precursor populations within white matter tracts. Furthermore, investigations indicate levels ofdoublecortin, a marker for newly formed neurons and brain derived neurotrophic factor, a cell survival modulator, are also reduced by 5-FU in the SGZ. Thus, 5-FU appears to have a lasting negative impact on cognition and to affect cellular and biochemical markers in various brain regions. Further work is needed to understand the

  10. Analysis of Celebrity Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高妙永

    2012-01-01

    With the development of market economy, brand has be- come an important means of marketing. The phenomenon that enter- prises hire stars as their spokespeople is increasingly common. Thus, the word celebrity effect came into being. At the same time, the nega- tive influence of celebrity effect also becomes a controversial topic. This paper plans to analyze celebrity effect, its universality in daily life, as well as the positive and negative aspects of this phnomenon and put forward in terms of law and moral standards, in order to achieve a comprehensive interpretation of celebrity effect.%随着市场经济的发展,品牌已成为市场营销的重要手段。企业聘请明星作为广告代言人的现象日益普遍,“明星效应”这个词应运而生。同时,明星效应带来的负面影响也成为颇受争议的话题。本文从明星效应现象的形成及其在日常生活中的普遍性展开分析,探讨了明星效应的积极作用及其存在的弊端,并从法律及道德层面为这些弊端提出相应的对策,以达到全面解读明星效应现象的目的。

  11. Causal Effect Estimation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between two popular modeling frameworks of causal inference from observational data, namely, causal graphical model and potential outcome causal model is discussed. How some popular causal effect estimators found in applications of the potential outcome causal model, such as inverse probability of treatment weighted estimator and doubly robust estimator can be obtained by using the causal graphical model is shown. We confine to the simple case of binary outcome and treatment vari...

  12. Effectively Measuring Student Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Z. Posner

    2012-01-01

    With a worldwide sample of students (N = 77, 387), this paper reviews and analyses the psychometric properties of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory [1]. Modest to strong internal reliability coefficients are found across a number of different dimensions. Predictive validity of the instrument is supported, with the instrument being able to differentiate between effective and ineffective leaders using both self-reported and observer (constituent) data. Few significant differences are f...

  13. Developing effective marketing brochure

    OpenAIRE

    Semenenko, Vitalii

    2013-01-01

    Following report is produced with a goal of developing effective marketing communication channel (brochure) for a case company. Report covers findings in the areas of − model of communication − influences during communication process − target audience identification − decision-making process − types of decision-making process − role of marketing communication in decision-making − channels of marketing communication − practical recommendations from field expert Rep...

  14. The Kaye effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-11-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur. This article is a written version of the oral contribution of the German team to the 21st IYPT competition, which was awarded first prize by an international jury. The article has been edited by European Journal of Physics.

  15. Radiation Bystander Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokohzaman Soleymanifard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation Induced Bystander Effect (RIBE which cause radiation effects in non-irradiated cells, has challenged the principle according to which radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is necessary for producing biological responses. What is the mechanism of this phenomenon? To have a better understanding of this rather ambiguous concept substantial number of original and reviewed article were carefully examined. Results: Irradiated cells release molecules which can propagate in cell environment and/or transmit through gap junction intercellular communication. These molecules can reach to non-irradiated cells and transmit bystander signals. In many investigations, it has been confirmed that these molecules are growth factors, cytokines, nitric oxide and free radicals like reactive oxygen species (ROS. Transmission of by stander signal to neighboring cells persuades them to produce secondary growth factors which in their turn cause further cell injuries. Some investigators suggest, organelles other than nucleus (mitochondria and cell membrane are the origin of these signals.  There is another opinion which suggests double strand breaks (DSB are not directly generated in bystander cells, rather they are due to smaller damage like single strand breaks which accumulate and end up to DSB. Although bystander mechanisms have not been exactly known, it can be confirmed that multiple mechanisms and various pathways are responsible for this effect. Cell type, radiation type, experimental conditions and end points identify the dominant mechanism. Conclusion: Molecules and pathways which are responsible for RIBE, also cause systemic responses to other non-irradiation stresses. So RIBE is a kind of systemic stress or innate immune responses, which are performed by cell microenvironment. Irradiated cells and their signals are components of microenvironment for creating bystander effects.

  16. Measuring Cyber Operations Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    using network scanners and frameworks like the SANS Critical Security Controls. Finally, a network vulnerability penetration test can be performed to...effectiveness in network, defensive, and offensive operations is a difficult task. Measures may be static , automated, some combination of both or...by SANS identifies using port scanners as a way to verify the setup has been performed correctly and only needed ports and protocols are allowed

  17. Tasting edge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Lydéric

    2007-02-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  18. 2012 Development Effectiveness Review

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2013-01-01

    The Development Effectiveness Review 2012 Report is the sixth annual corporate performance review of the Asian Development Bank (ADB). It assesses progress in implementing Strategy 2020, ADB’s long-term strategic framework, using the performance indicators, baselines, and targets in the ADB results framework. It analyzes performance trends, identifies strengths and weaknesses, and defines corrective actions. The review takes stock of progress since 2008 and shows whether ADB met its 2012 targ...

  19. Effective research communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, J.; Walkington, H.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the nature of research, identifying the key steps that both comprise the research process and help you to plan the presentation of your research. It highlights the advantages that can be gained as a geography student if you complete the research process right through to communication of your findings. The chapter makes explicit the principles of effective research communication in a variety of oral, visual and written formats, including checklists that you mig...

  20. Understaning the "funding effect"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2016-12-01

    There is a long history of industry funding of scientific and engineering research in the USA. Much of this work has been of high quality. Research demonstrates, however, that corporate funding can represent a threat to scientific independence and integrity. Studies show that sponsors' interests can affect research results, particularly when sponsors have a strong interest in a particular research outcome. The effects may occur through the impact of subconscious bias on sampling, study design, data interpretation, and/or reporting of results. Corporate funding can also skew research toward investigating certain questions at the expense of others, downplaying the significance of adverse findings, and/or failing to report adverse results. Gifts can affect behavior, even when they are unrelated to research activities. These impacts that are so substantial that they have a name: "the funding effect."[i] Evidence shows that scientists who strive to be objective and fair-minded may nonetheless fall prey to the funding effect. In many cases, the challenges of corporate gifts and funding can be addressed through education and improved self-awareness, agreements that protect researchers' freedom to publish without sponsor approval, sensible disclosure policies, and reasonable sanctions for failures of disclosure. However, in some cases, it may be appropriate for researchers and scientific societies to decline funding.

  1. Paradoxical Effect of Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doutremepuich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin is an important therapeutic option in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI and ischemic stroke, basedon its unique cost-effectiveness and widespread availability. In addition, based on the results of a number of large studies, aspirin is also widely used in the primary prevention of MI. This paper provides an update of the available data to offer greater clarity regarding the risks of aspirin with respect to hemorrhagic stroke. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and ischemic events, the evidence supports that the benefits of aspirin treatment significantly outweigh the risk of a major hemorrhage. When considering whether aspirin is appropriate, the absolute therapeutic cardiovascular benefits of aspirin must be balanced with the possible risks associated with its use, being hemorrhagic stroke. Regarding these clinical facts, normal, COX 1 −/−, and COX 2 −/− mice were treated with a wide range of doses of aspirin and studied by induced hemorrhagic time. The results outlined three major conclusions: high doses of aspirin induce hemorrhage, while low doses of aspirin do not. In the absence of COX 1, ultra low doses of aspirin produce an antihemorrhagic effect not observed with intermediate doses. The absence of COX 2 induced a hemorrhagic effect that needs further research, probably originated in compensatory phenomena.

  2. Effective communication with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn R

    2005-09-01

    This brief article aims at heightening awareness about communication with various patients, including strategies to assist in improving communicative effectiveness. It assists us as health care professionals to go back to basics and reflect on how we communicate. Several researchers have provided insight into ways that communication may be enhanced. Walter, Bundy, and Donan (2005) suggested personally greeting the patient, introducing oneself, engaging in talk about clinical concerns, and then discussing next steps toward healthcare solutions. Schillinger (2003) implored that health related jargon be avoided and that all messages be clear and simple. Illustrations in the form of black-white line drawn pictures also tend to assist in patient comprehension. Lawton and Carroll (2005) suggested that effective communication requires assessing what the patient knows about their illness. Seidel's model (2004) stated that healthcare providers listen to the patient's story and elicit information through questioning with sufficient time allotted to provide answers. He also discussed the importance of providing a short summary of what the patient conveyed and giving additional information so they learn more about what is happening to them and can become an active participant in making decisions. It is important that patients understand what we as healthcare professionals say to them. Wisner (1999) further conveyed that it is not words alone that communicate. Body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice often provide additional clues influencing communicative effectiveness. Without a doubt, communication, directly impacts service delivery and quality of care in healthcare today. Listen to your patients, they have much to say.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng-Yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing; An, Jia-Ze

    2014-07-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca(2+) influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection.

  4. SAD effects on grantmanship

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, George A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a state of depression induced by a lack of sufficient sunlight that occurs at high latitudes during the fall and winter. One effect of SAD is that causes people to be more risk-adverse, an effect that should be considered by granting agencies of high latitude countries. Funding agencies often have programmes aimed at high-risk, innovative research. However, the time of the year during which these purposefully high-risk proposals are evaluated usually does not take into consideration the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall might significantly detract from the very purpose of such programmes. At this time of the year, grant evaluators might be in a darkness-induced state of mild depression. As such, evaluators might be more likely to opt for safe investments, more of the same, the well established, which is the antithesis of innovative research.

  5. Stringy effects in scrambling

    CERN Document Server

    Shenker, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    In [1] we gave a precise holographic calculation of chaos at the scrambling time scale--the butterfly effect. We studied the influence of a small perturbation, long in the past, on a two-sided correlation function in the thermofield double state. A similar analysis applies to commutators and other out-of-time-order one-sided correlators [2,3]. The essential bulk physics is a high energy scattering problem near the horizon of an AdS black hole. These papers used Einstein gravity to study this problem; in the present paper we consider stringy and Planckian corrections. Elastic stringy corrections play an important role, effectively weakening and smearing out the development of chaos. We discuss their signature in the boundary field theory, commenting on the extension to weak coupling. Inelastic effects, although important for the evolution of the state, leave a parametrically small imprint on the correlators that we study. We briefly discuss ways to diagnose these small corrections, and we propose another corre...

  6. Effects of traffic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, D.

    1986-02-01

    One of the main sources of noise is road traffic. In 1984 there were over 25 million cars, 1.2 million lorries, 1.3 million motor cycles and 1.6 million mopeds using our roads. Opinion polls showed that 21% of the population felt that they were affected by traffic noise as a nuisance factor. An outline of the effects of this noise on the affected population is given, illustrated by diagrams. Details about noise emissions (drive-past level) of the different types of vehicles in city traffic are stated and the effects of noise described. The author goes into the nuisance effect (noise is not a physical factor, but a psychosocial one), changes in behaviour (ways of speaking, reduction of stress on households in proportion to rising income and higher educational levels) and the consequences for health (the reaction of the body to noise is primarily a consequence of the psychosomatic organisation of ow bodies). In conclusion, the author deals with the subjective efficiency of noise protection measures. (HWJ).

  7. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  8. A Study on Effective Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦淑玲

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, effective teaching has become an important phrase in English language teaching, and causes great attention. As a result of the emergence of teacher-led initiatives, the need of teacher effectiveness has been given renewed focus. This essay outlines what roles teachers play in effective teaching, and what personal qualities teachers maintain that qualify them as effective teachers.

  9. Telepsychiatry: effectiveness and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajaria A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amy Gajaria,1 David K Conn,1,2 Robert Madan1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Providing psychiatric services by real-time videoconferencing has been increasingly adopted as a method of reaching hard-to-serve populations since the early 1990s. As the field has expanded, a growing body of research has developed investigating both how telepsychiatry compares to in-person psychiatric care and how effectively telepsychiatry can be implemented in routine clinical care. A narrative review was performed to consider the evidence that telepsychiatry is feasible and effective across a variety of patient populations and clinical settings. There is a growing body of evidence investigating the efficacy of telepsychiatry when used for psychiatric assessment and treatment in the adult, child, and geriatric populations. Though studies vary in quality, they generally demonstrate that telepsychiatry is effective across multiple age groups and clinical settings. Telepsychiatry is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians and is feasible to implement, with the suggestion that some patients may actually prefer telepsychiatry to in-person treatment. Issues to consider in the implementation of telepsychiatry services include funding and reimbursement, medico-legal issues when provision crosses legislative boundaries, incorporation into existing health systems, and crosscultural considerations. Future directions for research and practice include a need for higher-quality efficacy studies, consideration of data security, increased attention to low- and middle-income countries, and the introduction of novel technological approaches. Keywords: efficacy, service delivery, telemental health, videoconferencing 

  10. Quantum Effects in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  11. Effectiveness of peritonaeal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the last few years, an increasing number of patients suffering from terminal renal disease of various leading causes was treated with renal replacement therapy. Peritonaeal dialysis involves an exchange of water and solutes between blood in the peritonaeal capillaries and dialysate in the peritonaeal cavum throughout the peritonaeum. Effective dialysis treatment should provide good quality of life, decrease the number of physical complaints, and bring the incidence of morbidity and mortality closer to the incidence of morbidity and mortality in the healthy population. Aim. The aim of this study was the evaluation of peritonaeal transport characteristics and dialysis effectiveness in 58 patients affected by terminal renal disease who underwent peritonaeal dialysis treatment during August 2003 at the Clinic of Nephrology of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. Method. We examined 30 male and 28 female patients, with an average age of 52 years (range 26 to 78 years. The average duration of peritoneal dialysis treatment was 20 months (ranging from 2 to 66 months, and the end-stage renal failure was caused by different leading disease in our patients. We applied different dialysis modalities: continuous ambulatory peritonaeal dialysis (CAPD with three to five 2- or 3-litre exchanges daily, cyclic peritonaeal dialysis (CCPD, intermittent peritonaeal dialysis (IPD, or automatic peritonaeal dialysis (APD, according to the transport characteristics of the peritonaeal membrane, the residual renal function (RRF, and the clinical status of the patients, in order to perform adequate depuration as suggested by the new international criteria. A peritonaeal equilibrium test (PET was performed according to the new international advice; urea and creatinine clearances (Kt/V and Ccr as well as RRF were calculated using the internationally suggested formulas. Results. Most of our patients received effective dialysis treatment, thanks to the modulation of

  12. The Malthus Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies and elucidates what it calls the Malthus Effect from two perspectives: a genealogical-theoretical one and an empirical-diagnostic one. The first concerns its implications for Michel Foucault's genealogy and conceptions of modern governmentality. The second suggests...... that Malthusian concerns have an enduring presence in recent and contemporary politics. In them we find a government of life that tethers the question of poverty to that of population, as both a national and international concern, links biopolitics to questions of national security and is a key source...

  13. Phosphorobacterin and Its Effectiveness,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-30

    was . .. ’ " S ] - -. 7. 7’ In~ DOC = 84143200 PAGE 4 obtained the reliable-addition of-crop. The All-Union institute -f oleaginous and essential oil ...cultures for the years 1952-1955 ran on the Ciscaucasian lixiviated black soil 27 tests, in which was studied the effect/action of phosphorobacterin...Mazepin [30] on lixiviated black soil obtained from * phosphorobacterin-addition of crop of sugar beet to 2.3-6*. In 1965 L. M. Dorosinskiy [9) published

  14. Environmental Effects of BPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Canesi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on bisphenol A (BPA as an environmental contaminant has now major regulatory implications toward the ecosystem health, and hence it is incumbent on scientists to do their research to the highest standards possible, in order that the most appropriate decisions are made to mitigate the impacts to aquatic wildlife. However, the contribution given so far appears rather fragmented. The present overview aims to collect available information on the effects of BPA on aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates to provide a general scenario and to suggest future developments toward more comprehensive approaches useful for aquatic species protection.

  15. Assuring reliability program effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide simple identification and description of techniques that have proved to be most useful either in developing a new product or in improving reliability of an established product. The first reliability task is obtaining and organizing parts failure rate data. Other tasks are parts screening, tabulation of general failure rates, preventive maintenance, prediction of new product reliability, and statistical demonstration of achieved reliability. Five principal tasks for improving reliability involve the physics of failure research, derating of internal stresses, control of external stresses, functional redundancy, and failure effects control. A final task is the training and motivation of reliability specialist engineers.

  16. Higgs Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this meeting is to present new theoretical advancements related to effective field theories, evaluate the impact of initial results from the LHC Run2, and discuss proposals for data interpretation/presentation during Run2. A crucial role of the meeting is to bring together theorists from different backgrounds and with different viewpoints and to extend bridges towards the experimental community. To this end, we would like to achieve a good balance between senior and junior speakers, enhancing the visibility of younger scientists while keeping some overview talks.

  17. Effective String Theory Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Hellerman, Simeon; Maltz, Jonathan; Swanson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In this set of notes we simplify the formulation of the Poincar\\'e invariant effective string theory in D dimensions by adding an intrinsic metric and embedding its dynamics into the Polyakov formalism. We apply this formalism to classify operators order by order in the inverse physical length of the string, in a fully gauge-invariant framework. We use this classification to discuss universality and nonuniversalty of observables up to and including next-to-next-to-leading order in the long string expansion.

  18. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  19. Hepatoprotective effects of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Andréia Assunço; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Bracht, Adelar; da Costa, Sandra Maria Gomes; Koehnlein, Eloá Angélica; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2013-07-01

    The particular characteristics of growth and development of mushrooms in nature result in the accumulation of a variety of secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds, terpenes and steroids and essential cell wall components such as polysaccharides, b-glucans and proteins, several of them with biological activities. The present article outlines and discusses the available information about the protective effects of mushroom extracts against liver damage induced by exogenous compounds. Among mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum is indubitably the most widely studied species. In this review, however, emphasis was given to studies using other mushrooms, especially those presenting efforts of attributing hepatoprotective activities to specific chemical components usually present in the mushroom extracts.

  20. Interfacial effects in multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.

    1998-12-31

    Interfacial structure and the atomic interactions between atoms at interfaces in multilayers or nano-laminates have significant impact on the physical properties of these materials. A technique for the experimental evaluation of interfacial structure and interfacial structure effects is presented and compared to experiment. In this paper the impact of interfacial structure on the performance of x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultra-violet multilayer optic structures is emphasized. The paper is concluded with summary of these results and an assessment of their implications relative to multilayer development and the study of buried interfaces in solids in general.

  1. The Policy Design Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Troels Fage

    2014-01-01

    attitudes have argued that this ‘policy design effect’ can be explained by a combination of self-interest patterns, public perceptions of the recipient group and whether eligibility under the policy is perceived as fair or arbitrary.The explanations, however, lack micro-level theory and testing as to why...... the design of a policy affects individual and public support. This article seeks to explain this policy design effect by theoretically outlining and testing how being proximate to recipients of a social benefit affects attitudes towards the benefit. A survey of attitudes towards spending on five social...

  2. Events and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing the period of ‘intensive transnationalism’ among Pakistani migrants in Denmark precipitated by the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir, this article explores the relationship between events and effects on a global scale. One significant initiative after the disaster was the founding of an ad hoc......, and national identity politics in Denmark. Despite the medical doctors’ efforts and intentions, the out- come was framed by 9/11, which has become the major critical event of the decade—one that has supported a developing cleavage between the Danish majority and Denmark’s Muslim immigrant minority....

  3. The Microwave Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band (8 - 12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to ...

  4. Holographic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia “Galileo Galilei' , Università di Padova,and INFN - Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zaffaroni, Alberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca,and INFN - Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2016-06-28

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  5. Effectively Measuring Student Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Z. Posner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With a worldwide sample of students (N = 77, 387, this paper reviews and analyses the psychometric properties of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory [1]. Modest to strong internal reliability coefficients are found across a number of different dimensions. Predictive validity of the instrument is supported, with the instrument being able to differentiate between effective and ineffective leaders using both self-reported and observer (constituent data. Few significant differences are found on the basis of respondent gender, ethnicity, nationality, or institutional level (high school versus college. Implications for developing student leaders and future research are offered.

  6. Effects of Longitudinal Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Friberg, C; Friberg, Christer; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2000-01-01

    The description of longitudinal photons is far from trivial, and their phenomenological importance is largely unknown. While the cross section for direct interactions is calculable, an even more important contribution could come from resolved states. In the development of our model for the interactions of (real and) virtual photons, we have modeled resolved longitudinal effects by simple multiplicative factors on the resolved transverse-photon contributions. Recently, a first set of parton distributions for longitudinal virtual photons has been presented by Ch\\'yla. We therefore compare their impact on some representative distributions, relative to the simpler approaches.

  7. Hall Effect in Quasicrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang; HU Cheng-zheng; GONG Ping; WANG Ai-jun

    2005-01-01

    The relations between Hall effect and symmetry are discussed for all 2- and 3 dimensional quasicrystals with crystallographically forbidden symmetries. The results show that the numbers of independent components of the Hall coefficient (RH) are one for 3-dimensional quasicrystals, two for those 2 dimensional quasicrystals whose symmetry group is non-Abelian, and three for those 2-dimensional quasicrystals whose symmetry group is Abelian, respectively. The quasicrystals with the same number of independent components have the same form of the components of RH.

  8. REDD: The Copenhagen Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feja Lesniewska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An agreement on reducing emissions from avoided deforestation and degradation at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties 15 (COP 15 in Copenhagen December 2010 was not forthcoming. For a number of reasons this is a welcome outcome as several important outstanding legal and technical issues remain unresolved. This article examines the results from COP 15 including the Copenhagen Accord. It focuses on the key issues of principles, finance models, and environmental and social safeguards. It concludes with an assessment of the potential effect that the COP 15 will have on REDD negotiations this coming year prior to the UNFCCC COP 16 in Mexico December 2010.

  9. 2013 Development Effectiveness Review

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Development Effectiveness Review (DEfR) is the seventh annual performance review of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the first to apply the revised corporate results framework. The DEfR uses the 89 performance indicators of the revised framework to assess progress in implementing Strategy 2020, ADB’s long-term strategic framework. It evaluates ADB’s strengths and identifies areas where performance needs to be improved. The findings of the 2013 DEfR will inform actions to improve ...

  10. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  11. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  12. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record and are toler......Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record...... and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...... compared with the risk of osteoporotic fractures, at least in patients with the same risk of fractures as those in the phase III trials. It is biologically plausible that atypical fragility fractures could follow from suppression of bone remodeling, but high-quality studies proving causality are lacking...

  13. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record and are toler......Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record...... and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...... compared with the risk of osteoporotic fractures, at least in patients with the same risk of fractures as those in the phase III trials. It is biologically plausible that atypical fragility fractures could follow from suppression of bone remodeling, but high-quality studies proving causality are lacking...

  14. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-03

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2–80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2 . A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30 nm )/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2 (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9 T ) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  16. Photoprotective effects of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L

    2010-04-01

    Sun protective measures can reduce numbers of both precancerous actinic keratoses and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas within relatively short periods of time even in high-risk populations. Sunscreens, which tend to provide greater protection against shortwave UVB than against longer wavelength UVA radiation, can however provide only partial protection from the mutagenic and immune suppressive effects of sunlight. In large part, this reflects poor compliance with proper sunscreen application and reapplication. Skin cancer is by far the most common malignancy in Caucasian populations, and additional strategies to reduce the morbidity and economic burden of this disease are now urgently needed. Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3, is an inexpensive agent which is used for a variety of dermatological applications with little or no toxicity even at high doses. Nicotinamide has photoprotective effects against carcinogenesis and immune suppression in mice, and is photoimmunoprotective in humans when used as a lotion or orally. UV irradiation depletes keratinocytes of cellular energy and nicotinamide, which is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, may act at least in part by providing energy repletion to irradiated cells.

  17. [Neuropsychic effects of dehydroepiandrosterone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, A S; Pellerin, J

    2001-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEA-S) are secreted primarily by the adrenal glands. DHEA could also be a neuroactive steroidal hormone. Because basal levels of DHEA and DHEA-S in humans decrease significantly with age, these hormones have been assumed to be involved in the aging process and in a number of pathologies which develop with aging: immunosenescence, increased mortality, increased incidence of cancer, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, its role is still unknown. In humans, cross sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that DHEA might be associated with global measures of well-being and functioning, but positive effects on measures of memory and attention could not be found. Studies investigating DHEA and DHEA-S levels in dementia have produced controversial results. Short-term experimental studies have not shown significant improvement in global measures of well-being and functioning in healthy subjects but have revealed preliminary evidence for mood enhancing and antidepressant effects of DHEA. There is no evidence that DHEA could induce addiction in human beings.

  18. The Effective MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Kobakhidze, Archil

    2015-01-01

    We suggest an effective field theory framework to discuss deviations from the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) which is based on an alternative arrangement of the gauge-Higgs sector. In this effective MSSM (EffMSSM) nonlinearly realised $SU(2)\\times U(1)$ gauge sector is described by an $SU(2)\\times U(1)$-valued massive vector superfield, which contains a neutral CP-even and charged Higgs fields, while another neutral CP-even Higgs and the neutral CP-odd Higgs fields are residing in an $SU(2)\\times U(1)$-singlet chiral superfield. Although the new theory contains the same particle content as the conventional MSSM, the unconventional representation of superfields allows for new type of interactions, which may lead to a significant modification of the phenomenology. As an illustrative example we consider EffMSSM with modified Higgs and electroweak gauge sector augmented by gaugino soft supersymmetry breaking masses, $M_i~ (i=1,2,3)$ and the Standard Higgs soft-breaking masses, $m_{H_u}=m_{H_d}$ and ...

  19. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  20. The Effective Equation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  1. VITAMIN D IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Radović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical role in the homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D shows a regulatory effect on a number of different cells, especially its antiproliferative and pro-differential biological function. Through its own receptor in the immune cells, vitamin D increases the phagocytic activity of macrophages and NK cells. Also, by binding to the regulatory sequences of antimicrobial peptides genes, vitamin D increases the microbicidal activity of phagocytes. Inhibition of differentiation and maturation of antigen-presenting dendritic cells, as well as direct influence on their contact with T lymphocytes, it significantlly influences the type of immune response. Dendritic cells under the influence of vitamin D induce a suppressor T cells, which can inhibit Th1 cell response and are critical in the regulation of immune tolerance. Vitamin D inhibits proliferation of Th1 and Th17 cells, as well their cytokine production, and suppresses the differentiation and maturation of B lymphocytes. Due to all these functions, vitamin D has shown beneficial effects in the prevention and modification of a number of autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, immunity disorders with predominant Th2 response (asthma, allergies did not show such good results after the use of hypocalcemic VDR agonists.

  2. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  3. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dumas

    Full Text Available Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  4. Electron-hole interaction and optical excitations in solids, surfaces, and polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    The optical properties of a variety of materials have been calculated using a recently developed ab initio method based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation of the two-particle Green's functions. Relevant self-energy and electron-hole interaction effects are included from first-principles. Results on selected semiconductors, insulators, surfaces, and conjugated polymers are discussed. In many of these systems, excitonic effects are shown to dramatically alter the excitation energies a...

  5. Controlled Electronic Transport through Branched Molecular Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The conductance through a branched conductor placed between two electrodes is analyzed using the Landauer transport formulation within the framework of the single electron, and the tight binding approximations. Terminal side chains are expressed as self energy terms which map the branched conductor onto an effective linear chain Hamiltonian. The effect of uniform side branches on resonant zero-bias conductance is shown to be analytically solvable and particularly simple, w...

  6. Electron-hole interaction and optical excitations in solids, surfaces, and polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    The optical properties of a variety of materials have been calculated using a recently developed ab initio method based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation of the two-particle Green's functions. Relevant self-energy and electron-hole interaction effects are included from first-principles. Results on selected semiconductors, insulators, surfaces, and conjugated polymers are discussed. In many of these systems, excitonic effects are shown to dramatically alter the excitation energies a...

  7. Thermoelectricity at the molecular scale: a large Seebeck effect in endohedral metallofullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See Kei; Buerkle, Marius; Yamada, Ryo; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tada, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C82, Gd@C82, and Ce@C82. We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 junctions. The conductance, on the other hand, remains comparable for all three systems. The power factor determined for the Gd@C82 based junction is so far the highest obtained for a single-molecule device. Although the encapsulated metal atom does not directly contribute to the transport, we show that the observed enhancement of the thermopower for Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 is elucidated by the substantial changes in the electronic- and geometrical structure of the fullerene molecule induced by the encapsulated metal atom.Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C82, Gd@C82, and Ce@C82. We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 junctions. The conductance, on the other hand

  8. Effective elastic moduli and interface effects of nano- crystalline materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Many properties of nanocrystalline materials are associated with interface effects. Based on their microstructural features, the influence of interfaces on the effective elastic property of nanocrystalline materials is investigated. First, the Mori-Tanaka method is employed to determine the overall effective elastic moduli by considering a nanocrystalline material as a binary composite solid consisting of a crystal or inclusion phase with regular lattice connected by an amorphous-like interface or matrix phase. The effects of strain gradients are then examined on the effective elastic property by using the strain gradient theory to analyze a representative unit cell. Two interface mechanisms are elucidated that influence the effective stiffness and other mechanical properties of materials. One is the softening effect due to the distorted atomic structures and the increased atomic spacings in interface regions, and the other is the baffling effect due to the existence of boundary layers near interfaces.

  9. Effects of Therapist's Nonverbal Communication on Rated Skill and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Mark; Rogers, Ronald W.

    1980-01-01

    Nonverbal cues of immediacy significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. A therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and effectiveness. (Author)

  10. The placebo effect and nothingness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    In this paper I shall discuss the placebo effect from a posthuman angle. The placebo effect is a medical conundrum, as it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing”. Placebo literally means, ”I please”, and the placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often...... trials. It has been studied as an effect of personality traits, as an expectational effect, and from a physiological point of departure. Still it remains a medical riddle how something that is “nothing” can cause a measurable effect? In this paper I shall address this issue from a posthuman angle...

  11. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the chasm between development and implementation through a sustained focus on the effects to be achieved by users through their adoption and use of a system. This involves iteratively (a) specifying the purpose of the system in terms of effects, (b) developing an IT system and associated organizational...... change that realize the specified effects, and (c) measuring the absence or presence of the specified effects during pilot use of the system while also remaining alert to the emergence of beneficial but hitherto unspecified effects. In this paper we explore effects-driven IT development and discuss...

  12. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  13. Hepatoprotective Effects of Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Marina Peralta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The particular characteristics of growth and development of mushrooms in nature result in the accumulation of a variety of secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds, terpenes and steroids and essential cell wall components such as polysaccharides, b-glucans and proteins, several of them with biological activities. The present article outlines and discusses the available information about the protective effects of mushroom extracts against liver damage induced by exogenous compounds. Among mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum is indubitably the most widely studied species. In this review, however, emphasis was given to studies using other mushrooms, especially those presenting efforts of attributing hepatoprotective activities to specific chemical components usually present in the mushroom extracts.

  14. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  15. Quenched effective population size

    CERN Document Server

    Sagitov, Serik; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We study the genealogy of a geographically - or otherwise - structured version of the Wright-Fisher population model with fast migration. The new feature is that migration probabilities may change in a random fashion. Applying Takahashi's results on Markov chains with random transition matrices, we establish convergence to the Kingman coalescent, as the population size goes to infinity. This brings a novel formula for the coalescent effective population size (EPS). We call it a quenched EPS to emphasize the key feature of our model - random environment. The quenched EPS is compared with an annealed (mean-field) EPS which describes the case of constant migration probabilities obtained by averaging the random migration probabilities over possible environments.

  16. The Energy Diameter Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitello, P; Garza, R; Hernandez, A; Souers, P C

    2007-07-10

    We explore various relations for the detonation energy and velocity as they relate to the inverse radius of the cylinder. The detonation rate-inverse slope relation seen in reactive flow models can be used to derive the familiar Eyring equation. Generalized inverse radii can be shown to fit large quantities of cylinder results. A rough relation between detonation energy and detonation velocity is found from collected JWL values. Cylinder test data for ammonium nitrate mixes down to 6.35 mm radii are presented, and a size energy effect is shown to exist in the Cylinder test data. The relation that detonation energy is roughly proportional to the square of the detonation velocity is shown by data and calculation.

  17. The Energy Diameter Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P; Vitello, P; Garza, R; Hernandez, A

    2007-04-20

    Various relations for the detonation energy and velocity as they relate to the inverse radius of the cylinder are explored. The detonation rate-inverse slope relation seen in reactive flow models can be used to derive the familiar Eyring equation. Generalized inverse radii can be shown to fit large quantities of cylinder and sphere results. A rough relation between detonation energy and detonation velocity is found from collected JWL values. Cylinder test data for ammonium nitrate mixes down to 6.35 mm radii are presented, and a size energy effect is shown to exist in the Cylinder test data. The relation that detonation energy is roughly proportional to the square of the detonation velocity is shown by data and calculation.

  18. The Effective Ambidextrous Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    . Results of structural equation analyses indicate that superior performance in the ambidextrous organizations is associated with efficiencies derived from adherence to centralized strategic planning and effectiveness generated by decentralized innovative behavior through participation and autonomous......There is general consensus that coordination and integration are needed to achieve efficient outcomes while distributed decision power and autonomous actions are essential to develop innovative responses. These dual requirements for operational optimization and ongoing business innovation capture...... the essence of organizational ambidexterity as the means to sustain performance over time when environmental conditions change. This paper incorporates strategic management and organization theoretical rationales in a model that combines elements of integration and experimentation in the strategy making...

  19. Unparticle phase effects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Hung

    2007-01-01

    Unparticles proposed by Georgi carry CP conserving phases in their propagators. We demonstrate that these peculiar phases have an important impact on CP violation. Without including the strong QCD phases, we study the unparticle phase effects on the direct CP asymmetries in the exclusive decays of $\\bar B_d\\to \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B\\to \\pi K$, in which the flavor changing neutral currents are forbidden at tree level but induced by one-loop diagrams. Interesting and consistent results comparing to the data are obtained. In addition, we find that unparticles will significantly enhance the differential branching ratio of $b\\to s \\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$ at the small invariant mass of $\\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$. The forward-backward asymmetries for $b\\to s \\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$ due to unparticles are also explored.

  20. Phytochemicals: Health Protective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Winston; Beck, Leslie

    1999-01-01

    Consuming a diet rich in plant foods will provide a milieu of phytochemicals, non-nutritive substances in plants that possess health-protective benefits. Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, herbs, nuts and seeds contain an abundance of phenolic compounds, terpenoids, sulfur compounds, pigments, and other natural antioxidants that have been associated with protection from and/or treatment of conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The foods and herbs with the highest anticancer activity include garlic, soybeans, cabbage, ginger, licorice root, and the umbelliferous vegetables. Citrus, in addition to providing an ample supply of vitamin C, folic acid, potassium, and soluble fibre, contains a host of active phytochemicals. Clinical trials have not yet been able to demonstrate the same protective effects from taking supplements. It is difficult to estimate how many Canadians achieve an adequate level of consumption, but it seems reasonable to assume that many Canadians could benefit from substantially increasing their intake of vegetables and fruit.

  1. The effective bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; von Harling, Benedict; Serone, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We study the numerical bounds obtained using a conformal-bootstrap method — advocated in ref. [1] but never implemented so far — where different points in the plane of conformal cross ratios z and overline{z} are sampled. In contrast to the most used method based on derivatives evaluated at the symmetric point z=overline{z}=1/2 , we can consistently "integrate out" higher-dimensional operators and get a reduced simpler, and faster to solve, set of bootstrap equations. We test this "effective" bootstrap by studying the 3D Ising and O( n) vector models and bounds on generic 4D CFTs, for which extensive results are already available in the literature. We also determine the scaling dimensions of certain scalar operators in the O( n) vector models, with n = 2, 3, 4, which have not yet been computed using bootstrap techniques.

  2. Performance effect of Lean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    relevant to Denmark, but the approach is empirically more generalizable. We show that the effect of Lean standardized flow production practices on performance is mediated by analytical continuous improvement empowerment practices and by delegation of decision rights practices. Thus, standardized flow......To understand how the practices of Lean affect performance, we tested and validated a system-wide approach using mediating relationships in a structural equation model. We used a cross-sectional survey of 200 Danish companies that indicated that they used Lean. Thus, this study is especially...... of decision rights. The paper provides evidence that supports the view that middle managers’ actions further enhance performance in Lean companies. The right Lean behavior by middle managers increases the level of analytical continuous improvement empowerment. In total, high-performing Lean companies...

  3. Quantum Magellan Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work we consider remarkable experiment of the quantum dynamical interaction between a photon and fixed beam splitter with additional two optical fibers. Given fibers, having "circular", almost completely closed loop forms, admit that both superposition terms, corresponding to reflecting and passing photon, interact unlimitedly periodically with splitter. For increasing number of given interactions final state of the photon tends to superposition of reflecting and passing photon with equivalent superposition coefficients quite independently of their initial values. So, many time repeated unitary quantum dynamical evolution implies an unexpected degeneration. Feynman ingeniously observed that a time of the degeneration of the ideas will come, known to any great geographer-explorer (e.g. Magellan that first circumnavigate Earth), when he thinks about the army of the tourists that will come after him. For this reason mentioned dynamical degeneration will be called quantum Magellan effect. Also, we conside...

  4. Piezotronic and Piezophototronic Effects

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-05-06

    Owing to the polarization of ions in a crystal that has noncentral symmetry, a piezoelectric potential (piezopotential) is created in the material by applying a stress. The creation of piezopotential together with the presence of Schottky contacts are the fundamental physics responsible for a few important nanotechnologies. The nanogenerator is based on the piezopotential-driven transient flow of electrons in the external load. On the basis of nanomaterials in the wurtzite semiconductors, such as ZnO and GaN, electronics fabricated by using a piezopotential as a gate voltage are called piezotronics, with applications in strain/force/pressure-triggered/controlled electronic devices, sensors, and logic gates. The piezophototronic effect is a result of three-way coupling among piezoelectricity, photonic excitation, and semiconductor transport, which allows tuning and controlling of electro-optical processes by a strain-induced piezopotential. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Fair and effective?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Maya; Nathan, Iben

    2014-01-01

    70) Pasgaard, M.a and Nathan, I. Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) is a proposed mechanism to mitigate global climate change without compromising biodiversity and local livelihoods. REDD+ initiatives are being introduced at a fast pace across the Global South. Many...... this question in the particular context of a REDD+ demonstration project in Oddar Meanchey district in Northern Cambodia. Based on a study of the actual drivers of deforestation in the locality and of the mechanisms presently determining how the participating communities share costs and benefits from forest...... governance, we conclude that the studied approach to reducing emissions from large scale deforestation is not effective in its present form, and is even likely to increase rather than decrease inequalities among rural people in the area. Factors such as high pressure on land, weak land- and forest tenure...

  6. Nuclear medium effects in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ have been studied for deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in iron nucleus by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions, target mass correction, shadowing and anti-shadowing corrections. The calculations have been performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Using these structure functions we have obtained the ratio $R_{F2,F3}^A(x,Q^2)= \\frac{2F_{2,3}^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2,3}^D(x,Q^2)}$, the differential scattering cross section $\\frac{1}{E}\\frac{d^2\\sigma}{dxdy}$ and the total scattering cross section $\\sigma$. The results of our numerical calculations in $^{56}Fe$ are compared with the experimental results of NuTeV and CDHSW collaborations.

  7. MEDIA EFFECTS THEORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena MAFTEI-GOLOPENȚIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the world and the various existing points of view play sometimes the role of barriers to understanding the events that take place around us or in which we are directly involved, that we may find overwhelming sometimes. In this context, we have no choice but to find instruments that can help us find a meaning beyond ”raw” information. Frames and other media effects theories can be this instrument, that can help us understand ”the stories” about the surrounding world. Frames are useful to us because our mind can’t simply process each new situation from scratch. This paper aims mainly at analysing frames, their function, their types, their roles and the levels at which they manifest themselves. It also represents the theoretical background of a future case study about the way in which the academic world is symbolically seen by the press.

  8. Managing intercultural conflict effectively

    CERN Document Server

    Ting-Toomey, Stella

    2001-01-01

    In this volume, Ting-Toomey and Oetzel accomplish two objectives: to explain the culture-based situational conflict model, including the relationship among conflict, ethnicity, and culture; and, second, integrate theory and practice in the discussion of interpersonal conflict in culture, ethnic, and gender contexts. While the book is theoretically directed, it is also a down-to-earth practical book that contains ample examples, conflict dialogues, and critical incidents. Managing Intercultural Conflict Effectively helps to illustrate the complexity of intercultural conflict interactions and readers will gain a broad yet integrative perspective in assessing intercultural conflict situations. The book is a multidisciplinary text that draws from the research work of a variety of disciplines such as cross-cultural psychology, social psychology, sociology, marital and family studies, international management, and communication.

  9. The hot chocolate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Frank S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-05-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  10. Hot chocolate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  11. [New effect biomarkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G; Corradi, M; Mutti, A; Baccarelli, A; Pesatori, A; Bertazzi, P A

    2004-01-01

    The major research goals for researchers developing biomarkers of effect are the development and validation of biomarkers that permit the prediction of the risk of disease in individuals and groups. One important objective is to prevent human cancer. This article reviews the most recent analytical methodologies, validation studies and field trials together with auditing and quality assessment of the necessary data based on scientific grounds. Consideration is given to new developments in the relatively young field of toxicogenomics, possibly leading to the identification of early changes that may lead to both cancer and non-cancer end points. Although the creation and development of reliable databases integrating information from genomic and proteomic research programmes should offer a contribution to the prediction of risks and prevention of diseases related to chemical exposure, the most promising future application of these technologies lies in the molecular diagnosis of diseases whose nosography will probably be redefined.

  12. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2012-01-01

    limiting the instance designer’s creativity, the design theorist may create an opportunity for the instance designer to be creative by passing down a design theory. Further, the artifact instance designer operates within the problem domain defined by design theorist, and engages in design thinking......Design theory lies at the heart of information systems design science research. One concern in this area is the potential to limit the designer’s creativity by over-specifying the meta-design or the design process. This paper explains how design research encapsulates a two-person design team...... consisting of the design theorist and the artifact instance designer. Design theory embodies a creativity passdown effect in which the creative design thinking is partly executed by the design theorist and the completion of this thinking is deferred to the artifact instance designer. In fact, rather than...

  13. The Effective Bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Serone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We study the numerical bounds obtained using a conformal-bootstrap method - advocated in ref. [1] but never implemented so far - where different points in the plane of conformal cross ratios $z$ and $\\bar z$ are sampled. In contrast to the most used method based on derivatives evaluated at the symmetric point $z=\\bar z =1/2$, we can consistently "integrate out" higher-dimensional operators and get a reduced simpler, and faster to solve, set of bootstrap equations. We test this "effective" bootstrap by studying the 3D Ising and $O(n)$ vector models and bounds on generic 4D CFTs, for which extensive results are already available in the literature. We also determine the scaling dimensions of certain scalar operators in the $O(n)$ vector models, with $n=2,3,4$, which have not yet been computed using bootstrap techniques.

  14. Effects of virtual monopoles;

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetism would be a ``more unified'' theory if there were elementary magnetic monopoles and/or particles with both electric and magnetic charges (dyons). I discuss the simplest possibilities for the addition of these entities onto the Standard Model, and their empirical consequences. Lower limits on the masses of monopoles and dyons stemming from their quantum effects on current observables turn out to be much stronger than the existing limits from direct searches. Anomalies in the three-photon decay of the Z constitute good specific signatures for monopoles or dyons. T-odd observables in the e^+e^-\\!\\rightarrow\\! W^+W^- process are signatures for dyons, but they are severely constrained by existing data. The subjects of monopolium, monopole cosmology and non-elementary monopoles are also discussed.

  15. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  16. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Design theory lies at the heart of information systems design science research. One concern in this area is the potential to limit the designer’s creativity by over-specifying the meta-design or the design process. This paper explains how design research encapsulates a two-person design team...... consisting of the design theorist and the artifact instance designer. Design theory embodies a creativity passdown effect in which the creative design thinking is partly executed by the design theorist and the completion of this thinking is deferred to the artifact instance designer. In fact, rather than...... limiting the instance designer’s creativity, the design theorist may create an opportunity for the instance designer to be creative by passing down a design theory. Further, the artifact instance designer operates within the problem domain defined by design theorist, and engages in design thinking...

  17. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  18. Psychobehavioral Effects of Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Suchorzynska, Anna

    2017-06-25

    Meditation is an increasingly popular psychobehavioral therapy. Various meditation techniques in use make it hard to objectively scrutinize the psychological benefits. Therefore, in this study we set out to examine the effects of two fundamentally different meditative techniques, Zazen, 'seated meditation', in which the body and mind are calmed, and Tai Chi, 'meditation in motion', based on energetic martial art performance. The aim was to compare the effects of both techniques on personality structure, emotional intelligence, mood, and coping with stress. The study was conducted in 48 healthy volunteers, aged 39-50, divided into those practicing Zazen, Tai Chi, and the non-meditating controls, each group consisting of 16 persons. The psychometric tools consisted of Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL), Emotional Intelligence Inventory (INTE), and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). We found that both Zazen and Tai Chi meditations significantly enhanced openness to experience, one of the personality dimensions of the Big Five Model. The enhanced openness was associated with improved strategies for coping with stress. The meditators had less avoidance-oriented approaches to perceived stress. They also had improved mood compared with non-meditating controls. The findings suggest that enhanced openness to experience could shape one's desire to hold onto the meditation regimen. We conclude that both, diametrically different types of meditation, are conducive to mental health by improving the general well-being, counteracting stress, and leading to a better vigor of spirit. Meditation may thus be considered a complimentary, albeit rather modestly acting, adjunct to psychotherapy.

  19. CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF PHYTOSTEROLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Dhankhar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Foods and nutrients play a vital role in normal functioning of the body. They are helpful in maintaining the health of the individual and in reducing the risk of various diseases. Worldwide acceptance of this fact formed a recognition link between "nutrition" and "health" and the concept of "nutraceuticals" has evolved. More than any other disease, the etiology of cardiovascular disease reveals many risk factors that are amenable to nutraceutical intervention. The scientific literature shows that there are several bioactive ingredients that are present in small amounts in plants that can affect mammalian biological processes relevant to cardiovascular disease and other common human diseases. The ability of bioactive ingredients to positively influence cardiovascular risk factors should be recognized as an enormous opportunity in the treatment of a highly prevalent disease. Nutraceuticals hold promise in clinical therapy as they have the potential to significantly reduce the risk of side effects associated with drugs and pills along with reducing the global health care cost. Common ingredients that have been studied include soluble fiber (from oats and psyllium; long-chain omega-3 fatty acids; plant sterols or phytosterols; polyphenols (from dark chocolate, red wine, green tea, or extravirgin olive oil; isoflavones from soy; Chinese red-yeast rice; and probiotics from dairy products. Amongst this vast array of bioactives, there is emerging evidence indicating role of phytosterols in mitigating risk of cardiovascular disease and promoting general health and well-being. Phytosterols are cholesterol-like molecules found in all plant foods. They are absorbed only in trace amounts but inhibit the absorption of intestinal cholesterol including recirculating endogenous biliary cholesterol, a key step in cholesterol elimination. In this review, an attempt has been made to summarize some of the recent research findings on phytosterols that have beneficial

  20. Triplet pairing in pure neutron matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Sarath; Ramanan, S.

    2016-12-01

    We study the zero-temperature BCS gaps for the triplet channel in pure neutron matter using similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolved interactions. We use the dependence of the results on the SRG resolution scale as a tool to analyze medium and many-body corrections. In particular, we study the effects of including the three-body interactions at leading order, which appear at next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) in the chiral effective field theory (EFT), as well as that of the first-order self-energy corrections on the zero-temperature gap. In addition we also extract the transition temperature as a function of densities and verify the BCS scaling of the zero-temperature gaps to the transition temperature. We observe that the self-energy effects are very crucial in order to reduce the SRG resolution scale dependence of the results, while the three-body effects at the leading order do not change the two-body resolution scale dependence. On the other hand, the results depend strongly on the three-body cutoff, emphasizing the importance of the missing higher-order three-body effects. We also observe that self-energy effects reduce the overall gap as well as shift the gap closure to lower densities.