WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductivity superfluidity nuclear

  1. Tests of the nuclear equation of state and superfluid and superconducting gaps using the Cassiopeia A neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O; Potekhin, Alexander Y

    2014-01-01

    The observed rapid cooling of the Cassiopeia A neutron star can be interpreted as being caused by neutron and proton transitions from normal to superfluid and superconducting states in the stellar core. Here we present two new Chandra ACIS-S Graded observations of this neutron star and measurements of the neutron star mass M and radius R found from consistent fitting of both the X-ray spectra and cooling behavior. This comparison is only possible for individual nuclear equations of state. We test phenomenological superfluid and superconducting gap models which mimic many of the known theoretical models against the cooling behavior. Our best-fit solution to the Cassiopeia A data is one in which the (M,R) = (1.43 Msun,12.6 km) neutron star is built with the BSk21 equation of state, strong proton superconductor and moderate neutron triplet superfluid gap models, and a pure iron envelope or a thin carbon layer on top of an iron envelope, although there are still large observational and theoretical uncertainties.

  2. Hierarchic Models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaivarainen, A

    2000-01-01

    New models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity, based on new Hierarchic theory, general for liquids and solids (physics/0102086), have been proposed. CONTENTS: 1 Turbulence. General description; 2 Mesoscopic mechanism of turbulence; 3 Superfluidity. General description; 4 Mesoscopic scenario of fluidity; 5 Superfluidity as a hierarchic self-organization process; 6 Superfluidity in 3He; 7 Superconductivity: General properties of metals and semiconductors; Plasma oscillations; Cyclotron resonance; Electroconductivity; 8. Microscopic theory of superconductivity (BCS); 9. Mesoscopic scenario of superconductivity: Interpretation of experimental data in the framework of mesoscopic model of superconductivity.

  3. Superfluidity and Superconductivity in Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Chamel

    2017-09-01

    Neutron stars, the compact stellar remnants of core-collapse supernova explosions, are unique cosmic laboratories for exploring novel phases of matter under extreme conditions. In particular, the occurrence of superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars will be briefly reviewed.

  4. The hottest superfluid and superconductor in the Universe: Discovery and nuclear physics implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G; Espinoza, Cristobal M; Glampedakis, Kostas; Haskell, Brynmor; Heinke, Craig O

    2013-01-01

    We present recent work on using astronomical observations of neutron stars to reveal unique insights into nuclear matter that cannot be obtained from laboratories on Earth. First, we discuss our measurement of the rapid cooling of the youngest neutron star in the Galaxy; this provides the first direct evidence for superfluidity and superconductivity in the supra-nuclear core of neutron stars. We show that observations of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on neutron stars can be used to constrain properties of neutron superfluidity and neutrino emission. We describe the implications of rapid neutron star rotation rates on aspects of nuclear and superfluid physics. Finally, we show that entrainment coupling between the neutron superfluid and the nuclear lattice leads to a less mobile crust superfluid; this result puts into question the conventional picture of pulsar glitches as being solely due to the crust superfluid and suggests that the core superfluid also participates.

  5. Magnetic trapping of superconducting submicron particles produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Suzuki, Junpei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Tokawa, Yurina; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Ashida, Masaaki; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2017-02-01

    We produced spherical superconducting submicron particles by laser ablation of their base metal tips in superfluid helium, and trapped them using a quadrupole magnetic field owing to the diamagnetism caused by the Meissner effect. We also measured their critical temperatures of superconductivity, by observing the threshold temperatures for the confinement of superconducting submicron particles in the trap.

  6. New dynamic critical phenomena in nuclear and quark superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sogabe, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamic critical phenomena near the possible high-density QCD critical point inside the superfluid phase of nuclear and quark matter. We find that this critical point belongs to a new dynamic universality class beyond the conventional classification by Hohenberg and Halperin. We show that the speed of the superfluid phonon vanishes at the critical point and that the dynamic critical index is $z \\approx 2$.

  7. Applied superconductivity and superfluidity for the exploration of the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso C P.; Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin; Zhong, Fang; Strayer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    We discuss how superconductivity and superfluidity can be applied to solve the challenges in the exploration of the Moon and Mars. High sensitivity instruments using phenomena of superconductivity and superfluidity can potentially make significant contributions to the fields of navigation, automation, habitation, and resource location. Using the quantum nature of superconductivity, lightweight and very sensitive diagnostic tools can be made to monitor the health of astronauts. Moreover, the Moon and Mars offer a unique environment for scientific exploration. We also discuss how powerful superconducting instruments may enable scientists to seek answers to several profound questions about nature. These answers will not only deepen our appreciation of the universe, they may also open the door to paradigm-shifting technologies. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppression of superconductivity in thin Nb nanowires fabricated in the vortex cores of superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Eugene B., E-mail: Gordon.eb@gmail.com [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bezryadin, Alexey V. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61874 (United States); Karabulin, Alexander V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Matyushenko, Vladimir I. [The Branch of Talrose Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1/10, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khodos, Igor I. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials RAS, Institutskaya Street 6, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation in superfluid helium allows producing thin nanowires of any metal. • Nb nanowires, about 4 nm in diameter, form in the cores of superfluid vortices. • Our oxide-free Nb nanowires exhibit a quantum superconductor-to-insulator transition. • The insulating behavior in Nb wires is explained in terms of quantum phase slips. • Such nanowires can be used in superconducting phase-slip qubits and transistors. - Abstract: Nanowires of niobium, platinum and indium–lead In{sub 88}Pb{sub 12} alloy with diameters of 4.2, 3.6 and 8 nm, respectively, were grown in quantized vortices of superfluid helium, and the dependences of their resistance on temperature have been studied. Through a detailed comparison of these dependences we present evidence that superconducting niobium wires allow a high rate of quantum phase slip. This phase slippage leads to a phase transition to an insulating state at T → 0.

  9. Heat transfer between the superconducting cables of the LHC accelerator magnets and the superfluid helium bath

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, Pier Paolo; Tommasini, D

    In this thesis work we investigate the heat transfer through the electrical insulation of superconducting cables cooled by superfluid helium. The cable insulation constitutes the most severe barrier for heat extraction from the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We performed an experimental analysis, a theoretical modeling and a fundamental research to characterize the present LHC insulation and to develop new ideas of thermally enhanced insulations. The outcome of these studies allowed to determine the thermal stability of the magnets for the LHC and its future upgrades. An innovative measurement technique was developed to experimentally analyze the heat transfer between the cables and the superfluid helium bath. It allowed to describe the LHC coil behavior using the real cable structure, an appropriate thermometry and controlling the applied pressure. We developed a new thermally enhanced insulation scheme based on an increased porosity to superfluid helium. It aims at withstan...

  10. 3 scientists win Nobel for physics electric superconductivity, superfluidity work honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel prize for physics to Russian Vitaly Ginzburg, 87, and Russian-born American Alexei Abrikosov, 75, for their work on electric superconductivity, and to British-born American Anthony Leggett, 65, for describing how liquid helium can become a "superfluid." The three scientists will split $1.3 million in prize money (1 page).

  11. Novel Role of Superfluidity in Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Magierski, Piotr; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate, within symmetry unrestricted time dependent density functional theory, the existence of new effects in low-energy nuclear reactions which originate from superfluidity. The dynamics of the pairing field induces solitonic excitations in the colliding nuclear systems, leading to qualitative changes in the reaction dynamics. The solitonic excitation prevents collective energy dissipation and effectively suppresses capture cross section. We demonstrate how the variations of the total kinetic energy of the fragments can be traced back to the energy stored in the superfluid junction of colliding nuclei. Both contact time and scattering angle in non-central collisions are significantly affected. The modification of the capture cross section and possibilities for its experimental detection are discussed.

  12. Nuclear superfluidity in isospin asymmetric matter within the Skyrme model

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, R.

    2013-01-01

    The phase diagram of the superfluid phase coupled to spin singlet (S=0) and isospin triplet (T=1) states in infinite nuclear matter is analyzed within the nonrelativistic Skyrme model. We use an approach that allows a unified and consistent treatment of the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. The gap equation is solved for the full range of accessible densities, isospin asymmetries, and temperatures. The characteristic features of each of the components Tz=0, +1, -1 are emphasized. ...

  13. Isotope effect in the superfluid density of high-temperature superconducting cuprates: stripes, pseudogap, and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon, J L; Islam, R S; Storey, J; Williams, G V M; Cooper, J R

    2005-06-17

    Underdoped cuprates exhibit a normal-state pseudogap, and their spins and doped carriers tend to spatially separate into 1D or 2D stripes. Some view these as central to superconductivity and others as peripheral and merely competing. Using La(2-x)Sr(x)Cu(1-y)Zn(y)O4 we show that an oxygen isotope effect in Tc and in the superfluid density can be used to distinguish between the roles of stripes and pseudogap and also to detect the presence of impurity scattering. We conclude that stripes and pseudogap are distinct, and both compete and coexist with superconductivity.

  14. Landau Zener Effect in Superfluid Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirea, M.

    The Landau Zener effect is generalized for many-body systems with pairing residual interactions. The microscopic equations of motion are obtained and the 14C decay of 223Ra spectroscopic factors are deduced. An asymmetric nuclear shape parametrization given by two intersected spheres is used. The single particle level scheme is determined in the frame of the superasymmetric two-center shell model. The deformation energy is computed in the microscopic macroscopic approximation. The penetrabilities are obtained within the WKB approximation. The fine structure of the cluster decay analyzed in the frame of this formalism gives a very good agreement with the experimental ratio of partial half-lives for transition to the first excited state and to the ground state.

  15. Single-Photon-Sensitive Superconducting TES Sensors for EUV Photons in Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Faustin; Hertel, Scott; Prober, Daniel; McKinsey, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Incident radiation can excite superfluid helium into a diatomic He2* excimer, which decays through the emission of a 15 eV photon. Such excimers have been used as tracers to measure the superfluid's quantum turbulence, thanks partly to the long half-life of the He2* triplet state (~13 seconds). However, the efficient detection of these excimers remains a challenge. This work presents two different detector designs capable of in-situ detection of the He2* excimers either directly, or by collecting the 15 eV emission upon decay. Both detectors are based on the superconducting transition edge sensor. One is designed to operate near 2 K, while the other is designed for ~100 mK operation in a dilution refrigerator. We will discuss operating characteristics of both, and present preliminary data from the 2 K detector.

  16. Superfluid density and superconducting transition temperature in Bi-based cuprate single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparov, L.; Tanner, D.; Berger, H.; Forro, L.; Margaritondo, G.

    2000-03-01

    We present temperature-dependent reflectance measurements for Bi-based cuprate single crystals in the frequency range from 100 to 40,000 cm-1 (0.012--5 eV). The optical conductivity is obtained by Kramers-Kronig analysis. We compare differently doped Bi-2212 (particularly in the underdoped regime) as well as Pr-doped Bi-2212 crystals by analyzing optical conductivity in the framework of a two-fluid approach. This approach allows us to study correlations between superfluid density and superconducting transition temperature of these materials.

  17. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: application to superfluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salort, J; Monfardini, A; Roche, P-E

    2012-12-01

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of ≈ 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.

  18. Coupling an Ensemble of Electrons on Superfluid Helium to a Superconducting Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantized lateral motional states and the spin states of electrons trapped on the surface of superfluid helium have been proposed as basic building blocks of a scalable quantum computer. Circuit quantum electrodynamics allows strong dipole coupling between electrons and a high-Q superconducting microwave resonator, enabling such sensitive detection and manipulation of electron degrees of freedom. Here, we present the first realization of a hybrid circuit in which a large number of electrons are trapped on the surface of superfluid helium inside a coplanar waveguide resonator. The high finesse of the resonator allows us to observe large dispersive shifts that are many times the linewidth and make fast and sensitive measurements on the collective vibrational modes of the electron ensemble, as well as the superfluid helium film underneath. Furthermore, a large ensemble coupling is observed in the dispersive regime during experiment, and it shows excellent agreement with our numeric model. The coupling strength of the ensemble to the cavity is found to be ≈1  MHz per electron, indicating the feasibility of achieving single electron strong coupling.

  19. Applied Superconductivity and Superfluidity for Exploration of the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso

    2004-01-01

    The initiative for human exploration of the Moon and Mars presents great technical challenges as well as new opportunities for scientific investigations. I will discuss recent developments in superconductivity and superfluidity that can be applied to solve some of these technical challenges. This includes biomedical imaging of astronauts using an array of SQUID magnetometers; resource exploration using SQUID as well as a SQUID-based gravitational gradiometer; measurement of rotational jitter of the Moon and of Mars, for improvement in GPS using a superfluid gyroscope; and the concept of a high precision superfluid clock recently proposed for navigation at JPL. Physicists can also participate as explorers in the Moon/Mars initiative. I will discuss a proposed experiment to search for the postulated strangelet particle (a dark matter candidate) by using the Moon or Mars as a giant detector. As suggest by Nobel Laureate Sheldon Glashow, a massive (approx. 1 ton) strangelet can generate a trail of seismic waves, as it traverses a celestial body. The pristine environments of the Moon and Mars, with their very low seismic backgrounds, are ideal for such an experiment. Very sensitive SQUID-based seismometers can be deployed to increase the sensitivity of strangelet detection.

  20. Generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in superconductivity and superfluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano, M. de

    2008-03-01

    Unification of the Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) theories is surveyed in terms of a generalized BEC (GBEC) finite-temperature statistical formalism. A vital distinction is that Cooper pairs (CPs) are true bosons that may suffer a BEC since they obey BE statistics, in contrast with BCS pairs that are "hard-core bosons" at best. A second crucial ingredient is the explicit presence of hole-pairs (2h) alongside the usual electron-pairs (2e). A third critical element (particularly in 2D where ordinary BEC does not occur) is the linear dispersion relation of CPs in leading order in the center-of-mass momentum (CMM) power-series expansion of the CP energy. The GBEC theory reduces in limiting cases to all five continuum (as opposed to "spin") statistical theories of superconductivity, from BCS on one extreme to the BEC theory on the other, as well as to the BCS-Bose "crossover" picture and the 1989 Friedberg-Lee BEC theory. It accounts for 2e- and 2h-CPs in arbitrary proportions while BCS theory can be deduced from the GBEC theory but allows only equal (50%-50%) BE condensed-mixtures of both kinds of CPs. As it yields the precise BCS gap equation for all temperatures as well as the precise BCS zero-temperature condensation energy for all couplings, it suggests that the BCS condensate is a BE condensate of a ternary mixture of kinematically independent unpaired electrons coexisting with equally proportioned weakly-bound zero-CMM 2e- and 2h-CPs. Without abandoning the electron-phonon mechanism in moderately weak coupling, and fortuituously insensitive to the BF interactions, the GBEC theory suffices to reproduce the unusually high values of Tc (in units of the Fermi temperature TF) of 0.01-0.05 empirically found in the so-called "exotic" superconductors of the Uemura plot, including cuprates, in contrast to the low values of Tc/TF⩽10-3 roughly reproduced by BCS theory for conventional (mostly elemental) superconductors.

  1. Non-linear Model Predictive Control for cooling strings of superconducting magnets using superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)673023; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique

    In each of eight arcs of the 27 km circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 2.5 km long strings of super-conducting magnets are cooled with superfluid Helium II at 1.9 K. The temperature stabilisation is a challenging control problem due to complex non-linear dynamics of the magnets temperature and presence of multiple operational constraints. Strong nonlinearities and variable dead-times of the dynamics originate at strongly heat-flux dependent effective heat conductivity of superfluid that varies three orders of magnitude over the range of possible operational conditions. In order to improve the temperature stabilisation, a proof of concept on-line economic output-feedback Non-linear Model Predictive Controller (NMPC) is presented in this thesis. The controller is based on a novel complex first-principles distributed parameters numerical model of the temperature dynamics over a 214 m long sub-sector of the LHC that is characterized by very low computational cost of simulation needed in real-time optimizat...

  2. On the role of the uncertainty principle in superconductivity and superfluidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Onofrio

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the general interplay between the uncertainty principle and the onset of dissipationless transport phenomena such as superconductivity and superfluidity.We argue that these phenomena are possible because of the robustness of many-body quantum states with respect to the external environment,which is directly related to the uncertainty principle as applied to coordinates and momenta of the carriers.In the case of superconductors,this implies relationships between macroscopic quantities such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field,and microscopic quantities such as the amount of spatial squeezing of a Cooper pair and its correlation time.In the case of ultracold atomic Fermi gases,this should be paralleled by a connection between the critical temperature for the onset of superfluidity and the corresponding critical velocity.Tests of this conjecture are finally sketched with particular regard to the understanding of the behaviour of superconductors under external pressures or mesoscopic superconductors,and the possibility to mimic these effects in ultracold atomic Fermi gases using Feshbach resonances and atomic squeezed states.

  3. Nuclear ferromagnetism and superconductivity at negative nuclear temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dyugaev, A M; Vider, P

    2001-01-01

    The quantitative theory of effects of the ferromagnetism on the metal superconductivity is proposed with an account of the spin-spin electron-nuclear interaction. The nuclear ferromagnetism at the negative temperatures, when the nuclear magnetization is directed against the external magnetic field, does not suppress but rather facilitates the superconductivity. The critical magnetic field of the Be metals and TiH sub 2 sub . sub 0 sub 7 hydrate may by one order exceed the critical field of the nonmagnetic superconductor

  4. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  5. Nuclear superfluidity and cooling time of neutron-star crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monrozeau, C.; Margueron, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite Paris Sud, F-91406 Orsay CEDEX (France); Sandulescu, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite Paris Sud, F-91406 Orsay CEDEX (France); Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-03-15

    We analyse the effect of neutron superfluidity on the cooling time of inner crust matter in neutron stars, in the case of a rapid cooling of the core. The specific heat of the inner crust, which determines the thermal response of the crust, is calculated in the framework of HFB approach at finite temperature. The calculations are performed with two paring forces chosen to simulate the pairing properties of uniform neutron matter corresponding respectively to Gogny-BCS approximation and to many-body techniques including polarisation effects. Using a simple model for the heat transport across the inner crust, it is shown that the two pairing forces give very different values for the cooling time. (authors)

  6. Relativistic dynamics of superfluid-superconducting mixtures in the presence of topological defects and the electromagnetic field, with application to neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gusakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The relativistic dynamic equations are derived for a superfluid-superconducting mixture coupled to the electromagnetic field. For definiteness and bearing in mind possible applications of our results to neutron stars, it is assumed that the mixture is composed of superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons, and normal electrons. Proton superconductivity of both I and II types is analysed, and possible presence of neutron and proton vortices (or magnetic domains in the case of type-I proton superconductivity) is allowed for. The derived equations neglect all dissipative effects except for the mutual friction dissipation and are valid for arbitrary temperatures (i.e. they do not imply that all nucleons are paired), which is especially important for magnetar conditions. It is demonstrated that these general equations can be substantially simplified for typical neutron stars, for which a kind of magnetohydrodynamic approximation is justified. Our results are compared to the nonrelativistic formulations existing ...

  7. Nuclear Electronics: Superconducting Detectors and Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polushkin, Vladimir

    2004-06-01

    With the commercialisation of superconducting particles and radiation detectors set to occur in the very near future, nuclear analytical instrumentation is taking a big step forward. These new detectors have a high degree of accuracy, stability and speed and are suitable for high-density multiplex integration in nuclear research laboratories and astrophysics. Furthermore, superconducting detectors can also be successfully applied to food safety, airport security systems, medical examinations, doping tests & forensic investigations. This book is the first to address a new generation of analytical tools based on new superconductor detectors demonstrating outstanding performance unsurpassed by any other conventional devices. Presenting the latest research and development in nanometer technologies and biochemistry this book: * Discusses the development of nuclear sensing techniques. * Provides guidance on the design and use of the next generation of detectors. * Describes cryogenic detectors for nuclear measurements and spectrometry. * Covers primary detectors, front-end readout electronics and digital signal processing. * Presents applications in nanotechnology and modern biochemistry including DNA sequencing, proteinomics, microorganisms. * Features examples of two applications in X-ray electron probe nanoanalysis and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This comprehensive treatment is the ideal reference for researchers, industrial engineers and graduate students involved in the development of high precision nuclear measurements, nuclear analytical instrumentation and advanced superconductor primary sensors. This book will also appeal to physicists, electrical and electronic engineers in the nuclear industry.

  8. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the {sup 85}Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a {sup 85}Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the {sup 85}Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei.

  9. Heat transfer through Rutherford superconducting cable with novel pattern of polyimide electrical insulation in pressurized superfluid helium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorowski, Maciej; Polinski, Jaroslaw; Strychalski, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Future LHC accelerator luminosity upgrade will increase a beam losses heat deposition in the superconducting magnet coils. Main barrier of the heat evacuation from the coils made of Rutherford type cables is a cable electrical insulation. The insulation is made of polyimide tapes wrapped around the cable in a special configuration. Presently used insulation wrapping schemes constitute very good electrical insulation with relatively low heat transport ability. Therefore a new insulation wrapping schemes with enhanced helium permeability and adequate dielectric properties have been developed at CERN. An experimental comparative study of heat transfer perpendicular to the Rutherford type cable, for an old and new insulation wrapping schemes have been accomplished at Wroclaw University of Technology. The tests have been performed in pressurized superfluid helium conditions, and at 60 MPa of the sample applied external pressure simulating the Lorentz forces. This paper presents the measurements methodology and gives experimental results.

  10. Landau-Zener effect in superfluid nuclear systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mirea, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Landau--Zener effect is generalized for many-body systems with pairing residual interactions. The microscopic equations of motion are obtained and the $^{14}$C decay of $^{223}$Ra spectroscopic factors are deduced. An asymmetric nuclear shape parametrization given by two intersected spheres is used. The single particle level scheme is determined in the frame of the superasymmetric two-center shell. The deformation energy is computed in the microscopic-macroscopic approximation. The penetr...

  11. Landau-Zener effect in superfluid nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mirea, M

    2003-01-01

    The Landau--Zener effect is generalized for many-body systems with pairing residual interactions. The microscopic equations of motion are obtained and the $^{14}$C decay of $^{223}$Ra spectroscopic factors are deduced. An asymmetric nuclear shape parametrization given by two intersected spheres is used. The single particle level scheme is determined in the frame of the superasymmetric two-center shell. The deformation energy is computed in the microscopic-macroscopic approximation. The penetrabilities are obtained within the WKB approximation. The fine structure of the cluster decay analyzed in the frame of this formalism gives a very good agreement with the experimental ratio of partial half-lives obtained in special conditions

  12. Quasi-periodic oscillations in superfluid, relativistic magnetars with nuclear pasta phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Pons, José A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the torsional magneto-elastic oscillations of relativistic superfluid magnetars and explore the effects of a phase transition in the crust-core interface (nuclear pasta) which results in a weaker elastic response. Exploring various models with different extension of nuclear pasta phases, we find that the differences in the oscillation spectrum present in purely elastic modes (weak magnetic field) are smeared out with increasing strength of the magnetic field. For magnetar conditions, the main characteristic and features of models without nuclear pasta are preserved. We find, in general, two classes of magneto-elastic oscillations which exhibit a different oscillation pattern. For Bp global magneto-elastic oscillations show a constant phase and become dominant when Bp > 5 × 1014 G. We do not find any evidence of fundamental pure crustal modes in the low-frequency range (below 200 Hz) for Bp ≥ 1014 G.

  13. Quasi-periodic oscillations in superfluid, relativistic magnetars with nuclear pasta phases

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We study the torsional magneto-elastic oscillations of relativistic superfluid magnetars and explore the effects of a phase transition in the crust-core interface (nuclear pasta) which results in a weaker elastic response. Exploring various models with different extension of nuclear pasta phases, we find that the differences in the oscillation spectrum present in purely elastic modes (low magnetic field), are smeared out with increasing strength of the magnetic field. For magnetar conditions, the main characteristic and features of models without nuclear pasta are preserved. We find in general two classes of magneto-elastic oscillations which exhibit a different oscillation pattern. For B_p 5 x 10^{14} G. We do not find any evidence of fundamental pure crustal modes in the low frequency range (below 200 Hz) for B_p >= 10^{14} G.

  14. Design and Fabrication of Superfluid Heat Exchanger Tubes for the LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Favre, G; Ferreira, L M A; Rossi, L; Savary, F

    2004-01-01

    The dipole and quadrupole cold masses of the LHC machine require about 1 700 heat exchanger tubes (HET). In operation the HET carries a two-phase flow of superfluid helium at sub-atmospheric pressure. The HET consists of an oxygen-free, seamless copper tube equipped with stainless steel ends. After an evaluation of different alternatives, a design based on the technologies of vacuum brazing and electron beam welding has been adopted. Presence of these multiple technologies at CERN and synergies with the cleaning, handling and transport of other 15-metre components for LHC, motivated CERN to undertake this series fabrication on site. The raw copper tubes are procured in industry, presenting challenging issues of geometric precision. Organisation of the HET fabrication includes cryomeasurements to validate cleaning procedures, characterisation of welding procedures, design and experimental verification of buckling pressure, quality control during series production. The series fabrication of these long, multi-te...

  15. Relativistic dynamics of superfluid-superconducting mixtures in the presence of topological defects and an electromagnetic field with application to neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, M. E.; Dommes, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The relativistic dynamic equations are derived for a superfluid-superconducting mixture coupled to an electromagnetic field. For definiteness, and bearing in mind possible applications of our results to neutron stars, it is assumed that the mixture is composed of superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons, and normal electrons. We analyze the proton superconductivity of both types I and II and allow for the possible presence of neutron and proton vortices (or magnetic domains in the case of type-I proton superconductivity). The derived equations neglect all dissipative effects except for the mutual friction dissipation and are valid for arbitrary temperatures (i.e., they do not imply that all nucleons are paired), which is especially important for magnetar conditions. It is demonstrated that these general equations can be substantially simplified for typical neutron stars, for which a kind of magnetohydrodynamic approximation is justified. Our results are compared to the nonrelativistic formulations existing in the literature, and a number of discrepancies are found. In particular, it is shown that, generally, the electric displacement D does not coincide with the electric field E , contrary to what is stated in previous works. The relativistic framework developed here is easily extendable to account for more sophisticated microphysics models, and it provides the necessary basis for realistic modeling of neutron stars.

  16. Superconducting Electric Boost Pump for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A submersible, superconducting electric boost pump sized to meet the needs of future Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems in the 25,000 lbf thrust range is proposed....

  17. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  18. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  19. Novel superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    This book reports on the latest developments in the field of Superfluidity. The phenomenon has had a tremendous impact on the fundamental sciences as well as a host of technologies. It began with the discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911, which was ultimately described theoretically by the theory of Bardeen Cooper and Schriever (BCS) in 1957. The analogous phenomena, superfluidity, was discovered in helium in 1938 and tentatively explained shortly thereafter as arising from a Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) by London. But the importance of superfluidity, and the range of systems in which it occurs, has grown enormously. In addition to metals and the helium liquids the phenomena has now been observed for photons in cavities, excitons in semiconductors, magnons in certain materials, and cold gasses trapped in high vacuum. It very likely exist for neutrons in a neutron star and, possibly, in a conjectured quark state at their center. Even the Universe itself can be regarded as being in a kind of sup...

  20. Local measurement of the superfluid density in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 across the superconducting dome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-12

    We measure the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}(T) in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} using local techniques that do not average over the sample. The superfluid density {rho}{sub s}(T) {triple_bond} 1/{lambda}{sub ab}(T){sup 2} has three main features. First, {rho}{sub s}(T = 0) falls sharply on the underdoped side of the dome. Second, {lambda}{sub ab}(T) is flat at low T at optimal doping, indicating fully gapped superconductivity, but varies more strongly in underdoped and overdoped samples, consistent with either a power law or a small second gap. Third, {rho}{sub s}(T) varies steeply near T{sub c} for optimal and underdoping. These observations are consistent with an interplay between magnetic and superconducting phases.

  1. Cryogenic infrastructure for superfluid helium testing of LHC prototype superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benda, V.; Duraffour, G.; Guiard-Marigny, A.; Lebrun, Ph.; Momal, F.; Saban, R.; Sergo, V.; Tavian, L.; Vullierme, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN will require about 1800 high-field superconducting magnets, operating below 1.9 K in pressurized helium II. All magnets will be reception-tested before their installation in the 26.7 km circumference ring tunnel. For this purpose, the authors have installed large-capacity cryogenic facilities, beginning to operate for tests of full-scale prototype magnets produced by European industry. Based around a 6 kW@4.5 K helium refrigerator and a 25 m{sup 3} liquid helium storage, the system includes a low-pressure, 6 to 18 g/s helium pumping unit for 1.8 K refrigeration, a set of magnet cooldown and warmup units delivering each up to 120 kW of refrigeration at precisely controlled temperature, and a network of cryogenic lines for transferring liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and cold gaseous helium. All components are controlled by embedded PLCs, connected to a general supervision system for operator interface. The authors present the system layout and describe the design and performance of the main components.

  2. Implementation of the superfluid helium phase transition using finite element modeling: Simulation of ransient heat transfer and He-I/He-II phase front movement in cooling channels of superconducting magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielert, E.R.; Verweij, A.P.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the thermal design of high magnetic field superconducting accelerator magnets, the emphasis is on the use of superfluid helium as a coolant and stabilizing medium. The very high effective thermal conductivity of helium below the lambda transition temperature significantly helps to extract heat fr

  3. Excitations in superfluid systems: contributions of the nuclear structure; Excitations dans les systemes superfluides: contributions de la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, E

    2005-12-15

    The author presents successively the theoretical aspect, the experimental aspect and the applied aspect of excitations in nuclear structures. The quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) tool is first described. Recent approaches on QRPA are based on the theory of the density function where the ground state and excited states are described from the same nucleon-nucleon interaction. 2 methods for measuring the collective excitations are then presented: the proton scattering that has the potentiality to investigate the evolution of magicity, the second method is in fact a new method for measuring the giant mono-polar resonance (GMP) in exotic nuclei. Nuclear reactions are considered as a compulsory step on the way from observables like cross-sections to nuclear structure. The author highlights the assets of the convolution model that can generate the optical potential from the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction and from proton and neutron densities of the nuclei involved. R-processes in nucleosynthesis and neutron stars are reviewed as applications of collective excitations in the field of nuclear astrophysics. (A.C.)

  4. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  5. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2014-01-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  7. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid 'atomtronic' circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W; Lobb, Christopher J; Phillips, William D; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2014-02-13

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits-it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  9. Color symmetrical superconductivity in a schematic nuclear quark model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Providencia, C.; da Providencia, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, a novel BCS-type formalism is constructed in the framework of a schematic QCD inspired quark model, having in mind the description of color symmetrical superconducting states. In the usual approach to color superconductivity, the pairing correlations affect only the quasi......-particle states of two colors, the single-particle states of the third color remaining unaffected by the pairing correlations. In the theory of color symmetrical superconductivity here proposed, the pairing correlations affect symmetrically the quasi-particle states of the three colors and vanishing net color...

  10. Extraction of radioactive positive ions across the surface of superfluid helium : A new method to produce cold radioactive nuclear beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, WX; Dendooven, P; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Pekola, JP; Aysto, J

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-decay recoils Rn-219 were stopped in superfluid helium and positive ions were extracted by electric field into the vapour phase. This first quantitative observation of extraction was successfully conducted using highly sensitive radioactivity detection. The efficiency for extraction across the

  11. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  12. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the superconducting transition temperature and superfluid density of SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X. L.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.; Yi, W.; Li, Z. C.; Zhang, C.; Ren, Z. A.; Che, G. C.; Sun, L. L.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, X. J.; Zhao, Z. X.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured magnetic susceptibility of iron pnictide superconductors SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.15 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) deceases linearly and the Meissner signal size also decreases with increasing pressure for SmFeAsO0.85 . In contrast, the TC of PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO initially increases with pressure then saturates above ˜0.8GPa . Meanwhile its Meissner signal exhibits the similar pressure dependence. Our results indicate that the pressure dependences of TC and superfluid density in both systems are positively correlated which suggests that these quaternary iron-based superconductors are not conventional BCS ones.

  13. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  14. Superfluidity in ultracold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gretchen

    2016-05-01

    The study of superfluidity has a long and rich history. In Bose-Einstein condensate, superfluidity gives rise to a number of interesting effects, including quantized vortices and persistent currents. In this seminar I will give an introduction to superfluidity in ultracold atoms, including a discussion of the critical velocity and the spectrum of elementary excitations in superfluid systems.

  15. High temperature superconductors and other superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, A S

    2017-01-01

    Written by eminent researchers in the field, this text describes the theory of superconductivity and superfluidity starting from liquid helium and a charged Bose-gas. It also discusses the modern bipolaron theory of strongly coupled superconductors, which explains the basic physical properties of high-temperature superconductors. This book will be of interest to fourth year graduate and postgraduate students, specialist libraries, information centres and chemists working in high-temperature superconductivity.

  16. Condensate of excitations in moving superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomeitsev, E E

    2016-01-01

    A possibility of the condensation of excitations with a non-zero momentum in rectilinearly moving and rotating superfluid bosonic and fermionic (with Cooper pairing) media is considered in terms of a phenomenological order-parameter functional at zero and non-zero temperature. The results might be applicable to the description of bosonic systems like superfluid $^4$He, ultracold atomic Bose gases, charged pion and kaon condensates in rotating neutron stars, and various superconducting fermionic systems with pairing, like proton and color-superconducting components in compact stars, metallic superconductors, and neutral fermionic systems with pairing, like the neutron component in compact stars and ultracold atomic Fermi gases. Order parameters of the "mother" condensate in the superfluid and the new condensate of excitations, corresponding energy gains, critical temperatures and critical velocities are found.

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  18. Exact solutions to a schematic nuclear quark model and colorless superconductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; da Providencia, Joao

    2008-01-01

    -neutral states have, in general, higher energy than the ground state. A novel BCS-type formalism, which is able to describe exactly color symmetrical BCS states, is used to show that the model admits, but only as excited states, color-neutral superconductivity. Therefore, such a model, with just a pairing force......, is unrealistic as a model for the color-neutral confined phase which prevails at normal nuclear densities. Finally, the paper shows that there exists a color-neutral superconducting phase independently of whether the model is based on the pairing force or a more realistic three-body string force....

  19. Superfluid LDA (SLDA): Local Density Approximation for Systems with Superfluid Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgac, A; Bulgac, Aurel; Yu, Yongle

    2004-01-01

    We present a concise account of our development of the first genuine Local Density Approximation (LDA) to the Energy Density Functional (EDF) for fermionic systems with superfluid correlations, with a particular emphasis to nuclear systems.

  20. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  1. Development of a novel method for the exploration of the thermal response of superfluid helium cooled superconducting cables to pulse heat loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, T.; Koettig, T.; Weelderen, van R.; Bremer, J.; Brake, ter H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Management of transient heat deposition in superconducting magnets and its extraction from the aforementioned is becoming increasingly important to bring high energy particle accelerator performance to higher beam energies and intensities. Precise knowledge of transient heat deposition phenomena in

  2. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  3. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  4. Two-fluid models of superfluid neutron star cores

    CERN Document Server

    Chamel, N

    2008-01-01

    Both relativistic and non-relativistic two-fluid models of neutron star cores are constructed, using the constrained variational formalism developed by Brandon Carter and co-workers. We consider a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons at zero temperature, taking into account mutual entrainment effects. Leptons, which affect the interior composition of the neutron star and contribute to the pressure, are also included. We provide the analytic expression of the Lagrangian density of the system, the so-called master function, from which the dynamical equations can be obtained. All the microscopic parameters of the models are calculated consistently using the non-relativistic nuclear energy density functional theory. For comparison, we have also considered relativistic mean field models. The correspondence between relativistic and non-relativistic hydrodynamical models is discussed in the framework of the recently developed 4D covariant formalism of Newtonian multi-fluid hydrodynamics. We hav...

  5. Antiferromagnetic nuclear spin helix and topological superconductivity in 13C nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Stano, Peter; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction arising from the hyperfine coupling between localized nuclear spins and conduction electrons in interacting 13C carbon nanotubes. Using the Luttinger liquid formalism, we show that the RKKY interaction is sublattice dependent, consistent with the spin susceptibility calculation in noninteracting carbon nanotubes, and it leads to an antiferromagnetic nuclear spin helix in finite-size systems. The transition temperature reaches up to tens of mK, due to a strong boost by a positive feedback through the Overhauser field from ordered nuclear spins. Similar to GaAs nanowires, the formation of the helical nuclear spin order gaps out half of the conduction electrons, and is therefore observable as a reduction of conductance by a factor of 2 in a transport experiment. The nuclear spin helix leads to a density wave combining spin and charge degrees of freedom in the electron subsystem, resulting in synthetic spin-orbit interaction, which induces nontrivial topological phases. As a result, topological superconductivity with Majorana fermion bound states can be realized in the system in the presence of proximity-induced superconductivity without the need of fine tuning the chemical potential. We present the phase diagram as a function of system parameters, including the pairing gaps, the gap due to the nuclear spin helix, and the Zeeman field perpendicular to the helical plane.

  6. Key role of work hardening in superconductivity/superfluidity, heat conductivity and ultimate strain increase, evolution, cancer, aging and other phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Kisel, V P

    2009-01-01

    The shear/laminar flow of liquids/gas/plasma/biological cells (BC), etc. is equivalent to dislocation-like shear of solids. The turbulent flow is the next stage of deformation/ multiplication of dislocation-like defects and their ordering in sub-grains and grain-boundaries, then grains slip-rotation in the direction approximately perpendicular to the shear flow. It is shown that phase transitions are governed by unified deformation hardening/softening under hydrostatic pressure, particle irradiation and impurity (isotope) chemical pressure, hard confining conditions and cooling, etc. thus changing electric, magnetic, ferroelectric, thermal, optical properties.1-2 Dislocation-like work hardening, DWH, is determined by non-monotonous properties of dislocation double edge-cross-jog slip, and ultrastrong DWH gives the lowest drag for any dislocation-like plasticity at phase transitions. This provides the same micromechanisms of the ultimate stage of conventional deformation (superfluidity) of ordinary liquids, i....

  7. Superfluid helium-4 in one dimensional channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Y.; Banavar, Samhita; Chan, Moses H. W.; Hayes, John; Sazio, Pier

    2013-03-01

    Superfluidity, as superconductivity, cannot exist in a strict one-dimensional system. However, the experiments employing porous media showed that superfluid helium can flow through the pores of nanometer size. Here we report a study of the flow of liquid helium through a single hollow glass fiber of 4 cm in length with an open id of 150 nm between 1.6 and 2.3 K. We found the superfluid transition temperature was suppressed in the hollow cylinder and that there is no flow above the transition. Critical velocity at temperature below the transition temperature was determined. Our results bear some similarity to that found by Savard et. al. studying the flow of helium through a nanohole in a silicon nitrite membrane. Experimental study at Penn State is supported by NSF Grants No. DMR 1103159.

  8. Interweaving of elementary modes of excitation in superfluid nuclei through particle-vibration coupling: Quantitative account of the variety of nuclear structure observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idini, A.; Potel, G.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation, and γ -decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe both the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wave function resulting from the coupling of these modes and, as a result, diagonalizing the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations in the case of superfluid nuclei. Our treatment goes beyond the traditional approach, in which these properties are calculated separately, and most often for systems near closed shells, based on perturbative approximations (weak coupling). It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion of open-shell nuclei in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling (PVC), leads to a detailed, quantitative account of the data, constraining the possible values of the k mass, of the 1S0 bare N N interaction, and of the PVC strengths within a rather narrow window.

  9. Superconducting Nuclear Recoil Sensor for Directional Dark Matter Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann; Baldwin, Kevin; Hehlen, Markus; Lafler, Randy; Loomba, Dinesh; Phan, Nguyen; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina

    The Universe consists of 72% dark energy, 23% dark matter and only 5% of ordinary matter. One of the greatest challenges of the scientific community is to understand the nature of dark matter. Current models suggest that dark matter is made up of slowly moving, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). But detecting WIMPs is challenging, as their expected signals are small and rare compared to the large background that can mimic the signal. The largest and most robust unique signature that sets them apart from other particles is the day-night variation of the directionality of dark matter on Earth. This modulation could be observed with a direction-sensitive detector and hence, would provide an unambiguous signature for the galactic origin of WIMPs. There are many studies underway to attempt to detect WIMPs both directly and indirectly, but solid-state WIMP detectors are widely unexplored although they would present many advantages to prevalent detectors that use large volumes of low pressure gas. We present first results of a novel multi-layered architecture, in which WIMPs would interact primarily with solid layers to produce nuclear recoils that then induce measureable voltage pulses in adjacent superconductor layers. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  10. Numerical studies of superfluids and superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Winiecki, T

    2001-01-01

    superconducting wire subject to an external magnetic field. We observe the motion of flux lines, and hence dissipation, due to the Lorentz force. We measure the V - I curve which is analogous to the drag force in a superfluid. With the introduction of impurities, flux lines become pinned which gives rise to an increased critical current. In this thesis we demonstrate the power of the Gross-Pitaevskii and the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations by numerically solving them for various fundamental problems related to superfluidity and superconductivity. We start by studying the motion of a massive object through a quantum fluid modelled by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Below a critical velocity, the object does not exchange momentum or energy with the fluid. This is a manifestation of its superfluid nature. We discuss the effect of applying a constant force to the object and show that for small forces a vortex ring is created to which the object becomes attached. For a larger force the object detaches from...

  11. Briton wins Nobel physics prize for work on superfluids

    CERN Multimedia

    Connor, S

    2003-01-01

    A British born scientist, Anthony Leggett, 65, has jointly won this year's Nobel prize in physics for research into the arcane area of superfluids - when matter behaves in its lowest and most ordered state. He shares the 800,000 pounds prize with two Russian physicists who have worked in the field of superconductivity - when electrical conductors lose resistance (1/2 page).

  12. Pinning down the superfluid and measuring masses using pulsar glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G; Antonopoulou, Danai; Andersson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known for their superb timing precision, although glitches can interrupt the regular timing behavior when the stars are young. These glitches are thought to be caused by interactions between normal and superfluid matter in the crust of the star. However, glitching pulsars such as Vela have been shown to require a superfluid reservoir that greatly exceeds that available in the crust. We examine a model in which glitches tap the superfluid in the core. We test a variety of theoretical superfluid models against the most recent glitch data and find that only one model can successfully explain up to 45 years of observational data. We develop a new technique for combining radio and X-ray data to measure pulsar masses, thereby demonstrating how current and future telescopes can probe fundamental physics such as superfluidity near nuclear saturation.

  13. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  14. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  15. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  16. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  17. Superfluids in Curved Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas, Kristian Hauser A

    2015-01-01

    Superfluids under an intense gravitational field are typically found in neutron star and quark star cores. Most treatments of these superfluids, however, are done in a flat spacetime background. In this paper, the effect of spacetime curvature on superfluidity is investigated. An effective four-fermion interaction is derived by integrating out the mediating scalar field. The fermions interacting via the mediating gauge vector bosons is also discussed. Two possible cases are considered in the mean-field treatment: antifermion-fermion and fermion-fermion pairings. An effective action, quadratic in fermion field, and a self-consistent equation are derived for both cases. The effective Euclidean action and the matrix elements of the heat kernel operator, which are very useful in curved-spacetime QFT calculations, are derived for the fermion-fermion pairing. Finally, explicit numerical calculation of the gravitational correction to the pairing order parameter is performed for the scalar superfluid case. It is foun...

  18. Jeans instability in superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Itamar; Oz, Yaron [Tel-Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the effect of a gravitational field on the sound modes of superfluids. We derive an instability condition that generalizes the well-known Jeans instability of the sound mode in normal fluids. We discuss potential experimental implications. (orig.)

  19. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  20. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Charles E.

    2016-12-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  1. A Dark Matter Superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    In this talk we present a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known cold at...

  2. Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In this talk I summarize a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the $\\Lambda$CDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. This framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known co...

  3. Microscopic Superconductivity and Room Temperature Electronics of High-Tc Cuprates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fu-Sui; CHEN Wan-Fang

    2008-01-01

    This paper points out that the Landau criterion for macroscopic superfluidity of He H is only a criterion for microscopic superfluidity of 4He, extends the Landau criterion to microscopic superconductivity in fermions (electron and hole) system and system with Cooper pairs without long-range phase coherence. This paper gives another three non-superconductive systems that are of microscopic superconductivity. This paper demonstrates that one application of microscopic superconductivity is to establish room temperature electronics of the high-To cuprates.

  4. Topological Vortices in Superfluid Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJun-Ping; DUANYi-Shi

    2005-01-01

    We study the topological structure of the vortex system in a superfluid film. Explicit expressions for the vortex density and velocity field as functions of the superfluid order parameter are derived. The evolution of vortices is also studied from the topological properties of the superfluid order parameter field.

  5. Superfluidity in topologically nontrivial flat bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Törmä, Päivi

    2015-11-20

    Topological invariants built from the periodic Bloch functions characterize new phases of matter, such as topological insulators and topological superconductors. The most important topological invariant is the Chern number that explains the quantized conductance of the quantum Hall effect. Here we provide a general result for the superfluid weight Ds of a multiband superconductor that is applicable to topologically nontrivial bands with nonzero Chern number C. We find that the integral over the Brillouin-zone of the quantum metric, an invariant calculated from the Bloch functions, gives the superfluid weight in a flat band, with the bound Ds⩾|C|. Thus, even a flat band can carry finite superfluid current, provided the Chern number is nonzero. As an example, we provide Ds for the time-reversal invariant attractive Harper-Hubbard model that can be experimentally tested in ultracold gases. In general, our results establish that a topologically nontrivial flat band is a promising concept for increasing the critical temperature of the superconducting transition.

  6. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  7. Chiral Superfluidity for QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma formed at LHC and RHIC can be considered as a chiral superfluid. The "normal" component of the fluid is the thermalized matter in common sense, while the "superfluid" part consists of long wavelength (chiral) fermionic states moving independently. We use the bosonization procedure with a finite cut-off and obtain a dynamical axion-like field out of the chiral fermionic modes. Then we use relativistic hydrodynamics for macroscopic description of the effective theory obtained after the bosonization. Finally, solving the hydrodynamic equations in gradient expansion, we find that in the presence of external electromagnetic fields or rotation the motion of the "superfluid" component gives rise to the chiral magnetic, chiral vortical, chiral electric and dipole wave effects. Latter two effects are specific for a two-component fluid, which provides us with crucial experimental tests of the model.

  8. Superfluidity in polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amo, A; Lefrere, J; Adrados, C; Giacobino, E; Bramati, A [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC, ENS and CNRS, 75005 Paris (France); Sanvitto, D; Laussy, F P; Ballarini, D; Valle, E del; MartIn, M D; Tejedor, C; Vina, L [SEMICUAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pigeon, S; Ciuti, C [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162, Universite Paris Diderot-Paris 7 and CNRS, 75013 Paris (France); Carusotto, I [BEC-CNR-INFM and Dip. di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Houdre, R [Institut de Photonique et d' Electronique Quantique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); LemaItre, A; Bloch, J [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Krizhanovskii, D N; Skolnick, M S, E-mail: alberto.amo@spectro.jussieu.f [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    Exciton-polaritons, two-dimensional composite bosons arising from the quantum mixture of excitons and photons, can manifest many-body quantum effects at liquid He temperatures (4 K). Interestingly, polaritons are predicted to behave as particular quantum fluids due to their out of equilibrium character, arising from their reduced lifetime (shorter than their thermalization time). Here we report the observation of superfluid motion of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities both under cw and pulsed excitation. Among other signatures, superfluidity is manifested via the absence of scattering of the polariton condensates when encountering a localized defect in their flow path.

  9. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  10. Towards quantum turbulence in cold atomic fermionic superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgac, Aurel; McNeil Forbes, Michael; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Fermionic superfluids provide a new realization of quantum turbulence, accessible to both experiment and theory, yet relevant to phenomena from both cold atoms to nuclear astrophysics. In particular, the strongly interacting Fermi gas realized in cold-atom experiments is closely related to dilute neutron matter in neutron star crusts. Unlike the liquid superfluids 4He (bosons) and 3He (fermions), where quantum turbulence has been studied in laboratory for decades, superfluid Fermi gases stand apart for a number of reasons. They admit a rather reliable theoretical description based on density functional theory called the time-dependent superfluid local density approximation that describes both static and dynamic phenomena. Cold atom experiments demonstrate exquisite control over particle number, spin polarization, density, temperature, and interaction strength. Topological defects such as domain walls and quantized vortices, which lie at the heart of quantum turbulence, can be created and manipulated with time-dependent external potentials, and agree with the time-dependent theoretical techniques. While similar experimental and theoretical control exists for weakly interacting Bose gases, the unitary Fermi gas is strongly interacting. The resulting vortex line density is extremely high, and quantum turbulence may thus be realized in small systems where classical turbulence is suppressed. Fermi gases also permit the study of exotic superfluid phenomena such as the Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell pairing mechanism for polarized superfluids which may give rise to 3D supersolids, and a pseudo-gap at finite temperatures that might affect the regime of classical turbulence. The dynamics associated with these phenomena has only started to be explored. Finally, superfluid mixtures have recently been realized, providing experimental access to phenomena like Andreev-Bashkin entrainment predicted decades ago. Superfluid Fermi gases thus provide a rich forum for addressing

  11. Aluminum and boron nuclear quadrupole resonance with a direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-12-01

    We report the application of our dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) spectrometer [C. Connor, J. Chang, and A. Pines, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 1059(1990)] to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies of aluminum-27, and boron-11 in crystalline and glassy solids. Our results give e2qQ/h=2.38 MHz and η=0.0 for α-Al2O3 at 4.2 K. For the natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10), we obtain e2qQ/h=4.56 MHz and η=0.47. The quadrupole resonance frequency is 1467 kHz in boron nitride, and in the vicinity of 1300 kHz for various borates in the B2O3ṡxH2O system. The distribution of boron environments in a B2O3 glass gives rise to a linewidth of about 80 kHz in the SQUID detected resonance.

  12. Superfluid Neutrons in the Core of the Neutron Star in Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Dany; Lattimer, James M; Steiner, Andrew W

    2011-01-01

    The supernova remnant Cassiopeia A contains the youngest known neutron star which is also the first one for which real time cooling has ever been observed. In order to explain the rapid cooling of this neutron star, we first present the fundamental properties of neutron stars that control their thermal evolution with emphasis on the neutrino emission processes and neutron/proton superfluidity/superconductivity. Equipped with these results, we present a scenario in which the observed cooling of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A is interpreted as being due to the recent onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star. The manner in which the earlier occurrence of proton superconductivity determines the observed rapidity of this neutron star's cooling is highlighted. This is the first direct evidence that superfluidity and superconductivity occur at supranuclear densities within neutron stars.

  13. Anomalous magnetic fluctuations in superconducting Sr2RuO4 revealed by 101Ru nuclear spin-spin relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Ishida, Kenji; Mao, Zhiqiang; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-10-01

    We carried out 101Ru nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement on superconducting (SC) Sr2RuO4 under zero magnetic field (H =0 ) and found that the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 is enhanced in the SC state. The 1 /T2 measurement in the SC state under H =0 is effective for detecting slow magnetic fluctuations parallel to the quantized axis of the nuclear spin. Our results indicate that low-energy magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the RuO2 plane emerge when the superconductivity sets in, which is consistent with the previous 17O-NQR result that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 of the in-plane O site exhibits anomalous behavior in the SC state. The enhancement of the magnetic fluctuations in the SC state is unusual and suggests that the fluctuations are related to the unconventional SC pairing. We suggest that this phenomenon is a consequence of the spin degrees of freedom of the spin-triplet pairing.

  14. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Kotsubo, Vincent Y.

    1992-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

  15. Thin film superfluid optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Christopher G; McAuslan, David L; Sachkou, Yauhen; He, Xin; Bowen, Warwick P

    2016-01-01

    Excitations in superfluid helium represent attractive mechanical degrees of freedom for cavity optomechanics schemes. Here we numerically and analytically investigate the properties of optomechanical resonators formed by thin films of superfluid $^4$He covering micrometer-scale whispering gallery mode cavities. We predict that through proper optimization of the interaction between film and optical field, large optomechanical coupling rates $g_0>2\\pi \\times 100$ kHz and single photon cooperativities $C_0>10$ are achievable. Our analytical model reveals the unconventional behaviour of these thin films, such as thicker and heavier films exhibiting smaller effective mass and larger zero point motion. The optomechanical system outlined here provides access to unusual regimes such as $g_0>\\Omega_M$ and opens the prospect of laser cooling a liquid into its quantum ground state.

  16. When superfluids are a drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  17. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  18. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    CERN Document Server

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fern\\'andez & Reisenegger (2005) for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger (2010) for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our prediction...

  19. Superfluid Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hennigar, Robie A; Tjoa, Erickson

    2016-01-01

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "$\\lambda$-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid $^4$He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically AdS hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  20. Superfluid Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigar, Robie A; Mann, Robert B; Tjoa, Erickson

    2017-01-13

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "λ-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid ^{4}He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  1. Towards Quantum Turbulence in Cold Atomic Fermionic Superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgac, Aurel; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Fermionic superfluids provide a new realization of quantum turbulence, accessible to both experiment and theory, yet relevant to both cold atoms and nuclear astrophysics. In particular, the strongly interacting Fermi gas realized in cold-atom experiments is closely related to dilute neutron matter in the neutron star crust. Unlike the liquid superfluids 4He (bosons) and 3He (fermions), where quantum turbulence has been studied in laboratory for decades, quantum gases, and in particular superfluid Fermi gases stand apart for a number of reasons. Fermi gases admit a rather reliable microscopic description based on density functional theory which describes both static and dynamical phenomena. Cold atom experiments demonstrate exquisite control over particle number, spin polarization, density, temperature, and interacting strength. Topological defects such as domain walls and quantized vortices, which lie at the heart of quantum turbulence, can be created and manipulated with time-dependent external potentials, a...

  2. Buoyancy and g-modes in young superfluid neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, A; Ho, W C G

    2015-01-01

    We consider the local dynamics of a realistic neutron star core, including composition gradients, superfluidity and thermal effects. The main focus is on the gravity g-modes, which are supported by composition stratification and thermal gradients. We derive the equations that govern this problem in full detail, paying particular attention to the input that needs to be provided through the equation of state and distinguishing between normal and superfluid regions. The analysis highlights a number of key issues that should be kept in mind whenever equation of state data is compiled from nuclear physics for use in neutron star calculations. We provide explicit results for a particular stellar model and a specific nucleonic equation of state, making use of cooling simulations to show how the local wave spectrum evolves as the star ages. Our results show that the composition gradient is effectively dominated by the muons whenever they are present. When the star cools below the superfluid transition, the support fo...

  3. Efficacy of crustal superfluid neutrons in pulsar glitch models

    CERN Document Server

    Hooker, J; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of recent hydrodynamic models of pulsar glitches, we explore systematically the dependence on the stiffness of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density $L$, of the fractional moment of inertia of the pinned neutron superfluid in the crust $G$ and the initial post-glitch relative acceleration of the crust $K$, both of which are confronted with observational constraints from the Vela pulsar. We allow for a variable fraction of core superfluid neutrons coupled to the crust on glitch rise timescales, $Y_{\\rm g}$. We assess whether the crustal superfluid neutrons are still a tenable angular momentum source to explain the Vela glitches when crustal entrainment is included. The observed values $G$ and $K$ are found to provide nearly orthogonal constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy, and thus taken together offer potentially tight constraints on the equation of state. However, when entrainment is included at the level suggested by recent microscopic calculations, the model is un...

  4. Superfluid and normal fluid density in high- Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, D. B.; Liu, H. L.; Quijada, M. A.; Zibold, A. M.; Berger, H.; Kelley, R. J.; Onellion, M.; Chou, F. C.; Johnston, D. C.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.; Markert, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    The electronic properties of the cuprate superconductors have been studied by measuring the reflectance over the frequency range from the far-infrared to the near-ultraviolet(roughly, 10 meV-5 eV). There is an interesting behavior in both the normal state and the superconducting state. In the normal state, there is the well-known non-Drude distribution of the doping-induced spectral weight. In the superconducting state, the spectral weight of the superconducting condensate correlates with Tc in a variety of materials. Remarkably, in optimally doped superconductors, only about 20% of the doping-induced carriers joins the superfluid; the rest of the spectral weight remains at finite frequencies.

  5. New light on the intriguing history of superfluidity in liquid (4)He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Allan

    2009-04-22

    Surprisingly, it was 30 years after the first liquefaction of (4)He in 1908 that the discovery that liquid (4)He is not just a 'cold' liquid was made. Below T = 2.18 K, it is a 'quantum' liquid which exhibits spectacular macroscopic quantum behaviour that can be seen with the naked eye. Since the observation of superfluidity in liquid (4)He is one of the greatest discoveries in modern physics, we present a day-to-day chronology of the tangled events which preceded the seminal discovery of zero viscosity in 1938 by Kapitza in Moscow and by Allen and Misener in Cambridge. On the theory side, London argued in 1938 that the microscopic basis for this new superfluid phase was the forgotten phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) first suggested by Einstein in 1925. In 1941, Landau developed a very successful theory of superfluid (4)He, but it was not anchored in a microscopic theory of interacting atoms. It took another 20 years for theorists to unify the two seemingly different theories of Landau and London. Experiments on trapped superfluid atomic gases since 1995 have shone new light on superfluid (4)He. In the mid-1930s, London had emphasized that superconductivity in metals and superfluidity in liquid (4)He were similar. Experiments on trapped two-component Fermi gases in the last five years have shown that a Bose condensate is indeed the basis of both of these superfluid phases. This confirms the now famous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-BEC crossover scenario developed for superfluidity by Leggett and Nozières in the early 1980s but largely ignored until a few years ago. The study of superfluid (4)He will increasingly overlap with strongly interacting dilute quantum gases, perhaps opening up a new era of research on this most amazing liquid.

  6. New light on the intriguing history of superfluidity in liquid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Allan

    2009-04-01

    Surprisingly, it was 30 years after the first liquefaction of 4He in 1908 that the discovery that liquid 4He is not just a 'cold' liquid was made. Below T = 2.18 K, it is a 'quantum' liquid which exhibits spectacular macroscopic quantum behaviour that can be seen with the naked eye. Since the observation of superfluidity in liquid 4He is one of the greatest discoveries in modern physics, we present a day-to-day chronology of the tangled events which preceded the seminal discovery of zero viscosity in 1938 by Kapitza in Moscow and by Allen and Misener in Cambridge. On the theory side, London argued in 1938 that the microscopic basis for this new superfluid phase was the forgotten phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) first suggested by Einstein in 1925. In 1941, Landau developed a very successful theory of superfluid 4He, but it was not anchored in a microscopic theory of interacting atoms. It took another 20 years for theorists to unify the two seemingly different theories of Landau and London. Experiments on trapped superfluid atomic gases since 1995 have shone new light on superfluid 4He. In the mid-1930s, London had emphasized that superconductivity in metals and superfluidity in liquid 4He were similar. Experiments on trapped two-component Fermi gases in the last five years have shown that a Bose condensate is indeed the basis of both of these superfluid phases. This confirms the now famous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-BEC crossover scenario developed for superfluidity by Leggett and Nozières in the early 1980s but largely ignored until a few years ago. The study of superfluid 4He will increasingly overlap with strongly interacting dilute quantum gases, perhaps opening up a new era of research on this most amazing liquid.

  7. Superfluid Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G. W.; Parker, N. G.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  8. Lifshitz Superfluid Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We construct the first order hydrodynamics of quantum critical points with Lifshitz scaling and a spontaneously broken symmetry. The fluid is described by a combination of two flows, a normal component that carries entropy and a super-flow which has zero viscosity and carries no entropy. We analyze the new transport effects allowed by the lack of boost invariance and constrain them by the local second law of thermodynamics. Imposing time-reversal invariance, we find eight new parity even transport coefficients. The formulation is applicable, in general, to any superfluid/superconductor with an explicit breaking of boost symmetry, in particular to high $T_c$ superconductors. We discuss possible experimental signatures.

  9. 60 years of Broken Symmetries in Quantum Physics (From the Bogoliubov Theory of Superfluidity to the Standard Model)

    CERN Document Server

    Shirkov, D V

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective historical overview of the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) in quantum theory, the issue that has been implemented in particle physics in the form of the Higgs mechanism. The main items are: -- The Bogoliubov's microscopical theory of superfluidity (1946); -- The BCS-Bogoliubov theory of superconductivity (1957); -- Superconductivity as a superfluidity of Cooper pairs (Bogoliubov - 1958); -- Transfer of the SSB into the QFT models (early 60s); -- The Higgs model triumph in the electro-weak theory (early 80s). The role of the Higgs mechanism and its status in the current Standard Model is also touched upon.

  10. Unconventional Superfluidity in Yttrium Iron Garnet Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2016-06-01

    We argue that the magnon condensate in yttrium iron garnet may display experimentally observable superfluidity at room temperature despite the 100 times dominance of the normal density over superfluid ones. The superfluidity has a more complicated nature than in known superfluids since the U(1) symmetry of the global phase shift is violated by the dipolar interaction leading to the exchange of spin moment between the condensate and the crystal lattice. It produces periodic inhomogeneity in the stationary superfluid flow. We discuss the manner of observation and possible applications of magnon superfluidity. It may strongly enhance the spin-torque effects and reduce the energy consumption of the magnonic devices.

  11. Signature of superfluid density in the single-particle excitation spectrum of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng; Lu; Shen; Kim; Eisaki; Damascelli; Yoshizaki; Shimoyama; Kishio; Gu; Oh; Andrus; O'Donnell; Eckstein; Shen

    2000-07-14

    We report that the doping and temperature dependence of photoemission spectra near the Brillouin zone boundary of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)exhibit unexpected sensitivity to the superfluid density. In the superconducting state, the photoemission peak intensity as a function of doping scales with the superfluid density and the condensation energy. As a function of temperature, the peak intensity shows an abrupt behavior near the superconducting phase transition temperature where phase coherence sets in, rather than near the temperature where the gap opens. This anomalous manifestation of collective effects in single-particle spectroscopy raises important questions concerning the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity.

  12. Phase slips in superconducting weak links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmel, Gregory; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting vortices and phase slips are primary mechanisms of dissipation in superconducting, superfluid, and cold-atom systems. While the dynamics of vortices is fairly well described, phase slips occurring in quasi-one- dimensional superconducting wires still elude understanding. The main reason is that phase slips are strongly nonlinear time-dependent phenomena that cannot be cast in terms of small perturbations of the superconducting state. Here we study phase slips occurring in superconducting weak links. Thanks to partial suppression of superconductivity in weak links, we employ a weakly nonlinear approximation for dynamic phase slips. This approximation is not valid for homogeneous superconducting wires and slabs. Using the numerical solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and bifurcation analysis of stationary solutions, we show that the onset of phase slips occurs via an infinite period bifurcation, which is manifested in a specific voltage-current dependence. Our analytical results are in good agreement with simulations.

  13. Radioactive core ions of microclusters, ``snowballs`` in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Shimoda, T. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Fujita, Y. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Miyatake, H. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Mizoi, Y. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kobayashi, H. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Sasaki, M. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Shirakura, T. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Itahashi, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Mitsuoka, S. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Matsukawa, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Ikeda, N. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Morinobu, S. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Hinde, D.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences; Asahi, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ueno, H. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Izumi, H. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-01

    Short-lived beta-ray emitters, {sup 12}B, sustaining nuclear spin polarization were introduced into superfluid helium. The nuclear polarization of {sup 12}B was observed via measurement of beta-ray asymmetry. It was found that the nuclear polarization was preserved throughout the lifetime of {sup 12}B (20.3 ms). This suggests that the ``snowball``, an aggregation of helium atoms produced around an alien ion, constitutes a suitable milieu for freezing-out the nuclear spin of the core ion and that most likely the solidification takes place at the interior of the aggregation. (orig.).

  14. Superfluid density in the d-density-wave scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q H; Han, J H; Lee, D H

    2001-08-13

    Recently Chakravarty, Laughlin, Morr, and Nayak [Phys. Rev. B 62, 4880 (2000)] made an interesting proposal that the cuprate superconductors possess a hidden " d-density-wave" (DDW) order. We study the implication of this proposal for the superfluid density rho(s). We find that it predicts a temperature gradient [d rho(s)/dT](T = 0) that is strongly doping dependent near the critical doping at which the superconducting gap vanishes. This demonstrates that the DDW scenario is inconsistent with existing well-established experimental data.

  15. Quench Simulation of Superconducting Magnets with Commercial Multiphysics Software

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)751171; Auchmann, Bernhard; Jarkko, Niiranen; Maciejewski, Michal

    The simulation of quenches in superconducting magnets is a multiphysics problem of highest complexity. Operated at 1.9 K above absolute zero, the material properties of superconductors and superfluid helium vary by several orders of magnitude over a range of only 10 K. The heat transfer from metal to helium goes through different transfer and boiling regimes as a function of temperature, heat flux, and transferred energy. Electrical, magnetic, thermal, and fluid dynamic effects are intimately coupled, yet live on vastly different time and spatial scales. While the physical models may be the same in all cases, it is an open debate whether the user should opt for commercial multiphysics software like ANSYS or COMSOL, write customized models based on general purpose network solvers like SPICE, or implement the physics models and numerical solvers entirely in custom software like the QP3, THEA, and ROXIE codes currently in use at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). Each approach has its strengt...

  16. Stimulated Superconductivity at Strong Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ning; Dong, Xi; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    Stimulating a system with time dependent sources can enhance instabilities, thus increasing the critical temperature at which the system transitions to interesting low-temperature phases such as superconductivity or superfluidity. After reviewing this phenomenon in non-equilibrium BCS theory (and its marginal fermi liquid generalization) we analyze the effect in holographic superconductors. We exhibit a simple regime in which the transition temperature increases parametrically as we increase the frequency of the time-dependent source.

  17. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  18. QPOs in superfluid magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the time-evolution of axisymmetric oscillations of superfluid magnetars with a poloidal magnetic field and an elastic crust. Extending earlier models, we study the effects of composition gradients and entrainment on the magneto-elastic wave spectrum and on the potential identification of the observed Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs). The basic features of the axial axisymmetric spectrum of normal fluid stars are reproduced by our results and in addition we find several magneto-elastic waves with a mixed character. In the core, these oscillations mimic the shear mode pattern of the crust as a result of the strong dynamical coupling between these two regions. Incorporating the most recent entrainment configurations in our models, we find that they have a double effect on the spectrum: the magnetic oscillations of the core have a frequency enhancement, while the mixed magneto-elastic waves originating in the crust are moved towards the frequencies of the single-fluid case. The distribution of lower-fr...

  19. Cosmological experiments in superfluid helium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, W. H.

    1985-10-01

    Symmetry breaking phase transitions occurring in the early Universe are expected to leave behind long-lived topologically stabel structures such as monopoles, strings or domain walls. The author discusses the analogy between cosmological strings and vortex lines in the superfluid, and suggests a cryogenic experiment which tests key elements of the cosmological scenario for string formation. In a superfluid obtained through a rapid pressure quench, the phase of the Bose condensate wavefunction - the 4He analogue of the broken symmetry of the field-theoretic vacuum - will be chosen randomly in domains of some characteristic size d. When the quench is performed in an annulus of circumference C the typical value of the phase mismatch around the loop will be ≡(C/d)1/2. The resulting phase gradient can be sufficiently large to cause the superfluid to flow with a measurable, randomly directed velocity.

  20. Collective excitations in unconventional superconductors and superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Brusov, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This is the first monograph that strives to give a complete and detailed description of the collective modes (CMs) in unconventional superfluids and superconductors (UCSF&SC). Using the most powerful method of modern theoretical physics - the path (functional) integral technique - authors build the three- and two-dimensional models for s -, p - and d -wave pairing in neutral as well as in charged Fermi-systems, models of superfluid Bose-systems and Fermi-Bose-mixtures. Within these models they study the collective properties of such systems as superfluid 3 He, superfluid 4 He, superfluid 3 He-

  1. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  2. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    CERN Document Server

    Scamps, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including BCS dynamical pairing correlations. The fission modes of the 258Fm nucleus are studied. The resulting fission fragment characteristics show a good agreement with experimental data. Quantum shell effects are shown to play a crucial role in the dynamics and formation of the fragments. The importance of quantum fluctuations beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle picture is underlined and qualitatively studied.

  3. Scale invariance and superfluid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Siddhartha, E-mail: siddhartha.sen@tcd.ie [CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); R.K. Mission Vivekananda University, Belur 711 202, West Bengal (India); Ray, Koushik, E-mail: koushik@iacs.res.in [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta 700 032 (India)

    2013-11-11

    We construct a Schroedinger field theory invariant under local spatial scaling. It is shown to provide an effective theory of superfluid turbulence by deriving, analytically, the observed Kolmogorov 5/3 law and to lead to a Biot–Savart interaction between the observed filament excitations of the system as well.

  4. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  5. On superconductivity of matter at hight density and the effects of inducing nuclear chirality in molecular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Providëncia, J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.; Bohr, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Superconductivity is described by the well-known Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory, which is a symmetry breaking approximation. Color superconductivity shows up in extremely high density matter and temperature, which is here investigated and compared to the other end of the scale of low ener...

  6. Operating at 1.8 K the technology of superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1996-01-01

    The technical properties of helium II ("superfluid" helium) are presented from the user point of view. Its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in accelerators and colliders are discussed in terms of heat transfer capability and limitations in conductive and convective modes. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, as concerns thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation.

  7. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Sixty years of broken symmetries in quantum physics (from the Bogoliubov theory of superfluidity to the Standard Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkov, Dmitrii V.

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective historical review of the ideas that led to the concept of the spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB), the issue that has been implemented in quantum field theory in the form of the Higgs mechanism. The key stages covered include: the Bogoliubov microscopic theory of superfluidity (1946); the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-Bogoliubov microscopic theory of superconductivity (1957); superconductivity as superfluidity of Cooper pairs (Bogoliubov, 1958); the extension of the SSB concept to simple quantum field models (early 1960s); triumph of the Higgs model in electroweak theory (early 1980s). The role and status of the Higgs mechanism in the current Standard Model are discussed.

  8. Superfluid analogies of cosmological phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2001-01-01

    Superfluid 3He-A gives example of how chirality, Weyl fermions, gauge fields and gravity appear in low emergy corner together with corresponding symmetries, including Lorentz symmetry and local SU(N). This supports idea that quantum field theory (Standard Model or GUT) is effective theory describing low-energy phenomena. * Momentum space topology of fermionic vacuum provides topological stability of universality class of systems, where above properties appear. * BCS scheme for 3He-A incorporates both ``relativistic'' infrared regime and ultraviolet ``transplanckian'' range: subtle issues of cut-off in quantum field theory and anomalies can be resolved on physical grounds. This allows to separate ``renormalizable'' terms in action, treated by effective theory, from those obtained only in ``transPlanckian'' physics. * Energy density of superfluid vacuum within effective theory is ~ E_{Planck}^4. Stability analysis of ground state beyond effective theory leads to exact nullification of vacuum energy: equilibrium...

  9. Superfluid helium II as the QCD vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    We study the winding number susceptibility in superfluid system and the topological susceptibility in QCD. We argue that both correlation functions exhibit similar structures, including the generation of the contact terms. We discuss the nature of the contact term in superfluid system and argue that it has exactly the same origin as in QCD, and it is related to the long distance physics which cannot be associated with conventional microscopical degrees of freedom such as phonons and rotons. We emphasize that the conceptual similarities between superfluid system and QCD may lead, hopefully, to a deeper understanding of the topological features of a superfluid system as well as the QCD vacuum.

  10. Superfluid helium II as the QCD vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-03-01

    We study the winding number susceptibility in a superfluid system and the topological susceptibility in QCD. We argue that both correlation functions exhibit similar structures, including the generation of the contact terms. We discuss the nature of the contact term in superfluid system and argue that it has exactly the same origin as in QCD, and it is related to the long distance physics which cannot be associated with conventional microscopical degrees of freedom such as phonons and rotons. We emphasize that the conceptual similarities between superfluid system and QCD may lead, hopefully, to a deeper understanding of the topological features of a superfluid system as well as the QCD vacuum.

  11. Frank Isakson Prize Talk: Superfluid and normal-fluid densities in the cuprate superconductors from infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, D. B.

    Measurements for a number of cuprate families of optical reflectance over a wide spectral range (far-infrared to ultraviolet) have been analyzed using Kramers-Kronig analysis to obtain the optical conductivity σ (ω) and (by integration of the real part of the conductivity) the spectral weight of low- and mid-energy excitations. For the Kramers-Kronig analysis to give reliable results, accurate high-frequency extrapolations, based on x-ray atomic scattering functions, were used. When the optical conductivities of the normal and superconducting states are compared, a transfer of spectral weight from finite frequencies to the zero-frequency delta-function conductivity of the superconductor is seen. The strength of this delta function gives the superfluid density, ρs. In a clean metallic superconductor the superfluid density is essentially equal to the conduction electron density. The cuprates in contrast have only about 20% of the a b-plane low-energy spectral weight in the superfluid. The rest remains in finite-frequency, midinfrared absorption. In underdoped materials the superfluid fraction is even smaller. There are two ways to measure ρs, using either the partial sum rule for the conductivity or by examination of σ2 (ω) . Comparison of these two estimates of the superfluid density shows that 98% of the a b-plane superfluid density comes from energies below 0.15 eV. Many students, postdocs, and materials preparers have contributed to this work; to all I am very grateful.

  12. Reconnection of superfluid vortex bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sultan Z; Youd, Anthony J; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2008-11-21

    Using the vortex filament model and the Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we show that bundles of quantized vortex lines in He II are structurally robust and can reconnect with each other maintaining their identity. We discuss vortex stretching in superfluid turbulence and show that, during the bundle reconnection process, kelvin waves of large amplitude are generated, in agreement with the finding that helicity is produced by nearly singular vortex interactions in classical Euler flows.

  13. Simplicity works for superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowley, Roger [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The famous philosopher Karl Popper once said that ''science is the art of systematic oversimplification''. Indeed, when faced with a new puzzle the trick is to simplify it without losing the essential physics - something that is easier said than done. However, this approach has paid off recently in low-temperature physics. Last year Richard Packard, Seamus Davis and co-workers at the University of California at Berkeley encountered a puzzling new phenomenon in superfluid helium-3, a quantum fluid that remains a liquid close to absolute zero and exhibits unusual properties such as the ability to flow without friction (A Machenkov et al. 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 3860). Previous experiments had revealed that certain effects in liquid helium are analogous to effects observed in superconductors, materials that lose all resistance to electric current at low temperatures. When the Berkeley researchers connected two reservoirs of superfluid helium-3, the superfluid flowed back and forth through apertures that formed a ''weak link'' between the two containers. This behaviour is similar to the oscillatory current of electrons that can flow across an insulating gap separating two superconductors - a device that is known as a Josephson junction. What was puzzling about the Berkeley results was that the helium-3 had two different stable configurations, both of which behaved in an unconventional way compared with a Josephson junction. This puzzle has now been solved independently by Sidney Yip at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Taiwan, and by Janne Viljas and Erkki Thuneberg at the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland (Phys. Rev. Lett. 1999 83 3864 and 3868). In this article the author describes the latest research on superfluid helium. (UK)

  14. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Prize Lecture: Quantum Mechanics meets Fluid Dynamics: Visualization of Vortex Reconnection in Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Long-range quantum order underlies a number of related physical phenomena including superfluidity, superconductivity and Bose-Einstein condensation. While superfluidity in helium-4 was one of the earliest discovered, it is not the best understood, owing to the strong interactions present (making theoretical progress difficult) and the lack of local experimental probes. Quantum fluids, such as superfluid helium-4, are typically described as a mixture of two interpenetrating fluids with distinct velocity fields: a viscous normal fluid akin to water and an inviscid superfluid exhibiting long-range quantum order. In this "two-fluid model," there is no conventional viscous dissipation in the superfluid component and vorticity is confined to atomically-thin vortices with quantized circulation. Turbulence may occur in either fluid component with turbulence in the superfluid exhibiting a complex tangle of quantized vortices, as first envisioned by Feynman. Approximately five years ago, our group discovered that micron-sized hydrogen particles may be used for flow visualization in superfluid helium-4. The particles can trace the motions of the normal fluid or be trapped by the quantized vortices, which enables one to characterize the dynamics of both the normal fluid and superfluid components for the first time. By directly observing and tracking these particles, we have directly confirmed the two-fluid model, observed vortex rings and quantized vortex reconnection, characterized thermal counterflows, and observed the very peculiar nature of quantum turbulence. One of many surprising observations is the existence of power-law tails in the probability distribution of velocities in quantum turbulence, which are in stark contrast to the Gaussian distributions typical of classical fluid turbulence.

  15. Radioactive ions and atoms in superfluid helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.G.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; Aysto, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W.; Harissopulos, S; Demetriou, P; Julin, R

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve t

  16. Dark Matter Superfluidity and Galactic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ~mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  17. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasha Berezhiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not: dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  18. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  19. A cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor for superfluid helium refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, L; Schustr, P; Vins, M; Brunovsky, I; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L

    1997-01-01

    CERN's new project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will use superfluid helium as coolant for its high-field superconducting magnets and therefore require large capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K. This may only be achieved by subatmospheric compression of gaseous helium at cryogenic temperature. To stimulate development of this technology, CERN has procured from industry prototype Cold Compressor Units (CCU). This unit is based on a cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor, running on ceramic ball bearings and driven by a variable-frequency electrical motor operating under low-pressure helium at ambient temperature. The machine has been commissioned and is now in operation. After describing basic constructional features of the compressor, we report on measured performance.

  20. Ultra-High Q Acoustic Resonance in Superfluid ^4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, L. A.; Schwab, K. C.

    2017-02-01

    We report the measurement of the acoustic quality factor of a gram-scale, kilohertz-frequency superfluid resonator, detected through the parametric coupling to a superconducting niobium microwave cavity. For temperatures between 400 mK and 50 mK, we observe a T^{-4} temperature dependence of the quality factor, consistent with a 3-phonon dissipation mechanism. We observe Q factors up to 1.4× 10^8, consistent with the dissipation due to dilute ^3He impurities, and expect that significant further improvements are possible. These experiments are relevant to exploring quantum behavior and decoherence of massive macroscopic objects, the laboratory detection of continuous gravitational waves from pulsars, and the probing of possible limits to physical length scales.

  1. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with superfluid $^4$He

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Pikovski, I; Schwab, K C

    2016-01-01

    Direct detection of gravitational waves is opening a new window onto our universe. Here, we study the sensitivity to continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme can operate at very high $Q$-factors, while the resonant frequency is tunable through pressurization of the helium in the 0.1-1.5 kHz range. The detector can therefore be tuned to a variety of astrophysical sources and can remain sensitive to a particular source over a long period of time. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that strain fields on the order of $h\\sim 10^{-23} /\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ are detectable. We show that the proposed system can significantly improve the limits on gravitational wave strain from nearby pulsars within a few months of integration time.

  2. The crystallography of color superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, J A; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2003-01-01

    We describe the crystalline phase of color superconducting quark matter. This phase may occur in quark matter at densities relevant for compact star physics, with possible implications for glitch phenomena in pulsars. We use a Ginzburg-Landau approach to determine that the crystal has a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure. Moreover, our results indicate that the phase is robust, with gaps, critical temperature, and free energy comparable to those of the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. Our calculations also predict ``crystalline superfluidity'' in ultracold gases of fermionic atoms.

  3. Magnetic and superconducting properties of a heavy-fermion CeCoIn5 epitaxial film probed by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kitagawa, Shunsaku; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibauchi, Takasada; Terashima, Takahito; Matsuda, Yuji; Ishida, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    Since the progress in the fabrication techniques of thin films of exotic materials such as strongly correlated heavy-fermion compounds, microscopic studies of the magnetic and electronic properties inside the films have been needed. Herein, we report the observation of 115In nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in an epitaxial film of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, for which the microscopic field gradient within the unit cell as well as magnetic and superconducting properties at zero field are evaluated. We find that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in the film is in excellent agreement with that of bulk crystals, whereas the NQR spectra show noticeable shifts and significant broadening indicating a change in the electric-field distribution inside the film. The analysis implies a displacement of In layers in the film, which, however, does not affect the magnetic fluctuations and superconducting pairing. This implies that inhomogeneity of the electronic field gradient in the film sample causes no pair-breaking effect.

  4. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  5. Detectability of Light Dark Matter with Superfluid Helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Katelin; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-09-16

    We show that a two-excitation process in superfluid helium, combined with sensitivity to meV energy depositions, can probe dark matter down to the ∼keV warm dark matter mass limit. This mass reach is 3 orders of magnitude below what can be probed with ordinary nuclear recoils in helium at the same energy resolution. For dark matter lighter than ∼100  keV, the kinematics of the process requires the two athermal excitations to have nearly equal and opposite momentum, potentially providing a built-in coincidence mechanism for controlling backgrounds.

  6. Fermion Superfluidity And Confining Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galal, A A

    2004-01-01

    We study the pairing of Fermi systems with long-range, confining interparticle interactions. We solve the Cooper problem for a pair of fermions interacting via a regularized harmonic oscillator potential and determine the s-wave spectrum of bound states. Using a model of two interacting species of fermions, we calculate the ground state energy of the normal phase in the Hartree-Fock approximation and find that it is infrared (IR) divergent, due to a combination of the sharpness of the Fermi sea and the long-range nature of the interaction. We calculate the correlation energy in the normal phase using the random phase approximation (RPA) and demonstrate the cancellation of infrared divergences between the Hartree-Fock and RPA contributions. Introducing a variational wavefunction to study the superfluid phase, we solve the BCS equations using a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) analysis to determine the wave-function, excitation gap, and other parameters of the superfluid phase. We show that the system crosses over...

  7. Putting in operation a full-scale ultracold-neutron source model with superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Keshishev, K. O.; Boldarev, S. T.; Vasil'ev, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A project of the source of ultracold neutrons for the WWR-M reactor based on superfluid helium for ultracold-neutron production has been developed. The full-scale source model, including all required cryogenic and vacuum equipment, the cryostat, and the ultracold-neutron source model has been created. The superfluid helium temperature T = 1.08 K without a heat load and T = 1.371 K with a heat load on the simulator of P = 60 W has been achieved in experiments at a technological complex of the ultracold-neutron source. The result proves the feasibility of implementing the ultracold-neutron source at the WWR-M reactor and the possibility of applying superfluid helium in nuclear engineering.

  8. Ultrasonic measurements of normal and superfluid He-3 in high porosity aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonseok

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance have been proven to be the most valuable spectroscopic tools in the study of superfluid 3He. These experimental methods provide complementary information on the orbital and spin structure of the Cooper pairs. In particular, the rich spectrum of the order parameter collective modes, a direct consequence of the exotic broken symmetry in the superfluid phases, have been mapped out by ultrasonic spectroscopic techniques. Aerogel possesses a unique structure, whose topology is at the antipode of conventional porous media such as Vycor glass and metallic sinters. High porosity aerogel presents additional scattering channel that substantially changes the ultrasonic behavior in both normal and superfluid phase of 3He. For example, in the normal fluid the classic first to zero sound crossover is effectively prohibited due to the residual elastic scattering from aerogel. However, the hydrodynamic-Knudsen crossover arises owing to the unique structure and the widely varying inelastic mean free path in 3He. In superfluid, no signatures of the order parameter collective modes were observed but the gapless superfluidity has been clearly verified through ultrasound measurements. In this paper, we will present the experimental results obtained in the past decade using ultrasonic techniques. Supported by NSF DMR-0803516 and DMR-1205891, and DMR-0654118 through National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the State of Florida.

  9. Dissipative processes in superfluid quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C

    2010-01-01

    We present some results about dissipative processes in fermionic superfluids that are relevant for compact stars. At sufficiently low temperatures the transport properties of a superfluid are dominated by phonons. We report the values of the bulk viscosity, shear viscosity and thermal conductivity of phonons in quark matter at extremely high density and low temperature. Then, we present a new dissipative mechanism that can operate in compact stars and that is named "rocket term". The effect of this dissipative mechanism on superfluid r-mode oscillations is sketched.

  10. High-Tc spin superfluidity in antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkov, Yu M; Alakshin, E M; Gazizulin, R R; Klochkov, A V; Kuzmin, V V; L'vov, V S; Tagirov, M S

    2012-04-27

    We report the observation of the unusual behavior of induction decay signals in antiferromagnetic monocrystals with Suhl-Nakamura interactions. The signals show the formation of the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons and the existence of spin supercurrent, in complete analogy with the spin superfluidity in the superfluid (3)He and the atomic BEC of quantum gases. In the experiments described here, the temperature of the magnon BEC is a thousand times larger than in the superfluid (3)He. It opens a possibility to apply the spin supercurrent for various magnetic spintronics applications.

  11. Phase transition temperatures of 405-725 K in superfluid ultra-dense hydrogen clusters on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlid, Leif; Kotzias, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) with its typical H-H bond distance of 2.3 pm is superfluid at room temperature as expected for quantum fluids. It also shows a Meissner effect at room temperature, which indicates that a transition point to a non-superfluid state should exist above room temperature. This transition point is given by a disappearance of the superfluid long-chain clusters H2N(0). This transition point is now measured for several metal carrier surfaces at 405 - 725 K, using both ultra-dense protium p(0) and deuterium D(0). Clusters of ordinary Rydberg matter H(l) as well as small symmetric clusters H4(0) and H3(0) (which do not give a superfluid or superconductive phase) all still exist on the surface at high temperature. This shows directly that desorption or diffusion processes do not remove the long superfluid H2N(0) clusters. The two ultra-dense forms p(0) and D(0) have different transition temperatures under otherwise identical conditions. The transition point for p(0) is higher in temperature, which is unexpected.

  12. Thermal studies of a high gradient quadrupole magnet cooled with pressurized, stagnant superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, L; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Novitski, I; Orris, D; Ozelis, J P; Peterson, Thomas J; Tartaglia, M; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    A 2-m long superconducting model of an LHC Interaction Region quadrupole magnet was wound with stabrite coated cable. The resulting low interstrand resistance and high AC losses presented the opportunity to measure magnet quench performance in superfluid as a function of helium temperature and heat deposition in the coil. Our motivation was to duplicate the high radiation heat loads predicted for the inner triplet quadrupoles at LHC and study the coil cooling conditions in the magnet. At the Magnet Test Facility in Fermilab's Technical Division, the magnet quench performance was tested as a function of bulk helium temperature and current ramp rate near the planned high luminosity interaction region field gradient of 205 T/m. AC loss measurements provided a correlation between current ramp rate and heat deposition in the coil. Analysis indicates that the results are consistent with there being little participation of superfluid helium in the small channels inside the inner layer in the heat removal from the co...

  13. Towards the in-situ detection of a single He2 * excimer in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Faustin; Hertel, Scott; Rooks, Michael; Prober, Daniel; McKinsey, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Incident radiation can excite superfluid helium into a diatomic He2* excimer, which decays through the emission of a 15 eV photon. Such excimers have been used as tracers to measure the superfluid's quantum turbulence, thanks partly to the long half-life of the He2* triplet state (13 seconds). However, the efficient detection of these excimers remains a challenge. We present a detector capable of in-situ detection of the He2* excimers either directly (the excimer collides with the detector), or by collecting the 15 eV photon emission upon decay. This detector is based on a tungsten superconducting transition edge sensor and is designed to operate near 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator. We will discuss operating characteristics and present preliminary data with an aim towards the detection of a single excimer.

  14. Development of a helium cryostat for laser spectroscopy of atoms with unstable nuclei in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Kei, E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Furukawa, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Instutute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    We are developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopic technique for the study of nuclear structure that can be applied to short-lived low-yield atoms with unstable nuclei. The method utilizes superfluid helium (He II) as a trapping medium for high-energy ion beams. A liquid helium cryostat with optical windows is a key apparatus for this type of experiment. We describe the design and the performance of the cryostat which is developed for the present project.

  15. A Theory of Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The DM and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. DM consists of axion-like particles with mass of order eV and strong self-interactions. The condensate has a polytropic equation of state P~rho^3 giving rise to a superfluid core within galaxies. Instead of behaving as individual collisionless particles, the DM superfluid is more aptly described as collective excitations. Superfluid phonons, in particular, are assumed to be governed by a MOND-like effective action and mediate a MONDian acceleration between baryonic matter particles. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): due to the higher velocity dispersion in clusters, and corres...

  16. Band geometry, Berry curvature, and superfluid weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Long; Vanhala, Tuomas I.; Peotta, Sebastiano; Siro, Topi; Harju, Ari; Törmä, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    We present a theory of the superfluid weight in multiband attractive Hubbard models within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) mean-field framework. We show how to separate the geometric contribution to the superfluid weight from the conventional one, and that the geometric contribution is associated with the interband matrix elements of the current operator. Our theory can be applied to systems with or without time-reversal symmetry. In both cases the geometric superfluid weight can be related to the quantum metric of the corresponding noninteracting systems. This leads to a lower bound on the superfluid weight given by the absolute value of the Berry curvature. We apply our theory to the attractive Kane-Mele-Hubbard and Haldane-Hubbard models, which can be realized in ultracold atom gases. Quantitative comparisons are made to state of the art dynamical mean-field theory and exact diagonalization results.

  17. Superfluid (quantum) turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Properties of distributed chaos in superfluid (quantum) turbulence have been studied using the data of recent direct numerical simulations (HVBK two-fluid model for He II, and a moving grid in the frames of Gross-Pitaevskii model of the Bose-Einstein condensates at low temperatures). It is found that for the viscous (normal) component of the velocity field in He II the viscosity dominates the distributed chaos with the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ and $\\beta = 2/3$. For the superfluid component the distributed chaos is dominated by the vorticity correlation integral with $\\beta =1/2$ (the soft spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For very low temperature the distributed chaos is tuned to the large-scale coherent motions: the viscous (normal) component is tuned to the fundamental mode, whereas the superfluid component is subharmonically tuned. For the Gross-Pitaevskii superfluid turbulence incompressible part of the energy spectrum (containing ...

  18. Dissipation in relativistic superfluid neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gusakov, M E; Chugunov, A I; Gualtieri, L

    2012-01-01

    We analyze damping of oscillations of general relativistic superfluid neutron stars. To this aim we extend the method of decoupling of superfluid and normal oscillation modes first suggested in [Gusakov & Kantor PRD 83, 081304(R) (2011)]. All calculations are made self-consistently within the finite temperature superfluid hydrodynamics. The general analytic formulas are derived for damping times due to the shear and bulk viscosities. These formulas describe both normal and superfluid neutron stars and are valid for oscillation modes of arbitrary multipolarity. We show that: (i) use of the ordinary one-fluid hydrodynamics is a good approximation, for most of the stellar temperatures, if one is interested in calculation of the damping times of normal f-modes; (ii) for radial and p-modes such an approximation is poor; (iii) the temperature dependence of damping times undergoes a set of rapid changes associated with resonance coupling of neighboring oscillation modes. The latter effect can substantially accel...

  19. Pulsar timing noise from superfluid turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Shear-driven turbulence in the superfluid interior of a neutron star exerts a fluctuating torque on the rigid crust, causing the rotational phase to walk randomly. The phase fluctuation spectrum is calculated analytically for incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence and is found to be red; the half-power point is set by the observed spin-down rate, the crust-superfluid lag, and the dynamical response time of the superfluid. Preliminary limits are placed on the latter quantities using selected time- and frequency-domain data. It is found that measurements of the normalization and slope of the power spectrum are reproduced for reasonable choices of the turbulence parameters. The results point preferentially to the neutron star interior containing a turbulent superfluid rather than a turbulent Navier-Stokes fluid. The implications for gravitational wave detection by pulsar timing arrays are discussed briefly.

  20. Statistics of Quantum Turbulence in Superfluid He

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, V. S.; Pomyalov, A.

    2016-11-01

    Based on our current understanding of statistics of quantum turbulence as well as on results of intensive ongoing analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we overview here the following problems in the large-scale, space-homogeneous, steady-state turbulence of superfluid ^4 He and ^3 He: (1) energy spectra of normal and superfluid velocity components; (2) cross-correlation function of normal and superfluid velocities; (3) energy dissipation by mutual friction and viscosity; (4) energy exchange between normal and superfluid components; (5) high-order statistics and intermittency effects. The statistical properties are discussed for turbulence in different types of flows: coflow of ^4 He; turbulent ^3 He with the laminar normal fluid; pure superflow and counterflow in ^4 He.

  1. Microphotonic Forces From Superfluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    McAuslan, D L; Baker, C; Sachkou, Y; He, X; Sheridan, E; Bowen, W P

    2015-01-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly one order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces demonstrated here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, and have the potential to allow efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy to motional kinetic energy.

  2. Electric response in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  3. Breathers on Quantized Superfluid Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-01-01

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantised superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localised in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the cross-over range of scales in superfl...

  4. Proceedings of the 55th Meeting on Cryogenics and Superconductivity; Dai 55 kai 1996 nendo shuki teion kogaku chodendo gakkai koen gaiyoshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-06

    This is a proceedings of the 55th Meeting on Cryogenics and Superconductivity. As for wires, made public were Bi-system 2223, Y-system NbTi, NbSn, Nb3Al, etc. As to oxide superconductors, some of them are promising. The study of those characteristics and the developmental application to the electric power field such as coils and cables were introduced. Beside wires, multilayer film superconductors were also introduced. With relation to fundamentals and theories, became topics were pinning characteristics, NbTi proximity effects, magnetic flux and visualization, stability, etc. About the application, large refrigerators are discussed in the refrigeration field in addition to GM/pulse tube refrigerators. Concerning cooling technology, made public were the development of a floating railroad use 80K cooling system, etc. Also studied were power leads, superconducting magnet, control action characteristics, etc. SMES (superconducting magnetic energy storage) also became a topic, and the element coil energization experiment, stability and mechanical properties were described. The paper also touched on accelerators, large superconducting devices such as LHD (large helical device) and ITER (international thermal-nuclear experimental reactor) as well as generators and current limiters. The cryogenetic engineering was also reported such as fracture toughness and superfluidity of cryostats and structural materials for extremely low temperatures.

  5. Proceedings of the 55th Meeting on Cryogenics and Superconductivity; Dai 55 kai 1996 nendo shuki teion kogaku chodendo gakkai koen gaiyoshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-06

    This is a proceedings of the 55th Meeting on Cryogenics and Superconductivity. As for wires, made public were Bi-system 2223, Y-system NbTi, NbSn, Nb3Al, etc. As to oxide superconductors, some of them are promising. The study of those characteristics and the developmental application to the electric power field such as coils and cables were introduced. Beside wires, multilayer film superconductors were also introduced. With relation to fundamentals and theories, became topics were pinning characteristics, NbTi proximity effects, magnetic flux and visualization, stability, etc. About the application, large refrigerators are discussed in the refrigeration field in addition to GM/pulse tube refrigerators. Concerning cooling technology, made public were the development of a floating railroad use 80K cooling system, etc. Also studied were power leads, superconducting magnet, control action characteristics, etc. SMES (superconducting magnetic energy storage) also became a topic, and the element coil energization experiment, stability and mechanical properties were described. The paper also touched on accelerators, large superconducting devices such as LHD (large helical device) and ITER (international thermal-nuclear experimental reactor) as well as generators and current limiters. The cryogenetic engineering was also reported such as fracture toughness and superfluidity of cryostats and structural materials for extremely low temperatures.

  6. Multipole strength function of deformed superfluid nuclei made easy

    CERN Document Server

    Stoitsov, M; Nakatsukasa, T; Losa, C; Nazarewicz, W

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in $^{240}$Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  7. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  8. Experience with a Pre-Series Superfluid Helium Test Bench for LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Benda, V; Schouten, J A

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN is based on the use of high-field superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium. For the validation of the machine dipoles and quadrupoles, a magnet test plant is under construction requiring 12 so-called Cryogenic Feeder Units (CFU). Based on experience done at CERN, two pre-series CFUs were designed and built by industry and are currently in use prior to final series delivery. This presentation describes the features of a CFU, its typical characteristics and the experience acquired with the first units.

  9. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  10. Microscopic molecular superfluid response: theory and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1938, superfluidity has been the subject of much investigation because it provides a unique example of a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics. About 60 years later, scientists successfully observed this phenomenon in the microscopic world though the spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in helium nano-droplets. This reduction of scale suggests that not only helium but also para-H2 (pH2) can be a candidate for superfluidity. This expectation is based on the fact that the smaller number of neighbours and surface effects of a finite-size cluster may hinder solidification and promote a liquid-like phase. The first prediction of superfluidity in pH2 clusters was reported in 1991 based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The possible superfluidity of pH2 was later indirectly observed in a spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in 2000. Since then, a growing number of studies have appeared, and theoretical simulations have been playing a special role because they help guide and interpret experiments. In this review, we go over the theoretical studies of pH2 superfluid clusters since the experiment of 2000. We provide a historical perspective and introduce the basic theoretical formalism along with key experimental advances. We then present illustrative results of the theoretical studies and comment on the possible future developments in the field. We include sufficient theoretical details such that the review can serve as a guide for newcomers to the field.

  11. Holographic Superfluidity in Imbalanced Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Kerner, Patrick; Ngo, Thanh Hai

    2011-01-01

    We construct superfluid black hole solutions with two chemical potentials. By analogy with QCD, the two chemical potentials correspond to the baryon and isospin symmetries, respectively. We consider two systems: the back-reacted U(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 4+1 dimensions and the 9+1-dimensional D3/D7 brane setup with two coincident D7-brane probes. In the D7-brane model, the identification of baryon and isospin chemical potential is explicit since the dual field theory is explicitly known. Studying the phase diagram, we find in both systems a quantum phase transition at a critical ratio of the two chemical potentials. However the quantum phase transition is different in the two systems: In the D3/D7 brane setup we always find a second order phase transition, while in the Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, depending on the strength of the back-reaction, we obtain a continuous or first order transition. We expect the continuous quantum phase transition to be BKT-like. We comment on the origin of this differing ...

  12. Unitary Superfluidity Of Polarized Fermionic Gases In Highly Elongated Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksmaty, L.; Lu, H.; Bolech, C.; Pu, H.

    2010-03-01

    Recent groundbreaking experiments on resonantly interacting fermionic superfluids encountered qualitative and quantitative discrepancies which seem to be a function of the confining geometry. Despite long familiarity with BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) superfluids in a wide range of physical systems such as nuclear matter, QCD, Astrophysics and Condensed Matter, these observations have defied theoretical explanation. Mindful of quantum rigidity and motivated by this impasse, we study the solution space for 3-dimensional fully self-consistent mean field formulation. Relying on numerical algorithms specifically developed for this purpose, we study realistic systems with up to 10^5 atoms. We find that for a large enough sample in a cigar-shaped trap, there are typically three types of solutions which are almost degenerate and have the ff. properties: (i) There is a solution very similar to the local density approximation (LDA) which is consistently the lowest in energy. (ii) However one of the other two solutions, connected by a smooth transition, and which are more consistent with experiment at high aspect ratio, supports a state very similar to the long sought FFLO (Fulde Ferrel Larkin Ovchinnikov) state. We submit that these solutions are relevant false vacua because, given high energy barriers and near degeneracy of the obtained solutions, the actual states observed in an experiment could be a strong function of the experimental procedure. Darpa OLE grant, ARO Grant no. W911NF-07-1-0464, Welch foundation (C-1669, C-1681) and NSF.

  13. A Superfluid Pulse Tube Refrigerator Without Moving Parts for Sub-Kelvin Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin K.

    2012-01-01

    A report describes a pulse tube refrigerator that uses a mixture of He-3 and superfluid He-4 to cool to temperatures below 300 mK, while rejecting heat at temperatures up to 1.7 K. The refrigerator is driven by a novel thermodynamically reversible pump that is capable of pumping the He-3 He-4 mixture without the need for moving parts. The refrigerator consists of a reversible thermal magnetic pump module, two warm heat exchangers, a recuperative heat exchanger, two cold heat exchangers, two pulse tubes, and an orifice. It is two superfluid pulse tubes that run 180 out of phase. All components of this machine except the reversible thermal pump have been demonstrated at least as proof-of-concept physical models in previous superfluid Stirling cycle machines. The pump consists of two canisters packed with pieces of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). The canisters are connected by a superleak (a porous piece of VYCOR glass). A superconducting magnetic coil surrounds each of the canisters.

  14. Photochemistry inside superfluid helium nano droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slenczka, Alkwin; Vdovin, Alexander; Dick, Bernhard [Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Superfluid helium nano droplets serve as the most gentle cyrogenic matrix for creating isolated and cold molecules. High resolution electronic spectroscopy is sensitive for the investigation of the very weak perturbation of the helium droplet on the embedded molecule. Fluorescence excitation spectra, dispersed emission spectra and pump--probe-spectra show details of the salvation of molecules in helium droplets which were attributed to relaxation processes of the first solvation layer around the dopant. Photochemistry such as ESIPT, tautomerization by proton transfer and charge transfer are highly sensitive on intermolecular perturbations. We have studies such processes in superfluid helium droplets. The comparison with the respective gas phase experiments and quantum chemical calculations reveals further details on the photochemistry as well as on the perturbation by the superfluid helium droplet.

  15. Extension of Radiative Viscosity to Superfluid Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PI Chun-Mei; YANG Shu-Hua; ZHENG Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T,the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.As one of the most important transport coefficients,the bulk viscosities of simple npe matter,of hyperon matter and even of quark matter,both in normal and superfluid states,have been extensively studied,[1-18] for more detail see Ref.[19].%The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T, the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.

  16. Holographic Vortex Pair Annihilation in Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Yiqiang; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-01-01

    We make a first principles investigation of the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid by holography through numerically solving its highly non-trivial gravity dual. With the randomly placed vortices and antivortices prepared as initial states, we find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process remarkably from a very early time on. In particular, subtracted by the universal offset, the power law fit indicates that our holographic turbulent superfluid exhibits an apparently different decay pattern from the superfluid recently experimented in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates.

  17. Shapes of rotating superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernando, Charles; Tanyag, Rico Mayro P.; Jones, Curtis; Bacellar, Camila; Bucher, Maximilian; Ferguson, Ken R.; Rupp, Daniela; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Gomez, Luis F.; Chatterley, Adam S.; Gorkhover, Tais; Müller, Maria; Bozek, John; Carron, Sebastian; Kwok, Justin; Butler, Samuel L.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2017-02-01

    Rotating superfluid He droplets of approximately 1 μm in diameter were obtained in a free nozzle beam expansion of liquid He in vacuum and were studied by single-shot coherent diffractive imaging using an x-ray free electron laser. The formation of strongly deformed droplets is evidenced by large anisotropies and intensity anomalies (streaks) in the obtained diffraction images. The analysis of the images shows that in addition to previously described axially symmetric oblate shapes, some droplets exhibit prolate shapes. Forward modeling of the diffraction images indicates that the shapes of rotating superfluid droplets are very similar to their classical counterparts, giving direct access to the droplet angular momenta and angular velocities. The analyses of the radial intensity distribution and appearance statistics of the anisotropic images confirm the existence of oblate metastable superfluid droplets with large angular momenta beyond the classical bifurcation threshold.

  18. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolos, Laura [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC/CSIC) Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Frankfurt Institute for Advances Studies. Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Manuel, Cristina [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC/CSIC) Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sarkar, Sreemoyee [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhaba Road, Mumbai-400005 (India); Tarrus, Jaume [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  19. Note on Zero Temperature Holographic Superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Minyong; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully non-linear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  20. Note on zero temperature holographic superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minyong; Lan, Shanquan; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-06-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully nonlinear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  1. Chiral Superfluidity for the Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, T

    2013-01-01

    We argue that the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma formed at LHC and RHIC can be considered as a chiral superfluid. The "normal" component of the fluid is the thermalized matter in common sense, while the "superfluid" part consists of long wavelength (chiral) fermionic states moving independently. We use the bosonization procedure with a finite cut-off and obtain a dynamical axion-like field out of the chiral fermionic modes. Then we use relativistic hydrodynamics for macroscopic description of the effective theory obtained after the bosonization. Finally, solving the hydrodynamic equations in gradient expansion, we find that in the presence of external electromagnetic fields the motion of the "superfluid" component gives rise to the chiral magnetic, chiral electric and dipole wave effects. Latter two effects are specific for a two-component fluid, which provides us with crucial experimental tests of the model. By considering probe quarks one can show that the fermionic spectrum at the intermediate tempera...

  2. Holographic thermal relaxation in superfluid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yiqiang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Niu, Chao [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-02

    Holographic duality provides a first-principles approach to investigate real time processes in quantum many-body systems, in particular at finite temperature and far-from-equilibrium. We use this approach to study the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid through numerically solving its gravity dual. We find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process, thus confirm the previous suspicion based on the experimental data for turbulent superfluid in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, the decay rate near the critical temperature is in good agreement with the recently developed effective theory of 2D superfluid turbulence.

  3. Polarization Effects in Superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, V. P.

    2011-03-01

    A theory of thermoelectric phenomena in superfluid 4He is developed. It is found an estimation of the dipole moment of helium atom arising due to electron shell deformation caused by pushing forces from the side of its surrounding atoms. The corresponding electric signal generated in a liquid consisting of electrically neutral atoms by the ordinary sound waves is found extremely small. The second sound waves in superfluid 4He generate the polarization of liquid induced by the relative accelerated motion of the superfluid and the normal component. The derived ratio of the amplitudes of temperature and electric polarization potential was proved to be practically temperature independent. Its magnitude is in reasonable correspondence with the experimental observations. The polarity of electric signal is determined by the sign of temperature gradient in accordance with the measurements. The problem of the roton excitations dipole moment is also discussed.

  4. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tolos, Laura; Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Tarrus, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  5. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yan-Xia; Duan Wen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases.A Kadomtsev Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) regime,Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regime,and unitarity regime.Onelump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained,and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases.The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  6. How superfluid vortex knots untie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Dustin; Kauffman, Louis H.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Knots and links often occur in physical systems, including shaken strands of rope and DNA (ref. ), as well as the more subtle structure of vortices in fluids and magnetic fields in plasmas. Theories of fluid flows without dissipation predict these tangled structures persist, constraining the evolution of the flow much like a knot tied in a shoelace. This constraint gives rise to a conserved quantity known as helicity, offering both fundamental insights and enticing possibilities for controlling complex flows. However, even small amounts of dissipation allow knots to untie by means of `cut-and-splice’ operations known as reconnections. Despite the potentially fundamental role of these reconnections in understanding helicity--and the stability of knotted fields more generally--their effect is known only for a handful of simple knots. Here we study the evolution of 322 elemental knots and links in the Gross-Pitaevskii model for a superfluid, and find that they universally untie. We observe that the centreline helicity is partially preserved even as the knots untie, a remnant of the perfect helicity conservation predicted for idealized fluids. Moreover, we find that the topological pathways of untying knots have simple descriptions in terms of minimal two-dimensional knot diagrams, and tend to concentrate in states which are twisted in only one direction. These results have direct analogies to previous studies of simple knots in several systems, including DNA recombination and classical fluids. This similarity in the geometric and topological evolution suggests there are universal aspects in the behaviour of knots in dissipative fields.

  7. Spontaneous electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by a strong magnetic field: QCD and electroweak theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N; Verschelde, H

    2012-01-01

    Both in electroweak theory and QCD, the vacuum in strong magnetic fields develops charged vector condensates once a critical value of the magnetic field is reached. Both ground states have a similar Abrikosov lattice structure and superconducting properties. It is the purpose of these proceedings to put the condensates and their superconducting properties side by side and obtain a global view on this type of condensates. Some peculiar aspects of the superfluidity and backreaction of the condensates are also discussed.

  8. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  9. Magnus force in superfluids and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    1997-01-01

    The forces on the vortex, transverse to its velocity, are considered. In addition to the superfluid Magnus force from the condensate (superfluid component), there are transverse forces from thermal quasiparticles and external fields violating the Galilean invariance. The forces between quasiparticles and the vortex originate from interference of quasiparticles with trajectories on the left and on the right from the vortex like similar forces for electrons interacting with the thin magnetic-flux tube (the Aharonov-Bohm effect). These forces are derived for phonons from the equations of superfluid hydrodynamics, and for BCS quasiparticles from the Bogolyubov-de Gennes equations. The effect of external fields breaking Galilean invariance is analyzed for vortices in the two-dimensional Josephson junction array. The symmetry analysis of the classical equations for the array shows that the total transverse force on the vortex vanishes. Therefore the Hall effect which is linear in the transverse force is absent also. This means that the Magnus force from the superfluid component exactly cancels with the transverse force from the external fields. The results of other approaches are also brought together for discussion.

  10. Internal Magnus effects in superfluid 3A

    OpenAIRE

    Salmelin, Riitta; Salomaa, M. M.; Mineev, V. P.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum of the coherently aligned Cooper pairs in superfluid 3A is encountered by an object immersed in the condensate. We evaluate the associated quasiparticle-scattering asymmetry experienced by a negative ion; this leads to a measureable, purely quantum-mechanical reactive force deflecting the ion’s trajectory. Possible hydrodynamic Magnus effects are also discussed. Peer reviewed

  11. Internal Magnus effects in superfluid 3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmelin, R. H.; Salomaa, M. M.; Mineev, V. P.

    1989-08-01

    Orbital angular momentum of the coherently aligned Cooper pairs in superfluid 3A is encountered by an object immersed in the condensate. We evaluate the associated quasiparticle-scattering asymmetry experienced by a negative ion; this leads to a measureable, purely quantum-mechanical reactive force deflecting the ion's trajectory. Possible hydrodynamic Magnus effects are also discussed.

  12. Excitations in Topological Superfluids and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao

    In this thesis I present the theoretical work on Fermionic surface states, and %the bulk Bosonic collective excitations in topological superfluids and superconductors. Broken symmetries %Bulk-edge correspondence in topological condensed matter systems have implications for the spectrum of Fermionic excitations confined on surfaces or topological defects. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  14. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  15. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  16. A transition-edge-sensor-based instrument for the measurement of individual He2* excimers in a superfluid 4He bath at 100 mK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Faustin Wirkus

    This dissertation is an account of the first calorimetric detection of individual He*2 excimers within a bath of superfluid 4He. When superfluid helium is subject to ionizing radiation, diatomic He molecules are created in both the singlet and triplet states. The singlet He molecules decay within nanoseconds, but due to a forbidden spin-flip the triplet molecules have a relatively long lifetime of 13 seconds in superfluid He. When He* 2 molecules decay, they emit a ~15 eV photon. Nearly all matter is opaque to these vacuum-UV photons, although they do propagate through liquid helium. The triplet state excimers propagate ballistically through the superfluid until they quench upon a surface; this process deposits a large amount of energy into the surface. The prospect of detecting both excimer states is the motivation for building a detector immersed directly in the superfluid bath. The detector used in this work is a single superconducting titanium transition edge sensor (TES). The TES is mounted inside a hermetically sealed chamber at the baseplate of a dilution refrigerator. The chamber contains superfluid helium at 100 mK. Excimers are created during the relaxation of high-energy electrons, which are introduced into the superfluid bath either in situ via a sharp tungsten tip held above the field-emission voltage, or by using an external gamma-ray source to ionize He atoms. These excimers either propagate through the LHe bath and quench on a surface, or decay and emit vacuum-ultraviolet photons that can be collected by the detector. This dissertation discusses the design, construction, and calibration of the TES-based excimer detecting instrument. It also presents the first spectra resulting from the direct detection of individual singlet and triplet helium excimers.

  17. Vortices in holographic superfluids and superconductors as conformal defects

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Oscar J C; Iqbal, Nabil; Santos, Jorge E

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a single vortex in a holographic symmetry breaking phase. At low energies the system flows to an nontrivial conformal fixed point. Novel vortex physics arises from the interaction of these gapless degrees of freedom with the vortex: at low energies the vortex may be understood as a conformal defect in this low energy theory. Defect conformal symmetry allows the construction of a simple infrared geometry describing a new kind of extremal horizon: a Poincare horizon with a small bubble of magnetic Reissner-Nordstrom horizon inside it that carries a single unit of magnetic flux and a finite amount of entropy even at zero temperature. We also construct the full geometry describing the vortex at finite temperature in a UV complete theory. We study both superfluid and superconducting boundary conditions and calculate thermodynamic properties of the vortex. A study of vortex stability reveals that the dual superconductor can be Type I or Type II, depending on the charge of the condense...

  18. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  19. Light Dark Matter in Superfluid Helium: Detection with Multi-excitation Production

    CERN Document Server

    Knapen, Simon; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    We examine in depth a recent proposal to utilize superfluid helium for direct detection of sub-MeV mass dark matter. For sub-keV recoil energies, nuclear scattering events in liquid helium primarily deposit energy into long-lived phonon and roton quasiparticle excitations. If the energy thresholds of the detector can be reduced to the meV scale, then dark matter as light as ~MeV can be reached with ordinary nuclear recoils. If, on the other hand, two or more quasiparticle excitations are directly produced in the dark matter interaction, the kinematics of the scattering allows sensitivity to dark matter as light as ~keV at the same energy resolution. We present in detail the theoretical framework for describing excitations in superfluid helium, using it to calculate the rate for the leading dark matter scattering interaction, where an off-shell phonon splits into two or more higher-momentum excitations. We validate our analytic results against the measured and simulated dynamic response of superfluid helium. F...

  20. Zero Temperature Holographic Superfluids with Two Competing Orders

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Hongbao; Zhao, Junkun

    2016-01-01

    We initiate the investigation of the zero temperature holographic superfluids with two competing orders, where besides the vacuum phase, two one band superfluid phases, the coexistent superfluid phase has also been found in the AdS soliton background for the first time. We construct the complete phase diagram in the $e-\\mu$ plane by numerics, which is consistent with our qualitative analysis. Furthermore, we calculate the corresponding optical conductivity and sound speed by the linear response theory. The onset of pole of optical conductivity at $\\omega=0$ indicates that the spontaneous breaking phase always represents the superfluid phase, and the residue of pole is increased with the chemical potential, which is consistent with the fact that the particle density is essentially the superfluid density for zero temperature superfluids. In addition, the resulting sound speed demonstrates the non-smoothness at the critical points as the order parameter of condensate, which indicates that the phase transitions c...

  1. Quasiparticle lifetime in a mixture of Bose and Fermi superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhai, Hui

    2014-12-31

    In this Letter, we study the effect of quasiparticle interactions in a Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture. We consider the lifetime of a quasiparticle of the Bose superfluid due to its interaction with quasiparticles in the Fermi superfluid. We find that this damping rate, i.e., the inverse of the lifetime, has quite a different threshold behavior at the BCS and the BEC side of the Fermi superfluid. The damping rate is a constant near the threshold momentum in the BCS side, while it increases rapidly in the BEC side. This is because, in the BCS side, the decay process is restricted by the constraint that the fermion quasiparticle is located near the Fermi surface, while such a restriction does not exist in the BEC side where the damping process is dominated by bosonic quasiparticles of the Fermi superfluid. Our results are related to the collective mode experiment in the recently realized Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture.

  2. Generic strong coupling behavior of Cooper pairs in the surface of superfluid nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillet, N. [DPTA/Service de Physique nucleaire, CEA/DAM Ile de France, BP12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Sandulescu, N. [DPTA/Service de Physique nucleaire, CEA/DAM Ile de France, BP12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]|[Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 76900 Bucharest (Romania)]|[Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS, UMR 8608, Orsay, F-91406 (France); Schuck, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS, UMR 8608, Orsay, F-91406 (France)]|[Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, F-91505 (France)

    2007-01-15

    With realistic HFB calculations, using the D1S Gogny force, we reveal a generic behavior of concentration of small sized Cooper pairs (2-3 fm) in the surface of superfluid nuclei. This study confirms and extends previous results given in the literature that use more schematic approaches. It is shown that the strong concentration of pair probability of small Cooper pairs in the nuclear surface is a quite general and generic feature and that nuclear pairing is much closer to the strong coupling regime than previously assumed.

  3. Spin-orbit Coupled Fermi Gases and Heavy Solitons in Fermionic Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Lawrence

    2013-05-01

    The coupling of the spin of electrons to their motional state lies at the heart of topological phases of matter. We have created and detected spin-orbit coupling in an atomic Fermi gas via spin-injection spectroscopy, which characterizes the energy-momentum dispersion and spin composition of the quantum states. For energies within the spin-orbit gap, the system acts as a spin diode. To fully inhibit transport, we open an additional spin gap with radio-frequency coupling, thereby creating a spin-orbit coupled lattice whose spinful band structure we probe. In the presence of s-wave interactions, spin-orbit coupled fermion systems should display induced p-wave pairing and consequently topological superfluidity. Such systems can be described by a relativistic Dirac theory with a mass term that can be made to vary spatially. Topologically protected edge states are expected to occur whenever the mass term changes sign. A system that similarly supports edges states is the strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas near a Feshbach resonance. Topological excitations, such as vortices - line defects - or solitons - planar defects - have been described theoretically for decades in many different physical contexts. In superconductivity and superfluidity they represent a defect in the order parameter and give rise to localized bound states. We have created and directly observed solitons in a fermionic superfluid by imprinting a phase step into the superfluid wavefunction. These are found to be stable for many seconds, allowing us to track their oscillatory motion in the trapped superfluid. Their trapping period increases dramatically as the interactions are tuned from the BEC to the BCS regime. At the Feshbach resonance, their period is an order of magnitude larger than expectations from mean-field Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory, signaling strong effects of bosonic quantum fluctuations and possible filling of Andreev bound states. Our work opens the study of fermionic edge states in

  4. $^3P_2$ Superfluids Are Topological

    CERN Document Server

    Mizushima, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the topology of the $^3P_2$ superfluidity which is expected to be realized in the cores of neutron stars and cubic odd-parity superconductors. The phase diagram includes the unitary uniaxial/biaxial nematic phases and nonunitary ferromagnetic and cyclic phases. We here show that the low-energy structures of all the phases are governed by different types of topologically protected gapless fermionic excitations: Surface Majorana fermions in nematic phases, single itinerant Majorana fermion in the ferromagnetic phase, and a quartet of itinerant Majorana fermions in the cyclic phase. Using the superfluid Fermi liquid theory, we also demonstrate that dihedral-two and -four biaxial nematic phases are thermodynamically favored in the weak coupling limit under a magnetic field. The mass acquisition of surface Majorana fermions in nematic phases is subject to symmetry.

  5. Entanglement area law in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, C. M.; Roy, P.-N.; Melko, R. G.; Maestro, A. Del

    2017-06-01

    Area laws were first discovered by Bekenstein and Hawking, who found that the entropy of a black hole grows proportional to its surface area, and not its volume. Entropy area laws have since become a fundamental part of modern physics, from the holographic principle in quantum gravity to ground-state wavefunctions of quantum matter, where entanglement entropy is generically found to obey area law scaling. As no experiments are currently capable of directly probing the entanglement area law in naturally occurring many-body systems, evidence of its existence is based on studies of simplified qualitative theories. Using new exact microscopic numerical simulations of superfluid 4He, we demonstrate for the first time an area law scaling of entanglement entropy in a real quantum liquid in three dimensions. We validate the fundamental principle that the area law originates from correlations local to the entangling boundary, and present an entanglement equation of state showing how it depends on the density of the superfluid.

  6. Relativistic superfluid models for rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, B

    2001-01-01

    This article starts by providing an introductory overview of the theoretical mechanics of rotating neutron stars as developped to account for the frequency variations, and particularly the discontinuous glitches, observed in pulsars. The theory suggests, and the observations seem to confirm, that an essential role is played by the interaction between the solid crust and inner layers whose superfluid nature allows them to rotate independently. However many significant details remain to be clarified, even in much studied cases such as the Crab and Vela. The second part of this article is more technical, concentrating on just one of the many physical aspects that needs further development, namely the provision of a satisfactorily relativistic (local but not microscopic) treatment of the effects of the neutron superfluidity that is involved.

  7. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ , the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition.

  8. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  9. Superconducting magnets. Citations from NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimherr, G. W.

    1980-10-01

    The cited reports discuss research on materials studies, theory, design and applications of superconducting magnets. Examples of applications include particle accelerators, MHD power generation, superconducting generators, nuclear fusion research devices, energy storage systems, and magnetic levitation. This updated bibliography contains 218 citations, 88 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  10. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  11. A theory for non-Abelian superfluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Akash

    2016-01-01

    We write down a theory for non-Abelian superfluids with a partially broken (semisimple) Lie group. We adapt the offshell formalism of hydrodynamics to superfluids and use it to comment on the superfluid transport compatible with the second law of thermodynamics. We find that the second law can be also used to derive the Josephson equation, which governs dynamics of the Goldstone modes. In the course of our analysis, we derive an alternate and mutually distinct parametrization of the recently proposed classification of hydrodynamic transport and generalize it to superfluids.

  12. Superfluid stiffness of a driven dissipative condensate with disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Alexander; Hyart, Timo; Eastham, Paul R; Rosenow, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Observations of macroscopic quantum coherence in driven systems, e.g. polariton condensates, have strongly stimulated experimental as well as theoretical efforts during the last decade. We address the question of whether a driven quantum condensate is a superfluid, allowing for the effects of disorder and its nonequilibrium nature. We predict that for spatial dimensions d<4 the superfluid stiffness vanishes once the condensate exceeds a critical size, and treat in detail the case d=2. Thus a nonequilibrium condensate is not a superfluid in the thermodynamic limit, even for weak disorder, although superfluid behavior would persist in small systems.

  13. Superfluidity in Bose-Hubbard circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arwas, Geva; Cohen, Doron

    2017-02-01

    A semiclassical theory is provided for the metastability regime diagram of atomtronic superfluid circuits. Such circuits typically exhibit high-dimensional chaos, and nonlinear resonances that couple the Bogoliubov excitations manifest. Contrary to the expectation, these resonances do not originate from the familiar Beliaev and Landau damping terms. Rather, they are described by a variant of the Cherry Hamiltonian of celestial mechanics. Consequently, we study the induced decay process and its dependence on the number of sites and condensed particles.

  14. Nonhydrodynamic spin transport in superfluid 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkov, Yu. M.; Dmitriev, V. V.; Markelov, A. V.; Mukharskii, Yu. M.; Einzel, D.

    1990-08-01

    We report the observation of two kinds of novel nonhydrodynamic spin-transport phenomena of quasiparticles in superfluid 3B. We find a drastic low-temperature depression of the transverse quasiparticle spin-diffusion coefficient. In addition, we have done the first measurements of the Leggett-Takagi spin-relaxation time far outside the hydrodynamic regime. The observations of spin diffusion are shown to be in quantitative agreement with a kinetic-equation approach to quasiparticle spin dynamics.

  15. Superfluid response in heavy fermion superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yin; Zhang, Lan; Shao, Can; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by a recent London penetration depth measurement [H. Kim, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 027003 (2015)] and novel composite pairing scenario [O. Erten, R. Flint, and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 027002 (2015)] of the Yb-doped heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, we revisit the issue of superfluid response in the microscopic heavy fermion lattice model. However, from the literature, an explicit expression for the superfluid response function in heavy fermion superconductors is rare. In this paper, we investigate the superfluid density response function in the celebrated Kondo-Heisenberg model. To be specific, we derive the corresponding formalism from an effective fermionic large- N mean-field pairing Hamiltonian whose pairing interaction is assumed to originate from the effective local antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. Interestingly, we find that the physically correct, temperature-dependent superfluid density formula can only be obtained if the external electromagnetic field is directly coupled to the heavy fermion quasi-particle rather than the bare conduction electron or local moment. Such a unique feature emphasizes the key role of the Kondo-screening-renormalized heavy quasi-particle for low-temperature/energy thermodynamics and transport behaviors. As an important application, the theoretical result is compared to an experimental measurement in heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn5 and Yb-doped Ce1- x Yb x CoIn5 with fairly good agreement and the transition of the pairing symmetry in the latter material is explained as a simple doping effect. In addition, the requisite formalism for the commonly encountered nonmagnetic impurity and non-local electrodynamic effect are developed. Inspired by the success in explaining classic 115-series heavy fermion superconductors, we expect the present theory will be applied to understand other heavy fermion superconductors such as CeCu2Si2 and more generic multi-band superconductors.

  16. Pairing fluctuations and an anisotropic pseudogap phenomenon in an ultracold superfluid Fermi gas with plural p -wave superfluid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inotani, Daisuke; Ohashi, Yoji

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the superfluid properties of a one-component Fermi gas with a uniaxially anisotropic p -wave pairing interaction, Ux>Uy=Uz [where Ui(i =x ,y ,z ) is a pi-wave pairing interaction]. This type of interaction is considered to be realized in a 40K Fermi gas. Including pairing fluctuations within a strong-coupling T -matrix theory, we determine the px-wave superfluid phase transition temperature Tcpx, as well as the other phase transition temperature Tcpx+i py(superfluid order parameter has the px+i py -wave symmetry. In the normal state near Tcpx, px-wave pairing fluctuations are shown to induce an anisotropic pseudogap phenomenon, where a dip structure in the angle-resolved density of states around ω =0 is the most remarkable in the px direction. In the px-wave superfluid phase (Tcpx+i pysuperfluid gap, the pseudogap in the perpendicular direction to the px axis is found to continue developing because of enhanced py-wave and pz-wave pairing fluctuations around the node of the px-wave superfluid order parameter. Since pairing fluctuations are always suppressed in the isotropic s -wave superfluid state, this phenomenon is peculiar to an unconventional Fermi superfluid with a nodal superfluid order parameter. Since the p -wave Fermi superfluid is the most promising non-s -wave pairing state in an ultracold Fermi gas, our results would contribute to understanding how the anisotropic pairing fluctuations, as well as the existence of plural superfluid phases, affect many-body properties of this unconventional Fermi superfluid.

  17. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  18. Final Report - Development of a Multi-Spoke Superconducting Cavity for Nuclear Physics, Light Sources, and Driven Systems Applications (ODU Contribution)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This report summarizes the work done by Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility toward the development of high-velocity superconducting spoke cavities.

  19. Three-flavor color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malekzadeh, H.

    2007-12-15

    I investigate some of the inert phases in three-flavor, spin-zero color-superconducting quark matter: the CFL phase (the analogue of the B phase in superfluid {sup 3}He), the A and A{sup *} phases, and the 2SC and sSC phases. I compute the pressure of these phases with and without the neutrality condition. Without the neutrality condition, after the CFL phase the sSC phase is the dominant phase. However, including the neutrality condition, the CFL phase is again the energetically favored phase except for a small region of intermediate densities where the 2SC/A{sup *} phase is favored. It is shown that the 2SC phase is identical to the A{sup *} phase up to a color rotation. In addition, I calculate the self-energies and the spectral densities of longitudinal and transverse gluons at zero temperature in color-superconducting quark matter in the CFL phase. I find a collective excitation, a plasmon, at energies smaller than two times the gap parameter and momenta smaller than about eight times the gap. The dispersion relation of this mode exhibits a minimum at some nonzero value of momentum, indicating a van Hove singularity. (orig.)

  20. Measurements and modelling of recuperator for superfluid Stirling refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, J. G.; Swift, G. W.

    Measurements and several methods of modelling of a recuperator for use in a dual superfluid Stirling refrigerator are discussed. The models are also applicable to non-superfluid machines. The heat capacity of the fluid entrained in the recuperator is essential for its efficient operation if the piston motions are sinusoidal.

  1. Dependence of the critical temperature in overdoped copper oxides on superfluid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božović, I.; He, X.; Wu, J.; Bollinger, A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The physics of underdoped copper oxide superconductors, including the pseudogap, spin and charge ordering and their relation to superconductivity, is intensely debated. The overdoped copper oxides are perceived as simpler, with strongly correlated fermion physics evolving smoothly into the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer behaviour. Pioneering studies on a few overdoped samples indicated that the superfluid density was much lower than expected, but this was attributed to pair-breaking, disorder and phase separation. Here we report the way in which the magnetic penetration depth and the phase stiffness depend on temperature and doping by investigating the entire overdoped side of the La2-xSrxCuO4 phase diagram. We measured the absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth and the phase stiffness to an accuracy of one per cent in thousands of samples; the large statistics reveal clear trends and intrinsic properties. The films are homogeneous; variations in the critical superconducting temperature within a film are very small (less than one kelvin). At every level of doping the phase stiffness decreases linearly with temperature. The dependence of the zero-temperature phase stiffness on the critical superconducting temperature is generally linear, but with an offset; however, close to the origin this dependence becomes parabolic. This scaling law is incompatible with the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer description.

  2. High-temperature superfluidity of the two-component Bose gas in a transition metal dichalcogenide bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The high-temperature superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) layers is predicted. We study Bose-Einstein condensation in the two-component system of dipolar A and B excitons. The effective mass, energy spectrum of the collective excitations, the sound velocity, and critical temperature are obtained for different TMDC materials. It is shown that in the Bogoliubov approximation, the sound velocity in the two-component dilute exciton Bose gas is always larger than in any one-component exciton system. The difference between the sound velocities for two-component and one-component dilute gases is caused by the fact that the sound velocity for a two-component system depends on the reduced mass of A and B excitons, which is always smaller than the individual mass of A or B exciton. Due to this fact, the critical temperature Tc for superfluidity for the two-component exciton system in a TMDC bilayer is about one order of magnitude higher than Tc in any one-component exciton system. We propose to observe the superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel TMDC layers, which causes two opposite superconducting currents in each TMDC layer.

  3. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, G I; Sheridan, E; Sachkou, Y; Baker, C; Bowen, W P

    2015-01-01

    Superfluidity is an emergent quantum phenomenon which arises due to strong interactions between elementary excitations in liquid helium. These excitations have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However measurements to-date have been limited, quite generally, to average properties of bulk superfluid or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of superfluid excitations in real-time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification of the thermal motion. This provides a new tool to understand and control the microscopic behaviour of superfluids, including phonon-phonon interactions, quantised vortices and two-dimensional quantum phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including femtogram effective masses, high me...

  4. Are vortices in rotating superfluids breaking the Weak Equivalence Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2009-01-01

    Due to the breaking of gauge symmetry in rotating superfluid Helium, the inertial mass of a vortex diverges with the vortex size. The vortex inertial mass is thus much higher than the classical inertial mass of the vortex core. An equal increase of the vortex gravitational mass is questioned. The possibility that the vortices in a rotating superfluid could break the weak equivalence principle in relation with a variable speed of light in the superfluid vacuum is debated. Experiments to test this possibility are investigated on the bases that superfluid Helium vortices would not fall, under the single influence of a uniform gravitational field, at the same rate as the rest of the superfluid Helium mass.

  5. Quasi-normal modes of superfluid neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Gusakov, M E; Chugunov, A I

    2014-01-01

    We study non-radial oscillations of neutron stars with superfluid baryons, in a general relativistic framework, including finite temperature effects. Using a perturbative approach, we derive the equations describing stellar oscillations, which we solve by numerical integration, employing different models of nucleon superfluidity, and determining frequencies and gravitational damping times of the quasi-normal modes. As expected by previous results, we find two classes of modes, associated to superfluid and non-superfluid degrees of freedom, respectively. We study the temperature dependence of the modes, finding that at specific values of the temperature, the frequencies of the two classes of quasi-normal modes show avoided crossings, and their damping times become comparable. We also show that, when the temperature is not close to the avoided crossings, the frequencies of the modes can be accurately computed by neglecting the coupling between normal and superfluid degrees of freedom. Our results have potential...

  6. Dark Energy and Dark Matter in a Superfluid Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kerson

    2013-01-01

    The vacuum is filled with complex scalar fields, such as the Higgs field. These fields serve as order parameters for superfluidity (quantum phase coherence over macroscopic distances), making the entire universe a superfluid. We review a mathematical model consisting of two aspects: (a) emergence of the superfluid during the big bang; (b) observable manifestations of superfluidity in the present universe. The creation aspect requires a self-interacting scalar field that is asymptotically free, i.e., the interaction must grow from zero during the big bang, and this singles out the Halpern-Huang potential, which has exponential behavior for large fields. It leads to an equivalent cosmological constant that decays like a power law, and this gives dark energy without "fine-tuning". Quantum turbulence (chaotic vorticity) in the early universe was able to create all the matter in the universe, fulfilling the inflation scenario. In the present universe, the superfluid can be phenomenologically described by a nonline...

  7. Vortex structure in superfluid color-flavor locked quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The core region of a neutron star may feature quark matter in the color-flavor- locked (CFL) phase. The CFL condensate breaks the baryon number symmetry, such that the phenomenon of superfluidity arises. If the core of the star is rotating, vortices will form in the superfluid, carrying the quanta of angular momentum. In a previous study we have solved the question of stability of these vortices, where we found numerical proof of a conjectured instability, according to which superfluid vortices will decay into an arrangement of so-called semi-superfluid fluxtubes. Here we report first results of an extension of our framework that allows us to study multi-vortex dynamics. This will in turn enable us to investigate the structure of semi-superfluid string lattices, which could be relevant to study pinning phenomena at the boundary of the core.

  8. LHC Report: superconducting circuit powering tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Mirko Pojer

    2015-01-01

    After the long maintenance and consolidation campaign carried out during LS1, the machine is getting ready to start operation with beam at 6.5 TeV… the physics community can’t wait! Prior to this, all hardware and software systems have to be tested to assess their correct and safe operation.   Most of the cold circuits (those with high current/stored energy) possess a sophisticated magnet protection system that is crucial to detect a transition of the coil from the superconducting to the normal state (a quench) and safely extract the energy stored in the circuits (about 1 GJ per dipole circuit at nominal current). LHC operation relies on 1232 superconducting dipoles with a field of up to 8.33 T operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K, along with more than 500 superconducting quadrupoles operating at 4.2 or 1.9 K. Besides, many other superconducting and normal resistive magnets are used to guarantee the possibility of correcting all beam parameters, for a total of mo...

  9. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  10. High-temperature superfluidity with indirect excitons in van der Waals heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, M M; Butov, L V; Novoselov, K S

    2014-07-28

    All known superfluid and superconducting states of condensed matter are enabled by composite bosons (atoms, molecules and Cooper pairs) made of an even number of fermions. Temperatures where such macroscopic quantum phenomena occur are limited by the lesser of the binding energy and the degeneracy temperature of the bosons. High-critical temperature cuprate superconductors set the present record of ~100 K. Here we propose a design for artificially structured materials to rival this record. The main elements of the structure are two monolayers of a transition metal dichalcogenide separated by an atomically thin spacer. Electrons and holes generated in the system would accumulate in the opposite monolayers and form bosonic bound states--the indirect excitons. The resultant degenerate Bose gas of indirect excitons would exhibit macroscopic occupation of a quantum state and vanishing viscosity at high temperatures.

  11. Superfluidity enhanced by spin-flip tunnelling in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun-Hui; Wang, Daw-Wei; Juzeliūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that when the magnetic field is stronger than a critical value, the spin imbalance can break the Cooper pairs of electrons and hence hinder the superconductivity in a spin-singlet channel. In a bilayer system of ultra-cold Fermi gases, however, we demonstrate that the critical value of the magnetic field at zero temperature can be significantly increased by including a spin-flip tunnelling, which opens a gap in the spin-triplet channel near the Fermi surface and hence reduces the influence of the effective magnetic field on the superfluidity. The phase transition also changes from first order to second order when the tunnelling exceeds a critical value. Considering a realistic experiment, this mechanism can be implemented by applying an intralayer Raman coupling between the spin states with a phase difference between the two layers. PMID:27633848

  12. Particle detection by evaporation from superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.H. (Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States))

    1992-04-20

    We report the first experiments in which 5-MeV alpha particles are detected via evaporation from a bath of superfluid helium. The {alpha} excites phonons and rotons in the liquid helium, and these excitations are sufficiently energetic to evaporate helium atoms when they reach the free surface of the liquid. The approximate overall efficiency of this process has been determined, and we compare this with expectations. We have also been able to detect evaporation induced by a flux of {gamma}'s from a {sup 137}Cs source.

  13. Turning bacteria suspensions into a "superfluid"

    CERN Document Server

    López, Héctor Matías; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidences for a low shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semi-dilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension display a "super-fluid" like transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear, is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  14. Vortex gyroscope imaging of planar superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, A T; Sammut, S J; Simula, T P

    2014-10-17

    We propose a robust imaging technique that makes it possible to distinguish vortices from antivortices in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates from a single image of the density of the atoms. Tilting the planar condensate prior to standard absorption imaging excites a generalized gyroscopic mode of the condensate, revealing the sign and location of each vortex. This technique is anticipated to enable experimental measurement of the incompressible kinetic energy spectrum of the condensate and the observation of a negative-temperature phase transition of the vortex gas, driven by two-dimensional superfluid turbulence.

  15. Superfluid phase transition and effects of mass imbalance in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas: A self-consistent T-matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Ryo; Ohashi, Yoji

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a two-component Fermi gas with mass imbalance (m↑ ≠m↓ , where mσ is an atomic mass in the σ-component) in the BCS-BEC crossover region. Including pairing fluctuations within a self-consistent T-matrix theory, we examine how the superfluid instability is affected by the presence of mass imbalance. We determine the superfluid region in the phase diagram of a Fermi gas in terms of the temperature, the strength of a pairing interaction, and the ratio of mass imbalance. The superfluid phase transition is shown to always occur even when m↑ ≠m↓ .[2] This behavior of Tc is quite different from the previous result in an extended T-matrix theory,[3] where Tc vanishes at a certain value of m↑ /m↓ > 0 in the BCS regime. Since Fermi condensates with mass imbalance have been discussed in various systems, such as a cold Fermi gas, an exciton(polariton) condensate, as well as color superconductivity, our results would be useful for further understandings of these novel Fermi superfluids. R.H. was supported by Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program, Keio University.

  16. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  17. Slowly Rotating General Relativistic Superfluid Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N

    2001-01-01

    We present a general formalism to treat slowly rotating general relativistic superfluid neutron stars. As a first approximation, their matter content can be described in terms of a two-fluid model, where one fluid is the neutron superfluid, which is believed to exist in the core and inner crust of mature neutron stars, and the other fluid represents a conglomerate of all other constituents (crust nuclei, protons, electrons, etc.). We obtain a system of equations, good to second-order in the rotational velocities, that determines the metric and the matter variables, irrespective of the equation of state for the two fluids. In particular, allowance is made for the so-called entrainment effect, whereby the momentum of one constituent (e.g. the neutrons) carries along part of the mass of the other constituent. As an illustration of the developed framework, we consider a simplified equation of state for which the two fluids are described by different polytropes. We determine numerically the effects of the two flui...

  18. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    states. The model and toolbox are engineered with a superconducting quantum circuit where two superconducting resonators are coupled via the UQDP circuit. Using fourth order perturbation theory one can realize a complete set of quantum operations between these two photon modes. This helps open a new field to treat photon modes as qubits. Additional, a three-wave mixing scheme using phase qubits permits one to engineer the coupling Hamiltonian using a phase qubit as a tunable coupler. Along with Feynman's idea using quantum to simulate quantum, superconducting quantum simulators have been studied intensively recently. Taking the advantage of mesoscopic size of superconducting circuit and local tunability, we came out the idea to simulate quantum phase transition due to disorder. Our first paper was to propose a superconducting quantum simulator of Bose-Hubbard model to do site-wise manipulation and observe Mott-insulator to superfluid phase transition. The side-band cooling of an array of superconducting resonators is solved after the paper was published. In light of the developed technology in manipulating quantum information with superconducting circuit, one can couple other quantum oscillator system to superconducting resonators in order manipulation of its quantum states or parametric amplification of weak quantum signal. A theory that works for different coupling schemes has been studied in chapter 5. This will be a platform for further research.

  19. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  20. Multiscaling in superfluid turbulence: A shell-model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    We examine the multiscaling behavior of the normal- and superfluid-velocity structure functions in three-dimensional superfluid turbulence by using a shell model for the three-dimensional (3D) Hall-Vinen-Bekharevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) equations. Our 3D-HVBK shell model is based on the Gledzer-Okhitani-Yamada shell model. We examine the dependence of the multiscaling exponents on the normal-fluid fraction and the mutual-friction coefficients. Our extensive study of the 3D-HVBK shell model shows that the multiscaling behavior of the velocity structure functions in superfluid turbulence is more complicated than it is in fluid turbulence.

  1. Hydrodynamic spectrum of a superfluid in an elongated trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Pierre-Philippe; Leyronas, Xavier; Chevy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In this article we study the hydrodynamic spectrum of a superfluid confined in cylindrical trap. We show that the dispersion relation ω(q) of the phonon branch scales like \\sqrt{q} at large q, leading to a vanishingly small superfluid critical velocity. In practice the critical velocity is set by the breakdown of the hydrodynamic approximation. For a broad class of superfluids, this entails a reduction of the critical velocity by a factor (\\hbarω_\\perp/μ_c)1/3 with respect to the free-space prediction (here ω_\\perp is the trapping frequency and μ_\\text{c} the chemical potential of the cloud).

  2. Superconducting fluctuation effect in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-11-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF single crystals. Superconducting fluctuations, featured by magnetic field enhanced and exponential temperature dependent diamagnetism, are observed above the superconducting transition temperature T c, which is similar to that of cuprate superconductors, but less pronounced. In addition, the ratio of T c versus superfluid density follows well the Uemura line of high-T c cuprates, which suggests the exotic nature of the superconductivity in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

  3. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Diamantini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalisable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D−1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D−2-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realised as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  4. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalisable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D - 1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D - 2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2) and the topological order (4) are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realised as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  5. Learning Experience for Calibration Speciifcation for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers%超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖鹏; 张伟; 黄挺

    2015-01-01

    Calibration Specification for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers JJF1448–2014 was conducted. Through the analysis of the main technical indicators of the superconducting pulsed Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, the reasons of ethyl benzene certified reference material,chloroform certified reference material,deuterated benzene/p-dioxane certified reference material and the features and advantages of calibration method in calibration specification JJF 1448–2014 were expounded. New standard calibration method is reasonable, the standards materials have simple structure, and can calibrate the main technical index of instruments, the efficiency was improved, it meets the most of the Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calibration requirements.%对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范JJF 1448–2014进行了解读.通过对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪主要技术指标的类型分析,说明了采用乙基苯溶液标准物质、氯仿溶液标准物质、氘代苯/p-二氧六环溶液标准物质被采用的原因及其在JJF 1448–2014校准方法中的特点及优势.新规范校准方法合理、所采用的标准物质结构简单、能够对仪器的主要技术指标进行校准,提高了效率,满足大部分傅里叶变换核磁共振的校准要求.

  6. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  7. Superconductivity in an electron band just above the Fermi level: possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, K; Ito, Y; Ota, Y; Kotani, Y; Shimojima, T; Kiss, T; Watanabe, S; Chen, C-T; Niitaka, S; Hanaguri, T; Takagi, H; Chainani, A; Shin, S

    2014-02-28

    Conventional superconductivity follows Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS) theory of electrons-pairing in momentum-space, while superfluidity is the Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) of atoms paired in real-space. These properties of solid metals and ultra-cold gases, respectively, are connected by the BCS-BEC crossover. Here we investigate the band dispersions in FeTe(0.6)Se(0.4)(Tc = 14.5 K ~ 1.2 meV) in an accessible range below and above the Fermi level(EF) using ultra-high resolution laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We uncover an electron band lying just 0.7 meV (~8 K) above EF at the Γ-point, which shows a sharp superconducting coherence peak with gap formation below Tc. The estimated superconducting gap Δ and Fermi energy [Symbol: see text]F indicate composite superconductivity in an iron-based superconductor, consisting of strong-coupling BEC in the electron band and weak-coupling BCS-like superconductivity in the hole band. The study identifies the possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

  8. Relaxation of polarized nuclei in superconducting rhodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuuttila, T.A.; Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates were measured in normal and superconducting (sc) rhodium with nuclear polarizations up to p = 0.55. This was sufficient to influence the sc state of Rh, whose T, and B-c, are exceptionally low. Because B-c

  9. The superconducting phase and electronic excitations of (Rb,Cs) Fe 2 As 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, J.; Shermadini, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Bukowski, Z.; Batlogg, B.

    2011-03-01

    We present specific heat, transport and Muon-Spin Rotation (μ SR) results on (Rb,Cs) Fe 2 As 2 . RbFe 2 As 2 was only recently found to be superconducting below 2.6 K by Bukowski et al. Compared to the related BaFe 2 As 2 the electron density is lower and no magnetic order is observed. For the superconducting phase the superfluid density was calculated from μ SR data. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density and the magnetic penetration depth is well described by a multi-gap scenario. In addition the electronic contribution the specific heat was studied for different compositions and magnetic fields and reveals a high value for the Sommerfeld coefficient γ .

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  11. A theory of first order dissipative superfluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Minwalla, Shiraz; Yarom, Amos

    2014-01-01

    We determine the most general form of the equations of relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics consistent with Lorentz invariance, the Onsager principle and the second law of thermodynamics at first order in the derivative expansion. Once parity is violated, either because the U(1) symmetry is anomalous or as a consequence of a different parity-breaking mechanism, our results deviate from the standard textbook analysis of superfluids. Our general equations require the specification of twenty parameters (such as the viscosity and conductivity). In the limit of small relative superfluid velocities we find a seven parameter set of equations. In the same limit, we have used the AdS/CFT correspondence to compute the parity odd contributions to the superfluid equations of motion for a generic holographic model and have verified that our results are consistent.

  12. Magnus and other forces on vortices in superfluids and superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Michael [University of Illinois, IL (United States)

    1998-07-01

    I discuss some of the forces acting on vortices in charged superfluids, paying particular attention to the way that the Berry and Aharonov-Casher phases combine to reflect the classical magnetohydrodynamics. (Author). 28 refs.

  13. Are Superfluid Vortices in Pulsars Violating the Weak Equivalence Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper we argue that timing irregularities in pulsars, like glitches and timing noise, could be associated with the violation of the weak equivalence principle for vortices in the superfluid core of rotating neutron stars.

  14. Stability of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored relative to well-separated triplets of "semi-superfluid" color flux tubes. However, the short-range interaction (metastable versus unstable) has not been established. In this paper we perform numerical calculations using the effective theory of the condensate field, mapping the regions in the parameter space of coupling constants where the vortices are metastable versus unstable. For the case of zero gauge coupling we analytically identify a candidate for the unstable mode, and show that it agrees well with the results of the numerical calculations. We find that in the region of the parameter space that seems likely to correspond to real-world CFL quark matter the vortices are unstable, indicating that if such matter exists in neutron star cores it is very likely to contain semi-superfluid color flux tubes rather than superfluid vortices.

  15. Quench from Mott Insulator to Superfluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziarmaga, Jacek [Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiello´nskiego; Tylutki, Marek [Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiello´nskiego

    2012-06-01

    We study a linear ramp of the nearest-neighbor tunneling rate in the Bose-Hubbard model driving the system from the Mott insulator state into the superfluid phase. We employ the truncated Wigner approximation to simulate linear quenches of a uniform system in 1...3 dimensions, and in a harmonic trap in 3 dimensions. In all these setups the excitation energy decays like one over third root of the quench time. The -1/3 scaling is explained by an impulse-adiabatic approximation - a variant of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism - describing a crossover from non-adiabatic to adiabatic evolution when the system begins to keep pace with the increasing tunneling rate.

  16. Hexatic, Wigner Crystal, and Superfluid Phases of Dipolar Bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Kaushik; Williams, C J; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2009-01-01

    The finite temperature phase diagram of two-dimensional dipolar bosons versus dipolar interaction strength is discussed. We identify the stable phases as dipolar superfluid (DSF), dipolar Wigner crystal (DWC), dipolar hexatic fluid (DHF), and dipolar normal fluid (DNF). We also show that other interesting phases like dipolar supersolid (DSS) and dipolar hexatic superfluid (DHSF) are at least metastable, and can potentially be reached by thermal quenching. In particular, for large densities or...

  17. First Sound in Holographic Superfluids at Zero Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, Angelo; Penco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of AdS/CFT, the gravity dual of an s-wave superfluid is given by scalar QED on an asymptotically AdS spacetime. While this conclusion is vastly supported by numerical arguments, here we provide an analytical proof that this is indeed the case. Working at zero temperature, we explicitly find the quadratic action for the superfluid phonon at the boundary in an arbitrary number of dimensions, recovering the known dispersion relation for conformal first sound.

  18. Holographic superfluid flows with a localized repulsive potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, Akihiro; Okamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a holographic model of superfluid flows with an external repulsive potential. When the strength of the potential is sufficiently weak, we analytically construct two steady superfluid flow solutions. As the strength of the potential is increased, the two solutions merge into a single critical solution at a critical strength, and then disappear above the critical value, as predicted by a saddle-node bifurcation theory. We also analyze the spectral function of fluctuations around the solutions under a certain decoupling approximation.

  19. Odd-parity superconductivity in Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huazhou; Chao, Sung-Po; Aji, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional superconducting states of matter are realized in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. In particular, nondegenerate bands can support odd-parity superconductivity with rich topological content. Here we study whether this is the case for Weyl semimetals. These are systems whose low-energy sector, in the absence of interactions, is described by linearly dispersing chiral fermions in three dimensions. The energy spectrum has nodes at an even number of points in the Brillouin zone. Consequently both intranodal finite momentum pairing and internodal BCS superconductivity are allowed. For local attractive interaction the finite momentum pairing state with chiral p-wave symmetry is found to be most favorable at finite chemical potential. The state is an analog of the superfluid 3He A phase, with Cooper pairs having finite center-of-mass momentum. For chemical potential at the node the state is preempted by a fully gapped charge density wave. For nonlocal attraction the BCS state wins out for all values of the chemical potential.

  20. The influence of topological phase transition on the superfluid density of overdoped copper oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginyan, V R; Stephanovich, V A; Msezane, A Z; Japaridze, G S; Popov, K G

    2017-08-23

    We show that a quantum phase transition, generating flat bands and altering Fermi surface topology, is a primary reason for the exotic behavior of the overdoped high-temperature superconductors represented by La2-xSrxCuO4, whose superconductivity features differ from what is predicted by the classical Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. This observation can open avenues for chemical preparation of high-Tc materials. We demonstrate that (1) at temperature T = 0, the superfluid density ns turns out to be considerably smaller than the total electron density; (2) the critical temperature Tc is controlled by ns rather than by doping, and is a linear function of the ns; (3) at T > Tc the resistivity ρ(T) varies linearly with temperature, ρ(T) ∝ αT, where α diminishes with Tc → 0, whereas in the normal (non superconducting) region induced by overdoping, Tc = 0, and ρ(T) ∝ T(2). Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  1. Majorana modes and topological superfluids for ultracold fermionic atoms in anisotropic square optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; Li, Ning; Kou, Su-Peng

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental realization of two-dimensional spin-orbit coupling through optical Raman lattice scheme, we study attractive interacting ultracold gases with spin-orbit interaction in anisotropic square optical lattices, and find that rich s-wave topological superfluids can be realized, including Z2 topological superfluids beyond the characterization of "tenfold way" in addition to chiral topological superfluids. The topological defects-superfluid vortex and edge dislocations-may host Majorana modes in some topological superfluids, which are helpful for realizing topological quantum computation and Majorana fermionic quantum computation. In addition, we also discuss the Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions for different topological superfluids.

  2. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Prakash; T S Datta; B P Ajith Kumar; J Antony; P Barua; J Chacko; A Choudhury; G K Chadhari; S Ghosh; S Kar; S A Krishnan; Manoj Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; A Mandal; D S Mathuria; R S Meena; R Mehta; K K Mistri; A Pandey; M V Suresh Babu; B K Sahu; A Sarkar; S S K Sonti; A Rai; S Venkatramanan; J Zacharias; R K Bhowmik; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed sufficiently. Details of the entire accelerator system including the cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indigenously, and present status of the project are presented.

  3. Superconducting magnets for the LHC main lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The main lattice of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will employ about 1600 main magnets and more than 4000 corrector magnets. All superconducting and working in pressurized superfluid helium bath, these impressive line of magnets will fill more than 20 km of the underground tunnel. With almost 70 main dipoles already delivered and 10 main quadrupoles almost completed, we passed the 5% of the production and now all manufacturers have fully entered into series production. In this paper the most critical issues encountered in the ramping up in such a real large scale fabrication will be addressed: uniformity of the coil size and of prestress, special welding technique, tolerances on curvature (dipoles) or straightness (quadrupoles) and of the cold mass extremities, harmonic content and, most important, the integrated field uniformity among magnets. The actual limits and the solution for improvements will be discussed. Finally a realistic schedule based on actual achievements is presented.

  4. Nuclear Equation of State and Neutron Star Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the nuclear equation of state (EoS) to the neutron star cooling. New era for nuclear EoS has begun after the discovery of $\\sim 2\\msun$ neutron stars PSR J1614$-$2230 and PSR J0348$+$0432 [1, 2]. Also recent works on the mass and radius of neutron stars from low-mass X-ray binaries [3] strongly constrain the EoS of nuclear matter. On the other hand, observations of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) more than 10 years confirmed the existence of nuclear superfluidity [4, 5]. Nuclear superfluidity reduces the heat capacities as well as neutrino emissivities. With nuclear superfluidity the neutrino emission processes are highly suppressed, and the existence of superfluidity makes the cooling path quite different from that of the standard cooling process. Superfluidity also allows new neutrino emission process, which is called `Pair Breaking and Formation'(PBF). PBF is a fast cooling process and can explain the fast cooling rate of neutron star in Cas A. Therefore, it is essent...

  5. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  6. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  7. Measurement of the hyperfine splitting of {sup 133}Cs atoms in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, K., E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Yang, X. F. [Peking University, School of Physics (China); Mitsuya, Y. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Fujita, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayasaka, M. [Tokyo Gakugei University, Department of Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Odashima, H. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    We have been developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopy method named “OROCHI” (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher). OROCHI utilizes superfluid helium (He II) not only as an efficient stopping medium of highly energetic ions but also as a host matrix of in-situ atomic laser spectroscopy. Using these characteristic of He II, we produce atomic spin polarization and measure Zeeman and hyperfine structure (HFS) splitting using laser-RF (radio frequency) / MW (microwave) double resonance method. From the measured energy splittings, we can deduce nuclear spins and moments. So far, we have conducted a series of experiments using both stable ({sup 85,87}Rb, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 197}Au, {sup 107,109}Ag) and unstable isotopes ({sup 84,86}Rb) to confirm the feasibility of OROCHI method, especially observing Zeeman resonance and determining nuclear spins. The measurement of HFS splitting of atoms introduced into He II is indispensable to clarify the nuclear properties by deducing nuclear moments as well as the study of nuclear spins. For this purpose, we perform a precision measurement of HFS of {sup 133}Cs atoms immersed in He II using laser ablation technique. In this paper, we describe the result of the experiment.

  8. Large-scale modulation in the superconducting properties of thin films due to domains in the SrTi O3 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-04-01

    Scanning superconducting quantum interference device measurements reveal large-scale modulations of the superfluid density and the critical temperature in superconducting Nb, NbN, and underdoped YB a2C u3O7 -δ films deposited on SrTi O3 (STO). We show that these modulations are a result of the STO domains and domain walls, forming below the 105 K structural phase transition of STO. We found that the flow of normal current, measured above the superconducting transition, is also modulated over the same domain structure, suggesting a modified carrier density. In clean STO, domain walls remain mobile down to low temperatures. Modulated superconductivity over mobile channels offers the opportunity to locally control superconducting properties and better understand the relations between superconductivity and the local structure.

  9. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D-2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, a generalised Higgs phenomenon takes place: the photon eats up not only the gapless mode but the massive vector t...

  10. The intrinsic heterogeneity of superconductivity in the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shengelaya, A.; Müller, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the hole-doped, high-temperature superconducting cuprates, an intrinsic heterogeneity is found, from the early observations to recent data. Below optimum doping, the heterogeneity consists of dynamic metallic and, at low temperatures, superconducting regions in the form of clusters or stripes, which develop and decay as a function of time and location in the antiferromagnetic lattice. This behaviour is underlined by the interesting linear relation between the oxygen isotope shifts of the magnetic penetration depth and the critical temperature with a slope that is a factor 2 larger than expected for the homogeneous distribution of superfluid density. Allusion is also made to the Bose-Einstein condensation reported in structurally heterogeneous, polycrystalline polymer platelets as well as especially to the heterogeneous distribution of visible and dark matter in the Universe, which point to a change of paradigm in modern physics.

  11. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  12. Resonant tidal excitation of superfluid neutron stars in coalescing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    We study the resonant tidal excitation of g-modes in coalescing superfluid neutron star binaries and investigate how such tidal driving impacts the gravitational-wave signal of the inspiral. Previous studies of this type treated the neutron star core as a normal fluid and thus did not account for its expected superfluidity. The source of buoyancy that supports the g-modes is fundamentally different in the two cases: in a normal fluid core the buoyancy is due to gradients in the proton-to-neutron fraction whereas in a superfluid core it is due to gradients in the muon-to-electron fraction. The latter yields a stronger stratification and a superfluid neutron star therefore has a denser spectrum of g-modes with frequencies above 10 Hz. As a result, many more g-modes undergo resonant tidal excitation as the binary sweeps through the bandwidth of gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO. We find that roughly 10 times more orbital energy is transferred into g-mode oscillations if the neutron star has a superfluid ...

  13. Galaxy Clusters in the Context of Superfluid Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hodson, Alistair; Khoury, Justin; Famaey, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been proposed, by assuming that dark matter is a superfluid, that MOND-like effects can be achieved on small scales whilst preserving the success of $\\Lambda$CDM on large scales. Here we aim to provide the first set of spherical models of galaxy clusters in the context of superfluid dark matter. We first outline the theoretical structure of the superfluid core and the surrounding "normal phase" dark halo of quasi-particles in thermal equlibrium. The latter should encompass the largest part of galaxy clusters. Here, we set the SfDM transition at the radius where the density and pressure of the superfluid and normal phase coincides, neglecting the effect of phonons in the suprefluid core. We then apply the theory to a sample of galaxy clusters, and directly compare the SfDM predicted mass profiles to data. We find that the superfluid formulation can reproduce the X-ray dynamical mass profile of clusters, with less free parameters than the corresponding CDM fits with NFW profiles. The SfDM fits h...

  14. Topological Excitonic Superfluids in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Matthew; Hankiewicz, Ewelina; Kim, Youngseok

    2013-03-01

    We study the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of topological dipolar intersurface exciton condensates within time-reversal invariant topological insulators in three spatial dimensions without a magnetic field. We elucidate that, in order to correctly identify the proper pairing symmetry within the condensate order parameter, the full three-dimensional Hamiltonian must be considered. As a corollary, we demonstrate that only particles with similar chirality play a significant role in condensate formation. Furthermore, we find that the intersurface exciton condensation is not suppressed by the interconnection of surfaces in three-dimensional topological insulators as the intersurface polarizability vanishes in the condensed phase. This eliminates the surface current flow leaving only intersurface current flow through the bulk. We conclude by illustrating how the excitonic superfluidity may be identified through an examination of the terminal currents above and below the condensate critical current. Army Research Office (ARO) under contract number W911NF-09-1-0347, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) under contract number N0014-11-1-0728, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under contract number FA9550-10-1-0459, DFG Grant HA 5893

  15. Renormalization group approach to superfluid neutron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebeler, K.

    2007-06-06

    In the present thesis superfluid many-fermion systems are investigated in the framework of the Renormalization Group (RG). Starting from an experimentally determined two-body interaction this scheme provides a microscopic approach to strongly correlated many-body systems at low temperatures. The fundamental objects under investigation are the two-point and the four-point vertex functions. We show that explicit results for simple separable interactions on BCS-level can be reproduced in the RG framework to high accuracy. Furthermore the RG approach can immediately be applied to general realistic interaction models. In particular, we show how the complexity of the many-body problem can be reduced systematically by combining different RG schemes. Apart from technical convenience the RG framework has conceptual advantage that correlations beyond the BCS level can be incorporated in the flow equations in a systematic way. In this case however the flow equations are no more explicit equations like at BCS level but instead a coupled set of implicit equations. We show on the basis of explicit calculations for the single-channel case the efficacy of an iterative approach to this system. The generalization of this strategy provides a promising strategy for a non-perturbative treatment of the coupled channel problem. By the coupling of the flow equations of the two-point and four-point vertex self-consistency on the one-body level is guaranteed at every cutoff scale. (orig.)

  16. Baryonic {sup 3}P{sub 2} superfluidity under charged-pion condensation with {delta} isobar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsuka, T.; Tamagaki, R. [Iwate Univ., Morioka, Iwate (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We study the baryonic {sup 3}P{sup 2} superfluidity under charged-pion condensation with isobar ({delta}) degrees of freedom. After a remark on motivations of the present study, the outline of theoretical framework is briefly described, typical results of the superfluid critical temperature are shown, and the possibility of coexistence of the superfluid with charged-pion condensation is discussed. (author)

  17. Superfluid Density and Flux-Flow Resistivity Measurements of Multiple-Band Superconductor β-PdBi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    β -PdBi2 (Tcmax = 5 . 4 K) is a newcomer of the multiple-band superconductors, revealed by the specific heat and the upper critical field measurements, and the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In addition, authors of ref. observed the spin-polarized band dispersion and proposed that β-PdBi2 is a candidate of topological superconductor. However, there is less information on superconducting properties so far. In order to clarify the superconducting gap function, we measured the temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependence of microwave complex conductivity of β-PdBi2 single crystals. We found that the superfluid density exhibits the thermally activated T dependence, manifesting the absence of nodes in the superconducting gaps. We also found that the flux-flow resistivity increased with B with downward-convex shape. Based on some theories, we considered that such a behavior originated from the backflow of supercurrents around vortices reflecting rather small Ginzburg-Landau parameter (κ ~= 5). This work was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 15K17697 and 26-9315), and the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists.

  18. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  19. Molecular superfluidity in helium clusters studied using impulsive alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinis, Gediminas; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; Watkins, Mark; Von Haeften, Klaus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Kazak, Lev; Goede, Sebastian; Skruszewicz, Slawomir; Irsig, Robert; Tiggesbaeumker, Josef; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock (Germany); Minns, Russell [Department of Chemistry, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Ellis, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Turcu, Edmon; Cacho, Cephise; Springate, Emma [CLF, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratories (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Superfluidity is an intriguing phenomenon commonly associated with frictionless flow. Although this macroscopic effect is well understood, our understanding of how superfluidity evolves on the nanoscale is less extensive.We apply new approach to study superfluidity as a function of the number of helium atoms involved. A femtosecond pump-probe laser setup is used to excite a rotational wavepacket and to follow its propagation in time. The periodically recurring molecular alignment is probed by analyzing the emission characteristics in delayed Coulomb explosion with a velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer. First results show CO attached to five helium atoms and rotational features of HCCH-He corresponding to a linear configuration. To maximize the molecular beam intensity and to cope with the associated high gas load we developed a unique, differentially pumped VMI spectrometer.

  20. Chiral superfluidity of the quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma can be considered as a chiral superfluid. The "normal" component of the fluid is the thermalized matter in common sense, while the "superfluid" part consists of long wavelength (chiral) fermionic states moving independently. We use several nonperturbative techniques to demonstrate that. First, we analyze the fermionic spectrum in the deconfinement phase (Tc < T < 2 Tc) using lattice (overlap) fermions and observe a gap between near-zero modes and the bulk of the spectrum. Second, we use the bosonization procedure with a finite cut-off and obtain a dynamical axion-like field out of the chiral fermionic modes. Third, we use relativistic hydrodynamics for macroscopic description of the effective theory obtained after the bosonization. Finally, solving the hydrodynamic equations in gradient expansion, we find that in the presence of external electromagnetic fields the motion of the "superfluid" component gives rise to the chiral magnetic, c...

  1. Mott-superfluid transition of q-deformed bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeć, T.K., E-mail: kopec@int.pan.wroc.pl

    2015-10-16

    The effect of q-deformation of the bosonic algebra on the Mott-superfluid transition for interacting lattice bosons described by the Bose–Hubbard model is studied using mean-filed theory. It has been shown that the Mott state proliferates and the initial periodicity of the Mott lobes as a function of the chemical potential disappears as the q-deformation increases. The ground state phase diagram as a function of the q-parameter exhibits superfluid order, which intervenes in narrow regions between Mott lobes, demonstrating the new concept of statistically induced quantum phase transition. - Highlights: • We study the effect of q-deformed bosons on superfluid transition. • A mean-field theory is employed. • Bosons can change statistics due to deformation of the commutation rules. • Statistically induced quantum phase transition is found.

  2. Long-period thermal oscillations in superfluid millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovich, Cristobal

    2010-01-01

    In previous papers, we have shown that, as the rotation of a neutron star slows down, it will be internally heated as a consequence of the progressively changing mix of particles (rotochemical heating). In previously studied cases non-superfluid neutron stars or superfluid stars with only modified Urca reactions), this leads to a quasi-steady state in which the star radiates thermal photons for a long time, possibly accounting for the ultraviolet radiation observed from the millisecond pulsar J0437-4715. For the first time, we explore the phenomenology of rotochemical heating with direct Urca reactions and uniform and isotropic superfluid energy gaps of different sizes. We first do exploratory work by integrating the thermal and chemical evolution equations numerically for different energy gaps, which suggests a rich phenomenology of stable and unstable solutions. In order to understand these, we do a stability analysis around the quasi-steady state, identifying the characteristic times of growing, decaying, ...

  3. Tunable anisotropic superfluidity in an optical kagome superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Tao; Eggert, Sebastian; Pelster, Axel

    2015-07-01

    We study the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on the kagome lattice with a broken sublattice symmetry. Such a superlattice structure can naturally be created and tuned by changing the potential offset of one sublattice in the optical generation of the frustrated lattice. The superstructure gives rise to a rich quantum phase diagram, which is analyzed by combining quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the generalized effective potential Landau theory. Mott phases with noninteger filling and a characteristic order along stripes are found, which show a transition to a superfluid phase with an anisotropic superfluid density. Surprisingly, the direction of the superfluid anisotropy can be tuned by changing the particle number, the hopping strength, or the interaction. Finally, we discuss characteristic signatures of anisotropic phases in time-of-flight absorption measurements.

  4. Holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shancheng; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    We construct the holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity via a Maxwell complex vector field model and investigate the effect of the curvature correction on the superfluid phase transition in the probe limit. We obtain the rich phase structure and find that the higher curvature correction hinders the condensate of the vector field but makes it easier for the appearance of translating point from the second-order transition to the first-order one or for the emergence of the Cave of Winds. Moreover, for the supercurrents versus the superfluid velocity, we observe that our results near the critical temperature are independent of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and agree well with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction.

  5. Inertial modes of non-stratified superfluid neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Prix, R; Andersson, N

    2004-01-01

    We present results concerning adiabatic inertial-mode oscillations of non-stratified superfluid neutron stars in Newtonian gravity, using the anelastic and slow-rotation approximations. We consider a simple two-fluid model of a superfluid neutron star, where one fluid consists of the superfluid neutrons and the second fluid contains all the comoving constituents (protons, electrons). The two fluids are assumed to be ``free'' in the sense that vortex-mediated forces like mutual friction or pinning are absent, but they can be coupled by the equation of state, in particular by entrainment. The stationary background consists of the two fluids rotating uniformly around the same axis with potentially different rotation rates. We study the special cases of co-rotating backgrounds, vanishing entrainment, and the purely toroidal r-modes, analytically. We calculate numerically the eigenfunctions and frequencies of inertial modes in the general case of non co-rotating backgrounds, and study their dependence on the relat...

  6. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  7. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  8. A titanium transition-edge sensor for the in-situ detection of individual He2 excimers in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Faustin; Hertel, Scott; Matulis, Catherine; Rooks, Michael; McKinsey, Daniel; Prober, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Incident radiation can excite superfluid helium into a diatomic He2* excimer, which decays through the emission of a 15 eV photon. Such excimers have been used as tracers to measure the superfluid's quantum turbulence, thanks in part to the long half-life of the He2* triplet state (~ 13 seconds). However, the efficient detection of single or a few excimers remains a challenge. We present a detector capable of in-situ detection of the He2* excimers either directly (the excimer collides with the detector), or by collecting the 15 eV photon emission upon decay. This detector is based on a titanium superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES), with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV fwhm, coupled to an aluminum absorber. The TES is designed to operate from 20-300 mK in a dilution refrigerator. We will discuss operating characteristics of the detector and present preliminary data for detection of individual excimers. We acknowledge support from YINQE, NSF MRSEC DMR-1119826, and NSF DMR-1007974.

  9. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskunov, Yu. V., E-mail: piskunov@imp.uran.ru; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  10. HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH CYANATE ESTER EPOXY MIX AND EPOXY GPAP–DETDA ELECTRICAL INSULATIONS AT SUPERFLUID HELIUM TEMPERATURE

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S; Canfer, S; Jones, S; Baudouy, B

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the European project EuCARD (FP7) aiming at constructing a high magnetic field accelerator magnet of 13 T with Nb3Sn superconducting cables, new electrical insulation are thermally tested. This technology will use “conventional” electrical insulation in combination with pressurized superfluid helium (He II) or saturated helium at atmospheric pressure as coolant. Two composite insulation systems composed of cyanate ester epoxy mix or a tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with fiberglass tape frame, have been chosen as potential candidates. The knowledge of their thermal properties is necessary for the thermal design and therefore samples have been tested in pressurized He II where heat is applied perpendicularly to the fibers between 1.6 K and 2.0 K. Overall thermal resistance is determined as a function of temperature and the results are compared with other electrical insulation systems used for accelerator magnets.

  11. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  12. Detection and Imaging of He_2 Molecules in Superfluid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Rellergert, W G; Garvan, A; Hanson, J C; Lippincott, W H; Nikkel, J A; McKinsey, D N

    2007-01-01

    We present data supporting our previous proposal [1] for using cycling transitions to detect and image metastable He_2 triplet molecules in superfluid helium. We demonstrate that limitations on the cycling efficiency due to the vibrational structure of the molecule can be mitigated by the use of repumping lasers. Images of the molecules obtained using the method are also shown. This technique gives rise to a new kind of ionizing radiation detector. The use of He_2 triplet molecules as tracer particles in the superfluid promises to be a powerful tool for visualization of both quantum [2-4] and classical [5] turbulence in liquid helium.

  13. Induced interactions in a superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Jami; Bruun, Georg

    2015-01-01

    -particle and collective excitations of the Fermi gas give rise to an induced interaction between the bosons, which varies strongly with momentum and frequency. It diverges at the sound mode of the Fermi superfluid, resulting in a sharp avoided crossing feature and a corresponding sign change of the interaction energy...... shift in the excitation spectrum of the BEC. In addition, the excitation of quasiparticles in the Fermi superfluid leads to damping of the excitations in the BEC. Besides studying induced interactions themselves, we can use these prominent effects to systematically probe the strongly interacting Fermi...

  14. A Neutron Scattering Study of Collective Excitations in Superfluid Helium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, E. H.; Minkiewicz, V. J.; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Extensive inelastic-neutron-scattering experiments have been performed on superfluid helium over a wide range of energy and momentum transfers. A high-resolution study has been made of the pressure dependence of the single-excitation scattering at the first maximum of the dispersion curve over...... of the multiexcitation scattering was also studied. It is shown that the multiphonon spectrum of a simple Debye solid with the phonon dispersion and single-excitation cross section of superfluid helium qualitatively reproduces these data....

  15. Collective Modes in the Superfluid Inner Crust of Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The neutron-star inner crust is assumed to be superfluid at relevant temperatures. The contribution of neutron quasiparticles to thermodynamic and transport properties of the crust is therefore strongly suppressed by the pairing gap. Nevertheless, the neutron gas still has low-energy excitations, namely long-wavelength collective modes. We summarize different approaches to describe the collective modes in the crystalline phases of the inner crust and present an improved model for the description of the collective modes in the pasta phases within superfluid hydrodynamics.

  16. Superfluidity versus Bloch oscillations in confined atomic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, H P; Geshkenbein, V B; Blatter, G

    2001-09-01

    We study the superfluid properties of (quasi) one-dimensional bosonic atom gases/liquids in traps with finite geometries in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. Driving the condensate with a moving defect we find the nucleation rate for phase slips using instanton techniques. While phase slips are quenched in a ring resulting in a superfluid response, they proliferate in a tube geometry where we find Bloch oscillations in the chemical potential. These Bloch oscillations describe the individual tunneling of atoms through the defect and thus are a consequence of particle quantization.

  17. Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The in-flight tests and the operational sequences of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment are outlined. These tests include the transfer of superfluid helium at a variety of rates, the transfer into cold and warm receivers, the operation of an extravehicular activity coupling, and tests of a liquid acquisition device. A variety of different types of instrumentation will be required for these tests. These include pressure sensors and liquid flow meters that must operate in liquid helium, accurate thermometry, two types of quantity gauges, and liquid-vapor sensors.

  18. Quantised vortices and mutual friction in relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Vickers, J A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the detailed dynamics of an array of quantised superfluid vortices in the framework of general relativity, as required for quantitative modelling of realistic neutron star cores. Our model builds on the variational approach to relativistic (multi-) fluid dynamics, where the vorticity plays a central role. The description provides a natural extension of, and as it happens a better insight into, existing Newtonian models. In particular, we account for the mutual friction associated with scattering of a second "normal" component in the mixture off of the superfluid vortices.

  19. Anisotropic phases of superfluid ^{3}he in compressed aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J I A; Zimmerman, A M; Pollanen, J; Collett, C A; Halperin, W P

    2015-03-13

    It has been shown that the relative stabilities of various superfluid states of ^{3}He can be influenced by anisotropy in a silica aerogel framework. We prepared a suite of aerogel samples compressed up to 30% for which we performed pulsed NMR on ^{3}He imbibed within the aerogel. We identified A and B phases and determined their magnetic field-temperature phase diagrams as a function of strain. From these results, we infer that the B phase is distorted by negative strain forming an anisotropic superfluid state more stable than the A phase.

  20. Superconducting energy scales and anomalous dissipative conductivity in thin films of molybdenum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmendinger, Julian; Pracht, Uwe S.; Daschke, Lena; Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    We report investigations of molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films with different thickness and disorder and with superconducting transition temperature 9.89 K ≥Tc≥2.78 K . Using terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy we explore the normal and superconducting charge carrier dynamics for frequencies covering the range from 3 to 38 cm-1 (0.1 to 1.1 THz). The superconducting energy scales, i.e., the critical temperature Tc, the pairing energy Δ , and the superfluid stiffness J , and the superfluid density ns can be well described within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for conventional superconductors. At the same time, we find an anomalously large dissipative conductivity, which cannot be explained by thermally excited quasiparticles, but rather by a temperature-dependent normal-conducting fraction, persisting deep into the superconducting state. Our results on this disordered system constrain the regime, where discernible effects stemming from the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition possibly become relevant, to MoN films with a transition temperature lower than at least 2.78 K.

  1. Solid helium, a superfluid?; L'helium solide, un superfluide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balibar, S. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Physique Statistique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    At very low temperature, liquid helium becomes superfluid, meaning that it can flow practically without any friction. But what about solid helium? A recent experiment carried out at the Ecole Normale Superieure of Paris (France) has given amazing results: in some conditions some matter can flow through helium without friction. This article makes a synthesis of the experiments carried out on solid helium since the end of the 1960's and which have tried to explain this 'super-solidity' effect. The recent results indicate that the super-solidity of solid helium is linked to its disorder and probably localized at the grain joints, but is not a fundamental property of its crystalline state. (J.S.)

  2. Superconducting Cable and Magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a high energy, high luminosity particle accelerator under construction at CERN and it will be the largest application of superconductivity. Most of the existing 27 km underground tunnel will be filled with superconducting magnets, mainly 15 m long dipoles and 3 m long quadrupoles. These 1232 dipole and 400 quadrupole magnets as well as many other magnets, are wound with copper stabilized NbTi Rutherford cables and will be operated at 1.9 K by means of pressurized superfluid helium. The operating dipole field is 8.33 T; however the whole system is designed for possible operation up to 9 T. The coils are powered at about 12 kA and about 12 GJ of magnetic energy will be stored in superconducting devices. After a brief review of the main characteristics of the superconductors and of the magnets, the special measures taken to fulfill the mass production with the necessary accuracy are presented. The results on one third of the superconducting cable production and on the first f...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  4. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  5. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  6. Self-energy Effects in the Superfluidity of Neutron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, U; Zuo, W

    2001-01-01

    The superfluidity of neutron matter in the channel $^1 S_0$ is studied by taking into account the effect of the ground-state correlations in the self-energy. To this purpose the gap equation has been solved within the generalized Gorkov approach. A sizeable suppression of the energy gap is driven by the quasi-particle strength around the Fermi surface.

  7. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G. I.; McAuslan, D. L.; Sheridan, E.; Sachkou, Y.; Baker, C.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-08-01

    Superfluidity is a quantum state of matter that exists macroscopically in helium at low temperatures. The elementary excitations in superfluid helium have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However, measurements of phonon excitations have so far been limited to average thermodynamic properties or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of phonon excitations in real time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification. This represents a new tool to observe and control superfluid excitations that may provide insight into phonon-phonon interactions, quantized vortices and two-dimensional phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including the prospect of femtogram masses, high mechanical quality factors, strong phonon-phonon and phonon-vortex interactions, and self-assembly into complex geometries with sub-nanometre feature size.

  8. Suspension of superfluid helium using cesium-coated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C.; Giese, C.F.; Halley, J.W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We report results of an experiment which demonstrates that a layer of superfluid helium can be suspended over a cesium-coated orifice. By measuring the layer thickness with a capacitance bridge, we have shown in two runs that fluid layers up to 2 mm thick were suspended over a 70-{mu}m-diam cesium-coated orifice in a platinum foil for over 2 h in a cryostat held at 1.2 K. The effect depends on the recently established fact that superfluid helium does not wet cesium-coated surfaces. As a consequence, superfluid helium is expected to form a stable meniscus across such a cesium-coated hole. The observed depths of suspended helium are consistent with a simple theoretical model based on this picture. We briefly discuss the possible application of this method to the performance of a proposed experiment to study quantum coherence in superfluid helium by directing pulsed beams of helium atoms at such a suspended layer of fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, WX; Dendooven, P; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Arutyunov, K; Pekola, JP; Aysto, J

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyvaskyla, Finland. An open Ra-223 alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. T

  10. Projected performance of a large superfluid helium solar neutrino detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Enss, C.; Goldhaber, G.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Based upon experiments carried out using radioactive sources to investigate the particle detection properties of superfluid helium the authors project a configuration for and the response of a full scale detector for solar neutrinos employing the roton/quantum evaporation technique.

  11. Quantum vortex dynamics in two-dimensional neutral superfluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C. -C J.; Duine, R.A.; MacDonald, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    We derive an effective action for the vortex-position degree of freedom in a superfluid by integrating out condensate phase- and density-fluctuation environmental modes. When the quantum dynamics of environmental fluctuations is neglected, we confirm the occurrence of the vortex Magnus force and

  12. Experimental characterization of turbulent superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Matthew S.

    Fundamental processes in turbulent superfluid 4He are experimentally characterized by refining a visualization technique recently introduced by Bewley et al.. A mixture of hydrogen and helium gas is injected into the bulk fluid, which produces a distribution of micron-sized hydrogen tracer particles that are visualized and individually tracked allowing for local velocity measurements. Tracer trajectories are complex since some become trapped on the quantized vortices while others flow with the normal fluid. This technique is first applied to study the dynamics of a thermal counterflow. The resulting observations constitute the first direct confirmation of two-fluid motions in He II and provide a quantitative test of the expression for the dependence of the normal fluid velocity, vn, on the applied heat flux, q, derived by L. D. Landau in 1941. Nearly 20,000 individual reconnection events are identified for the first time and used to characterize the dynamics by the minimum separation distance, delta( t), between two reconnecting vortices. Dimensional arguments predict that this separation behaves asymptotically as delta(t) ≈ A(kappa∣t -- t0∣) 1/2, where kappa = h/m is the quantum of circulation. The major finding of the experiments is strong support for this asymptotic form with kappa as the dominant controlling quantity. Nevertheless there are significant event-to-event fluctuations that are equally well fit by two modified expressions: (a) an arbitrary power-law expression delta( t) = B∣t -- t0∣alpha and (b) a correction-factor expression delta(t) = A(kappa∣t -- t 0)1/2 (1 + c∣t -- t0∣). In light of various physical interpretations we regard the correction-factor expression (b), which attributes the observed deviations from the predicted asymptotic form to fluctuations in the local environment and boundary conditions, as best describing the experimental data. The observed dynamics appear statistically time-reversible, suggesting that an effective

  13. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  14. Superconductivity in the antiperovskite Dirac-metal oxide Sr3-xSnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudah, Mohamed; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Hausmann, Jan Niklas; Yonezawa, Shingo; Fukumoto, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Masatoshi; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of perovskite oxides triggered by the discovery of high-temperature and unconventional superconductors have had crucial roles in stimulating and guiding the development of modern condensed-matter physics. Antiperovskite oxides are charge-inverted counterpart materials to perovskite oxides, with unusual negative ionic states of a constituent metal. No superconductivity was reported among the antiperovskite oxides so far. Here we present the first superconducting antiperovskite oxide Sr3-xSnO with the transition temperature of around 5 K. Sr3SnO possesses Dirac points in its electronic structure, and we propose from theoretical analysis a possibility of a topological odd-parity superconductivity analogous to the superfluid 3He-B in moderately hole-doped Sr3-xSnO. We envision that this discovery of a new class of oxide superconductors will lead to a rapid progress in physics and chemistry of antiperovskite oxides consisting of unusual metallic anions.

  15. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors for the Superconducting Magnets of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, MR; Sapinski, M; Kurfuerst, C; Griesmayer, E; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E

    2014-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor detectors close to the interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider are currently located outside the cryostat, far from the superconducting coils of the magnets. In addition to their sensitivity to lost beam particles, they also detect particles coming from the experimental collisions, which do not contribute significantly to the heat deposition in the superconducting coils. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and dangerous quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The system can be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass in a superfluid helium environment, at 1.9 K. The dose then measured by such Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors would more precisely correspond to the real dose deposited in the coil. The candidates under investigation for such detectors are based on p+-n-n+ si...

  16. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskaya, Elena; Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei; Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Egorov, Nicolai; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×1016 p/cm2. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment.

  17. Optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor of rats in microtesla fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Huang, Kai-Wen; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    This study presents an optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in microtesla fields for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor in rats by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1, of tested samples. The detection coil, which was coupled to the SQUID through a flux transformer, was optimized by varying the copper wires' winding turns and diameters. When comparing the measured NMR signals, we found that the simulated NMR signal agrees with simulated signals. When discriminating liver tumors in rats, the averaged longitudinal relaxation rate was observed to be T1-1 = 3.3 s-1 for cancerous liver tissue and T1-1 = 6.6 s-1 for normal liver tissue. The results suggest that it can be used to successfully discriminate cancerous liver tissue from normal liver tissues in rats. The minimum amount of samples that can be detected is 0.2 g for liver tumor and 0.4 g for normal liver tissue in 100 μT fields. The specimen was not damaged; it can be used for other pathological analyses. The proposed method provides more possibilities for examining undersized specimens.

  18. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  19. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  20. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  1. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  2. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  3. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  4. Non-Riemannian effective spacetime effects on Hawking radiation in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia de Andrade, L C

    2005-01-01

    Riemannian effective spacetime description of Hawking radiation in $^{3}He-A$ superfluids is extended to non-Riemannian effective spacetime. An example is given of non-Riemannian effective geometry of the rotational motion of the superfluid vacuum around the vortex where the effective spacetime Cartan torsion can be associated to the Hawking giving rise to a physical interpretation of effective torsion recently introduced in the literature in the form of an acoustic torsion in superfluid $^{4}He$ (PRD-70(2004),064004). Curvature and torsion singularities of this $^{3}He-A$ fermionic superfluid are investigated. This Lense-Thirring effective metric, representing the superfluid vacuum in rotational motion, is shown not support Hawking radiation when the isotropic $^{4}He$ is restored at far distances from the vortex axis. Hawking radiation can be expressed also in topological solitons (moving domain walls) in fermionic superfluids in non-Riemannian (teleparallel) $(1+1)$ dimensional effective spacetime. A telep...

  5. Topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ningning; Guo, Huaiming; Zhang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Topological superfluid is an exotic state of quantum matter that possesses a nodeless superfluid gap in the bulk and Andreev edge modes at the boundary of a finite system. Here, we study a multi-orbital superfluid driven by an attractive s-wave interaction in a rotating optical lattice. Interestingly, we find that the rotation induces the inter-orbital hybridization and drives the system into topological orbital superfluid in accordance with intrinsically chiral d-wave pairing characteristics. Thanks to the conservation of spin, the topological orbital superfluid supports four rather than two chiral Andreev edge modes at the boundary of the lattice. Moreover, we find that the intrinsic harmonic confining potential forms a circular spatial barrier which accumulates atoms and supports a mass current under the injection of small angular momentum as an external driving force. This feature provides an experimentally detectable phenomenon to verify the topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice.

  6. Measurement setup for the magnetic penetration depth and superfluid stiffness in thin superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Lorenz; Brunner, Markus Christopher Paul; Schneider, Ina; Kronfeldner, Klaus; Strunk, Christoph [Institute for exp. and appl. Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Bousquet, Jessica; Bustarret, Etienne [Institut NEEL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    A mutual inductance measurement setup has been established in order to determine the magnetic penetration depths of thin film superconductors. By measuring the variation of the mutual inductance M, the temperature dependent penetration depth can be evaluated. The setup has been characterized using thin aluminum and niobium films as a reference. Temperature dependence of λ of B-doped diamond films is determined down to 0.3 K and compared with theoretical expectations. The impact of the doping ratio B/C and film thickness on λ and T{sub c} is investigated. Correlation between the film impedance σ = σ{sub 1} - i σ{sub 2} and λ is examined.

  7. Renormalization-Group Theory Study of Superfluidity and Phase Separation of Helium Mixtures Immersed in Jungle-Gym Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatnikova, Anna; Berker, A. Nihat

    1997-03-01

    Superfluidity and phase separation in ^3He-^4He mixtures immersed in jungle-gym (non-random) aerogel are studied by renormalization-group theory.(Phys. Rev. B, in press (1996)) Phase diagrams are calculated for a variety of aerogel concentrations. Superfluidity at very low ^4He concentrations and a depressed tricritical temperature are found at the onset of superfluidity. A superfluid-superfluid phase separation, terminating at an isolated critical point, is found entirely within the superfluid phase. These phenomena, and trends with respect to aerogel concentration, are explained by the connectivity and tenuousness of jungle-gym aerogel.

  8. Nonlocal quantum fluctuations and fermionic superfluidity in the imbalanced attractive Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, M O J; Kim, D-H; Troyer, M; Törmä, P

    2014-10-31

    We study fermionic superfluidity in strongly anisotropic optical lattices with attractive interactions utilizing the cluster dynamical mean-field theory method, and focusing in particular on the role of nonlocal quantum fluctuations. We show that nonlocal quantum fluctuations impact the BCS superfluid transition dramatically. Moreover, we show that exotic superfluid states with a delicate order parameter structure, such as the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase driven by spin population imbalance, can emerge even in the presence of such strong fluctuations.

  9. Gaussian impurity moving through a Bose-Einstein superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, Florian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper a finite Gaussian impurity moving through an equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate at T = 0 is studied. The problem can be described by a Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which is solved perturbatively. The analysis is done for systems of 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. The Bogoliubov equation solutions for the condensate perturbed by a finite impurity are calculated in the co-moving frame. From these solutions the total energy of the perturbed system is determined as a function of the width and the amplitude of the moving Gaussian impurity and its velocity. In addition we derive the drag force the finite sized impurity approximately experiences as it moves through the superfluid, which proves the existence of a superfluid phase for finite extensions of the impurities below the speed of sound. Finally we find that the force increases with velocity until an inflection point from which it decreases again in 2 and 3d.

  10. Dissipation of Quasiclassical Turbulence in Superfluid $^4$He

    CERN Document Server

    Zmeev, D E; Golov, A I; McClintock, P V E; Fisher, S N; Vinen, W F

    2015-01-01

    We compare the decay of turbulence in superfluid $^4$He produced by a moving grid to the decay of turbulence created by either impulsive spin-down to rest or by intense ion injection. In all cases the vortex line density $L$ decays at late time $t$ as $L \\propto t^{-3/2}$. At temperatures above 0.8 K, all methods result in the same rate of decay. Below 0.8 K, the spin-down turbulence maintains initial rotation and decays slower than grid turbulence and ion-jet turbulence. This may be due to a decoupling of the large-scale superfluid flow from the normal component at low temperatures, which changes its effective boundary condition from no-slip to slip.

  11. Superfluid phase transition in two-dimensional excitonic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apinyan, V.; Kopeć, T.K., E-mail: kopec@int.pan.wroc.pl

    2014-03-01

    We study the superfluid phase transition in the two-dimensional (2D) excitonic system. Employing the extended Falicov–Kimball model (EFKM) and considering the local quantum correlations in the system composed of conduction band electrons and valence band holes we demonstrate the existence of the excitonic insulator (EI) state in the system. We show that at very low temperatures, the particle phase stiffness in the pure-2D excitonic system, governed by the non-local cross correlations, is responsible for the vortex–antivortex binding phase-field state, known as the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless (BKT) superfluid state. We demonstrate that the existence of excitonic insulator phase is a necessary prerequisite, leading to quasi-long-range order in the 2D excitonic system.

  12. Holographic Superfluids and Superconductors in Dilaton-Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We investigate holographic models of superfluids and superconductors in which the gravitational theory includes a dilatonic field. Dilaton extensions are interesting as they allow us to obtain a better description of low temperature condensed matter systems. We focus on asymptotically AdS black hole configurations, which are dual to field theories with conformal ultraviolet behavior. A nonvanishing value of the dilaton breaks scale invariance in the infrared and is therefore compatible with the normal phase being insulating (or a solid in the fluid mechanical interpretation); indeed we find that this is the case at low temperatures and if one appropriately chooses the parameters of the model. Not only the superfluid phase transitions, but also the response to external gauge fields is analyzed. This allows us to study, among other things, the vortex phase and to show that these holographic superconductors are also of Type II. However, at low temperatures they can behave in a qualitatively different way compare...

  13. Superfluid density of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Yu, Zeng-Qiang; Ng, Tai Kai; Zhang, Shizhong; Pitaevskii, Lev; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the superfluid properties of a uniform, weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensed gas with spin-orbit coupling, realized recently in experiments. We find a finite normal fluid density ρn at zero temperature which turns out to be a function of the Raman coupling. In particular, the entire fluid becomes normal at the transition point from the zero momentum to the plane wave phase, even though the condensate fraction remains finite. We emphasize the crucial role played by the breaking of Galilean invariance and by the gapped branch of the elementary excitations whose contribution to various sum rules is discussed explicitly. Our predictions for the superfluid density are successfully compared with the available experimental results based on the measurement of the sound velocities.

  14. Geometry and Dynamics of Vortex Loops at Superfluid Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2004-03-01

    The geometrical properties of thermally-excited vortex loops near a superfluid phase transition can be deduced from the dynamics of the transition. The frictional force on a loop is proportional to the total length of the vortex core, and hence depends on the fractal Hausdorff dimension DH of the random-walking core. By comparing the results for the loop dynamics with the dynamic-scaling predictions of Halperin and Hohenberg for the relaxation time, we find DH = (D+2)/2 = 2.5 in D = 3 dimensions, if the dynamic exponent is z = D/2. Computing the frequency-dependence of the superfluid density and comparing with the dynamic scaling of Fisher, Fisher, and Huse gives just the same value. Since Shenoy and co-workers have found precisely the same DH from a Flory-scaling analysis of the loop random walk, our results show that Shenoy's theory is exact if dynamic scaling is exact.

  15. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durì, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-02-01

    We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found to scale similarly as the corresponding extra cooling in classical fluids. We propose a preliminary analysis of the response of the sensor and show that-contrary to a common assumption-such sensor can be used to probe local velocity in turbulent superfluid helium.

  16. Coherent magneto-elastic oscillations in superfluid magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Gabler, Michael; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Font, José A; Müller, Ewald

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of superfluidity on torsional oscillations of highly magnetised neutron stars (magnetars) with a microphysical equation of state by means of two-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamical- elastic simulations. The superfluid properties of the neutrons in the neutron star core are treated in a parametric way in which we effectively decouple part of the core matter from the oscillations. Our simulations confirm the existence of two groups of oscillations, namely continuum oscillations that are confined to the neutron star core and are of Alfv\\'enic character, and global oscillations with constant phase and that are of mixed magneto-elastic type. The latter might explain the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in magnetar giant flares, since they do not suffer from the additional damping mechanism due to phase mixing, contrary to what happens for continuum oscillations. However, we cannot prove rigorously that the coherent oscillations with constant phase are normal modes. Moreover, we find no crust...

  17. Lifshitz effects on holographic p-wave superfluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Bo Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the probe limit, we numerically build a holographic p-wave superfluid model in the four-dimensional Lifshitz black hole coupled to a Maxwell-complex vector field. We observe the rich phase structure and find that the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z contributes evidently to the effective mass of the matter field and dimension of the gravitational background. Concretely, we obtain that the Cave of Winds appeared only in the five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS spacetime, and the increasing z hinders not only the condensate but also the appearance of the first-order phase transition. Furthermore, our results agree with the Ginzburg–Landau results near the critical temperature. In addition, the previous AdS superfluid model is generalized to the Lifshitz spacetime.

  18. Critical Analysis of the Bogoliubov Theory of Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, S

    2003-01-01

    The microscopic theory of superfluidity [1-3] was proposed by Bogoliubov in 1947 to explain the Landau-type excitation spectrum of helium 4. An analysis of the Bogoliubov theory has already been performed in the recent review [4]. Here we add some new critical analyses of this theory. This leads us to consider the superstable Bogoliubov model [5]. It gives rise to an improvement of the previous theory which will be explained with more details in a next paper [6]: coexistence in the superfluid liquid of particles inside and outside the Bose condensate (even at zero temperature), Bose/Bogoliubov statistics, ``Cooper pairs'' in the Bose condensate, Landau-type excitation spectrum...

  19. Critical superfluid velocity in a trapped dipolar gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan M; Ronen, Shai; Bohn, John L

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the superfluid properties of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a fully three-dimensional trap. Specifically, we estimate a superfluid critical velocity for this system by applying the Landau criterion to its discrete quasiparticle spectrum. We test this critical velocity by direct numerical simulation of condensate depletion as a blue-detuned laser moves through the condensate. In both cases, the presence of the roton in the spectrum serves to lower the critical velocity beyond a critical particle number. Since the shape of the dispersion, and hence the roton minimum, is tunable as a function of particle number, we thereby propose an experiment that can simultaneously measure the Landau critical velocity of a dipolar BEC and demonstrate the presence of the roton in this system.

  20. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durı, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-02-01

    We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found to scale similarly as the corresponding extra cooling in classical fluids. We propose a preliminary analysis of the response of the sensor and show that—contrary to a common assumption—such sensor can be used to probe local velocity in turbulent superfluid helium.

  1. Dynamics of vortices in neutral superfluids with noninteracting phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-Yves

    2001-05-01

    The transverse force on an isolated and moving vortex in a neutral superfluid at rest is evaluated at finite temperature in the case of noninteracting phonons. Using the Thouless, Ao, Niu (TAN) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3758 (1996)] general theory, we show that the transverse force is exactly equal to the superfluid Magnus force. We extend this theory in the case of a slowly moving vortex on a circular trajectory, and find an additional contribution coming from the centrifugal reaction. This term gives a negative vortex mass due to the phonons and diverges logarithmically at low frequency. The friction force is also evaluated for zero and finite frequencies, and compared with the scattering theory.

  2. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Wan Xia; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Arutyunov, K; Pekola, J P; Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyvaeskylae, Finland. An open sup 2 sup 2 sup 3 Ra alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling sup 2 sup 1 sup 9 Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface was possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactivity detection. An efficiency of 36% was obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  3. Direct Lattice Shaking of Bose Condensates: Finite Momentum Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Clark, Logan W.; Crawford, Jennifer; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.; Scherpelz, Peter; Feng, Lei; Chin, Cheng; Levin, K.

    2017-06-01

    We address band engineering in the presence of periodic driving by numerically shaking a lattice containing a bosonic condensate. By not restricting to simplified band structure models we are able to address arbitrary values of the shaking frequency, amplitude, and interaction strengths g . For "near-resonant" shaking frequencies with moderate g , a quantum phase transition to a finite momentum superfluid is obtained with Kibble-Zurek scaling and quantitative agreement with experiment. We use this successful calibration as a platform to support a more general investigation of the interplay between (one particle) Floquet theory and the effects associated with arbitrary g . Band crossings lead to superfluid destabilization, but where this occurs depends on g in a complicated fashion.

  4. Superfluid and Insulating Phases of Fermion Mixtures in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2007-08-01

    The ground state phase diagram of fermion mixtures in optical lattices is analyzed as a function of interaction strength, fermion filling factor, and tunneling parameters. In addition to standard superfluid, phase-separated or coexisting superfluid excess-fermion phases found in homogeneous or harmonically trapped systems, fermions in optical lattices have several insulating phases, including a molecular Bose-Mott insulator (BMI), a Fermi-Pauli (band) insulator (FPI), a phase-separated BMI-FPI mixture or a Bose-Fermi checkerboard (BFC). The molecular BMI phase is the fermion mixture counterpart of the atomic BMI found in atomic Bose systems, the BFC or BMI-FPI phases exist in Bose-Fermi mixtures, and lastly the FPI phase is particular to the Fermi nature of the constituent atoms of the mixture.

  5. Instabilities in relativistic two-component (super)fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Haber, Alexander; Stetina, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We study two-fluid systems with nonzero fluid velocities and compute their sound modes, which indicate various instabilities. For the case of two zero-temperature superfluids we employ a microscopic field-theoretical model of two coupled bosonic fields, including an entrainment coupling and a non-entrainment coupling. We analyse the onset of the various instabilities systematically and point out that the dynamical two-stream instability can only occur beyond Landau's critical velocity, i.e., in an already energetically unstable regime. A qualitative difference is found for the case of two normal fluids, where certain transverse modes suffer a two-stream instability in an energetically stable regime if there is entrainment between the fluids. Since we work in a fully relativistic setup, our results are very general and of potential relevance for (super)fluids in neutron stars and, in the non-relativistic limit of our results, in the laboratory.

  6. Superfluid hydrodynamics in the inner crust of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Noël

    2016-01-01

    The inner crust of neutron stars is supposed to be inhomogeneous and composed of dense structures (clusters) that are immersed in a dilute gas of unbound neutrons. Here we consider spherical clusters forming a BCC crystal and cylindrical rods arranged in a hexagonal lattice. We study the relative motion of these dense structures and the neutron gas using superfluid hydrodynamics. Within this approach, which relies on the assumption that Cooper pairs are small compared to the crystalline structures, we find that the entrainment of neutrons by the clusters is very weak since neutrons of the gas can flow through the clusters. Consequently, we obtain a low effective mass of the clusters and a superfluid density that is even higher than the density of unbound neutrons. Consequences for the constraints from glitch observations are discussed.

  7. Superfluid hydrodynamics in the inner crust of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Noël; Urban, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The inner crust of neutron stars is supposed to be inhomogeneous and composed of dense structures (clusters) that are immersed in a dilute gas of unbound neutrons. Here we consider spherical clusters forming a body-centered cubic (BCC) crystal and cylindrical rods arranged in a hexagonal lattice. We study the relative motion of these dense structures and the neutron gas using superfluid hydrodynamics. Within this approach, which relies on the assumption that Cooper pairs are small compared to the crystalline structures, we find that the entrainment of neutrons by the clusters is very weak since neutrons of the gas can flow through the clusters. Consequently, we obtain a low effective mass of the clusters and a superfluid density that is even higher than the density of unbound neutrons. Consequences for the constraints from glitch observations are discussed.

  8. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnyuk, I A

    2016-01-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semi-classical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  9. Quantum Nucleation of Phase Slips in 1-d Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arovas, Daniel

    1998-03-01

    The rate for quantum nucleation of phase slips past an impurity in a one-dimensional superfluid is computed. Real time evolution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that there is a critical velocity vc below which solutions are time-independent [1,2]; this is the regime of quantum phase slip nucleation. We start with the Gross-Pitaevskii model in the presence of an impurity potential, and derive the Euclidean action for a space-time vortex-antivortex pair, which describes a phase slip event. The action is computed as a function of the superfluid velocity v and the impurity potential width and depth.l [1] V. Hakim, Phys. Rev. E 55, 2835 (1997).l [1] J. A. Freire, D. P. Arovas, and H. Levine, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press, 1997).l

  10. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2014-05-08

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  11. A molecular superfluid: non-classical rotations in doped para-hydrogen clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas; McKellar, A R W; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.133401

    2010-01-01

    Clusters of para-hydrogen (pH2) have been predicted to exhibit superfluid behavior, but direct observation of this phenomenon has been elusive. Combining experiments and theoretical simulations, we have determined the size evolution of the superfluid response of pH2 clusters doped with carbon dioxide (CO2). Reduction of the effective inertia is observed when the dopant is surrounded by the pH2 solvent. This marks the onset of molecular superfluidity in pH2. The fractional occupation of solvation rings around CO2 correlates with enhanced superfluid response for certain cluster sizes.

  12. Geometry-induced phase transition from a bosonic superfluid to a Mott insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Thomas; Thomas, Claire; Leung, Tsz Him; Okano, Masayuki; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    We describe a preliminary characterization of the superfluid and Mott insulating phases of ultracold Rb 87 bosonic atoms in a two-dimensional optical superlattice with tunable lattice geometry. By smoothly changing the lattice structure from the triangular to kagome geometries while maintaining near-constant tunneling and interaction energies, we observe a geometry-induced phase transition from the superfluid to the Mott-insulating state. We characterize the superfluid by measurements of the coherent population fraction in time of flight, and find that the superfluid is less robust in the kagome geometry than in the triangular lattice, owing to the lower its lower coordination number.

  13. px+ipy superfluid from s-wave interactions of fermionic cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M; Das Sarma, S

    2008-10-17

    Two-dimensional (p(x)+ip(y)) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p(x)+ip(y) superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid.

  14. Search for Majorana Fermions in S-Wave Fermionic Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    tunable spin-orbit coupling through the modulation of the Raman coupling strength in experiments; 3) We found that the spin-orbit coupled Fulde...Ferrell superfluids can support Weyl points or rings with nontrivial topological structures; 4) We proposed and experimentally realized a new type of...strongly modulating the Raman coupling tunes the SOC strength, independently of geometry and in agreement with theory. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution

  15. Topological Superfluid in P-band Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; He, Jing; Zang, Chun-Li; Kou, Su-Peng

    2012-02-01

    By studying p-band fermionic system with nearest neighbor attractive interaction we find translation symmetry protected Z2 topological superfluid (TSF) that is characterized by a special fermion parity pattern at high symmetry points in momentum space k= (0,0), (0, π), (π, 0), (π, π). Such Z2 TSF supports the robust Majorana edge modes and a new type of low energy excitation - (supersymmetric) Z2 link-excitation.

  16. Internal Magnus effects in superfluid 3He-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmelin, R. H.; Salomaa, M. M.; Mineev, V. P.

    The orbital angular momentum of the coherently aligned Cooper pairs in superfluid (3)He-A is transmitted to an object immersed in the condensate. The authors evaluate the quasiparticle-scattering asymmetry experienced by a negative ion; this leads to a measurable, purely quantum-mechanical Magnus force deflecting the ion's trajectory. Close to T(sub c), possible hydrodynamic Magnus effects are smaller by the factor delta sub A/(k sub B)(T sub c).

  17. Polar Phase of Superfluid (3)He in Anisotropic Aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, V V; Senin, A A; Soldatov, A A; Yudin, A N

    2015-10-16

    We report the first observation of the polar phase of superfluid (3)He. This phase appears in (3)He confined in a new type of aerogel with a nearly parallel arrangement of strands which play the role of ordered impurities. Our experiments qualitatively agree with theoretical predictions and suggest that in other systems with unconventional Cooper pairing (e.g., in unconventional superconductors) similar phenomena may be found in the presence of anisotropic impurities.

  18. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  19. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  20. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  1. Axially symmetric equations for differential pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M.; Pizzochero, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present an analytical two-component model for pulsar rotational dynamics. Under the assumption of axial symmetry, implemented by a paraxial array of straight vortices that thread the entire neutron superfluid, we are able to project exactly the 3D hydrodynamical problem to a 1D cylindrical one. In the presence of density-dependent entrainment the superfluid rotation is non-columnar: we circumvent this by using an auxiliary dynamical variable directly related to the areal density of vortices. The main result is a system of differential equations that take consistently into account the stratified spherical structure of the star, the dynamical effects of non-uniform entrainment, the differential rotation of the superfluid component and its coupling to the normal crust. These equations represent a mathematical framework in which to test quantitatively the macroscopic consequences of the presence of a stable vortex array, a working hypothesis widely used in glitch models. Even without solving the equations explicitly, we are able to draw some general quantitative conclusions; in particular, we show that the reservoir of angular momentum (corresponding to recent values of the pinning forces) is enough to reproduce the largest glitch observed in the Vela pulsar, provided its mass is not too large.

  2. Superfluidity of bosons in kagome lattices with frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yi-Zhuang; Chen, Zhu; Sun, Xiao-Qi; Zhai, Hui

    2012-12-28

    In this Letter we consider spinless bosons in a kagome lattice with nearest-neighbor hopping and on-site interaction, and the sign of hopping is inverted by insetting a π flux in each triangle of the kagome lattice so that the lowest single particle band is perfectly flat. We show that in the high-density limit, despite the infinite degeneracy of the single particle ground states, interaction will select out the Bloch state at the K point of the Brillouin zone for boson condensation at the lowest temperature. As the temperature increases, the single-boson superfluid order can be easily destroyed, while an exotic triple-boson paired superfluid order will remain. We establish that this trion superfluid exists in a broad temperature regime until the temperature is increased to the same order of hopping and then the system turns into normal phases. Finally, we show that time-of-flight measurement of the momentum distribution and its noise correlation can be used to distinguish these three phases.

  3. On Holographic p-wave Superfluids with Back-reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ammon, Martin; Grass, Viviane; Kerner, Patrick; O'Bannon, Andy

    2009-01-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically Anti-de Sitter charged black hole solutions of (4+1)-dimensional SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory that, for sufficiently low temperature, develop vector hair. Via gauge-gravity duality, these solutions describe a strongly-coupled conformal field theory at finite temperature and density that undergoes a phase transition to a superfluid state with spontaneously broken rotational symmetry (a p-wave superfluid state). The bulk theory has a single free parameter, the ratio of the five-dimensional gravitational constant to the Yang-Mills coupling, which we denote as alpha. Previous analyses have shown that in the so-called probe limit, where alpha goes to zero and hence the gauge fields are ignored in Einstein's equation, the transition to the superfluid state is second order. We construct fully back-reacted solutions, where alpha is finite and the gauge fields are included in Einstein's equation, and find that for values of alpha above a critical value alpha_c = 0.365 +- 0.0...

  4. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle; Ashcroft, N W

    2004-10-07

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report a topological analysis of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  5. Transverse forces on vortices in superfluids in a periodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyzes the transverse forces (the Magnus and the Lorentz forces) on vortices in superfluids put into periodic potentials at T =0 . The case of weak potential and the tight-binding limit described by the Bose-Hubbard model were addressed. The analysis was based on the balance of true momentum and quasimomentum. A special attention was paid to the superfluid close to the superfluid-insulator transition. In this area of the phase diagram the theory predicts the particle-hole symmetry line where the Magnus force changes sign with respect to that expected from the sign of velocity circulation. Our analysis has shown that the magnitude of the Magnus force is a continuous function at crossing the particle-hole symmetry line. This challenges the theory connecting the magnitude of the Magnus force with topological Chern numbers and predicting a jump at crossing this line. Disagreement is explained by the role of intrinsic pinning and guided vortex motion ignored in the topological approach. It is one more evidence that in general topological arguments are not sufficient for derivation of equations of vortex motion.

  6. Imbalanced superfluid state in an annular disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Chen, Yan; Wang, Z D; Zhang, F C

    2009-09-02

    The imbalanced superfluid state of spin- 1/2 fermions with s-wave pairing is numerically studied by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation at zero temperature in an annular disk geometry with narrow radial width. Two distinct types of systems are considered. The first case may be relevant to heavy fermion superconductors, where magnetic field causes spin imbalance via Zeeman interaction and the system is studied in a grand canonical ensemble. As the magnetic field increases, the system is transformed from the uniform superfluid state to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state, and finally to the spin polarized normal state. The second case may be relevant to cold fermionic systems, where the number of fermions of each species is fixed as in a canonical ensemble. In this case, the ground state depends on the pairing strength. For weak pairing, the order parameter exhibits a periodic domain wall lattice pattern with a localized spin distribution at low spin imbalance, and a sinusoidally modulated pattern with extended spin distribution at high spin imbalance. For strong pairing, the phase separation between the superfluid state and polarized normal state is found to be preferable, while the increase of spin imbalance simply changes the ratio between them.

  7. Resonant quasiparticle-ion scattering in anisotropic superfluid 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmelin, R. H.; Salomaa, M. M.

    1990-03-01

    Low-energy excitations in quantum fluids are most directly encountered by ions. In the superfluid phases of 3He the relevant elementary excitations are Bogoliubov quasiparticles, which undergo repeated scattering off an ion in the presence of a divergent density of states. We present a quantum-mechanical calculation of the resonant 3He quasiparticle-scattering-limited mobility for negative ions in the anisotropic bulk 3A (A phase) and 3P (polar phase) that is exact when the quasiparticles scatter elastically. We develop a numerical scheme to solve the singular equations for quasiparticle-ion scattering in the A and P phases. Both of these superfluid phases feature a uniaxially symmetric order parameter but distinct topology for the magnitude of the energy gap on the Fermi sphere, i.e., points versus lines of nodes. In particular, the perpetual orbital circulation of Cooper pairs in 3A results in a novel, purely quantum-mechanical intrinsic Magnus effect, which is absent in the polar phase, where Cooper pairs possess no spontaneous orbital angular momentum. This is of interest also for transport properties of heavy-fermion superconductors. We discuss the 3He quasiparticle-ion cross sections, which allow one to account for the mobility data with essentially no free parameters. The calculated mobility thus facilitates an introduction of ``ion spectroscopy'' to extract useful information on fundamental properties of the superfluid state, such as the temperature dependence of the energy gap in 3A.

  8. Black-Hole and White-Hole Horizons in Superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2006-01-01

    Ripplons -- gravity-capillary waves on the free surface of a liquid or at the interfaces between two superfluids -- are the most favourable excitations for simulation of the general-relativistic effects related to horizons and ergoregions. The white-hole horizon for the ``relativistic'' ripplons at the surface of the shallow liquid is easily simulated using the kitchen-bath hydraulic jump. The same white-hole horizon is observed in quantum liquid -- superfluid 4He. The ergoregion for the ``non-relativistic'' ripplons is generated in the experiments with two sliding 3He superfluids. The common property experienced by all these ripplons is the Miles instability inside the ergoregion or horizon. Because of the universality of the Miles instability, one may expect that it could take place inside the horizon of the astrophysical black holes, if there is a preferred reference frame which comes from the trans-Planckian physics. If this is the case, the black hole would evapotate much faster than due to the Hawking r...

  9. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  10. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  11. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  12. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  13. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device that is presently under construction. This article starts with a brief historical introduction to superconductivity as a phenomenon, and some fundamental properties necessary for the understanding of the technical behavior of superconductors are described. The introduction of superconductivity in the industrial cycle faces many challenges, first for the properties of the base elements, e.g. the wires, tapes and thin films, then for the various applied devices, where a number of new difficulties had to be resolved. A variety of industrial applications in energy, medicine and communications are briefly presented, showing how superconductivity is now entering the market.

  14. Casimir Energy and Vacua vor Superconducting Ball in Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Burinskii, A

    2002-01-01

    Casimir energy for solid conducting ball is considered on the base of some finite models. One model is physical and built of a battery of parallel metallic plates. Two finite models are based on the Higgs model of superconductivity. One of them is supersymmetric and based on the Witten field model for superconducting strings. Treatment shows that contribution of Casimir energy can be very essential for superdence state in the neutron stars and nuclear matter.

  15. Superfluid-Mott transitions and vortices in the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices with time-reversal-symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, A. L. C.; Martin, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the ground-state behavior of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices in the presence of a synthetic magnetic field, via a Gutzwiller ansatz. Specifically, we study the superfluid-Mott transition and the formation of vortex lattices in the superfluid regime. We find a suppression of the superfluid fraction due to the frustration induced by the incommensurate magnetic and spacial lattice lengths. We also predict the formation of triangular vortex lattices inside the superfluid regime.

  16. Performance of the First LHC Pre-series Superconducting Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Modena, M; Pojer, M; Pugnat, P; Rossi, L; Sanfilippo, S; Siemko, A; Vlogaert, J; Walckiers, L; Wyss, C

    2003-01-01

    Within the LHC magnet program, a preseries production of final design, full-scale superconducting dipoles has presently started in industry and magnets are being tested at CERN. The main features of these magnets are: two-in-one structure, 56 mm aperture, six-block two layer coils wound from 15.1 mm wide graded NbTi cables, and all-polyimide insulation. This paper reviews the main test results of magnets tested to date in both supercritical and superfluid helium. The results of the quench training, conductor performance, magnet protection, sensitivity to ramp rate, and magnetic field quality are presented and discussed in terms of the design parameters and the aims of the LHC magnet programme.

  17. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  18. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  19. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  20. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged ρ -mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that ρ -meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the ρ -meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and ρ -mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  1. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Brauner, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged rho-mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that rho-meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the rho-meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and rho-mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  2. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  3. Flux tubes and the type-I/type-II transition in a superconductor coupled to a superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G

    2007-01-01

    We analyze magnetic flux tubes at zero temperature in a superconductor that is coupled to a superfluid via both density and gradient (``entrainment'') interactions. The example we have in mind is high-density nuclear matter, which is a proton superconductor and a neutron superfluid, but our treatment is general and simple, modeling the interactions as a Ginzburg-Landau effective theory with four-fermion couplings, including only s-wave pairing. We numerically solve the field equations for flux tubes with an arbitrary number of flux quanta, and compare their energies. This allows us to map the type-I/type-II transition in the superconductor, which occurs at the conventional kappa = 1/sqrt(2) if the condensates are uncoupled. We find that a density coupling between the condensates raises the critical kappa and blurs the transition into a series of steps as the number of quanta in the favored flux tube varies between 1 and infinity. We find that a gradient coupling between the condensates lowers the critical kap...

  4. Superfluid helium orbital resupply - The status of the SHOOT flight experiment and preliminary user requirements. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Kittel, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment is designed to demonstrate the components and techniques necessary to resupply superfluid helium to satellites or Space Station based facilities. A top level description as well as the development status of the critical components to be used in SHOOT are discussed. Some of these components include the thermomechanical pump, the fluid acquisition system, the normal helium and superfluid helium phase separators, Venturi flow meter, cryogenic valves, burst disks, and astronaut-compatible EVA coupler and transfer line. The requirements for the control electronics and software are given. A preliminary description of the requirements that must be met by a satellite requiring superfluid helium servicing is given. In particular, minimum and optimum plumbing arrangements are shown, transfer line flow impedance and heat input impacts are assessed, instrumentation is described, and performance parameters are considered.

  5. Magnetic Domain Walls as Hosts of Spin Superfluids and Generators of Skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    A domain wall in a magnet with easy-axis anisotropy is shown to harbor spin superfluid associated with its spontaneous breaking of the U(1) spin-rotational symmetry. The spin superfluid is shown to have several topological properties, which are absent in conventional superfluids. First, the associated phase slips create and destroy Skyrmions to obey the conservation of the total Skyrmion charge, which allows us to use a domain wall as a generator and detector of Skyrmions. Second, the domain wall engenders the emergent magnetic flux for magnons along its length, which are proportional to the spin supercurrent flowing through it, and thereby provides a way to manipulate magnons. Third, the spin supercurrent can be driven by the magnon current traveling across it owing to the spin transfer between the domain wall and magnons, leading to the magnonic manipulation of the spin superfluid. The theory for superfluid spin transport within the domain wall is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Towards laboratory detection of topological vortices in superfluid phases of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arpan; De, Somnath; Srivastava, Ajit M

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects arise in a variety of systems, e.g. vortices in superfluid helium to cosmic strings in the early universe. There is an indirect evidence of neutron superfluid vortices from glitches in pulsars. One also expects that topological defects may arise in various high baryon density phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), e.g. superfluid topological vortices in the color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We investigate the possibility of detecting these topological superfluid vortices in laboratory experiments, namely heavy-ion collisions. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we show that vortices can qualitatively affect the power spectrum of flow fluctuations. This can give unambiguous signal for superfluid transition resulting in vortices, allowing for check of defect formation theories in a relativistic quantum field theory system.

  7. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  8. Ultrathin two-dimensional superconductivity with strong spin–orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Chen, Hua; Liu, Tijiang; Kim, Jisun; Zhang, Chendong; Yong, Jie; Lemberger, Thomas R.; Kratz, Philip A.; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn; Adams, Philip W.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of epitaxially grown ultrathin Pb films that are only a few atoms thick and have parallel critical magnetic fields much higher than the expected limit set by the interaction of electron spins with a magnetic field, that is, the Clogston–Chandrasekhar limit. The epitaxial thin films are classified as dirty-limit superconductors because their mean-free paths, which are limited by surface scattering, are smaller than their superconducting coherence lengths. The uniformity of superconductivity in these thin films is established by comparing scanning tunneling spectroscopy, scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, double-coil mutual inductance, and magneto-transport, data that provide average superfluid rigidity on length scales covering the range from microscopic to macroscopic. We argue that the survival of superconductivity at Zeeman energies much larger than the superconducting gap can be understood only as the consequence of strong spin–orbit coupling that, together with substrate-induced inversion-symmetry breaking, produces spin splitting in the normal-state energy bands that is much larger than the superconductor’s energy gap. PMID:27601678

  9. Ultrathin two-dimensional superconductivity with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Chen, Hua; Liu, Tijiang; Kim, Jisun; Zhang, Chendong; Yong, Jie; Lemberger, Thomas R; Kratz, Philip A; Kirtley, John R; Moler, Kathryn; Adams, Philip W; MacDonald, Allan H; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-09-20

    We report on a study of epitaxially grown ultrathin Pb films that are only a few atoms thick and have parallel critical magnetic fields much higher than the expected limit set by the interaction of electron spins with a magnetic field, that is, the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. The epitaxial thin films are classified as dirty-limit superconductors because their mean-free paths, which are limited by surface scattering, are smaller than their superconducting coherence lengths. The uniformity of superconductivity in these thin films is established by comparing scanning tunneling spectroscopy, scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, double-coil mutual inductance, and magneto-transport, data that provide average superfluid rigidity on length scales covering the range from microscopic to macroscopic. We argue that the survival of superconductivity at Zeeman energies much larger than the superconducting gap can be understood only as the consequence of strong spin-orbit coupling that, together with substrate-induced inversion-symmetry breaking, produces spin splitting in the normal-state energy bands that is much larger than the superconductor's energy gap.

  10. Superfluidity and collective modes in Rashba spin–orbit coupled Fermi gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lianyi, E-mail: lianyi@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies and Institute for Theoretical Physics, J. W. Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Huang, Xu-Guang, E-mail: xhuang@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter and Physics Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    We present a theoretical study of the superfluidity and the corresponding collective modes in two-component atomic Fermi gases with s-wave attraction and synthetic Rashba spin–orbit coupling. The general effective action for the collective modes is derived from the functional path integral formalism. By tuning the spin–orbit coupling from weak to strong, the system undergoes a crossover from an ordinary BCS/BEC superfluid to a Bose–Einstein condensate of rashbons. We show that the properties of the superfluid density and the Anderson–Bogoliubov mode manifest this crossover. At large spin–orbit coupling, the superfluid density and the sound velocity become independent of the strength of the s-wave attraction. The two-body interaction among the rashbons is also determined. When a Zeeman field is turned on, the system undergoes quantum phase transitions to some exotic superfluid phases which are topologically nontrivial. For the two-dimensional system, the nonanalyticities of the thermodynamic functions and the sound velocity across the phase transition are related to the bulk gapless fermionic excitation which causes infrared singularities. The superfluid density and the sound velocity behave nonmonotonically: they are suppressed by the Zeeman field in the normal superfluid phase, but get enhanced in the topological superfluid phase. The three-dimensional system is also studied. -- Highlights: •The general effective action for Rashba spin–orbit coupled Fermi superfluids is derived. •The evolution of the collective modes manifests the BCS/BEC-rashbon crossover. •The superfluid properties are universal at large spin–orbit coupling. •The sound velocity behaves nonanalytically across the quantum phase transition.

  11. Influence of self-irradiation on the magnitude of the superfluid density in PuCoGa{sub 5} probed by muon spin rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohishi, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: ohishi.kazuki@jaea.go.jp; Heffner, R.H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ito, T.U. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Higemoto, W. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bauer, E.D.; Graf, M.J.; Zhu, J.-X.; Morales, L.A.; Sarrao, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fluss, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); MacLaughlin, D.E.; Shu, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2008-04-01

    We have performed muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements in the radioactive Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} to study the effects of radiation damage on the superconducting properties. The same single crystals were studied 25 days (fresh) and 400 days (aged) after initial preparation. We find that the {mu}SR rate {sigma}{sub v}, which is proportional to superfluid density {rho}{sub s}, is steeply reduced in the aged sample compared with its reduction of T{sub c}. This result is inconsistent with conventional Abrikosov-Gor'kov pair-breaking theory, but can be explained by the local suppression of the order parameter in a strong-scattering, short-coherence-length superconductor.

  12. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  13. Quantized Vortices and Four-Component Superfluidity of Semiconductor Excitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anankine, Romain; Beian, Mussie; Dang, Suzanne; Alloing, Mathieu; Cambril, Edmond; Merghem, Kamel; Carbonell, Carmen Gomez; Lemaître, Aristide; Dubin, François

    2017-03-24

    We study spatially indirect excitons of GaAs quantum wells, confined in a 10  μm electrostatic trap. Below a critical temperature of about 1 K, we detect macroscopic spatial coherence and quantized vortices in the weak photoluminescence emitted from the trap. These quantum signatures are restricted to a narrow range of density, in a dilute regime. They manifest the formation of a four-component superfluid, made by a low population of optically bright excitons coherently coupled to a dominant fraction of optically dark excitons.

  14. Scaling laws of wave-cascading superfluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Phenomenological model is constructed for superfluid turbulence for two distinct energy cascade scenarios, sound wave cascade and critically-balanced Kelvin wave cascade, using the method for magneto-fluid turbulence theory. Excitations along dispersion relations are used as the primary energy reservoir. The spectral indices in the inertial range are estimated as -3/2 for the long-wavelength sound wave cascade, -3 in the direction to the mean filaments for the Kelvin wave cascade, and -5/3 perpendicular to the filament direction.

  15. Color superfluidity and trion formation in ultracold fermionic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Akos [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We investigate the low temperature properties of the three component Hubbard model. This system might be realized by trapping 3 different hyperfine states of ultracold Li-6 atoms in optical lattices. Studies concerning the SU(3) symmetric attractive case based on a Gutzwiller variational method in d={infinity} suggest that there is a continuous phase transition happening between a weak coupling color superfluid and a strong coupling trionic ground state. We construct and investigate the properties of the quantum field theory describing this quantum phase transition.

  16. Dynamical density fluctuations of superfluids near the critical velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Watabe, Shohei

    2010-07-16

    We propose a stability criterion of superfluids in condensed Bose-Einstein systems, which incorporates the spectral function or the autocorrelation function of the local density. Within the Gross-Pitaevskii-Bogoliubov theory, we demonstrate the validity of our criterion for the soliton-emission instability, with use of explicit forms of zero modes of the Bogoliubov equation and a dynamical scaling near the saddle-node bifurcation. We also show that the criterion is applicable to the Landau phonon instability and the Landau roton instability within the single-mode approximation.

  17. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows

    OpenAIRE

    Durì, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found...

  18. Topological Effects on Quantum Phase Slips in Superfluid Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate effects of quantum fluctuations on superfluid spin transport through easy-plane quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains in the large-spin limit. Quantum fluctuations result in the decaying spin supercurrent by unwinding the magnetic order parameter within the easy plane, which is referred to as phase slips. We show that the topological term in the nonlinear sigma model for the spin chains qualitatively differentiates the decaying rate of the spin supercurrent between the integer versus half-odd-integer spin chains. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which the dependence of the decaying rate on constituent spins can be verified by measuring the nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  19. New theory of superfluidity. Method of equilibrium density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarev, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The variational theory of equilibrium boson system state to have been previously developed by the author under the density matrix formalism is applicable for researching equilibrium states and thermodynamic properties of the quantum Bose gas which consists of zero-spin particles. Particle pulse distribution function is obtained and duly employed for calculation of chemical potential, internal energy and gas capacity temperature dependences. It is found that specific phase transition, which is similar to transition of liquid helium to its superfluid state, occurs at the temperature exceeding that of the Bose condensation.

  20. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  1. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  2. The High Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates: Physics of the Pseudogap Region

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid $^4He$. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence o...

  3. Quantum phase transition in a multiconnected superconducting Jaynes-Cummings lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kangjun; Tian, Lin

    2015-05-01

    The connectivity and tunability of superconducting qubits and resonators provide us with an appealing platform to study the many-body physics of microwave excitations. Here we present a multiconnected Jaynes-Cummings lattice model which is symmetric with respect to the nonlocal qubit-resonator couplings. Our calculation shows that this model exhibits a Mott insulator-superfluid-Mott insulator phase transition at commensurate fillings, featured by symmetric quantum critical points. Phase diagrams in the grand canonical ensemble are also derived, which confirm the incompressibility of the Mott insulator phase. Different from a general-purposed quantum computer, it only requires two operations to demonstrate this phase transition: the preparation and the detection of commensurate many-body ground state. We discuss the realization of these operations in a superconducting circuit.

  4. Superconductivity and Magnetism in Organic Materials Studied with μSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Francis

    2016-09-01

    A review is given of the current status and recent progress in the use of μSR for the study of superconductivity and magnetism in organic materials. For organic superconductors, important factors are discussed that influence the observed μSR line widths and their field and temperature dependences in the superconducting state. The accumulated μSR results give direct information about the scaling relationship between superfluid stiffness and transition temperature that provides a strong constraint for theories of organic superconductors. For organic magnetism, μSR offers a sensitive probe for detecting various weak magnetic phenomena ranging from spin-density-wave transitions through spin dynamics and 3D ordering of Heisenberg chain systems to field induced magnetism of quantum spin liquids. Finally, experiments are described that focus on two current issues in organic spintronics: direct measurement of the spin coherence length and the identification of the relative importance of different mechanisms of spin decoherence.

  5. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  6. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  7. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  8. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  9. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  10. Coherent magneto-elastic oscillations in superfluid magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Michael; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Font, José A.; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of superfluidity on torsional oscillations of highly magnetised neutron stars (magnetars) with a microphysical equation of state by means of two-dimensional, magneto-hydrodynamical-elastic simulations. The superfluid properties of the neutrons in the neutron star core are treated in a parametric way in which we effectively decouple part of the core matter from the oscillations. Our simulations confirm the existence of two groups of oscillations, namely continuum oscillations that are confined to the neutron star core and are of Alfvénic character, and global oscillations with constant phase and that are of mixed magneto-elastic type. The latter might explain the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in magnetar giant flares, since they do not suffer from the additional damping mechanism due to phase mixing, contrary to what happens for continuum oscillations. However, we cannot prove rigorously that the coherent oscillations with constant phase are normal modes. Moreover, we find no crustal shear modes for the magnetic field strengths typical for magnetars. We provide fits to our numerical simulations that give the oscillation frequencies as functions of magnetic field strength and proton fraction in the core.

  11. Bogoliubov-de Gennes soliton dynamics in unconventional Fermi superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke A.

    2016-01-01

    Exact self-consistent soliton dynamics based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) formalism in unconventional Fermi superfluids/superconductors possessing an SU(d ) -symmetric two-body interaction is presented. The derivation is based on the ansatz having the similar form as the Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation in the inverse scattering theory. Our solutions can be regarded as a multicomponent generalization of the solutions recently derived by Dunne and Thies [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 121602 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.121602]. We also propose superpositions of occupation states, which make it possible to realize various filling rates even in one-flavor systems, and include Dirac and Majorana fermions. The soliton solutions in the d =2 systems, which describe the mixture of singlet s -wave and triplet p -wave superfluids, exhibit a variety of phenomena such as rotating polar phases by soliton spins, SU(2)-DHN breathers, Majorana triplet states, s -p mixed dynamics, and so on. These solutions are illustrated by animations, where order parameters are visualized by spherical harmonic functions. The full formulation of the BdG theory is also supported, and the double-counting problem of BdG eigenstates and N -flavor generalization are discussed.

  12. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  13. Coordinate-Space Solver for Superfluid Many-Fermion Systems with Shifted Conjugate Orthogonal Conjugate Gradient Method

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Shi; Roche, Kenneth; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Self-consistent approaches to superfluid many-fermion systems in 3-dimensions (and subsequent time-dependent approaches) require a large number of diagonalizations of very large dimension hermitian matrices, which results in enormous computational costs. We present an approach based on the shifted conjugate-orthogonal conjugate-gradient (COCG) method for the evaluation of the Green's function, from which we subsequently extract various densities (particle number, spin, current, kinetic energy, etc.) of a nuclear system needed in self-consistent approaches. The approach eschews the construction of the quasiparticle wavefunctions and their corresponding quasiparticle energies, which are never explicitly needed in any density functional approaches. As benchmarks we present calculations for nuclei with axial symmetry, including the ground state of spherical (magic or semi-magic) and axially deformed nuclei, the saddle-point in the $^{240}$Pu constrained fission path, and a vortex in the neutron star crust.

  14. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  15. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  16. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  17. The winding and testing of a 10 cm superconductive quadrupole for CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J.E.C.; Cornish, D.N.

    1970-01-01

    The construction and testing of the first of a pair of quadrupole magnets, designed for use as superconductive beam handling elements at CERN, is described. Tests showed this magnet to be eminently suitable for nuclear physics applications.

  18. Flux tubes and the type-I/type-II transition in a superconductor coupled to a superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G.; Good, Gerald

    2008-07-01

    We analyze magnetic-flux tubes at zero temperature in a superconductor that is coupled to a superfluid via both density and gradient (“entrainment”) interactions. The example we have in mind is high-density nuclear matter, which is a proton superconductor and a neutron superfluid, but our treatment is general and simple, modeling the interactions as a Ginzburg-Landau effective theory with four-fermion couplings, including only s -wave pairing. We numerically solve the field equations for flux tubes with an arbitrary number of flux quanta and compare their energies. This allows us to map the type-I/type-II transition in the superconductor, which occurs at the conventional κ≡λ/ξ=1/2 if the condensates are uncoupled. We find that a density coupling between the condensates raises the critical κ and, for a sufficiently high neutron density, resolves the type-I/type-II transition line into an infinite number of bands corresponding to “ type-II(n) ” phases, in which n , the number of quanta in the favored flux tube, steps from 1 to infinity. For lower neutron density, the coupling creates spinodal regions around the type-I/type-II boundary, in which metastable flux configurations are possible. We find that a gradient coupling between the condensates lowers the critical κ and creates spinodal regions. These exotic phenomena may not occur in nuclear matter, which is thought to be deep in the type-II region but might be observed in condensed-matter systems.

  19. Control of stopping position of radioactive ion beam in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.F., E-mail: yangxf@ribf.riken.jp [School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Wakui, T. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Imamura, K. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, T. [Dept. of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dept. of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yoshida, N.; Shirai, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Y.; Hayasaka, M. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, S.; Muramoto, S. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Wada, M.; Sonoda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei with extremely low yields by measuring nuclear spins and moments, a new laser spectroscopy technique – “OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher) has been proposed in recent years. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated by means of a considerable amount of offline and online studies of various atoms in superfluid helium. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, trapping atoms in the observation region of laser is a key step. Therefore, a method which enables us to trap accelerated atoms at a precise position in He II is highly needed for performing experiment. In this work, a technique making use of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is established for checking the stopping position of beam based on the LISE++ calculation. The method has been tested and verified by on-line experiments with the {sup 84,85,87}Rb beam. Details of the experimental setup, working procedure and testing results of this method are presented.

  20. Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Superfluid Fermi Systems in Large Boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, J. C. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fann, George I [ORNL; Harrison, Robert J [ORNL; Nazarewicz, W. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hill, Judith C [ORNL; Galindo, Diego A [ORNL; Jia, Jun [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov problem in large boxes can be solved accurately in the coordinate space with the recently developed solvers HFB-AX (2D) and MADNESS-HFB (3D). This is essential for the description of superfluid Fermi systems with complicated topologies and significant spatial extend, such as fissioning nuclei, weakly-bound nuclei, nuclear matter in the neutron star rust, and ultracold Fermi atoms in elongated traps. The HFB-AX solver based on B-spline techniques uses a hybrid MPI and OpenMP programming model for parallel computation for distributed parallel computation, within a node multi-threaded LAPACK and BLAS libraries are used to further enable parallel calculations of large eigensystems. The MADNESS-HFB solver uses a novel multi-resolution analysis based adaptive pseudo-spectral techniques to enable fully parallel 3D calculations of very large systems. In this work we present benchmark results for HFB-AX and MADNESS-HFB on ultracold trapped fermions.

  1. Competition between superconductivity and magnetic/nematic order as a source of anisotropic superconducting gap in underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H [Ames Laboratory; Tanatar, M A [Ames Laboratory; Straszheim, W E [Ames Laboratory; Cho, K [Ames Laboratory; Murphy, J [Iowa State University; Spyrison, N [Iowa State University; Reid, J -Ph [Universite de Sherbrooke; Shen, Bing [Nanjing University; Wen, Hai-Hu [Nanjing University; Fernandes, R M [University of Minnesota; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-07-01

    The in-plane London penetration depth Δλ(T) was measured using a tunnel diode resonator technique in single crystals of Ba1-xKxFe2As2 with doping levels x ranging from heavily underdoped, x=0.16 (Tc=7K), to nearly optimally doped, x=0.34 (Tc=39K). Exponential saturation of Δλ(T) in the T→0 limit is found in optimally doped samples, with the superfluid density ρs(T)≡[λ(0)/λ(T)]2 quantitatively described by a self-consistent γ model with two nodeless isotropic superconducting gaps. As the doping level is decreased towards the extreme end of the superconducting dome at x=0.16, the low-temperature behavior of Δλ(T) becomes nonexponential and is best described by the power law Δλ(T)∝T2, characteristic of strongly anisotropic gaps. The change between the two regimes happens within the range of coexisting magnetic/nematic order and superconductivity, x<0.25, and is accompanied by a rapid rise in the absolute value of Δλ(T) with underdoping. This effect, characteristic of the competition between superconductivity and other ordered states, is very similar to but of significantly smaller magnitude than what is observed in the electron-doped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 compounds. Our study suggests that the competition between superconductivity and magnetic/nematic order in hole-doped compounds is weaker than in electron-doped compounds, and that the anisotropy of the superconducting state in the underdoped iron pnictides is a consequence of the anisotropic changes in the pairing interaction and in the gap function promoted by both magnetic and nematic long-range orders.

  2. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  3. Geometric Origin of Superfluidity in the Lieb-Lattice Flat Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julku, Aleksi; Peotta, Sebastiano; Vanhala, Tuomas I.; Kim, Dong-Hee; Törmä, Päivi

    2016-07-01

    The ground state and transport properties of the Lieb lattice flat band in the presence of an attractive Hubbard interaction are considered. It is shown that the superfluid weight can be large even for an isolated and strictly flat band. Moreover the superfluid weight is proportional to the interaction strength and to the quantum metric, a band structure quantity derived solely from the flat-band Bloch functions. These predictions are amenable to verification with ultracold gases and may explain the anomalous behavior of the superfluid weight of high-Tc superconductors.

  4. Relativistic superfluidity and vorticity from the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Chi; Guo, Yulong; Liu, Xiaopei; Huang, Kerson

    2014-01-01

    We investigate superfluidity, and the mechanism for creation of quantized vortices, in the relativistic regime. The general framework is a nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in curved spacetime for a complex scalar field, whose phase dynamics gives rise to superfluidity. The mechanisms discussed are local inertial forces (Coriolis and centrifugal), and current-current interaction with an external source. The primary application is to cosmology, but we also discuss the reduction to the non-relativistic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which is widely used in describing superfluidity and vorticity in liquid helium and cold-trapped atomic gases.

  5. Competition between the superfluidity and the slippage of {sup 4}He films adsorbed on porous gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ideura, K; Kobayashi, H; Taniguchi, J; Suzuki, M [Department of Applied Physics and Chimistry, University of Eletro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Hosomi, N [Department of Physics, Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi 448-8542 (Japan)], E-mail: ide@phys.uec.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    We have carried out QCM measurements for {sup 4}He films adsorbed on porous gold in the crossover region between the superfluidity and slippage. In relative low areal densities, the resonance frequency increases gradually below T{sub S} due to the slippage of solid film, while the superfluid onset is observed in high areal densities. In the crossover region, we observed a peculiar behavior: The increase in the resonance frequency below T{sub S} is suddenly suppressed at a certain temperature T{sub D}. From these observations, it is concluded that the superfluidity and the slippage of {sup 4}He competes with each other.

  6. Anisotropic pair superfluidity of trapped two-component Bose gases in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the pair-superfluid phase of two-component ultracold gases with attractive inter-species interactions in an optical lattice. We establish the phase diagram for filling n = 1 at zero and finite temperatures, by applying bosonic dynamical mean-field theory, and observe stable pair-superfluid and charge-density wave quantum phases for asymmetric hopping of the two species. While the pair superfluid is found to be robust in the presence of a harmonic trap, we observe that it is destroyed already by a small population imbalance of the two species.

  7. Coherence Times of Bose-Einstein Condensates beyond the Shot-Noise Limit via Superfluid Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, William Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Vadia, Samarth; Chen, Wenlan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new way to extend the coherence time of separated Bose-Einstein condensates that involves immersion into a superfluid bath. When both the system and the bath have similar scattering lengths, immersion in a superfluid bath cancels out inhomogeneous potentials either imposed by external fields or inherent in density fluctuations due to atomic shot noise. This effect, which we call superfluid shielding, allows for coherence lifetimes beyond the projection noise limit. We probe the coherence between separated condensates in different sites of an optical lattice by monitoring the contrast and decay of Bloch oscillations. Our technique demonstrates a new way that interactions can improve the performance of quantum devices.

  8. BCS-BEC crossover and liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Meng [Institute of Particle Physics and Physical Department, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 4300079 (China); Urban, Michael [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire -Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, F-91406 Orsay (France); Schuck, Peter, E-mail: jinm@iopp.ccnu.edu.cn [Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses,CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-09-16

    The effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations in symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature is studied beyond BCS theory. We calculate the critical temperature for a BEC superfluid of deuterons, of a BCS superfluid of nucleons, and in the crossover between these limits. The effect of the correlations on the liquid-gas phase transition is discussed. Our results show that nucleon-nucleon correlations beyond BCS play an important role for the properties of nuclear matter, especially in the low-density region.

  9. Beam commissioning for a superconducting proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; He, Yuan; Jia, Huan; Dou, Wei-ping; Chen, Wei-long; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, Shu-hui; Feng, Chi; Tao, Yue; Wang, Wang-sheng; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To develop the next generation of safe and cleaner nuclear energy, the accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system emerges as one of the most attractive technologies. It will be able to transmute the long-lived transuranic radionuclides produced in the reactors of today's nuclear power plants into shorter-lived ones, and also it will provide positive energy output at the same time. The prototype of the Chinese ADS (C-ADS) proton accelerator comprises two injectors and a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA continuous wave (CW) superconducting main linac. The injector scheme II at the C-ADS demo facility inside the Institute of Modern Physics is a 10 MeV CW superconducting linac with a designed beam current of 10 mA, which includes an ECR ion source, a low-energy beam transport line, a 162.5 MHz radio frequency quadrupole accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport line, and a superconducting half wave resonator accelerator section. This demo facility has been successfully operating with an 11 mA, 2.7 MeV CW beam and a 3.9 mA, 4.3 MeV CW beam at different times and conditions since June 2014. The beam power has reached 28 kW, which is the highest record for the same type of linear accelerators. In this paper, the parameters of the test injector II and the progress of the beam commissioning are reported.

  10. Microwave spectroscopy evidence of superconducting pairing in the magnetic-field-induced metallic state of InO(x) films at zero temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Pan, LiDong; Wen, Jiajia; Kim, Minsoo; Sambandamurthy, G; Armitage, N P

    2013-08-09

    We investigate the field-tuned quantum phase transition in a 2D low-disorder amorphous InO(x) film in the frequency range of 0.05 to 16 GHz employing microwave spectroscopy. In the zero-temperature limit, the ac data are consistent with a scenario where this transition is from a superconductor to a metal instead of a direct transition to an insulator. The intervening metallic phase is unusual with a small but finite resistance that is much smaller than the normal state sheet resistance at the lowest measured temperatures. Moreover, it exhibits a superconducting response on short length and time scales while global superconductivity is destroyed. We present evidence that the true quantum critical point of this 2D superconductor metal transition is located at a field B(sm) far below the conventionally defined critical field B(cross) where different isotherms of magnetoresistance cross each other. The superfluid stiffness in the low-frequency limit and the superconducting fluctuation frequency from opposite sides of the transition both vanish at B≈B(sm). The lack of evidence for finite-frequency superfluid stiffness surviving B(cross) signifies that B(cross) is a crossover above which superconducting fluctuations make a vanishing contribution to dc and ac measurements.

  11. Microwave Spectroscopy Evidence of Superconducting Pairing in the Magnetic-Field-Induced Metallic State of InOx Films at Zero Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Pan, LiDong; Wen, Jiajia; Kim, Minsoo; Sambandamurthy, G.; Armitage, N. P.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the field-tuned quantum phase transition in a 2D low-disorder amorphous InOx film in the frequency range of 0.05 to 16 GHz employing microwave spectroscopy. In the zero-temperature limit, the ac data are consistent with a scenario where this transition is from a superconductor to a metal instead of a direct transition to an insulator. The intervening metallic phase is unusual with a small but finite resistance that is much smaller than the normal state sheet resistance at the lowest measured temperatures. Moreover, it exhibits a superconducting response on short length and time scales while global superconductivity is destroyed. We present evidence that the true quantum critical point of this 2D superconductor metal transition is located at a field Bsm far below the conventionally defined critical field Bcross where different isotherms of magnetoresistance cross each other. The superfluid stiffness in the low-frequency limit and the superconducting fluctuation frequency from opposite sides of the transition both vanish at B≈Bsm. The lack of evidence for finite-frequency superfluid stiffness surviving Bcross signifies that Bcross is a crossover above which superconducting fluctuations make a vanishing contribution to dc and ac measurements.

  12. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device...

  13. 超导量子干涉仪及其在低场核磁共振及成像中的应用%Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and Its Application in Low-Field Nuclear M agnetic Resonance & Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 蒋凤英; 金贻荣; 李绍; 邓辉; 田野; 任育峰; 郑东宁

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device ( SQUID) is a kind of ultra-sensitive flux detector based on macroscopic quantum interferencephenomenon of Josephson junctions .The principle of SQUID and advantages of its appli-cation in low-field nuclear magnetic resonance ( NMR) &imaging ( MRI) technologies are introduced, and some important experimental results are reported here .We built a low-field NMR&MRI system and obtained highly improved 1 H proton FID&Spin echo spectra.Pure J-coupling spectrum of 2, 2, 2-Trifluoroethyl was also measured and agreed well with high-field NMR results.In addition, we tried and successfully obtained 1D and 2D MRI images of water phantoms and bio-sam-ples.The influence of 8nm Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles on longitudinal relaxation time of water was studied.Based on this property, we illustrated T1-contrast enhanced 2D imaging of water phantoms by using magnetic nanoparticles, which show evident contrast variation under different pre-polarization times.%超导量子干涉仪利用约瑟夫森结宏观量子干涉效应,是一种具有超高灵敏度的磁通探测器件。对超导量子干涉仪的基本原理及其在低场核磁共振/成像技术中的应用进行了简要介绍,并报道了在这方面的主要研究成果。搭建了一套低场核磁共振及成像系统并获得具有较高信噪比的水样品1 H质子NMR谱及三氟乙醇的纯J-耦合谱,同时还测到了清晰的自旋回波信号。在此基础上,采用直接背投影重建方法,尝试并成功获得了水样品和生物样品的一维及二维核磁共振像。采用8 nm粒径的超顺磁Fe3 O4磁性纳米粒子作为对比增强剂,研究了磁性纳米粒子对1 H核自旋纵向弛豫时间 T1的影响,据此演示了磁性纳米粒子T1加权对比度增强成像实验,所得二维核磁共振像随极化时间的不同显示出显著的对比度变化。

  14. Slowly rotating superfluid neutron stars with isospin dependent entrainment in a two-fluid model

    CERN Document Server

    Kheto, Apurba

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the slowly rotating general relativistic superfluid neutron stars including the entrainment effect in a two-fluid model, where one fluid represents the superfluid neutrons and the other is the charge-neutral fluid called the proton fluid, made of protons and electrons. The equation of state and the entrainment effect between the superfluid neutrons and the proton fluid are computed using a relativistic mean field (RMF) model where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by the exchange of $\\sigma$, $\\omega$, and $\\rho$ mesons and scalar self interactions are also included. The equations governing rotating neutron stars in the slow rotation approximation are second order in rotational velocities of neutron and proton fluids. We explore the effects of the isospin dependent entrainment and the relative rotation between two fluids on the global properties of rotating superfluid neutron stars such as mass, shape, and the mass shedding (Kepler) limit within the RMF model with different parameter sets. ...

  15. Flow-induced charge modulation in superfluid atomic fermions loaded into an optical kagome lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Chika; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Shunji

    2013-04-05

    We study the superfluid state of atomic fermions in a tunable optical kagome lattice motivated by recent experiments. We show that the imposed superflow induces spatial modulations in the density and order parameter of the pair condensate and leads to a charge modulated superfluid state analogous to a supersolid state. The spatial modulations in the superfluid emerge due to the geometric effect of the kagome lattice that introduces anisotropy in hopping amplitudes of fermion pairs in the presence of superflow. We also study superflow instabilities and find that the critical current limited by the dynamical instability is quite enhanced due to the large density of states associated with the flatband. The charge modulated superfluid state can sustain high temperatures close to the transition temperature that is also enhanced due to the flatband and is therefore realizable in experiments.

  16. Another Path for the Emergence of Modified Galactic Dynamics from Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In recent work we proposed a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The agents responsible for mediating the MONDian force law are superfluid phonons that couple to ordinary (baryonic) matter. In this paper we propose an alternative way for the MOND phenomenon to emerge from DM superfluidity. The central idea is to use higher-gradient corrections in the superfluid effective theory. These next-to-leading order terms involve gradients of the gravitational potential, and therefore effectively modify the gravitational force law. In the process we discover a novel mechanism for generating the non-relativistic MOND action, starting from a theory that is fully analytic in all field variables. The idea, inspired by the symmetron mechanism, uses the spontaneous breaking of a discrete symmetry. For large acceleration, the symmetry is unbro...

  17. Role reversal in first and second sound in a relativistic superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G; Schmitt, Andreas; Stetina, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic superfluidity at arbitrary temperature, chemical potential and (uniform) superflow is discussed within a self-consistent field-theoretical approach. Our starting point is a complex scalar field with a $\\varphi^4$ interaction, for which we calculate the 2-particle-irreducible effective action in the Hartree approximation. With this underlying microscopic theory, we can obtain the two-fluid picture of a superfluid, and compute properties such as the superfluid density and the entrainment coefficient for all temperatures below the critical temperature for superfluidity. We compute the critical velocity, taking into account the full self-consistent effect of the temperature and superflow on the quasiparticle dispersion. We also discuss first and second sound modes and how first (second) sound evolves from a density (temperature) wave at low temperatures to a temperature (density) wave at high temperatures. This role reversal is investigated for ultra-relativistic and near-non-relativistic systems for...

  18. Lagrangian perturbation theory for a superfluid immersed in an elastic neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Samuelsson, L

    2011-01-01

    The inner crust of mature neutron stars, where an elastic lattice of neutron-rich nuclei coexists with a neutron superfluid, impacts on a range of astrophysical phenomena. The presence of the superfluid is key to our understanding of pulsar glitches, and is expected to affect the thermal conductivity and hence the evolution of the surface temperature. The coupling between crust and superfluid must also be accounted for in studies of neutron star dynamics, discussions of global oscillations and associated instabilities. In this paper we develop Lagrangian perturbation theory for this problem, paying attention to key issues like superfluid entrainment, potential vortex pinning, dissipative mutual friction and the star's magnetic field. We also discuss the nature of the core-crust interface. The results provide a theoretical foundation for a range of interesting astrophysical applications.

  19. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  20. Electronic spectroscopy of lumiflavin in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, Alexander; Slenczka, Alkwin; Dick, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    We present the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of lumiflavin doped into superfluid He nanodroplets. Both spectra show well resolved vibrational structure. The electronic origin transition at 21511 cm-1 is the strongest line in both spectra. Quantum chemical calculations with DFT and CASSCF methods support the assignment of S1 to a ππ∗ excited state. We obtain vibrational frequencies in the ground and lowest excited singlet state that can serve to test the validity of quantum chemical calculations. Multidimensional Franck-Condon factors are in good agreement with the intensities within the vibrational structure for S0 and S1. The strongest progression forming mode has a frequency of 164 cm-1 in both states and is assigned to an in-plane bending mode of the whole flavin chromophore with a large amplitude on the two methyl groups at ring I.

  1. Photochemistry of 3-hydroxyflavone inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnig, R; Pentlehner, D; Vdovin, A; Dick, B; Slenczka, A

    2009-11-21

    3-Hydroxyflavone is a prototype system for excited state intramolecular proton transfer which is one step of a closed loop photocycle. It was intensively studied for the bare molecule and for the influence of solvents. In the present paper this photocycle is investigated for 3-hydroxyflavone and some hydrated complexes when doped into superfluid helium droplets by the combined measurement of fluorescence excitation spectra and dispersed emission spectra. Significant discrepancies in the proton transfer behavior to gas phase experiments provide evidence for the presence of different complex configurations of the hydrated complexes in helium droplets. Moreover, for bare 3-hydroxyflavone and its hydrated complexes the proton transfer appears to be promoted by the helium environment.

  2. (Non)-universality of vortex reconnections in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide

    2016-01-01

    An insight into vortex reconnections in superfluids is presented making use of analytical results and numerical simulations of the Gross--Pitaevskii model. Universal aspects of the reconnection process are investigated by considering different initial vortex configurations and making use of a recently developed tracking algorithm to reconstruct the vortex filaments. We show that about the reconnection event the vortex lines approach and separate always accordingly to the time scaling $ \\delta \\sim t^{-1/2} $ with pre-factors that depend on the vortex configuration. We also investigate the behavior of curvature and torsion close to the reconnection point, demonstrating analytically that the curvature can exhibit a self-similar behavior that might be broken by the development of shock-like structures in the torsion.

  3. Stationary Vortices and Pair Currents in a Trapped Fermion Superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzi, P.; Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the effects of stationary vortices in superfluid Li atoms at zero temperature in the frame of the recently developed fluiddynamical scheme, that includes the pair density and its associated pair current and pair kinetic energy in addition to the fields appearing in the hydrodynamical description of normal fluids. In this frame, the presence of any particle velocity field gives rise to the appearance of a pair current. As an illustration, we consider a stationary vortex with cylindrical geometry in an unpolarized fluid, and examine the effects of the rotational velocity field on the spatial structure of the equilibrium gap and the profiles of the pair current. We show that the latter is intrinsically complex and its imaginary part is the source of a radial drift for the velocity field. We discuss the consequences on the stationary regime.

  4. Superfluid Thomas—Fermi approximation for trapped fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E. S.; Capuzzi, P.; Szybisz, L.

    2009-02-01

    We present a generalization of fermionic fluiddynamics to the case of two trapped fermion species with a contact interaction. Within a mean field approximation, we derive coupled equations of motion for the particle densities, particle currents, and anomalous pair density. For an inhomogeneous system, the equilibrium situation with vanishing currents is described by a generalized Thomas-Fermi relation that includes the superfluid gap, together with a new nonlocal gap equation that replaces the usual BCS one. These equations are numericaly solved resorting to a local density approximation (LDA). Density and gap profiles are analyzed in terms of the scattering length, revealing that the current frame can exhibit microscopic details of quantum origin that are frequently absent in more macroscopic scenarios.

  5. Superfluid Thomas-Fermi approximation for trapped fermi gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, E S; Capuzzi, P; Szybisz, L [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: shernand@df.uba.ar, E-mail: capuzzi@df.uba.ar, E-mail: szybisz@tandar.cnea.gov.ar

    2009-02-01

    We present a generalization of fermionic fluiddynamics to the case of two trapped fermion species with a contact interaction. Within a mean field approximation, we derive coupled equations of motion for the particle densities, particle currents, and anomalous pair density. For an inhomogeneous system, the equilibrium situation with vanishing currents is described by a generalized Thomas-Fermi relation that includes the superfluid gap, together with a new nonlocal gap equation that replaces the usual BCS one. These equations are numericaly solved resorting to a local density approximation (LDA). Density and gap profiles are analyzed in terms of the scattering length, revealing that the current frame can exhibit microscopic details of quantum origin that are frequently absent in more macroscopic scenarios.

  6. Is Brain in a Superfluid State? Physics of Consciousness

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraverty, Benoy

    2010-01-01

    The article "Physics of Consciousness" treats mind as an abstract Hilbert space with a set of orthogonal base vectors to describe information like particles, which are considered to be the elementary excitation of a quantum field. A non-Hermitian operator of Self is introduced to create these information like particles which in turn will constitute a coherent information field. The non - zero average of this self operator is shown to constitute our basic I. Awareness and consciousness is described very simply as a response function of these operators to external world. We show with a very simple neural model how a baby less than two years old develop self-awareness as the neural connectivity achieves a critical value. The all-important I is the basic cognitive order parameter of each human brain and is a result of thermodynamic phase transition from a chaotic disordered state to a symmetry broken coherent ordered state, very akin to physics of superfluidity.

  7. Generalized Local Induction Equation, Elliptic Asymptotics, and Simulating Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    We prove the generalized induction equation and the generalized local induction equation (GLIE), which replaces the commonly used local induction approximation (LIA) to simulate the dynamics of vortex lines and thus superfluid turbulence. We show that the LIA is, without in fact any approximation at all, a general feature of the velocity field induced by any length of a curved vortex filament. Specifically, the LIA states that the velocity field induced by a curved vortex filament is asymmetric in the binormal direction. Up to a potential term, the induced incompressible field is given by the Biot-Savart integral, where we recall that there is a direct analogy between hydrodynamics and magnetostatics. Series approximations to the Biot-Savart integrand indicate a logarithmic divergence of the local field in the binormal direction. While this is qualitatively correct, LIA lacks metrics quantifying its small parameters. Regardless, LIA is used in vortex filament methods simulating the self-induced motion of quan...

  8. Pressure driven flow of superfluid 4He through a nanopipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botimer, Jeffrey; Taborek, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Pressure driven flow of superfluid helium through single high-aspect-ratio glass nanopipes into a vacuum has been studied for a wide range of pressure drop (0-30 bars), reservoir temperature (0.8-2.5 K), pipe lengths (1-30 mm), and pipe radii (131 and 230 nm). As a function of pressure drop we observe two distinct flow regimes above and below a critical pressure drop Pc. For P Feynman critical velocity. As the pressure drop approaches Pc, there is a sudden transition to a new flow state with a critical velocity more than an order of magnitude higher. The position of the transition is explained by a simple model that accounts for the fountain pressure generated by evaporative cooling at the outlet of the nanopipe.

  9. Libration of strongly-oriented polar molecules inside a superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We study a polar molecule immersed into a superfluid environment, such as a helium nanodroplet or a Bose-Einstein condensate, in the presence of an intense electrostatic field. We show that coupling of the molecular pendular motion, induced by the field, to the fluctuating bath leads to formation of pendulons -- spherical harmonic librators dressed by a field of many-particle excitations. We study the behavior of the pendulon in a broad range of molecule-bath and molecule-field interaction strengths, and reveal that its spectrum features series of instabilities which are absent in the field-free case of the angulon quasiparticle. Furthermore, we show that an external field allows to finetune the positions of these instabilities in the molecular rotational spectrum. This opens the door to detailed experimental studies of redistribution of orbital angular momentum in many-particle systems.

  10. Axially symmetric equations for differential pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We propose an analytical two-components model for pulsar rotational dynamics: the aim is to reduce the 3D hydrodynamical problem to a 1D (radial) problem, using the hypothesis of negligible azimuthal inhomogeneities. The result is the construction of a computationally simple model that takes into account for the non-uniform structure of the star, entrainment effect and differential rotation of the superfluid component. For the first time all these ingredients are treated in a fully consistent way within the picture provided by our initial hypotheses. Our treatment clarifies which are the physical inputs needed to build, to current knowledge, more realistic simulations of rotating neutron stars and gives a neat description of the effect of entrainment when straight vortex lines are considered. Moreover, on this basis, we briefly introduce a new method that can be used to put a constraint to the mass of the pulsars that display very large glitches and to the relative spin up timescales.

  11. A New Microscopic Theory of Superfluidity at all Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, S

    2003-01-01

    Following the program suggested in [1], we get a new microscopic theory of superfluidity for all temperatures and densities. In particular, the corresponding phase diagram of this theory exhibits: (i) a thermodynamic behavior corresponding to the Mean-Field Gas for small densities or high temperatures, (ii) the ''Landau-type'' excitation spectrum in the presence of non-conventional Bose condensation for high densities or small temperatures, (iii) a coexistence of particles inside and outside the condensate with the formation of ``Cooper pairs'', even at zero-temperature experimentally, an estimate of the fraction of condensate in liquid helium 4 at T=0 K is 9%, see [2,3]. In contrast to Bogoliubov's last approach and with the caveat that the full interacting Hamiltonian is truncated, the analysis performed here is rigorous by involving for the first time a complete thermodynamic analysis of a non-trivial continuous gas in the canonical ensemble.

  12. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4{He}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4{He} is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  13. Vortex dynamics in superfluids governed by an interacting gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Salvatore; Valiente, Manuel; Öhberg, Patrik

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a vortex in a quasi two-dimensional Bose gas consisting of light-matter coupled atoms forming two-component pseudo spins. The gas is subject to a density dependent gauge potential, hence governed by an interacting gauge theory, which stems from a collisionally induced detuning between the incident laser frequency and the atomic energy levels. This provides a back-action between the synthetic gauge potential and the matter field. A Lagrangian approach is used to derive an expression for the force acting on a vortex in such a gas. We discuss the similarities between this force and the one predicted by Iordanskii, Lifshitz and Pitaevskii when scattering between a superfluid vortex and the thermal component is taken into account.

  14. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10{sup 4} ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10{sup 5}/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  15. First cosmological constraints on the Superfluid Chaplygin gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Lazkoz, Ruth; Salzano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    In this work we set observational constraints of the Superfluid Chaplygin gas model, which gives a unified description of the dark sector of the Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) that behaves as dark energy (DE) while it is in the ground state and as dark matter (DM) when it is in the excited state. We first show and perform the various steps leading to a form of the equations suitable for the observational tests to be carried out. Then, by using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) code, we constrain the model with a sample of cosmology-independent long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) calibrated using their Type I Fundamental Plane, as well as the Union2.1 set and observational Hubble parameter data. In this analysis, using our cosmological constraints, we sketch the effective equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter, and we also obtain the redshift of the transition from deceleration to acceleration: $z_t$.

  16. Quantized superfluid vortex rings in the unitary Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Kelley, Michelle M; Roche, Kenneth J; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-17

    In a recent article, Yefsah et al. [Nature (London) 499, 426 (2013)] report the observation of an unusual excitation in an elongated harmonically trapped unitary Fermi gas. After phase imprinting a domain wall, they observe oscillations almost an order of magnitude slower than predicted by any theory of domain walls which they interpret as a "heavy soliton" of inertial mass some 200 times larger than the free fermion mass or 50 times larger than expected for a domain wall. We present compelling evidence that this "soliton" is instead a quantized vortex ring, by showing that the main aspects of the experiment can be naturally explained within the framework of time-dependent superfluid density functional theories.

  17. Semiclassical approximation to neutron star superfluidity corrected for proximity effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, F.; Broglia, R. A.; Esbensen, H.; Vigezzi, E.; Physics; Univ. of Seville; Univ. of Milan and INFN; Univ. of Copenhagen

    1998-08-01

    The inner crust of a neutron star is a superfluid and inhomogeneous system, consisting of a lattice of nuclei immersed in a sea of neutrons. We perform a quantum calculation of the associated pairing gap and compare it to the results one obtains in the local density approximation (LDA). It is found that the LDA overestimates the spatial dependence of the gap, and leads to a specific heat of the system which is too large at low temperatures, as compared with the quantal result. This is caused by the neglect of proximity effects and the delocalized character of the single-particle wave functions close to the Fermi energy. It is possible to introduce an alternative, simple semiclassical approximation of the pairing gap which leads to a specific heat that is in good agreement with the quantum calculation.

  18. Superconducting Linac and associated accelerator development at NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Roy

    2001-08-01

    There has been significant progress in the programme to develop a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster for the Pelletron accelerator at the Nuclear Science Centre. This paper presents the current status of the development in all the major components of the accelerator.

  19. Moment of inertia of a trapped superfluid gas of atomic fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Farine, M.; Schuck, Peter; Viñas Gausí, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The moment of inertia of a trapped superfluid gas of atomic Fermions (6Li) is calculated as a function of two system parameters: temperature and deformation of the trap. For moderate deformations at zero temperature the moment of inertia takes on the irrotational flow value. Only for T very close to the critical temperature rigid rotation is attained. For very strong trap deformations the moment of inertia approaches its rigid body value even in the superfluid state. It is proposed that futur...

  20. Microscopic construction of the two-fluid model for superfluid helium-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shygorin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a system of Heisenberg's equation of motion for both the normal and the anomalous correlation functions a two-fluid hydrodynamics for superfluid helium-4 was constructed. The method is based on a gradient expansion of the exact equations of motion for correlation functions about a local equilibrium together with explicit use of the local equilibrium statistical operator for superfluid helium in the frame of reference, where condensate is in the state of rest.

  1. On superfluidity of asymmetric mixture of fermions: How two wrongs make a right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Ilya; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2016-10-01

    The existence and stability of the superfluid state in a mixture of two fermion species with different masses and chemical potentials is investigated with respect to the asymmetry between the species. It is found that the mass asymmetry between the two types of particles can be effectively compensated by the asymmetry in their chemical potentials, this way increasing the range of the parameters, which allow the superfluid state.

  2. Critical velocity for superfluid flow across the BEC-BCS crossover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D E; Chin, J K; Stan, C A; Liu, Y; Setiawan, W; Sanner, C; Ketterle, W

    2007-08-17

    Critical velocities have been observed in an ultracold superfluid Fermi gas throughout the BEC-BCS crossover. A pronounced peak of the critical velocity at unitarity demonstrates that superfluidity is most robust for resonant atomic interactions. Critical velocities were determined from the abrupt onset of dissipation when the velocity of a moving one-dimensional optical lattice was varied. The dependence of the critical velocity on lattice depth and on the inhomogeneous density profile was studied.

  3. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  4. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  5. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  6. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  7. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  8. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  9. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  10. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  11. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  12. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  13. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  14. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  15. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  16. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  17. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  18. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  19. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  20. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  1. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  2. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  3. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  4. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  5. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  6. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  7. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  8. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  9. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  10. Pairing correlations and transitions in nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Belic, A; Hjorth-Jensen, M

    2004-01-01

    We discuss several pairing-related phenomena in nuclear systems, ranging from superfluidity in neutron stars to the gradual breaking of pairs in finite nuclei. We describe recent experimental evidence that points to a relation between pairing and phase transitions (or transformations) in finite nuclear systems. A simple pairing interaction model is used in order to study and classify an eventual pairing phase transition in finite fermionic systems such as nuclei. We show that systems with as few as 10-16 fermions can exhibit clear features reminiscent of a phase transition.

  11. Superconducting properties and pseudogap from preformed Cooper pairs in the triclinic (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmach, M. A.; Brückner, F.; Kamusella, S.; Sarkar, R.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Park, J. T.; Ghambashidze, G.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Choi, W. J.; Seo, Y. I.; Kwon, Y. S.; Klauss, H.-H.; Inosov, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    Using a combination of muon-spin relaxation (μ SR ) , inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we investigated the novel iron-based superconductor with a triclinic crystal structure (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8 (Tc=13 K), containing platinum-arsenide intermediary layers. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density obtained from the μ SR relaxation-rate measurements indicates the presence of two superconducting gaps, Δ1≫Δ2 . According to our INS measurements, commensurate spin fluctuations are centered at the (π ,0 ) wave vector, like in most other iron arsenides. Their intensity remains unchanged across Tc, indicating the absence of a spin resonance typical for many Fe-based superconductors. Instead, we observed a peak in the spin-excitation spectrum around ℏ ω0=7 meV at the same wave vector, which persists above Tc and is characterized by the ratio ℏ ω0/kBTc≈6.2 , which is significantly higher than typical values for the magnetic resonant modes in iron pnictides (˜4.3 ) . The temperature dependence of magnetic intensity at 7 meV revealed an anomaly around T*=45 K related to the disappearance of this new mode. A suppression of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1T , observed by NMR immediately below T* without any notable subsequent anomaly at Tc, indicates that T* could mark the onset of a pseudogap in (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8 , which is likely associated with the emergence of preformed Cooper pairs.

  12. Universal mechanism for breaking the hc/2e periodicity of flux-induced oscillations in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakaryuk, Victor

    2008-10-17

    A universal mechanism of restoration of minimal hc/e periodicity in the response of small superconducting rings or cylinders to the magnetic flux is proposed. The mechanism is based on the dependence of the Cooper pair's internal energy on its motion as a whole and does not rely on the presence of quasiparticles in the system. The thermal equilibrium hc/2e periodicity is broken by an offset of the transition between different current-carrying states. The magnitude of the offset is calculated for an s-wave superconducting cylinder of radius R in the limit R>xi_{0}, where xi_{0} is the BCS coherence length and turns out to be exponentially small. A possible enhancement of the effect for nodal superconductors is suggested. Similar conclusions should also apply to the response of charged or neutral superfluids to rotation.

  13. Local magnetic order vs superconductivity in a layered cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa; Uchida; Tranquada; Niemoller; Gehring; Lee; Schneider

    2000-08-21

    We report on the phase diagram for charge-stripe order in La1.6-xNd0. 4SrxCuO4, determined by neutron and x-ray scattering studies and resistivity measurements. From an analysis of the in-plane resistivity motivated by recent nuclear-quadrupole-resonance studies, we conclude that the transition temperature for local charge ordering decreases monotonically with x, and hence that local antiferromagnetic order is uniquely correlated with the anomalous depression of superconductivity at x approximately 1 / 8. This result is consistent with theories in which superconductivity depends on the existence of charge-stripe correlations.

  14. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  15. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  16. Large Chern-number topological superfluids in a coupled-layer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beibing; Chan, Chun Fai; Gong, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Large Chern-number topological phase is always an important topic in modern physics. Here we investigate the topological superfluids in a coupled-layer system, in which transitions between different topological superfluids can be realized by controlling the binding energy, interlayer tunneling, and layer asymmetry, etc. These topological transitions are characterized by energy gap closing and reopening at the critical points at zero momentum, where the Chern number and sign of Pfaffian undergo a discontinuous change. Topological protected edge modes at the boundaries are ensured by the bulk-edge correspondence. In a trapped potential the edge modes are spatially localized at the interfaces between distinct topological superfluids, where the number of edge modes is equal to the Chern-number difference between the left and right superfluids. These topological transitions can be detected by spin texture at or near zero momentum, which changes discretely across the critical points due to band inversion. The model can be generalized to a multilayer system in which the Chern number can be equal to any positive integer. These large Chern-number topological superfluids provide fertile grounds for exploring exotic quantum matters in the context of ultracold atoms.

  17. Dynamics of semi-superfluid fluxtubes in color-flavor locked quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    At very high densities, as for example in the core of a neutron star, matter may appear in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, which is a superfluid. This phase features topologically stable vortex solutions, which arise in a spinning superfluid as localized configurations carrying quanta of angular momentum. Despite the topological stability of these vortices they are not the lowest energy state of the system at neutron star densities and decay into triplets of semi-superfluid fluxtubes. In these proceedings we report on the progress of our numerical study in the Ginzburg-Landau approach, where we investigate lattices of semi-superfluid fluxtubes. The fluxtubes are obtained through controlled decay of global vortex configurations in the presence of a gauge field. Understanding the dynamics of semi-superfluid string configurations is important in the context of angular momentum transfer from a quark matter core of a neutron star beyond the core boundary, since not vortex-, but fluxtube pinning seems to be th...

  18. Reaching a Fermi-superfluid state near an orbital Feshbach resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junjun; Zhang, Ren; Cheng, Yanting; Zhang, Peng; Qi, Ran; Zhai, Hui

    2016-09-01

    We propose to realize a strongly interacting Fermi superfluid near a narrow Feshbach resonance using the recently discovered "orbital Feshbach resonance." The orbital Feshbach resonance is a type of magnetic field tunable scattering resonance theoretically predicted and experimentally observed recently in the alkaline-earth-metal-like 173Yb atom. We first show that the orbital Feshbach resonance is a narrow resonance in energy, while it is hundreds Gauss wide in terms of magnetic field strength, taking the advantage that the magnetic moment difference between the open and closed channels is quite small. Therefore, this is an ideal platform for the experimental realization of a strongly interacting Fermi superfluid with narrow resonance. We further show that the transition temperature for the Fermi superfluid in this system, especially at the BCS side of the resonance, is even higher than that in a wide resonance, which is also due to the narrow character of this resonance. Our results will encourage experimental efforts to realize Fermi superfluid in the alikaline-earth-metal-like 173Yb system, the properties of which will be complementary to extensively studied Fermi superfluids nearby a wide resonance in alkali-metal 40K and 6Li systems.

  19. Role of geometry in the superfluid flow of nonlocal photon fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocke, David; Wilson, Kali; Marino, Francesco; Carusotto, Iacopo; Wright, Ewan M.; Roger, Thomas; Anderson, Brian P.; Öhberg, Patrik; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Recent work has unveiled a new class of optical systems that can exhibit the characteristic features of superfluidity. One such system relies on the repulsive photon-photon interaction that is mediated by a thermal optical nonlinearity and is therefore inherently nonlocal due to thermal diffusion. Here we investigate how such a nonlocal interaction, which at a first inspection would not be expected to lead to superfluid behavior, may be tailored by acting upon the geometry of the photon fluid itself. Our models and measurements show that restricting the laser profile and hence the photon fluid to a strongly elliptical geometry modifies thermal diffusion along the major beam axis and reduces the effective nonlocal interaction length by two orders of magnitude. This in turn enables the system to display a characteristic trait of superfluid flow: the nucleation of quantized vortices in the flow past an extended physical obstacle. These results are general and apply to other nonlocal fluids, such as dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, and show that "thermal" photon superfluids provide an exciting and novel experimental environment for probing the nature of superfluidity, with applications to the study of quantum turbulence and analog gravity.

  20. Electronic spectroscopy of lumiflavin in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, Alexander [Institut für Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Philips Research, High Tech Campus 34, 5656 Eindhoven (Netherlands); Slenczka, Alkwin [Institut für Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Dick, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.dick@chemie.uni-regensburg.de [Institut für Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► We present the first electronic spectra of a flavin compound in a molecular beam. ► The low temperature of He-droplets (370 mK) permits high vibrational resolution. ► Vibrational frequencies of S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} agree well with quantum chemical calculations. ► These data can serve as reference for simulations on flavin containing enzymes. - Abstract: We present the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of lumiflavin doped into superfluid He nanodroplets. Both spectra show well resolved vibrational structure. The electronic origin transition at 21511 cm{sup −1} is the strongest line in both spectra. Quantum chemical calculations with DFT and CASSCF methods support the assignment of S{sub 1} to a ππ{sup ∗} excited state. We obtain vibrational frequencies in the ground and lowest excited singlet state that can serve to test the validity of quantum chemical calculations. Multidimensional Franck–Condon factors are in good agreement with the intensities within the vibrational structure for S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}. The strongest progression forming mode has a frequency of 164 cm{sup −1} in both states and is assigned to an in-plane bending mode of the whole flavin chromophore with a large amplitude on the two methyl groups at ring I.